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Sample records for alpha reduced widths

  1. The gravity dependence of the H-alpha width in late-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarro, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    A theoretical gravity-scaling law for the H-alpha absorption width in late-type stars is developed. The derivation is based upon (1) the hydrostatic thickening of stellar chromospheres with decreasing surface gravity, and (2) a dependence of the H-alpha width upon opacity and Doppler width in a region subject to a chromospheric temperature rise. The scaling relation is approximately consistent with the mean gravity dependence deduced from the empirical correlation between H-alpha and Ca II K Wilson-Bappu widths. The calculations suggest that gravity variations in chromospheric-mass column density may, in addition to Doppler velocity enhancements, control the width-luminosity broadening of the H-alpha profile in late-type stars.

  2. Large Equivalent Width Galaxies from Large Area Lyman-Alpha Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.; Rhoads, J.; Dey, A.; Jannuzi, B.; Stern, D.; Spinrad, H.

    2001-05-01

    We find many candidate z=4.5 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies in our LALA (Large Area Lyman Alpha) survey. More than half of these sources have rest frame equivalent widths greater than 200 Angstroms, which is the largest equivalent width expected for a standard stellar initial mass function (IMF). Either these sources are type II quasars or galaxies with an IMF dominated by massive stars. From Chandra Deep Field X-ray source counts, we estimate that only 10-20% of the LALA sources can be type II quasars. This then indicates that some galaxies at high redshifts had top heavy IMFs.

  3. High-resolution measurement of absolute {alpha}-decay widths in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2011-06-15

    By using a large-acceptance position-sensitive silicon detector array in coincidence with the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph, unambiguous measurements have been made of the absolute {alpha}-particle decay widths from excited states in {sup 16}O* in the energy range 13.85 to 15.87 MeV. Carbon targets have been bombarded with 42-MeV {sup 6}Li beams to induce {sub 6}{sup 12}C({sub 3}{sup 6}Li, d){sub 8}{sup 16}O* reactions. The deuteron ejectiles were measured in the Q3D and the results gated by {sup 4}He+{sup 12}C breakup products detected in the silicon array, the efficiency of which was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. By comparing total population and breakup-gated spectra, the following absolute {alpha}-decay widths have been measured with high resolution: {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}0/{Gamma}{sub tot} = 0.87{+-}0.11 (13.980 MeV), 1.04{+-}0.15 (14.302 MeV), 0.92{+-}0.10 (14.399 MeV), 0.59{+-}0.04 (14.815 MeV), 0.88{+-}0.18 (15.785 MeV), and {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}1/{Gamma}{sub tot}=1.14{+-}0.08 (14.660 MeV), 0.46{+-}0.06 (14.815 MeV).

  4. Geocoronal Balmer-alpha Doppler Widths and Effective Temperatures Near Solar Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.

    2010-12-01

    Geocoronal hydrogen Balmer-alpha Doppler widths and effective temperatures retrieved from high spectral resolution line profile observations are presented. These observations were made between 08 January 2000 and 21 November 2001 from Pine Bluff Observatory (WI) with a double etalon Fabry-Perot spectrometer operating at a resolving power of 80,000. This rich data set spans sixty-four nights of observations (1404 spectra in total) over 20 dark-moon periods. Observed trends in the line profile, including seasonal variations in the retrieved (neutral) exobase temperatures, will be discussed.

  5. Measurement of {alpha} and neutron decay widths of excited states of {sup 14}C

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, P. J.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; McEwan, P.; Price, D.; Ziman, V.; Bohlen, H. G.; Kokalova, Tz.; Schulz, Ch.; Torabi, R.; Oertzen, W. von; Wheldon, C.; Catford, W.; Harlin, C.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Massey, T. N.

    2008-07-15

    The {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{sup 14}O){sup 14}C reaction was studied at a beam energy of 234 MeV. The {sup 14}O ejectile was detected by a Q3D spectrometer at forward angles. The energies and angles of the excited {sup 14}C recoil break-up fragments were measured in coincidence with the {sup 14}O ejectile using a double sided silicon strip detector array at backward angles. A complete kinematic reconstruction of the reaction was performed to reconstruct the {sup 14}C*{yields}{sup 10}Be+{alpha} and {sup 14}C*{yields}{sup 13}C+n decay channels and the branching ratios and widths of these decays were calculated. Theoretical decay branches were calculated using barrier penetrability factors and were compared to the measured ratios to provide information on the spins, parities, and configurations of the states. Neutron emission was found to be favored for the 11.73, 12.96, 14.87, 16.72, and 18.6 MeV states. The 14.87, 18.6, and 21.4 MeV states were found to have a considerable width for {alpha}-decay and are candidates for the three bodied molecular cluster structure of {sup 14}C.

  6. The transmission correlation in the QSO Ly(alpha) forest produced by finite width lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Lin; Bond, J. Richard

    1994-03-01

    The transmission of a quasar spectrum (flux divided by the continuum) is correlated because of the finite width of absorption lines. We describe a technique for calculating the transmission correlation function produced by randomly distributed lines. We also introduce straightforward procedure for measuring the pixel-pixel transmission correlation function xipp directly from observed quasar spectra. We apply the method to 12 Sargent, Boksenberg, & Steidel Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO) spectra and compare these with theoretical transmission correlation functions and with xipp measured from computer-simulated quasar spectra of Ly(alpha) forest models with Poisson-distributed lines. The simulations are designed to mimic the observed spectrum as closely as possible, with the same wavelength sampling, instrumental resolution, continuum and noise properties. The comparisons with line distributions that are power laws in column density and redshift, and Gaussians in line width b reveal an excess in the observed xipp at Delta(v) is approximately or equal to 150 km/s, if we adopt the Carswell et al. (1991) parameters for the Gaussian (mean b0 = 30 km/s, dispersion sigmab = 10 km/s). One possibility is that the Ly(alpha) forest lines are actually clustered at velocity separation scales Delta(v) is approximately or equal to 150 km/s. Another possibility we explore is that the b-distribution has more large b clouds and a larger dispersion. We find the observed xipp is barely consistent with b0 = 40 km/s and sigmab = 25 km/s. We show that the measured xipp is relatively insensitive to the noise level and to errors in the continuum determination, unlike the traditional line counting methods, where the outcome is quite vulnerable to both. It also requires no line deblending and thus offers a powerful tool for extracting information from the crowded Ly(alpha) forest.

  7. Alpha Decay Width of212Po from a quartetting wave function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röpke, G.; Schuck, P.; Funaki, Y.; Horiuchi, H.; Ren, Z.; Tohsaki, A.; Xu, C.; Yamada, T.; Zhou, B.

    2017-06-01

    An effective α particle equation is derived for cases where an α particle is bound to a doubly magic nucleus. As an example, we consider212Po with the α on top of the208Pb core. The fully quantal solution of the problem is inspired by the THSR (Tohsaki-Horiuchi-Schuck-Röpke) wave function concept that has been successfully applied to light nuclei. Shell model calculations are improved by including four-particle (α-like) correlations that are of relevance when the matter density becomes low. In the region where the α-like cluster penetrates the core nucleus, the intrinsic bound state wave function transforms at a critical density into an unbound four-nucleon shell model state. We present a microscopic calculation of both α-cluster preformation probability and decay width in typical α-emitter212Po. Using actually measured density distribution of the208 Pb core, the calculated alpha decay width of212Po agrees fairly well with the measured one. Applications to other nuclei (20Ne) are discussed.

  8. Facial Width-To-Height Ratio Relates to Alpha Status and Assertive Personality in Capuchin Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Lefevre, Carmen Emilia; Wilson, Vanessa A. D.; Morton, F. Blake; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Paukner, Annika; Bates, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Social dominance hierarchies play a pivotal role in shaping the behaviour of many species, and sex differences within these hierarchies often exist. To date, however, few physical markers of dominance have been identified. Such markers would be valuable in terms of understanding the etiology of dominant behaviour and changes in social hierarchies over time. Animals may also use such traits to evaluate the potential dominance of others relative to themselves (i.e. a physical “cue”). Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR), for example, has been suggested as a cue to dominance in humans, with links to both dominant behaviour and the perception of dominance in other individuals. Whether this association is present in non-human animals is currently not known. Therefore, here we examine within-species links between fWHR and dominant behaviour in 64 brown capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) aged between 2 and 40 years. fWHR was positively associated with alpha status and with a dimensional rating of assertive personality in both males and females. Moreover, fWHR showed significant sexual dimorphism in adults but not juveniles, suggesting a developmental change may occur during puberty. In a sub-sample, sex differences were mediated by weight, suggesting fWHR dimorphism does not exceed what would be expected by differences in body weight. This is the first report of an association between face shape and behaviour in a non-human species. Results are discussed in terms of the role that face-behaviour associations might play within capuchin societies, and the possible selective forces that might have led to the evolution of fWHR-dominance associations in humans. PMID:24705247

  9. Facial width-to-height ratio relates to alpha status and assertive personality in capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Carmen Emilia; Wilson, Vanessa A D; Morton, F Blake; Brosnan, Sarah F; Paukner, Annika; Bates, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    Social dominance hierarchies play a pivotal role in shaping the behaviour of many species, and sex differences within these hierarchies often exist. To date, however, few physical markers of dominance have been identified. Such markers would be valuable in terms of understanding the etiology of dominant behaviour and changes in social hierarchies over time. Animals may also use such traits to evaluate the potential dominance of others relative to themselves (i.e. a physical "cue"). Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR), for example, has been suggested as a cue to dominance in humans, with links to both dominant behaviour and the perception of dominance in other individuals. Whether this association is present in non-human animals is currently not known. Therefore, here we examine within-species links between fWHR and dominant behaviour in 64 brown capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) aged between 2 and 40 years. fWHR was positively associated with alpha status and with a dimensional rating of assertive personality in both males and females. Moreover, fWHR showed significant sexual dimorphism in adults but not juveniles, suggesting a developmental change may occur during puberty. In a sub-sample, sex differences were mediated by weight, suggesting fWHR dimorphism does not exceed what would be expected by differences in body weight. This is the first report of an association between face shape and behaviour in a non-human species. Results are discussed in terms of the role that face-behaviour associations might play within capuchin societies, and the possible selective forces that might have led to the evolution of fWHR-dominance associations in humans.

  10. H{alpha} EQUIVALENT WIDTHS FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY: EVOLUTION WITH REDSHIFT AND DEPENDENCE ON STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G.; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Brammer, Gabriel; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Lundgren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Nelson, Erica; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Kriek, Mariska

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of the H{alpha} equivalent width, EW(H{alpha}), with redshift and its dependence on stellar mass, using the first data from the 3D-HST survey, a large spectroscopic Treasury program with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. Combining our H{alpha} measurements of 854 galaxies at 0.8 < z < 1.5 with those of ground-based surveys at lower and higher redshift, we can consistently determine the evolution of the EW(H{alpha}) distribution from z = 0 to z = 2.2. We find that at all masses the characteristic EW(H{alpha}) is decreasing toward the present epoch, and that at each redshift the EW(H{alpha}) is lower for high-mass galaxies. We find EW(H{alpha}) {approx}(1 + z){sup 1.8} with little mass dependence. Qualitatively, this measurement is a model-independent confirmation of the evolution of star-forming galaxies with redshift. A quantitative conversion of EW(H{alpha}) to specific star formation rate (sSFR) is model dependent because of differential reddening corrections between the continuum and the Balmer lines. The observed EW(H{alpha}) can be reproduced with the characteristic evolutionary history for galaxies, whose star formation rises with cosmic time to z {approx} 2.5 and then decreases to z = 0. This implies that EW(H{alpha}) rises to 400 A at z = 8. The sSFR evolves faster than EW(H{alpha}), as the mass-to-light ratio also evolves with redshift. We find that the sSFR evolves as (1 + z){sup 3.2}, nearly independent of mass, consistent with previous reddening insensitive estimates. We confirm previous results that the observed slope of the sSFR-z relation is steeper than the one predicted by models, but models and observations agree in finding little mass dependence.

  11. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of season, vegetation, and buffer width

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effectiveness of vegetative buffer strips (VBS) for reducing herbicide transport in runoff may be affected by season, plant species composition, and buffer width. A plot-scale study was conducted from 2007-2012 on an eroded claypan soil with the objectives of: 1) assessing the effects of season ...

  12. ON THE (NON-)ENHANCEMENT OF THE Ly{alpha} EQUIVALENT WIDTH BY A MULTIPHASE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Laursen, Peter; Duval, Florent; Oestlin, Goeran

    2013-04-01

    It has been suggested that radiative transfer effects may explain the unusually high equivalent widths (EWs) of the Ly{alpha} line, observed occasionally from starburst galaxies, especially at high redshifts. If the dust is locked up inside high-density clouds dispersed in an empty intercloud medium, the Ly{alpha} photons could scatter off of the surfaces of the clouds, effectively having their journey confined to the dustless medium. The continuum radiation, on the other hand, does not scatter, and would thus be subject to absorption inside the clouds. This scenario is routinely invoked when Ly{alpha} EWs higher than what is expected theoretically are observed, although the ideal conditions under which the results are derived usually are not considered. Here we systematically examine the relevant physical parameters in this idealized framework, testing whether any astrophysically realistic scenarios may lead to such an effect. It is found that although clumpiness indeed facilitates the escape of Ly{alpha}, it is highly unlikely that any real interstellar media should result in a preferential escape of Ly{alpha} over continuum radiation. Other possible causes are discussed, and it is concluded that the observed high EWs are more likely to be caused by cooling radiation from cold accretion and/or anisotropic escape of the Ly{alpha} radiation.

  13. KOLMOGOROV WIDTHS IN THE SPACE {\\tilde L}_q OF THE CLASSES {\\tilde W}_p^{\\overline \\alpha} AND {\\tilde H}_p^{\\overline \\alpha} OF PERIODIC FUNCTIONS OF SEVERAL VARIABLES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, È. M.

    1986-04-01

    The author finds the order of the Kolmogorov widths d_N({\\tilde W}_p^{\\overline \\alpha} = \\bigcap_{i=1}^m {\\tilde W}_p^{\\alpha^i}, {\\tilde L}_q) for all 1 < p,q < \\infty, where {\\tilde W}_p^\\alpha is the class of periodic functions of several variables determined by a Weyl mixed fractional derivative, and d_N({\\tilde H}_p^{\\overline \\alpha} = \\bigcap_{i=1}^m {\\tilde H}_p^{\\alpha^i},{\\tilde L}_q) for p \\ge 2 or q \\ge 2, where {\\tilde H}_p^\\alpha is the class determined by a mixed difference. Bibliography: 28 titles.

  14. The quasar proximity effect in an equivalent-width-limited sample of the Lyman-alpha forest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernomordik, Viktor V.; Ozernoy, Leonid M.

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained a simple analytical approximation to the relationship between a rest-frame equivalent-width distribution for Ly-alpha forest absorption lines, N(W), and an H I column density distribution of the observed cloud number, N(N). Assuming a simple power-law form for N(N) proportional to N exp (1-beta), it is shown that beta = 1.4 turns out to agree fairly well with the observed form of N(W) in a broad range of column densities. We present a theoretical analysis of how the 'proximity effect' influences a W-limited sample of Ly-alpha forest lines. It is shown that this influence is considerably smaller than has been found before for a N-limited sample, for which an approximate value of beta was assumed rather than derived as has been done, for a W-limited sample, in the present paper. As a result, available observational data appear to be still consistent with the conjecture that the observed population of QSOs is the major source of the UV background at redshifts z about 2-4.

  15. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; p<0.05) over the same temperature range, suggesting a more uniform maintenance of lipid dynamics despite the presence of cholesterol. These data indicate that EPA and DHA had different effects on membrane bilayer width, membrane fluidity, and cholesterol crystalline domain formation; suggesting omega-3 fatty acids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions. Copyright © 2016. Published

  16. Predicting bone remodeling around tissue- and bone-level dental implants used in reduced bone width.

    PubMed

    Eser, Atilim; Tonuk, Ergin; Akca, Kivanc; Dard, Michel M; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2013-09-03

    The objective of this study was to predict time-dependent bone remodeling around tissue- and bone-level dental implants used in patients with reduced bone width. The remodeling of bone around titanium tissue-level, and titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy bone-level implants was studied under 100 N oblique load for one month by implementing the Stanford theory into three-dimensional finite element models. Maximum principal stress, minimum principal stress, and strain energy density in peri-implant bone and displacement in x- and y- axes of the implant were evaluated. Maximum and minimum principal stresses around tissue-level implant were higher than bone-level implants and both bone-level implants experienced comparable stresses. Total strain energy density in bone around titanium implants slightly decreased during the first two weeks of loading followed by a recovery, and the titanium-zirconium implant showed minor changes in the axial plane. Total strain energy density changes in the loading and contralateral sides were higher in tissue-level implant than other implants in the cortical bone at the horizontal plane. The displacement values of the implants were almost constant over time. Tissue-level implants were associated with higher stresses than bone-level implants. The time-dependent biomechanical outcome of titanium-zirconium alloy bone-level implant was comparable to the titanium implant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; ...

    2011-01-01

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from themore » simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.« less

  18. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Lundberg, D. P.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Boedo, J.; Umansky, M.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.

  19. Anomalous fluctuations of s-wave reduced neutron widths of 192,194Pt resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul Edward; Becvar, F.; Krticka, Milan; Harvey, John A; Guber, Klaus H

    2010-01-01

    We obtained an unprecedentedly large number of s-wave neutron widths through R-matrix analysis of neutron cross-section measurements on enriched Pt samples. Careful analysis of these data rejects the validity of the Porter-Thomas distribution with a statistical significance of at least 99.997%.

  20. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of buffer width, vegetation, and season

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The effect of vegetative buffer strip (VBS) width, vegetation, and season of the year on herbicide transport in runoff has not been well documented for runoff prone soils. A multi-year replicated plot-scale study was conducted on an eroded claypan soil with the following objectives: 1) assess the ef...

  1. A pulse width modulated picket fence pulser to reduce accelerator start-up transients

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Balmes, Anthony A; Bradley, Joseph T; Netz, Dana; Sandoval, Jacob B

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a solid state modulator used to control the input beam to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center 'LANSCE' 800 MeV accelerator. This electrostatic Ground Level Deflector (GLD) chops the beam after the 750 keV injection energy. Two GLD's are utilized, one for the 'H+' beam and another for the 'H-' beam. These modulators are mounted on the vacuum beam pipe and directly operate sets of deflection plates. To minimize the accelerator beam start up transients, the beam is let into the accelerator cavity structures by a pulse width modulated picket fence operating between 0 and 12 kV. As the deflection plate structure appears as a capacitive load, a totem-pole switching network is utilized to facilitate rise and fall times of {approx}50 ns that is able to sink and source current to minimize beam induced sidewall activation. This paper will describe the system design and provides operational results as now presently utilized on the LANSCE accelerator system.

  2. Does formate reduce alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia to glutamate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughan, Q.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The reported reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia by formate is much slower than described (Morowitz et al., 1995). The formate reduction if any is small under these conditions. Glutamate is produced from a reduction by a second molecule of alpha-ketoglutarate involving an oxidative decarboxylation.

  3. Does formate reduce alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia to glutamate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughan, Q.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The reported reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia by formate is much slower than described (Morowitz et al., 1995). The formate reduction if any is small under these conditions. Glutamate is produced from a reduction by a second molecule of alpha-ketoglutarate involving an oxidative decarboxylation.

  4. Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin in diabetes: a hyperglycemia related phenomenon associated with reduced antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Stante, A; Dello Russo, P; Torella, R

    1989-01-01

    Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and concentration, and decreased antithrombin III (ATIII) plasma concentration are reported in diabetic subjects. In diabetes an inverse correlation between ATIII activity and blood glucose, HbA1, alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration, and a direct correlation between both alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration with blood glucose and HbA1 are found. Moreover, a direct correlation between alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration fails. In both diabetic and normal subjects induced hyperglycemia increases alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration reduces ATIII activity, while ATIII concentration is not affected. These data which show that hyperglycemia may increase alpha 2M molecule levels while altering only the biological function of ATIII, provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may condition the levels of some risk factors for the development of diabetic complications such as alpha 2M.

  5. Experimental investigation of heat transfer augmentation inside double pipe heat exchanger equipped with reduced width twisted tapes inserts using polymeric nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazbehian, Mohammad; Maddah, Heydar; Mohammadiun, Hamid; Alizadeh, Mostafa

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we report a further enhancement in heat transfer coefficients of base fluid in combination with structural modifications of tape inserts. Polyvinyl Alcohol and TiO2 with mean diameter of 15 nm were chosen as base fluid and nano-particles, respectively. The experiments are carried out in plain tube with four longitudinal internal fins and reduced width twisted tape (RWTT) inserts of twist ratio varying form 2-5 and width of 12-16. Experiments are undertaken to determine heat transfer coefficients and friction factor of TiO2/PVA nanofluid up to 2.0 % volume concentration at an average temperature of 30 °C. The investigations are undertaken in the Reynolds number range of 800-30,000 for flow in tubes and with tapes of different width length ratios. The experiments was verified with well-known correlations. The average Nusselt number and friction factor in the tube fitted with the full-length twisted tapes at y/w = 3.0, and 5.0, are respectively 50-130, and 30-95 % higher than those in the plain tube; 90-220 and 100-270 % when the working fluid is nanofluid, respectively. For the reduced width twisted tapes, the heat transfer rate is decreased with decreasing tapes width. The average Nusselt numbers in the tube fitted with the RWTT of 16, 14 and 12 are respectively, 210-390, 190-320 and 170-290 % of that in the plain tube. With the similar trend mentioned above, RWTT with higher width length yield higher thermal enhancement factor in comparison with smaller width. The use of RWTT led to the highest thermal performance factor up to 1.75. Maximum thermal performance factor which was obtained belonged to twists with twist ratio of 2 and width of 16 with φ = 0.5 % and Reynolds number range of 800-30,000.

  6. 8-Iso-prostaglandin f(2alpha) reduces trophoblast invasion and matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Staff, A C; Ranheim, T; Henriksen, T; Halvorsen, B

    2000-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a common pregnancy complication in the latter half of gestation diagnosed by hypertension and proteinuria. A key feature of preeclampsia is an altered placentation with reduced trophoblast invasion. Normal placentation requires controlled invasion of trophoblasts into the maternal uterine wall, with secretion of specific proteolytic enzymes able to degrade basement membranes and extracellular matrix, such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). 8-Iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) (8-iso-PGF(2alpha)) is a marker of oxidative stress in vivo and is biologically active. We have recently reported an elevated content of free 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) in preeclamptic gestational tissue at delivery. Assuming an elevated level of 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) during the invasion period of the pregnancy, we hypothesized that 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) could reduce invasion of JAR cells, a choriocarcinoma cell line. We investigated JAR cell invasion with 2 types of Transwell assays and demonstrated that 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) (10 micromol/L) resulted in reduced cell invasion in both the colorimetric and radioactivity Transwell assays (P<0.01). Zymograms revealed reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in conditioned media from JAR cells incubated with 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) (10 micromol/L) (P<0.02). 8-Iso-PGF(2alpha) (10 micromol/L) also reduced the collagenase type IV activity in the conditioned media of JAR cells (P=0.04). No effects on MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA levels were observed after incubation with 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) (10 micromol/L), whereas protein levels were significantly decreased (P<0.02), suggesting a posttranscriptional regulation. We hypothesize a potential role for 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) in the reduced trophoblast invasion in preeclampsia.

  7. alpha-Chaconine inhibits angiogenesis in vitro by reducing matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Kun; Chen, Pei-Hsieng; Shih, Yuan-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ting; Huang, En-Tze; Liu, Cheng-Ruei; Chen, Pin-Shern

    2010-01-01

    alpha-Chaconine, a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid in potato sprouts, was found to possess anti-carcinogenic properties, such as inhibiting proliferation, migration, invasion, and inducing apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the effect of alpha-chaconine on tumor angiogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of alpha-chaconine on angiogenesis in vitro. Data demonstrated that alpha-chaconine inhibited proliferation of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) in a dose-dependent manner. When treated with non-toxic doses of alpha-chaconine, cell migration, invasion and tube formation were markedly suppressed. Furthermore, alpha-chaconine reduced the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), which is involved in angiogenesis. Our biochemical assays indicated that alpha-chaconine potently suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and Akt, while it did not affect phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulating kinase (ERK) and p38. In addition, alpha-chaconine significantly increased the cytoplasmic level of inhibitors of kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) and decreased the nuclear level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), suggesting that alpha-chaconine could inhibit NF-kappaB activity. Furthermore, the treatment of inhibitors specific for JNK (SP600125), PI3K (LY294002) or NF-kappaB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate) to BAECs reduced tube formation. Taken together, the results suggested that alpha-chaconine inhibited migration, invasion and tube formation of BAECs by reducing MMP-2 activities, as well as JNK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways and inhibition of NF-kappaB activity. These findings reveal a new therapeutic potential for alpha-chaconine on anti-angiogenic therapy.

  8. Alpha-thujone reduces 5-HT3 receptor activity by an effect on the agonist-reduced desensitization.

    PubMed

    Deiml, T; Haseneder, R; Zieglgänsberger, W; Rammes, G; Eisensamer, B; Rupprecht, R; Hapfelmeier, G

    2004-02-01

    The convulsant effects of alpha-thujone, the psychotropic component of absinthe, were attributed to inhibitory actions at the GABAA receptor. Here, we investigated for the first time the 5-HT3 receptor as a potential site of the psychotropic actions of alpha-thujone. This cation permeable ligand-gated ion channel shows considerable homology to the GABAA receptor. We previously demonstrated that in homomeric assemblies of cloned human 5-HT,A receptor subunits. the endogenous agonist 5-HT induced desensitization via channel blockade. When the 5-HT3 B receptor subunit was co-expressed, the resulting heteromeric assemblies desensitized independent from channel blockade. In the present study, patch-clamp experiments revealed an inhibitory action of alpha-thujone on both homomeric and heteromeric 5-HT3 receptors. This inhibitory action was mediated via channel blockade. However, it was not alpha-thujone itself which blocked the channel. The present experiments suggested that, in homomeric receptors, alpha-thujone enhanced the inherent channel-blocking potency of the natural ligand. 5-HT. In heteromeric receptors, alpha-thujonerecruited an additional channel-blocking component of the agonist. By means of kinetic modeling, we simulated possible mechanisms by which alpha-thuljone decreased the 5-HT-induced responses. It is suggested that alpha-thujone reduced 5-HT3 receptor activity by an effect on mechanisms involved in receptor desensitization, which depend on receptor subunit composition. It remains to be shown if this inhibitory action on serotonergic responses contributes to behavioral effects of alpha-thujone.

  9. 5Alpha-Reduced Steroids Are Major Metabolites in the Early Equine Embryo Proper and Its Membranes.

    PubMed

    Raeside, James I; Christie, Heather L; Betteridge, Keith J

    2015-09-01

    Steroid production and metabolism by early conceptuses are very important for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in horses. Our earlier work suggested the possible formation of 5alpha-reduced steroids in equine conceptuses. We have now demonstrated the formation of 5alpha-reduced metabolites of androstenedione, testosterone, and progesterone by the embryo and its membranes. A total of 44 conceptuses were collected from 26 mares between 20 and 31 days of pregnancy. Tissues from the embryo proper and from the separated components of the conceptus (bilaminar and trilaminar trophoblast, allantois) were incubated with tritium-labeled substrates. 5Alpha-reduced metabolites (5alpha-dihydro- and 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydro- steroids) as radiolabeled products were identified from a series of chromatographic steps using four solvent systems for high-performance liquid chromatography. Use of a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor confirmed the metabolites were indeed 5alpha-reduced steroids. For the embryo, the only products from androstenedione were 5alpha-dihydroandrostenedione and 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydroandrostenedione, with no evidence of more polar metabolites; there was some 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydrotestosterone but no 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone from testosterone, and formation of androstenedione was followed by the production of 5alpha-dihydroandrostenedione and 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydroandrostenedione. The major 5alpha-reduced product from progesterone was 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydroprogesterone, with lesser amounts of 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone. For the membranes, reductions to tetrahydro, 5alpha-reduced steroids were prominent in most instances, but also present were considerable amounts of products more polar than the substrates. The well-recognized activity of some 5alpha-reduced steroids--for example, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone in male sexual differentiation--provokes interest in their even earlier appearance, as seen in this study, and suggests a possible role for them in

  10. Alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols reduce inflammatory angiogenesis in human microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wells, Shannon R; Jennings, Merilyn H; Rome, Courtney; Hadjivassiliou, Vicky; Papas, Konstantinos A; Alexander, Jonathon S

    2010-07-01

    Vitamin E, a micronutrient (comprising alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols, alpha-, beta-, gamma- and delta-tocotrienols), has documented antioxidant and non-antioxidant effects, some of which inhibit inflammation and angiogenesis. We compared the abilities of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols to regulate human blood cytotoxicity (BEC) and lymphatic endothelial cytotoxicity (LEC), proliferation, invasiveness, permeability, capillary formation and suppression of TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 as in vitro models of inflammatory angiogenesis. alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols were not toxic to either cell type up to 40 microM. In BEC, confluent cell density was decreased by all concentrations of delta- and gamma-tocopherol (10-40 microM) but not by alpha-tocopherol. LEC showed no change in cell density in response to tocopherols. delta-Tocopherol (40 microM), but not other isomers, decreased BEC invasiveness. In LEC, all doses of gamma-tocopherol, as well as the highest dose of alpha-tocopherol (40 microM), decreased cell invasiveness. delta-Tocopherol had no effect on LEC invasiveness at any molarity. delta-Tocopherol dose dependently increased cell permeability at 48 h in BEC and LEC; alpha- and gamma-tocopherols showed slight effects. Capillary tube formation was decreased by high dose (40 microM) concentrations of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherol, but showed no effects with smaller doses (10-20 microM) in BEC. gamma-Tocopherol (10-20 microM) and alpha-tocopherol (10 microM), but not delta-tocopherol, increased LEC capillary tube formation. Lastly, in BEC, alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherol each dose-dependently reduced TNF-alpha-induced expression of VCAM-1. In LEC, there was no significant change to TNF-alpha-induced VCAM-1 expression with any concentration of alpha-, gamma- or delta-tocopherol. These data demonstrate that physiological levels (0-40 microM) of alpha-, gamma- and delta-tocopherols are nontoxic and dietary tocopherols, especially delta

  11. Grape seed extract inhibits VEGF expression via reducing HIF-1alpha protein expression.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianming; Zhang, Keqiang; Chen, Shiuan; Wen, Wei

    2009-04-01

    Grape seed extract (GSE) is a widely consumed dietary supplement that has antitumor activity. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory effect of GSE on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and the mechanism underlying this action. We found that GSE inhibited VEGF messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression in U251 human glioma cells and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. GSE inhibited transcriptional activation of the VEGF gene through reducing protein but not mRNA expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) 1alpha. The inhibitory effect of GSE on HIF-1alpha expression was mainly through inhibiting HIF-1alpha protein synthesis rather than promoting protein degradation. Consistent with this result, GSE-suppressed phosphorylation of several important components involved in HIF-1alpha protein synthesis, such as Akt, S6 kinase and S6 protein. Furthermore, in the MDA-MB-231 tumor, we found that GSE treatment inhibited the expression of VEGF and HIF-1alpha and the phosphorylation of S6 kinase without altering the subcellular localization of HIF-1alpha, correlating with reduced vessel density and tumor size. Depletion of polyphenol with polyvinylpyrrolidone abolished the inhibitory activity of GSE, suggesting a water-soluble fraction of polyphenol in GSE is responsible for the inhibitory activity. Taken together, our results indicate that GSE inhibits VEGF expression by reducing HIF-1alpha protein synthesis through blocking Akt activation. This finding provides new insight into the mechanisms of anticancer activity of GSE and reveals a novel molecular mechanism underlying the antiangiogenic action of GSE.

  12. Reduced upper limits on the equivalent width of interstellar Li I 670.8 towards SN 1987 A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baade, D.; Cristiani, S.; Lanz, T.; Malaney, R. A.; Sahu, K. S.; Vladilo, G.

    1991-11-01

    A new search for interstellar Li I 670.8 along the line of sight to SN 1987 A has been carried out using all 34 known high-resolution Reticon spectra obtained at the European Southern Observatory. The most probably 3-sigma detection limit in equivalent width is 7.3 x 10 exp -6 nm. For the cloud at radial velocity +286 km/s, standard relations then imply a maximum abundance, Li/H, of 1.7 x 10 exp -11 in the gaseous interstellar medium of the LMC. If depletion to dust grains is the same for both lithium and potassium, this figure has to be increased by 1.1 dex. Accordingly, conventional present-day reasoning suggests that the elemental abundance of lithium does not exceed 2.7 x 10 exp -10. However, the cumulative uncertainties are such that a primordial abundance which is an order of magnitude higher is not firmly ruled out. Constraints on primordial nucleosynthesis models are, therefore, only weak.

  13. Design and evaluation of single nozzle with a non-conductive tip for reducing applied voltage and pattern width in electrohydrodynamic jet printing (EHDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Yong; Park, Jaehong; Hwang, Jungho

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a non-conductive tip inserted into a capillary nozzle (inner diameter of 860 µm) on jet formation and pattern width in electrohydrodynamic jet printing. Simulated and experimental results showed that the non-conductive tip stabilized the jet, and reduced the effective nozzle diameter and the onset voltage needed for the cone-jet mode, by eliminating the backflow near the apex of the liquid cone while a tiny backflow away from the apex of the liquid cone still remained. Silver nanocolloid patterns with an average width of 18.5 µm (standard deviation: 1.5 µm) were obtained with an applied voltage of 2.7 kV, a flow rate of 3 µl min-1 and a stage velocity of 200 mm s-1.

  14. Disruption of insulin-like growth factor-I expression in type IIαI collagen-expressing cells reduces bone length and width in mice

    PubMed Central

    Govoni, Kristen E.; Lee, Seong Keun; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Behringer, Richard R.; Wergedal, Jon E.; Baylink, David J.; Mohan, Subburaman

    2010-01-01

    It is well established that insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I is critical for the regulation of peak bone mineral density (BMD) and bone width. However, the role of systemic vs. local IGF-I is not well understood. To determine the role local IGF-I plays in regulating BMD and bone width, we crossed IGF-I flox/flox mice with procollagen, typeIIαI-Cre mice to generate conditional mutants in which chondrocyte-derived IGF-I was disrupted. Bone parameters were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry at 2, 4, 8, and 12 wk of age and peripheral quantitative computed tomography at 12 wk of age. Body length, areal BMD, and bone mineral content (BMC) were reduced (P < 0.05) between 4 and 12 wk in the conditional mutant mice. Bone width was reduced 7% in the vertebrae and femur (P < 0.05) of conditional mutant mice at 12 wk. Gains in body length and total body BMC and BMD were reduced by 27, 22, and 18%, respectively (P < 0.05) in conditional mutant mice between 2 and 4 wk of age. Expression of parathyroid hormone related protein, parathyroid hormone receptor, distal-less homeobox (Dlx)-5, SRY-box containing gene-9, and IGF binding protein (IGFBP)-5 were reduced 27, 36, 45, 33, and 45%, respectively, in the conditional mutant cartilage (P < 0.05); however, no changes in Indian hedgehog, Dlx-3, growth hormone receptor, IGF-I receptor, and IGFBP-3 expression were observed (P ≥ 0.20). In conclusion, IGF-I from cells expressing procollagen type IIαI regulates bone accretion that occurs during postnatal growth period. PMID:17519362

  15. Bright illumination reduces parietal EEG alpha activity during a sustained attention task.

    PubMed

    Min, Byoung-Kyong; Jung, Young-Chul; Kim, Eosu; Park, Jin Young

    2013-11-13

    The influence of the illumination condition on our cognitive-performance seems to be more critical in the modern life, wherein, most people work in an office under a specific illumination condition. However, neurophysiological changes in a specific illumination state and their cognitive interpretation still remain unclear. Thereby, in the present study, the effect of different illumination conditions on the same cognitive performance was evaluated particularly by EEG wavelet analyses. During a sustained attention task, we observed that the higher illumination condition yielded significantly lower parietal tonic electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha activity before the presentation of the probe digit and longer reaction times, than that of the other illumination conditions. Although previous studies suggest that lower prestimulus EEG alpha activity is related to higher performance in an upcoming task, the reduced prestimulus alpha activity under higher illumination was associated with delayed reaction times in the present study. Presumably, the higher background illumination condition seems to be too bright for normal attentional processing and distracted participants' attention during a sustained attention task. Such a bottom-up effect by stimulus salience seemed to overwhelm a prestimulus top-down effect reflected in prestimulus alpha power during the bright background condition. This finding might imply a dynamic competition between prestimulus top-down and poststimulus bottom-up processes. Our findings provide compelling evidence that the illumination condition substantially modulates our attentional processing. Further refinement of the illumination parameters and subsequent exploration of cognitive-modulation are necessary to facilitate our cognitive performance.

  16. Effect of progesterone, testosterone and their 5 alpha-reduced metabolites on GFAP gene expression in type 1 astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Melcangi, R C; Riva, M A; Fumagalli, F; Magnaghi, V; Racagni, G; Martini, L

    1996-03-04

    Astrocytes possess steroid receptors as well as several enzymes typical of steroid target cells, such as 5 alpha-reductase, which converts testosterone (T) and progesterone (P) into their respective 5 alpha-reduced metabolites, and the 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3 alpha-HSD). Because of this, it was deemed of interest to analyze whether the original hormones P and T, and their 5 alpha-reduced metabolites dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 5 alpha-androstan-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol (3 alpha-diol), dihydroprogesterone (DHP) and 5 alpha-pregnan-3 alpha-ol-20-one (THP), might exert some effects on the expression of the most typical astrocytic marker, i.e. the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP). Cultures of rat type 1 astrocytes were exposed to the various steroids for 2, 6, and 24 h, and the variations of GFAP mRNA were measured by Northern blot analysis. A significant elevation of GFAP mRNA levels was observed after exposure to either P or DHP; the effect of DHP appeared more promptly (at 2 h) than that of P (at 6 h). This result suggests that the effect of P might be linked to its conversion into DHP; this hypothesis has been confirmed by showing that the addition of finasteride (a specific blocker of the 5 alpha-reductase) is able to completely abolish the effect of P. After exposure to DHP or THP, a decrease of GFAP gene expression was observed at later intervals (24 h). In the case of androgens, T and 3 alpha-diol did not change GFAP expression at any time of exposure, while DHT produced a significant decrease of GFAP mRNA only after 24 h of exposure. Taken together, the data indicate that the 5 alpha-reduced metabolites of P and T may modulate the expression of GFAP in type 1 rat astrocytes.

  17. Phase width reduction project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Xie, Z.Q.; McMahan, M. A.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of the phase width reduction project, 1993--96, was to reduce the phase width of the 88-Inch Cyclotron beam on target from 5--10 ns to 1--2 ns for certain experiments, such as Gammasphere, which use time-of-flight identification. Since reducing the phase width also reduces beam intensity, tuning should be done to also optimize the transmission. The Multi-turn Collimator slits in the cyclotron center region were used to collimate the early turns radially, thus reducing the phase width from about 5 ns to 1--2 ns FWHM for a Gammasphere beam. The effect of the slits on phase width was verified with a Fast Faraday Cup and with particle and gamma-ray detectors in the external beamline.

  18. Attenuation of cardiac contractility in Na,K-ATPase alpha1 isoform-deficient hearts under reduced calcium conditions.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Amy E; Cougnon, Marc H; Grupp, Ingrid L; El Schultz, Jo; Lingrel, Jerry B

    2004-11-01

    We have previously reported that genetic reduction of the Na,K-ATPase alpha1 isoform (alpha1(+/-)) results in a hypocontractile cardiac phenotype. This observation was surprising and unexpected. In order to determine if calcium overload contributes to the depressed phenotype, cardiac performance was examined by perfusing the hearts with buffer containing 2 or 1.5 mM calcium. At 2 mM calcium, +dP/dt for the alpha1(+/-) hearts (1374 +/- 180) was significantly less than that of wild-type (2656 +/- 75, P < 0.05). At 1.5 mM calcium, a larger decrease in +dP/dt occurred (vs. 2 mM calcium) for the alpha1(+/-) hearts (517 +/- 92) compared to wild-type (2238 +/- 157). At 2 mM calcium, -dP/dt was 50% lower in alpha1(+/-) hearts (-1903 +/- 141) than wild-type (-982 +/- 143). At 1.5 mM calcium relaxation was further reduced in alpha1(+/-) compared to wild-type (-443 +/- 56 vs. - 1691 +/- 109). We also tested whether the compensatory upregulation of the Na,K-ATPase alpha2 isoform in the alpha1(+/-) hearts contributes to the hypocontractile phenotype. At 8 x 10(-6) M ouabain, that would completely inhibit the alpha2 isoform, a 30% increase in contractility was obtained in alpha1(+/-) hearts compared to no ouabain treatment, while a 63% faster time-to-peak (TTP) and 67% faster half-time-to-relaxation (RT(1/2)) were observed in alpha1(+/-) hearts treated with ouabain. These results suggest that upregulation of the alpha2 isoform may play a role in slower TTP and RT(1/2) in the alpha1(+/-) hearts. Furthermore, lowering extracellular calcium in the perfusate did not alleviate the depressed contractile phenotype in the alpha1(+/-) hearts and resulted in further depressed cardiac contractility suggesting that these hearts are not calcium overloaded.

  19. Foam-stabilizing effects and cling formation patterns of iso-alpha-acids and reduced iso-alpha-acids in lager beer.

    PubMed

    Kunimune, Takeshi; Shellhammer, Thomas H

    2008-09-24

    Foam-stabilizing properties and cling formation patterns of iso-alpha-acids and reduced iso-alpha-acids were investigated using an unhopped lager beer. Unhopped beer was dosed with iso-alpha-acid (Iso), rho-iso-alpha-acid (Rho), tetrahydro-iso-alpha-acid (Tetra), and hexahydro-iso-alpha-acid (Hexa), separately, over a range of concentrations from 2 to 10 ppm. A uniform foam was created by Inpack 2000 Flasher Head and was measured by a NIBEM Foam Stability Tester (NIBEM-TPH) followed by a NIBEM Cling Meter (NIBEM-CLM) to determine the relationship between the concentration and NIBEM-30 and the cling formation ability of each compound. The foam-stabilizing power was determined to be Tetra, Hexa, Iso, and Rho from the strongest to weakest. Linear regression models were created using the NIBEM-TPH data set, and on the basis of 95% confidence intervals, the foam stability of Tetra or Hexa became significantly larger than that of Iso when 2.4 or 4.2 ppm of Tetra or Hexa was used as a replacement for Iso, respectively. Cling formation patterns could be categorized into three groups: "ring", "mesh", and "powdery". The control beer had the lowest foam stability and did not yield any foam cling.

  20. An isozyme of acid alpha-glucosidase with reduced catalytic activity for glycogen.

    PubMed Central

    Beratis, N G; LaBadie, G U; Hirschhorn, K

    1980-01-01

    Both the common and a variant isozyme of acid alpha-glucosidase have been purified from a heterozygous placenta with CM-Sephadex, ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, Amicon filtration, affinity chromatography by Sephadex G-100, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Three and two activity peaks, from the common and variant isozymes, respectively, were obtained by DEAE-cellulose chromatography using a linear NaCl gradient. The three peaks of activity of the common isozyme were eluted with 0.08, 0.12, and 0.17 M NaCl, whereas the two peaks of the variant, with 0.01 and 0.06 M NaCl. The pH optimum and thermal denaturation at 57 degrees C were the same in all enzyme peaks of both isozymes. Rabbit antiacid alpha-glucosidase antibodies produced against the common isozyme were found to cross-react with both peaks of the variant isozyme. The two isozymes shared antigenic identity and had similar Km's with maltose as substrate. Normal substrate saturation kinetics were observed with the common isozyme when glycogen was the substrate, but the variant produced an S-shaped saturation curve indicating a phase of negative and positive cooperativity at low and high glycogen concentrations, respectively. The activity of the variant was only 8.6% and 19.2% of the common isozyme when assayed with nonsaturating and saturating concentrations of glycogen, respectively. A similar rate of hydrolysis of isomaltose by both isozymes was found indicating that the reduced catalytic activity of the variant isozyme toward glycogen is not the result of a reduced ability of this enzyme to cleave the alpha-1,6 linkages of glycogen. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:6770674

  1. Nicotinic alpha5 subunit deletion locally reduces high-affinity agonist activation without altering nicotinic receptor numbers.

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert W B; Collins, Allan C; Lindstrom, Jon M; Whiteaker, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha5 mRNA is widely expressed in the CNS. An alpha5 gene polymorphism has been implicated in behavioral differences between mouse strains, and alpha5-null mutation induces profound changes in mouse acute responses to nicotine. In this study, we have examined the distribution and prevalence of alpha5* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in mouse brain, and quantified the effects of alpha5-null mutation on pre-synaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor function (measured using synaptosomal (86)Rb(+) efflux) and overall [(125)I]epibatidine binding site expression. alpha5* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor expression was found in nine of fifteen regions examined, although < 20% of the total nicotinic acetylcholine receptor population in any region contained alpha5. Deletion of the alpha5 subunit gene resulted in localized loss of function (thalamus, striatum), which was itself confined to the DHbetaE-sensitive receptor population. No changes in receptor expression were seen. Consequently, functional changes must occur as a result of altered function per unit of receptor. The selective depletion of high agonist activation affinity sites results in overall nicotinic function being reduced, and increases the overall agonist activation affinity. Together, these results describe the receptor-level changes underlying altered behavioral responses to nicotine in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha5 subunit-null mutants.

  2. Transgenic Over Expression of Nicotinic Receptor Alpha 5, Alpha 3, and Beta 4 Subunit Genes Reduces Ethanol Intake in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Gallego, Xavier; Ruiz, Jessica; Valverde, Olga; Molas, Susanna; Robles, Noemí; Sabrià, Josefa; Crabbe, John C.; Dierssen, Mara

    2012-01-01

    Abuse of alcohol and smoking are extensively co-morbid. Some studies suggest partial commonality of action of alcohol and nicotine mediated through nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We tested mice with transgenic over expression of the alpha 5, alpha 3, beta 4 receptor subunit genes, which lie in a cluster on human chromosome 15, that were previously shown to have increased nicotine self-administration, for several responses to ethanol. Transgenic and wild-type mice did not differ in sensitivity to several acute behavioral responses to ethanol. However, transgenic mice drank less ethanol than wild-type in a two-bottle (ethanol vs. water) preference test. These results suggest a complex role for this receptor subunit gene cluster in the modulation of ethanol’s as well as nicotine’s effects. PMID:22459873

  3. Failure of isolated rat tibial periosteal cells to 5 alpha reduce testosterone to 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.T.; Bleiberg, B.; Colvard, D.S.; Keeting, P.E.; Evans, G.; Spelsberg, T.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Periosteal cells were isolated from tibiae of adult male rats after collagenase treatment. Northern blot analysis of total cytoplasmic RNA extracted from the isolated periosteal cells was positive for expression of genes encoding the osteoblast marker proteins osteocalcin (BGP) and pre-pro-alpha 2(I) chain of type 1 precollagen. The isolated periosteal cells were incubated with 1 nM (3H)testosterone (({sup 3}H)T) for up to 240 minutes and the reaction products separated by high-performance liquid chromatography. ({sup 3}H)5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (({sup 3}H)DHT) was not detected in extracts of periosteal cell incubations. In contrast, ({sup 3}H)DHT was produced in a time-dependent manner by cells from seminal vesicles. These results suggest that testosterone 5 alpha-reductase activity is not expressed by osteoblasts in rat tibial periosteum and that the anabolic effects of androgens in this tissue are not mediated by locally produced DHT.

  4. Overt expression of AP-1 reduces alpha myosin heavy chain expression and contributes to heart failure from chronic volume overload.

    PubMed

    Freire, Grace; Ocampo, Catherina; Ilbawi, Nadim; Griffin, Andrew J; Gupta, Madhu

    2007-10-01

    Reduced expression of alpha-MHC plays a significant role in cardiac contractile dysfunction from hemodynamic overload. Previously, Pur proteins and YY1 have been shown to play a role in alpha-MHC repression during heart failure induced by pressure overload and by spontaneous hypertension, respectively. This was not observed in volume-overload-induced heart failure, suggesting additional regulatory mechanisms for alpha-MHC repression. The present study was performed to identify volume overload responsive transcription factors involved in alpha-MHC gene regulation. DNA binding activity of several transcription factors was evaluated in a functionally characterized rat model of heart failure induced by aorto-caval shunt. After 10 weeks of shunt, severe LV dilatation and reduced LV function were accompanied by increased expression of ANF and beta-MHC, and decreased expression of alpha-MHC. This was associated with dramatic (10-fold) activation of AP-1 together with increased expression of c-fos and c-jun. AP-1 activation was not observed following 4 weeks of shunt when cardiac function was preserved. In cultured cardiomyocytes, induction of AP-1 by PMA attenuated alpha-MHC mRNA by 60%. Transient transfection assays mapped PMA responsive sequence to -582 to -588 bp of alpha-MHC promoter. Deletion or mutation of these nucleotides had minimal effect on basal promoter activity but played a dominant role in PMA-mediated repression of alpha-MHC promoter activity. Over-expression of c-fos and c-jun in cardiomyocytes inhibited alpha-MHC promoter activity in a concentration dependent manner. Data suggest a repressive role of AP-1 in alpha-MHC expression and its possible involvement in the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to heart failure in chronic volume overload.

  5. 17-alpha Hydroxyprogesterone caproate did not reduce the rate of recurrent preterm birth in a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David B; McIntire, Donald D; McDonald, Jeffrey; Gard, John; Turrichi, Paula; Leveno, Kenneth J

    2017-06-01

    17-alpha Hydroxyprogesterone caproate for prevention of recurrent preterm birth is recommended for use in the United States. We sought to assess the clinical effectiveness of 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate to prevent recurrent preterm birth ≤35 weeks compared to similar births in our obstetric population prior to the implementation of 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate. This was a prospective cohort study of 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate in our obstetric population. The primary outcome was the recurrence of birth ≤35 weeks for the entire study cohort compared to a historical referent rate of 16.8% of recurrent preterm birth in our population. There were 3 secondary outcomes. First, did 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate modify a woman's history of preterm birth when taking into account her prior number and sequence of preterm and term births? Second, was recurrence of preterm birth related to 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate plasma concentration? Third, was duration of pregnancy modified by 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate treatment compared to a prior preterm birth? From January 2012 through March 2016, 430 consecutive women with prior births ≤35 weeks were treated with 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate. Nearly two thirds of the women (N = 267) began injections ≤18 weeks and 394 (92%) received a scheduled weekly injection within 10 days of reaching 35 weeks or delivery. The overall rate of recurrent preterm birth was 25% (N = 106) for the entire cohort compared to the 16.8% expected rate (P = 1.0). The 3 secondary outcomes were also negative. First, 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate did not significantly reduce the rates of recurrence regardless of prior preterm birth number or sequence. Second, plasma concentrations of 17-alpha hydroxyprogesterone caproate were not different (P = .17 at 24 weeks; P = .38 at 32 weeks) between women delivered ≤35 weeks and those delivered later in pregnancy. Third, the mean (

  6. Alpha-lipoic acid reduces peridural fibrosis after laminectomy of lumbar vertebrae in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Miktat; Yildirim, Can Hakan; Kosemehmetoglu, Kemal; Huseyinoglu, Urfettin; Erdogan, Hakan; Akbasak, Aytac; Tasdemiroglu, Erol

    2012-07-01

    Peridural fibrosis is an inevitable healing process causing failed back surgery syndrome after lumbar spinal operations. In this study, alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), reported to reduce fibrosis in liver, oral mucosa, and peritoneum, investigated as a potential candidate for prevention of peridural fibrosis. Twelve adult New Zealand white male rabbits were divided into control (n = 5) and ALA groups (n = 7). Laminectomy of lumbar spine was performed and ALA was applied on the exposed dura mater topically in ALA group. According to histological peridural grading, the ALA group (median grade 1) showed significantly less peridural fibrosis than the control group (median grade 3, p = 0.005). ALA is a promising substance in the prevention of peridural fibrosis, especially in early preoperative and postoperative period.

  7. Essential oil of Myrtus communis inhibits inflammation in rats by reducing serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Maxia, Andrea; Frau, Maria Assunta; Falconieri, Danilo; Karchuli, Manvendra Singh; Kasture, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    The topical antiinflammatory activity of the essential oil of Myrtus communis L. was studied using croton oil induced ear edema and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in mice, and cotton pellet induced granuloma, and serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rats. On topical application, the oil exhibited a significant decrease in the ear edema as well as MPO activity. The oil also inhibited cotton pellet-induced granuloma and serum TNF-alpha and IL-6. It can be concluded that the essential oil of Myrtus communis reduces leukocyte migration to the damaged tissue and exhibits antiinflammatory activity.

  8. Biodentine Reduces Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-induced TRPA1 Expression in Odontoblastlike Cells.

    PubMed

    El Karim, Ikhlas A; McCrudden, Maelíosa T C; McGahon, Mary K; Curtis, Tim M; Jeanneau, Charlotte; Giraud, Thomas; Irwin, Chris R; Linden, Gerard J; Lundy, Fionnuala T; About, Imad

    2016-04-01

    The transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channels have emerged as important cellular sensors in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, with TRPA1 playing a central role in nociception and neurogenic inflammation. The functionality of TRP channels has been shown to be modulated by inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of inflammation on odontoblast TRPA1 expression and to determine the effect of Biodentine (Septodent, Paris, France) on inflammatory-induced TRPA1 expression. Immunohistochemistry was used to study TRPA1 expression in pulp tissue from healthy and carious human teeth. Pulp cells were differentiated to odontoblastlike cells in the presence of 2 mmol/L beta-glycerophosphate, and these cells were used in quantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, calcium imaging, and patch clamp studies. Immunofluorescent staining revealed TRPA1 expression in odontoblast cell bodies and odontoblast processes, which was more intense in carious versus healthy teeth. TRPA1 gene expression was induced in cultured odontoblastlike cells by tumor necrosis factor alpha, and this expression was significantly reduced in the presence of Biodentine. The functionality of the TRPA1 channel was shown by calcium microfluorimetry and patch clamp recording, and our results showed a significant reduction in tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced TRPA1 responses after Biodentine treatment. In conclusion, this study showed TRPA1 to be modulated by caries-induced inflammation and that Biodentine reduced TRPA1 expression and functional responses. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Treatment with alpha-lipoic acid reduces asymmetric dimethylarginine in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, Friedrich; Pleiner, Johannes; Francesconi, Mario; Wolzt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Elevated asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentrations predict cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It has been shown that alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) improves endothelial function and oxidative stress in these patients. The present study investigated if ALA reduces ADMA in patients with T2DM. Plasma concentrations of ADMA, L-arginine and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) were determined in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study in patients with T2DM. Intravenous ALA (n = 16) or placebo (n = 14) was administered daily for 3 weeks. ALA reduced ADMA while no change was observed with placebo (mean change -0.05 micromol/1[95% CI: -0.01; -0.09] vs. 0.01 micromol/1 [95% CI: -0.05; -0.03]; ANOVA p = 0.031). SDMA and L-arginine were not affected by ALA. In conclusion ALA treatment reduces ADMA in patients with T2DM. Long-term studies need to demonstrate if ALA may cause cardiovascular risk reduction.

  10. alpha-tocopherol supplementation reduces the elevated 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine blood levels induced by training in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Tsakiris, Stylianos; Parthimos, Theodore; Tsakiris, Theodore; Parthimos, Nickolaos; Schulpis, Kleopatra H

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of alpha-tocopherol (alpha-Te) supplementation on DNA oxidative damage induced by heavy training in basketball players. Blood was obtained from 10 players before (group A) and after training (group B) and after 1 month on alpha-Te (200 mg/day, orally) supplementation, before (group C) and after training (group D). Total antioxidant status (TAS), muscle enzyme activities and the biomarker of DNA oxidation, 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), were measured using commercial kits. alpha-Te and catecholamine blood levels were determined using HPLC methods. TAS was higher in the groups with alpha-Te (groups C and D). Levels of 8-OHdG and muscle creatine kinase (CK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were remarkably lower (0.20+/-0.03 ng/mL, 120+/-15 U/L and 430+/-90 U/L, respectively) in the group with alpha-Te (group D) than in group B (0.42+/-0.05 ng/mL, 286+/-12 U/L and 688+/-88 U/L, respectively; p<0.001). 8-OHdG levels were negatively correlated to TAS and positively to CK levels. alpha-Te supplementation may reduce DNA oxidation induced by training by protecting muscle cell "death" from glutamate entry and/or by elevation of TAS via amelioration of lipid peroxidation.

  11. Development of reduced-fat mayonnaise using 4alphaGTase-modified rice starch and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Mun, Saehun; Kim, Young-Lim; Kang, Choon-Gil; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Shim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Yong-Ro

    2009-06-01

    In this study a disproportionating enzyme, 4-alpha-glucanotransferase (4alphaGTase), was used to modify the structural properties of rice starch to produce a suitable fat substitute in reduced-fat (RF) mayonnaise. The mayonnaise fat was partially substituted with the 4alphaGTase-treated starch paste at levels up to 50% in combination with xanthan gum and the physical and rheological properties of the modified RF mayonnaise samples were investigated. All mayonnaises prepared in this study exhibited shear thinning behavior and yield stress. Viscoelastic properties of mayonnaise were characterized using dynamic oscillatory shear test and it was observed that mayonnaises exhibited weak gel-like properties. The magnitude of elastic and loss moduli was also affected by 4alphaGTase-treated starch concentration and presence of xanthan gum. In relation to microstructure, RF mayonnaise prepared with 3.8 or 5.6 wt% of 4alphaGTase-treated starch and xanthan gum showed smaller droplets. The use of 5.6 wt% of 4alphaGTase-treated starch and 0.1 wt% of xanthan gum produced a RF mayonnaise with similar rheological properties and appearances as FF mayonnaise with gum. This study demonstrated a high feasibility for using 4alphaGTase-treated rice starch as a viable fat replacer in mayonnaise.

  12. Alpha-1-antitrypsin monotherapy reduces graft-versus-host disease after experimental allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tawara, Isao; Sun, Yaping; Lewis, Eli C.; Toubai, Tomomi; Evers, Rebecca; Nieves, Evelyn; Azam, Tania; Dinarello, Charles A.; Reddy, Pavan

    2012-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) is a major complication that prevents successful outcomes after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), an effective therapy for hematological malignancies. Several studies demonstrate that donor T cells and host antigen-presenting cells along with several proinflammatory cytokines are required for the induction of GvHD and contribute to its severity. Increasing evidence demonstrates that human serum-derived αalpha-1- anti-trypsin (AAT) reduces production of proinflammatory cytokines, induces anti-inflammatory cytokines, and interferes with maturation of dendritic cells. Using well-characterized mouse models of BMT, we have studied the effects of AAT on GvHD severity. Administration of AAT early after BMT decreased mortality in three models of GvHD and reduced serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines in the allogeneic recipients compared with vehicle (albumin) treated animals. AAT treatment reduced the expansion of alloreactive T effector cells but enhanced the recovery of T regulatory T cells, (Tregs) thus altering the ratio of donor T effector to T regulatory cells in favor of reducing the pathological process. However, despite altering the ratio in vivo, AAT had no direct effects on either the donor T effector cells or T regulatory cells Tregs in vitro. In contrast, AAT suppressed LPS-induced in vitro secretion of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-1β, enhanced the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, and impaired NF-κB translocation in the host dendritic cells. In light of its long history of safety in humans, these findings suggest that administration of AAT represents a novel unique and viable strategy to mitigate clinical GvHD. PMID:22203983

  13. beta-Naphthoflavone protects from peritonitis by reducing TNF-alpha-induced endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Yao; Liou, Je-Wen; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Peng, Shih-Yi; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Wei-Cheng; Huang, Zheng-Kai; Jiang, Shinn-Jong

    2015-12-01

    β-Naphthoflavone (β-NF), a ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, has been shown to possess anti-oxidative properties. We investigated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory potential of β-NF in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Pretreatment with β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species, translocation of p67(phox), and TNF-α-induced monocyte binding and transmigration. In addition, β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. The mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 were reduced by β-NF, as was the infiltration of white blood cells, in a peritonitis model. The inhibition of adhesion molecules was associated with suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and Akt, and suppressed phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38. The translocation of Egr-1, a downstream transcription factor involved in the MEK-ERK signaling pathway, was suppressed by β-NF treatment. Our findings show that β-NF inhibits TNF-α-induced NF-kB and ERK1/2 activation and ROS generation, thereby suppressing the expression of adhesion molecules. This results in reduced adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes in vitro and prevents the infiltration of leukocytes in a peritonitis model. Our findings also suggest that β-NF might prevent TNF-α-induced inflammation.

  14. Reduced prefrontal MEG alpha-band power in mild traumatic brain injury with associated posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Mihai; Hughes, John D; Popescu, Elena-Anda; Riedy, Gerard; DeGraba, Thomas J

    2016-09-01

    To determine if changes in cortical alpha-band power in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) are associated with the severity of their post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and if injury severity and level of exposure to psychologically traumatic events are predictors of these electrophysiological changes. Resting-state magnetoencephalographic recordings were analyzed in 32 patients with mTBI. Alpha-band power was estimated for each patient in 68 cortical regions and was compared between groups of patients with low versus high PTSD symptoms severity. Participants with high PTSD symptom severity showed reduced alpha-band power bilaterally in the superior and middle frontal gyri and frontal poles, and in the left inferior frontal gyrus. Alpha-band power in bilateral middle frontal gyri and frontal poles was negatively correlated with scores reflecting symptoms of emotional numbing. Loss of consciousness (LOC) associated with mTBI and level of exposure to psychologically traumatic events were predictors of decreased prefrontal alpha-band power in some of these regions. Altered prefrontal alpha-band activity, shown to be partly explained by mTBI-related LOC, is associated with PTSD symptoms severity. Our findings will guide future studies addressing the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying a higher incidence of PTSD in patients with mTBI. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. Antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid inhibits osteoclast differentiation by reducing nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding and prevents in vivo bone resorption induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyon Jong; Chang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Hyun-Man; Lee, Seung Bok; Kim, Hyun-Duck; Su Kim, Ghi; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2006-05-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and bone mineral density or osteoporosis has recently been reported. As bone loss occurring in osteoporosis and inflammatory diseases is primarily due to increases in osteoclast number, reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be relevant to osteoclast differentiation, which requires receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) frequently present in inflammatory conditions has a profound synergy with RANKL in osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (alpha-LA), a strong antioxidant clinically used for some time, on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. At concentrations showing no growth inhibition, alpha-LA potently suppressed osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow-derived precursor cells driven either by a high-dose RANKL alone or by a low-dose RANKL plus TNF-alpha (RANKL/TNF-alpha). alpha-LA abolished ROS elevation by RANKL or RANKL/TNF-alpha and inhibited NF-kappaB activation in osteoclast precursor cells. Specifically, alpha-LA reduced DNA binding of NF-kappaB but did not inhibit IKK activation. Furthermore, alpha-LA greatly suppressed in vivo bone loss induced by RANKL or TNF-alpha in a calvarial remodeling model. Therefore, our data provide evidence that ROS plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation through NF-kappaB regulation and the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid has a therapeutic potential for bone erosive diseases.

  16. alpha-MSH tripeptide analogs activate the melanocortin 1 receptor and reduce UV-induced DNA damage in human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A; Ruwe, Andrew; Kavanagh-Starner, Renny; Kadekaro, Ana Luisa; Swope, Viki; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie; Koikov, Leonid; Knittel, James J

    2009-10-01

    One skin cancer prevention strategy that we are developing is based on synthesizing and testing melanocortin analogs that reduce and repair DNA damage resulting from exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, in addition to stimulating pigmentation. Previously, we reported the effects of tetrapeptide analogs of alpha-melanocortin (alpha-MSH) that were more potent and stable than the physiological alpha-MSH, and mimicked its photoprotective effects against UV-induced DNA damage in human melanocytes. Here, we report on a panel of tripeptide analogs consisting of a modified alpha-MSH core His(6)-d-Phe(7)-Arg(8), which contained different N-capping groups, C-terminal modifications, or arginine mimics. The most potent tripeptides in activating cAMP formation and tyrosinase of human melanocytes were three analogs with C-terminal modifications. The most effective C-terminal tripeptide mimicked alpha-MSH in reducing hydrogen peroxide generation and enhancing nucleotide excision repair following UV irradiation. The effects of these three analogs required functional MC1R, as they were absent in human melanocytes that expressed non-functional receptor. These results demonstrate activation of the MC1R by tripeptide melanocortin analogs. Designing small analogs for topical delivery should prove practical and efficacious for skin cancer prevention.

  17. Hypoxia reduces constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human proximal renal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xuan; Kimura, Hideki . E-mail: hkimura@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Hirota, Kiichi; Sugimoto, Hidehiro; Yoshida, Haruyoshi

    2005-10-07

    Chronic hypoxia has been reported to be associated with macrophage infiltration in progressive forms of kidney disease. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of hypoxia on constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-stimulated expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in cultured human proximal renal tubular cells (HPTECs). Hypoxia reduced constitutive MCP-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent fashion for up to 48 h. Hypoxia also inhibited MCP-1 up-regulation by TNF-{alpha}. Treatment with actinomycin D showed that hypoxic down-regulation of MCP-1 expression resulted mainly from a decrease in the transcription but not the mRNA stability. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that treatment with hypoxia or an iron chelator, desferrioxamine, induced nuclear accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in HPTECs. Desferrioxamine mimicked hypoxia in the reduction of MCP-1 expression. However, overexpression of a dominant negative form of HIF-1{alpha} did not abolish the hypoxia-induced reduction of MCP-1 expression in HPTECs. These results suggest that hypoxia is an important negative regulator of monocyte chemotaxis to the renal inflamed interstitium, by reducing MCP-1 expression partly via hypoxia-activated signals other than the HIF-1 pathway.

  18. Pregabalin action at a model synapse: binding to presynaptic calcium channel alpha2-delta subunit reduces neurotransmission in mice.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Indu; Taylor, Charles P

    2006-12-28

    Pregabalin, ((S)-3-(aminomethyl)-5-methylhexanoic acid, also known as (S)-3-isobutyl GABA, Lyricatrade mark) is approved for treatment of certain types of peripheral neuropathic pain and as an adjunctive therapy for partial seizures of epilepsy both the EU and the USA and also for generalized anxiety disorder in the EU. Though pregabalin binds selectively to the alpha(2)-delta (alpha(2)-delta) auxiliary subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, the cellular details of pregabalin action are unclear. The high density of alpha(2)-delta in skeletal muscle fibers raises the question of whether pregabalin alters excitation-contraction coupling. We used the mouse soleus neuromuscular junction from mice containing an artificially mutated alpha(2)-delta Type 1 protein (R217A) as a model to examine the effect of pregabalin. Pregabalin reduced nerve-evoked muscle contractions by 16% at a clinically relevant concentration of 10 muM in wildtype mice. When acetylcholine receptors were blocked with curare, pregabalin had no effect on contraction from direct stimulation of muscle, suggesting a lack of drug effects on contraction coupling. Our data are consistent with pregabalin having no effect on striated muscle L-type calcium channel function. However, in mice expressing mutant (R217A) alpha(2)-delta Type 1, there was no significant effect of pregabalin on nerve-evoked muscle contraction. We propose that pregabalin reduces presynaptic neurotransmitter release without altering postsynaptic receptors or contraction coupling and that these effects require high affinity binding to alpha(2)-delta Type 1 auxiliary subunit of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels.

  19. Selenium Reduces Early Signs of Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha-Induced Meniscal Tissue Degradation.

    PubMed

    Häfelein, Klaus; Preuße-Prange, Andrea; Behrendt, Peter; Kurz, Bodo

    2017-05-01

    Meniscal integrity is a prerequisite for sustained knee joint health and prevention of meniscal degeneration is a main research goal. Cartilage-protective effects of selenium have been described, but little is known about the impact on the meniscus. We therefore investigated the influence of sodium selenite on meniscal explants under tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα)-stimulated proinflammatory conditions. Meniscal explant disks (3 mm diameter × 1 mm thickness) were isolated from 2-year-old cattle and incubated with TNFα (10 ng/ml) and sodium selenite (low dose, LoD 6.7 ng/ml as being found in Insulin-Transferrin-Selenium medium supplements, ITS; medium-dose, MeD 40 ng/ml described as physiological synovial concentration; high dose, HiD 100 ng/ml described as optimal serum concentration). After 3 days of culture glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release (DMMB assay), nitric oxide (NO) production (Griess assay), gene expression of matrix-degrading enzymes (quantitative RT-PCR), and apoptosis rate were determined. TNFα led to a significant raise of GAG release and NO production. LoD and MeD selenite significantly reduced the TNFα-induced GAG release (by 83, 55 %, respectively), NO production (by 59, 40 %, respectively), and apoptosis (by 68, 39 %, respectively). LoD and MeD selenite showed a tendency to reduce the TNFα-mediated increase of inducible NO-synthase (iNOS) levels, LoD selenite furthermore matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3 transcription levels and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs (ADAMTS)-4 levels. LoD and less pronounced MeD selenite show a substantial impact on the early meniscal inflammatory response. To our knowledge this is the first study showing the protective influence of selenium on meniscal tissue maintenance. To understand the superior potency of low-dose selenium on molecular level future studies are needed.

  20. Brief Report: Reduced Temporal-Central EEG Alpha Coherence During Joint Attention Perception in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Mark; McMahon, Camilla M; Davidson, Bridget C; Newell, Lisa C; Mundy, Peter C; Henderson, Heather A

    2016-04-01

    Although prior studies have demonstrated reduced resting state EEG coherence in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), no studies have explored the nature of EEG coherence during joint attention. We examined the EEG coherence of the joint attention network in adolescents with and without ASD during congruent and incongruent joint attention perception and an eyes-open resting condition. Across conditions, adolescents with ASD showed reduced right hemisphere temporal-central alpha coherence compared to typically developing adolescents. Greater right temporal-central alpha coherence during joint attention was positively associated with social cognitive performance in typical development but not in ASD. These results suggest that, in addition to a resting state, EEG coherence during joint attention perception is reduced in ASD.

  1. Reduced Temporal-Central EEG Alpha Coherence during Joint Attention Perception in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jaime, Mark; McMahon, Camilla M.; Davidson, Bridget C.; Newell, Lisa C.; Mundy, Peter C.; Henderson, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Although prior studies have demonstrated reduced resting state EEG coherence in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), no studies have explored the nature of EEG coherence during joint attention. We examined the EEG coherence of the joint attention network in adolescents with and without ASD during congruent and incongruent joint attention perception and an eyes-open resting condition. Across conditions, adolescents with ASD showed reduced right hemisphere temporal–central alpha coherence compared to typically developing adolescents. Greater right temporal–central alpha coherence during joint attention was positively associated with social cognitive performance in typical development but not in ASD. These results suggest that, in addition to a resting state, EEG coherence during joint attention perception is reduced in ASD. PMID:26659813

  2. Hyperglycemia reduces integrin subunits alpha v and alpha 5 on the surface of dermal fibroblasts contributing to deficient migration.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maira Estanislau S; Monteiro, Kelly S; Kato, Ellen E; Sampaio, Sandra C; Braga, Tarcio T; Câmara, Niels O S; Lamers, Marcelo L; Santos, Marinilce F

    2016-10-01

    Deficient wound healing is a common multifactorial complication in diabetic patients, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved are poorly defined. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of hyperglycemia on integrins expression in rat dermal fibroblasts and addressed its role in cell adhesion and migration. Diabetes Mellitus was induced in rats by streptozotocin injection and maintained for 30 days. Primary cultures of dermal fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats were maintained under low glucose (5 mM D-glucose) or high glucose (30 mM D-glucose) for 7 days. Cell adhesion and migration were studied by kymography, transwell, and time-lapse assays, and the expressions of integrin subunits αv and α5 were studied by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. Fibroblasts derived from diabetic rats confirmed a reduced migration speed and delayed spreading compared to fibroblasts derived from control rats. The membrane fraction of diabetic-derived fibroblasts showed a decrease of integrin subunits α5 and αv, which was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assays. A reduction in the pericellular fibronectin matrix was also observed. The exposure of diabetic-derived cells to a higher concentration of exogenous fibronectin improved migration velocity and the expression of αv but did not completely restore their migration capacity. In conclusion, the mechanisms involved in the deleterious effects of Diabetes Mellitus on wound healing include the ability of fibroblasts to secrete and to adhere to fibronectin.

  3. The natural xanthone alpha-mangostin reduces oxidative damage in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Lugo-Huitrón, Rafael; Valdivia-Cerda, Verónica; Miranda-Ramírez, Luis Rubén; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; González-Cuahutencos, Octavio; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Mata, Rachel; Santamaría, Abel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2009-02-01

    The antiperoxidative properties of alpha-mangostin, a xanthone isolated from mangosteen fruit, were tested for the first time in nerve tissue exposed to different toxic insults. Two reliable biological preparations (rat brain homogenates and synaptosomal P2 fractions) were exposed to the toxic actions of a free radical generator (ferrous sulfate), an excitotoxic agent (quinolinate), and a mitochondrial toxin (3-nitropropionate). alpha-Mangostin decreased the lipoperoxidative action of FeSO(4) in both preparations in a concentration-dependent manner, and completely abolished the peroxidative effects of quinolinate, 3-nitropropionate and FeSO(4) + quinolinate at all concentrations tested. Interestingly, when tested alone in brain homogenates, alpha-mangostin significantly decreased the lipoperoxidation even below basal levels. alpha-Mangostin also prevented the decreased reductant capacity of mitochondria in synaptosomal fractions. Our results suggest that alpha-mangostin exerts a robust antiperoxidative effect in brain tissue preparations probably through its properties as a free radical scavenger. In light of these findings, this antioxidant should be tested in other neurotoxic models involving oxidative stress.

  4. The 5-alpha reductase inhibitor finasteride reduces dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Frau, Roberto; Savoia, Paola; Fanni, Silvia; Fiorentini, Chiara; Fidalgo, Camino; Tronci, Elisabetta; Stancampiano, Roberto; Meloni, Mario; Cannas, Antonino; Marrosu, Francesco; Bortolato, Marco; Devoto, Paola; Missale, Cristina; Carta, Manolo

    2017-05-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is a disabling motor complication occurring in Parkinson's disease patients (PD) after long-term l-DOPA treatment. Although its etiology remains unclear, there is accumulating evidence that LID relies on an excessive dopamine receptor transmission, particularly at the downstream signaling of D1 receptors. We previously reported that the pharmacological blockade of 5-alpha reductase (5AR), the rate limiting enzyme in neurosteroids synthesis, rescued a number of behavioral aberrations induced by D1 receptor-selective and non-selective agonists, without inducing extrapyramidal symptoms. Thus, the present study was designed to verify whether the 5AR inhibitor finasteride (FIN) may counteract the dyskinesias induced by dopaminergic agonists in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. First, we assessed the acute and chronic effect of different doses of FIN (30-60mg/kg) on LID, in male 6-OHDA-lesioned dyskinetic rats. Thereafter, to fully characterize the therapeutic potential of FIN on LID and its impact on l-DOPA efficacy, we assessed abnormal involuntary movements and forelimb use in hemiparkinsonian male rats chronically injected with FIN (30-60mg/kg/24days) either prior to- or concomitant with l-DOPA administration. In addition, to investigate whether the impact of FIN on LID may be ascribed to a modulation of the D1- or D2/D3-receptor function, dyskinesias were assessed in l-DOPA-primed 6-OHDA-lesioned rats that received FIN in combination with selective direct dopaminergic agonists. Finally, we set to investigate whether FIN may produce similar effect in female hemiparkinsonian rats, as seen in males. The results indicated that FIN administrations significantly dampened LID in all tested treatment regimens, without interfering with the ability of l-DOPA to ameliorate forelimb use in the stepping test. The antidyskinetic effect appears to be due to modulation of both D1- and D2/D3-receptor function, as FIN also reduced abnormal

  5. Alpha-1 antitrypsin reduces ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alpha-1antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional protein with proteinase inhibitor and anti-inflammatory activities. Recent studies showed that AAT has therapeutic effect for diseases associated with inflammation, such as type 1 diabetes and arthritis. Proinflammatory cytokines are primary mediators of...

  6. Alpha-lipoic acid reduces body weight and regulates triglycerides in obese patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Okanović, Azra; Prnjavorac, Besim; Jusufović, Edin; Sejdinović, Rifat

    2015-08-01

    To determine an influence of alpha-lipoic acid to reduction of body weight and regulation of total cholesterol concentration, triglycerides and glucose serum levels in obese patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. A prospective study includes two groups of obese patients with diabetes mellitus and signs of peripheral polyneuropathia: examined group (30 patients; 15 females and 15 males), and control group (30 patients; 12 females and 18 males). All were treated with metformin (850-1700 mg/day). Examined patients were additionally treated with alpha-lipoic acid 600 mg/day during 20 weeks. Body mass index and concentrations of total cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose in serum were compared before and after the treatment. The group treated with 600 mg alpha-lipoic acid lost significantly more weight, and had lower triglyceride level than the control group. There were no significant differences in total cholesterol and glucose serum levels between the groups. Alpha-lipoic acid of 600 mg/day treatment have influenced weight and triglycerides loss in obese patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. It should be considered as an important additive therapy in obese patients with diabetes mellitus type 2. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  7. alpha1-Antitrypsin inhalation reduces airway inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Griese, M; Latzin, P; Kappler, M; Weckerle, K; Heinzlmaier, T; Bernhardt, T; Hartl, D

    2007-02-01

    The airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are characterised by neutrophils that release high amounts of elastase overwhelming the local antiprotease shield. Inhalation of alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) may restore the protease-antiprotease balance and attenuate airway inflammation in CF airways. The aims of the present study were: 1) to assess the best deposition region for inhaled AAT by two different inhalation strategies; and 2) to examine the effect of 4 weeks of AAT inhalation on lung function, protease-antiprotease balance and airway inflammation in CF patients. In a prospective, randomised study, 52 CF patients received a daily deposition by inhalation of 25 mg AAT for 4 weeks targeting their peripheral or bronchial compartment. The levels of elastase activity, AAT, pro-inflammatory cytokines, neutrophils, immunoglobulin G fragments and the numbers of Pseudomonas aeruginosa were assessed in induced sputum before and after the inhalation period. Inhalation of AAT increased AAT levels and decreased the levels of elastase activity, neutrophils, pro-inflammatory cytokines and the numbers of P. aeruginosa. However, it had no effect on lung function. No difference was found between the peripheral and bronchial inhalation mode. In conclusion, although no effect on lung function was observed, the clear reduction of airway inflammation after alpha(1)-antitrypsin treatment may precede pulmonary structural changes. The alpha(1)-antitrypsin deposition region may play a minor role for alpha(1)-antitrypsin inhalation in cystic fibrosis patients.

  8. Production of interleukin-4, interferon (IFN)-gamma and IFN-alpha in human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection: an imbalance of type 1 and type 2 cytokines may reduce the synthesis of IFN-alpha.

    PubMed

    Hober, D; Benyoucef, S; Chehadeh, W; Chieux, V; De La Tribonniere, X; Mouton, Y; Bocket, L; Wattre, P

    1998-10-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) is an important molecule in the antiviral response, but cells from HIV-1-infected individuals show a reduced ability to secrete IFN-alpha. We investigated an association between an imbalance of type 1/type2 cytokines and the production of IFN-alpha in HIV-1 infection. We used whole blood culture to study the cytokine production profile, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), in response to HIV-1 antigens and to study the Sendai Virus and HSV-1-induced-production of IFN-alpha in seven HIV-1-infected patients. An impaired synthesis of IFN-alpha was obtained in patients with a predominant IL-4 production (IL-4 > IFN-gamma), and we found a positive correlation between the ex vivo production of IFN-alpha and the IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratio but not with the HIV RNA copy number in plasma. We investigated the role of T-cell-derived cytokines in the in vitro production of IFN-alpha by PBMC from eight healthy donors, activated with Sendai Virus or HSV-1. Whereas type 2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-13) inhibited virus-induced IFN-alpha synthesis, on the contrary, type 1 cytokines (IL-2, IFN-gamma) enhanced it. A disarray in the T-cell-derived cytokine response may play a role in the defect of IFN-alpha production in HIV-1-infected individuals. Further investigations are needed to explore this hypothesis.

  9. Simultaneous CAR- and alpha V integrin-binding ablation fails to reduce Ad5 liver tropism.

    PubMed

    Martin, Karine; Brie, Anne; Saulnier, Patrick; Perricaudet, Michel; Yeh, Patrice; Vigne, Emmanuelle

    2003-09-01

    Targeting adenovirus encoding therapeutic genes to specific cell types has become a major goal in gene therapy. Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) and alpha(V) integrins have been identified as the primary cell surface components that interact with adenovirus type 5 (Ad5)-based vectors during in vitro transduction. Redirecting Ad5-based vectors requires abrogation of the natural interaction between the viral capsid and its cellular receptors and simultaneous introduction of a new binding specificity into the viral capsid. To abrogate native Ad5 tropism, fiber knob mutations Pro409Glu and Lys417Ala were each incorporated into adenoviral vectors, while the RGD motif was deleted from the penton base. In vitro transduction experiments showed that these capsid mutations eliminated Ad5 interactions with CAR and alpha(V) integrins. Moreover, incorporation in the fiber HI loop of a vitronectin-derived ligand (VN4) specific for the uPAR/CD87 receptor provided the Lys417Ala virus with an alternative entry pathway specific for uPAR-expressing cells, indicating a successful in vitro retargeting of the vector. Unexpectedly, however, simultaneous disruption of Ad5 binding to CAR and alpha(V) integrins had no effect on liver gene transfer following systemic administration in mice. This study highlights the need to understand better the molecular determinants involved in adenovirus uptake by the liver to control the fate of adenoviral vectors in vivo.

  10. Repeated sauna therapy reduces urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2alpha).

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akinori; Miyata, Masaaki; Kihara, Takashi; Minagoe, Shinichi; Tei, Chuwa

    2004-03-01

    We have reported that repeated sauna therapy improves impaired vascular endothelial function in a patient with coronary risk factors. We hypothesized that sauna therapy decreases urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) levels as a marker of oxidative stress and conducted a randomized, controlled study. Twenty-eight patients with at least one coronary risk factor were divided into a sauna group (n = 14) and non-sauna group (n = 14). Sauna therapy was performed with a 60 degrees C far infrared-ray dry sauna for 15 minutes and then bed rest with a blanket for 30 minutes once a day for two weeks. Systolic blood pressure and increased urinary 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) levels in the sauna group were significantly lower than those in the non-sauna group at two weeks after admission (110 +/- 15 mmHg vs 122 +/- 13 mmHg, P < 0.05, 230 +/- 67 pg/mg x creatinine vs 380 +/- 101 pg/mg x creatinine, P < 0.0001, respectively). These results suggest that repeated sauna therapy may protect against oxidative stress, which leads to the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  11. alpha1-Adrenoceptors stimulate a Galphas protein and reduce the transient outward K+ current via a cAMP/PKA-mediated pathway in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Mónica; Setién, Raúl; Puebla, Lilian; Boyano-Adánez, María Del Carmen; Arilla, Eduardo; Casis, Oscar

    2005-03-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptor stimulation prolongs the duration of the cardiac action potentials and leads to positive inotropic effects by inhibiting the transient outward K(+) current (I(to)). In the present study, we have examined the role of several protein kinases and the G protein involved in I(to) inhibition in response to alpha(1)-adrenoceptor stimulation in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. Our findings exclude the classic alpha(1)-adrenergic pathway: activation of the G protein G(alphaq), phospholipase C (PLC), and protein kinase C (PKC), because neither PLC, nor PKC, nor G(alphaq) blockade prevents the alpha(1)-induced I(to) reduction. To the contrary, the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor does not inhibit I(to) in the presence of protein kinase A (PKA), adenylyl cyclase, or G(alphas) inhibitors. In addition, PKA and adenylyl cyclase activation inhibit I(to) to the same extent as phenylephrine. Finally, we have shown a functional coupling between the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor and G(alphas) in a physiological system. Moreover, this coupling seems to be compartmentalized, because the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor increases cAMP levels only in intact cells, but not in isolated membranes, and the effect on I(to) disappears when the cytoskeleton is disrupted. We conclude that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor stimulation reduces the amplitude of the I(to) by activating a G(alphas) protein and the cAMP/PKA signaling cascade, which in turn leads to I(to) channel phosphorylation.

  12. Metallothionein treatment reduces proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha and apoptotic cell death during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Penkowa, M; Hidalgo, J

    2001-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for the human autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are considered important for induction and pathogenesis of EAE/MS disease, which is characterized by significant inflammation and neuroglial damage. We have recently shown that the exogenous administration of the antioxidant protein zinc-metallothionein-II (Zn-MT-II) significantly decreased the clinical symptoms, mortality, and leukocyte infiltration of the CNS during EAE. However, it is not known how EAE progression is regulated nor how cytokine production and cell death can be reduced. We herewith demonstrate that treatment with Zn-MT-II significantly decreased the CNS expression of IL-6 and TNF-alpha during EAE. Zn-MT-II treatment could also significantly reduce apoptotic cell death of neurons and oligodendrocytes during EAE, as judged by using TUNEL and immunoreactivity for cytochrome c and caspases 1 and 3. In contrast, the number of apoptotic lymphocytes and macrophages was less affected by Zn-MT-II treatment. The Zn-MT-II-induced decrease in proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis during EAE could contribute to the reported diminution of clinical symptoms and mortality in EAE-immunized rats receiving Zn-MT-II treatment. Our results demonstrate that MT-II reduces the CNS expression of proinflammatory cytokines and the number of apoptotic neurons during EAE in vivo and that MT-II might be a potentially useful factor for treatment of EAE/MS.

  13. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  14. Alpha 1-antitrypsin reduces inflammation and enhances mouse pancreatic islet transplant survival.

    PubMed

    Koulmanda, Maria; Bhasin, Manoj; Fan, Zhigang; Hanidziar, Dusan; Goel, Nipun; Putheti, Prabhakar; Movahedi, Babak; Libermann, Towia A; Strom, Terry B

    2012-09-18

    The promise of islet cell transplantation cannot be fully realized in the absence of improvements in engraftment of resilient islets. The marginal mass of islets surviving the serial peritransplant insults may lead to exhaustion and thereby contribute to an unacceptably high rate of intermediate and long-term graft loss. Hence, we have studied the effects of treatment with alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) in a syngeneic nonautoimmune islet graft model. A marginal number of syngeneic mouse islets were transplanted into nonautoimmune diabetic hosts and islet function was analyzed in control and AAT treated hosts. In untreated controls, marginal mass islet transplants did not restore euglycemia. Outcomes were dramatically improved by short-term AAT treatment. Transcriptional profiling identified 1,184 differentially expressed transcripts in AAT-treated hosts at 3 d posttransplantation. Systems-biology-based analysis revealed AAT down-regulated regulatory hubs formed by inflammation-related molecules (e.g., TNF-α, NF-κB). The conclusions yielded by the systems-biology analysis were rigorously confirmed by QRT-PCR and immunohistology. These data suggest that short-term AAT treatment of human islet transplant recipients may be worthy of a clinical trial.

  15. Reduced transcript stabilization restricts TNF-alpha expression in RAW264.7 macrophages infected with pathogenic mycobacteria: evidence for an involvement of lipomannan.

    PubMed

    Basler, Tina; Holtmann, Helmut; Abel, Jens; Eckstein, Torsten; Baumer, Wolfgang; Valentin-Weigand, Peter; Goethe, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Despite the critical role that TNF-alpha plays in the containment of mycobacterial infection, the mechanisms involved in regulation of its expression by mycobacteria are poorly defined. We addressed this question by studying MAP, which causes a chronic enteritis in ruminants and is linked to human Crohn's disease. We found that in MAP infected macrophages, TNF-alpha gene expression was substantially lower than in macrophages infected with nonpathogenic MS or stimulated with LPS. TNF-alpha transcriptional one could not fully explain the differential TNF-alpha mRNA expression, suggesting that there must be a substantial contribution by post-transcriptional mechanisms.Accordingly, we found reduced TNF-alpha mRNA stability in MAP-infected macrophages. Further comparison of MAP- and MS-infected macrophages revealed that lower TNF-alpha mRNA stability combined with lower mRNA and protein expression in MAP-infected macrophages correlated with lower p38 MAPK phosphorylation. These findings were independent of viability of MAP and MS. We demonstrate that the major mycobacterial cell-wall lipoglycan LM of MAP and MS induced TNF-alpha mRNA transcription,but only the MS-LM induced p38 MAPK-dependent transcript stabilization. Overall, our data suggest that pathogenic mycobacteria cause weak p38 and TNF-alpha mRNA stabilization as a result of their structural cell-wall components such as LM and thereby, restrict TNF-alpha expression in macrophages.

  16. The alpha1 adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin reduces heroin self-administration in rats with extended access to heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Walker, Brendan M; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P; Koob, George F

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration of dependent rats. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). Thus, prazosin appears to stimulate food intake in extended access rats by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. The data suggest that the alpha1 adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended access.

  17. Ligands of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR-gamma and PPAR-alpha) reduce myocardial infarct size.

    PubMed

    Wayman, Nicole S; Hattori, Yoshiyuki; McDonald, Michelle C; Mota-Filipe, Helder; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Pisano, Babrbara; Chatterjee, Prabal K; Thiemermann, Christoph

    2002-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effects of various chemically distinct activators of PPAR-gamma and PPAR-alpha in a rat model of acute myocardial infarction. Using Northern blot analysis and RT-PCR in samples of rat heart, we document the expression of the mRNA for PPAR-gamma (isoform 1 but not isoform 2) as well as PPAR-beta and PPAR-alpha in freshly isolated cardiac myocytes and cardiac fibroblasts and in the left and right ventricles of the heart. Using a rat model of regional myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (in vivo), we have discovered that various chemically distinct ligands of PPAR-gamma (including the TZDs rosiglitazone, ciglitazone, and pioglitazone, as well as the cyclopentanone prostaglandins 15D-PGJ2 and PGA1) cause a substantial reduction of myocardial infarct size in the rat. We demonstrate that two distinct ligands of PPAR-alpha (including clofibrate and WY 14643) also cause a substantial reduction of myocardial infarct size in the rat. The most pronounced reduction in infarct size was observed with the endogenous PPAR-gamma ligand, 15-deoxyDelta12,14-prostagalndin J2 (15D-PGJ2). The mechanisms of the cardioprotective effects of 15D-PGJ2 may include 1) activation of PPAR-alpha, 2) activation of PPAR-gamma, 3) expression of HO-1, and 4) inhibition of the activation of NF-kappaB in the ischemic-reperfused heart. Inhibition by 15D-PGJ2 of the activation of NF-kappaB in turn results in a reduction of the 1) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and the nitration of proteins by peroxynitrite, 2) formation of the chemokine MCP-1, and 3) expression of the adhesion molecule ICAM-1. We speculate that ligands of PPAR-gamma and PPAR-alpha may be useful in the therapy of conditions associated with ischemia-reperfusion of the heart and other organs. Our findings also imply that TZDs and fibrates may help protect the heart against ischemia-reperfusion injury. This beneficial effect of 15D-PGJ2 was associated with a reduction in the

  18. Is There a Role for Preoperative 5 Alpha Reductase Inhibitors in Reducing Prostate Vascularity and Blood Loss?

    PubMed

    Bruha, Matthew; Welliver, Charles

    2017-10-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and the related medical problems are a major burden as health care costs and as a cause of patient morbidity. The introduction of medical therapy largely offered an alternative to surgical therapy, and these medications have been linked with multiple positive BPH-related outcomes. With ubiquitous use, however, a variety of adverse side effects and unsupported claims to these medications have been reported both in scientific literature and popular press. The use of 5 alpha reductase inhibitors (5ARIs) to reduce recurrent bleeding due to BPH is a reasonable option for men with recurrent trips to the physician or hospital. After a largely anecdotal report of their use in the preoperative period to reduce bleeding during BPH surgery, there was interest in the use of 5ARIs for this indication considering the effusive bleeding that can occur during BPH-related surgery, a dreaded and not uncommon complication. While the pathophysiology for the use of 5ARI to reduce BPH-related bleeding is sound, the actual clinical outcomes still require scrutiny to determine if the efficacy is both scientifically valid and clinically significant. This report will review the current literature on this topic and make attempts to determine if the use of a 5ARI before BPH-related surgery should be encouraged.

  19. The free radical spin-trap alpha-PBN attenuates periinfarct depolarizations following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats without reducing infarct volume.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, Torben; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2003-11-14

    The effect of the free radical spin-trap alpha-phenyl-butyl-tert-nitrone (alpha-PBN) in permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats was examined in two series of experiments. In the first, rats were subjected to permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) and treated 1 h after occlusion with a single dose of alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg) or saline. Body temperature was measured and controlled for the first 24 h to obtain identical temperature curves in the two groups. Cortical infarct volumes were determined on histological sections 7 days later. alpha-PBN did not significantly reduce infarct volume (control: 28.3+/-16.3 mm3 vs. alpha-PBN 23.7+/-7.4 mm3). In the second series of experiments, periinfarct depolarizations (PIDs) were recorded with an extracellular DC electrode at two locations in the ischemic penumbra for the initial 3 h following MCAO. alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg, single dose in conjunction with occlusion) significantly reduced the total number (median value of 3 PIDs in the control groups vs. 1 PID in alpha-PBN groups, p<0.001) and total duration of the PIDs (median value 662 s in the control groups vs. 162 s in the alpha-PBN groups, p<0.006). In spite of this, cortical infarct volumes determined 7 days later in the same rats were not smaller in alpha-PBN-treated rats. The study thus demonstrates that attenuation of PIDs does not always lead to smaller infarcts if permanent arterial occlusion is followed by long survival time and does not support the hypothesis that PIDs per se are critical determinants of infarct size in this situation.

  20. Targeting of Alpha-V Integrins Reduces Malignancy of Bladder Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    van der Horst, Geertje; Bos, Lieke; van der Mark, Maaike; Cheung, Henry; Heckmann, Bertrand; Clément-Lacroix, Philippe; Lorenzon, Giocondo; Pelger, Rob C. M.; Bevers, Rob F. M.; van der Pluijm, Gabri

    2014-01-01

    Low survival rates of metastatic cancers emphasize the need for a drug that can prevent and/or treat metastatic cancer. αv integrins are involved in essential processes for tumor growth and metastasis and targeting of αv integrins has been shown to decrease angiogenesis, tumor growth and metastasis. In this study, the role of αv integrin and its potential as a drug target in bladder cancer was investigated. Treatment with an αv integrin antagonist as well as knockdown of αv integrin in the bladder carcinoma cell lines, resulted in reduced malignancy invitro, as illustrated by decreased proliferative, migratory and clonogenic capacity. The CDH1/CDH2 ratio increased, indicating a shift towards a more epithelial phenotype. This shift appeared to be associated with downregulation of EMT-inducing transcription factors including SNAI2. The expression levels of the self-renewal genes NANOG and BMI1 decreased as well as the number of cells with high Aldehyde Dehydrogenase activity. In addition, self-renewal ability decreased as measured with the urosphere assay. In line with these observations, knockdown or treatment of αv integrins resulted in decreased metastatic growth in preclinical invivo models as assessed by bioluminescence imaging. In conclusion, we show that αv integrins are involved in migration, EMT and maintenance of Aldehyde Dehydrogenase activity in bladder cancer cells. Targeting of αv integrins might be a promising approach for treatment and/or prevention of metastatic bladder cancer. PMID:25247809

  1. Diatomic predissociation line widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Predissociation by rotation and curve crossing in diatomic molecules is discussed. The pattern of predissociation line widths is seen as providing a highly sensitive yardstick for the determination of unknown potential curves. In addition, the computation of such a pattern for given potential curves is considered a matter of routine, unless the predissociation happens to occur from an adiabatic potential curve. Analytic formulas are used to provide physical insight into the details of the predissociation pattern, to the extent that a direct inversion procedure is developed for determination of the repulsive potential curves for Type 1 predissociations.

  2. Selective alpha adrenergic antagonist reduces severity of transient hypertension during sexual stimulation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Aaron A; Elliott, Stacy L; Zheng, Mei M Z; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2015-03-15

    On a daily basis, the majority of those with high-level spinal cord injury have autonomic dysreflexia, which describes a life-threatening episode of transient extreme hypertension (i.e., as high as 300 mm Hg) as many as 90% of people living with this condition. Unfortunately, ejaculation is a major initiating factor for autonomic dysreflexia, which discourages sexual activity. In order to obtain a sperm specimen, or for initial assessment of fertility, penile vibrostimulation is clinically performed. Nifedipine, a selective calcium channel blocker, is the most commonly prescribed pharmaceutical for a priori management of autonomic dysreflexia secondary to ejaculation or other causes; however, it is limited because of its potential exacerbation of low resting pressure, which also affects this population. The present study examined the effect of a short-acting selective α1 antagonist (prazosin) on autonomic dysreflexia severity using a randomized placebo trial during medically supervised penile vibrostimulation in six males with cervical spinal cord injury. Beat-by-beat blood pressure and heart rate were recorded throughout penile vibrostimulation during placebo and prazosin-treated days. The increase in systolic blood pressure was mitigated during vibrostimulation in subjects administered prazosin as compared with those administered placebo (+140±19 mm Hg vs. +96±14 mmHg; p<0.05). On average, the peak in systolic blood pressure was 46 mm Hg lower during penile vibrostimulation when patients were administered prazosin (p<0.05), whereas resting blood pressure was not affected. Prazosin appears to be effective at reducing the severity of autonomic dysreflexia during sexual stimulation in patients with spinal cord injury, without exacerbating resting hypotension in high-level spinal cord injury.

  3. G(s)alpha deficiency in skeletal muscle leads to reduced muscle mass, fiber-type switching, and glucose intolerance without insulin resistance or deficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Min; Feng, Han-Zhong; Gupta, Divakar; Kelleher, James; Dickerson, Kathryn E; Wang, Jie; Hunt, Desmond; Jou, William; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jin, Jian-Ping; Weinstein, Lee S

    2009-04-01

    The ubiquitously expressed G protein alpha-subunit G(s)alpha is required for receptor-stimulated intracellular cAMP responses and is an important regulator of energy and glucose metabolism. We have generated skeletal muscle-specific G(s)alpha-knockout (KO) mice (MGsKO) by mating G(s)alpha-floxed mice with muscle creatine kinase-cre transgenic mice. MGsKO mice had normal body weight and composition, and their serum glucose, insulin, free fatty acid, and triglyceride levels were similar to that of controls. However, MGsKO mice were glucose intolerant despite the fact that insulin sensitivity and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were normal, suggesting an insulin-independent mechanism. Isolated muscles from MGsKO mice had increased basal glucose uptake and normal responses to a stimulator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which indicates that AMPK and its downstream pathways are intact. Compared with control mice, MGsKO mice had reduced muscle mass with decreased cross-sectional area and force production. In addition, adult MGsKO mice showed an increased proportion of type I (slow-twitch, oxidative) fibers based on kinetic properties and myosin heavy chain isoforms, despite the fact that these muscles had reduced expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor coactivator protein-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and reduced mitochondrial content and oxidative capacity. Therefore G(s)alpha deficiency led to fast-to-slow fiber-type switching, which appeared to be dissociated from the expected change in oxidative capacity. MGsKO mice are a valuable model for future studies of the role of G(s)alpha signaling pathways in skeletal muscle adaptation and their effects on whole body metabolism.

  4. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increases long-chain fatty acid oxidation and reduces cell viability with incremental palmitic acid concentration in 293T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jambor de Sousa, Ulrike L.; Koss, Michael D.; Fillies, Marion; Gahl, Anja; Scheeder, Martin R.L.; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Monika . E-mail: monika.leonhardt@inw.agrl.ethz.ch

    2005-12-16

    To test the cellular response to an increased fatty acid oxidation, we generated a vector for an inducible expression of the rate-limiting enzyme carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1{alpha} (CPT1{alpha}). Human embryonic 293T kidney cells were transiently transfected and expression of the CPT1{alpha} transgene in the tet-on vector was activated with doxycycline. Fatty acid oxidation was measured by determining the conversion of supplemented, synthetic cis-10-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n-7) to C15:ln-7. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation about 6-fold. Addition of palmitic acid (PA) decreased viability of CPT1{alpha} over-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both, PA and CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased cell death. Interestingly, PA reduced total cell number only in cells over-expressing CPT1{alpha}, suggesting an effect on cell proliferation that requires PA translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This inducible expression system should be well suited to study the roles of CPT1 and fatty acid oxidation in lipotoxicity and metabolism in vivo.

  5. Toxicity and residual action of the photoactivated compound, cyano-alpha-terthienyl, and its efficacy for reducing pre-imaginal populations of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Dosdall, L M; Galloway, M M; Arnason, J T

    1992-06-01

    The photoactivated compound, cyano-alpha-terthienyl (cyano-alpha-T), was highly toxic to pre-imagines of the mosquitoes Culex restuans, Cx. tarsalis and Culiseta inornata when synergized with piperonyl butoxide (PBO). Lethal concentrations for 50% mortality, determined during an outdoor trial using caged fourth-instar Culex spp. larvae, were 19.4, 15.4 and 12.9 g/ha at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. No residual activity of cyano-alpha-T was observed beyond 24 h following treatment. In artificial pool tests, greatest population reductions were achieved using dosages of 20 and 40 g/ha; statistically significant reductions were not observed following applications of 5 g/ha. Cyano-alpha-T plus PBO was more effective for reducing mosquito populations than alpha-terthienyl (alpha-T) plus PBO at comparable dosages, although it exhibited slightly lower insecticidal activity at a dosage of 20 g/ha than a formulation of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Vectobac 12 AS, 0.12 ml/m2). Greatest effectiveness of cyano-alpha-T plus PBO was observed in pools with low organic content relative to pools high in organic content.

  6. Women at altitude: short-term exposure to hypoxia and/or alpha(1)-adrenergic blockade reduces insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Braun, B; Rock, P B; Zamudio, S; Wolfel, G E; Mazzeo, R S; Muza, S R; Fulco, C S; Moore, L G; Butterfield, G E

    2001-08-01

    After short-term exposure to high altitude (HA), men appear to be less sensitive to insulin than at sea level (SL). We hypothesized that the same would be true in women, that reduced insulin sensitivity would be directly related to the rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations at altitude, and that the addition of alpha-adrenergic blockade would potentiate the reduction. To test the hypotheses, 12 women consumed a high-carbohydrate meal at SL and after 16 h at simulated 4,300-m elevation (HA). Subjects were studied twice at each elevation: once with prazosin (Prz), an alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist, and once with placebo (Pla). Mathematical models were used to assess insulin resistance based on fasting [homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)] and postprandial [composite model insulin sensitivity index (C-ISI)] glucose and insulin concentrations. Relative to SL-Pla (HOMA-IR: 1.86 +/- 0.35), insulin resistance was greater in HA-Pla (3.00 +/- 0.45; P < 0.05), SL-Prz (3.46 +/- 0.51; P < 0.01), and HA-Prz (2.82 +/- 0.43; P < 0.05). Insulin sensitivity was reduced in HA-Pla (C-ISI: 4.41 +/- 1.03; P < 0.01), SL-Prz (5.73 +/- 1.01; P < 0.05), and HA-Prz (4.18 +/- 0.99; P < 0.01) relative to SL-Pla (8.02 +/- 0.92). Plasma epinephrine was significantly elevated in HA-Pla (0.57 +/- 0.08 ng/ml; P < 0.01), SL-Prz (0.42 +/- 0.07; P < 0.05), and HA-Prz (0.82 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01) relative to SL-Pla (0.28 +/- 0.04), but correlations with HOMA-IR, HOMA-beta-cell function, and C-ISI were weak. In women, short-term exposure to simulated HA reduced insulin sensitivity compared with SL. The change does not appear to be directly mediated by a concurrent rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations.

  7. Antidepressants reduce neuroinflammatory responses and astroglial alpha-synuclein accumulation in a transgenic mouse model of multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Valera, Elvira; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-02-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the pathological accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) within oligodendroglial cells. This accumulation is accompanied by neuroinflammation with astrogliosis and microgliosis, that leads to neuronal death and subsequent parkinsonism and dysautonomia. Antidepressants have been explored as neuroprotective agents as they normalize neurotrophic factor levels, increase neurogenesis and reduce neurodegeneration, but their anti-inflammatory properties have not been fully characterized. We analyzed the anti-inflammatory profiles of three different antidepressants (fluoxetine, olanzapine and amitriptyline) in the MBP1-hα-syn transgenic (tg) mouse model of MSA. We observed that antidepressant treatment decreased the number of α-syn-positive cells in the basal ganglia of 11-month-old tg animals. This reduction was accompanied with a similar decrease in the colocalization of α-syn with astrocyte markers in this brain structure. Consistent with these results, antidepressants reduced astrogliosis in the hippocampus and basal ganglia of the MBP1-hα-syn tg mice, and modulated the expression levels of key cytokines that were dysregulated in the tg mouse model, such as IL-1β. In vitro experiments in the astroglial cell line C6 confirmed that antidepressants inhibited NF-κB translocation to the nucleus and reduced IL-1β protein levels. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory properties of antidepressants in the MBP1-hα-syn tg mouse model of MSA might be related to their ability to inhibit α-syn propagation from oligodendrocytes to astroglia and to regulate transcription factors involved in cytokine expression. Our results suggest that antidepressants might be of interest as anti-inflammatory and α-syn-reducing agents for MSA and other α-synucleinopathies. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Prophylactic Injection of Recombinant Alpha-Enolase Reduces Arthritis Severity in the Collagen-Induced Arthritis Mice Model

    PubMed Central

    Guillou, Clément; Derambure, Céline; Fréret, Manuel; Verdet, Mathieu; Avenel, Gilles; Golinski, Marie-Laure; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Loarer, François Le; Adriouch, Sahil; Boyer, Olivier; Lequerré, Thierry; Vittecoq, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ability of the glycolytic enzyme alpha-enolase (ENO1) or its immunodominant peptide (pEP1) to reduce the severity of CIA in DBA/1 mice when injected in a prophylactic way. Methods Mice were treated with mouse ENO1 or pEP1 one day prior to collagen II immunization. Clinical assessment was evaluated using 4 parameters (global and articular scores, ankle thickness and weight). Titers of serum anti-ENO1, anti-cyclic citrullinated peptides (anti-CCP) and anti-CII (total IgG and IgG1/IgG2a isotypes) antibodies were measured by ELISA at different time-points. Disease activity was assessed by histological analysis of both anterior and hind paws at the end of experimentation. Results Prophylactic injection of 100 μg of ENO1 reduced severity of CIA. Serum levels of anti-CII antibodies were reduced in ENO1-treated mice. Concordantly, ENO1-treated mice joints presented less severe histological signs of arthritis. ENO1 did not induce a shift toward a Th2 response since IgG1/IgG2a ratio of anti-CII antibodies remained unchanged and IL-4 serum levels were similar to those measured in the control group. Conclusions Pre-immunization with ENO1 or its immunodominant peptide pEP1 reduces CIA severity at the clinical, immunological and histological levels. Effects of pEP1 were less pronounced. This immunomodulatory effect is associated with a reduction in anti-CII antibodies production but is not due to a Th1/Th2 shift. PMID:26302382

  9. Antidepressants reduce neuroinflammatory responses and astroglial alpha-synuclein accumulation in a transgenic mouse model of Multiple System Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Elvira; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Rockenstein, Edward; Masliah, Eliezer

    2014-01-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by the pathological accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) within oligodendroglial cells. This accumulation is accompanied by neuroinflammation with astrogliosis and microgliosis, that leads to neuronal death and subsequent parkinsonism and dysautonomia. Antidepressants have been explored as neuroprotective agents as they normalize neurotrophic factor levels, increase neurogenesis and reduce neurodegeneration, but their anti-inflammatory properties have not been fully characterized. We analyzed the anti-inflammatory profiles of three different antidepressants (fluoxetine, olanzapine and amitriptyline) in the MBP1-hα-syn transgenic (tg) mouse model of MSA. We observed that antidepressant treatment decreased the number of α-syn-positive cells in the basal ganglia of 11-month old tg animals. This reduction was accompanied with a similar decrease in the colocalization of α-syn with astrocyte markers in this brain structure. Consistent with these results, antidepressants reduced astrogliosis in the hippocampus and basal ganglia of the MBP1-hα-syn tg mice, and modulated the expression levels of key cytokines that were dysregulated in the tg mouse model, such as IL-1β. In vitro experiments in the astroglial cell line C6 confirmed that antidepressants inhibited NF-κB translocation to the nucleus and reduced IL-1β protein levels. We conclude that the anti-inflammatory properties of antidepressants in the MBP1-hα-syn tg mouse model of MSA might be related to their ability to inhibit α-syn propagation from oligodendrocytes to astroglia and to regulate transcription factors involved in cytokine expression. Our results suggest that antidepressants might be of interest as anti-inflammatory and α-syn-reducing agents for MSA and other α-synucleinopathies. PMID:24310907

  10. Passive Immunization Reduces Behavioral and Neuropathological Deficits in an Alpha-Synuclein Transgenic Model of Lewy Body Disease

    PubMed Central

    Masliah, Eliezer; Rockenstein, Edward; Mante, Michael; Crews, Leslie; Spencer, Brian; Adame, Anthony; Patrick, Christina; Trejo, Margarita; Ubhi, Kiren; Rohn, Troy T.; Mueller-Steiner, Sarah; Seubert, Peter; Barbour, Robin; McConlogue, Lisa; Buttini, Manuel; Games, Dora; Schenk, Dale

    2011-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson's Disease (PD) are common causes of motor and cognitive deficits and are associated with the abnormal accumulation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn). This study investigated whether passive immunization with a novel monoclonal α-syn antibody (9E4) against the C-terminus (CT) of α-syn was able to cross into the CNS and ameliorate the deficits associated with α-syn accumulation. In this study we demonstrate that 9E4 was effective at reducing behavioral deficits in the water maze, moreover, immunization with 9E4 reduced the accumulation of calpain-cleaved α-syn in axons and synapses and the associated neurodegenerative deficits. In vivo studies demonstrated that 9E4 traffics into the CNS, binds to cells that display α-syn accumulation and promotes α-syn clearance via the lysosomal pathway. These results suggest that passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies against the CT of α-syn may be of therapeutic relevance in patients with PD and DLB. PMID:21559417

  11. Both interferon alpha and lambda can reduce all intrahepatic HDV infection markers in HBV/HDV infected humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Giersch, Katja; Homs, Maria; Volz, Tassilo; Helbig, Martina; Allweiss, Lena; Lohse, Ansgar W; Petersen, Jörg; Buti, Maria; Pollicino, Teresa; Sureau, Camille; Dandri, Maura; Lütgehetmann, Marc

    2017-06-16

    Co-infection with hepatitis B (HBV) and D virus (HDV) is associated with the most severe course of liver disease. Interferon represents the only treatment currently approved. However, knowledge about the impact of interferons on HDV in human hepatocytes is scant. Aim was to assess the effect of pegylated interferon alpha (peg-IFNα) and lambda (peg-IFNλ), compared to the HBV-polymerase inhibitor entecavir (ETV) on all HDV infection markers using human liver chimeric mice and novel HDV strand-specific qRT-PCR and RNA in situ hybridization assays, which enable intrahepatic detection of HDV RNA species. Peg-IFNα and peg-IFNλ reduced HDV viremia (1.4 log and 1.2 log, respectively) and serum HBsAg levels (0.9-log and 0.4-log, respectively). Intrahepatic quantification of genomic and antigenomic HDV RNAs revealed a median ratio of 22:1 in untreated mice, resembling levels determined in HBV/HDV infected patients. Both IFNs greatly reduced intrahepatic levels of genomic and antigenomic HDV RNA, increasing the amounts of HDAg- and antigenomic RNA-negative hepatocytes. ETV-mediated suppression of HBV replication (2.1-log) did not significantly affect HBsAg levels, HDV productivity and/or release. In humanized mice lacking adaptive immunity, IFNs but not ETV suppressed HDV. Viremia decrease reflected the intrahepatic reduction of all HDV markers, including the antigenomic template, suggesting that intracellular HDV clearance is achievable.

  12. Osteoclast formation is strongly reduced both in vivo and in vitro in the absence of CD47/SIRP{alpha}-interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, Pernilla . E-mail: pernilla.lundberg@odont.umu.se; Koskinen, Cecilia; Baldock, Paul A.; Loethgren, Hanna; Stenberg, Asa; Lerner, Ulf H.; Oldenborg, Per-Arne

    2007-01-12

    Physical interaction between the cell surface receptors CD47 and signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRP{alpha}) was reported to regulate cell migration, phagocytosis, cytokine production, and macrophage fusion. However, it is unclear if the CD47/SIRP{alpha}-interaction can also regulate macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL)-stimulated formation of osteoclasts. Here, we show that functional blocking antibodies to either CD47 or SIRP{alpha} strongly reduced formation of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP){sup +} osteoclasts in cultures of murine hematopoietic cells, stimulated in vitro by M-CSF and RANKL. In addition, the numbers of osteoclasts formed in M-CSF/RANKL-stimulated bone marrow macrophage cultures from CD47 {sup -/-} mice were strongly reduced, and bones of CD47 {sup -/-} mice exhibited significantly reduced osteoclast numbers, as compared with wild-type controls. We conclude that the CD47/SIRP{alpha} interaction is important for M-CSF/RANKL-stimulated osteoclast formation both in vivo and in vitro, and that absence of CD47 results in decreased numbers of osteoclasts in CD47 {sup -/-} mice.

  13. New evidence that both T-type calcium channels and GABAA channels are responsible for the potent peripheral analgesic effects of 5alpha-reduced neuroactive steroids.

    PubMed

    Pathirathna, Sriyani; Brimelow, Barbara C; Jagodic, Miljen M; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Jiang, Xin; Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven; Covey, Douglas F; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2005-04-01

    Neurosteroids are potent blockers of neuronal low-voltage activated (T-type) Ca(2+) channels and potentiators of GABA(A) ligand-gated channels, but their effects in peripheral pain pathways have not been studied previously. To investigate potential analgesic effects and the ion channels involved, we tested the ability of locally injected 5alpha-reduced neurosteroids to modulate peripheral thermal nociception to radiant heat in adult rats in vivo and to modulate GABA(A) and T-type Ca(2+) channels in vitro. The steroid anesthetic alphaxalone (ALPX), the endogenous neurosteroid allopregnanolone (3alpha5alphaP), and a related compound ((3alpha,5alpha,17beta)-3-hydroxyandrostane-17-carbonitrile, (ACN)), induced potent, dose-dependent, enantioselective anti-nociception in vivo and modulation of both T-type Ca(2+) currents and GABA(A)-mediated currents in vitro. Analgesic effects of ALPX were incompletely antagonized by co-injections of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. The neurosteroid analogue ((3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxy-13,24-cyclo-18,21-dinorchol-22-en-24-ol (CDNC24), a compound with GABAergic but not T-type activity, was not analgesic. However, (3beta,5alpha,17beta)-17-hydroxyestrane-3-carbonitrile (ECN)), which has effects on T-type channels but not on GABA(A) receptors, also induced potent enantioselective peripheral anti-nociception. ECN increased pain thresholds less than ALPX, 3alpha5alphaP and ACN. However, when an ineffective dose of CDNC24 was combined with ECN, anti-nociceptive activity was greatly enhanced, and this effect was bicuculline-sensitive. These results strongly suggest that GABA(A) channels do not contribute to baseline pain transmission, but they can enhance anti-nociception mediated by blockade of T-type Ca(2+) channels. In conclusion, we demonstrate that potent peripheral analgesia induced by 5alpha-reduced neurosteroid is mediated in part by effects on T-type Ca(2+) channels. Our results also reveal a role of GABA-gated ion channels

  14. The widths of the α decaying states of 12C within the three-cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, D. V.; Jensen, A. S.; Fynbo, H. O. U.

    2003-05-01

    We estimate the widths of the alpha decaying states of 12C (1+, 1-, 1-1, 2+, 2-, 3-, and 4+) within the three-alpha cluster model. We solve the Faddeev equations using the hyperspheric approach and calculate the decisive effective hyper-radial barriers. We calculate the widths in the WKB approximation and compare with experimental data.

  15. Finite width of quasistatic shear bands.

    PubMed

    Jagla, E A

    2008-08-01

    I study the average deformation rate of an amorphous material submitted to an external uniform shear strain rate, in the geometry known as the split-bottom configuration. The material is described using a stochastic model of plasticity at a mesoscopic scale. A shear band is observed to start at the split point at the bottom, and widen progressively towards the surface. In a two-dimensional geometry the average statistical properties of the shear band look similar to those of the directed polymer model. In particular, the surface width of the shear band is found to scale with the system height H as H;{alpha} with alpha=0.68+/-0.02 . In more realistic three-dimensional simulations the exponent changes to alpha=0.60+/-0.02 and the bulk profile of the width of the shear band is closer to a quarter of a circle, as it was observed to be the case in recent simulations of granular materials.

  16. Aerosolized 5 alpha-androst-16-en-3-one reduced agonistic behavior and temporarily improved performance of growing pigs.

    PubMed

    McGlone, J J; Stansbury, W F; Tribble, L F

    1986-09-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of aerosolized 5 alpha-androst-16-en-3-one (androstenone) on pig aggressive and submissive behaviors and on pig performance. In Exp. 1, twenty-four 5-wk-old pigs were randomly regrouped in a two-pig bioassay. A solution of either isopropyl alcohol or .5 mg androstenone in isopropyl alcohol per pig was aerosolized on both pigs in the observation pens. Summarization of video records from the 90-min bioassay showed that pens of pigs aerosolized with androstenone spent 58% less time engaged in aggressive behavior (P less than .05) and 96% less time engaged in submissive behavior (P less than .01). In Exp. 2, a performance trial was conducted with finishing pigs from 57 to 91 kg body weight. Factorially arranged treatments included aerosolized androstenone (.5 mg/pig) or the vehicle isopropyl alcohol and regrouping into uniform body weight blocks or no regrouping. Regrouping depressed average daily feed consumption (P less than .05) and average daily gain (P less than .05) for the first 7 d of the trial. Pigs reveiving the androstenone aerosol had improved average daily gain (P = .01) and gain:feed ratio (P less than .01) for the first 28 d of the trial. Performance of all treated pigs was similar for the entire finishing period. This olfactory stimulant reduced pig agonistic behavior and transiently improved performance of regrouped and non-regrouped finishing pigs.

  17. The human alpha defensin HD5 neutralizes JC polyomavirus infection by reducing endoplasmic reticulum traffic and stabilizing the viral capsid.

    PubMed

    Zins, Stephen R; Nelson, Christian D S; Maginnis, Melissa S; Banerjee, Rahul; O'Hara, Bethany A; Atwood, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a fatal disease with limited treatment options, both clinically and in the research pipeline. Potential therapies would target and neutralize its etiologic agent, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV). The innate immune response to JCPyV infection has not been studied, and little is known about the initial host response to polyomavirus infection. This study examined the ability of a human alpha defensin, HD5, to neutralize JCPyV infection in human fetal glial cells. We show that HD5, by binding to the virion, blocks infection. The JCPyV-HD5 complexes bind to and enter host cells but are reduced in their ability to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where virions are normally uncoated. Furthermore, HD5 binding to the virion stabilizes the capsid and prevents genome release. Our results show that HD5 neutralizes JCPyV infection at an early postentry step in the viral life cycle by stabilizing the viral capsid and disrupting JCPyV trafficking. This study provides a naturally occurring platform for developing antivirals to treat PML and also expands on the known capabilities of human defensins.

  18. The Human Alpha Defensin HD5 Neutralizes JC Polyomavirus Infection by Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Traffic and Stabilizing the Viral Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Zins, Stephen R.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Maginnis, Melissa S.; Banerjee, Rahul; O'Hara, Bethany A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a fatal disease with limited treatment options, both clinically and in the research pipeline. Potential therapies would target and neutralize its etiologic agent, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV). The innate immune response to JCPyV infection has not been studied, and little is known about the initial host response to polyomavirus infection. This study examined the ability of a human alpha defensin, HD5, to neutralize JCPyV infection in human fetal glial cells. We show that HD5, by binding to the virion, blocks infection. The JCPyV-HD5 complexes bind to and enter host cells but are reduced in their ability to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where virions are normally uncoated. Furthermore, HD5 binding to the virion stabilizes the capsid and prevents genome release. Our results show that HD5 neutralizes JCPyV infection at an early postentry step in the viral life cycle by stabilizing the viral capsid and disrupting JCPyV trafficking. This study provides a naturally occurring platform for developing antivirals to treat PML and also expands on the known capabilities of human defensins. PMID:24198413

  19. Radial widths, optical depths, and eccentricities of the Uranian rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Matthews, K.; Goldreich, P.

    1982-02-01

    Observations of the stellar occultation by the Uranian rings of 15/16 August 1980 are used to estimate radial widths and normal optical depths for segments of rings 6, 5, 4, alpha, beta, eta, gamma, and delta. Synthetic occultation profiles are generated to match the observed light curves. A review of published data confirms the existence of width-radius relations for rings alpha and beta, and indicates that the optical depths of these two rings vary inversely with their radial widths. Masses are obtained for rings alpha and beta, on the assumption that differential precession is prevented by their self-gravity. A quantitative comparison of seven epsilon-ring occultation profiles obtained over a period of 3.4 yr reveals a consistent structure, which may reflect the presence of unresolved gaps and subrings.

  20. Tumor necrosis factor alpha derived from classically activated "M1" macrophages reduces interstitial cell of Cajal numbers.

    PubMed

    Eisenman, S T; Gibbons, S J; Verhulst, P-J; Cipriani, G; Saur, D; Farrugia, G

    2017-04-01

    Delayed gastric emptying in diabetic mice and humans is associated with changes in macrophage phenotype and loss of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) in the gastric muscle layers. In diabetic mice, classically activated M1 macrophages are associated with delayed gastric emptying, whereas alternatively activated M2 macrophages are associated with normal gastric emptying. This study aimed to determine if secreted factors from M1 macrophages could injure mouse ICC in primary culture. Cultures of gastric ICC were treated with conditioned medium (CM) from activated bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) and the effect of CM was quantified by counting ICC per high-powered field. Bone marrow-derived macrophages were activated to a M1 or M2 phenotype confirmed by qRT-PCR. Conditioned medium from M1 macrophages reduced ICC numbers by 41.1%, whereas M2-CM had no effect as compared to unconditioned, control media. Immunoblot analysis of 40 chemokines/cytokines found 12 that were significantly increased in M1-CM, including tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α). ELISA detected 0.697±0.03 ng mL(-1) TNF-α in M1-CM. Recombinant mouse TNF-α reduced Kit expression and ICC numbers in a concentration-dependent manner (EC50 = 0.817 ng mL(-1) ). Blocking M1-CM TNF-α with a neutralizing antibody preserved ICC numbers. The caspase inhibitor Z-VAD.fmk partly preserved ICC numbers (cells/field; 6.63±1.04, 9.82±1.80 w/Z-VAD.fmk, n=6, P<.05). This work demonstrates that TNF-α secreted from M1 macrophages can result in Kit loss and directly injure ICC in vitro partly through caspase-dependent apoptosis and may play an important role in ICC depletion in diabetic gastroparesis. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R reduces thrombin generation when displayed on the surface of cells expressing tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Richard F; Pepler, Laura; Bhagirath, Vinai; Liaw, Patricia C; Sheffield, William P

    2014-11-01

    The M358R variant of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is a potent soluble inhibitor of thrombin. Previously we engineered AR-API M358R, a membrane-bound form of this protein and showed that it inhibited exogenous thrombin when expressed on transfected cells lacking tissue factor (TF). To determine the suitability of AR-API M358R for gene transfer to vascular cells to limit thrombogenicity, we tested the ability of AR-API M358R to inhibit endogenous thrombin generated in plasma via co-expression co-expressing it on the surface of cells expressing TF. Transfected AR-API M358R formed inhibitory complexes with thrombin following exposure of recalcified, defibrinated plasma to TF on T24/83 cells, but discontinuously monitored thrombin generation was unaffected. Similarly, AR-API M358R expression did not reduce continuously monitored thrombin generation by T24/83 cell suspensions exposed to recalcified normal plasma in a Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope-type thrombin generation assay (TGA); in contrast, 1 μM hirudin variant 3 or soluble API M358R abolished thrombin generation. Gene transfer of TF to HEK 293 conferred the ability to support TF-dependent thrombin generation on HEK 293 cells. Co-transfection of HEK 293 cells with a 9:1 excess of DNA encoding AR-API M358R to that encoding TF reduced peak thrombin generation approximately 3-fold compared to controls. These in vitro results suggest that surface display of API M358R inhibits thrombin generation when the tethered serpin is expressed in excess of TF, and suggest its potential to limit thrombosis in appropriate vascular beds in animal models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estradiol reduces nonclassical transcription at cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate response elements in glioma cells expressing estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Mhyre, Andrew J; Shapiro, Robert A; Dorsa, Daniel M

    2006-04-01

    Estradiol can protect the brain from a variety of insults by activating membrane-initiated signaling pathways, and thereby modulate gene expression and lead to functional changes in neurons. These direct neuronal effects of the hormone have been well documented; however, it is less understood what effects estradiol may have on nonneuronal cells of the central nervous system. There is evidence that estradiol levels can induce the release of glial-derived growth factors and other cytokines, suggesting that estradiol may both directly and indirectly protect neurons. To determine whether 17beta-estradiol (E2) can activate rapid signaling and modulate nonclassical transcription in astrocytes, we stably transfected the C6 rat glioblastoma cell line with human estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (C6ERalpha) or rat ERbeta (C6ERbeta). Introduction of a cAMP response element-luciferase reporter gene into C6, C6ERalpha, and C6ERbeta cells leads to the observation that E2 treatment reduced isoproterenol-stimulated luciferase activity by 35% in C6ERalpha but had no effect on reporter gene expression in C6ERbeta or untransfected C6 cells. A similar effect was seen with a membrane-impermeable estrogen (E2-BSA), suggesting the modulation of nonclassical transcription by estradiol treatment is mediated by the activation of a membrane-initiated signaling pathway. Furthermore, pretreatment with wortmannin (phosphatidylinsositol 3-kinase) or U73122 (phospholipase C) attenuated the E2-induced reduction in nonclassical transcription. We conclude that E2 treatment reduces cAMP response element-mediated transcription in glioma cells expressing ERalpha and that this reduction is dependent on the activation of membrane-initiated signaling. These findings suggest a novel model of estrogen rapid signaling in astrocytes that leads to modulation of nonclassical transcription.

  3. An ScFv Intrabody Against the Non-Amyloid Component of Alpha Synuclein Reduces Intracellular Aggregation and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Sandra M.; Zhou, Chun; Messer, Anne

    2008-01-01

    Summary Prevention of abnormal misfolding and aggregation of alpha-synuclein (α-syn) protein in vulnerable neurons should be a viable therapeutic strategy for reducing pathogenesis in Parkinson’s disease (PD). The non-amyloid component (NAC) region of α-syn shows strong tendencies to form β-sheet structures, and deletion of this region has been shown to reduce aggregation and toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Binding of a molecular species to this region may mimic effects of such deletions. Single-chain Fv antibodies (scFvs) retain the binding specificity of antibodies, and when genetically manipulated to create high-diversity libraries, allow in vitro selection against peptides. Accordingly, we used a yeast surface display library of an entire naïve repertoire of human scFv antibodies to select for binding to a NAC peptide. Candidate scFvs (after transfer to mammalian expression vectors), were screened for viability in a neuronal cell line by transient co-transfection with A53T mutant α-syn. This provided a ranking of the protective efficacies of the initial panel of intracellular antibodies (intrabodies). High steady-state expression levels and apparent conformational epitope binding appeared more important than in vitro affinity in these assays. None of the scFvs selected matched the sequences of previously-reported anti- α-syn scFvs. A stable cell line expressing the most effective intrabody, NAC32, showed highly significant reductions of abnormal aggregation in two separate models. Recently, intrabodies have shown promising anti-aggregation and neuroprotective effects against misfolded mutant huntingtin protein. The NAC32 study extends such work significantly, utilizing information about the pathogenic capacity of a specific α-syn region to offer a new generation of in vitro-derived antibody fragments, both for further engineering as direct therapeutics and as tools for rational drug design for PD. PMID:18237741

  4. Reduced endothelial NO-cGMP vascular relaxation pathway during TNF-alpha-induced hypertension in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Davis, Justin R; Giardina, Jena B; Green, Gachavis M; Alexander, Barbara T; Granger, Joey P; Khalil, Raouf A

    2002-02-01

    Placental ischemia during pregnancy is thought to release cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), which may contribute to the increased vascular resistance associated with pregnancy-induced hypertension. We have reported that a chronic twofold elevation in plasma TNF-alpha increases blood pressure in pregnant but not in virgin rats; however, the vascular mechanisms are unclear. We tested the hypothesis that increasing plasma TNF-alpha during pregnancy impairs endothelium-dependent vascular relaxation and enhances vascular reactivity. Active stress was measured in aortic strips of virgin and late-pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats untreated or infused with TNF-alpha (200 ng x kg(-1) x day(-1) for 5 days) to increase plasma level twofold. Phenylephrine (Phe) increased active stress to a maximum of 4.2 +/- 0.4 x 10(3) and 9.9 +/- 0.7 x 10(3) N/m2 in control pregnant and TNF-alpha-infused pregnant rats, respectively. Removal of the endothelium enhanced Phe-induced stress in control but not in TNF-alpha-infused pregnant rats. In endothelium-intact strips, ACh caused greater relaxation of Phe contraction in control than in TNF-alpha-infused pregnant rats. Basal and ACh-induced nitrite/nitrate production was less in TNF-alpha-infused than in control pregnant rats. Pretreatment of vascular strips with 100 microM N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, to inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthase, or 1 microM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-]quinoxalin-1-one, to inhibit cGMP production in smooth muscle, inhibited ACh-induced relaxation and enhanced Phe-induced stress in control but not in TNF-alpha-infused pregnant rats. Phe contraction and ACh relaxation were not significantly different between control and TNF-alpha-infused virgin rats. Thus an endothelium-dependent NO-cGMP-mediated vascular relaxation pathway is inhibited in late-pregnant rats infused with TNF-alpha. The results support a role for TNF-alpha as one possible mediator of the increased vascular resistance

  5. Width of nonlinear resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Ohnuma, S.

    1984-03-01

    Two approximations are made, one essential and the other not so essential but convenient to keep the analytical treatment manageable: (1) Only one nonlinear resonance is considered at a time so that the treatment is best suited when the tune is close to one resonance only. To improve this approximation, one must go to the next order which involves a canonical transformation of dynamical variables. Analytical treatment of more than one resonance is not possible for general cases. (2) In the formalism using the action-angle variables, the Hamiltonian can have terms which are independent of the angle variables. These terms are called phase-independent terms or shear terms. The tune is then a function of the oscillation amplitudes. In the lowest-order treatment, the (4N)-pole components but not the (4N + 2)-pole components contribute to this dependence. In deriving the resonance width analytically, one ignores these terms in the Hamiltonian for the sake of simplicity. If these are retained, one needs at least three extra parameters and the analytical treatment becomes rather unwieldy.

  6. Low voltage alpha EEG phenotype is associated with reduced amplitudes of alpha event related oscillations, increased cortical phase synchrony, and a low level of response to alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Cindy L.; Wills, Derek N.; Phillips, Evelyn; Havstad, James

    2015-01-01

    Low voltage EEG (LVEEG) is a heritable phenotype that differs depending on ancestral heritage, yet its impact on brain networks and cognition remain relatively unexplored. In this study we assessed energy and task related phase locking of event-related oscillation (EROs), behavioral responses, measures of IQ and personality, and expected responses to alcohol in a large sample of individuals with LVEEG compared to those with higher voltage variants. Participants (n=762) were recruited from a Native American community and completed a diagnostic interview, the Quick Test, the Subjective High Assessment Scale Expectation Version (SHAS-E) and the Maudsley Personality Inventory. Clinical and spectral analyzed EEGs were collected for determination of the presence of a LVEEG variant. EROs were generated using a facial expression recognition task. Participants with LVEEG (n=451) were significantly more likely to be older, married and have higher degrees of Native American heritage but did not differ in gender, income or education. Individuals with LVEEG were also found to have decreased energy in their alpha EROs, increased phase locking between stimulus trials, and increased phase-locking between cortical brain areas. No significant differences in the cognitive tests, personality variables or alcohol dependence or anxiety diagnoses were found, however, individuals with LVEEG did report a larger number of drinks ever consumed in a 24-hr period and a less intense expected response to alcohol. These data suggest that alpha power in the resting EEG is highly associated with energy and cortical connectivity measures generated by event-related stimuli, as well as potentially increased risk for alcohol use. PMID:26151497

  7. Reducing renal uptake of 90Y- and 177Lu-labeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Fisher, Darrell R.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to improve the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-[1,2,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-Re-Cys,D-Phe,Arg]alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH), through coupling a negatively charged glutamic acid (Glu) to the peptide sequence. A new peptide of DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH was designed, synthesized and labeled with 90Y and 177Lu. Pharmacokinetics of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Glu,Arg)CCNSH were determined in B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Both exhibited significantly less renal uptake than 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH at 30 min and at 2, 3, and 24 h after dose administration. The renal uptake values of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH were 28.16% and 28.81% of those of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 hr post-injection. We also showed higher tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios 2.28 and 1.69 times that of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 h post-injection. The90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH activity accumulation was low in normal organs except for kidneys. Coupling a negatively charged amino acid (Glu) to the CCMSH peptide sequence dramatically reduced the renal uptake values and increased the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH, facilitating their potential applications as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  8. Eugenol reduces acute pain in mice by modulating the glutamatergic and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) pathways.

    PubMed

    Dal Bó, Wladmir; Luiz, Ana Paula; Martins, Daniel F; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Santos, Adair R S

    2013-10-01

    Eugenol is utilized together with zinc oxide in odontological clinical for the cementation of temporary prostheses and the temporary restoration of teeth and cavities. This work explored the antinociceptive effects of the eugenol in different models of acute pain in mice and investigated its possible modulation of the inhibitory (opioid) and excitatory (glutamatergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines) pathways of nociceptive signaling. The administration of eugenol (3-300 mg/kg, p.o., 60 min or i.p., 30 min) inhibited 82 ± 10% and 90 ± 6% of the acetic acid-induced nociception, with ID₅₀ values of 51.3 and 50.2 mg/kg, respectively. In the glutamate test, eugenol (0.3-100 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the response behavior by 62 ± 5% with an ID₅₀ of 5.6 mg/kg. In addition, the antinociceptive effect of eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the glutamate test was prevented by the i.p. treatment for mice with naloxone. The pretreatment of mice with eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to inhibit the nociception induced by the intrathecal (i.t.) injection of glutamate (37 ± 9%), kainic (acid kainite) (41 ± 12%), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) (55 ± 5%), and substance P (SP) (39 ± 8%). Furthermore, eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) also inhibited biting induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, 65 ± 8%). These results extend our current knowledge of eugenol and confirm that it promotes significant antinociception against different mouse models of acute pain. The mechanism of action appears to involve the modulation of the opioid system and glutamatergic receptors (i.e., kainate and AMPA), and the inhibition of TNF-α. Thus, eugenol could represent an important compound in the treatment for acute pain.

  9. Reduced expression of Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor-alpha modulates the cytotoxic effect of busulfan in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Janka; Bien, Sandra; Sonnemann, Jürgen; Beck, James F; Wieland, Thomas; Kroemer, Heyo K; Ritter, Christoph A

    2007-03-01

    High-dose busulfan is an important component in many conditioning protocols for hematopoietic stem cell or bone marrow transplantation. Treatment with busulfan results in the inhibition of cell cycle progression and apoptosis of tumor cells. As Rho GTPases are involved in cell cycle regulation, we investigated the influence of modified Rho guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor-alpha (GDI), a physiological inhibitor of Rho GTPases, on busulfan activity in cancer cells. RhoGDIalpha has been shown to be overexpressed in multiple types of tumors such as ovarian and breast cancer. To investigate the role of RhoGDIalpha, we established a RhoGDIalpha knockdown by the transient transfection of HEK293 cells with specific small interfering RNA resulting in strongly reduced RhoGDIalpha mRNA and protein expression. Other members of the RhoGDI family such as RhoGDIbeta and RhoGDIgamma were not affected. In RhoGDIalpha knockdown cells, cell cycle regulation was not altered by the downregulation of RhoGDIalpha; however, the rate of apoptotic cells increased when compared with the control small interfering RNA-transfected cells. In addition, treatment of cells with busulfan resulted in a further increased apoptotic rate, as determined by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis and caspase-3 activation. Such a sensitization of RhoGDIalpha small interfering RNA transfected cells was also found upon treatment with doxorubicin and taxol. In summary, we could demonstrate that the expression of RhoGDIalpha influences the sensitivity of cells toward busulfan-induced cytotoxicity.

  10. Corticosteroid-binding globulin cleavage is paradoxically reduced in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: Implications for cortisol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nenke, Marni A; Holmes, Mark; Rankin, Wayne; Lewis, John G; Torpy, David J

    2016-01-15

    High-affinity corticosteroid-binding globulin (haCBG) is cleaved by neutrophil elastase (NE) resulting in permanent transition to the low cortisol-binding affinity form (laCBG), thereby increasing cortisol availability at inflammatory sites. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major inhibitor of NE. AAT deficiency (AATD) predisposes patients to early-onset emphysema due to increased proteolytic destruction from the inherent proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance. We hypothesized that AATD may result in increased CBG cleavage in vivo. We collected demographic data and blood samples from 10 patients with AATD and 28 healthy controls measuring total CBG and haCBG levels by parallel in-house ELISAs, as well as AAT, total and free cortisol levels. haCBG was higher (median [range]); 329 [210-551] vs. 250 [175-365] nmol/L; P<0.005, and laCBG lower; 174 [68-229] vs. 220 [119-348] nmol/L; P=0.016 in the AATD group, compared with controls. The ratio of haCBG:total CBG was also higher in AATD; 72 [53-83] vs. 54 [41-72] %; P=0.0001). There was a negative correlation between haCBG:total CBG and AAT levels (P<0.05, R=-0.64). Paradoxically, proteolytic cleavage of CBG was reduced in AATD, despite the recognized increase in NE activity. This implies that NE activity is not the mechanism for systemic CBG cleavage in basal, low inflammatory conditions. Relatively low levels of laCBG may have implications for cortisol action in AATD.

  11. Platelets of the Wistar Furth rat have reduced levels of alpha-granule proteins. An animal model resembling gray platelet syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C W; Hutson, N K; Steward, S A; Saito, N; Cramer, E M

    1991-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Furth (WF) strain have hereditary macrothrombocytopenia (large mean platelet volume [MPV] with increased platelet size heterogeneity and reduced platelet count). Ultrastructural studies suggest that this anomaly results from erratic subdivision of megakaryocyte cytoplasm into platelets. In this study, we have examined protein profiles of platelets of WF rats for biochemical abnormalities associated with this anomaly. Marked decreases in protein bands with an Mr of 185, 57, 53, 16, 13, and 8 kd were observed in one-dimensional reduced SDS-PAGE gels in WF platelets compared with platelets of Wistar, Long Evans, and Sprague-Dawley rats. These proteins were released into the supernatant when washed platelets were treated with thrombin suggesting that they were alpha-granule proteins. These abnormalities were not present in offspring of crosses between Wistar Furth and Wistar rats; however, they were present in platelets of offspring with large MPV derived from backcrosses of (WF X Wistar) F1 males to WF females, but not in backcross offspring with normal platelet size. Immunoblotting confirmed decreased levels of thrombospondin, fibrinogen, and platelet factor 4 in WF platelets. Electron microscopic examination revealed that platelet alpha granules were usually smaller in Wistar Furth than in Wistar rats. In addition, immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that the surface connected canalicular system of the large Wistar Furth platelets, contained dense material composed of alpha-granule proteins, not present in Wistar platelets. From these results, we conclude that the Wistar Furth rat platelet phenotype of large mean platelet volume and decreased levels of alpha-granule proteins represents an animal model resembling gray platelet syndrome. The autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance of the large MPV phenotype and platelet alpha-granule protein deficiencies suggests that a component common to both formation of platelet alpha granules, and

  12. Effect of mild-thiol reducing agents and alpha2,3-sialyltransferase expression on secretion and sialylation of recombinant EPO in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kern Hee; Jeong, Yeon Tae; Kwak, Chan Yeong; Choi, One; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2013-05-01

    We have previously reported that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only delayed apoptosis but also enhanced the production of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture. To investigate the production enhancement mechanism, the effects of similar thiolreducing agents were studied. Intriguingly, all mild reducing agents examined including mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (MESNA), thiolactic acid (TLA), and thioglycolate (TG) were shown to block apoptosis and increase EPO production. A pulse-chase study of EPO secretion revealed that all four thiol-reducing agents increased the EPO secretion rate; among them TLA showed the highest rate. In terms of product quality, the sialic acid content of the glycoprotein is one of the most important factors. It was reported that a number of glycoproteins produced by CHO cells often have incomplete sialylation, particularly under high-producing conditions. Human alpha2,3-sialyltransferase (alpha2,3-ST) was introduced into EPO-producing CHO cells in order to compensate for the reduced sialylation during supplementation with NAC. When alpha2,3-ST was expressed in the presence of NAC, reduced sialylation was restored and an even more sialylated EPO was produced. Thus, our study is significant in that it offers increased EPO production while still allowing the prevention of decreased sialylation of EPO.

  13. The Width of a Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Gila

    2014-01-01

    This paper's aim is to discuss the concept of width of a proof put forward by Timothy Gowers. It explains what this concept means and attempts to show how it relates to other concepts discussed in the existing literature on proof and proving. It also explores how the concept of width of a proof might be used productively in the mathematics…

  14. The antinociceptive effect of the mu-opioid fentanyl is reduced in the presence of the alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist idazoxan in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, J F; Solano, R E

    1999-09-04

    Interactions between alpha(2)-adrenergic and mu-opioid systems play an important role in the modulation of hyperalgesic states. The antinociceptive effects of alpha(2)-adrenergic agonists and mu-opioids are potentiated when co-administered; however, attempts to induce cross reversal of the antinociceptive effects of alpha(2)-adrenergic and mu-opioid systems have produced contradictory results. We have studied the possible endogenous tonic control of the alpha(2)-adrenergic systems in the modulation of pain in inflammation, and the interactions between the two antinociceptive systems in rat spinal cord nociceptive reflexes activated by both natural and electrical stimulation. The facilitatory actions of the alpha(2)-adrenergic antagonist idazoxan were compared in control rats and in animals with carrageenan-induced paw inflammation. The antinociceptive effect of the mu-opioid fentanyl was tested alone and in the presence of idazoxan. In agreement with some previous observations, idazoxan i.v. produced no change in responses to natural and electrical stimulation in normal animals. In animals with inflammation, idazoxan only induced facilitation of responses evoked by noxious thermal stimulation but not by mechanical or electrical stimulation. Fentanyl reduced the responses to either stimuli with lower potency in the presence of idazoxan, but only in animals with inflammation. Its dose-response curve was shifted to the right between 1.8- and 3. 5-fold depending on the stimulus used. It is concluded that the increase of thermal responses by idazoxan in animals with inflammation is probably due to changes in the peripheral blood flow. Nevertheless, since an interaction with mu-opioids is clear in inflammation, endogenous alpha(2)-adrenergic systems play an important role in the modulation of the effectiveness of opioids during inflammation.

  15. Improvement in the detection of low concentration protein digests on a MALDI TOF/TOF workstation by reducing alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid adduct ions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiangping; Papayannopoulos, Ioannis A

    2003-12-01

    Alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (alpha-CHCA) as a matrix facilitates the ionization of proteins and peptides in a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer. The matrix itself also ionizes and so do its sodium and potassium adducts. Matrix clusters and metal ion adducts interfere with peptide ionization and peptide mass spectrum interpretation. These matrix adducts are significantly reduced with addition of ammonium monobasic phosphate or ammonium dibasic citrate to the matrix and sample deposited onto the MALDI target. The reduction of matrix adducts results in the increase of peptide intensity and signal-to-noise ratio as well as in improvement of peptide ionization for samples deposited onto the target at levels of 10 fmol or below. These improvements were particularly significant in the detection of peptides at amol levels when reduced amounts of matrix were also used.

  16. Simulated Microgravity Reduces TNF-Alpha Activity, Suppresses Glucose Uptake and Enhances Arginine Flux in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of microgravity upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF - alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-117,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). We observed a greater glucose concentration and increased disappearance of arginine in islets cultured in HARVs. While nitrogenous compound analysis indicated a ubiquitous reliance upon glutamine in all experimental groups, arginine was converted to ornithine at a two-fold greater rate in the islets cultured in the HARV microgravity paradigm (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV paradigm. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  17. Simulated Microgravity Reduces TNF-Alpha Activity, Suppresses Glucose Uptake and Enhances Arginine Flux in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of microgravity upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF - alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-117,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). We observed a greater glucose concentration and increased disappearance of arginine in islets cultured in HARVs. While nitrogenous compound analysis indicated a ubiquitous reliance upon glutamine in all experimental groups, arginine was converted to ornithine at a two-fold greater rate in the islets cultured in the HARV microgravity paradigm (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV paradigm. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  18. Identification of the 109Xe and 105Te Alpha-Decay Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Liddick, S. N.; Grzywacz, R.; Mazzocchi, C.; Page, R. D.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Darby, I. G.; Drafta, G.; Goodin, C.; Gross, Carl J; Hamilton, J. H.; Hecht, A. A.; Hwang, J. K.; Ilyushkin, S.; Joss, D. T.; Korgul, A.; Krolas, W.; Lagergren, K.; Li, K.; Tantawy, M. N.; Thomson, J.; Winger, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The alpha-decay chain 109Xe-->105Te-->101Sn was identified at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Advances in digital electronics have made possible the identification of both alpha emitters in the same experiment despite the disparate half-lives of 13+/_2ms and 620+/_70ns for 109Xe and 105Te, respectively. Two alpha-decay transitions were observed from 109Xe with Q/alpha values of 4067 +/_ 10 and 4217 +/_ 8keV. One transition between the ground states of 105Te and 101Sn was observed with a Q/alpha value of 4889 +/_6keV. Using the measured half-lives, branching ratios, and Q/alpha values the reduced alpha-decay widths, delta squared, were determined. Comparison of the delta squared value for 105Te with 213Po indicates a "superallowed" character in the alpha emission of 105Te.

  19. The small-molecule TNF-alpha modulator, UTL-5g, reduces side effects induced by cisplatin and enhances the therapeutic effect of cisplatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shaw, JiaJiu; Chen, Ben; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Lee, An-Rong; Media, Joseph; Valeriote, Frederick A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated a small-molecule modulator of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), UTL-5g (also referred to as GBL-5g), as a potential chemoprotective agent against cisplatin-induced side effects including nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity. Pretreatment of UTL-5g i.p. in BDF1 mice reduced the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine induced by cisplatin treatment. The levels of both aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) in these animals were also reduced by UTL-5g. Pretreatment of UTL-5g did not significantly affect the number of white blood cells (WBC) under current experimental conditions, yet it markedly increased blood platelet counts by more than threefold. Therapeutic assessment in SCID mice inoculated with human HCT-15 tumor cells showed that UTL-5g did not attenuate the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin but increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. The LD50 of UTL-5g was determined to be > 2,000 mg/kg by an acute toxicity study. In summary, our studies showed that 1) UTL-5g significantly reduces nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity induced by cisplatin in mice, presumably by lowering the levels of TNF-alpha, 2) UTL-5g markedly increased blood platelet counts in mice and 3) UTL-5g treatment increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin against HCT-15 cells inoculated in SCID mice.

  20. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and -gamma mRNA levels are reduced in chronic hepatitis C with steatosis and genotype 3 infection.

    PubMed

    de Gottardi, A; Pazienza, V; Pugnale, P; Bruttin, F; Rubbia-Brandt, L; Juge-Aubry, C E; Meier, C A; Hadengue, A; Negro, F

    2006-01-01

    Steatosis in chronic hepatitis C is associated with inflammation and accelerated fibrogenesis. To assess the contribution of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and -gamma to the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus associated steatosis is unknown. We measured peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-alpha and -gamma mRNA by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in liver biopsies of 35 genotype 1 and 22 genotype 3 infected patients and in Huh7 cells expressing hepatitis C virus 1b or 3a core protein. PPAR-alpha mRNA was significantly reduced in livers of patients with genotype 3 compared with genotype 1. Steatosis was associated to a decreased expression of PPAR-alpha in genotype 1, but not in genotype 3. PPAR-gamma expression was significantly lower in genotype 3 compared with genotype 1 and steatosis was associated to decreased levels of PPAR-gamma, but only in genotype 1. There was no significant relationship between PPARs mRNA levels and liver activity or fibrosis. Expression of the hepatitis C virus 3a core protein was associated with an increase in triglyceride accumulation and with a significant reduction of PPAR-gamma mRNA compared with hepatitis C virus 1b. The presence of steatosis and hepatitis C virus genotype 3 are both associated with a significant down-regulation of PPARs. These receptors, and also additional factors, seem to play a role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus-associated steatosis.

  1. Systemically administered interleukin-10 reduces tumor necrosis factor-alpha production and significantly improves functional recovery following traumatic spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Bethea, J R; Nagashima, H; Acosta, M C; Briceno, C; Gomez, F; Marcillo, A E; Loor, K; Green, J; Dietrich, W D

    1999-10-01

    In these studies, we examined the neuroprotective effects of the potent antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) following spinal cord injury (SCI). Neuroprotection was assessed by using behavioral and morphological end points. We hypothesized that injury-induced inflammation contributes to the resulting neuropathology and subsequent loss of function. Therefore, by attenuating injury-induced inflammation, we should promote functional recovery. The New York University device was used to induce moderate SCI and study the resulting inflammatory response and functional consequences of inhibiting this response in rats. We determined that SCI induces the expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in the spinal cord and by SCI-activated monocytes isolated from the peripheral circulation. IL-10 (5.0 microg) administered 30 minutes after-injury significantly reduced the expression of TNF-alpha protein in the spinal cord and in vitro by SCI-activated monocytes. Next, we investigated whether IL-10 would improve functional recovery after SCI. Randomized, double-blinded studies demonstrated that a single injection of IL-10 significantly improves hind limb motor function 2 months after injury, as determined by the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) open-field behavioral test. IL-10-treated animals had a mean BBB score of 18.0+/-0.5 (SEM, n = 9) compared with a score of 12.9+/-0.6 (SEM, n = 9) for the saline-treated controls. Morphological analysis demonstrated that IL-10 reduces lesion volume by approximately 49% 2 months after injury. These data suggest that acute administration of IL-10 reduces TNF-alpha synthesis in the spinal cord and by activated macrophages, is neuroprotective, and promotes functional recovery following SCI.

  2. Formation of 5alpha-reduced androgens in the testes and urogenital tract of the grey short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jean D; Renfree, Marilyn B; Auchus, Richard J; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    Testicular 5alpha-reduced androgens, largely 5alpha-androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol (androstanediol), are responsible for virilisation of pouch young in one marsupial (the tammar wallaby), but are not formed until later in development in another marsupial (the brushtail possum) and in rodents. Because the mechanism of virilisation of the urogenital tract in the grey short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica has never been defined, androgen formation and metabolism were investigated in this species. Testis fragments from grey short-tailed opossums of a wide range of ages were incubated with [3H]-progesterone and the metabolites were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The only 19-carbon metabolites identified in the youngest ages (5-26 days) and the major metabolites in adult testes were testosterone and androstenedione. At 30, 42 and 49 days of age, dihydrotestosterone and small amounts of androstanediol were present. Time-sequence studies indicated that dihydrotestosterone and androstanediol were formed from the 5alpha-reduction (and 3-keto reduction) of testosterone. In a second series of experiments, tissue fragments of a variety of urogenital tract tissues were incubated with [3H]-testosterone and the metabolites separated by HPLC. During the interval in which male urogenital tract differentiation takes place in this species (between Days 15 and 28), the major metabolite identified was dihydrotestosterone. We conclude that the timing of 5alpha-reductase expression in the testes of the grey short-tailed possum resembles that of rodents and the brushtail possum rather than that of the tammar wallaby and that dihydrotestosterone is probably the intracellular androgen responsible for virilisation of the urogenital tract in this species.

  3. Characterization of the lys2 gene of Acremonium chrysogenum encoding a functional alpha-aminoadipate activating and reducing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hijarrubia, M J; Aparicio, J F; Casqueiro, J; Martín, J F

    2001-02-01

    A 5.2-kb NotI DNA fragment isolated from a genomic library of Acremonium chrysogenum by hybridization with a probe internal to the Penicillium chrysogenum lys2 gene, was able to complement an alpha-aminoadipate reductase-deficient mutant of P. chrysogenum (lysine auxotroph L-G-). Enzyme assays showed that the alpha-aminoadipate reductase activity was restored in all the transformants tested. The lys2-encoded enzyme catalyzed both the activation and reduction of alpha-aminoadipic acid to its semialdehyde, as shown by reaction of the product with p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde. The reaction required NADPH, and was not observed in the presence of NADH. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene encodes a protein with relatively high similarity to members of the superfamily of acyladenylate-forming enzymes. The Lys2 protein contained all nine motifs that are conserved in the adenylating domain of this enzyme family, a peptidyl carrier domain, and a reduction domain. In addition, a new NADP-binding motif located at the N-terminus of the reduction domain that may form a Rossmann-like betaalphabeta-fold has been identified and found to be shared by all known Lys2 proteins. The lys2 gene was mapped to chromosome I (2.2 Mb, the smallest chromosome) of A. chrysogenum C10 (the chromosome that contains the "late" cephalosporin cluster) and is transcribed as a monocistronic 4.5-kb mRNA although at relatively low levels compared with the beta-actin gene.

  4. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  5. Breakup effects on alpha spectroscopic factors of 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Basu, C.; Sugathan, P.; Jhinghan, A.; Behera, B. R.; Saneesh, N.; Kaur, G.; Thakur, M.; Mahajan, R.; Dubey, R.; Mitra, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The triton angular distribution for the 12C(7Li,t)16O* reaction is measured at 20 MeV, populating discrete states of 16O. Continuum discretized coupled reaction channel calculations are used to to extract the alpha spectroscopic properties of 16O states instead of the distorted wave born approximation theory to include the effects of breakup on the transfer process. The alpha reduced width, spectroscopic factors and the asymptotic normalization constant (ANC) of 16O states are extracted. The error in the spectroscopic factor is about 35% and in that of the ANC about 27%.

  6. Interferon-alpha-induced inflammation is associated with reduced glucocorticoid negative feedback sensitivity and depression in patients with hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Felger, Jennifer C; Haroon, Ebrahim; Woolwine, Bobbi J; Raison, Charles L; Miller, Andrew H

    2016-11-01

    Major medical illnesses are associated with increased risk for depression and alterations in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis function. Pathophysiological processes such as inflammation that occur as a part of medical illnesses and their treatments have been shown to cause depressive symptoms, and may also affect the HPA axis. We previously reported that patients with hepatitis C virus chronically administered interferon (IFN)-alpha develop increased evening plasma cortisol concentrations and a flattened diurnal cortisol slope, which correlated with increased tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and its soluble receptor 2 (sTNFR2). Increased TNF and sTNFR2 were further correlated with depression and fatigue scores. The current study examined whether flattened cortisol slope might be secondary to reduced glucocorticoid receptor (GR) sensitivity, by measuring glucocorticoid negative feedback to dexamethasone (DEX) administration followed by corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) challenge. In an exploratory analysis, 28 male and female patients with hepatitis C virus were studied at baseline (Visit 1) and after 12weeks (Visit 2) of either IFN-alpha plus ribavirin (n=17) or no treatment (n=11). Patients underwent dexamethasone DEX-CRH challenge, neuropsychiatric assessments, and measurement of plasma TNF and sTNFR2 during each visit. IFN-alpha did not affect neuroendocrine responses following CRH but did increase post-DEX cortisol, which was correlated with flattening of the diurnal cortisol slope (r=0.57, p=0.002) and with increased depression scores (r=0.38, p=0.047). Furthermore, the change in post-DEX cortisol was associated with IFN-alpha-induced increase in sTNFR2 (r=0.51, p=006), which was in turn correlated with depression (r=0.63, p<0.001) and fatigue (r=0.51, p=0.005) scores. Whereas the relationship between sTNFR2 and depression scores were independent of the change in post-DEX cortisol, the correlation between post-DEX cortisol and depression scores was not

  7. Serous ovarian carcinoma patients with high alpha-folate receptor had reducing survival and cytotoxic chemo-response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Chia-Yen; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Lin, Han-Wei; Chen, Chi-An; Hsieh, Chang-Yao; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2012-06-01

    The alpha-folate receptor (α-FR) is highly-expressed in various non-mucinous tumors of epithelial origin, including ovarian carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between alpha-folate receptor (α-FR) and the clinico-pathologic features and outcomes of serous ovarian carcinoma patients and the possible mechanism of α-FR to chemo-resistance. Therefore, semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions for α-FR expression were performed in the 91 specimens of serous ovarian carcinomas. The expression of α-FR in each ovarian cancer tissue specimen was defined as the ratio of density of α-FR to density of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In vitro apoptotic experiments were tested in the original OVCAR-3 tumor cells and various OVCAR-3 α-FR-transfectants. Patients with an increased α-FR expression level had poorer responses to chemotherapy (per α-FR expression level increase: odds ratio (OR): 8.97 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-57.36), p = 0.021). An increased α-FR expression level was an independently poor prognostic factor for disease free interval (DFI) (per α-FR expression level increase: hazard ratio (HR): 2.45 (95% CI: 1.16-5.18), p = 0.02) and had a negative impact on overall survival (OS) of these serous ovarian cancer patients (per α-FR expression level increase: HR: 3.6 (95% CI: 0.93-13.29), p = 0.03) by multivariate analyses. α-FR inhibited cytotoxic drug-induced apoptosis in our in vitro apoptotic assays. α-FR could induce chemo-resistance via regulating the expression of apoptosis-related molecules, Bcl-2 and Bax. Therefore, α-FR can be a potential biomarker for the prediction of chemotherapeutic responses and clinical prognosis. It also could be the target of ovarian cancer treatment.

  8. Reduction of Mouse Egg Surface Integrin Alpha9 Subunit (ITGA9) Reduces the Egg's Ability to Support Sperm-Egg Binding and Fusion1

    PubMed Central

    Vjugina, Ulyana; Zhu, Xiaoling; Oh, Eugene; Bracero, Nabal J.; Evans, Janice P.

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of egg integrins in mammalian sperm-egg interactions has been controversial, with data from integrin inhibitor studies contrasting with evidence from knockouts showing that specific integrin subunits are not essential for fertility. An alpha4/alpha9 (ITGA4/ITGA9) integrin subfamily member has been implicated in fertilization but not extensively examined, so we tested the following three hypotheses: 1) an ITGA4/ITGA9 integrin participates in sperm-egg interactions, 2) short-term acute knockdown by RNA interference of integrin subunits would result in a fertilization phenotype differing from that of chronic depletion via knockout, and 3) detection of a fertilization phenotype is sensitive to in vitro fertilization (IVF) assay conditions. We show that mouse and human eggs express the alpha9 integrin subunit (ITGA9). RNA interference-mediated knockdown resulted in reduced levels of Itga9 mRNA and surface protein in mouse eggs. RNA interference attempts to knockdown ITGA9′s likely beta partner, beta1 (ITGB1), resulted in reduced Itgb1 mRNA but no reduction in ITGB1 surface protein. Therefore, studies using a function-blocking anti-ITGB1 antibody tested the hypothesis that ITGB1 participates in gamete interactions. Analyses of sperm-egg interactions with Itga9-knockdown eggs and anti-ITGB1 antibody-treated eggs in IVF assays using specific sperm:egg ratios revealed the following: 1) a reduction, but not complete loss, of sperm-egg binding and fusion was observed and 2) the reduction of sperm-egg binding and fusion was not detected in inseminations with high sperm:egg ratios. These data demonstrate that ITGA9 and ITGB1 participate in sperm-egg interactions but clearly are not the only molecules involved. This also shows that careful design of IVF parameters allows detection of deficiencies in gamete interactions. PMID:19129508

  9. Reduction of mouse egg surface integrin alpha9 subunit (ITGA9) reduces the egg's ability to support sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    PubMed

    Vjugina, Ulyana; Zhu, Xiaoling; Oh, Eugene; Bracero, Nabal J; Evans, Janice P

    2009-04-01

    The involvement of egg integrins in mammalian sperm-egg interactions has been controversial, with data from integrin inhibitor studies contrasting with evidence from knockouts showing that specific integrin subunits are not essential for fertility. An alpha(4)/alpha(9) (ITGA4/ITGA9) integrin subfamily member has been implicated in fertilization but not extensively examined, so we tested the following three hypotheses: 1) an ITGA4/ITGA9 integrin participates in sperm-egg interactions, 2) short-term acute knockdown by RNA interference of integrin subunits would result in a fertilization phenotype differing from that of chronic depletion via knockout, and 3) detection of a fertilization phenotype is sensitive to in vitro fertilization (IVF) assay conditions. We show that mouse and human eggs express the alpha(9) integrin subunit (ITGA9). RNA interference-mediated knockdown resulted in reduced levels of Itga9 mRNA and surface protein in mouse eggs. RNA interference attempts to knockdown ITGA9's likely beta partner, beta(1) (ITGB1), resulted in reduced Itgb1 mRNA but no reduction in ITGB1 surface protein. Therefore, studies using a function-blocking anti-ITGB1 antibody tested the hypothesis that ITGB1 participates in gamete interactions. Analyses of sperm-egg interactions with Itga9-knockdown eggs and anti-ITGB1 antibody-treated eggs in IVF assays using specific sperm:egg ratios revealed the following: 1) a reduction, but not complete loss, of sperm-egg binding and fusion was observed and 2) the reduction of sperm-egg binding and fusion was not detected in inseminations with high sperm:egg ratios. These data demonstrate that ITGA9 and ITGB1 participate in sperm-egg interactions but clearly are not the only molecules involved. This also shows that careful design of IVF parameters allows detection of deficiencies in gamete interactions.

  10. Masses, widths, and leptonic widths of the higher upsilon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, D. M.; Horstkotte, J. E.; Klopfenstein, C.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Romero, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Youssef, S.; Franzini, P.; Son, D.; Tuts, P. M.; Zhao, T.; Herb, S.; Dietl, H.; Eigen, G.; Fonseca, V.; Lorenz, E.; Mageras, G.; Han, K.; Imlay, R.; Metcalf, W.; Sreedhar, V.

    1985-02-01

    The masses, total widths, and leptonic widths of three triplet s-wave bb¯ states Υ(4S), Υ(5S), and Υ(6S) are determined from measurements of the e+e- annihilation cross section into hadrons for 10.55

  11. Relation between index finger width and hand width anthropometric measures.

    PubMed

    Komandur, Sashidharan; Johnson, Peter W; Storch, Richard L; Yost, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    Measures of hand and finger anthropometry are very important for designing many hand held devices as well as understanding anthropometric effects on the operation of such devices. Many historical datasets have measured and recorded gross hand dimensions but do not often record the finer dimensions of the hand such as finger anthropometry. Knowing the size and mass of fingers across genders can be critical to the design and operation of hand held devices. In this paper we compare two empirical linear models that predicts index finger width at the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (a finger anthropometric measure) based on hand-width (hand anthropometric measure). This will be especially useful for deriving population measures of finger anthropometry from large historical data sets where only gross hand dimensions are available.

  12. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase alpha restores restimulation-induced cell death and reduces immunopathology in XLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Ruffo, Elisa; Malacarne, Valeria; Larsen, Sasha E.; Das, Rupali; Patrussi, Laura; Wülfing, Christoph; Biskup, Christoph; Kapnick, Senta M.; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Baldari, Cosima T.; Rubio, Ignacio; Nichols, Kim E.; Snow, Andrew L.; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1) is an often-fatal primary immunodeficiency associated with the exuberant expansion of activated CD8+ T cells following Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. XLP-1 is caused by defects in SAP, an adaptor protein that modulates T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. SAP-deficient T cells exhibit impaired TCR restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) and diminished TCR-induced inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKα), leading to increased diacylglycerol metabolism and decreased signaling through Ras and PKCθ. Here, we show that down-regulation of DGKα activity in SAP-deficient T cells restores diacylglycerol signaling at the immune synapse and rescues RICD via induction of the pro-apoptotic proteins NUR77 and NOR1. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of DGKα prevents the excessive CD8+ T cell expansion and IFNγ production that occur in Sap-deficient mice following Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus infection without impairing lytic activity. Collectively, these data highlight DGKα as a viable therapeutic target to reverse the life-threatening EBV-associated immunopathology that occurs in XLP-1 patients. PMID:26764158

  13. Alpha-ketoglutarate reduces ethanol toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster by enhancing alcohol dehydrogenase activity and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Bayliak, Maria M; Shmihel, Halyna V; Lylyk, Maria P; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol at low concentrations (<4%) can serve as a food source for fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whereas at higher concentrations it may be toxic. In this work, protective effects of dietary alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) against ethanol toxicity were studied. Food supplementation with 10-mM AKG alleviated toxic effects of 8% ethanol added to food, and improved fly development. Two-day-old adult flies, reared on diet containing both AKG and ethanol, possessed higher alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity as compared with those reared on control diet or diet with ethanol only. Native gel electrophoresis data suggested that this combination diet might promote post-translational modifications of ADH protein with the formation of a highly active ADH form. The ethanol-containing diet led to significantly higher levels of triacylglycerides stored in adult flies, and this parameter was not altered by AKG supplement. The influence of diet on antioxidant defenses was also assessed. In ethanol-fed flies, catalase activity was higher in males and the levels of low molecular mass thiols were unchanged in both sexes compared to control values. Feeding on a mixture of AKG and ethanol did not affect catalase activity but caused a higher level of low molecular mass thiols compared to ethanol-fed flies. It can be concluded that both a stimulation of some components of antioxidant defense and the increase in ADH activity may be responsible for the protective effects of AKG diet supplementation in combination with ethanol. The results suggest that AKG might be useful as a treatment option to neutralize toxic effects of excessive ethanol intake and to improve the physiological state of D. melanogaster and other animals, potentially including humans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Modeling Solar Lyman Alpha Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.; Donnelly, R. F.; London, J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analyses. Models developed with multiple linear regression analysis, including daily values and 81-day running means of solar indices, predict reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. It is shown that the full disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm offers the best proxy for Lyman alpha, and that the total irradiance corrected for sunspot effect also has a high correlation with Lyman alpha.

  15. Brief Report: Reduced Temporal-Central EEG Alpha Coherence during Joint Attention Perception in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaime, Mark; McMahon, Camilla M.; Davidson, Bridget C.; Newell, Lisa C.; Mundy, Peter C.; Henderson, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Although prior studies have demonstrated reduced resting state EEG coherence in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), no studies have explored the nature of EEG coherence during joint attention. We examined the EEG coherence of the joint attention network in adolescents with and without ASD during congruent and incongruent joint attention…

  16. Brief Report: Reduced Temporal-Central EEG Alpha Coherence during Joint Attention Perception in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaime, Mark; McMahon, Camilla M.; Davidson, Bridget C.; Newell, Lisa C.; Mundy, Peter C.; Henderson, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Although prior studies have demonstrated reduced resting state EEG coherence in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), no studies have explored the nature of EEG coherence during joint attention. We examined the EEG coherence of the joint attention network in adolescents with and without ASD during congruent and incongruent joint attention…

  17. Multimode fiber with z-dependent alpha-value.

    PubMed

    Marcuse, D

    1979-07-01

    The width of the impulse response of multimode fibers with power law index profiles depends on the alpha-value of the power law exponent. For constant alpha, optimum pulse width is achievable only in a very narrow range of values centered around alpha = 2 - (12/5)Delta. We show in this paper that the optimum width of the impulse response is achievable for fibers with nonoptimum alpha-values provided alpha varies slowly along the fiber and deviates on average by equal amounts to either side of its (constant) optimum value.

  18. Double bond in the side chain of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-22-ene-vitamin D(3) is reduced during its metabolism: studies in chronic myeloid leukemia (RWLeu-4) cells and rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Sunita Rao, D; Balkundi, D; Uskokovic, M R; Tserng, K; Clark, J W; Horst, R L; Satyanarayana Reddy, G

    2001-08-01

    1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)] is mainly metabolized via the C-24 oxidation pathway and undergoes several side chain modifications which include C-24 hydroxylation, C-24 ketonization, C-23 hydroxylation and side chain cleavage between C-23 and C-24 to form the final product, calcitroic acid. In a recent study we reported that 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(2) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2)] like 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), is also converted into the same final product, calcitroic acid. This finding indicated that 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2) also undergoes side chain cleavage between C-23 and C-24. As the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2) when compared to the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), has a double bond between C-22 and C-23 and an extra methyl group at C-24 position, it opens the possibility for both (a) double bond reduction and (b) demethylation to occur during the metabolism of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2). We undertook the present study to establish firmly the possibility of double bond reduction in the metabolism of vitamin D(2) related compounds. We compared the metabolism of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-22-ene-vitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)-22-ene-D(3)], a synthetic vitamin D analog whose side chain differs from that of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) only through a single modification namely the presence of a double bond between C-22 and C-23. Metabolism studies were performed in the chronic myeloid leukemic cell line (RWLeu-4) and in the isolated perfused rat kidney. Our results indicate that both 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-22-ene-D(3) and 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) are converted into common metabolites namely, 1alpha,24(R),25-trihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1alpha,24(R),25(OH)(3)D(3)], 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-24-oxovitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)-24-oxo-D(3)], 1alpha,23(S),25-trihydroxy-24-oxovitamin D(3) and 1alpha,23-dihydroxy-24,25,26,27-tetranorvitamin D(3). This finding indicates that the double bond in the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-22-ene-D(3) is reduced during its metabolism. Along with

  19. Effect of step width manipulation on tibial stress during running.

    PubMed

    Meardon, Stacey A; Derrick, Timothy R

    2014-08-22

    Narrow step width has been linked to variables associated with tibial stress fracture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of step width on bone stresses using a standardized model of the tibia. 15 runners ran at their preferred 5k running velocity in three running conditions, preferred step width (PSW) and PSW±5% of leg length. 10 successful trials of force and 3-D motion data were collected. A combination of inverse dynamics, musculoskeletal modeling and beam theory was used to estimate stresses applied to the tibia using subject-specific anthropometrics and motion data. The tibia was modeled as a hollow ellipse. Multivariate analysis revealed that tibial stresses at the distal 1/3 of the tibia differed with step width manipulation (p=0.002). Compression on the posterior and medial aspect of the tibia was inversely related to step width such that as step width increased, compression on the surface of tibia decreased (linear trend p=0.036 and 0.003). Similarly, tension on the anterior surface of the tibia decreased as step width increased (linear trend p=0.029). Widening step width linearly reduced shear stress at all 4 sites (p<0.001 for all). The data from this study suggests that stresses experienced by the tibia during running were influenced by step width when using a standardized model of the tibia. Wider step widths were generally associated with reduced loading of the tibia and may benefit runners at risk of or experiencing stress injury at the tibia, especially if they present with a crossover running style.

  20. Simultaneous quantification of GABAergic 3alpha,5alpha/3alpha,5beta neuroactive steroids in human and rat serum.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Patrizia; O'Buckley, Todd K; Alward, Sarah E; Marx, Christine E; Shampine, Lawrence J; Girdler, Susan S; Morrow, A Leslie

    2009-01-01

    The 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone enhance GABAergic neurotransmission and produce inhibitory neurobehavioral and anti-inflammatory effects. Despite substantial information on the progesterone derivative (3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP, allopregnanolone), the physiological significance of the other endogenous GABAergic neuroactive steroids has remained elusive. Here, we describe the validation of a method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to simultaneously identify serum levels of the eight 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone. The method shows specificity, sensitivity and enhanced throughput compared to other methods already available for neuroactive steroid quantification. Administration of pregnenolone to rats and progesterone to women produced selective effects on the 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced neuroactive steroids, indicating differential regulation of their biosynthetic pathways. Pregnenolone administration increased serum levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP (+1488%, p<0.001), (3alpha,5alpha)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THDOC, +205%, p<0.01), (3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxyandrostan-17-one (3alpha,5alpha-A, +216%, p<0.001), (3alpha,5alpha,17beta)-androstane-3,17-diol (3alpha,5alpha-A-diol, +190%, p<0.01). (3alpha,5beta)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5beta-THP) and (3alpha,5beta)-3-hydroxyandrostan-17-one (3alpha,5beta-A) were not altered, while (3alpha,5beta)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5beta-THDOC) and (3alpha,5beta,17beta)-androstane-3,17-diol (3alpha,5beta-A-diol) were increased from undetectable levels to 271+/-100 and 2.4+/-0.9 pg+/-SEM, respectively (5/8 rats). Progesterone administration increased serum levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP (+1806%, p<0.0001), 3alpha,5beta-THP (+575%, p<0.001), 3alpha,5alpha

  1. Alpha-lipoic acid supplementation reduces mTORC1 signaling in skeletal muscle from high fat fed, obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuyun; Dungan, Cory M; Carrier, Bradley; Rideout, Todd C; Williamson, David L

    2014-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is hyperactive in liver, adipose and skeletal muscle tissues of obese rodents. Alpha-lipoic acid (αLA) has been well accepted as a weight-loss treatment, though there are limited studies on its effect on mTOR signaling in high-fat fed, obese rodents. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine mTOR signaling and oxidative protein alterations in skeletal muscle of high-fat fed, obese rats after αLA supplementation. Phosphorylation of the mTOR substrate, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eIF4B were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in muscle from αLA supplemented rats. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an mTOR inhibitory kinase, was higher (p < 0.05) in the αLA group. Protein expression of markers of oxidative metabolism, acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), cytochrome c oxidase IV (COX IV), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and PPAR gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) after αLA supplementation compared to non-supplemented group. Our findings show that αLA supplementation limits the negative ramifications of consuming a high fat diet on skeletal muscle markers of oxidative metabolism and mTORC1 signaling.

  2. Reduced alpha-lipoic acid synthase gene expression exacerbates atherosclerosis in diabetic apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xianwen; Xu, Longquan; Hiller, Sylvia; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2012-07-01

    To study the effects of reduced lipoic acid gene expression on diabetic atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E null mice (Apoe(-/-)). Heterozygous lipoic acid synthase gene knockout mice (Lias(+/-)) crossed with Apoe(-/-) mice were used to evaluate the diabetic effect induced by streptozotocin on atherosclerosis in the aortic sinus of the heart. While diabetes markedly increased atherosclerotic plaque size in Apoe(-/-) mice, a small but significant effect of reduced expression of lipoic acid gene was observed in diabetic Lias(+/-)Apoe(-/-) mice. In the aortic lesion area, the Lias(+/-)Apoe(-/-) mice exhibited significantly increased macrophage accumulation and cellular apoptosis than diabetic Lias(+/+)Apoe(-/-) littermates. Plasma glucose, cholesterol, and interleukin-6 were also higher. These abnormalities were accompanied with increased oxidative stress including a decreased ratio of reduced glutathione/oxidized glutathione in erythrocytes, increased systemic lipid peroxidation, and increased Gpx1 and MCP1 gene expression in the aorta. Decreased endogenous lipoic acid gene expression plays a role in development of diabetic atherosclerosis. These findings extend our understanding of the role of antioxidant in diabetic atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Central alpha-activation by clonidine reduces plasma level of beta-endorphin in patients with essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yasunari, K; Kanayama, Y; Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Kawarabayashi, T; Takeda, T; Kotsugai, N; Sato, K

    1985-10-21

    Whether peripheral beta-endorphin contributes to the antihypertensive action of clonidine was examined by measuring plasma levels of beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (beta EpLI) after acute administration of clonidine in patients with essential hypertension. Administration of clonidine (0.225 mg) in one dose significantly lowered blood pressure, decreased heart rate and reduced the plasma level of beta EpLI and ACTH, while the placebo had no effect on blood pressure, heart rate or plasma level of beta EpLI suggesting that peripheral beta-endorphin does not play a major role in the antihypertensive action of acute clonidine administration.

  4. Oral glucosylceramide reduces 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene induced inflammatory response in mice by reducing TNF-alpha levels and leukocyte infiltration.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Sakai, Shota; Aida, Kazuhiko; Hirata, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Sphingolipids are constituents of cellular membranes and play important roles as second messengers mediating cell functions. As significant components in foods, sphingolipids have been proven to be critical for human health. Moreover, diverse metabolic intermediates of sphingolipids are known to play key roles both in proinflammatory and in anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effect of dietary sphingolipids on inflammation is a complicated field that needs to be further assessed. Our study evaluated the effects of orally administered maize glucosylceramide (GluCer), one of the most conventional dietary sphingolipids, on inflammation using the 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene-treated BALB/c murine model. Oral administration of GluCer inhibited ear swelling and leukocyte infiltration to the inflammatory site, suggesting that dietary GluCer has anti-inflammatory properties. ELISA analyses revealed that oral administration of GluCer for 6 days had not modified the Th1/Th2 balance, but significantly down-regulated the activation of TNF-α at the inflammatory site. Based on these results, the down-regulation of TNF-α by dietary GluCer may suppress vascular permeability and reduce the migration of inflammatory cells. Our findings increase understanding of the actions of dietary sphingolipids on the balance of the immune response.

  5. Simulations of alpha parameters in a TFTR DT supershot with high fusion power

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R.V.; Bell, M.G.; Janos, A.C.

    1995-07-01

    A TFTR supershot with a plasma current of 2.5 MA, neutral beam heating power of 33.7 MW, and a peak DT fusion power of 7.5 MW is studied using the TRANSP plasma analysis code. Simulations of alpha parameters such as the alpha heating, pressure, and distributions in energy and v{sub parallel}/v are given. The effects of toroidal ripple and mixing of the fast alpha particles during the sawteeth observed after the neutral beam injection phase are modeled. The distributions of alpha particles on the outer midplane are peaked near forward and backward v{sub parallel}/v. Ripple losses deplete the distributions in the vicinity of v{sub parallel}/v {approximately}{minus}0.4. Sawtooth mixing of fast alpha particles is computed to reduce their central density and broaden their width in energy.

  6. Turner syndrome isochromosome karyotype correlates with decreased dental crown width.

    PubMed

    Rizell, S; Barrenäs, M-L; Andlin-Sobocki, A; Stecksén-Blicks, C; Kjellberg, H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this project was to study possible influences of Turner syndrome (TS) karyotype and the number of X chromosomes with intact short arm (p-arm) on dental crown width. Primary and permanent mesio-distal crown width was measured on plaster casts from 112 TS females. The influence on crown width of four karyotypes: 1. monosomy (45,X), 2. mosaic (45,X/46,XX), 3. isochromosome, and 4. other, and the number of intact X chromosomal p-arms were investigated. In comparisons between karyotypes, statistically significant differences were found for isochromosome karyotype maxillary second premolars, canines, laterals, mandibular first premolars, and canines, indicating that this karyotype was the most divergent as shown by the most reduced crown width. When each karyotype group were compared versus controls, all teeth in the isochromosome group were significantly smaller than controls (P < 0.01-0.001). The 45,X/46,XX karyotype expressed fewer and smaller differences from controls, while 45,X individuals seemed to display an intermediate tooth width compared with 45,X/46,XX and isochromosomes. No significant difference in crown width was found comparing the groups with one or two intact X chromosomal p-arms. Both primary and permanent teeth proved to have a significantly smaller crown width in the entire group of TS females compared to healthy females. We conclude that the isochromosome group deviates most from other karyotypes and controls, exhibiting the smallest dental crown width, while individuals with 45,X/46,XX mosaicism seemed to have a less affected crown width. An influence of the number of intact p-arms on crown width could not be demonstrated in this study.

  7. Activation of Alpha 7 Cholinergic Nicotinic Receptors Reduce Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Kobori, Nobuhide; Redell, John B.; Hylin, Michael J.; Hood, Kimberly N.; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major human health concern that has the greatest impact on young men and women. The breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important pathological consequence of TBI that initiates secondary processes, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, which can exacerbate brain inflammation and contribute to poor outcome. While the role of inflammation within the injured brain has been examined in some detail, the contribution of peripheral/systemic inflammation to TBI pathophysiology is largely unknown. Recent studies have implicated vagus nerve regulation of splenic cholinergic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (nAChRa7) signaling in the regulation of systemic inflammation. However, it is not known whether this mechanism plays a role in TBI-triggered inflammation and BBB breakdown. Following TBI, we observed that plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels, as well as BBB permeability, were significantly increased in nAChRa7 null mice (Chrna7−/−) relative to wild-type mice. The administration of exogenous IL-1β and TNF-α to brain-injured animals worsened Evans Blue dye extravasation, suggesting that systemic inflammation contributes to TBI-triggered BBB permeability. Systemic administration of the nAChRa7 agonist PNU-282987 or the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 significantly attenuated TBI-triggered BBB compromise. Supporting a role for splenic nAChRa7 receptors, we demonstrate that splenic injection of the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin increased BBB permeability in brain-injured rats, while PNU-282987 injection decreased such permeability. These effects were not seen when α-bungarotoxin or PNU-282987 were administered to splenectomized, brain-injured rats. Together, these findings support the short-term use of nAChRa7-activating agents as a strategy to reduce TBI-triggered BBB permeability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI

  8. Combination of interferon alpha with either Ara-C or ATRA in vitro reduces the selective action of interferon against CML CFU-GM.

    PubMed

    Marley, S B; Davidson, R J; Goldman, J M; Gordon, M Y

    2000-08-01

    Although interferon (IFN)-alpha has no specific inhibitory effect on the plating efficiency of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) from patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), it does selectively inhibit the replating ability (secondary colony formation) of CML CFU-GM. Thus, amplification of CFU-GM may be a target for IFN-alpha and other agents used in the treatment of CML. Here we examined whether cytarabine (Ara-C) or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) exert similar effects and whether they might in combination with IFN-alpha enhance its efficacy. We found that Ara-C preferentially inhibits the formation of CML CFU-GM compared to normal CFU-GM, but this inhibition was not increased by addition of IFN-alpha. When Ara-C was added to cultures containing IFN-alpha, the inhibition of replating by CML progenitors was abrogated. ATRA increased significantly the plating efficiency of normal CFU-GM. The addition of IFN-alpha to ATRA had no effect on CML or normal colony numbers. However, addition of ATRA to cultures containing IFN-alpha reversed the selective inhibition of CML CFU-GM replating seen in cultures containing IFN-alpha alone. In four IFN-alpha/Ara-C experiments, secondary CML patient-derived colonies were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). All of them were Ph chromosome positive. No significant effects on CFU-GM production were observed when CML primitive haemopoietic progenitor cells were investigated in a delta (delta) assay. Thus we conclude that combining IFN-alpha with Ara-C or ATRA neutralises the effect of IFN-alpha on CML CFU-GM. This observation provides a rationale for treating patients with alternating courses of IFN-alpha and Ara-C or ATRA, rather than giving either of these two agents in combination with IFN-alpha.

  9. The alpha-2A adrenoceptor agonist guanfacine improves sustained attention and reduces overactivity and impulsiveness in an animal model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, Terje

    2006-01-01

    Background ADHD is currently defined as a cognitive/behavioral developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral. Overactivity, impulsiveness, and inattentiveness are presently regarded as the main clinical symptoms. There is no biological marker, but there is considerable evidence to suggest that ADHD behavior is associated with poor dopaminergic and noradrenergic modulation of neuronal circuits that involve the frontal lobes. The best validated animal model of ADHD, the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR), shows pronounced overactivity, impulsiveness, and deficient sustained attention. While dopamine release is decreased in SHR prefrontal cortex, norepinephrine concentrations are elevated. The noradrenergic system appears to be hyperactive as a result of impaired alpha-2A adrenoceptor regulation. Thus, the present study tested behavioral effects of the centrally acting alpha-2A adrenoceptor agonist guanfacine on SHR behavior. Methods The present study tested behavioral effects of guanfacine at doses of 0.075, 0.15, 0.30 and 0.60 mg base/kg i.p. in both male SHRs and their controls, the Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY). ADHD-like behavior was tested with a visual discrimination task measuring overactivity, impulsiveness and inattentiveness. Results The striking impulsiveness, overactivity, and reduced sustained attention during baseline conditions in the SHR improved by treatment with guanfacine. The most pronounced improvement in SHR behavior was seen following the two highest doses (0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg) of guanfacine when SHR behaviors virtually normalized. The positive effects of the drug were most marked towards the end of the session. Conclusion The results indicate that guanfacine improved poor noradrenergic modulation of neuronal circuits that involve the frontal lobes in an animal model of ADHD. The present results support the beneficial effects of guanfacine on ADHD behavior reported clinically and experimentally in primate models of frontal function

  10. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  11. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-03

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  12. Tetrahydro iso-alpha acids from hops improve glucose homeostasis and reduce body weight gain and metabolic endotoxemia in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Everard, Amandine; Geurts, Lucie; Van Roye, Marie; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Cani, Patrice D

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a low-grade inflammatory state possibly through changes in gut microbiota composition and the development of higher plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, i.e. metabolic endotoxemia. Various phytochemical compounds have been investigated as potential tools to regulate these metabolic features. Humulus lupulus L. (hops) contains several classes of compounds with anti-inflammatory potential. Recent evidence suggests that hops-derived compounds positively impact adipocyte metabolism and glucose tolerance in obese and diabetic rodents via undefined mechanisms. In this study, we found that administration of tetrahydro iso-alpha acids (termed META060) to high-fat diet (HFD)-fed obese and diabetic mice for 8 weeks reduced body weight gain, the development of fat mass, glucose intolerance, and fasted hyperinsulinemia, and normalized insulin sensitivity markers. This was associated with reduced portal plasma LPS levels, gut permeability, and higher intestinal tight junction proteins Zonula occludens-1 and occludin. Moreover, META060 treatment increased the plasma level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 and decreased the plasma level of the pro-inflammatory cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. In conclusion, this research allows us to decipher a novel mechanism contributing to the positive effects of META060 treatment, and supports the need to investigate such compounds in obese and type 2 diabetic patients.

  13. Overexpression of the calpain-specific inhibitor calpastatin reduces human alpha-Synuclein processing, aggregation and synaptic impairment in [A30P]αSyn transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Diepenbroek, Meike; Casadei, Nicolas; Esmer, Hakan; Saido, Takaomi C.; Takano, Jiro; Kahle, Philipp J.; Nixon, Ralph A; Rao, Mala V.; Melki, Ronald; Pieri, Laura; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Krueger, Rejko; Masliah, Eliezer; Riess, Olaf; Nuber, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), contain aggregated alpha-synuclein (αSyn), which is found in several modified forms and can be discovered phosphorylated, ubiquitinated and truncated. Aggregation-prone truncated species of αSyn caused by aberrant cleavage of this fibrillogenic protein are hypothesized to participate in its sequestration into inclusions subsequently leading to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death. Here, we investigated the role of calpain cleavage of αSyn in vivo by generating two opposing mouse models. We crossed into human [A30P]αSyn transgenic (i) mice deficient for calpastatin, a calpain-specific inhibitor, thus enhancing calpain activity (SynCAST(−)) and (ii) mice overexpressing human calpastatin leading to reduced calpain activity (SynCAST(+)). As anticipated, a reduced calpain activity led to a decreased number of αSyn-positive aggregates, whereas loss of calpastatin led to increased truncation of αSyn in SynCAST(−). Furthermore, overexpression of calpastatin decreased astrogliosis and the calpain-dependent degradation of synaptic proteins, potentially ameliorating the observed neuropathology in [A30P]αSyn and SynCAST(+) mice. Overall, our data further support a crucial role of calpains, particularly of calpain 1, in the pathogenesis of PD and in disease-associated aggregation of αSyn, indicating a therapeutic potential of calpain inhibition in PD. PMID:24619358

  14. Exposure of the eggs to 17alpha-methyl testosterone reduced hatching success and growth and elicited teratogenic effects in postembryonic life stages of crayfish.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Günter

    2007-12-30

    Testosterone is regularly found in the tissues of decapod crustaceans. Although this vertebrate-type sex hormone is not the principal factor of sex differentiation in crustaceans, it was shown to be capable of acting on the reproductive organs of shrimps and crabs. In the present study I have exposed developing eggs and stage 5 juveniles of the parthenogenetic all female marbled crayfish to 17alpha-methyl testosterone in order to test whether in freshwater crayfish sex can be changed from female to male by this androgen. MT did not elicit sex change, neither when administered during embryonic development nor during juvenile stage 5, the main period of proliferation of the oocytes. However, exposure to 100 microg/L MT from 64% to 84% embryonic development resulted in prolonged embryonic development, reduced hatching success, reduced growth of the juveniles, and severe malformations of the appendages in the juveniles. The marbled crayfish is recommended to be considered for toxicity tests due to its easy culture in the laboratory and its genotypical uniformity.

  15. Tetrahydro iso-Alpha Acids from Hops Improve Glucose Homeostasis and Reduce Body Weight Gain and Metabolic Endotoxemia in High-Fat Diet-Fed Mice

    PubMed Central

    Van Roye, Marie; Delzenne, Nathalie M.; Cani, Patrice D.

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a low-grade inflammatory state possibly through changes in gut microbiota composition and the development of higher plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, i.e. metabolic endotoxemia. Various phytochemical compounds have been investigated as potential tools to regulate these metabolic features. Humulus lupulus L. (hops) contains several classes of compounds with anti-inflammatory potential. Recent evidence suggests that hops-derived compounds positively impact adipocyte metabolism and glucose tolerance in obese and diabetic rodents via undefined mechanisms. In this study, we found that administration of tetrahydro iso-alpha acids (termed META060) to high-fat diet (HFD)-fed obese and diabetic mice for 8 weeks reduced body weight gain, the development of fat mass, glucose intolerance, and fasted hyperinsulinemia, and normalized insulin sensitivity markers. This was associated with reduced portal plasma LPS levels, gut permeability, and higher intestinal tight junction proteins Zonula occludens-1 and occludin. Moreover, META060 treatment increased the plasma level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 and decreased the plasma level of the pro-inflammatory cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. In conclusion, this research allows us to decipher a novel mechanism contributing to the positive effects of META060 treatment, and supports the need to investigate such compounds in obese and type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:22470484

  16. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation by reducing the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}/retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, Adam J.; Luo Zhengyu; Vincent, Karen A.; Akita, Geoffrey Y.; Cheng, Seng H.; Gregory, Richard J.; Jiang Canwen

    2007-12-21

    In response to cellular hypoxia, cardiomyocytes adapt to consume less oxygen by shifting ATP production from mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation to glycolysis. The transcriptional activation of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes by hypoxia is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). In this study, we examined whether HIF-1 was involved in the suppression of mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. We showed that either hypoxia or adenovirus-mediated expression of a constitutively stable hybrid form (HIF-1{alpha}/VP16) suppressed mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by an accumulation of intracellular neutral lipid. Both treatments also reduced the mRNA levels of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mitochondrial import of fatty acids for {beta}-oxidation. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression of HIF-1{alpha}/VP16 in cardiomyocytes under normoxic conditions also mimicked the reduction in the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})/retinoid X receptor (RXR), in the presence or absence of a PPAR{alpha} ligand. These results suggest that HIF-1 may be involved in hypoxia-induced suppression of fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes by reducing the DNA binding activity of PPAR{alpha}/RXR.

  17. In Vitro Effects of the Reduced Form of Coenzyme Q(10) on Secretion Levels of TNF-alpha and Chemokines in Response to LPS in the Human Monocytic Cell Line THP-1.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Constance; Lorenz, Gerti; Rimbach, Gerald; Döring, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Ubiquinol-10 (QH(2)), the reduced form of Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)) serves as a potent antioxidant of lipid membranes. Because many antioxidants reveal potent anti-inflammatory effects, the influence of QH(2) on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were determined in the human monocytic cell line THP-1. Stimulation of cells with LPS resulted in a distinct release of Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), Macrophage inflammatory protein-1 alpha (MIP-1alpha), Regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) and Monocyte chemotattractant protein-1 (MCP-1). The LPS-induced responses were significantly decreased by pre-incubation of cells with QH(2) to 60.27 +/- 9.3% (p = 0.0009), 48.13 +/- 6.93% (p = 0.0007) and 74.36 +/- 7.25% (p = 0.008) for TNF-alpha, MIP-1alpha and RANTES, respectively. In conclusion, our results indicate anti-inflammatory effects of the reduced form of CoQ(10) on various proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in vitro.

  18. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Width, as an element of quality, does not apply to tobacco in strip form. (See Elements of Quality Chart... Heavy Fleshy Medium Thin Oil Lean Oily Rich Color intensity Pale Weak Moderate Strong Deep. Width... quality...

  19. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Width, as an element of quality, does not apply to tobacco in strip form. (See Elements of Quality Chart... Heavy Fleshy Medium Thin Oil Lean Oily Rich Color intensity Pale Weak Moderate Strong Deep. Width... quality...

  20. Reduced interferon-alpha production by Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines and lectin-stimulated lymphocytes in congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia type I.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, S N; Hasan, R; Smythe, J

    1997-08-01

    The concentrations of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) in supernatants from cultures of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from seven patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia (CDA) type I were below the 95% confidence limits for those derived from six healthy subjects. In contrast, the concentrations of IFN-alpha in supernatants from cultures of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from four patients with other types of CDA and four patients with hereditary sideroblastic anaemia were normal. Supernatants from cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen contained less IFN-alpha when the cells were derived from patients with CDA type I than when derived from healthy subjects. Since patients with CDA type I show a substantial haematological response to treatment with IFN-alpha, the data suggest that impaired IFN-alpha production may be an important pathogenetic mechanism in CDA type I.

  1. Alpha-chaconine-reduced metastasis involves a PI3K/Akt signaling pathway with downregulation of NF-kappaB in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yuan-Wei; Chen, Pin-Shern; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Jeng, Ya-Fang; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2007-12-26

    Alpha-chaconine, isolated from Solanum tuberosum Linn., is a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid in potato sprouts. Some reports demonstrated that alpha-chaconine had various anticarcinogenic properties. The aim of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of alpha-chaconine on lung adenocarcinoma cell metastasis in vitro. We chose the highly metastatic A549 cells, which were treated with various concentrations of alpha-chaconine to clarify the potential of inhibiting A549 cells invasion and migration. Data showed that alpha-chaconine inhibited A549 cell invasion/migration according to wound healing assay and Boyden chamber assay. Our results also showed that alpha-chaconine could inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Akt, whereas it did not affected phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulating kinase (ERK) and p38. In addition, alpha-chaconine significantly decreased the nuclear level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and the binding ability of NF-kappaB. These results suggested that alpha-chaconine inhibited A549 cell metastasis by a reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activities involving suppression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/NF-kappaB (PI3K/Akt/NF-kappaB) signaling pathway. Inhibiting metastasis by alpha-chaconine might offer a pivotal mechanism for its effective chemotherapeutic action.

  2. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Route width. (a) Routes and route segments over Federal airways, foreign airways, or advisory routes have a width equal to the designated width of those airways or advisory routes. Whenever the... clearance. (2) Minimum en route altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density...

  3. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Route width. (a) Routes and route segments over Federal airways, foreign airways, or advisory routes have a width equal to the designated width of those airways or advisory routes. Whenever the... clearance. (2) Minimum en route altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density...

  4. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Route width. (a) Routes and route segments over Federal airways, foreign airways, or advisory routes have a width equal to the designated width of those airways or advisory routes. Whenever the... clearance. (2) Minimum en route altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density...

  5. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Route width. (a) Routes and route segments over Federal airways, foreign airways, or advisory routes have a width equal to the designated width of those airways or advisory routes. Whenever the... clearance. (2) Minimum en route altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density...

  6. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Route width. (a) Routes and route segments over Federal airways, foreign airways, or advisory routes have a width equal to the designated width of those airways or advisory routes. Whenever the... clearance. (2) Minimum en route altitudes. (3) Ground and airborne navigation aids. (4) Air traffic density...

  7. 23 CFR 658.15 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.15 Width. (a) No State shall impose a width limitation of more or less than 102 inches, or its approximate metric equivalent, 2.6 meters (102.36 inches) on...

  8. Effects of alpha-escin on histomorphometrical parameters of long bones in rats with experimental post-steroid osteopenia.

    PubMed

    Cegieła, U; Pytlik, M; Janiec, W

    2000-01-01

    The excess of glucocorticosteroids leads to the development of osteopenia. A decreased bone formation rate and an increased bone resorption rate are observed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of alpha-escin on the experimental prednisolone-induced osteopenia. The experiments were carried out on male Wistar rats with initial body weight of 240-310 g, divided into 4 groups (n = 6): Control, Alpha-escin, Prednisolone, Prednisolone + alpha-escin. Prednisolone (5 mg/kg im daily) and/or alpha-escin (100 mg/kg po daily) were administered for 28 days. Transverse cross-section surfaces of the cortical diaphysis and of the marrow cavity in the tibia, transverse growth, width of endosteal and periosteal osteoid, thickness of trabeculae and width of epiphyseal cartilage were examined. Prednisolone administration caused osteopenic changes in rat bones. Alpha-escin administered to the control rats did not exert statistically significant influence on the investigated bone parameters. Alpha-escin administration to prednisolone-treated rats slightly reduced the unfavorable effects of prednisolone on width of periosteal and endosteal osteoid and periosteal transverse growth in the tibia.

  9. Reduced volume and increased training intensity elevate muscle Na+-K+ pump alpha2-subunit expression as well as short- and long-term work capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Bangsbo, Jens; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Wendell, Jesper; Nybo, Lars; Thomassen, Martin

    2009-12-01

    The present study examined muscle adaptations and alterations in work capacity in endurance-trained runners as a result of a reduced amount of training combined with speed endurance training. For a 6- to 9-wk period, 17 runners were assigned to either a speed endurance group with a 25% reduction in the amount of training but including speed endurance training consisting of six to twelve 30-s sprint runs 3-4 times/wk (SET group n = 12) or a control group (n = 5), which continued the endurance training ( approximately 55 km/wk). For the SET group, the expression of the muscle Na(+)-K(+) pump alpha(2)-subunit was 68% higher (P < 0.05) and the plasma K(+) level was reduced (P < 0.05) during repeated intense running after 9 wk. Performance in a 30-s sprint test and the first of the supramaximal exhaustive runs was improved (P < 0.05) by 7% and 36%, respectively, after the speed endurance training period. In the SET group, maximal O(2) uptake was unaltered, but the 3-km (3,000-m) time was reduced (P < 0.05) from 10.4 +/- 0.1 to 10.1 +/- 0.1 min and the 10-km (10,000-m) time was improved from 37.3 +/- 0.4 to 36.3 +/- 0.4 min (means +/- SE). Muscle protein expression and performance remained unaltered in the control group. The present data suggest that both short- and long-term exercise performances can be improved with a reduction in training volume if speed endurance training is performed and that the Na(+)-K(+) pump plays a role in the control of K(+) homeostasis and in the development of fatigue during repeated high-intensity exercise.

  10. Combined Intraperitoneal and Intrathecal Etanercept Reduce Increased Brain Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Levels and Rescues Spatial Deficits in Young Rats after Bile Duct Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Hsu, Mei-Hsin; Tain, You-Lin; Yu, Hong-Ren; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rats subjected to bile duct ligation (BDL) exhibit increased systemic oxidative stress and brain dysfunction characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), including fatigue, neurotransmitter alterations, cognitive and motor impairment, and brain inflammation. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are both increased in plasma and brain in encephalopathy induced by chronic liver failure. This study first determined the temporal profiles of TNF-α and ADMA in the plasma, brain cortex, and hippocampus in young BDL rats. Next, we examined whether etanercept was beneficial in preventing brain damage. Methods: Young rats underwent sham ligation or BDL at day 17 ± 1 for 4 weeks. Treatment group rats were administered etanercept (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (IP) three times per week with or without etanercept (100 μg) intrathecally (IT) three times in total. Results: We found increased plasma TNF-α, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR2), and ADMA levels, increased cortical TNF-α mRNA and protein and ADMA, and hippocampal TNF-α mRNA and protein, and spatial defects in young BDL rats. The increase in cortex TNF-α mRNA and ADMA were reduced by IP etanercept or combined IP and IT etanercept. Dually IP/IT etanercept administration reduced the increased cortical and hippocampal TNF-α mRNA and protein level as well as spatial deficits. Conclusions: We conclude that combined intraperitoneal and intrathecal etanercept reduce increased brain TNF-α and ADMA levels and rescues spatial deficits in young rats after BDL. PMID:27445694

  11. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors sensitize reduced glucocorticoid response mediated by TNF{alpha} in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Kenji . E-mail: knjond@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Nagashima, Masahiro; Kawakubo, Yo; Inoue, Shota; Hirano, Toshihiko; Oka, Kitaro

    2006-12-08

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential drugs administered topically or systematically for the treatment of autoimmune skin diseases such as pemphigus. However, a certain proportion of patients does not respond well to GCs. Although studies on the relationship between cytokines and GC insensitivity in local tissues have attracted attention recently, little is known about the underlying mechanism(s) for GC insensitivity in epidermal keratinocytes. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) {alpha} reduces GC-induced transactivation of endogenous genes as well as a reporter plasmid which contains GC responsive element (GRE) in human epidermal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT). The GC insensitivity by TNF{alpha} was not accompanied by changes in mRNA expressions of GR isoforms ({alpha} or {beta}). However, we observed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) significantly sensitized the GC-induced transactivation of anti-inflammatory genes (glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 gene in the presence of TNF{alpha}. Additionally, we observed that TNF{alpha} reduced prednisolone (PSL)-dependent nuclear translocation of GR, which was restored by pre-treatment of MEK-1 inhibitors. This is the first study demonstrating a role of the MEK-1/ERK cascade in TNF{alpha}-mediated GC insensitivity. Our data suggest that overexpression of TNF{alpha} leads to topical GC insensitivity by reducing GR nuclear translocation in keratinocytes, and our findings also suggest that inhibiting the MEK-1/ERK cascade may offer a therapeutic potential for increasing GC efficacy in epidermis where sufficient inflammatory suppression is required.

  12. Topical application of the cornea post-infection with plasmid DNA encoding interferon-alpha1 but not recombinant interferon-alphaA reduces herpes simplex virus type 1-induced mortality in mice.

    PubMed

    Noisakran, S; Carr, D J

    2001-12-03

    A study was undertaken to compare the efficacy of recombinant interferon (rIFN)-alphaA to plasmid DNA encoding IFN-alpha1 against ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. The topical application of rIFN-alphaA (100-300 units/eye) onto the cornea of mice subsequently infected 24 h later with HSV-1 antagonized viral-induced mortality. The enhancement in cumulative survival in the rIFN-alphaA-treated mice correlated with a reduction of viral titers recovered in the eye and trigeminal ganglion (TG) at 3 and 6 days post-infection. The protective effect was site-specific such that when rIFN-alphaA was administered orally or intranasally, no efficacy against HSV-1 was observed. However, the protective effect was time-dependent. Specifically, when the rIFN-alphaA (100-1000 units/eye) was administered at 24 h post-infection, no protective effect was observed against HSV-1 compared to the vehicle-treated group. In contrast, plasmid DNA (100 microg/eye) containing the IFN-alpha1 transgene showed significant protection when topically applied 24 h post-infection. Although the transgene was found to traffic distal from the site of application (eye), including the trigeminal ganglion and the spleen where CD11b(+) and CD11c(+) cells express the transgene, the migration of the transgene did not correlate with efficacy. Collectively, the results suggest that naked DNA encoding type I IFN applied post-infection provides a greater degree of protection against ocular HSV-1 infection in comparison with recombinant protein effectively antagonizing viral replication and spread.

  13. Vanadium oxides on aluminum oxide supports. 1. Surface termination and reducibility of vanadia films on alpha-Al2O3(0001).

    PubMed

    Todorova, Tanya K; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Veronica; Sauer, Joachim

    2005-12-15

    Using density functional theory and statistical thermodynamics, we obtained the phase diagram of thin VnOm films of varying thickness (approximately 2-6 A, 1-6 vanadium layers) supported on alpha-Al2O3(0001). Depending on the temperature, oxygen pressure, and vanadium concentration, films with different thickness and termination may form. In ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), at room temperature and for low vanadium concentrations, an ultrathin (1 x 1) O=V-terminated film is most stable. As more vanadium is supplied, the thickest possible films form. Their structures and terminations correspond to previous findings for the (0001) surface of bulk V2O3 [Kresse et al., Surf. Sci. 2004, 555, 118]. The presence of surface vanadyl (O=V) groups is a prevalent feature. They are stable up to at least 800 K in UHV. Vanadyl oxygen atoms induce a V(2p) core-level shift of about 2 eV on the surface V atoms. The reducibility of the supported films is characterized by the energy of oxygen defect formation. For the stable structures, the results vary between 4.11 and 3.59 eV per 1/2O2. In contrast, oxygen removal from the V2O5(001) surface is much easier (1.93 eV). This provides a possible explanation for the lower catalytic activity of vanadium oxides supported on alumina compared to that of crystalline vanadia particles.

  14. Ru(bpy)32+/nanoporous silver-based electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for alpha fetoprotein enhanced by gold nanoparticles decorated black carbon intercalated reduced graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Lv, Xiaohui; Wang, Qi; Ma, Hongmin; Wu, Dan; Yan, Tao; Hu, Lihua; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was proposed for the quantitative determination of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) using gold nanoparticles decorated black carbon intercalated reduced graphene oxide (Au-rGO@CB) as sensing platform and nanoporous silver (NPS) loaded Ru(bpy)32+ as labels. In this work, intercalation of CB inhibited the accumulation of rGO and Au-rGO@CB was firstly used to immobilize primary antibody (Ab1) in ECL system. NPS prepared by the dealloying of binary alloy has high pore volume and surface areas, which was used to load amount of secondary antibodies (Ab2) and Ru(bpy)32+, which could greatly enhance the ECL intensity. Under optimal conditions, the designed immunosensor exhibited wider linear range from 0.0001 to 30 ng/mL with a relative lower detection limit of 33 fg/mL for AFP detection. Overall, the designed immunosensor exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity, good repeatability and stability. This proposed method provided a potential application for clinical monitoring of AFP. PMID:26829062

  15. Lavandula Reduces Heart Injury via Attenuating Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and Oxidative Stress in A Rat Model of Infarct-Like Myocardial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vakili, Abedin; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Zahedi khorasani, Mahdi; Darabian, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Objective Lavender is used in herbal medicine for different therapeutic purposes. Nonetheless, potential therapeutic effects of this plant in ischemic heart disease and its possible mechanisms remain to be investigated. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, lavender oil at doses of 200, 400 or 800 mg/kg was administered through gastric gavage for 14 days before infarct-like myocardial injury (MI). The carotid artery and left ventricle were cannulated to record arterial blood pressure (BP) and cardiac function. At the end of experiment, the heart was removed and histopathological alteration, oxidative stress biomarkers as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level were evaluated. Results Induction of M.I caused cardiac dysfunction, increased levels of lipid peroxidation, TNF-α and troponin I in heart tissue (P<0.001). Pretreatment with lavender oil at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly reduced myocardial injury, troponin I and TNF-α. In addition, it improved cardiac function and antioxidant enzyme activity (P<0.01). Conclusion Our finding showed that lavender oil has cardioprotective effect through inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammatory pathway in the rat model with infarct-like MI. We suggest that lavender oil may be helpful in prevention or attenuation of heart injury in patients with high risk of myocardial infarction and/or ischemic heart disease. PMID:28367419

  16. Prussian blue-gold nanoparticles-ionic liquid functionalized reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as label for ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qi; Liu, Na; Ma, Zhanfang

    2014-06-04

    In this work, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) protected Prussian blue/gold nanoparticles/ionic liquid functionalized reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO-Au-PDDA-PB) nanocomposite was fabricated. The resulting nanocomposite exhibited high biocompatibility, conductivity and catalytic activity. To assess the performance of the nanocomposite, a sensitive sandwich-type immunosensor was constructed for detecting alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Greatly enhanced sensitivity for this immunosensor was based on triple signal amplification strategies. Firstly, IL-rGO modified electrode was used as biosensor platform to capture a large amount of antibody due to its increased surface area, thus amplifying the detection response. Secondly, a large number of Au-PDDA-PB was conjugated on the surface of IL-rGO, which meant the enrichment of the signal and the more immobilization of label antibody. Finally, the catalytic reaction between H2O2 and the IL-rGO-Au-PDDA-PB nanocomposite further enhanced the signal response. The signals increased linearly with AFP concentrations in the range of 0.01-100 ng mL(-1). The detection limit for AFP was 4.6 pg mL(-1). The immunosensor showed high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and good stability. Moreover, the immunosensor was applied to the analysis of AFP in serum sample with satisfactory result. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Alpha1-chimaerin, a Rac1 GTPase-activating protein, is expressed at reduced mRNA levels in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tomoko; Konishi, Yoshihiro; Shimohama, Shun; Beach, Thomas G.; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Alpha1-chimaerin is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rac1, a member of the Rho small GTPase family, whose action leads to the inactivation of Rac1. Rac1 activity is upregulated in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the role of α1-chimaerin. In this study, we investigated the expression and localization of α1-chimaerin mRNA in postmortem human brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease and control subjects. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated that α1-chimaerin was expressed by neurons in the neo-cortex of the temporal lobe and the hippocampus of both controls and Alzheimer's disease cases, with the signal intensity dramatically decreased in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Real-time PCR analysis confirmed a significant reduction of α1-chimaerin mRNA expression in the temporal cortex of Alzheimer's disease cases. In contrast, α2-chimaerin mRNA levels showed no significant difference between the groups. The present study showed reduced α1-chimaerin expression in the brain of Alzheimer's disease cases, suggesting a role in the upregulation of Rac1 activity during the disease process. PMID:25676811

  18. Krill powder increases liver lipid catabolism and reduces glucose mobilization in tumor necrosis factor-alpha transgenic mice fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Bjørndal, Bodil; Vik, Rita; Brattelid, Trond; Vigerust, Natalya Filipchuk; Burri, Lena; Bohov, Pavol; Nygård, Ottar; Skorve, Jon; Berge, Rolf K

    2012-10-01

    A promising approach to ameliorate obesity and obesity-associated diseases is the identification of new sources of dietary ingredients. The present study investigated the hepatic regulation of energy metabolism after feeding a powder isolated from Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) in a transgenic mouse model of chronic inflammation (human tumor necrosis factor-alpha (hTNFα) mice) known to display unfavorable effects on lipid metabolism. Male hTNFα mice were fed high-fat diets (23.6%, w/w) with or without krill powder (6.4% lipids, 4.3% protein, w/w) for 6 weeks. Blood, liver lipid, and fatty acid composition, as well as hepatic enzyme activities and gene expressions, were determined. Krill powder fed mice displayed lowered hepatic and plasma triacylglycerol levels compared to mice on a high-fat casein diet. This was accompanied by down-regulated hepatic expression of genes involved in lipogenesis and glycerolipid synthesis, and increased β-oxidation activity. In addition, the krill powder diet lowered plasma levels of cholesterol, as well as hepatic gene expression of sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBP2) and enzymes involved in cholesterol synthesis. Notably, genes involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis were significantly reduced in liver by the krill powder diet, while genes involved in oxidative phosphorylation and uncoupling were not affected. Krill powder also reduced endogenous TNFα in liver, indicating an anti-inflammatory effect. In a high-fat mouse model with disturbed lipid metabolism due to persistent hTNFα expression, krill powder showed significant effects on hepatic glucose- and lipid metabolism, resulting in an improved lipid status in liver and plasma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced expression of collagen VI alpha 3 (COL6A3) confers resistance to inflammation-induced MCP1 expression in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Gesta, Stephane; Guntur, Kalyani; Majumdar, Ishita Deb; Akella, Syamala; Vishnudas, Vivek K; Sarangarajan, Rangaprasad; Narain, Niven R

    2016-08-01

    Collagen VI alpha 3 (COL6A3) is associated with insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation. In this study, the role of COL6A3 in human adipocyte function was characterized. Immortalized human preadipocyte cell lines stably expressing control or COL6A3 shRNA were used to study adipocyte function and inflammation. COL6A3 knockdown increased triglyceride content, lipolysis, insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation, and mRNA expression of key adipogenic genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ, glucose transporter, adiponectin, and fatty acid binding protein), indicating increased adipocyte function and insulin sensitivity. However, COL6A3 knockdown decreased basal adipocyte chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 [CCL2, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP1)] mRNA expression, reduced secreted protein levels, and abrogated tumor necrosis factor-α- and lipopolysaccharide-induced MCP1 mRNA expression. In addition, while control adipocytes co-cultured with THP1 macrophages showed a threefold increase in adipocyte MCP1 mRNA expression, in COL6A3 knockdown adipocytes MCP1 mRNA expression was unaltered by co-culturing. Lastly, in normal differentiated adipocytes, matrix metalloproteinase-11 treatment reduced expression of COL6A3 protein, MCP1 mRNA, MCP1 secretion, and abrogated tumor necrosis factor-α- and lipopolysaccharide-induced MCP1 mRNA expression and protein secretion. COL6A3 knockdown in adipocytes leads to the development of a unique state of inflammatory resistance via suppression of MCP1 induction. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  20. THE LYMAN ALPHA MORPHOLOGY OF LOCAL STARBURST GALAXIES: RELEASE OF CALIBRATED IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Oestlin, Goeran; Hayes, Matthew; Kunth, Daniel; Atek, Hakim; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Leitherer, Claus; Petrosian, Artashes E-mail: matthew.hayes@unige.ch

    2009-09-15

    We present reduced and calibrated high resolution Lyman-alpha (Ly{alpha}) images for a sample of six local star-forming galaxies. Targets were selected to represent a range in luminosity and metallicity and to include both known Ly{alpha} emitters and nonemitters. Far ultraviolet imaging was carried out with the Solar Blind Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the F122M (Ly{alpha} online) and F140LP (continuum) filters. The resulting Ly{alpha} images are the product of careful modeling of both the stellar and nebular continua, facilitated by supporting HST imaging at {lambda} {approx} 2200, 3300, 4400, 5500, H{alpha}, and 8000 A, combined with Starburst 99 evolutionary synthesis models, and prescriptions for dust extinction on the continuum. In all, the resulting morphologies in Ly{alpha}, H{alpha}, and UV continuum are qualitatively very different and we show that the bulk of Ly{alpha} emerges in a diffuse component resulting from resonant scattering events. Ly{alpha} escape fractions, computed from integrated H{alpha} luminosities and recombination theory, are found never to exceed 14%. Internal dust extinction is estimated in each pixel and used to correct Ly{alpha} fluxes. However, the extinction corrections are far too small (by factors from 2.6 to infinity) to reconcile the emerging global Ly{alpha} luminosities with standard recombination predictions. Surprisingly, when comparing the global equivalent widths of Ly{alpha} and H{alpha}, the two quantities appear to be anticorrelated, which may be due to the evolution of mechanical feedback from the starburst. This calls for caution in the interpretation of Ly{alpha} observations in terms of star formation rates. The images presented have a physical resolution 3 orders of magnitude better than attainable at high redshifts from the ground with current instrumentation and our images may therefore serve as useful templates for comparing with observations and modeling of

  1. The Nature of High Equivalent Width Lyman-α Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, S. L.; Rhoads, J. E.; Malhotra, S.; Pirzkal, N.; Wang, J.

    2005-12-01

    We present new results on the nature of the high equivalent width Lyα lines seen in high-redshift galaxies. These galaxies were identified on the basis of their large equivalent width Lyα emission, beyond the maximum expected for normal stellar populations. To be produced, this strong Lyα emission requires a strong ionizing continuum. Previous X-ray images and optical spectra show that this emission is not powered by active galactic nuclei. The optical colors of these galaxies provide a diagnostic of the stellar populations. The large equivalent widths seen in the Lyα line in these galaxies could be produced via star formation if the stellar photospheres are hotter than normal, which might be expected for star formation in low metallicity galaxies. They could also result from a top-heavy initial mass function. Both of these scenarios might be expected in primitive galaxies. To investigate these galaxies, we have computed stellar population models using the stellar population synthesis code created by Bruzual and Charlot (2003). We will use these models to predict the equivalent width distribution of the Lyα line in these high-redshift galaxies. We will also be able to derive estimates of stellar masses and stellar population ages, and be able to determine if these systems are indeed young and relatively primitive. Furthermore, we are obtaining new deep broadband imaging data on high-redshift galaxies taken from the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey. These observations will yield better equivalent width measurements and continuum colors than previous data has allowed. We will compare these colors with the expectations for hot stars. We will also be able to constrain the star-formation rate using the UV continuum light from these galaxies, which will provide a valuable comparison with star-formation rates derived from the Lyα luminosity alone.

  2. Red cell distribution width and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gulcan Kurt, Yasemin; Cayci, Tuncer; Aydin, Fevzi Nuri; Agilli, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Red cell distribution width is a measure of deviation of the volume of red blood cells. It is a marker of anisocytosis and often used to evaluate the possible causes of anemia. Elevated red cell distribution width levels are also associated with acute and chronic inflammatory responses. In nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, inflammation is accompanied with steatosis. For assuming red cell distribution width as a marker of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, intervening factors such as levels of inflammatory markers should also be evaluated. PMID:25473202

  3. Limit Cycles Can Reduce the Width of the Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haqq-Misra, Jacob; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Batalha, Natasha E.; Harman, Chester E.; Kasting, James F.

    2016-08-01

    The liquid water habitable zone (HZ) describes the orbital distance at which a terrestrial planet can maintain above-freezing conditions through regulation by the carbonate-silicate cycle. Recent calculations have suggested that planets in the outer regions of the HZ cannot maintain stable, warm climates, but rather should oscillate between long, globally glaciated states and shorter periods of climatic warmth. Such conditions, similar to “Snowball Earth” episodes experienced on Earth, would be inimical to the development of complex land life, including intelligent life. Here, we build on previous studies with an updated energy balance climate model to calculate this “limit cycle” region of the HZ where such cycling would occur. We argue that an abiotic Earth would have a greater CO2 partial pressure than today because plants and other biota help to enhance the storage of CO2 in soil. When we tune our abiotic model accordingly, we find that limit cycles can occur but that previous calculations have overestimated their importance. For G stars like the Sun, limit cycles occur only for planets with CO2 outgassing rates less than that on modern Earth. For K- and M-star planets, limit cycles should not occur; however, M-star planets may be inhospitable to life for other reasons. Planets orbiting late G-type and early K-type stars retain the greatest potential for maintaining warm, stable conditions. Our results suggest that host star type, planetary volcanic activity, and seafloor weathering are all important factors in determining whether planets will be prone to limit cycling.

  4. Human Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (hAAT) therapy reduces renal dysfunction and acute tubular necrosis in a murine model of bilateral kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Maicas, Nuria; van der Vlag, Johan; Bublitz, Janin; Florquin, Sandrine; Bakker-van Bebber, Marinka; Dinarello, Charles A.; Verweij, Vivienne; Masereeuw, Roos; Joosten, Leo A.

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), the major serum serine protease inhibitor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of human AAT (hAAT) monotherapy during the early and recovery phase of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury. Mild renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury was induced in male C57Bl/6 mice by bilateral clamping of the renal artery and vein for 20 min. hAAT (80 mg/kg, Prolastin®) was administered daily intraperitoneally (i.p.) from day -1 until day 7 after surgery. Control animals received the same amount of human serum albumin (hAlb). Plasma, urine and kidneys were collected at 2h, 1, 2, 3, 8 and 15 days after reperfusion for histological and biochemical analysis. hAAT partially preserved renal function and tubular integrity after induction of bilateral kidney I/R injury, which was accompanied with reduced renal influx of macrophages and a significant decrease of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) protein levels in urine and plasma. During the recovery phase, hAAT significantly decreased kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) protein levels in urine but showed no significant effect on renal fibrosis. Although the observed effect size of hAAT administration was limited and therefore the clinical relevance of our findings should be evaluated carefully, these data support the potential of this natural protein to ameliorate ischemic and inflammatory conditions. PMID:28235038

  5. Reduced odor responses from antennal neurons of G(q)alpha, phospholipase Cbeta, and rdgA mutants in Drosophila support a role for a phospholipid intermediate in insect olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Kain, Pinky; Chakraborty, Tuhin Subra; Sundaram, Susinder; Siddiqi, Obaid; Rodrigues, Veronica; Hasan, Gaiti

    2008-04-30

    Mechanisms by which G-protein-coupled odorant receptors transduce information in insects still need elucidation. We show that mutations in the Drosophila gene for G(q)alpha (dgq) significantly reduce both the amplitude of the field potentials recorded from the whole antenna in responses to odorants as well as the frequency of evoked responses of individual sensory neurons. This requirement for G(q)alpha is for adult function and not during antennal development. Conversely, brief expression of a dominant-active form of G(q)alpha in adults leads to enhanced odor responses. To understand signaling downstream of G(q)alpha in olfactory sensory neurons, genetic interactions of dgq were tested with mutants in genes known to affect phospholipid signaling. dgq mutant phenotypes were further enhanced by mutants in a PLCbeta (phospholipase Cbeta) gene, plc21C. Interestingly although, the olfactory phenotype of mutant alleles of diacylglycerol kinase (rdgA) was rescued by dgq mutant alleles. Our results suggest that G(q)alpha-mediated olfactory transduction in Drosophila requires a phospholipid second messenger the levels of which are regulated by a cycle of phosphatidylinositol 1,4-bisphosphate breakdown and regeneration.

  6. ENMD-1198, a novel tubulin-binding agent reduces HIF-1alpha and STAT3 activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) cells, and inhibits growth and vascularization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Moser, Christian; Lang, Sven A; Mori, Akira; Hellerbrand, Claus; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K; Fogler, William E; Stoeltzing, Oliver

    2008-07-23

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a highly vascularized tumor entity and the process of angiogenesis is essential for the growth of HCC. Importantly, the pro-angiogenic transcription factors HIF-1alpha and STAT3 have been implicated in HCC progression, thus representing interesting targets for molecular targeted therapy. We hypothesized that therapeutic inhibition of HIF-1alpha could be achieved by using a novel tubulin-binding agent (ENMD-1198). ENMD-1198 is an analog of 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) with antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity. The human HCC cell lines HUH-7 and HepG2 were used for experiments. Effects of ENMD-1198 on constitutive and inducible (hypoxia, growth factors) activation of signaling cascades, including HIF-1alpha and STAT3, were investigated by Western blotting. Changes in VEGF expression were determined by real-time PCR. Effects of ENMD-1198 on cancer cell migration and invasion were evaluated in in vitro-assays. The growth-inhibitory effects of ENMD-1198 (200 mg/kg/day) were determined in a subcutaneous tumor model (HUH-7). ENMD-1198 inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPK/Erk, PI-3K/Akt and FAK. Moreover, activation of HIF-1alpha and STAT3 was dramatically reduced by ENMD-1198, which resulted in lower VEGF mRNA expression (P < 0.05). In addition, tumor cell migratory and invasive properties were significantly inhibited (P < 0.05, for both). In vivo, treatment with ENMD-1198 led to a significant reduction in tumor growth, tumor vascularization, and numbers of proliferating tumor cells (P < 0.05 for all). The novel microtubule destabilizing agent ENMD-1198 is suitable for inhibiting HIF-1alpha and STAT3 in human HCC cells and leads to reduced tumor growth and vascularization in vivo. Hence, inhibition of HIF-1alpha and STAT3 could prove valuable for therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  7. Inhibition of 5alpha-reduced steroid biosynthesis impedes acquisition of ethanol drinking in male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Ford, Matthew M; Yoneyama, Naomi; Strong, Moriah N; Fretwell, Andrea; Tanchuck, Michelle; Finn, Deborah A

    2008-08-01

    Allopregnanolone (ALLO) is a physiologically relevant neurosteroid modulator of GABA(A) receptors, and it exhibits a psychopharmacological profile that closely resembles the post-ingestive effects of ethanol. The 5alpha-reductase inhibitor finasteride (FIN), which inhibits biosynthesis of ALLO and structurally related neurosteroids, was previously demonstrated to reduce the maintenance of limited-access ethanol consumption. The primary aim of the current work was to determine whether FIN would reduce the acquisition of drinking in ethanol-naïve mice. Male C57BL/6J (B6) mice were acclimated to a reverse light/dark schedule, and were provided ad libitum access to chow and water. Following habituation to vehicle injections (VEH; 20% w/v beta-cyclodextrin; i.p.) administered 22-hour prior to drinking sessions with water only, mice were divided into 3 treatment groups: vehicle control (VEH), 50 mg/kg FIN (FIN-50), and 100 mg/kg FIN (FIN-100). Twenty-two hours after the first treatment, mice were permitted the inaugural 2-hour limited access to a 10% v/v ethanol solution (10E) and water. The acquisition of 10E consumption and underlying drinking patterns were assessed during FIN treatment (7 days) and subsequent FIN withdrawal (13 days) phases. FIN dose-dependently blocked the acquisition of 10E drinking and prevented the development of ethanol preference, thereby suggesting that the GABAergic neurosteroids may be important in the establishment of stable drinking patterns. FIN-elicited reductions in 10E intake were primarily attributable to selective and marked reductions in bout frequency, as no changes were observed in bout size, duration, or lick rates following FIN treatment. FIN-treated mice continued to exhibit attenuated ethanol consumption after 2 weeks post-treatment, despite a full recovery in brain ALLO levels. A second study confirmed the rightward and downward shift in the acquisition of ethanol intake following 7 daily FIN injections. While there were no

  8. Alpha Interferon Inhibits Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) Reactivation in Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cells and Reduces HHV-8 Load in Cultured Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Monini, Paolo; Carlini, Francesca; Stürzl, Michael; Rimessi, Paola; Superti, Fabiana; Franco, Marina; Melucci-Vigo, Gianna; Cafaro, Aurelio; Goletti, Delia; Sgadari, Cecilia; Butto’, Stefano; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Chiozzini, Chiara; Barresi, Caterina; Tinari, Antonella; Bonaccorsi, Angela; Capobianchi, Maria R.; Giuliani, Massimo; di Carlo, Aldo; Andreoni, Massimo; Rezza, Giovanni; Ensoli, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Infection by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with the development of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). Since regression of KS can be achieved by treatment of the patients with alpha interferon (IFN-α), we analyzed the effects of IFN-α or anti-IFN-α antibodies (Ab) on HHV-8 latently infected primary effusion lymphoma-derived cell lines (BCBL-1 and BC-1) and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with all forms of KS and from at-risk subjects. IFN-α inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the amplification of HHV-8 DNA in BCBL-1 cells induced to lytic infection with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA). This effect was associated with the inhibition of the expression of HHV-8 nut-1 and kaposin genes that are induced early and several hours, respectively, after TPA treatment. In addition, IFN-α inhibited virus production and/or release from BCBL-1 cells. Inhibition of nut-1 and kaposin genes by IFN-α was also observed in BC-1 cells induced with n-butyrate. Conversely, the addition of anti-IFN-α Ab to TPA-induced BCBL-1 cells resulted in a larger number of mature enveloped particles and in a more extensive cytopathic effect due to the neutralization of the endogenous IFN produced by these cells. IFN was also produced by cultured PBMC from HHV-8-infected individuals, and this was associated with a loss of viral DNA during culture. However, the addition of anti-IFN-α Ab or anti-type I IFN receptor Ab promoted the maintenance of HHV-8 DNA in these cells that was associated with the detection of the latency-associated kaposin RNA. Finally, the addition of IFN-α reduced the HHV-8 load in PBMC. Thus, IFN-α appears to have inhibitory effects on HHV-8 persistent infection of PBMC. These results suggest that, in addition to inhibiting the expression of angiogenic factors that are key to KS development, IFN-α may induce KS regression by reducing the HHV-8 load and/or inhibiting virus reactivation. PMID:10196299

  9. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... (a) Approved routes and route segments over U.S. Federal airways or foreign airways (and advisory... designated width of those airways or routes. Whenever the Administrator finds it necessary to determine the width of other approved routes, he considers the following: (1) Terrain clearance. (2) Minimum en route...

  10. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... (a) Approved routes and route segments over U.S. Federal airways or foreign airways (and advisory... designated width of those airways or routes. Whenever the Administrator finds it necessary to determine the width of other approved routes, he considers the following: (1) Terrain clearance. (2) Minimum en route...

  11. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... (a) Approved routes and route segments over U.S. Federal airways or foreign airways (and advisory... designated width of those airways or routes. Whenever the Administrator finds it necessary to determine the width of other approved routes, he considers the following: (1) Terrain clearance. (2) Minimum en route...

  12. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... (a) Approved routes and route segments over U.S. Federal airways or foreign airways (and advisory... designated width of those airways or routes. Whenever the Administrator finds it necessary to determine the width of other approved routes, he considers the following: (1) Terrain clearance. (2) Minimum en route...

  13. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... (a) Approved routes and route segments over U.S. Federal airways or foreign airways (and advisory... designated width of those airways or routes. Whenever the Administrator finds it necessary to determine the width of other approved routes, he considers the following: (1) Terrain clearance. (2) Minimum en route...

  14. Betaine supplement alleviates hepatic triglyceride accumulation of apolipoprotein E deficient mice via reducing methylation of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor alpha promoter.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Chen, Li; Tan, Yaozong; Wei, Jun; Chang, Ying; Jin, Tianru; Zhu, Huilian

    2013-03-13

    Betaine is a methyl donor and has been considered as a lipotropic effect substance. But its mechanism remains unclear. Hepatic steatosis is associated with abnormal expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. DNA methylation contributes to the disregulation of gene expression. Here we hypothesized that betaine supplement and subsequent DNA methylation modifications alter the expression of genes that are involved in hepatic lipid metabolism and hence alleviate hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Male wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice (n = 6) were fed with the AIN-93 G diet. ApoE-/- mice (n = 12), weight-matched with the WT mice, were divided into two groups (n = 6 per group), and fed with the AIN-93 G diet and AIN-93 G supplemented with 2% betaine/100 g diet. Seven weeks after the intervention, mice were sacrificed. Liver betaine, choline, homocysteine concentration were measured by HPLC. Liver oxidants activity and triglyceride level were assessed by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. Finally, hepatic PPAR alpha gene and its target genes expression levels and the methylation status of the PPAR alpha gene were determined. ApoE-/- mice had higher hepatic triglyceride and lower GSH-Px activity when compared with the WT mice. Betaine intervention reversed triglyceride deposit, enhanced SOD and GSH-Px activity in the liver. Interestingly, mice fed on betaine-supplemented diet showed a dramatic increase of hepatic choline concentration and a decrease of betaine and homocysteine concentration relative to the WT mice and the ApoE-/- mice absent with betaine intervention. Expression of PPAR alpha and CPT1 were decreased and expression of FAS was markedly increased in ApoE-/- mice. In parallel, PPAR alpha promoter methylation level were slightly increased in ApoE-/- mice though without significance. Betaine supplement upregulated expression of PPAR alpha and its target genes (CPT1, CYP2E1) and reversed hypermethylation of PPAR alpha promoter of ApoE-/- mice. Furthermore

  15. Betaine supplement alleviates hepatic triglyceride accumulation of apolipoprotein E deficient mice via reducing methylation of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor alpha promoter

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Betaine is a methyl donor and has been considered as a lipotropic effect substance. But its mechanism remains unclear. Hepatic steatosis is associated with abnormal expression of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism. DNA methylation contributes to the disregulation of gene expression. Here we hypothesized that betaine supplement and subsequent DNA methylation modifications alter the expression of genes that are involved in hepatic lipid metabolism and hence alleviate hepatic triglyceride accumulation. Methods Male wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 mice (n = 6) were fed with the AIN-93 G diet. ApoE−/− mice (n = 12), weight-matched with the WT mice, were divided into two groups (n = 6 per group), and fed with the AIN-93 G diet and AIN-93 G supplemented with 2% betaine/100 g diet. Seven weeks after the intervention, mice were sacrificed. Liver betaine, choline, homocysteine concentration were measured by HPLC. Liver oxidants activity and triglyceride level were assessed by ultraviolet spectrophotometry. Finally, hepatic PPAR alpha gene and its target genes expression levels and the methylation status of the PPAR alpha gene were determined. Results ApoE−/− mice had higher hepatic triglyceride and lower GSH-Px activity when compared with the WT mice. Betaine intervention reversed triglyceride deposit, enhanced SOD and GSH-Px activity in the liver. Interestingly, mice fed on betaine-supplemented diet showed a dramatic increase of hepatic choline concentration and a decrease of betaine and homocysteine concentration relative to the WT mice and the ApoE−/− mice absent with betaine intervention. Expression of PPAR alpha and CPT1 were decreased and expression of FAS was markedly increased in ApoE−/− mice. In parallel, PPAR alpha promoter methylation level were slightly increased in ApoE−/− mice though without significance. Betaine supplement upregulated expression of PPAR alpha and its target genes (CPT1, CYP2E1) and reversed

  16. Alpha and beta thalassemia.

    PubMed

    Muncie, Herbert L; Campbell, James

    2009-08-15

    The thalassemias are a group of inherited hematologic disorders caused by defects in the synthesis of one or more of the hemoglobin chains. Alpha thalassemia is caused by reduced or absent synthesis of alpha globin chains, and beta thalassemia is caused by reduced or absent synthesis of beta globin chains. Imbalances of globin chains cause hemolysis and impair erythropoiesis. Silent carriers of alpha thalassemia and persons with alpha or beta thalassemia trait are asymptomatic and require no treatment. Alpha thalassemia intermedia, or hemoglobin H disease, causes hemolytic anemia. Alpha thalassemia major with hemoglobin Bart's usually results in fatal hydrops fetalis. Beta thalassemia major causes hemolytic anemia, poor growth, and skeletal abnormalities during infancy. Affected children will require regular lifelong blood transfusions. Beta thalassemia intermedia is less severe than beta thalassemia major and may require episodic blood transfusions. Transfusion-dependent patients will develop iron overload and require chelation therapy to remove the excess iron. Bone marrow transplants can be curative for some children with beta thalassemia major. Persons with thalassemia should be referred for preconception genetic counseling, and persons with alpha thalassemia trait should consider chorionic villus sampling to diagnose infants with hemoglobin Bart's, which increases the risk of toxemia and postpartum bleeding. Persons with the thalassemia trait have a normal life expectancy. Persons with beta thalassemia major often die from cardiac complications of iron overload by 30 years of age.

  17. Elevated red blood cell distribution width and inflammation in printing workers

    PubMed Central

    Celik, Ahmet; Aydin, Neriman; Ozcirpici, Birgul; Saricicek, Edibe; Sezen, Hatice; Okumus, Mehmet; Bozkurt, Selim; Kilinc, Metin

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to estimate the effects of exposure to chemical compounds on systemic biochemical inflammatory markers in printing industry workers. Material/Methods Fifty-eight printing workers from 19 different small- and medium-sized enterprises in the printing sector were investigated. For comparison, 80 healthy workers not subjected to workplace chemicals served as control subjects. Results No significant differences were observed between the printing workers and control subjects with respect to age, BMI, waist circumference/hip circumference ratio, smoking, and alcohol consumption. Printing workers had significantly higher serum TNF-alpha levels (11.02±5.34 vs. 9.26±3.87 pg/ml, p=0.039), plasma fibrinogen levels (1.74±0.49 vs. 1.38±0.5 mg/dl, p=0.012), and red blood cell distribution width (RDW-SD) (49.77±3.09 vs. 47.3±2.88 p<0.01) compared to control subjects. Conclusions Elevation of RDW, serum TNF-alpha, and plasma fibrinogen levels in printing workers may be due to systemic toxic effects of chemical compounds used in this sector. TNF-alpha is an inflammatory cytokine that has a wide spectrum of biological activities, and fibrinogen plays an important role in pathological processes. Some compounds may be carcinogenic or mutagenic. Better designed workplaces and working conditions will help to reduce the hazardous effects of chemical compounds. PMID:24231719

  18. Development of crash modification factors for changing lane width on roadway segments using generalized nonlinear models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chris; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Park, Juneyoung; Wang, Jung-Han

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of changing lane width in reducing crashes on roadway segments. To consider nonlinear relationships between crash rate and lane width, the study develops generalized nonlinear models (GNMs) using 3-years crash records and road geometry data collected for all roadway segments in Florida. The study also estimates various crash modification factors (CMFs) for different ranges of lane width based on the results of the GNMs. It was found that the crash rate was highest for 12-ft lane and lower for the lane width less than or greater than 12ft. GNMs can extrapolate this nonlinear continuous effect of lane width and estimate the CMFs for any lane width, not only selected lane widths, unlike generalized linear models (GLMs) with categorical variables. The CMFs estimated using GNMs reflect that crashes are less likely to occur for narrower lanes if the lane width is less than 12ft whereas crashes are less likely to occur for wider lanes if the lane width is greater than 12ft. However, these effects varied with the posted speed limits as the effect of interaction between lane width and speed limit was significant. The estimated CMFs show that crashes are less likely to occur for lane widths less than 12ft than the lane widths greater than 12ft if the speed limit is higher than or equal to 40mph. It was also found from the CMFs that crashes at higher severity levels (KABC and KAB) are less likely to occur for lane widths greater or less than 12ft compared to 12-ft lane. The study demonstrates that the CMFs estimated using GNMs clearly reflect variations in crashes with lane width, which cannot be captured by the CMFs estimated using GLMs. Thus, it is recommended that if the relationship between crash rate and lane width is nonlinear, the CMFs are estimated using GNMs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Critical comparison of Kramers' fission width with the stationary width from the Langevin equation

    SciTech Connect

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Pal, Santanu

    2009-06-15

    It is shown that Kramers' fission width, originally derived for a system with constant inertia, can be extended to systems with a deformation-dependent collective inertia, which is the case for nuclear fission. The predictions of Kramers' width for systems with variable inertia are found to be in very good agreement with the stationary fission widths obtained by solving the corresponding Langevin equations.

  20. Terrace width variations in complex lunar craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, Steven J.; Melosh, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    The widths of terrace structures in complex craters on the moon are compared to existing theoretical models of their origin. Terrace widths in an individual crater increase monotonically outward toward the crater rim. Similarly, the width W of the terraces lying closest to the rim of a crater of diameter D increases monotonically, obeying a least-squares power-law relation WS (km) = 0.09D exp 0.87 km). A simple model of slumping that ignores inertial forces and assumes a constant bedrock yield strength is in good agreement with the observations.

  1. Agonists of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors (PPAR) alpha, beta/delta or gamma reduce transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta-induced proteoglycans' production in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Poleni, P E; Bianchi, A; Etienne, S; Koufany, M; Sebillaud, S; Netter, P; Terlain, B; Jouzeau, J Y

    2007-05-01

    To investigate the potency of selective agonists of peroxisome proliferators-activated receptors' (PPAR) isotypes (alpha, beta/delta or gamma) to modulate the stimulating effect of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) on proteoglycans' (PGs) synthesis in chondrocytes. Rat chondrocytes embedded in alginate beads and cultured under low serum conditions were exposed to TGF-beta1 (10 ng/ml), alone or in combination with the following agonists: Wy14643 for PPARalpha, GW501516 for PPARbeta/delta, rosiglitazone (ROSI) for PPARgamma, in the presence or absence of PPAR antagonists (GW6471 for PPARalpha, GW9662 for PPARgamma). PGs' synthesis was evaluated by radiolabelled sulphate incorporation and glycosaminoglycans' (GAGs) content by Alcian blue staining of beads and colorimetric 1.9 dimethyl-methylene blue assay after beads' solubilization. Phosphorylation of Extracellular Signal-related Kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), Smad2/3 and p38-MAPK was assessed by Western Blot and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) by Enzyme immuno-assay (EIA). Levels of mRNA for PPAR target genes [acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO) for PPARalpha; mitochondrial carnitin palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1) for PPARbeta/delta and adiponectin for PPARgamma], aggrecan, TGF-beta1 and genes controlling GAGs' side chains' synthesis were quantified by real time polymerase chain reaction and normalized over RP29 housekeeping gene. ACO was selectively up-regulated by 100 microM of Wy14643, CPT-1 by 100 nM of GW501516 and adiponectin by 10 microM of ROSI without cell toxicity. TGF-beta1 increased PGs' synthesis by four-fold, GAGs' content and deposition by 3.5-fold and six-fold, respectively, while inducing aggrecan expression around 10-fold without modifying mRNA levels of GAGs' controlling enzymes. PPAR agonists inhibited the stimulating effect of TGF-beta1 by 24-44% on PGs' synthesis and over 75% on aggrecan, GAGs' content and deposition with the following rank order of potency: ROSI>GW501516> or =Wy14643. TGF-beta1

  2. Gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist stimulates milt fluidity and plasma concentrations of 17,20beta-dihydroxylated and 5beta-reduced, 3alpha-hydroxylated C21 steroids in male plaice (Pleuronectes platessa).

    PubMed

    Vermeirssen, E L; Scott, A P; Mylonas, C C; Zohar, Y

    1998-11-01

    Spermiating male plaice were caught in the North Sea and acclimatised to laboratory conditions. In two experiments, males were injected intramuscularly with either microspheres or pellets containing gonadotrophin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa). Blood was sampled at 2- to 5-day intervals. Individual blood plasma specimens were assayed for testosterone, 5beta-reduced, 3alpha-hydroxy ("5beta,3alpha") steroids and sulphated 17, 20beta-dihydroxy ("17,20beta") steroids. Pooled plasma samples were also assayed for free and sulphated 17, 20beta-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one, free 11-ketotestosterone, and glucuronidated testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone. Plasma concentrations of all steroids were significantly elevated by GnRHa from 2 to 5 days onwards following treatment. The most marked changes occurred in the concentrations of the sulphated 17,20beta steroids, which comprised approximately equal amounts of 5beta-pregnane-3alpha,17,20beta-triol 20-sulphate (3alpha,17, 20beta-P-5beta-S) and 5beta-pregnane-3beta,17,20beta-triol 20-sulphate, rising from ca. 1 to 30-80 ng/ml in the first and from ca. 8 to 80 ng/ml in the second experiment. Concentrations of 5beta, 3alpha steroids matched those of 17,20beta steroids in one experiment. However, in the other experiment, the two RIAs yielded highly disparate results in about 50% of the fish (including males in the control group). The plasma of these fish contained excessive amounts of 5beta,3alpha-immunoreactive material between 10 and 25 days. This material was identified as 3alpha,17, 21-trihydroxy-5beta-pregnan-20-one 21-sulphate (a metabolite of 11-deoxycortisol). All previous studies have indicated that when plasma concentrations of this steroid are high, so are those of 3alpha,17,20beta-P-5beta-S. This is the first indication that these steroids are regulated independently. In a third experiment, milt fluidity and production were assessed at 10, 15, and 25 days following GnRHa implantation. Milt volume and fluidity were

  3. Similarity of Stream Width Distributions Across Headwater Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Barefoot, E. A.; Tashie, A.; Butman, D. E.

    2016-12-01

    The morphology and abundance of streams control the rates of hydraulic and biogeochemical exchange between streams, groundwater, and the atmosphere. In large river systems, studies have used remote sensing to quantify river morphology, and have found that the relationship between river width and abundance is fractal, such that narrow rivers are proportionally more common than wider rivers. However, in headwater systems (stream order 1-3), where many biogeochemical reactions are most rapid, the relationship between stream width and abundance is unknown, reducing the certainty of biogeochemical flux estimates. To constrain this uncertainty, we surveyed two components of stream morphology (wetted stream width and length) in seven physiographically contrasting stream networks in Kings Creek in Konza Prarie, KS; Sagehen Creek in the N. Sierra Nevada Mtns., CA; Elder Creek in Angelo Coast Range Preserve, CA; Caribou Creek in the Caribou Poker Creek Research Watershed, AK; V40 Stream, NZ; Blue Duck Creek, NZ; Stony Creek in Duke Forest, NC. To assess temporal variations, we also surveyed stream geometry in a subcatchment of Stony Creek six times over a range of moderate streamflow conditions (discharge less than 90 percentile of gauge record). Here we show a strikingly consistent gamma statistical distribution of stream width in all surveys and a characteristic most abundant stream width of 32±7 cm independent of flow conditions or basin size. This consistency is remarkable given the substantial physical diversity among the studied catchments. We propose a model that invokes network topology theory and downstream hydraulic geometry to show that, as active drainage networks expand and contract in response to changes in streamflow, the most abundant stream width remains approximately static. This framework can be used to better extrapolate stream size and abundance from large rivers to small headwater streams, with significant impact on understanding of the hydraulic

  4. New parameter in diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Platelet distribution width

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Bulent; Oskay, Alten; Dinc, Selcan Enver; Bas, Bilge; Tekin, Sabri

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of the mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width in acute appendicitis. METHODS: This retrospective, case-controlled study compared 295 patients with acute appendicitis (Group I), 100 patients with other intra-abdominal infections (Group II), and 100 healthy individuals (Group III) between January 2012 and January 2013. The age, gender, and white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, mean platelet volume, and platelet distribution width values from blood samples were compared among the groups. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS for Windows 21.0 software. In addition, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and likelihood ratios, and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. RESULTS: The mean ages of patients were 29.9 ± 12.0 years for Group I, 31.5 ± 14.0 years for Group II, and 30.4 ± 13.0 years for Group III. Demographic features such as age and gender were not significantly different among the groups. White blood cell count, neutrophil percentage and platelet distribution width were significantly higher in Group I compared to groups II and III (P < 0.05). Diagnostically, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 73.1%, 94.0%, and 78% for white blood cell count, 70.0%, 96.0%, and 76.0% for neutrophil percentage, 29.5%, 49.0%, and 34.0% for mean platelet volume, and 97.1%, 93.0%, and 96.0% for platelet distribution width, respectively. The highest diagnostic accuracy detected was for platelet distribution width between Group I and Group III (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Platelet distribution width analysis can be used for diagnosis of acute appendicitis without requiring additional tests, thus reducing the cost and loss of time. PMID:25684947

  5. Bipartite Graphs of Large Clique-Width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpelainen, Nicholas; Lozin, Vadim V.

    Recently, several constructions of bipartite graphs of large clique-width have been discovered in the literature. In the present paper, we propose a general framework for developing such constructions and use it to obtain new results on this topic.

  6. Alpha-null defocus: An optimum defocus condition with relevance for focal-series reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    O'Keefe, Michael A.

    2001-02-14

    Two optimum defocus conditions are used in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Scherzer defocus produces an image of the specimen ''projected potential'' to the resolution of the microscope, and Lichte defocus minimizes dispersion. A third optimum defocus is best for focal-series reconstruction; alpha-null defocus maximizes transfer of high-frequency diffracted beam amplitudes into the microscope image. Beam transfer is confined by incident-beam convergence to a Gaussian ''packet'' of defocus values centered on the alpha-null defocus. For a diffracted beam hkl, with a spatial frequency of u, the envelope for incident beam convergence has null damping effect when defocus is set to -Cs. (wavelength.u)**2. On either side of this alpha-null defocus value, the damping effect of incident-beam convergence reduces diffracted-beam transfer. The position of alpha-null defocus for any spatial frequency depends only on the value of Cs, but defocus-packet width around the alpha-null defocus depends only on the convergence semi-angle. Under NCEM OAM (one-Angstrom microscope) conditions, a [110] diamond image with the correct 0.89A spacing appears when the Si (004) alpha-null defocus is selected. The alpha-null defocus should be included as the (furthest underfocus) limit for all high-resolution focal series reconstruction.

  7. A diet containing alpha-cellulose and fish oil reduces aberrant crypt foci formation and modulates other possible markers for colon cancer risk in azoxymethane-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Leana J; Landström, Eva K; Royle, Peter J; Bird, Anthony R; McIntosh, Graeme H

    2002-08-01

    There is a need for better understanding of the roles of dietary fats and fibers in colon cancer risk. We examined the effect of different dietary fiber and fat sources on an azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer in rats. In a 2 x 3 factorial design, rats were fed a semipurified diet containing soy-derived fiber (Fibrim), alpha-cellulose (Solkafloc) or resistant starch (RS; Hi-maize) at 10 g dietary fiber/100 g diet, combined with fish oil (FO) or sunflower seed oil (SSO) at 10 g/100 g diet, and lard added to all diets at 10 g/100 g, to provide a total of 20 g mixed fat/100 g diet. Sprague-Dawley rats (28 d of age) consumed diets for 4 wk and then two doses of AOM (15 mg/kg body) were administered 1 wk apart by subcutaneous injection. Rats were killed after 13 wk of consuming experimental diets. Colons were fixed in formalin and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were quantified after staining. ACF counts were higher (+66%, P < 0.01) in rats fed SSO and RS, than in those fed alpha-cellulose and FO. Rats fed FO had 19% fewer ACF than those fed SSO (P < 0.05). alpha-Cellulose was associated with the highest cecal butyrate concentration (P < 0.001), the highest beta-glucuronidase specific activity (P < 0.001) and the lowest cecal water cytotoxicity (P < 0.001) relative to soy fiber- and RS-fed rats. There were inverse correlations between the number of ACF and cecal butyrate concentration (r = -0.33, P < 0.05) and between cecal water cytotoxicity and beta-glucuronidase activity (r = -0.70, P < 0.001). The greatest protection was associated with alpha-cellulose as the fiber source and FO as the fat source as measured by colon ACF numbers in rats.

  8. Design of athermal phonon light detector for reducing alpha recoil background of next-gen CUORE 0 νββ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Joseph; Pyle, Matt; Kolomensky, Yury; Cuore Collaboration; Cdms Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The current generation of bolometric 0 νββ experiments, including CUORE, expect degraded alpha recoils to be the dominant background restricting experimental sensitivity. The CUPID project will aim to improve the sensitivity of CUORE by over an order of magnitude, and search for 0 νββ in the entire region of parameter space consistent with the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Surface contamination of Cu support structures for CUORE's 130Te crystal bolometers is primarily responsible for these unwanted alpha recoils. Electronic signals produced near Qββ (2.53 MeV) have been shown to produce Cherenkov radiation on the order of 100 eV in 130Te crystals. The heavier and slower alpha particles of comparable energy in the region of interest do not produce a Cherenkov signal, allowing for discrimination via a high-resolution cryogenic light detector. A photon detector with energy resolution <10 eV is necessary. We will discuss how athermal phonon collection calorimeter technology developed by the CDMS collaboration over the past decade can be scaled to produce such a sensitive detector, while also satisfying requirements for scintillating crystal alternatives. We will also present the current status of the detector development. NSF: NSF PHY-1314881.

  9. Reduction of track width in perpendicular magnetic recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, W.; Yamada, T.; Aoi, H.; Muraoka, H.; Nakamura, Y.

    2005-02-01

    In order to three dimensionally analyze perpendicular magnetic recording mechanisms, we have developed a program in which the magnetization of magnetic particles is introduced into calculations of magnetization distributions in a recording layer, based on the commercial software JMAG-Studio. Because this program was based on a FEM calculation, the head and media interactions and demagnetization during the recording process can be accurately modeled. Using this program, methods to reduce the recorded track width in perpendicular magnetic recording were investigated. Decreasing the magnetic spacing, the use of a side-shielded head structure and using media with weak exchange coupling are effective ways to reduce the track width in a single pole head and double-layer perpendicular media recording system.

  10. Alpha Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions such as high blood pressure and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Find out more about this class of medication. ... these conditions: High blood pressure Enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia) Though alpha blockers are commonly used to treat ...

  11. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an apparently normal individual has a child with hemoglobin H disease or alpha thalassemia minor. It can ... gene on one chromosome 25% 25% 25% 25% hemoglobin H disease there is a 25% chance with ...

  12. Finite banana width effect on magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y.P.; Tsai, S.T.

    1995-08-01

    The finite banana width (FBW) effect on the coupling between magnetoacoustic waves and the near harmonic gyro-oscillations of the energetic ions/{alpha} particles in tokamaks are studied. The gyrokinetic equation with FBW effect is rederived for the energetic trapped ions. The dispersion relation and growth rate of the magnetoacoustic cyclotron instability (MACI) are obtained. It is found that the coherence interaction between the energetic ion trajectory and mode field has a significant effect when the Larmor radius of energetic ions is larger than the wavelength of MACI. Near the low field side the FBW effect destabilizes the mode, while away from it the FBW gives a stabilizing effect. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  13. Involvement of both the V2 and V3 regions of the CCR5-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope in reduced sensitivity to macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Y; Foda, M; Matsushita, S; Harada, S

    2000-02-01

    To determine whether C-C chemokines play an important role in the phenotype switch of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from CCR5 to CXCR4 usage during the course of an infection in vivo, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha-resistant variants were isolated from CCR5-tropic (R5) HIV-1 in vitro. The selected variants displayed reduced sensitivities to MIP-1alpha (fourfold) through CCR5-expressing CD4-HeLa/long terminal repeat-beta-galactosidase (MAGI/CCR5) cells. The variants were also resistant to other natural ligands for CCR5, namely, MIP-1beta (>4-fold) and RANTES (regulated upon activation, normal T-cell expressed and secreted) (6-fold). The env sequence analyses revealed that the variants had amino acid substitutions in V2 (valine 166 to methionine) and V3 (serine 303 to glycine), although the same V3 substitution appeared in virus passaged without MIP-1alpha. A single-round replication assay using a luciferase reporter HIV-1 strain pseudotyped with mutant envelopes confirmed that mutations in both V2 and V3 were necessary to confer the reduced sensitivity to MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta, and RANTES. However, the double mutant did not switch its chemokine receptor usage from CCR5 to CXCR4, indicating the altered recognition of CCR5 by this mutant. These results indicated that V2 combined with the V3 region of the CCR5-tropic HIV-1 envelope modulates the sensitivity of HIV-1 to C-C chemokines without altering the ability to use chemokine receptors.

  14. Discovery of {sup 109}Xe and {sup 105}Te: Superallowed {alpha} Decay near Doubly Magic {sup 100}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Liddick, S. N.; Batchelder, J. C.; Grzywacz, R.; Bingham, C. R.; Mazzocchi, C.; Drafta, G.; Tantawy, M. N.; Page, R. D.; Darby, I. G.; Joss, D. T.; Thomson, J.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Gross, C. J.; Goodin, C.; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.; Li, K.; Hecht, A. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Korgul, A.

    2006-08-25

    Two new {alpha} emitters {sup 109}Xe and {sup 105}Te were identified through the observation of the {sup 109}Xe{yields}{sup 105}Te{yields}{sup 101}Sn {alpha}-decay chain. The {sup 109}Xe nuclei were produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 54}Fe({sup 58}Ni,3n){sup 109}Xe and studied using the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Two transitions at E{sub {alpha}}=4062{+-}7 keV and E{sub {alpha}}=3918{+-}9 keV were interpreted as the l=2 and l=0 transitions from the 7/2{sup +} ground state in {sup 109}Xe (T{sub 1/2}=13{+-}2 ms) to the 5/2{sup +} ground state and a 7/2{sup +} excited state, located at 150{+-}13 keV in {sup 105}Te. The observation of the subsequent decay of {sup 105}Te marks the discovery of the lightest known {alpha}-decaying nucleus. The measured transition energy E{sub {alpha}}=4703{+-}5 keV and half-life T{sub 1/2}=620{+-}70 ns were used to determine the reduced {alpha}-decay width {delta}{sup 2}. The ratio {delta}{sub {sup 105}Te}{sup 2}/{delta}{sub {sup 213}Po}{sup 2} of {approx}3 indicates a superallowed character of the {alpha} emission from {sup 105}Te.

  15. Reduced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta1 expression in the lungs of inbred mice that fail to develop fibroproliferative lesions consequent to asbestos exposure.

    PubMed

    Brass, D M; Hoyle, G W; Poovey, H G; Liu, J Y; Brody, A R

    1999-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta mRNA and protein expression and the degree of fibroproliferative response to inhaled asbestos fibers are clearly reduced in the 129 inbred mouse strain as compared with typical fibrogenesis observed in the C57BL/6 inbred strain. The C57BL/6 mice showed prominent lesions at bronchiolar-alveolar duct (BAD) junctions where asbestos fibers deposit and responding macrophages accumulate. The 129 mice, however, were generally indistinguishable from controls even though the numbers of asbestos fibers deposited in the lungs of all exposed animals were the same. Quantitative morphometry of H&E-stained lung sections comparing the C57BL/6 and 129 mice showed significantly less mean cross-sectional area of the BAD junctions in the 129 animals, apparent at both 48 hours and 4 weeks after exposure. In addition, fewer macrophages had accumulated at these sites in the 129 mice. Nuclear bromodeoxyuridine immunostaining demonstrated that the number of proliferating cells at first alveolar duct bifurcations and in adjacent terminal bronchioles was significantly reduced in the 129 strain compared with C57BL/6 mice at 48 hours after exposure (P < 0.01). TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 gene expression, as measured by in situ hybridization, was reduced in the 129 mice at 48 hours after exposure, and expression of TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 protein, as measured by immunohistochemistry, was similarly reduced or absent in the 129 animals. We postulate that the protection afforded the 129 mice is related to reduction of growth factor expression by the bronchiolar-alveolar epithelium and lung macrophages.

  16. Relative Width and Height of Handwritten Letter.

    PubMed

    Lizega Rika, Joseba

    2017-02-28

    This is an exploratory study that analyzes the width and the height of letters in two texts written by each of the 21 writers analyzed. After detrending the linear, text, and allograph trends, we proceeded to comparing the sizes obtained in different texts. The different detrended series were compared by means of correlation and t-test. According to the results regarding the width of letters, the texts of 19 of 21 writers correlated strongly, whereas the texts of two writers did not correlate with the limits of the threshold. With regard to the height of letters, texts written by between 18 and 21 writers of 21 writers correlated strongly, whereas texts that did not correlate were within the threshold value. Regarding both the width and the height of letters, of 21 writers, texts written by between 19 and 21 individuals were found to correlate strongly.

  17. The Variable Line Width of Achernar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivinius, Th.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Baade, D.; Carciofi, A. C.; Leister, N.; Štefl, S.

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Achernar over the past decades, have shown the photospheric line width, as measured by the rotational parameter v sin i, to vary in correlation with the emission activity. Here we present new observations, covering the most recent activity phase, and further archival data collected from the archives. The v sin i variation is confirmed. On the basis of the available data it cannot be decided with certainty whether the increased line width precedes the emission activity, i.e. is a signature of the ejection mechanism, or postdates it, which would make it a signature of re-accretion of some of the disk-material. However, the observed evidence leans towards the re-accretion hypothesis. Two further stars showing the effect of variable line width in correlation with emission activity, namely 66 Oph and π Aqr, are presented as well.

  18. The role of relative floodplain width in forming anabranching rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmonds, D. A.; Polanco, S. E. M.; Amos, K.

    2015-12-01

    Anabranching rivers (including anastomosing) are a relatively common channel pattern, especially among the world's biggest rivers, and are defined as a system of multiple channels separated by immobile alluvial islands. The origin of anabranching remains poorly understood and is an important topic of research. Previous studies on Australian rivers and a recent empirical compilation show that floodplain width (relative to the size of the channel) might play an important role in the formation of anabranching rivers. To test this idea further we carried out two sets of morphodynamic simulations using Delft3D. In the first set we create a generic channel-floodplain complex with uniform floodplain and channel width, slope, and grain size and allow the system to adjust to passing floodwaves. In successive runs we hold all variables constant, except we increase floodplain width. Results of these simulations show a transition from single channel to braided to anabranching as floodplain width increases. Anabranching arises because as floodplain width increases, alluvial bar growth occurs on the floodplain. The emergence of bars causes flow bifurcation, and subsequent bifurcation instability leads to reduction of channels and the emergence of multiple anabranches. Transition to a stable anabranching pattern is achieved because as anabranches increase their cross-sectional area, Shields stresses on the intervening bars are reduced until they bars stop migrating. To test the idea that alluvial bar growth can be a precursor to anabranching we carried out a second experiment set using boundary conditions from four different field scale anabranching rivers. Results from these simulations show that anabranching can initiate from alluvial bar growth. Compared to field measurements of anabranching rivers our simulations accurately predict number of channels, supporting the idea that relatively wide floodplains might be an important attribute of anabranching rivers.

  19. Equivalent Widths in the Spectrum of Sirius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Qiu, H. M.; Chen, Y. Q.; Li, Z. W.

    2000-02-01

    The equivalent widths of total 546 lines (26 elements are included) in the spectrum of the bright Am star Sirius from 380 to 930 nm are tabulated. The high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum was obtained with the Coudé Echelle Spectrograph attached to the 2.16 m telescope at Beijing Astronomical Observatory (Xinglong, China). Here we also give the results of the equivalent widths comparison between our measurements and those of Strom et al. and Sadakane & Ueta.

  20. Optimization of Pole and Slot Widths for Reluctance Torque Reduction in a Brushless DC Spindle Motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. Y.; Lieu, D. K.; McAllister, J. S.

    A parametric study was conducted to determine the effect of motor stator slot widths and rotor permanent magnet pole separation widths on the reluctance torque. This study is based on a finite element analysis of a particular 6-pole/9-slot motor. The analysis can be expanded to other slot/pole combinations. Force and torque calculations were based on an integration of the Maxwell stresses along the center of the airgap. As a general rule, the reluctance torque may be reduced by decreasing the slot width for any given pole separation. For any given slot width, the reluctance torque can be reduced to zero by selection of the proper pole separation. The optimum slot widths are slightly different than those predicted by past analytical formulation. There will be, however, a noticeable effect on the main drive torque and the torque ripple.

  1. Ethanol and arachidonic acid synergize to activate Kupffer cells and modulate the fibrogenic response via tumor necrosis factor alpha, reduced glutathione, and transforming growth factor beta-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Cubero, Francisco Javier; Nieto, Natalia

    2008-12-01

    Because of the contribution of ethanol and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) to alcoholic liver disease, we investigated whether chronic ethanol administration and arachidonic acid (AA) could synergistically mediate Kupffer cell (KC) activation and modulate the stellate cell (HSC) fibrogenic response. (1) the effects of ethanol and AA on KC and HSC were as follows: Cell proliferation, lipid peroxidation, H(2)O(2), O(2).(-), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate reduced form (NADPH) oxidase activity, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) were higher in KC(ethanol) than in KC(control), and were enhanced by AA; HSC(ethanol) proliferated faster, increased collagen, and showed higher GSH than HSC(control), with modest effects by AA. (2) AA effects on the control co-culture: We previously reported the ability of KC to induce a pro-fibrogenic response in HSC via reactive oxygen species (ROS)-dependent mechanisms; we now show that AA further increases cell proliferation and collagen in the control co-culture. The latter was prevented by vitamin E (an antioxidant) and by diphenyleneiodonium (a NADPH oxidase inhibitor). (3) Ethanol effects on the co-cultures: Co-culture with KC(control) or KC(ethanol) induced HSC(control) and HSC(ethanol) proliferation; however, the pro-fibrogenic response in HSC(ethanol) was suppressed because of up-regulation of TNF-alpha and GSH, which was prevented by a TNF-alpha neutralizing antibody (Ab) and by L-buthionine-sulfoximine, a GSH-depleting agent. (4) Ethanol plus AA effects on the co-cultures: AA lowered TNF-alpha in the HSC(control) co-cultures, allowing for enhanced collagen deposition; furthermore, AA restored the pro-fibrogenic response in the HSC(ethanol) co-cultures by counteracting the up-regulation of TNF-alpha and GSH with a significant increase in GSSG and in pro-fibrogenic transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). These results unveil synergism between ethanol and AA to the mechanism whereby KC mediate ECM

  2. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  3. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  4. An efficient algorithm for equal width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakodah, Huda. O.; Banaja, Mona. A.

    2016-10-01

    The new modification of Laplace Adomian decomposition method (ADM) to obtain numerical solution of the equal width equation is presented. The performance of the method illustrated by solving some test examples of the problem. By computing the absolute error the results are found in good agreement with exact solution.

  5. Reasons for reduced activities of 17 alpha-hydroxylase and C17-C20 lyase in spite of increased contents of cytochrome P-450 in mature rat testis fetally irradiated with 60Co.

    PubMed

    Inano, H; Ishii-Ohba, H; Suzuki, K; Ikeda, K

    1990-05-01

    Pregnant rats received whole body irradiation with 2.6 Gy gamma-ray from a 60Co source at Day 20 of gestation. When pups were 4 months old, activities of electron transport system and steroid monooxygenase in tests were assayed. The content of total cytochrome P-450 in the irradiated testes had increased to 170% of that in non-irradiated rats, but NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase activity had reduced to 36% of the control. Also, amounts of cytochrome b5 in testicular microsomal fraction were decreased markedly after irradiation, but no significant change of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase activity was observed in the treated pups. Because both 17 alpha-hydroxylase and C17-C20 lyase activities tended to be decreased by fetal irradiation, testosterone production from progesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone was reduced to about 30% of the control. From these results, it has been suggested that the testicular cytochrome P-450 is radioresistant but steroid monooxygenase activities are reduced after the fetal irradiation. We propose that the discrepancy arises from the marked decrement of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase activity.

  6. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  7. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  8. Alpha fetoprotein

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver Liver cancer Malignant teratoma Recovery from hepatitis Problems during pregnancy Alternative Names Fetal alpha globulin; AFP Images Blood ... JL, et al, eds. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Read More ... cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma Malignant teratoma of the ...

  9. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood disorder that reduces the production of hemoglobin . Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that ... alpha thalassemia , a reduction in the amount of hemoglobin prevents enough oxygen from reaching the body's tissues. ...

  10. Narrow lines from alpha-alpha reactions. [in Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlovsky, B.; Ramaty, R.

    1977-01-01

    Intensities and spectral shapes of the prompt gamma-ray lines of Li-7 at 0.431 MeV and Be-7 at 0.478 MeV and of the delayed 0.478-MeV line, all resulting from alpha-alpha reactions, are calculated using recent direct measurements of the cross sections for the alpha-alpha reactions. It is found that the intensities of these lines are comparable to that of the 4.44-MeV line of C-12, so that the investigated lines should be observable in large solar flares, provided their Doppler widths are not excessively large. An evaluation of the shapes of the prompt lines indicates that for an isotropic distribution of energetic alpha-particles, the two lines merge into a broad feature which essentially cannot be distinguished from the continuum. A situation in which the delayed 0.478-MeV line could be very narrow is considered.

  11. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist-mediated inhibition of [3H]noradrenaline release from rat hippocampus is reduced by 4-aminopyridine, but that caused by an adenosine analogue or omega-conotoxin is not.

    PubMed

    Hu, P S; Fredholm, B B

    1989-07-01

    The inhibitory effect of an adenosine analogue, R-PIA, and an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, UK 14,304, on [3H]NA efflux from field-stimulated rat hippocampal slices was examined. The effect of 0.1 microM UK 14,304 was mimicked by 30 nM omega-conotoxin and by 10 microM cadmium chloride, inhibitors of N- and L-type Ca2+ channels. R-PIA (1 microM) had no effect per se, but caused a clear-cut inhibition after blockade of the pre-synaptic alpha 2-receptor by yohimbine. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) caused a dose-dependent increase in evoked transmitter release. At 30 microM 4-AP did not affect the actions of omega-conotoxin or cadmium chloride. The pre-synaptic effect of R-PIA was similarly unaffected by 30 microM 4-AP. The pre-synaptic effect of UK 14,304 was virtually abolished by 4-AP (30 microM). The effect of UK 14,304 (0.1 microM) could be partly restored by reducing the Ca2+ concentration during treatment with 4-AP (22% inhibition compared to 42% with normal Ca2+). The magnitude of increase in evoked [3H]NA efflux by yohimbine (1 microM) was decreased by 4-AP in a concentration-dependent manner from 142% increase in controls to 21% at 100 microM 4-AP. The present results indicate that NA release is reduced by somewhat different mechanisms by pre-synaptic alpha 2- and adenosine A1-receptors. Furthermore, the results indicate that pre-synaptic A1-receptors on hippocampal NA neurons do not primarily regulate 4-AP-dependent potassium channels, but they might act directly on a Ca2+ conductance.

  12. The AGN Fraction in Lyman Alpha Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junxian; Rhoads, J.; Malhotra, S.

    2007-05-01

    A large fraction of high redshift Lyman-alpha emitters selected through narrow band imaging technique show rest frame equivalent widths (EWs) above 200\\AA. This is beyond the maximum EW expected for normal stellar population. The high EWs can be produced by younger stellar populations, dust, or by type 2 AGNs. We review recent observational progresses on the AGN fraction in high redshift Lyman-alpha searches, including radio, X-ray, and optical spectroscopic observations. Specifically, we show that an upper limit of 5% of the AGN fraction has been obtained based on deep Chandra images. We also present deep IMACS multi-slit spectroscopic observations of 200 candidate z 4.5 Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies selected in the Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) narrow band imaging survey Cetus field. This consitutes the largest ever sample of high redshift Lyman-alpha emitters with spectroscopic follow-up.

  13. Control of shape memory alloy actuator using pulse width modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, N.; Song, G.

    2003-10-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA), in particular nickel-titanium alloy (or nitinol), have been used as actuators in some astronautic, aeronautic and industrial applications. The future will see more SMA application if less energy is required for actuation. This paper presents the design and experimental results of control of an SMA actuator using pulse width modulation (PWM) to reduce the energy consumption by the SMA actuator. A SMA wire test stand is used in this research. Open-loop testing of the SMA wire actuator is conducted to study the effect of the PWM parameters. Based on test results and parameter analysis of the pulse width (PW) modulator, a PW modulator is designed to modulate a proportional plus derivative (PD) controller. Experiments demonstrate that control of the SMA actuator using PWM effectively saves actuation energy while maintaining the same control accuracy as compared to continuous PD control. PWM also demonstrates robustness to external disturbances. A comparison with a pulse width pulse frequency modulator is also presented.

  14. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  15. K- nuclear states: Binding energies and widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrtánková, J.; Mareš, J.

    2017-07-01

    K- optical potentials relevant to calculations of K- nuclear quasibound states were developed within several chiral meson-baryon coupled-channels interaction models. The applied models yield quite different K- binding energies and widths. Then the K- multinucleon interactions were incorporated by a phenomenological optical potential fitted recently to kaonic atom data. Though the applied K- interaction models differ significantly in the K-N subthreshold region, our self-consistent calculations of kaonic nuclei across the periodic table lead to conclusions valid quite generally. Due to K- multinucleon absorption in the nuclear medium, the calculated widths of K- nuclear states are sizable, ΓK-≥90 MeV, and exceed substantially their binding energies in all considered nuclei.

  16. The alpha-1A adrenergic receptor agonist A61603 reduces cardiac polyunsaturated fatty acid and endocannabinoid metabolites associated with inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Monte S.; Ilaiwy, Amro; Montgomery, Megan D.; Simpson, Paul C.; Jensen, Brian C.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (α1-ARs) are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) with three highly homologous subtypes (α1A, α1B, and α1D). Of these three subtypes, only the α1A and α1B are expressed in the heart. Multiple pre-clinical models of heart injury demonstrate cardioprotective roles for the α1A. Non-selective α1-AR activation promotes glycolysis in the heart, but the functional α1-AR subtype and broader metabolic effects have not been studied. Objectives Given the high metabolic demands of the heart and previous evidence indicating benefit from α1A activation, we chose to investigate the effects of α1A activation on the cardiac metabolome in vivo. Methods Mice were treated for one week with a low, subpressor dose of A61603, a highly selective and potent α1A agonist. Cardiac tissue and serum were analyzed using a non-targeted metabolomics approach. Results We identified previously unrecognized metabolic responses to α1A activation, most notably broad reduction in the abundance of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and endocannabinoids (ECs). Conclusion Given the well characterized roles of PUFAs and ECs in inflammatory pathways, these findings suggest a possible role for cardiac α1A-ARs in the regulation of inflammation and may offer novel insight into the mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective benefit of selective pharmacologic α1A activation. PMID:28533737

  17. You can't stop the music: reduced auditory alpha power and coupling between auditory and memory regions facilitate the illusory perception of music during noise.

    PubMed

    Müller, Nadia; Keil, Julian; Obleser, Jonas; Schulz, Hannah; Grunwald, Thomas; Bernays, René-Ludwig; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-10-01

    Our brain has the capacity of providing an experience of hearing even in the absence of auditory stimulation. This can be seen as illusory conscious perception. While increasing evidence postulates that conscious perception requires specific brain states that systematically relate to specific patterns of oscillatory activity, the relationship between auditory illusions and oscillatory activity remains mostly unexplained. To investigate this we recorded brain activity with magnetoencephalography and collected intracranial data from epilepsy patients while participants listened to familiar as well as unknown music that was partly replaced by sections of pink noise. We hypothesized that participants have a stronger experience of hearing music throughout noise when the noise sections are embedded in familiar compared to unfamiliar music. This was supported by the behavioral results showing that participants rated the perception of music during noise as stronger when noise was presented in a familiar context. Time-frequency data show that the illusory perception of music is associated with a decrease in auditory alpha power pointing to increased auditory cortex excitability. Furthermore, the right auditory cortex is concurrently synchronized with the medial temporal lobe, putatively mediating memory aspects associated with the music illusion. We thus assume that neuronal activity in the highly excitable auditory cortex is shaped through extensive communication between the auditory cortex and the medial temporal lobe, thereby generating the illusion of hearing music during noise. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of pacing magnitudes and forms on bistability width in a modeled ventricular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Liu, Xuemei; Zheng, Lixian; Mi, Yuanyuan; Qian, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Bistability in periodically paced cardiac tissue is relevant to cardiac arrhythmias and its control. In the present paper, one-dimensional tissue of the phase I Luo-Rudy model is numerically investigated. The effects of various parameters of pacing signals on bistability width are studied. The following conclusions are obtained: (i) Pacing can be classified into two types: pulsatile and sinusoidal types. Pulsatile pacing reduces bistability width as its magnitude is increased. Sinusoidal pacing increases the width as its amplitude is increased. (ii) In a pacing period the hyperpolarizing part plays a more important role than the depolarizing part. Variations of the hyperpolarizing ratio in a period evidently change the width of bistability and its variation tendency. (iii) A dynamical mechanism is proposed to qualitatively explain the phenomena, which reveals the reason for the different effects of pulsatile and sinusoidal pacing on bistability. The methods for changing bistability width by external pacing may help control arrhythmias in cardiology.

  19. Testing Computability by Width Two OBDDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Dana; Tsur, Gilad

    Property testing is concerned with deciding whether an object (e.g. a graph or a function) has a certain property or is “far” (for some definition of far) from every object with that property. In this paper we give lower and upper bounds for testing functions for the property of being computable by a read-once width-2 Ordered Binary Decision Diagram (OBDD), also known as a branching program, where the order of the variables is known. Width-2 OBDDs generalize two classes of functions that have been studied in the context of property testing - linear functions (over GF(2)) and monomials. In both these cases membership can be tested in time that is linear in 1/ɛ. Interestingly, unlike either of these classes, in which the query complexity of the testing algorithm does not depend on the number, n, of variables in the tested function, we show that (one-sided error) testing for computability by a width-2 OBDD requires Ω(log(n)) queries, and give an algorithm (with one-sided error) that tests for this property and performs tilde{O}(log(n)/ɛ) queries.

  20. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Wang, Junhua; Fu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m) and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m) were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes). These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes. PMID:27754447

  1. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Wang, Junhua; Fu, Ting

    2016-10-14

    This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m) and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m) were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes). These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes.

  2. Laminar flow heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of power-law fluids inside tubes with varying width twisted tape inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, A.G.

    2000-02-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of heat transfer and flow friction of a generalized power-law fluid in tape generated swirl flow inside a 25.0 mm i.d. circular tube, are presented. In order to reduce excessive pressure drops associated with full width twisted tapes, with less corresponding reduction in heat transfer coefficients, reduced width twisted tapes of widths ranging from 11.0 to 23.8 mm, which are lower than the tube inside diameter are used. Reduced width twisted tape inserts give 18%--56% lower isothermal friction factors than the full width tapes. Uniform wall temperature Nusselt numbers decrease only slightly by 5%--25%, for tape widths of 19.7 and 11.0 mm, respectively. Based on the constant pumping power criterion, the tapes of width 19.7 mm perform more or less like full width tapes. Correlations are presented for isothermal and heating friction factors and Nusselt numbers (under uniform wall temperature condition) for a fully developed laminar swirl flow, which are applicable to full width as well as reduced width twisted tapes, using a modified twist ratio as pitch to width ratio of the tape. The reduced width tapes offer 20%--50% savings in the tape material as compared to the full width tapes.

  3. A recombinant single-chain human class II MHC molecule (HLA-DR1) as a covalently linked heterotrimer of alpha chain, beta chain, and antigenic peptide, with immunogenicity in vitro and reduced affinity for bacterial superantigens.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Bavari, S; Ulrich, R; Sadegh-Nasseri, S; Ferrone, S; McHugh, L; Mage, M

    1997-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules bind to numerous peptides and display these on the cell surface for T cell recognition. In a given immune response, receptors on T cells recognize antigenic peptides that are a minor population of MHC class II-bound peptides. To control which peptides are presented to T cells, it may be desirable to use recombinant MHC molecules with covalently bound antigenic peptides. To study T cell responses to such homogeneous peptide-MHC complexes, we engineered an HLA-DR1 cDNA coding for influenza hemagglutinin, influenza matrix, or HIV p24 gag peptides covalently attached via a peptide spacer to the N terminus of the DR1 beta chain. Co-transfection with DR alpha cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of HLA-DR1 molecules that reacted with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes. This suggested that the spacer and peptide did not alter expression or folding of the molecule. We then engineered an additional peptide spacer between the C terminus of a truncated beta chain (without transmembrane or cytoplasmic domains) and the N terminus of full-length DR alpha chain. Transfection of this cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of the entire covalently linked heterotrimer of peptide, beta chain, and alpha chain with the expected molecular mass of approximately 66 kDa. These single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules reacted with mAb specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes, and identified one mAb with [MHC + peptide] specificity. Affinity-purified soluble secreted single-chain molecules with truncated alpha chain moved in electrophoresis as compact class II MHC dimers. Cell surface two-chain or single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with a covalent HA peptide stimulated HLA-DR1-restricted HA-specific T cells. They were immunogenic in vitro for peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The two-chain and single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with covalent HA peptide had reduced binding

  4. Width Criterion For Weld-Seam-Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincir, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Image-processing algorithm in "through-torch-vision" (T3V) system developed to guide gas/tungsten arc welding robot along weld seam modified, according to proposal, reducing incidence of inaccurate tracking of weld seam. Developmental system intended to provide closed-loop control of motion of welding robot along weld seam on basis of lines in T3V image identified by use of image-processing algorithm and assumed to coincide with edges of weld seam. Use of width criterion prevents tracking of many false pairs of lines, with consequent decrease in incidence of inaccurate tracking and increase in confidence in weld-tracking capability of robotic welding system.

  5. Solution conformation of a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA that discriminates {alpha}3 vs. {alpha}6 nAChR subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Seung-Wook; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Olivera, Baldomero M.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Han, Kyou-Hoon . E-mail: khhan600@kribb.re.kr

    2006-06-23

    {alpha}-Conotoxin OmIA from Conus omaria is the only {alpha}-conotoxin that shows a {approx}20-fold higher affinity to the {alpha}3{beta}2 over the {alpha}6{beta}2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. We have determined a three-dimensional structure of {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. {alpha}-Conotoxin OmIA has an '{omega}-shaped' overall topology with His{sup 5}-Asn{sup 12} forming an {alpha}-helix. Structural features of {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA responsible for its selectivity are suggested by comparing its surface characteristics with other functionally related {alpha}4/7 subfamily conotoxins. Reduced size of the hydrophilic area in {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA seems to be associated with the reduced affinity towards the {alpha}6{beta}2 nAChR subtype.

  6. Peripheral noxious stimulation reduces withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli after spinal cord injury: role of tumor necrosis factor alpha and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Garraway, Sandra M; Woller, Sarah A; Huie, J Russell; Hartman, John J; Hook, Michelle A; Miranda, Rajesh C; Huang, Yung-Jen; Ferguson, Adam R; Grau, James W

    2014-11-01

    We previously showed that peripheral noxious input after spinal cord injury (SCI) inhibits beneficial spinal plasticity and impairs recovery of locomotor and bladder functions. These observations suggest that noxious input may similarly affect the development and maintenance of chronic neuropathic pain, an important consequence of SCI. In adult rats with a moderate contusion SCI, we investigated the effect of noxious tail stimulation, administered 1 day after SCI on mechanical withdrawal responses to von Frey stimuli from 1 to 28 days after treatment. In addition, because the proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) is implicated in numerous injury-induced processes including pain hypersensitivity, we assessed the temporal and spatial expression of TNFα, TNF receptors, and several downstream signaling targets after stimulation. Our results showed that unlike sham surgery or SCI only, nociceptive stimulation after SCI induced mechanical sensitivity by 24h. These behavioral changes were accompanied by increased expression of TNFα. Cellular assessments of downstream targets of TNFα revealed that nociceptive stimulation increased the expression of caspase 8 and the active subunit (12 kDa) of caspase 3, indicative of active apoptosis at a time point consistent with the onset of mechanical allodynia. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis revealed distinct morphological signs of apoptosis in neurons and microglia at 24h after stimulation. Interestingly, expression of the inflammatory mediator NFκB was unaltered by nociceptive stimulation. These results suggest that noxious input caudal to the level of SCI can increase the onset and expression of behavioral responses indicative of pain, potentially involving TNFα signaling. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Alpha-Lipoic Acid Reduces LDL-Particle Number and PCSK9 Concentrations in High-Fat Fed Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Bradley; Wen, Shin; Zigouras, Sophia; Browne, Richard W.; Li, Zhuyun; Patel, Mulchand S.; Williamson, David L.; Rideout, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    We characterized the hypolipidemic effects of alpha-lipoic acid (LA, R-form) and examined the associated molecular mechanisms in a high fat fed Zucker rat model. Rats (n = 8) were assigned to a high fat (HF) diet or the HF diet with 0.25% LA (HF-LA) for 30 days and pair fed to remove confounding effects associated with the anorectic properties of LA. Compared with the HF controls, the HF-LA group was protected against diet-induced obesity (102.5±3.1 vs. 121.5±3.6,% change BW) and hypercholesterolemia with a reduction in total-C (−21%), non-HDL-C (−25%), LDL-C (−16%), and total LDL particle number (−46%) and an increase in total HDL particles (∼22%). This cholesterol-lowering response was associated with a reduction in plasma PCSK9 concentration (−70%) and an increase in hepatic LDLr receptor protein abundance (2 fold of HF). Compared with the HF-fed animals, livers of LA-supplemented animals were protected against TG accumulation (−46%), likely through multiple mechanisms including: a suppressed lipogenic response (down-regulation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase expression); enhanced hepatic fat oxidation (increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase Iα expression); and enhanced VLDL export (increased hepatic diacylglycerol acyltransferase and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression and elevated plasma VLDL particle number). Study results also support an enhanced fatty acid uptake (2.8 fold increase in total lipase activity) and oxidation (increased CPT1β protein abundance) in muscle tissue in LA-supplemented animals compared with the HF group. In summary, in the absence of a change in caloric intake, LA was effective in protecting against hypercholesterolemia and hepatic fat accumulation under conditions of strong genetic and dietary predisposition toward obesity and dyslipidemia. PMID:24595397

  8. Vanadium oxides on aluminum oxide supports. 2. Structure, vibrational properties, and reducibility of V2O5 clusters on alpha-Al2O3(0001).

    PubMed

    Brázdová, Veronika; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Verónica; Sauer, Joachim

    2005-12-15

    The structure, stability, and vibrational properties of isolated V2O5 clusters on the Al2O3(0001) surface have been studied by density functional theory and statistical thermodynamics. The most stable structure does not possess vanadyl oxygen atoms. The positions of the oxygen atoms are in registry with those of the alumina support, and both vanadium atoms occupy octahedral sites. Another structure with one vanadyl oxygen atom is only 0.12 eV less stable. Infrared spectra are calculated for the two structures. The highest frequency at 922 cm(-1) belongs to a V-O stretch in the V-O-Al interface bonds, which supports the assignment of such a mode to the band observed around 941 cm(-1) for vanadia particles on alumina. Removal of a bridging oxygen atom from the most stable cluster at the V-O-Al interface bond costs 2.79 eV. Removal of a (vanadyl) oxygen atom from a thin vanadia film on alpha-Al2O3 costs 1.3 eV more, but removal from a V2O5(001) single-crystal surface costs 0.9 eV less. Similar to the V2O5(001) surface, the facile reduction is due to substantial structure relaxations that involve formation of an additional V-O-V bond and yield a pair of V(IV)(d1) sites instead of a V(III)(d2)/V(V)(d0) pair.

  9. Blueberries reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and IL-6 production in mouse macrophages by inhibiting NF Kappa B activation and the MAPK pathway

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blueberries (BB) have been reported to attenuate atherosclerosis in apoE deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of BB in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine production in mouse macrophages. ApoE-/- mice were fed AIN-93G diet (CD) or CD formulated to contain 1% fre...

  10. Supplementation with alpha-tocopherol or beta-carotene reduces serum concentrations of vascular endothelial growth factor-D, but Not -A or -C, in male smokers.

    PubMed

    Mondul, Alison M; Rager, Helen C; Kopp, William; Virtamo, Jarmo; Albanes, Demetrius

    2011-11-01

    Evidence from the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study suggests that vitamin E and β-carotene supplement use may influence the risk of several cancers. Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF) are proteins involved in angiogenesis, an important requirement for tumor growth and metastasis. Thus, vitamin E and β-carotene may influence cancer risk through one or more VEGF. The ATBC Study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, primary cancer prevention trial in which participants were assigned to 1 of 4 supplementation groups based on a 2 × 2 factorial design: 1) α-tocopherol (vitamin E); 2) β-carotene; 3) both; or 4) placebo. For the present study, 100 cancer-free participants with follow-up serum available were randomly selected from each intervention group. VEGF-A, -C, and -D concentrations were measured by ELISA in serum obtained at baseline and after at least 2 y of supplementation. Differences in change in VEGF levels from baseline to follow-up between intervention groups were assessed using the ANOVA test. Change in VEGF-A and VEGF-C concentrations between baseline and follow-up did not differ by intervention group (P = 0.45 and 0.29, respectively). The decrease in the serum VEGF-D concentration was greater in the men supplemented with α-tocopherol (-9.7 ± 2.5%) or β-carotene (-8.5 ± 2.7%) and tended to be greater in those supplemented with both (-6.8 ± 2.4%) compared to the placebo group, in which there was no change (-0.4 ± 3.0%) (P = 0.03). In this population of male smokers, supplementation with α-tocopherol or β-carotene was associated with a decrease in VEGF-D levels over time. Although the mechanism through which these supplements affect cancer etiolog remains unclear, our results support the hypothesis that vitamin E and β-carotene may influence cancer progression through VEGF-mediated lymphangiogenesis.

  11. Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank; Grunthaner, Paula; Bryson, Charles, III

    2003-01-01

    Artifacts that are fabricated with the help of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are undergoing development for use as dimensional calibration standards with submicron widths. Such standards are needed for calibrating instruments (principally, scanning electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes) for measuring the widths of features in advanced integrated circuits. Dimensional calibration standards fabricated by an older process that involves lithography and etching of trenches in (110) surfaces of single-crystal silicon are generally reproducible to within dimensional tolerances of about 15 nm. It is anticipated that when the artifacts of the present type are fully developed, their critical dimensions will be reproducible to within 1 nm. These artifacts are expected to find increasing use in the semiconductor-device and integrated- circuit industries as the width tolerances on semiconductor devices shrink to a few nanometers during the next few years. Unlike in the older process, one does not rely on lithography and etching to define the critical dimensions. Instead, one relies on the inherent smoothness and flatness of MBE layers deposited under controlled conditions and defines the critical dimensions as the thicknesses of such layers. An artifact of the present type is fabricated in two stages (see figure): In the first stage, a multilayer epitaxial wafer is grown on a very flat substrate. In the second stage, the wafer is cleaved to expose the layers, then the exposed layers are differentially etched (taking advantage of large differences between the etch rates of the different epitaxial layer materials). The resulting structure includes narrow and well-defined trenches and a shelf with thicknesses determined by the thicknesses of the epitaxial layers from which they were etched. Eventually, it should be possible to add a third fabrication stage in which durable, electronically inert artifacts could be replicated in diamondlike carbon from a master made by

  12. Replacement of the Lys linker with an Arg linker resulting in improved melanoma uptake and reduced renal uptake of Tc-99m-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone hybrid peptide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianquan; Guo, Haixun; Padilla, R Steve; Berwick, Marianne; Miao, Yubin

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the non-specific renal uptake of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) hybrid peptide through structural modification or L-lysine co-injection. The RGD motif {cyclic(Arg-Gly-Asp-DTyr-Asp)} was coupled to [Cys(3,4,10), D-Phe7, Arg11] alpha-MSH3-13 {(Arg11)CCMSH} through the Arg linker (substituting the Lys linker) to generate a novel RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH hybrid peptide. The melanoma targeting and pharmacokinetic properties of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The effect of L-lysine co-injection on the renal uptake was determined through the co-injection of L-lysine with 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH or 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. Replacement of the Lys linker with an Arg linker exhibited a profound effect in reducing the non-specific renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, as well as increasing the tumor uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH compared to 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited high tumor uptake (21.41+/-3.74% ID/g at 2 h post-injection) and prolonged tumor retention (6.81+/-3.71% ID/g at 24 h post-injection) in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. The renal uptake values of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were 40.14-64.08% of those of 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH (p<0.05) at 0.5, 2, 4 and 24 h post-injection. Co-injection of L-lysine was effective in decreasing the renal uptakes of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH by 27.7% and 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH by 52.1% at 2 h post-injection. Substitution of the Lys linker with an Arg linker dramatically improved the melanoma uptake and reduced the renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, warranting the further evaluation of 188Re-labeled RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH as a novel MC1 receptor-targeting therapeutic peptide for melanoma treatment in the future.

  13. A low-glycemic index diet and exercise intervention reduces TNF(alpha) in isolated mononuclear cells of older, obese adults.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen R; Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas P J; Patrick-Melin, Aimee J; Cook, Marc; Rocco, Michael; Barkoukis, Hope; Kirwan, John P

    2011-06-01

    Low-glycemic index diets and exercise independently improve glucose tolerance and reduce diabetes risk. However, the combined effect of a low-glycemic index diet and exercise on inflammation and glucose metabolism is not known. Therefore, we randomized 28 insulin-resistant adults (age: 66 ± 1 y; BMI: 34.2 ± 0.7 kg · m(-2)) to a 12-wk, low (LGI = 40) or high- (HGI = 80) glycemic index diet plus aerobic exercise (5 d · wk(-1), 60 min · d(-1), 80-85% heart rate(max)) intervention. All food and fluids were provided during the study. Inflammation was assessed from cytokine (TNFα and IL-6) secretion using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated overnight with LPS. Glycemic response was determined following ingestion of a 75-g glucose solution. Fasting blood samples were collected for additional cytokine [TNFα, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)] analysis. Both interventions decreased BMI (P < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (P = 0.01), and insulin (P = 0.02). The glycemic response was reduced only in the LGI group (P = 0.04). Plasma and MNC-derived TNFα secretion were reduced in the LGI group (P = 0.02) but increased in the HGI group (P = 0.02). Secretion of IL-6 from MNC and plasma IL-6 and MCP-1 concentrations were reduced in the LGI group. The change in MNC-derived TNFα (r = 0.43; P = 0.04) and plasma MCP-1 (r = 0.44; P = 0.04) correlated with decreases in the glycemic response. These data highlight the importance of diet composition in the treatment and prevention of inflammation and hyperglycemia. A low-glycemic index diet has antiinflammatory and antidiabetogenic effects when combined with exercise in older, obese prediabetics.

  14. Selective estrogen receptor alpha agonist GTx-758 decreases testosterone with reduced side effects of androgen deprivation therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, Evan Y; Getzenberg, Robert H; Coss, Christopher C; Gittelman, Marc M; Keane, Thomas; Tutrone, Ronald; Belkoff, Laurence; Given, Robert; Bass, Joel; Chu, Franklin; Gambla, Michael; Gaylis, Franklin; Bailen, James; Hancock, Michael L; Smith, Jordan; Dalton, James T; Steiner, Mitchell S

    2015-02-01

    A need remains for new therapeutic approaches for men with advanced prostate cancer, particularly earlier in the disease course. To assess the ability of an oral selective estrogen receptor α agonist (GTx-758) to lower testosterone concentrations compared with leuprolide while minimizing estrogen deficiency-related side effects of androgen-deprivation therapy. Hormone-naive advanced prostate cancer patients were randomized to oral GTx-758 1000 mg/d, 2000 mg/d, or leuprolide depot. GTx-758 and leuprolide. The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving total testosterone ≤ 50 ng/dl by day 60. Secondary end points included serum free testosterone, prostate-specific antigen (PSA), sex hormone-binding globulin, hot flashes, bone turnover markers, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 levels. Of 159 randomized patients, leuprolide reduced total testosterone to ≤ 50 ng/dl in a greater proportion of patients than GTx-758 by day 60 (43.4%, 63.6%, and 88.2% of subjects receiving GTx-758 1000 mg [p<0.001], GTx-758 2000 mg [p=0.004], and leuprolide, respectively). GTx-758 reduced free testosterone and PSA earlier and to a greater degree than leuprolide. GTx-758 led to fewer hot flashes, decreases in bone turnover markers, and alterations in IGF-1 compared with leuprolide. A higher incidence of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs) was seen with GTx-758 (4.1%) compared with leuprolide (0.0%). Although leuprolide reduced total testosterone to ≤ 50 ng/dl in a greater proportion of patients compared with GTx-758, GTx-758 was superior in lowering free testosterone and PSA. GTx-758 reduced estrogen deficiency side effects of hot flashes, bone loss, and insulin resistance but with a higher incidence of VTEs. This paper reports findings that leuprolide lowered total testosterone more than GTx-758 but that GTx-758 lowered free testosterone and prostate-specific antigen more than leuprolide. GTx-758 also reduced estrogen deficiency side effects, albeit at a higher

  15. Relating shortening, erosion, and exhumation to orogen width during Alpine collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Claudio; Berger, Alfons; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Bousquet, Romain

    2014-05-01

    The width of orogens may change through time depending on the amount of shortening, on the efficiency of erosion, on the strength and thickness of the plates, or on the occurrence of pre-existing and newly formed weaknesses within the plates. The effect of erosion rates on the width of the Alps was controversially discussed, based on estimates of paleo-erosion rates and paleo-widths of the orogen. However, both parameters are difficult to reconstruct. In this contribution we investigate the causes of present-day, along-strike changes of width of the Eastern and the Central Alps to understand its width changes through time. Based on a series of 6 orogen-scale cross-sections and their retro-deformation we set the width of the thickened accreted lower plate in relation to the amount of collisional shortening and exhumation. We conclude that higher amounts of shortening systematically coincide with smaller widths of the thickened, accreted lower plate, i.e. the width of the mountain chain north of the South-Alpine indenters. Changes of width by a factor 2 along orogen segments of less than 200 km length cannot result from long-term climatic differences and sedimentary or paleontological evidences suggesting such differences are lacking. Therefore, erosional processes did not directly control the width of the orogen, which did not behave as a critical taper. Higher amounts of shortening coincide with larger amplitudes of orogen-scale, upright folds, with larger amounts of exhumation, and with higher exhumation rates. Hence, erosion did play a major role in reducing by up to 35 km the vertical crustal thickness in order to accommodate and allow shortening by folding, but along-strike changes of erosion rates were governed by different amounts of shortening, not by different climate.

  16. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    DOEpatents

    Slicker, James M.

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a "flyback" DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  17. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slicker, James M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a flyback DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  18. Optical antennas with sinusoidal modulation in width.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan; Segerink, Frans B; Korterik, Jeroen P; Pfaff, Stefan S; Prangsma, Jord C; Herek, Jennifer L

    2016-08-08

    Small metal structures sustaining plasmon resonances in the optical regime are of great interest due to their large scattering cross sections and ability to concentrate light to subwavelength volumes. In this paper, we study the dipolar plasmon resonances of optical antennas with a constant volume and a sinusoidal modulation in width. We experimentally show that by changing the phase of the width-modulation, with a small 10 nm modulation amplitude, the resonance shifts over 160 nm. Using simulations we show how this simple design can create resonance shifts greater than 600 nm. The versatility of this design is further shown by creating asymmetric structures with two different modulation amplitudes, which we experimentally and numerically show to give rise to two resonances. Our results on both the symmetric and asymmetric antennas show the capability to control the localization of the fields outside the antenna, while still maintaining the freedom to change the antenna resonance wavelength. The antenna design we tested combines a large spectral tunability with a small footprint: all the antenna dimensions are factor 7 to 13 smaller than the wavelength, and hold potential as a design element in meta-surfaces for beam shaping.

  19. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  20. Finite beam-width ray model for geometric spectral broadening.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, P R; Fish, P J; Pye, S D; Anderson, T

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare measured spectral width and maximum frequency with that predicted from ray models of geometric spectral broadening. Zero and finite beam-width models were used. Spectral data were acquired from a string phantom using two commonly-used linear array systems. Beam width and Doppler aperture sizes were measured using a needle hydrophone. The results showed that the experimentally measured data agreed best with the finite beam-width model. The zero beam-width model was in error by up to 50% for calculated spectral width, and up to 10% for maximum frequency. It is concluded that spectral width and maximum frequency are best calculated using the finite beam-width model, and that ultrasound manufacturers could improve the variation in spectral broadening measured at different locations on a single machine by adjusting the aperture size to give a constant subtended angle and beam width.

  1. Alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist treatment reduces neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and brain injury in mice with ischemic stroke and bone fracture.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenying; Li, Li; Wang, Liang; Degos, Vincent; Maze, Mervyn; Su, Hua

    2014-11-01

    Bone fracture at the acute stage of stroke exacerbates stroke injury by increasing neuroinflammation. We hypothesize that activation of α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α-7 nAchR) attenuates neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, and reduces brain injury in mice with bone fracture and stroke. Permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) was performed in C57BL/6J mice followed by tibia fracture 1 day later. Mice were treated with 0.8 mg/kg PHA 568487 (PHA, α-7 nAchR-specific agonist), 6 mg/kg methyllycaconitine (α-7 nAchR antagonist), or saline 1 and 2 days after pMCAO. Behavior was tested 3 days after pMCAO. Neuronal injury, CD68(+) , M1 (pro-inflammatory) and M2 (anti-inflammatory) microglia/macrophages, phosphorylated p65 component of nuclear factor kappa b in microglia/macrophages, oxidative and anti-oxidant gene expression were quantified. Compared to saline-treated mice, PHA-treated mice performed better in behavioral tests, had fewer apoptotic neurons (NeuN(+) TUNEL(+) ), fewer CD68(+) and M1 macrophages, and more M2 macrophages. PHA increased anti-oxidant gene expression and decreased oxidative stress and phosphorylation of nuclear factor kappa b p65. Methyllycaconitine had the opposite effects. Our data indicate that α-7 nAchR agonist treatment reduces neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, which are associated with reduced brain injury in mice with ischemic stroke plus tibia fracture. Bone fracture at the acute stage of stroke exacerbates neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and brain injury, and our study has shown that the α-7 nAchR agonist, PHA (PHA 568487), attenuates neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and brain injury in mice with stroke and bone fracture. Hence, PHA could provide an opportunity to develop a new strategy to reduce brain injury in patients suffering from stroke and bone fracture. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. Anti-Interleukin-1 Beta/Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha IgY Antibodies Reduce Pathological Allergic Responses in Guinea Pigs with Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei-xu, Hu; Wen-yun, Zhou; Xi-ling, Zhu; Zhu, Wen; Li-hua, Wu; Xiao-mu, Wu; Hui-ping, Wei; Wen-ding, Wang; Dan, He; Qin, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether the combined blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α can alleviate the pathological allergic inflammatory reaction in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in allergic rhinitis (AR) guinea pigs. Healthy guinea pigs treated with saline were used as the healthy controls. The AR guinea pigs were randomly divided into (1) the AR model group treated with intranasal saline; (2) the 0.1% nonspecific IgY treatment group; (3) the 0.1% anti-TNF-α IgY treatment group; (4) the 0.1% anti-IL-1β IgY treatment group; (5) the 0.1% combined anti-IL-1β and TNF-α IgY treatment group; and (6) the fluticasone propionate treatment group. The inflammatory cells were evaluated using Wright's staining. Histopathology was examined using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results showed that the number of eosinophils was significantly decreased in the peripheral blood, nasal lavage fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (P < 0.05), and eosinophil, neutrophil, and lymphocyte infiltration and edema were significantly reduced or absent in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues (P < 0.05) in the combined 0.1% anti-IL-1β- and TNF-α IgY-treated guinea pigs. The data suggest that topical blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α could reduce pathological allergic inflammation in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in AR guinea pigs. PMID:27046957

  3. Anti-Interleukin-1 Beta/Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha IgY Antibodies Reduce Pathological Allergic Responses in Guinea Pigs with Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wei-Xu, Hu; Wen-Yun, Zhou; Xi-Ling, Zhu; Zhu, Wen; Li-Hua, Wu; Xiao-Mu, Wu; Hui-Ping, Wei; Wen-Ding, Wang; Dan, He; Qin, Xiang; Guo-Zhu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether the combined blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α can alleviate the pathological allergic inflammatory reaction in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in allergic rhinitis (AR) guinea pigs. Healthy guinea pigs treated with saline were used as the healthy controls. The AR guinea pigs were randomly divided into (1) the AR model group treated with intranasal saline; (2) the 0.1% nonspecific IgY treatment group; (3) the 0.1% anti-TNF-α IgY treatment group; (4) the 0.1% anti-IL-1β IgY treatment group; (5) the 0.1% combined anti-IL-1β and TNF-α IgY treatment group; and (6) the fluticasone propionate treatment group. The inflammatory cells were evaluated using Wright's staining. Histopathology was examined using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results showed that the number of eosinophils was significantly decreased in the peripheral blood, nasal lavage fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (P < 0.05), and eosinophil, neutrophil, and lymphocyte infiltration and edema were significantly reduced or absent in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues (P < 0.05) in the combined 0.1% anti-IL-1β- and TNF-α IgY-treated guinea pigs. The data suggest that topical blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α could reduce pathological allergic inflammation in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in AR guinea pigs.

  4. Alpha(+)-thalassaemia and malarial anaemia.

    PubMed

    Danquah, Ina; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2008-11-01

    The mechanisms by which alpha(+)-thalassaemia protects against severe malaria, and severe malarial anaemia in particular, are poorly understood. A recent report proposes that the increased count of microcytic and hypochromic erythrocytes in alpha(+)-thalassaemia reduces the haemoglobin decline during acute malaria and, thus, reduces the risk of anaemia. This mechanism might add to further alpha(+)-thalassaemic attributes that are involved in the attenuation of anaemia caused by both acute and chronic Plasmodium infections.

  5. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  6. Device-width dependence of plateau width in quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaji, S.; Hirakawa, K.; Nagata, M.

    1993-02-01

    Hall bar type devices having a total length of 2900 μm, a source and drain electrode width of 400 μm and different widths w ranging from 10 to 120 μm in its central 600 μm long part are fabricated from a GaAs/AlGaAs wafer with electron mobility of 21 m 2V -1s -1. The current at which the quantum Hall plateau for i=2 at B=9.7T at T=1.2K disappears is proportional to w. The average critical current density is Jcr=(1.6±0.2) A m -1

  7. Reduced embryonic survival in rainbow trout resulting from paternal exposure to the environmental estrogen 17 alpha- ethynylestradiol during late sexual maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kim H.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Nagler, James J.

    2007-11-01

    Exposure of fishes to environmental estrogens is known to affect sexual development and spawning, but little information exists regarding effects on gametes. This study evaluated embryonic survival of offspring from male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17a-ethynylestradiol (EE2)using an in vitro fertilization protocol. Males were exposed at either 1800 or 6700 degree days (8d) (i.e. 161 or 587 days post-fertilization (dpf)) to test for effects on testes linked to reproductive ontogeny. At 18008d, fish were beginning testicular differentiation and were exposed to 109 ng EE2/l for 21 days. At 67008d, fish have testes containing spermatocytes and spermatids and were exposed for 56 days to either 0.8, 8.3, or 65 ng EE2/l. Semen was collected at full sexual maturity in each group and used to fertilize eggs pooled from several non-exposed females. Significant decreases in embryonic survival were observed only with the 67008d exposure. In 0.8 and 8.3 ng EE2/l treatments, embryo survival was significantly reduced at 19 dpf when compared with the control. In contrast, an immediate decrease in embryonic survival at 0.5 dpf was observed in the 65 ng EE2/l treatment. Blood samples collected at spawning from 67008d exposed males revealed a significant decrease in 11-ketotestosterone and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone levels for the 65 ng EE2/l treatment when compared with the other treatment groups. Results indicate that sexually maturing male rainbow trout are susceptible to EE2 exposure with these fish exhibiting two possible mechanisms of reduced embryonic survival through sperm varying dependant

  8. Lyman Alpha Emitters and Galaxy Formation Scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.; Kovac, K.; Somerville, R.; Moustakas, L.; Rhoads, J. E.

    2002-12-01

    The Large Area Lyman Alpha (LALA) survey has successfully identified the population of young Lyman-alpha emitting galaxies predicted about 35 years ago. High equivalent widths of the Lyman-alpha line in these sources suggest that they are a very young (age < 107 years), metal poor, population of stars at redshifts 4.5 and 5.7, making them very interesting objects to study in the context of galaxy formation scenarios. We have begun to do exactly this using the correlation function of LALA galaxies. While the strong correlation function indicates massive halos, the volume density of Lyman-alpha sources and the faint continuum levels indicate low-mass stellar systems. This discrepancy can be resolved by postulating multiple emitters in a single halo.

  9. Interface width effect on the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the weakly nonlinear regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; Li, Y. J.

    2010-05-15

    In this paper, the interface width effects (i.e., the density gradient effects or the density transition layer effects) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in the weakly nonlinear (WN) regime are investigated by numerical simulation (NS). It is found that the interface width effects dramatically influence the linear growth rate in the linear growth regime and the mode coupling process in the WN growth regime. First, the interface width effects decrease the linear growth rate of the RTI, particularly for the short perturbation wavelengths. Second, the interface width effects suppress (reduce) the third-order feedback to the fundamental mode, which induces the nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) to exceed the classical prediction, 0.1lambda. The wider the density transition layer is, the larger the NSA is. The NSA in our NS can reach a half of its perturbation wavelength. Finally, the interface width effects suppress the generation and the growth of the second and the third harmonics. The ability to suppress the harmonics' growth increases with the interface width but decreases with the perturbation wavelength. On the whole, in the WN regime, the interface width effects stabilize the RTI, except for an enhancement of the NSA, which is expected to improve the understanding of the formation mechanism for the astrophysical jets, and for the jetlike long spikes in the high energy density physics.

  10. Solar-Cycle Changes in GONG P-Mode Widths and Amplitudes 1995-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komm R. W.; Howe, R.; Hill, F.

    1999-01-01

    We search for a solar cycle variation in mode widths and amplitudes derived from 3-month GONG time series. The variation of mode width and amplitude observed in GONG data are the combined effects of fill factor, temporal variation, and measurement uncertainties. The largest variation is caused by the fill factor resulting in modes with increased width and reduced amplitude when fill is lower. We assume that the solar cycle variation is the only other systematic variation beside the temporal window function effect. We correct all currently available data sets for the fill factor and simultaneously derive the solar cycle variation. We find an increase of about 3% on average in mode width from the previous minimum to Oct. 1998 and a decrease of about 7% and 6% in mode amplitude and mode area (width x amplitude). We find no l dependence of the solar-cycle changes. As a function of frequency, these changes show a maximum between 2.7 and 3.3 mHz with about 47% higher than average values for mode width and about 29% and 36% higher ones for mode amplitude and area. We estimate the significance of these rather small changes by a pre-whitening method and find that the results are significant at or above the 99.9% level with mode area showing the highest level of significance and mode width the lowest. The variation in background amplitude is most likely not significant and is consistent with a zero change.

  11. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists potentiate responses mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors in the cat nictitating membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Shepperson, N. B.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha 1 but not alpha 2-adrenoceptors mediate contractions of the cat nictitating membrane. The contractions of this tissue evoked by alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists, but not those evoked by angiotensin II, are potentiated by pre-dosing with alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists. This potentiation is reversed by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, WY 26392. Pressor responses evoked by alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists or angiotensin II were not affected by alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Contractions of the nictitating membrane evoked by noradrenaline were reduced by pretreatment with WY 26392. These results suggest that in some tissues the role of alpha 2-adrenoceptors may be to modulate responses to alpha 1-adrenoceptors, rather than to evoke a discrete response themselves. PMID:6148985

  12. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W {yields} e{nu} candidates selected in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 {+-} 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model and is the most precise direct measurement result from a single experiment to date.

  13. Direct measurement of the W boson width.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-12-04

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W --> enu candidate events. Data from approximately 1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity recorded at square root of s = 1.96 TeV by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider are analyzed. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 +/- 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model.

  14. Red cell distribution width and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Red cell distribution width (RDW) is an index which primarily reflects impaired erythropoiesis and abnormal red blood cell survival. In last years the interest in this marker has considerably grown and now a lot of data are available indicating that this simple and inexpensive parameter is a strong and independent risk factor for death in the general population. Moreover, several investigations have been performed to investigate the role of RDW in cardiovascular and thrombotic disorders. Contrarily, there are relatively few reports focusing on RDW in the area of oncology and to date none review have been performed in this specific field. As such, the aim of this narrative review is to summarize some interesting results obtained in studies performed in patients affected by solid and hematological tumors. Even if larger studies are needed before these preliminary findings can be generalized, it seems plausible to affirm that RDW can be useful by adding prognostic information in patients with oncologic disease. PMID:27867951

  15. Alpha-mangostin from mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana Linn.) pericarp extract reduces high fat-diet induced hepatic steatosis in rats by regulating mitochondria function and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Shin-Yu; Chung, Pei-Chin; Owaga, Eddy E; Tsai, I-Jong; Wang, Pei-Yuan; Tsai, Jeng-I; Yeh, Tien-Shun; Hsieh, Rong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    potential, enhanced cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR), decreased tROS (total ROS) and mitoROS (mitochondrial ROS) levels ; reduced Ca(2+) and cytochrome c (cyt c) release from mitochondria, and reduced caspases 9 and 3 activities compared with control group. These findings demonstrate α-MG attenuated hepatic steatosis in high fat-diet fed rats potentially through enhanced cellular antioxidant capacity and improved mitochondrial functions as well as suppressed apoptosis of hepatocytes. The findings of study represent a novel nutritional approach on the use of α-MG in the prevention and management of NAFLD.

  16. Neutron decay widths of excited states of {sup 11}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, P. J.; Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; McEwan, P.; Bohlen, H. G.; Dorsch, T.; Kokalova, Tz.; Schulz, Ch.; Wheldon, C.

    2009-01-15

    The two-neutron transfer reaction {sup 9}Be({sup 16}O, {sup 14}O){sup 11}Be[{sup 10}Be +n] has been used to measure the branching ratios for the neutron decay of excited states of {sup 11}Be. The {sup 14}O ejectile was detected by a Q3D spectrometer at forward angles. The energies and angles of the {sup 10}Be fragments of the decaying {sup 11}Be* recoil were measured in coincidence with the {sup 14}O ejectile using a double-sided silicon strip detector array at backward angles. This enabled a kinematic reconstruction of the reaction to be performed. Theoretical decay branch ratios were calculated using barrier penetrability factors and were compared to the measured ratios to provide information on the relative reduced widths of the states. The decay widths have been used to link states in {sup 11}Be with a common structure and structurally to states in the daughter nucleus {sup 10}Be. The 3/2{sup -} 8.82-MeV state was identified as a candidate for a molecular band head.

  17. Changing step width alters lower extremity biomechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Brindle, Richard A; Milner, Clare E; Zhang, Songning; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2014-01-01

    Step width is a spatiotemporal parameter that may influence lower extremity biomechanics at the hip and knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical response of the lower extremity joints to step width changes during running. Lower extremity data from 30 healthy runners, half of them male, were collected during running in three step width conditions: preferred, wide, and narrow. Dependent variables and step width were analyzed using a mixed model ANOVA and pairwise t-tests for post hoc comparisons. Step width was successfully altered in the wide and narrow conditions. Generally, frontal plane peak values decreased as step width increased from narrow to preferred to wide. Peak hip adduction and rearfoot eversion angles decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Peak knee abduction moment and knee abduction impulse also decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Although men and women ran differently, gender only influenced the effect of step width on peak rearfoot inversion moment. In conclusion, step width influences lower extremity biomechanics in healthy runners. When step width increased from narrow to wide, peak values of frontal plane variables decreased. In addition to previously reported changes at the rearfoot, the hip and knee joint biomechanics were also influenced by changes in step width.

  18. Poly(I:C) reduces expression of JAM-A and induces secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} via distinct NF-{kappa}B pathways in human nasal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkuni, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Masaki, Tomoyuki; Fuchimoto, Jun; Kamekura, Ryuta; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Himi, Tetsuo; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-01-01

    Human nasal epithelium is an important physical barrier and innate immune defense protecting against inhaled substances and pathogens. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, which plays a key role in the innate immune response, has not been well characterized in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs), including the epithelial tight junctional barrier. In the present study, mRNAs of TLR1-10 were detected in hTERT-transfected HNECs, which can be used as an indispensable and stable model of normal HNECs, similar to primary cultured HNECs. To investigate the changes of tight junction proteins and the signal transduction pathways via TLRs in HNECs in vitro, hTERT-transfected HNECs were treated with TLR2 ligand P{sub 3}CSK{sub 4}, TLR3 ligand poly(I:C), TLR4 ligand LPS, TLR7/8 ligand CL097, TLR8 ligand ssRNA40/LyoVec, and TLR9 ligand ODN2006. In hTERT-transfected HNECs, treatment with poly(I:C) significantly reduced expression of the tight junction protein JAM-A and induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-{alpha}. Both the reduction of JAM-A expression and the induction of secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} after treatment with poly(I:C) were modulated by distinct signal transduction pathways via EGFR, PI3K, and p38 MAPK and finally regulated by a TLR3-mediated NF-{kappa}B pathway. The control of TLR3-mediated signaling pathways in HNECs may be important not only in infection by viral dsRNA but also in autoimmune diseases caused by endogenous dsRNA released from necrotic cells.

  19. Regression methods to investigate the relationship between facial measurements and widths of the maxillary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Isa, Zakiah Mohd; Tawfiq, Omar Farouq; Noor, Norliza Mohd; Shamsudheen, Mohd Iqbal; Rijal, Omar Mohd

    2010-03-01

    In rehabilitating edentulous patients, selecting appropriately sized teeth in the absence of preextraction records is problematic. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between some facial dimensions and widths of the maxillary anterior teeth to potentially provide a guide for tooth selection. Sixty full dentate Malaysian adults (18-36 years) representing 2 ethnic groups (Malay and Chinese), with well aligned maxillary anterior teeth and minimal attrition, participated in this study. Standardized digital images of the face, viewed frontally, were recorded. Using image analyzing software, the images were used to determine the interpupillary distance (IPD), inner canthal distance (ICD), and interalar width (IA). Widths of the 6 maxillary anterior teeth were measured directly from casts of the subjects using digital calipers. Regression analyses were conducted to measure the strength of the associations between the variables (alpha=.10). The means (standard deviations) of IPD, IA, and ICD of the subjects were 62.28 (2.47), 39.36 (3.12), and 34.36 (2.15) mm, respectively. The mesiodistal diameters of the maxillary central incisors, lateral incisors, and canines were 8.54 (0.50), 7.09 (0.48), and 7.94 (0.40) mm, respectively. The width of the central incisors was highly correlated to the IPD (r=0.99), while the widths of the lateral incisors and canines were highly correlated to a combination of IPD and IA (r=0.99 and 0.94, respectively). Using regression methods, the widths of the anterior teeth within the population tested may be predicted by a combination of the facial dimensions studied. (c) 2010 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  1. Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies at 2 < z < 3: Towards a Calibrated Probe of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Caryl Gronwall

    2012-12-03

    The goal of this project was to establish the physical properties of Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies from redshifts of 2 to 3 in order to better calibrate the use of LAEs as probes of the large scale structure of the universe for upcoming dark energy experiments, such as the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). We have obtained narrow-band imaging of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S) in two different narrow-band filters centered at Ly{alpha} at z=2.1 and 3.1. The resulting of samples of LAEs were used to determine the LAE luminosity function, equivalent width distribution and clustering properties (bias) of LAEs at these redshifts. While the results from the ECDF-S appear robust, they are based on a single field. To explore the effects of cosmic variance and galaxy environment on the physical properties of LAEs, we have also obtained narrow-band data at both redshifts (z = 2:1 and 3:1) in three additional fields (SDSS 1030+-05, the Extended Hubble Deep Field South, and CW 1255+01). The narrow-band imaging data has been reduced and LAE catalogs are being generated. We have calculated preliminary luminosity functions, equivalent width distributions, and clustering properties. We have also obtained follow-up spectroscopy in the optical (using VLT/FORS) and in the near-infrared (using Magellan/MMIRS). Since individual LAEs have too little S/N to enable meaningful fits for stellar population parameters, our previous work has analyzed stacked Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). SED fitting was performed on several subsets of LAEs selected by their rest-UV luminosity, UV spectral slope, Ly alpha luminosity, Equivalent Width, or rest-optical (IRAC) luminosity.

  2. Thread Graphs, Linear Rank-Width and Their Algorithmic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganian, Robert

    The introduction of tree-width by Robertson and Seymour [7] was a breakthrough in the design of graph algorithms. A lot of research since then has focused on obtaining a width measure which would be more general and still allowed efficient algorithms for a wide range of NP-hard problems on graphs of bounded width. To this end, Oum and Seymour have proposed rank-width, which allows the solution of many such hard problems on a less restricted graph classes (see e.g. [3,4]). But what about problems which are NP-hard even on graphs of bounded tree-width or even on trees? The parameter used most often for these exceptionally hard problems is path-width, however it is extremely restrictive - for example the graphs of path-width 1 are exactly paths.

  3. Microtubule Depolymerization Potentiates Alpha-Synuclein Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, A. Raquel; Arduíno, Daniela M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Cardoso, Sandra M.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with perturbed mitochondria function and alpha-synuclein fibrillization. We evaluated potential mechanistic links between mitochondrial dysfunction and alpha-synuclein aggregation. We studied a PD cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell line in which platelet mitochondria from a PD subject were transferred to NT2 neuronal cells previously depleted of endogenous mitochondrial DNA. Compared to a control cybrid cell line, the PD line showed reduced ATP levels, an increased free/polymerized tubulin ratio, and alpha-synuclein oligomer accumulation. Taxol (which stabilizes microtubules) normalized the PD tubulin ratio and reduced alpha-synuclein oligomerization. A nexus exists between mitochondrial function, cytoskeleton homeostasis, and alpha-synuclein oligomerization. In our model, mitochondrial dysfunction triggers an increased free tubulin, which destabilizes the microtubular network and promotes alpha-synuclein oligomerization. PMID:20552056

  4. Relationship between width of greater trochanters and width of iliac wings in tronchanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Viradia, Neal K; Berger, Alex A; Dahners, Laurence E

    2011-09-01

    Trochanteric bursitis is a common disorder that is characterized by inflammation of the bursa, superficial to the greater trochanter of the femur, leading to pain in the lateral hip, and often occurs because of acute trauma or repetitive friction involving the iliotibial band, the greater trochanter, and the bursa. In the study reported here, we hypothesized that the increased incidence of bursitis may be the result of the increased prominence of the trochanter in relation to the wings of the iliac crest. Distances between the outermost edges of trochanters and iliac wings were measured in 202 patients from the University of North Carolina Health Care System-101 without a known diagnosis and 101 with a clinical diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis. To determine significance, t tests for nonpaired data were used. Mean (SD) difference between trochanter and iliac wing widths was 28 (20) mm in the group diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and 17 (18) mm in the control group. The difference between the groups in this regard was significant (P<.00005). In addition, mean (SD) ratio of trochanter widths to iliac wing widths was 1.09 (.06) in the bursitis group and 1.05 (.06) in the control group. The difference between these groups was significant (P<.0005) in this regard as well. Having trochanters wider in relation to iliac wings was associated with the diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis.

  5. Food extracts consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia reduce protein concentrations of androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaskirat; Xie, Chanlu; Yao, Mu; Hua, Sheng; Vignarajan, Soma; Jardine, Greg; Hambly, Brett D; Sved, Paul; Dong, Qihan

    2010-04-01

    Active surveillance is an emerging management option for the rising number of men with low-grade, clinically localized prostate cancer. However, 30-40% of men on active surveillance will progress to high-grade disease over 5 y. With the ultimate aim of developing a food-based chemoprevention strategy to retard cancer progression in these otherwise healthy men, we have developed a blend of food extracts commonly consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia. The effect of the food extracts known as Blueberry Punch (BBP) on prostate cancer cell growth and key signaling pathways were examined in vitro and in vivo. BBP reduced prostate cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner (0.08-2.5%) at 72 h in vitro due to the reduction in cell proliferation and viability. Prostate cancer cell xenograft-bearing mice, administered 10% BBP in drinking water for 2 wk, had a 25% reduction in tumor volume compared with the control (water only). In vitro, BBP reduced protein concentrations in 3 signaling pathways necessary for the proliferation and survival of prostate cancer cells, namely androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B/protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha. The downstream effectors of these pathways, including prostate-specific antigen and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, were also reduced. Thus, this palatable food supplement is a potential candidate for testing in clinical trials and may ultimately prove effective in retarding the progression of low-grade, early-stage prostate cancer in men managed by active surveillance.

  6. ENERGY-DEPENDENT GAMMA-RAY BURST PULSE WIDTH DUE TO THE CURVATURE EFFECT AND INTRINSIC BAND SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Z. Y.; Ma, L.; Zhao, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Bao, Y. Y.

    2012-06-20

    Previous studies have found that the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulse is energy dependent and that it decreases as a power-law function with increasing photon energy. In this work we have investigated the relation between the energy dependence of the pulse and the so-called Band spectrum by using a sample including 51 well-separated fast rise and exponential decay long-duration GRB pulses observed by BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory). We first decompose these pulses into rise and decay phases and find that the rise widths and the decay widths also behave as a power-law function with photon energy. Then we investigate statistically the relations between the three power-law indices of the rise, decay, and total width of the pulse (denoted as {delta}{sub r}, {delta}{sub d}, and {delta}{sub w}, respectively) and the three Band spectral parameters, high-energy index ({alpha}), low-energy index ({beta}), and peak energy (E{sub p} ). It is found that (1) {alpha} is strongly correlated with {delta}{sub w} and {delta}{sub d} but seems uncorrelated with {delta}{sub r}; (2) {beta} is weakly correlated with the three power-law indices, and (3) E{sub p} does not show evident correlations with the three power-law indices. We further investigate the origin of {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha}. We show that the curvature effect and the intrinsic Band spectrum could naturally lead to the energy dependence of the GRB pulse width and also the {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha} correlations. Our results hold so long as the shell emitting gamma rays has a curved surface and the intrinsic spectrum is a Band spectrum or broken power law. The strong {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} correlation and inapparent correlations between {delta}{sub r} and the three Band spectral parameters also suggest that the rise and decay phases of the GRB pulses have different origins.

  7. GAS MOTION STUDY OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 2 USING FUV AND OPTICAL SPECTRAL LINES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Rauch, Michael; Janice Lee; Okamura, Sadanori

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of Magellan/MMIRS and Keck/NIRSPEC spectroscopy for five Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z {approx_equal} 2.2 for which high-resolution FUV spectra from Magellan/MagE are available. We detect nebular emission lines including H{alpha} on the individual basis and low-ionization interstellar (LIS) absorption lines in a stacked FUV spectrum, and measure average offset velocities of the Ly{alpha} line, {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}}, and LIS absorption lines, {Delta}v {sub abs}, with respect to the systemic velocity defined by the nebular lines. For a sample of eight z {approx} 2-3 LAEs without active galactic nucleus from our study and the literature, we obtain {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} = 175 {+-} 35 km s{sup -1}, which is significantly smaller than that of Lyman-break Galaxies (LBGs), {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} {approx_equal} 400 km s{sup -1}. The stacked FUV spectrum gives {Delta}v {sub abs} = -179 {+-} 73 km s{sup -1}, comparable to that of LBGs. These positive {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} and negative {Delta}v {sub abs} suggest that LAEs also have outflows. In contrast to LBGs, however, the LAEs' {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} is as small as |{Delta}v {sub abs}|, suggesting low neutral hydrogen column densities. Such a low column density with a small number of resonant scattering may cause the observed strong Ly{alpha} emission of LAEs. We find an anti-correlation between Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) and {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} in a compilation of LAE and LBG samples. Although its physical origin is not clear, this anti-correlation result appears to challenge the hypothesis that a strong outflow, by means of a reduced number of resonant scattering, produces a large EW. If LAEs at z > 6 have similarly small {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} values, constraints on the reionization history derived from the Ly{alpha} transmissivity may need to be revised.

  8. Activation of the adenosine A3 receptor in RAW 264.7 cells inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release by reducing calcium-dependent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lynn; Pingle, Sandeep C; Hallam, Daniel M; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the immune system and promotes inflammation via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, which regulates the synthesis and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and other inflammatory cytokines. Previous studies have shown that the nucleoside adenosine suppresses LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release in human UB939 macrophages by activating an adenosine A(3) receptor (A(3)AR) subtype on these cells. In this study, we examined the mechanism(s) underlying A(3)AR-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha release in a mouse (RAW 264.7) cell line. Treatment of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS (3 mug/ml) increased TNF-alpha release, which was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by adenosine analogs N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and R-phenylisopropyladenosine and reversed by selective A(3)AR blockade. The increase in TNF-alpha release was preceded by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release by IB-MECA, a selective agonist of the A(3)AR, or with BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, reduced LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release. Activation of the A(3)AR or inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release also reduced LPS-stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Similar inhibition by A(3)AR was observed for LPS-stimulated inducible nitric-oxide synthase. These data support the contention that inhibition of LPS-stimulated release of inflammatory molecules, such as TNF-alpha and NO via the A(3)AR, involves suppression of intracellular Ca(2+)signaling, leading to suppression of NF-kappaB and ERK1/2 pathways.

  9. Stance width changes how sensory feedback is used for multisegmental balance control

    PubMed Central

    Mellodge, Patricia; Peterka, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    A multilink sensorimotor integration model of frontal plane balance control was developed to determine how stance width influences the use of sensory feedback in healthy adults. Data used to estimate model parameters came from seven human participants who stood on a continuously rotating surface with three different stimulus amplitudes, with eyes open and closed, and at four different stance widths. Dependent variables included lower body (LB) and upper body (UB) sway quantified by frequency-response functions. Results showed that stance width had a major influence on how parameters varied across stimulus amplitude and between visual conditions. Active mechanisms dominated LB control. At narrower stances, with increasing stimulus amplitude, subjects used sensory reweighting to shift reliance from proprioceptive cues to vestibular and/or visual cues that oriented the LB more toward upright. When vision was available, subjects reduced reliance on proprioception and increased reliance on vision. At wider stances, LB control did not exhibit sensory reweighting. In the UB system, both active and passive mechanisms contributed and were dependent on stance width. UB control changed across stimulus amplitude most in wide stance (opposite of the pattern found in LB control). The strong influence of stance width on sensory integration and neural feedback control implies that rehabilitative therapies for balance disorders can target different aspects of balance control by using different stance widths. Rehabilitative strategies designed to assess or modify sensory reweighting will be most effective with the use of narrower stances, whereas wider stances present greater challenges to UB control. PMID:24760788

  10. Effects of stance width on performance and postural stability in national-standard pistol shooters.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Richard N; Sefton, Joellen M

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether changing stance width would result in a corresponding change in postural and/or pistol stability. Twelve national-standard male air pistol shooters performed 10 shots each at five stance widths (30 cm, 45 cm, 60 cm, 75 cm, and 90 cm). Postural stability was determined by measuring centre-of-pressure changes with a dual force-platform system. Shooting mechanics measures were determined by a NOPTEL ST-2000 optoelectronic training system. Medial-lateral centre-of-pressure excursion (F₄,₄₄ = 7.17, P < 0.001, effect size = 0.99) and speed (F₄,₄₄ = 77.03, P < 0.001, effect size = 3.88) were reduced as stance width decreased. Centre of gravity fine (the percentage of time held within an area the size of the ten-ring) improved during narrower stance widths (F₄,₃₂ = 12.49, P < 0.001, effect size = 0.71). Our findings suggest that stance width affects postural and pistol stability in national-standard air pistol athletes. Moreover, the current method of suggesting a wider stance to improve shooting performance should be reconsidered and perhaps air-pistol shooters should use a 30-cm stance width to improve postural stability and shooting performance.

  11. Statistical evaluation of metal fill widths for emulated metal fill in parasitic extraction methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J-Me, Teh; Noh, Norlaili Mohd.; Aziz, Zalina Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In the chip industry today, the key goal of a chip development organization is to develop and market chips within a short time frame to gain foothold on market share. This paper proposes a design flow around the area of parasitic extraction to improve the design cycle time. The proposed design flow utilizes the usage of metal fill emulation as opposed to the current flow which performs metal fill insertion directly. By replacing metal fill structures with an emulation methodology in earlier iterations of the design flow, this is targeted to help reduce runtime in fill insertion stage. Statistical design of experiments methodology utilizing the randomized complete block design was used to select an appropriate emulated metal fill width to improve emulation accuracy. The experiment was conducted on test cases of different sizes, ranging from 1000 gates to 21000 gates. The metal width was varied from 1 x minimum metal width to 6 x minimum metal width. Two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least significant difference test were used to analyze the interconnect net capacitance values of the different test cases. This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis for the 45 nm process technology. The recommended emulated metal fill width was found to be 4 x the minimum metal width.

  12. Beta/alpha continuous air monitor

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Gregory K.; Martz, Dowell E.

    1989-01-01

    A single deep layer silicon detector in combination with a microcomputer, recording both alpha and beta activity and the energy of each pulse, distinguishing energy peaks using a novel curve fitting technique to reduce the natural alpha counts in the energy region where plutonium and other transuranic alpha emitters are present, and using a novel algorithm to strip out radon daughter contribution to actual beta counts.

  13. Beta/alpha continuous air monitor

    DOEpatents

    Becker, G.K.; Martz, D.E.

    1988-06-27

    A single deep layer silicon detector in combination with a microcomputer, recording both alpha and beta activity and the energy of each pulse, distinquishing energy peaks using a novel curve fitting technique to reduce the natural alpha counts in the energy region where plutonium and other transuranic alpha emitters are present, and using a novel algorithm to strip out radon daughter contribution to actual beta counts. 7 figs.

  14. Comparison of Intercanine and Intermolar Width Between Cleft Lip Palate and Normal Class I Occlusion Group.

    PubMed

    Wahaj, Aiyesha; Ahmed, Imtiaz

    2015-11-01

    To determine the mean difference of arch dimensions (both intercanine and intermolar width) between cleft lip palate and normal class I occlusion group. Cross-sectional analytic study. Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, [Dow University of Health Sciences (DUHS)], Karachi, from March 2012 to April 2013. Group 1 consisted of 32 subjects with complete repaired, non-syndromic unilateral and bilateral cleft lip palate. Group 2 consisted of 32 subjects with normal facial morphology and class I occlusion. Exclusion criteria were cleft lip palate subjects with systemic diseases, any arch expansion procedure, incomplete repaired palate, open fistulas, developmental or acquired craniofacial muscular deformities, autoimmune conditions, syndromes, endocrine abnormalities, neurological problems, or previous history of orthodontic treatment and signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders, history of trauma, impacted or missing teeth, periodontally involved teeth, subdivision molar classification, skeletal base II and III with molar class I. The transverse width (intercanine and intermolar width) of dental casts was measured with the help of digital caliper. The intercanine width was measured between cusp tips of the canine while the intermolar width distance was measured between mesiobuccal cusp tips of first molars, and buccal grooves of the mandibular first molars in both cleft lip palate and normal class I occlusion group, respectively. There were 64 subjects with mean 14.7 ±6.8 years in the cleft palate and 14.7 ±6.3 years in the normal group. There was statistically significant differences found between intercanine and intermolar width in maxillary arch (p < 0.001). In mandibular arch, only intercanine width has showed significant difference (p < 0.001) between cleft and normal occlusion class I group. Maxillary and mandibular intercanine width was found to be significantly reduced in cleft lip palate group (both unilateral

  15. Nondeletional alpha-thalassemia: first description of alpha Hph alpha and alpha Nco alpha mutations in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Ayala, S; Colomer, D; Aymerich, M; Pujades, A; Vives-Corrons, J L

    1996-07-01

    Several different deletions underlie the molecular basis of alpha-thalassemia. The most common alpha-thalassemia determinant in Spain is the rightward deletion (-alpha 3.7). To our knowledge, however, no cases of alpha-thalassemia due to nondeletional mutations have so far been described in this particular Mediterranean area. Here, we report the existence of nondeletional forms of alpha-thalassemia in ten Spanish families. The alpha 2-globin gene was characterized in ten unrelated patients and their relatives only when the presence of deletional alpha-thalassemia was ruled out. The alpha 2-globin gene analysis was performed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction enzyme analysis or by allelespecific priming. This allowed the identification of a 5-base pair (bp) deletion at the donor site of IVS I (alpha Hph alpha) in 9 cases and the alpha 2 initiation codon mutation (alpha Nco alpha) in one case. Although these alpha 2-globin gene mutations are found in other mediterranean areas, our results demonstrate their presence in the Spanish population and suggest that the alpha Hph alpha/alpha alpha genotype is probably the most common nondeletional form of alpha-thalassemia in Spain.

  16. Development of the Global Width Database for Large Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai; O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Trigg, Mark A.; Miller, Zachary F.; Pavelsky, Tamlin M.; Bates, Paul D.

    2014-04-01

    River width is a fundamental parameter of river hydrodynamic simulations, but no global-scale river width database based on observed water bodies has yet been developed. Here we present a new algorithm that automatically calculates river width from satellite-based water masks and flow direction maps. The Global Width Database for Large Rivers (GWD-LR) is developed by applying the algorithm to the SRTM Water Body Database and the HydroSHEDS flow direction map. Both bank-to-bank river width and effective river width excluding islands are calculated for river channels between 60S and 60N. The effective river width of GWD-LR is compared with existing river width databases for the Congo and Mississippi Rivers. The effective river width of the GWD-LR is slightly narrower compared to the existing databases, but the relative difference is within ±20% for most river channels. As the river width of the GWD-LR is calculated along the river channels of the HydroSHEDS flow direction map, it is relatively straightforward to apply the GWD-LR to global and continental-scale river modeling.

  17. Perceptual lane width, wide perceptual road centre markings and driving speeds.

    PubMed

    Godley, Stuart T; Triggs, Thomas J; Fildes, Brian N

    2004-02-26

    The possibility that driving speeds could be reduced through the use of lane delineation was explored. Using a high-fidelity driving simulator, 28 experienced drivers were measured on seven two-lane rural roads with lane widths of 3.6, 3.0, or 2.5 m, and with either a standard centreline (control), a wide painted hatched road centre marking, or a wide white gravel road centre marking. Driving speeds were reduced on the narrowest lane width road, and further reduced on straight road sections that contained the centre marking with painted hatching. It was concluded that the narrow lane width increased steering workload and reduced speeds through a speed-steering workload trade-off, whilst the hatched road centre marking enhanced peripheral visual speed perception, leading to higher speed estimations and slower speeds. Therefore, narrowing the lane width below 3.0 m by using a painted hatched road centre marking should be an effective way to reduce driving speeds.

  18. Antibody-mediated reduction of {alpha}-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, P.G.; Gallop, M.A.

    1998-06-09

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an {alpha}-ketoamide to the corresponding {alpha}-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  19. Antibody-mediated reduction of .alpha.-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Gallop, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an .alpha.-ketoamide to the corresponding .alpha.-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  20. Alpha-decay properties of /sup 205-208/Fr: Identification of /sup 206/Fr/sup m/

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, B.G.; Toth, K.S.; Carter, H.K.; Mlekodaj, R.L.; Spejewski, E.H.

    1981-05-01

    Alpha-particle and ..gamma..-ray spectral measurements were made for /sup 205-208/Fr. A new a emitter (T/sub 1/2/ = 0.7 +- 0.1 sec and E/sub a/ = 6.930 +- 0.005 MeV) was observed and identified with the decay of a previously unknown isomer in /sup 206/Fr. From the a particle and g ray intensities, a decay branching ratios were deduced for /sup 205-208/Fr utilizing available information concerning the nuclides' (electron capture+positron) decay properties. Reduced widths were calculated and compared with those of neighboring nuclei.

  1. Reduced volume but increased training intensity elevates muscle Na+-K+ pump alpha1-subunit and NHE1 expression as well as short-term work capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Iaia, F Marcello; Thomassen, Martin; Kolding, Helle; Gunnarsson, Thomas; Wendell, Jesper; Rostgaard, Thomas; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Krustrup, Peter; Nybo, Lars; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2008-03-01

    The present study examined muscle adaptations and alterations in work capacity in endurance-trained runners after a change from endurance to sprint training. Fifteen runners were assigned to either a sprint training (ST, n = 8) or a control (CON, n = 7) group. ST replaced their normal training by 30-s sprint runs three to four times a week, whereas CON continued the endurance training (approximately 45 km/wk). After the 4-wk sprint period, the expression of the muscle Na+-K+ pump alpha1-subunit and Na+/H+-exchanger isoform 1 was 29 and 30% higher (P < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, plasma K+ concentration was reduced (P < 0.05) during repeated intense running. In ST, performance in a 30-s sprint test, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, and two supramaximal exhaustive runs was improved (P < 0.05) by 7, 19, 27, and 19%, respectively, after the sprint training period, whereas pulmonary maximum oxygen uptake and 10-k time were unchanged. No changes in CON were observed. The present data suggest a role of the Na+-K+ pump in the control of K+ homeostasis and in the development of fatigue during repeated high-intensity exercise. Furthermore, performance during intense exercise can be improved and endurance performance maintained even with a reduction in training volume if the intensity of training is very high.

  2. Circulating Levels of Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha Receptor 2 Are Increased in Heart Failure with Preserved Ejection Fraction Relative to Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction: Evidence for a Divergence in Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Putko, Brendan N.; Wang, Zuocheng; Lo, Jennifer; Anderson, Todd; Becher, Harald; Dyck, Jason R. B.; Kassiri, Zamaneh; Oudit, Gavin Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background Various pathways have been implicated in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) with preserved ejection fraction (HFPEF). Inflammation in response to comorbid conditions, such as hypertension and diabetes, may play a proportionally larger role in HFPEF as compared to HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFREF). Methods and Results This study investigated inflammation mediated by the tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) axis in community-based cohorts of HFPEF patients (n = 100), HFREF patients (n = 100) and healthy controls (n = 50). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to investigate levels of TNFα, its two receptors (TNFR1 and TNFR2), and a non-TNFα cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), in plasma derived from peripheral blood samples. Plasma levels of TNFα and TNFR1 were significantly elevated in HFPEF relative to controls, while levels of TNFR2 were significantly higher in HFPEF than both controls and HFREF. TNFα, TNFR1 and TNFR2 were each significantly associated with at least two of the following: age, estimated glomerular filtration rate, hypertension, diabetes, smoking, peripheral vascular disease or history of atrial fibrillation. TNFR2 levels were also significantly associated with increasing grade of diastolic dysfunction and severity of symptoms in HFPEF. Conclusions Inflammation mediated through TNFα and its receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2, may represent an important component of a comorbidity-induced inflammatory response that partially drives the pathophysiology of HFPEF. PMID:24923671

  3. Zidovudine and interferon-alpha treatment induces a high response rate and reduces HTLV-1 proviral load and VEGF plasma levels in patients with adult T-cell leukemia from North East Iran.

    PubMed

    Kchour, Ghada; Makhoul, Nadine J; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Kooshyar, Mohamad-Mehdi; Shirdel, Abbas; Rastin, Maryam; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Tarhini, Mahdi; Zalloua, Pierre A; Hermine, Olivier; Farid, Reza; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2007-02-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is endemic in southern Japan, the Caribbean, intertropical Africa, and Brazil. Recently north east Iran, particularly the region of Mashhad, has been recognized as a new endemic region. ATLL is an aggressive T-cell lymphoproliferative disorder. Patients with ATLL have high plasma levels of VEGF that induce angiogenesis. Prognosis of ATLL remains poor because of immunosuppression and intrinsic resistance to chemotherapy. Important advances in the treatment of ATLL were reported with the combination of zidovudine (AZT) and interferon-alpha. We investigated the effect of AZT/IFN treatment on vascular endothelium growth factor (VEGF) plasma levels and HTLV-I proviral load in ATLL patients from the region of Mashhad. We confirmed that AZT/IFN treatment induces a high response rate and prolonged survival with minimal side effects. We also confirmed that VEGF plasma levels and HTLV-I proviral load are higher in ATLL patients than in asymptomatic carriers. We finally showed that AZT/IFN treatment reduced both HTLV-I proviral load and importantly VEGF plasma levels, suggesting a potential antiangiogenic effect of this therapy. These results provide further evidence for the efficacy and the mechanism of action of AZT/IFN therapy for ATLL in a developing country.

  4. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film.

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-20

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation.

  5. Adalimumab (tumor necrosis factor-blocker) reduces the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity increased by exogenous tumor necrosis factor alpha in an organotypic culture of porcine neuroretina.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Bueno, I; Garcia-Gutierrez, M T; Srivastava, G K; Gayoso, M J; Gonzalo-Orden, J M; Pastor, J C

    2013-01-01

    To determine if exogenous addition of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) exacerbates retinal reactive gliosis in an organotypic culture of porcine neuroretina and to evaluate if concomitant adalimumab, a TNF-blocker, diminishes it. Porcine retinal explants from 20 eyeballs were cultured. Cultures with 100 pg/ml TNFα, 10 µg/ml adalimumab, 100 pg/ml TNFα plus 10 µg/ml adalimumab, or controls without additives were maintained for 9 days. Freshly detached retinas were processed in parallel. TNFα levels in control culture supernatants were quantified with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cryostat sections were doubly immunostained for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker for reactive gliosis, and cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP), a marker for Müller cells. Sections were also labeled with the isolectin IB4, a label for microglia/macrophages. TNFα in control culture supernatants was detected only at day 1. Compared to the fresh neuroretinal samples, upregulation of GFAP and downregulation of CRALBP occurred during the 9 days of culture. Exogenous TNFα stimulated glial cells to upregulate GFAP and downregulate CRALBP immunoreactivity. TNFα-treated cultures also initiated the growth of gliotic membranes and underwent retinal disorganization. Adalimumab inhibited the spontaneous increases in GFAP and maintained CRALBP. In combination with TNFα, adalimumab reduced GFAP expression and conserved CRALBP, with only slight retinal disorganization. No appreciable changes in IB4 labeling were observed under the different culture conditions. In cultured porcine neuroretina, spontaneous reactive gliosis and retinal disorganization were exacerbated by exogenous TNFα. Adalimumab reduced spontaneous changes and those induced by TNFα. Therefore, inhibiting TNFα may represent a novel approach to controlling retinal fibrosis observed in some human diseases.

  6. Distinct myeloid suppressor cell subsets correlate with plasma IL-6 and IL-10 and reduced interferon-alpha signaling in CD4⁺ T cells from patients with GI malignancy.

    PubMed

    Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Young, Gregory S; Bauer, Todd; Binkley, Elaine; Bloomston, Mark; Bill, Matthew A; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Carson, William E; Lesinski, Gregory B

    2011-09-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) promotes anti-tumor immunity through its actions on immune cells. We hypothesized that elevated percentages of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood would be associated with impaired response to IFN-α in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies. This study evaluated relationships between plasma IL-6, IL-10, circulating MDSC subsets, and IFN-α-induced signal transduction in 40 patients with GI malignancies. Plasma IL-6 and IL-10 were significantly higher in patients versus normal donors. CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD11b(+)CD15(+) and CD33(+)HLADR(-/low)CD14(+) MDSC subsets were also elevated in patients versus normal donors (P < 0.0001). Plasma IL-6 was correlated with CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD15(+) MDSC (P = 0.008) and IL-10 with CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD15(-) MDSC (P = 0.002). The percentage of CD15(+) and CD15(-) but not CD14(+) MDSC subsets were inversely correlated with IFN-α-induced STAT1 phosphorylation in CD4(+) T cells, while co-culture with in vitro generated MDSC led to reduced IFN-α responsiveness in both PBMC and the CD4(+) subset of T cells from normal donors. Exploratory multivariable Cox proportional hazards models revealed that an increased percentage of the CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD15(-) MDSC subset was associated with reduced overall survival (P = 0.049), while an increased percentage of the CD33(+)HLADR(-/low)CD14(+) subset was associated with greater overall survival (P = 0.033). These data provide evidence for a unique relationship between specific cytokines, MDSC subsets, and IFN-α responsiveness in patients with GI malignancies.

  7. Supplementation with the reduced form of Coenzyme Q10 decelerates phenotypic characteristics of senescence and induces a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha gene expression signature in SAMP1 mice.

    PubMed

    Schmelzer, Constance; Kubo, Hiroshi; Mori, Masayuki; Sawashita, Jinko; Kitano, Mitsuaki; Hosoe, Kazunori; Boomgaarden, Inka; Döring, Frank; Higuchi, Keiichi

    2010-06-01

    Our present study reveals significant decelerating effects on senescence processes in middle-aged SAMP1 mice supplemented for 6 or 14 months with the reduced form (Q(10)H(2), 500 mg/kg BW/day) of coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)). To unravel molecular mechanisms of these CoQ(10) effects, a genome-wide transcript profiling in liver, heart, brain and kidney of SAMP1 mice supplemented with the reduced (Q(10)H(2)) or oxidized form of CoQ(10) (Q(10)) was performed. Liver seems to be the main target tissue of CoQ(10) intervention, followed by kidney, heart and brain. Stringent evaluation of the resulting data revealed that Q(10)H(2) has a stronger impact on gene expression than Q(10), primarily due to differences in the bioavailability. Indeed, Q(10)H(2) supplementation was more effective than Q(10) to increase levels of CoQ(10) in the liver of SAMP1 mice. To identify functional and regulatory connections of the "top 50" (p<0.05) Q(10)H(2)-sensitive transcripts in liver, text mining analysis was used. Hereby, we identified Q(10)H(2)-sensitive genes which are regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha and are primarily involved in cholesterol synthesis (e.g. HMGCS1, HMGCL and HMGCR), fat assimilation (FABP5), lipoprotein metabolism (PLTP) and inflammation (STAT-1). These data may explain, at least in part, the decelerating effects on degenerative processes observed in Q(10)H(2)-supplemented SAMP1 mice.

  8. Ab initio calculations of nuclear widths via an integral relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nollett, Kenneth M.

    2012-10-01

    I describe the computation of energy widths of nuclear states using an integral over the interaction region of ab initio variational Monte Carlo wave functions, and I present calculated widths for many states. I begin by presenting relations that connect certain short-range integrals to widths. I then present predicted widths for 5⩽A⩽9 nuclei, and I compare them against measured widths. They match the data more closely and with less ambiguity than estimates based on spectroscopic factors. I consider the consequences of my results for identification of observed states in 8B, 9He, and 9Li. I also examine failures of the method and conclude that they generally involve broad states and variational wave functions that are not strongly peaked in the interaction region. After examining bound-state overlap functions computed from a similar integral relation, I conclude that overlap calculations can diagnose cases in which computed widths should not be trusted.

  9. Stability-Guaranteed Width Control for Hot Strip Mill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Cheol Jae; Hwang, I. Cheol

    We propose a stability-guaranteed width control (SGWC) for the hot strip finishing mill. It is shown that the proposed SGWC guarantees the stability of the width controller by the universal approximation of the neural network. It is shown through the field test in the hot strip mill of POSCO that the stability of the width controller is guaranteed by the proposed control scheme.

  10. Biologic width and its importance in periodontal and restorative dentistry

    PubMed Central

    Nugala, Babitha; Kumar, BB Santosh; Sahitya, S; Krishna, P Mohana

    2012-01-01

    An adequate understanding of the relationship between periodontal tissues and restorative dentistry is paramount to ensure adequate form, function, esthetics and comfort of the dentition. While most clinicians are aware of this important relationship, uncertainty remains regarding specific concepts such as biologic width, its maintenance and applications of crown lengthening in cases of biologic width violation. Relevant publications regarding biologic width, its violation and management were identified up to August 2011 using manual and electronic database search in Medline, Embase, Directory of Open Access Journals and Google Scholar. This review discusses the concept of biologic width around tooth and its relationship to periodontal health and restorative dentistry. PMID:22368328

  11. Scaling function for surface width for free boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Hyeong-Chai; Kim, Jin Min

    2003-08-01

    We study the restricted curvature model with both periodic and free boundary conditions and show that the scaling function of the surface width depends on the type of boundary conditions. When the free boundary condition is applied, the surface width shows a new dynamic scaling whose asymptotic behavior is different from the usual scaling behavior of the self-affine surfaces. We propose a generalized scaling function for the surface width for free boundary conditions and introduce a normalized surface width to clarify the origin of the superrough phenomena of the model.

  12. Some geometric constraints on ring-width trend

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phipps, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    Simulations of tree rings from trees of undisturbed forest sites are used to describe natural, long-term width trends. Ring-width trends of canopy-sized white oak are simulated from regressions of BAI (ring area) data of real trees. Examples are given of a tree from a typical re-growth forest in Illinois and of a more slowly growing tree from an old-growth forest in Kentucky. The long-term width trend was simulated as being toward constant ring width regardless of growth rate of the tree. Conditions by which either increasing or decreasing ring-width trends could be simulated from the same linear BAI trend are examined. I conclude that curvilinear width trends, either increasing or decreasing, represent width adjustments to changes in growth rate (BAI trend) after which the width trend stabilizes to a near-constant value. Interpretation of ring-width trends of trees from undisturbed stands may be useful in assessing stand disturbance history. Copyright ?? 2005 by the Tree-Ring Society.

  13. Effect of stand width and adjacent habitat on breeding bird communities in bottomland hardwoods

    Treesearch

    John C. Kilgo; Robert A. Sargent

    1998-01-01

    Bottomland hardwood forests support an abundant and diverse avifauna, but area of this forest type has been reduced, and current projections indicate continued declines. The authors compared breeding bird abundance indices and species richness among bottomland hardwood stands ranging in width from 1,000 m and enclosed by forested habitat. They also...

  14. Compact Pulse Width Modulation Circuitry for Silicon Photomultiplier Readout

    PubMed Central

    Bieniosek, M F; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2013-01-01

    The adoption of solid state photo-detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) system design and the interest in 3D interaction information from PET detectors has lead to an increasing number of readout channels in PET systems. To handle these additional readout channels, PET readout electronics should be simplified to reduce the power consumption, cost, and size of the electronics for a single channel. Pulse width modulation (PWM), where detector pulses are converted to digital pulses with width proportional to the detected photon energy, promises to simplify PET readout by converting the signals to digital form at the beginning of the processing chain, and allowing a single time-to-digital converter to perform the data acquisition for many channels rather than routing many analog channels and digitizing in the back end. Integrator based PWM systems, also known as charge-to-time converters (QTC), are especially compact, reducing the front-end electronics to an op-amp integrator with a resistor discharge, and a comparator. QTCs, however, have a long dead-time during which dark count noise is integrated, reducing the output signal to noise ratio. This work presents a QTC based PWM circuit with a gated integrator that shows performance improvements over existing QTC based PWM. By opening and closing an analog switch on the input of the integrator, the circuit can be controlled to integrate only the portions of the signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It also allows for multiplexing different detectors into the same PWM circuit while avoiding uncorrelated noise propagation between photodetector channels. Four gated integrator PWM circuits were built to readout the spatial channels of two position sensitive solid state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM). Results show a 4×4 array 0.9mm×0.9mm×15mm of LYSO crystals being identified on the 5mm×5mm PS-SSPM at room temperature with no degradation for 2-fold multiplexing. In principle, much larger multiplexing ratios are

  15. Compact pulse width modulation circuitry for silicon photomultiplier readout.

    PubMed

    Bieniosek, M F; Olcott, P D; Levin, C S

    2013-08-07

    The adoption of solid-state photodetectors for positron emission tomography (PET) system design and the interest in 3D interaction information from PET detectors has lead to an increasing number of readout channels in PET systems. To handle these additional readout channels, PET readout electronics should be simplified to reduce the power consumption, cost, and size of the electronics for a single channel. Pulse-width modulation (PWM), where detector pulses are converted to digital pulses with width proportional to the detected photon energy, promises to simplify PET readout by converting the signals to digital form at the beginning of the processing chain, and allowing a single time-to-digital converter to perform the data acquisition for many channels rather than routing many analogue channels and digitizing in the back end. Integrator based PWM systems, also known as charge-to-time converters (QTCs), are especially compact, reducing the front-end electronics to an op-amp integrator with a resistor discharge, and a comparator. QTCs, however, have a long dead-time during which dark count noise is integrated, reducing the output signal-to-noise ratio. This work presents a QTC based PWM circuit with a gated integrator that shows performance improvements over existing QTC based PWM. By opening and closing an analogue switch on the input of the integrator, the circuit can be controlled to integrate only the portions of the signal with a high signal-to-noise ratio. It also allows for multiplexing different detectors into the same PWM circuit while avoiding uncorrelated noise propagation between photodetector channels. Four gated integrator PWM circuits were built to readout the spatial channels of two position sensitive solid-state photomultiplier (PS-SSPM). Results show a 4 × 4 array 0.9 mm × 0.9 mm × 15 mm of LYSO crystals being identified on the 5 mm × 5 mm PS-SSPM at room temperature with no degradation for twofold multiplexing. In principle, much larger

  16. a Measurement of the Mass, Full Width, and Radiative Width of the Positive B(1237) Meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collick, Bruce David

    An experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to investigate the coherent production of mesons on nuclear targets (lead and copper). The experiment used and 200 GeV/c incident meson beam and a high resolution forward spectrometer consisting of proportional and drift chambers plus a liquid argon photon calorimeter. This thesis reports the results of the process (pi)('+) + A (--->) (pi)('+) (omega) + A. The (pi)('+)(omega) spectrum was found to be dominated by the B('+)(1237) meson. A fit was performed on the line shape of the (pi)('+)(omega) mass spectrum and values of 1.271 (+OR-) 0.011 GeV and 0.232 (+OR-) 0.029 GeV were found for the mass and total width. The helicity zero decay probability of the (omega), (VBAR)F(,0)(VBAR)('2), was measured to be (VBAR)F(,0)(VBAR)('2) = 0.15 (+OR-) 0.035. The t distributions were analyzed allowing the electromagnetic and hadronic production processes to interfer. From these distributions a radiative width of 230 (+OR-) 61 was extracted.

  17. Atypical alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Hale, T Sigi; Smalley, Susan L; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T; McGough, James J; Loo, Sandra K

    2009-08-01

    A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha asymmetry has been associated with ADHD-like traits such as reduced reward responsiveness, a lack of inhibition toward aversive experience, and increased approach behaviors, and previous work has indicated increased rightward alpha asymmetry in children with ADHD. The current study explores whether increased rightward alpha asymmetry is also evident in adults with ADHD. We assessed low (8-10 Hz) and high (10-12 Hz) alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD (n=29) versus controls (n=62) during baseline and cognitive activation conditions for nine homologous electrode pairs along the anterior-posterior axis. Seven results emerged (p<.05) showing increased rightward alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD. This occurred in three specific electrode pairs across two testing conditions, and five of six results occurred in the lower alpha band. Finally, post hoc analysis indicated that increased rightward alpha asymmetry was generally associated with greater numbers of ADHD symptoms--with a possible parietal association for inattentive and a fronto-temporal association for hyperactivity symptoms. Increased rightward alpha asymmetry previously observed in children with ADHD appears to be a developmentally persistent feature of ADHD.

  18. Chicken interferon alpha pretreatment reduces virus replication of pandemic H1N1 and H5N9 avian influenza viruses in lung cell cultures from different avian species

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Type I interferons, including interferon alpha (IFN-α), represent one of the first lines of innate immune defense against influenza virus infection. Following natural infection of chickens with avian influenza virus (AIV), transcription of IFN-α is quickly up regulated along with multiple other immune-related genes. Chicken IFN-α up regulates a number of important anti-viral response genes and has been demonstrated to be an important cytokine to establish anti-viral immunity. However, the mechanisms by which interferon inhibit virus replication in avian species remains unknown as does the biological activity of chicken interferon in other avian species. Methods In these studies, we assessed the protective potential of exogenous chicken IFN-α applied to chicken, duck, and turkey primary lung cell cultures prior to infection with the pandemic H1N1 virus (A/turkey/Virginia/SEP-4/2009) and an established avian H5N9 virus (A/turkey/Wisconsin/1968). Growth kinetics and induction of select immune response genes, including IFN-α and myxovirus-resistance gene I (Mx), as well as proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β and IL-6), were measured in response to chicken IFN-α and viral infection over time. Results Results demonstrate that pretreatment with chicken IFN-α before AIV infection significantly reduced virus replication in both chicken-and turkey-origin lung cells and to a lesser degree the duck-origin cells. Virus growth was reduced by approximately 200-fold in chicken and turkey cells and 30-fold in duck cells after 48 hours of incubation. Interferon treatment also significantly decreased the interferon and proinflammatory response during viral infection. In general, infection with the H1N1 virus resulted in an attenuated interferon and proinflammatory response in these cell lines, compared to the H5N9 virus. Conclusions Taken together, these studies show that chicken IFN-α reduces virus replication, lower host innate immune response following infection

  19. Solar wind suprathermal electron Stahl widths across high-speed stream structures

    SciTech Connect

    Skoug, Ruth M; Steinberg, John T; Goodrich, Katherine A; Anderson, Brett R

    2011-01-03

    Suprathermal electrons (100-1500 eV) observed in the solar wind typically show a strahl distribution, that is, a beam directed away from the Sun along the magnetic field direction. The strahl width observed at 1 AU is highly variable, ranging from 10-70 degrees. The obsenred finite width of the strahl results from the competition between beam focusing as the interplanetary magnetic field strength drops with distance from the Sun, and pitch-angle scattering as the beam interacts with the solar wind plasma in transit from the sun. Here we examine strahl width, observed with ACE SWEPAM across high-speed stream structures to investigate variations in electron scattering as a function of local plasma characteristics. We find that narrow strahls (less than 20 degrees wide), indicating reduced scattering, are observed within high-speed streams. Narrow strahls are also observed in both very low temperature solar wind, in association with ICMEs. Case studies of high-speed streams typically show the strahl narrowing at the leading edge of the stream. In some cases, the strahl narrows at the reverse shock or pressure wave, in other cases at the stream interface. The narrowing can either occur discontinuously or gradually over a period of hours. Within the high-speed wind, the strahl remains narrow for a period of hours to days, and then gradually broadens. The strahl width is roughly constant at all energies across these structures. For some fraction of high-speed streams, counterstreaming is associated with passage of the corotating interaction region. In these cases, we find the widths of the two counterstreaming beams frequently differ by more than 40 degrees. This dramatic difference in strahl width contrasts with observations in the solar wind as a whole, in which counterstreaming strahls typically differ in width by less than 20 degrees.

  20. Ageing effects on medio-lateral balance during walking with increased and decreased step width.

    PubMed

    Nagano, H; Begg, R; Sparrow, W A

    2013-01-01

    The current study used falls direction to categorize falls and explore age-related effects on the biomechanics of medio-lateral balance control. Minimum lateral margin (MLM) was defined as the critical swing phase event where the medio-lateral length between center of mass (CoM) and stance heel became minimum and accordingly, any lateral balance perturbation at MLM was considered to increase the risk of balance loss lateral to the stance foot. Lateral center of pressure (CoP) displacement from toe-off to MLM was also monitored to assess the risk of medio-lateral balance perturbation. Gait testing involving 30 young and 26 older male subjects was conducted under the three step width conditions: preferred and ± 50% wider and narrower. For an overall description of gait, spatio-temporal parameters were also obtained. Typical ageing effects on spatio-temporal parameters such as lower step velocity, shorter step length and prolonged double support time were found, emerging most clearly in narrower, followed by wider and least in preferred width walking. MLM and CoP lateral displacement were not differentiated between the two age groups, but older adults demonstrated significantly more variable MLM and CoP in their non-dominant limb when walking with non-preferred widths. Variability of step width reduced in increased and decreased step width conditions while MLM and CoP variability increased, suggesting less consistent medio-lateral CoM control despite consistent foot control in altered width conditions. In summary, older adults were found to have less consistent control of CoM with respect to the non-dominant stance foot when walking with narrower and wider widths possibly due to more variable medio-lateral CoP control.

  1. Stream water responses to timber harvest: Riparian buffer width effectiveness

    Treesearch

    Barton D. Clinton

    2011-01-01

    Vegetated riparian buffers are critical for protecting aquatic and terrestrial processes and habitats in southern Appalachian ecosystems. In this case study, we examined the effect of riparian buffer width on stream water quality following upland forest management activities in four headwater catchments. Three riparian buffer widths were delineated prior to cutting; 0m...

  2. A design aid for determining width of filter strips

    Treesearch

    M.G. Dosskey; M.J. Helmers; D.E. Eisenhauer

    2008-01-01

    watershed planners need a tool for determining width of filter strips that is accurate enough for developing cost-effective site designs and easy enough to use for making quick determinations on a large number and variety of sites.This study employed the process-based Vegetative Filter Strip Model to evaluate the relationship between filter strip width and trapping...

  3. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  4. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  5. Implications of Satellite Swath Width on Global Aerosol Optical Thickness Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; Kahn, Ralph; Remer, Lorraine; Levy, Robert; Welton, Ellsworth

    2012-01-01

    We assess the impact of swath width on the statistics of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieved by satellite as inferred from observations made by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We sub-sample the year 2009 MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua spacecraft along several candidate swaths of various widths. We find that due to spatial sampling there is an uncertainty of approximately 0.01 in the global, annual mean AOT. The sub-sampled monthly mean gridded AOT are within +/- 0.01 of the full swath AOT about 20% of the time for the narrow swath sub-samples, about 30% of the time for the moderate width sub-samples, and about 45% of the time for the widest swath considered. These results suggest that future aerosol satellite missions with only a narrow swath view may not sample the true AOT distribution sufficiently to reduce significantly the uncertainty in aerosol direct forcing of climate.

  6. A Partial Width Calculation of OZI-Allowed Charmonium Decays in a Coupled Channel Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Hirano, M.; Katō, K.

    2009-09-01

    Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed partial decay widths, masses, and total decay width of charmonium states are studied in a nonrelativistic coupled-channel framework based on microscopic effective quark interactions. With the help of the complex scale transformation, the coupled channel equation is easily solved under the proper boundary condition for resonances. The obtained result as a whole is very successful and encouraging for the traditional charmonium states including ψ(4040) whose features of mass and partial decay widths have been argued historically. The coupling mechanisms of these states are investigated by reducing artificially the channel coupling strengths little by little and finally turning the coupling off. The situations turn out to be quite different from what we would have naively supposed. Other solutions than the traditional charmonium states were obatined at the same time. Some of them are discussed in relation with new particles observed recently.

  7. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  8. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  9. Nuclear Structure Studies from Hg and Au Alpha Decay Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goon, J. Tm.; Bingham, C. R.; Hartley, D. J.; Zhang, Jing-Ye; Riedinger, L. L.; Danchev, M.; Kondev, F. G.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Abu Saleem, K. H.; Ahmad, I.; Davids, C. N.; Heinz, A.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Lister, C. J.; Poli, G. L.; Seweryniak, D.; Wiedenhover, I.; Ma, W. C.; Amro, H.; Reviol, W.; Cizewski, J. A.; Smith, M.

    2003-04-01

    Neutron deficient nuclei near the Z = 82 shell gap have been a source of great interest. This region is known to exhibit the phenomena of shape-coexistence and triaxiality. Alpha decay study of these nuclei coupled with gamma-rayspectroscopy data can give a better understanding of their nuclear structure properties. The decay chains of ^173-177Au and ^175-179Hg were studied following the bombardment of ^92,94,96Mo targets with ^84Sr beam from the ATLAS accelerator at the Argonne National Laboratory. The experiment utilized the Gammasphere array in conjunction with the Fragment Mass Analyzer (FMA) for mass identification and a Double-sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSD) that was used to detect the recoiling implants and the alpha particles associated with each nuclide. An array of four Ge detectors and a low-energy photon spectrometer (LEPS) was used at the focal plane of the FMA to detect γ rays in coincidence with the α particles. This information was used to elucidate the α-decay fine structures. Inverse radioactive decay tagging was also useful in assigning certain fine structure α peaks to a particular nuclide. New α decay lines were observed and their energies, and half-lives were measured. These include fine structure lines in the α decays of ^174,176Au and ^173Pt. The decay schemes resulting from the fine structure observations will be presented. The α decay reduced widths are used to suggest spin and parity assignments. The structure of these states will be discussed in the framework of the Nilsson model and alpha decay selection rules. * This work is supported by the Department of Energy through contract numbers DE-FG02-96ER40983 (UT), W-31-109-ENG-38 (ANL), DE-FG02-95ER40939 (MSU), DE-FG05-88ER40406 (WU), and by the National Science Foundation (RU

  10. Controlling ρ width effects for a precise value of α in B → ρρ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2017-03-01

    It has been pointed out that the currently most precise determination of the weak phase ϕ2 = α of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix achieved in B → ρρ decays is susceptible to a small correction at a level of (Γρ /mρ) 2 due to an I = 1 amplitude caused by the ρ width. Using Breit-Wigner distributions for the two pairs of pions forming ρ mesons, we study the I = 1 contribution to B → ρρ decay rates as function of the width and location of the ρ band. We find that in the absence of a particular enhancement of the I = 1 amplitude reducing a single band to a width Γρ at SuperKEKB leads to results which are completely insensitive to the ρ width. If the I = 1 amplitude is dynamically enhanced relative to the I = 0 , 2 amplitude one could subject its contribution to a ;magnifying glass; measurement using two separated ρ bands of width Γρ. Subtraction of the I = 1 contribution from the measured decay rate would lead to a very precise determination of the I = 0 , 2 amplitude needed for performing the isospin analysis.

  11. Laser cutting of various materials: Kerf width size analysis and life cycle assessment of cutting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilbas, Bekir Sami; Shaukat, Mian Mobeen; Ashraf, Farhan

    2017-08-01

    Laser cutting of various materials including Ti-6Al-4V alloy, steel 304, Inconel 625, and alumina is carried out to assess the kerf width size variation along the cut section. The life cycle assessment is carried out to determine the environmental impact of the laser cutting in terms of the material waste during the cutting process. The kerf width size is formulated and predicted using the lump parameter analysis and it is measured from the experiments. The influence of laser output power and laser cutting speed on the kerf width size variation is analyzed using the analytical tools including scanning electron and optical microscopes. In the experiments, high pressure nitrogen assisting gas is used to prevent oxidation reactions in the cutting section. It is found that the kerf width size predicted from the lump parameter analysis agrees well with the experimental data. The kerf width size variation increases with increasing laser output power. However, this behavior reverses with increasing laser cutting speed. The life cycle assessment reveals that material selection for laser cutting is critical for the environmental protection point of view. Inconel 625 contributes the most to the environmental damages; however, recycling of the waste of the laser cutting reduces this contribution.

  12. alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    alpha - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( alpha - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 84 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  13. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much_gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  14. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  15. Type II Quasars among Z>4 Strong Lyman Alpha Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta

    2002-09-01

    Strong Lyman-alpha emission is expected both from primordial galaxies and from the type II quasars required to explain the hard x-ray background. We have identified ~300 Ly-alpha sources at redshifts 4.5 and 5.7. About 60% of these show rest equivalent widths >200 Angstrom, which requires active nuclei, or extreme populations of massive stars. Our Ly-alpha survey (LALA) is a unique resource for determining the space density of type II quasars at high z efficiently. The large fields of ACIS and LALA will allow us to observe 60 ly-alpha emitters, including the brightest narrow line Ly-alpha emitter with EW=660. This will have implications for composition of the X-ray background, background radiation at other wavelengths, and structure formation (stars vs black holes) in the early universe.

  16. Alpha-1 antitrypsin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003715.htm Alpha-1 antitrypsin blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a laboratory test to measure ...

  17. Influence of the {alpha}-d motion in {sup 6}Li on Trojan horse applications

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzone, R.G.; Spitaleri, C.; Cherubini, S.; La Cognata, M.; Lamia, L.; Musumarra, A.; Romano, S.; Tumino, A.; Tudisco, S.; Miljanic, D.; Typel, S.

    2005-05-01

    The {alpha}-d cluster structure of {sup 6}Li has been extensively investigated in the past few decades. In particular the width of the {alpha} momentum distribution in {sup 6}Li has been studied as a function of the transferred momentum. These investigations are now reviewed and updated after recent experiments. Trojan horse method applications are also discussed because the momentum distribution of the spectator particle inside the Trojan horse nucleus is a necessary input for this method. The impact of the width (FWHM) variation in the extraction of the astrophysical S(E) factor is discussed for the {sup 6}Li(d,{alpha}){sup 4}He reaction.

  18. The Alpha Centauri System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderblom, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Alpha Centauri star system, which is the closest star system to the sun. Discusses the difficulties associated with measurements involving Alpha Centauri, along with some of the recent advances in stellar seismology. Raises questions about the possibilities of planets around Alpha Centauri. (TW)

  19. The Alpha Antihydrogen Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, N.; Andresen, G.; Bertsche, W.; Boston, A.; Bowe, P. D.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Chartier, M.; Fajans, J.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R. D.; Povilus, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Seif El Nasr, S.; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-03-01

    ALPHA is a new experiment at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD). The short term goal of ALPHA is trapping of cold antihydrogen, with the long term goal of conducting precise spectroscopic comparisons of hydrogen and antihydrogen. Here we present the current status of ALPHA and the physics considerations and results leading to its design as well as recent progress towards trapping.

  20. The Alpha Centauri System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderblom, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Alpha Centauri star system, which is the closest star system to the sun. Discusses the difficulties associated with measurements involving Alpha Centauri, along with some of the recent advances in stellar seismology. Raises questions about the possibilities of planets around Alpha Centauri. (TW)

  1. Accurate vessel width measurement from fundus photographs: a new concept.

    PubMed Central

    Rassam, S M; Patel, V; Brinchmann-Hansen, O; Engvold, O; Kohner, E M

    1994-01-01

    Accurate determination of retinal vessel width measurement is important in the study of the haemodynamic changes that accompany various physiological and pathological states. Currently the width at the half height of the transmittance and densitometry profiles are used as a measure of retinal vessel width. A consistent phenomenon of two 'kick points' on the slopes of the transmittance and densitometry profiles near the base, has been observed. In this study, mathematical models have been formulated to describe the characteristic curves of the transmittance and the densitometry profiles. They demonstrate the kick points being coincident with the edges of the blood column. The horizontal distance across the kick points would therefore indicate the actual blood column width. To evaluate this hypothesis, blood was infused through two lengths of plastic tubing of known diameters, and photographed. In comparison with the known diameters, the half height underestimated the blood column width by 7.33% and 6.46%, while the kick point method slightly overestimated it by 1.40% and 0.34%. These techniques were applied to monochromatic fundus photographs. In comparison with the kick point method, the half height underestimated the blood column width in veins by 16.67% and in arteries by 15.86%. The characteristics of the kick points and their practicality have been discussed. The kick point method may provide the most accurate measurement of vessel width possible from these profiles. Images PMID:8110693

  2. Step width alters iliotibial band strain during running.

    PubMed

    Meardon, Stacey A; Campbell, Samuel; Derrick, Timothy R

    2012-11-01

    This study assessed the effect of step width during running on factors related to iliotibial band (ITB) syndrome. Three-dimensional (3D) kinematics and kinetics were recorded from 15 healthy recreational runners during overground running under various step width conditions (preferred and at least +/- 5% of their leg length). Strain and strain rate were estimated from a musculoskeletal model of the lower extremity. Greater ITB strain and strain rate were found in the narrower step width condition (p < 0.001, p = 0.040). ITB strain was significantly (p < 0.001) greater in the narrow condition than the preferred and wide conditions and it was greater in the preferred condition than the wide condition. ITB strain rate was significantly greater in the narrow condition than the wide condition (p = 0.020). Polynomial contrasts revealed a linear increase in both ITB strain and strain rate with decreasing step width. We conclude that relatively small decreases in step width can substantially increase ITB strain as well as strain rates. Increasing step width during running, especially in persons whose running style is characterized by a narrow step width, may be beneficial in the treatment and prevention of running-related ITB syndrome.

  3. What sets the minimum tokamak scrape-off layer width?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joseph, Ilon

    2016-10-01

    The heat flux width of the tokamak scrape-off layer is on the order of the poloidal ion gyroradius, but the ``heuristic drift'' physics model is still not completely understood. In the absence of anomalous transport, neoclassical transport sets the minimum width. For plateau collisionality, the ion temperature width is set by qρi , while the electron temperature width scales as the geometric mean q(ρeρi) 1 / 2 and is close to qρi in magnitude. The width is enhanced because electrons are confined by the sheath potential and have a much longer time to radially diffuse before escaping to the wall. In the Pfirsch-Schluter regime, collisional diffusion increases the width by the factor (qR / λ) 1 / 2 where qR is the connection length and λ is the mean free path. This qualitatively agrees with the observed transition in the scaling law for detached plasmas. The radial width of the SOL electric field is determined by Spitzer parallel and ``neoclassical'' radial electric conductivity and has a similar scaling to that for thermal transport. Prepared under US DOE contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  4. Downflow Width Behavior of Martian and Terrestrial Lava Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peitersen, M. N.; Crown, D. A.

    1996-03-01

    Lava flow morphology is typically the primary type of data available for constraining planetary volcanic processes. Flow emplacement (and hence morphology) is controlled by topography, rheology, and thermal history, but the exact relationship between these factors and the resulting flow shape is not well understood. Accurate interpretation of flow dynamics is dependent upon well-constrained flow geometry. Previous modeling studies have commonly assumed relatively constant flow widths and/or cross-sectional areas, use a single value for width based upon a limited number of measurements, or do not consider width at all. Recent analysis of individual flow lobes in the Puu Oo flow field on the east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano show that flow widths vary by up to an order of magnitude. Significant width variations in Martian flows on Tyrhenna Patera, Alba Patera, and Elysium Mons are also observed. Complex flow-forms may be the result of spatially-interacting, temporally-discrete episodes in addition to contemporaneously emplaced flows. Variations in width with downflow distance from the vent may provide critical clues to flow emplacement processes and volcanic stratigraphy; furthermore, flow width is one of the few characteristics that can easily be measured from planetary mission data. The relative widths and lengths of lava flows are presumably a function of the relationship between the lateral spreading rate and flow front advance. Width/length "aspect ratios" are used to quantify this; however, they are highly dependent upon flow history interpretations. Although topography is thought to be a primary control, recent studies have demonstrated a marked insensitivity of flow morphology to topographic variations at 20 to 40 foot scales.

  5. Extension of H-alpha/H-beta Photometry to Additional Luminosity Classes and Emission Line Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    In Joner & Hintz (2015) they presented a fully calibrated H-alpha index based on spectroscopic observations of main sequence stars ranging from O9 to K2. In that work they provided relations between the H-alpha index, temperature, and equivalent width. In Didelon (1982) the relation between spectral type and equivalent width is examined with a clear difference between luminosity classes. In this poster we will present results from a spectroscopic examination of the H-alpha/H-beta relations. First we will examine the equivalent width as a function of luminosity class. Then we will examine the extension of the H-alpha system for application to emission line objects.We would like to acknowledge use of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory 1.2-m Telescope.

  6. Narrowing carpal arch width to increase cross-sectional area of carpal tunnel--a cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Li, Zong-Ming; Gabra, Joseph N; Marquardt, Tamara L; Kim, Dong Hee

    2013-04-01

    Carpal tunnel morphology plays an essential role in the etiology and treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. The purpose of this study was to observe the morphological changes of the carpal tunnel as a result of carpal arch width narrowing. It was hypothesized that carpal arch width narrowing would result in increased height and area of the carpal arch. The carpal arch width of eight cadaveric hands was narrowed by a custom apparatus and cross-sectional ultrasound images were acquired. The carpal arch height and area were quantified as the carpal arch width was narrowed. Correlation and regression analyses were performed for the carpal arch height and area with respect to the carpal arch width. The carpal tunnel became more convex as the carpal arch width was narrowed. The initial carpal arch width, height, and area were 25.7 (SD1.9) mm, 4.1 (SD0.6) mm, and 68.5 (SD14.0) mm(2), respectively. The carpal arch height and area negatively correlated with the carpal arch width, with correlation coefficients of -0.974 (SD0.018) and -0.925 (SD0.034), respectively. Linear regression analyses showed a 1mm narrowing of the carpal arch width resulted in proportional increases of 0.40 (SD0.14) mm in the carpal arch height and 4.0 (SD2.2) mm(2) in the carpal arch area. This study demonstrates that carpal arch width narrowing leads to increased carpal arch height and area, a potential mechanism to reduce the mechanical insult to the median nerve and relieve symptoms associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Narrowing carpal arch width to increase cross-sectional area of carpal tunnel – a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zong-Ming; Gabra, Joseph N.; Marquardt, Tamara L.; Kim, Dong Hee

    2013-01-01

    Background Carpal tunnel morphology plays an essential role in the etiology and treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. The purpose of this study was to observe the morphological changes of the carpal tunnel as a result of carpal arch width narrowing. It was hypothesized carpal arch width narrowing would result in increased height and area of the carpal arch. Methods The carpal arch width of eight cadaveric hands was narrowed by a custom apparatus and cross-sectional ultrasound images were acquired. The carpal arch height and area were quantified as the carpal arch width was narrowed. Correlation and regression analyses were performed for the carpal arch height and area with respect to the carpal arch width. Findings The carpal tunnel became more convex as the carpal arch width was narrowed. The initial carpal arch width, height, and area were 25.7 (SD 1.9) mm, 4.1 (SD 0.6) mm, and 68.5 (SD 14.0) mm2, respectively. The carpal arch height and area negatively correlated with the carpal arch width, with correlation coefficients of −0.974 (SD 0.018) and −0.925 (SD 0.034), respectively. Linear regression analyses showed a 1 mm narrowing of the carpal arch width resulted in proportional increases of 0.40 (SD 0.14) mm in the carpal arch height and 4.0 (SD 2.2) mm2 in the carpal arch area. Interpretation This study demonstrates that carpal arch width narrowing leads to increased carpal arch height and area, a potential mechanism to reduce the mechanical insult to the median nerve and relieve symptoms associated with carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:23583095

  8. Searching constant width mazes captures the AC 0 hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrington, David A. Mix; Lu, Chi-Jen; Miltersen, Peter Bro; Skyum, Sven

    We show that searching a width k maze is complete for Π k, i.e., for the k'th level of the AC 0 hierarchy. Equivalently, st-connectivity for width k grid graphs is complete for Π k. As an application, we show that there is a data structure solving dynamic st-connectivity for con stant width grid graphs with time bound O(log log n) per operation on a random access machine. The dynamic algorithm is derived from the parallel one in an indirect way using algebraic tools.

  9. Bank stability and channel width adjustment, East Fork River, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Frequent surveys of eight cross sections located in self-formed reaches of the East Fork River, Wyoming, during the 1974 snowmelt flood showed a close relation between channel morphology and scour and fill. Those cross sections narrower than the mean reach width filled at discharges less than bankfull and scoured at discharges greater than bankfull. Those cross sections wider than the mean reach width scoured at discharges less than bankfull and filled at discharges greater than bankfull. Bank stability, and to some extent the adjustment of stream channel width, in the East Fork River study reach appears to be controlled by the processes of scour and fill. -from Author

  10. Experimental and Theoretical Electron Density Distribution of Alpha,Alpha-Trehalose Dihydrate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alpha,alpha-rehalose is of interest because of its cryoprotective and antidessicant properties, and because it possesses various technical anomalies such as 13C NMR spectra that give misleading indications of intramolecular structural symmetry. It is a non-reducing disaccharide, with the glycosidic...

  11. Correcting Coefficient Alpha for Correlated Errors: Is [alpha][K]a Lower Bound to Reliability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rae, Gordon

    2006-01-01

    When errors of measurement are positively correlated, coefficient alpha may overestimate the "true" reliability of a composite. To reduce this inflation bias, Komaroff (1997) has proposed an adjusted alpha coefficient, ak. This article shows that ak is only guaranteed to be a lower bound to reliability if the latter does not include correlated…

  12. Impaired PGC-1alpha function in muscle in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Rajnish K; Adhihetty, Peter; Shukla, Shubha; Hennessy, Thomas; Calingasan, Noel; Yang, Lichuan; Starkov, Anatoly; Kiaei, Mahmoud; Cannella, Milena; Sassone, Jenny; Ciammola, Andrea; Squitieri, Fernando; Beal, M Flint

    2009-08-15

    We investigated the role of PPAR gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha) in muscle dysfunction in Huntington's disease (HD). We observed reduced PGC-1alpha and target genes expression in muscle of HD transgenic mice. We produced chronic energy deprivation in HD mice by administering the catabolic stressor beta-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), a creatine analogue that reduces ATP levels, activates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which in turn activates PGC-1alpha. Treatment with GPA resulted in increased expression of AMPK, PGC-1alpha target genes, genes for oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain and mitochondrial biogenesis, increased oxidative muscle fibers, numbers of mitochondria and motor performance in wild-type, but not in HD mice. In muscle biopsies from HD patients, there was decreased PGC-1alpha, PGC-1beta and oxidative fibers. Oxygen consumption, PGC-1alpha, NRF1 and response to GPA were significantly reduced in myoblasts from HD patients. Knockdown of mutant huntingtin resulted in increased PGC-1alpha expression in HD myoblast. Lastly, adenoviral-mediated delivery of PGC-1alpha resulted increased expression of PGC-1alpha and markers for oxidative muscle fibers and reversal of blunted response for GPA in HD mice. These findings show that impaired function of PGC-1alpha plays a critical role in muscle dysfunction in HD, and that treatment with agents to enhance PGC-1alpha function could exert therapeutic benefits. Furthermore, muscle may provide a readily accessible tissue in which to monitor therapeutic interventions.

  13. Stark Widths Of Ionized Xenon UV Lines Of Low Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Cirisan, M.; Djurovic, S.; Pelaez, R. J.; Aparicio, J. A.; Mar, S.

    2007-04-23

    Stark width measurements of several low intensity Xe II spectral lines (5d - 4f transitions) in UV region, are presented here for the first time. These measurements were obtained from helium - xenon pulsed arc plasma.

  14. On the computations of decay widths of Fano resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, T.; Kazandjian, S.; Sisourat, N.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present an ab initio approach to the computation of decay widths of Fano resonances. The method relies on Fano theory, in which a resonance is described as a bound state embedded in and interacting with a continuum of states. In our approach, we use the Configuration Interaction (CI) method to describe the bound-like and continuum-like parts of the resonance wave function. The aim of this Fano-CI method is to provide decay widths of resonances at a low computational cost such that large systems can be treated. Along with the implementation of the method, we present benchmark calculations of decay widths of Auger and ICD processes in Ne atom, and Ne2 and NeAr dimers. Our results are in good agreement with the decay widths from other theoretical and experimental works. This makes the Fano-CI approach a promising method for the treatment of Fano resonances.

  15. Martian Meanders: Wavelength-Width Scaling and Flow Duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregoire-Mazzocco, H.; Stepinski, T. F.; McGovern, P. J.; Lanzoni, S.; Frascati, A.; Rinaldo, A.

    2006-03-01

    Martian meanders reveals linear wavelength/width scaling with a coef. k~10, that can be used to estimate discharges. Simulations of channel evolution are used to determine flow duration from sinuosity. Application to Nirgal Vallis yields 200 yrs.

  16. Widths of some classes of convex functions and bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V. N.; Maiorov, Vitalii E.

    2010-02-01

    We consider classes of uniformly bounded convex functions defined on convex compact bodies in \\mathbb{R}^d and satisfying a Lipschitz condition and establish the exact orders of their Kolmogorov, entropy, and pseudo-dimension widths in the L_1-metric. We also introduce the notions of pseudo-dimension and pseudo-dimension widths for classes of sets and determine the exact orders of the entropy and pseudo-dimension widths of some classes of convex bodies in \\mathbb{R}^drelative to the pseudo-metric defined as the d-dimensional Lebesgue volume of the symmetric difference of two sets. We also find the exact orders of the entropy and pseudo-dimension widths of the corresponding classes of characteristic functions in L_p-spaces, 1\\le p\\le\\infty.

  17. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    DOEpatents

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  18. Line Width Recovery after Vectorization of Engineering Drawings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gramblička, Matúš; Vaský, Jozef

    2016-12-01

    Vectorization is the conversion process of a raster image representation into a vector representation. The contemporary commercial vectorization software applications do not provide sufficiently high quality outputs for such images as do mechanical engineering drawings. Line width preservation is one of the problems. There are applications which need to know the line width after vectorization because this line attribute carries the important semantic information for the next 3D model generation. This article describes the algorithm that is able to recover line width of individual lines in the vectorized engineering drawings. Two approaches are proposed, one examines the line width at three points, whereas the second uses a variable number of points depending on the line length. The algorithm is tested on real mechanical engineering drawings.

  19. Quantifying River Widths of North America from Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, G. H.; Pavelsky, T.; Miller, Z.

    2013-12-01

    River width is a fundamental predictor variable in many hydrologic, geomorphic, and biogeochemical models, yet current large-scale models rely on theoretical hydraulic geometry relationships that do not fully capture natural variability in river form. Here we present the first high-resolution dataset of long-term mean width of North American rivers wider than 30 m. The dataset contains 7.93 million georeferenced width measurements derived from Landsat TM and ETM+ imagery that were acquired when rivers were most likely to be at mean discharge. We built the dataset by developing an automated procedure that selects and downloads raw imagery, creates cloud-free normalized difference water index images, histogram balances and mosaics them together, and produces a water mask using a dynamic water-land threshold technique. We then visually inspected and corrected the mask for errors and used RivWidth software to calculate river width at each river centerline pixel. We validated our dataset using >1000 United States Geological Survey and Water Survey of Canada in situ gauge station measurements. Error analysis shows a robust relationship between the remotely sensed widths and in situ gauge measurements with an r 2 = 0.86 (Spearman's = 0.81) and a mean absolute error of 27.5 m. We find that North American river widths lie on logarithmic frequency curve with some notable exceptions at widths <100 m. This dataset can be used to improve our understanding of the water, carbon, and nitrogen cycles, as well as large-scale landscape evolution models. Our results also allow for the characterization of the extent of rivers likely to be observable by the planned Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission.

  20. Finite coplanar waveguide width effects in pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.L.; Kos, A.B.; Silva, T.J.

    2004-07-12

    The effect of finite coplanar waveguide (CPW) width on the measurement of the resonance frequency in thin ferromagnetic films has been characterized for pulsed inductive microwave magnetometry. A shift in resonant frequency is a linear function of the ratio of sample thickness to CPW width. The proportionality constant is experimentally determined to be 0.74{+-}0.1 times the saturation magnetization of the film. The frequency shift may be modeled as arising from an effective magnetic-anisotropy field.

  1. Experimental Studies of the Effective Width of Buckled Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lahde, R; Wagner, H

    1936-01-01

    The object of the present experiments is a more exact determination of the effective width for the case of pure compression and of the sheet clamped at the angle section. From the experimental data of the effective width the calculation of the buckling load of an angle joined to a thin sheet is then deduced. The test material consisted of spring-hardened brass sheet.

  2. Manipulation of two alpha-endo-beta-1,4-glucanase genes, AtCel6 and GmCel7, reduces susceptibility to Heterodera glycines in soybean roots

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plant endo-beta-1,4-glucanases (EGases) include cell-wall-modifying enzymes that are involved in nematode-induced growth of syncytia (feeding structures) in nematode-infected roots. EGases in the alpha and beta subfamilies contain signal peptides and are secreted, while those in the gamma subfamily ...

  3. Increase in vastus lateralis aponeurosis width induced by resistance training: implications for a hypertrophic model of pennate muscle.

    PubMed

    Wakahara, Taku; Ema, Ryoichi; Miyamoto, Naokazu; Kawakami, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to ascertain whether training-induced muscle hypertrophy is accompanied by an increase in the aponeurosis width, and to infer its impact on the training-induced increase in the pennation angle. Eleven young men completed a resistance training program of unilateral knee extensions for 12 weeks. Before and after training, anatomical cross-sectional area (ACSA) of the vastus lateralis and its distal aponeurosis width in the transverse plane were measured with magnetic resonance imaging. The pennation angle and fascicle length were also determined with ultrasonography at the midbelly of the muscle. The effect of change in aponeurosis width on the magnitude of training-induced increase in pennation angle was estimated by using a parallelepipedon model. After the training, there were significant increases in ACSA (10.7 ± 7.6 %), pennation angle (10.8 ± 7.3 %) and aponeurosis width (1.9 ± 3.1 %), whereas no significant change was found in the fascicle length. The model simulation shows that the increase in aponeurosis width by 1.9 % reduces the magnitude of increase in pennation angle by only 0.4°. These results indicate that (1) the aponeurosis width of the vastus lateralis increases after 12 weeks of resistance training and (2) the increase in the aponeurosis width accompanying muscle hypertrophy by the amount of ~10 % does not substantially affect the increase in pennation angle.

  4. Tunable pulse width and multi-megawatt peak-power pulses from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Ryutarou; Maeda, Kazuo; Watanabe, Goro; Tei, Kazuyoku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Enokidani, Jun; Sumida, Shin

    2016-03-01

    We report on tunable pulse width and high peak power pulse generation from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system. The master seed source employs a Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator (MZIM). This seed source has operational flexibility with respect to pulse width, 90 ps to 2 ns and repetition rate, 200 kHz to 2 MHz. The seed pulses are amplified by a monolithic three-stage amplifier system based on polarization maintain Yb-doped fibers. The maximum output power was 32 W at the shortest pulse condition, the pulse width of 90 ps and the repetition rate of 750 kHz. A spectral width after amplification was broadened to 0.73 nm at RMS width. Both of ASE and SRS are not observed in the spectrum. After amplification, we also demonstrated pulse compression with a small piece of chirped volume Bragg-grating (CVBG) which has the dispersion rate of 81 ps/nm. As a result of pulse compression, the shortest pulse width was reduced from 90 ps to 3.5 ps, which brought an increase of the peak power up to 3.2 MW. The compressed pulses are clean with little structure in their wings. We can expand the operation range of the monolithic fiber MOPA system in pulse width, 3.5 ps to 2 ns.

  5. Crack width monitoring of concrete structures based on smart film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2014-04-01

    Due to its direct link to structural security, crack width is thought to be one of the most important parameters reflecting damage conditions of concrete structures. However, the width problem is difficult to solve with the existing structural health monitoring methods. In this paper, crack width monitoring by means of adhering enameled copper wires with different ultimate strains on the surface of structures is proposed, based on smart film crack monitoring put forward by the present authors. The basic idea of the proposed method is related to a proportional relationship between the crack width and ultimate strain of the broken wire. Namely, when a certain width of crack passes through the wire, some low ultimate strain wires will be broken and higher ultimate strain wires may stay non-broken until the crack extends to a larger scale. Detection of the copper wire condition as broken or non-broken may indicate the width of the structural crack. Thereafter, a multi-layered stress transfer model and specimen experiment are performed to quantify the relationship. A practical smart film is then redesigned with this idea and applied to Chongqing Jiangjin Yangtze River Bridge.

  6. Peak width issues with generalised 2D correlation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwan, Gemma M.; Adams, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    Two-dimensional spectral correlation analysis is shown to be sensitive to fluctuations in spectral peak width as a function of perturbation variable. This is particularly significant where peak width fluctuations are of similar order of magnitude as the peak width values themselves and where changes in peak width are not random but are, for example, proportional to intensity. In such cases these trends appear in the asynchronous matrix as false peaks that serve to interfere with interpretation of the data. Complex, narrow band spectra such as provided by 1H NMR spectroscopy are demonstrated to be prone to such interference. 2D correlation analysis was applied to a series of NMR spectra corresponding to a commercial wine fermentation, in which the samples collected over a period of several days exhibit dramatic changes in concentration of minor and major components. The interference due to changing peak width effects is eliminated by synthesizing the recorded spectra using a constant peak width value prior to performing 2D correlation analysis.

  7. Localization of alpha integrin subunits in the neural retina of the tiger salamander.

    PubMed

    Sherry, D M; Proske, P A

    2001-04-01

    Integrin receptors mediate cell-extracellular matrix interactions and regulate many events, including cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Retinal integrins are incompletely understood, although these receptors are potentially important factors in normal retinal function and pathology. Immunocytochemistry was used to localize alpha integrin subunits 1-6 in the neural retina. Each alpha integrin subunit had a unique distribution in the retina, although there was considerable overlap among subunits. The alpha 1 subunit was broadly distributed throughout the retina, with some presumptive ganglion cells showing enriched labeling. The alpha 2 subunit was present on all retinal cell bodies, but was reduced in synaptic layers. The alpha 3 subunit was present in synaptic layers, Müller cells, and some cone and amacrine cells. The alpha 4 subunit was broadly distributed in the nuclear layers but was reduced in synaptic layers. The alpha 5 subunit was broadly expressed in the nuclear and synaptic layers with enriched labeling in the outer plexiform layer. Labeling for the alpha 6 subunit was restricted to the outer limiting membrane and some cone outer segments. Double-labeling studies indicated that photoreceptor terminals may exhibit alpha 1 and alpha 5 subunits, while processes from second-order neurons may exhibit alpha 1, alpha 3, and alpha 5 subunits. Integrin receptors containing the alpha 1, alpha 3, and alpha 5 subunits may have important functions at retinal synapses, in addition to roles in the nuclear layers. Integrin receptors containing alpha 2, alpha 4, and alpha 6 subunits probably serve non-synaptic functions.

  8. Effects of interventions on normalizing step width during self-paced dual-belt treadmill walking with virtual reality, a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Oude Lansink, I L B; van Kouwenhove, L; Dijkstra, P U; Postema, K; Hijmans, J M

    2017-07-18

    Step width is increased during dual-belt treadmill walking, in self-paced mode with virtual reality. Generally a familiarization period is thought to be necessary to normalize step width. The aim of this randomised study was to analyze the effects of two interventions on step width, to reduce the familiarization period. We used the GRAIL (Gait Real-time Analysis Interactive Lab), a dual-belt treadmill with virtual reality in the self-paced mode. Thirty healthy young adults were randomly allocated to three groups and asked to walk at their preferred speed for 5min. In the first session, the control-group received no intervention, the 'walk-on-the-line'-group was instructed to walk on a line, projected on the between-belt gap of the treadmill and the feedback-group received feedback about their current step width and were asked to reduce it. Interventions started after 1min and lasted 1min. During the second session, 7-10days later, no interventions were given. Linear mixed modeling showed that interventions did not have an effect on step width after the intervention period in session 1. Initial step width (second 30s) of session 1 was larger than initial step width of session 2. Step width normalized after 2min and variation in step width stabilized after 1min. Interventions do not reduce step width after intervention period. A 2-min familiarization period is sufficient to normalize and stabilize step width, in healthy young adults, regardless of interventions. A standardized intervention to normalize step width is not necessary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tree-ring width reveals the preparation of the 1974 Mt. Etna eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Ruedi; Houlié, Nicolas; Cherubini, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Reduced near-infrared reflectance observed in September 1973 in Skylab images of the western flank of Mt. Etna has been interpreted as an eruption precursor of the January 1974 eruption. Until now, it has been unclear when this signal started, whether it was sustained and which process(es) could have caused it. By analyzing tree-ring width time-series, we show that the reduced near-infrared precursory signal cannot be linked to a reduction in annual tree growth in the area. However, comparing the tree-ring width time-series with both remote sensing observations and volcano-seismic activity enables us to discuss the starting date of the pre-eruptive period of the 1974 eruption.

  10. Tree-ring width reveals the preparation of the 1974 Mt. Etna eruption

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Ruedi; Houlié, Nicolas; Cherubini, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Reduced near-infrared reflectance observed in September 1973 in Skylab images of the western flank of Mt. Etna has been interpreted as an eruption precursor of the January 1974 eruption. Until now, it has been unclear when this signal started, whether it was sustained and which process(es) could have caused it. By analyzing tree-ring width time-series, we show that the reduced near-infrared precursory signal cannot be linked to a reduction in annual tree growth in the area. However, comparing the tree-ring width time-series with both remote sensing observations and volcano-seismic activity enables us to discuss the starting date of the pre-eruptive period of the 1974 eruption. PMID:28266610

  11. On the Assimilation of Tree-Ring-Width Chronologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, Walter; Reich, Sebastian; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Data assimilation (DA) of climate proxy records is currently acknowledged as a promising approach to the paleoclimate reconstruction problem, with the potential to bring physical consistency to reconstructed fields. Previous paleo-DA studies have typically assumed a linear relationship between climate forcing and the resulting proxy data, whereas there exist growing evidence of complex, potentially non-linear, proxy formation processes. Accordingly, it appears natural to simulate the proxy response to climate in a more realistic fashion, by way of proxy-specific forward models. Following this train of thought, we investigate the assimilation of the most traditional climate proxy type, Tree-Ring-Width (TRW) chronologies, using the process-based tree-ring growth forward model Vaganov-Shashkin-Lite (VSL) and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) techniques. Used as observation operator, VSL's formulation implies three compounding, challenging features: (i) time averaging, (ii) "switching recording" of 2 variables and (iii) bounded response windows leading to "thresholded response". DA experiments involving VSL-based pseudo-TRW observations are performed first for a chaotic 2-scale dynamical system, used as a cartoon of the atmosphere-land system, and then for an atmospheric general circulation model of intermediate complexity. Our results reveal that VSL's nonlinearities may considerable deteriorate the performance of EnKF for Time-Averaged (TA) estimation, as compared to the utilization of a TA linear observation operator. Moreover, we show that this assimilation skill loss can be considerably reduced by embedding VSL's formulation into fuzzy logic theory, which fosters new interpretations of tree-ring growth limitation processes.

  12. The relationship between innercanthal dimension and interalar width to the intercanine width of maxillary anterior teeth in central Indian population

    PubMed Central

    Deogade, Suryakant Chhagan; Mantri, Sneha S.; Sumathi, K.; Rajoriya, Shivani

    2015-01-01

    Statement of Problem: Selection of proper sized maxillary anterior teeth is one of the difficult clinical steps in complete denture esthetics. Several studies have been reported to establish methods of estimating the combined width of maxillary anterior teeth. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine whether a relationship exists between the innercanthal distance (ICD) and interalar width (IAW) with the combined width of maxillary anterior teeth. Material and Methods: The maxillary anterior teeth of 600 adult subjects were examined. ICD was measured between the median angles of the palpebral fissure. IAW was measured between the ala of the nose at their widest point. The mean combined width of the maxillary anterior teeth was determined intraorally at their widest dimension. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated to determine the relationship between ICD, IAW and the combined width of maxillary anterior teeth (α =0.05). Results: Although the Pearson correlation coefficients were relatively small, a significant relationship existed between innercanthal dimension and IAW (P < 0001). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, the results suggest that ICD and IAW cannot be used as a preliminary method for determining the width of the maxillary anterior teeth for edentulous patients. PMID:26929493

  13. Giant dipole resonance width in nuclei near Sn at low temperature and high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Srijit; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, Deepak; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Gupta, D.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2008-02-15

    High energy {gamma} rays in coincidence with low energy yrast {gamma} rays have been measured from {sup 113}Sb, at excitation energies of 109 and 122 MeV, formed by bombarding {sup 20}Ne on {sup 93}Nb at projectile energies of 145 and 160 MeV, respectively, to study the role of angular momentum (J) and temperature (T) over giant dipole resonance (GDR) width ({gamma}). The maximum populated angular momenta for fusion were 67({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and 73({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), respectively, for the above-mentioned beam energies. The high energy photons were detected using a Large Area Modular BaF{sub 2} Detector Array (LAMBDA) along with a 24-element multiplicity filter. After pre-equilibrium corrections, the excitation energy E* was averaged over the decay steps of the compound nucleus (CN). The average values of temperature, angular momentum, CN mass, etc., have been calculated using the statistical model code CASCADE. Using those average values, results show the systematic increase of GDR width with T, which is consistent with Kusnezov parametrization and the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM). The rise of GDR width with temperature also supports the assumptions of adiabatic coupling in the TSFM. But the GDR widths and corresponding reduced plots with J are not consistent with those of the theoretical model at high spins.

  14. Optimal caliper width for propensity score matching of three treatment groups: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongji; Cai, Hongwei; Li, Chanjuan; Jiang, Zhiwei; Wang, Ling; Song, Jiugang; Xia, Jielai

    2013-01-01

    Propensity score matching is a method to reduce bias in non-randomized and observational studies. Propensity score matching is mainly applied to two treatment groups rather than multiple treatment groups, because some key issues affecting its application to multiple treatment groups remain unsolved, such as the matching distance, the assessment of balance in baseline variables, and the choice of optimal caliper width. The primary objective of this study was to compare propensity score matching methods using different calipers and to choose the optimal caliper width for use with three treatment groups. The authors used caliper widths from 0.1 to 0.8 of the pooled standard deviation of the logit of the propensity score, in increments of 0.1. The balance in baseline variables was assessed by standardized difference. The matching ratio, relative bias, and mean squared error (MSE) of the estimate between groups in different propensity score-matched samples were also reported. The results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that matching using a caliper width of 0.2 of the pooled standard deviation of the logit of the propensity score affords superior performance in the estimation of treatment effects. This study provides practical solutions for the application of propensity score matching of three treatment groups.

  15. Influence of sample width on the magnetoresistance and planar Hall effect of Co/Cu multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C. Lima, S.; Baibich, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied Co/Cu multilayers to understand the effect of the sample's width on their magnetoresistance (MR). By keeping constant both the length and the thickness and exploring the widths within the range of usual magnetic domain sizes in those nanostructures, we were able to observe effects on the MR curve, as well as infer linked changes in the magnetization process. Associating MR and Planar Hall Effect (PHE) measurements, coupled to an analysis of the MR plots' symmetry, we were able to establish that, apart from the expected antiferromagnetic coupling, reducing the width forces the magnetization to stay aligned to the current channel, thus inducing more symmetric, closer to model Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR). Also, the sample edges might contribute by adding extra coupling through magnetostatic interaction. The added effects result in a counter-intuitive trend that goes from the near ideal wide samples through intermediate sizes with fairly abrupt changes in MR, and finally to the closer to bell-shaped ideal GMR at narrow widths.

  16. Precision Measurement of {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} Decay Width via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Liping Gin

    2013-08-01

    A precision measurement of the {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} decay width via the Primakoff effect is underway in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The decay width will be extracted from measured differential cross sections at forward angles on two light targets, liquid hydrogen and 4He, using a 11.5 GeV tagged photon beam. Results of this experiment will not only potentially resolve a long standing discrepancy between the Primakoff and the collider measurements, but will also reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two on the average value of previous experimental results listed by the Particle Data Group(PDG). It will directly improve all other eta partial decay widths which rely on the accuracy of the eta radiative decay width. The projected 3% precision on the {Gamma}({eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} ) measurement will have a significant impact on the experimental determination of the fundamental parameters in QCD, such as the ratio of light quark masses (m{sub u},m{sub d},m{sub s}) and the {eta} - {eta}' mixing angle. It will be a sensitive probe for understanding QCD symmetries and the origin and the dynamics of QCD symmetry breaking.

  17. Top quark mediated Higgs boson decay into hadrons to order alphas5.

    PubMed

    Baikov, P A; Chetyrkin, K G

    2006-08-11

    We present in analytic form the O(alphas5) correction to the H-->gg partial width of the standard-model Higgs boson with an intermediate mass MH<2Mt. Its knowledge is useful because the O(alphas4) correction is sizable (around 20%). For MH=120 GeV, the resulting QCD correction factor reads 1+(215/12)alphas(5)(MH)/pi+152.5[alphas(5)(MH)/pi]2+381.5[alphas(5)(MH)/pi]3 approximately 1+0.65+0.20+0.02. The new four-loop correction increases the total Higgs-boson hadronic width by a small amount of order 1 per thousand and stabilizes significantly the residual scale dependence.

  18. THE TWO REGIMES OF PHOTOSPHERIC MOTIONS IN {alpha} HYDRA

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, David F.

    2013-02-10

    High-resolution spectroscopic observations of {alpha} Hya were acquired between 2003 and 2010. Analysis of line shifts, differential shifts, line widths, and line bisectors points to two regimes of velocity fields in the photosphere of {alpha} Hya: (1) normal granulation embedded in (2) large convection cells. Variations occur on a wide range of timescales, from several years on down. Radial velocity variations, which are irregular and span 786 m s{sup -1}, have a distribution consistent with a true mean rise velocity of the large cells of {approx}725 m s{sup -1} and a dispersion of {approx}220 m s{sup -1}. The distribution of granulation velocities, as measured from the widths of spectral lines, shows only small variations, consistent with the two regime concepts. On the multi-year timescale, radial velocity changes, small temperature variations ({approx}10 K), and small line-width variations ({approx}<0.8%) track each other, possibly with phase shifts. The granulation velocity gradient for {alpha} Hya is about half as large as the Sun's and no variation with time was seen, implying that any variation in velocity gradient from one large cell to the next must be less than a few percent. The asymmetry in the granulation velocity distribution, as specified in the flux deficit, is smaller than expected for {alpha} Hya's position in the HR diagram and appears to be variable.

  19. Dynamical and Stellar Masses of Lyman-alpha Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoads, James E.; Malhotra, S.; McLinden, E.; Richardson, M. L.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Tilvi, V. S.

    2012-01-01

    We have observed strong nebular lines of [OIII] and H alpha for Lyman-alpha galaxies at z=2-3.1 using Keck+NIRSPEC, LBT+LUCIFER, and Gemini+NIFS. [OIII] 5007 is strong enough to dominate the 2 micron K band fluxes of these galaxies, and leads to an overestimate of the stellar mass of the galaxy by an order of magnitude. After correcting for the observed [OIII] lines, we infer low masses and young ages for these galaxies. We also use the physical widths of the rest-optical lines, combined with spatial sizes from HST imaging, to obtain direct dynamical mass estimates of Lyman alpha galaxies (which cannot be done using the resonantly scattered Lyman alpha line). Finally, we combine our stellar mass estimates and line widths to place these galaxies on the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation. We find that the stellar masses required to reproduce the observed light are lower than one would expect based on the galaxies' line widths. The stellar mass densities of these galaxies are comparable to those of elliptical galaxies today. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF grant NSF-AST-0808165.

  20. On the radial width of CMEs between 0.1 and 0.4 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N. P.; Forsyth, R. J.; Rouillard, A. P.; Owens, M. J.; Davies, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    The launch of the two STEREO spacecraft in 2006 has heralded a new era of opportunities to make remote observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). An example CME on the 16th February 2008 with an approximately circular cross section was tracked through successive images obtained by the Heliospheric Imager (HI) instrument onboard the STEREO-A spacecraft. The cylindrical nature of force-free constant alpha flux ropes is used to determine the radial size of the CME. The radial velocity and longitude of propagation are determined. With these parameters known, the radial size is calculated from the images taking projection effects into account. A power law is obtained for the resulting radial width behaviour with heliocentric distance as the CME travels between 0.1 and 0.4 AU. We compare our results to those obtained in published studies based on in-situ spacecraft observations of ICMEs between 0.3 and 1.0 AU.

  1. Variations in solar Lyman alpha irradiance on short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Variations in solar UV irradiance at Lyman alpha are studied on short time scales (from days to months) after removing the long-term changes over the solar cycle. The SME/Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analysis. In order to study the nonlinear effects, Lyman alpha irradiance is modeled with a 5th-degree polynomial as well. It is shown that the full-disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm, which is used as a proxy for the plages and active network, can best reproduce the changes observed in Lyman alpha. Approximately 72 percent of the solar-activity-related changes in Lyman alpha irradiance arise from plages and the network. The network contribution is estimated by the correlation analysis to be about 19 percent. It is shown that significant variability remains in Lyman alpha irradiance, with periods around 300, 27, and 13.5d, which is not explained by the solar activity indices. It is shown that the nonlinear effects cannot account for a significant part of the unexplained variation in Lyman alpha irradiance. Therefore, additional events (e.g., large-scale motions and/or a systematic difference in the area and intensity of the plages and network observed in the lines of Ca-K, He 1083, and Lyman alpha) may explain the discrepancies found between the observed and estimated irradiance values.

  2. Interpreting EEG alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Bazanova, O M; Vernon, D

    2014-07-01

    Exploring EEG alpha oscillations has generated considerable interest, in particular with regards to the role they play in cognitive, psychomotor, psycho-emotional and physiological aspects of human life. However, there is no clearly agreed upon definition of what constitutes 'alpha activity' or which of the many indices should be used to characterize it. To address these issues this review attempts to delineate EEG alpha-activity, its physical, molecular and morphological nature, and examine the following indices: (1) the individual alpha peak frequency; (2) activation magnitude, as measured by alpha amplitude suppression across the individual alpha bandwidth in response to eyes opening, and (3) alpha "auto-rhythmicity" indices: which include intra-spindle amplitude variability, spindle length and steepness. Throughout, the article offers a number of suggestions regarding the mechanism(s) of alpha activity related to inter and intra-individual variability. In addition, it provides some insights into the various psychophysiological indices of alpha activity and highlights their role in optimal functioning and behavior. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Dependence of divertor heat flux widths on heating power, flux expansion, and plasma current in the NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Maingi, Rajesh; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Ahn, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    We report the dependence of the lower divertor surface heat flux profiles, measured from infrared thermography and mapped magnetically to the mid-plane on loss power into the scrape-off layer (P{sub LOSS}), plasma current (I{sub p}), and magnetic flux expansion (f{sub exp}), as well as initial results with lithium wall conditioning in NSTX. Here we extend previous studies [R. Maingi et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 363-365 (2007) 196-200] to higher triangularity similar to 0.7 and higher I{sub p} {le} 1.2 MA. First we note that the mid-plane heat flux width mapped to the mid-plane, {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} is largely independent of P{sub LOSS} for P{sub LOSS} {ge} 4 MW. {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} is also found to be relatively independent of f{sub exp}; peak heat flux is strongly reduced as f{sub exp} is increased, as expected. Finally, {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} is shown to strongly contract with increasing I{sub p} such that {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} {alpha} I{sub p}{sup -1.6} with a peak divertor heat flux of q{sub div,peak} similar to 15 MW/m{sup 2} when I{sub p} = 1.2 MA and P{sub LOSS} similar to 6 MW. These relationships are then used to predict the divertor heat flux for the planned NSTX-Upgrade, with heating power between 10 and 15 MW, B{sub t} = 1.01 and I{sub p}= 2.0 MA for 5 s.

  4. Variation in the Width of Transition Region Network Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    The transition region network seen in solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines is the extension of the chromospheric network. The network appears as an irregular web-like pattern over the solar surface outside active regions. The average width of transition region network boundaries is obtained from the two-dimensional autocorrelation function of SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) synoptic images of the Sun in two emission lines, He i 586 Å and O v 630 Å during 1996 - 2012. The width of the network boundaries is found to be roughly correlated with the solar cycle variation with a lag of about ten months. A comparison of the widths in the two emission lines shows that they are larger for the He i line. The SOHO/CDS data also show large asymmetry in boundary widths in the horizontal (x) and vertical (y) image directions, which is shown to be caused by image distortions that are due to instrumental effects. Since the network boundary widths are related to the magnetic flux concentration along the boundaries, the results are expected to have implications on the flux transport on the solar surface, solar cycle, and the mass and energy budget of network loops and jets.

  5. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    DOEpatents

    Mihalka, Alex M.

    1986-01-01

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20-50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the DC input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  6. The width of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Borgonovo, Luis

    2015-03-01

    The emission processes active in the highly relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain unknown. In this paper, we propose a new measure to describe spectra: the width of the EFE spectrum, a quantity dependent only on finding a good fit to the data. We apply this to the full sample of GRBs observed by Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The results from the two instruments are fully consistent. We find that the median widths of spectra from long and short GRBs are significantly different (chance probability <10-6). The width does not correlate with either duration or hardness, and this is thus a new, independent distinction between the two classes. Comparing the measured spectra with widths of spectra from fundamental emission processes - synchrotron and blackbody radiation - the results indicate that a large fraction of GRB spectra are too narrow to be explained by synchrotron radiation from a distribution of electron energies: for example, 78 per cent of long GRBs and 85 per cent of short GRBs are incompatible with the minimum width of standard slow cooling synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, with fast cooling spectra predicting even wider spectra. Photospheric emission can explain the spectra if mechanisms are invoked to give a spectrum much broader than a blackbody.

  7. Difference of CBD width on US vs. ERCP.

    PubMed

    Brook, Olga R; Suissa, Alain; Khamaysi, Iyad; Koren, Dorit; Gaitini, Diana

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between US and ERCP in the measurement of common bile duct (CBD) width after application of Compound and Harmonic imaging on ultrasound. We prospectively evaluated the CBD width as measured on endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and ultrasonography (US), applying Compound and Harmonic US techniques, on 100 patients. Furthermore, we retrospectively re-examined US and ERCP images of 48 patients who underwent ERCP and US during the same hospitalization period. The average difference in measurements by US compared to ERCP was 2.3 mm (P < 0.01) in the retrospective and 1.9 mm in the prospective study (P < 0.001). The average difference in measurements between US and ERCP in post-cholecystectomy patients was 4.0 mm in the retrospective study (10 patients), and 3.8 in the prospective study (25 patients). The difference between the measurements on both examinations decreased with increasing CBD width. There was a good correlation between ERCP and US measurements of CBD width (r = 0.73 for all patients and r = 0.88 for patients with intact gallbladder, P < 0.001). There is a gap between measurement of CBD width on US and ERCP of about 2 mm. The application of Compound and Harmonic techniques in the prospective study probably enabled a more accurate sonographic measurement.

  8. Deciduous neonatal line: Width is associated with duration of delivery.

    PubMed

    Hurnanen, Jaana; Visnapuu, Vivian; Sillanpää, Matti; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Rautava, Jaana

    2017-02-01

    The delivery-related neonatal line (NNL) appears into the enamel of primary teeth and first permanent molars at birth and is a marker of live birth process. It varies in width and its location, is different in each deciduous tooth type, and is indicative of gestation time. It is unclear which triggers determine NNL at birth. Our objective was to investigate the effect of the duration and mode of delivery on NNL width. NNL of 129 teeth, a collection derived from a long-term, prospectively followed population cohort, was measured under light microscope. Altogether, 54 sections with most optimal plane of sectioning were analysed for the duration and mode of delivery. NNL was detected in 98% of the deciduous teeth with the median width of 9.63μm (min 3.16μm, max 27.58μm). A prolonged duration of vaginal delivery was highly significantly associated with a narrower NNL (r=-0.41, p=0.0097). No significant association was found between the width of NNL and mode of delivery (p=0.36). NNL is demonstrable in virtually all deciduous teeth. The width seems to be inversely proportional to the duration of delivery. Causes of the inverse proportion are speculated to result from altered amelogenesis induced by prolonged and intensified delivery-associated stress. Further research is needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms.

  9. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalka, A. M.

    1986-04-01

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the dc input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  10. Enhancement of the triple alpha process in hot, dense environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Mary; Austin, Sam M.; Cyburt, Richard

    2016-09-01

    The triple alpha process plays a particularly important role in nuclear astrophysics, bridging the A =5 and A =8 stability gaps, producing 12C. The reaction itself proceeds via the 0 + (Hoyle) resonance at 7.65 MeV in 12C, at a rate proportional to the radiative width of the state. For sufficiently hot and dense environments, the rate of the triple alpha reaction is significantly enhanced by hadronic inelastic scattering that de-excites the Hoyle state. We present theoretical calculations for the enhancement of the triple alpha rate based on inelastic n, p and alpha cross sections. For comparable densities, neutrons play the largest role. NSCL PHY11-02511, JINA-CEE PHY14-30152.

  11. Comparison of mesiodistal crown dimension and arch width in subjects with and without hypodontia.

    PubMed

    Fekonja, Anita

    2013-06-01

    Tooth agenesis is one of the most common anomalies in the development of the human dentition and may have wider associations in the development of the dentition including tooth size. This study aimed to compare mesiodistal crown dimension and arch widths between subjects with hypodontia and subjects without hypodontia (control group). Dental casts were measured of 55 hypodontia patients and 55 patients with total permanent dentition (control group). Tooth agenesis was evaluated for hypodontia, excluding the third molars, from the panoramic radiograph. Mesiodistal crown dimensions were recorded by measuring all erupted teeth on study models with a digital Mitutoyo caliper (Mitutoyo U.K. Ltd, United Kingdom). Patients with hypodontia had smaller mesiodistal tooth dimensions than the control group, and this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05) for all teeth in both genders. Upper lateral incisors, lower central incisors, and lower second molars showed the highest difference in tooth dimension. Also, the intercanine and intermolar arch widths in the hypodontia group were statistically significantly reduced (p < 0.05) compared with the control group. The findings indicate that the mesiodistal crown dimensions and arch widths are reduced in hypodontia patients. This should be taken into account when planning orthodontic treatment. Congenital absence of permanent teeth has direct clinical implications. Early detection of the number of missing teeth and evaluation of the tooth size and arch width is of immense value in the planning and managing treatment with a multidisciplinary team approach to achieve an aesthetic and functional dentition and reduce the complications of hypodontia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Development of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor from medicinal herbs].

    PubMed

    Ji, Fang; Xiao, Guochun; Dong, Li; Ma, Zijiao; Ni, Jingman

    2010-06-01

    Alpha-glucosidase inhibitor can reduce the postprandial hyperglycemia and have good effect on preventing and treating the diabetes and diabetic complication. Along with the application of acarbose which is a kind of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor, many research groups pay attention to the crude alpha-glucosidase inhibitor screened from the medicinal herbs in order to find new, safe, and effective medicine. The development of alpha-glucosidase inhibitor screened from the medicinal herbs and its evaluation in vivo and vitro as well as the varieties of the medicinal herbs that contain alpha-glucosidase inhibitor in recent 30 years were summarized in this paper.

  13. Analysis of edge stability for models of heat flux width

    DOE PAGES

    Makowski, Michael A.; Lasnier, Charles J.; Leonard, Anthony W.; ...

    2017-05-12

    Detailed measurements of the ne, and Te, and Ti profiles in the vicinity of the separatrix of ELMing H-mode discharges have been used to examine plasma stability at the extreme edge of the plasma and assess stability dependent models of the heat flux width. The results are strongly contrary to the critical gradient model, which posits that a ballooning instability determines a gradient scale length related to the heat flux width. The results of this analysis are not sensitive to the choice of location to evaluate stability. Significantly, it is also found that the results are completely consistent with themore » heuristic drift model for the heat flux width. Here the edge pressure gradient scales with plasma density and is proportional to the pressure gradient inferred from the equilibrium in accordance with the predictions of that theory.« less

  14. Area-width scaling in generalised Motzkin paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haug, Nils; Prellberg, Thomas; Siudem, Grzegorz

    2017-09-01

    We consider a generalised version of Motzkin paths, where horizontal steps have length ℓ, with ℓ being a fixed positive integer. We first give the general functional equation for the area-width generating function of this model. Using a heuristic ansatz, we then derive the area-width scaling behaviour in terms of a scaling function in one variable for the special cases of Dyck, (standard) Motzkin and Schröder paths, before generalising our approach to arbitrary ℓ. We then rigorously derive the tricritical scaling of Schröder paths by applying the generalised method of steepest descents to the known exact solution for their area-width generating function. Our results show that for Dyck and Schröder paths, the heuristic scaling ansatz reproduces the rigorous results.

  15. Why momentum width matters for atom interferometry with Bragg pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szigeti, S. S.; Debs, J. E.; Hope, J. J.; Robins, N. P.; Close, J. D.

    2012-02-01

    We theoretically consider the effect of the atomic source's momentum width on the efficiency of Bragg mirrors and beamsplitters and, more generally, on the phase sensitivity of Bragg pulse atom interferometers. By numerical optimization, we show that an atomic cloud's momentum width places a fundamental upper bound on the maximum transfer efficiency of a Bragg mirror pulse, and furthermore limits the phase sensitivity of a Bragg pulse atom interferometer. We quantify these momentum width effects, and precisely compute how mirror efficiencies and interferometer phase sensitivities vary as functions of Bragg order and source type. Our results and methodology allow for an efficient optimization of Bragg pulses and the comparison of different atomic sources, and will help in the design of large momentum transfer Bragg mirrors and beamsplitters for use in atom-based inertial sensors.

  16. Fast and Robust Nanocellulose Width Estimation Using Turbidimetry.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Michiko; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Iwamoto, Shinichiro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Isogai, Akira; Endo, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The dimensions of nanocelluloses are important factors in controlling their material properties. The present study reports a fast and robust method for estimating the widths of individual nanocellulose particles based on the turbidities of their water dispersions. Seven types of nanocellulose, including short and rigid cellulose nanocrystals and long and flexible cellulose nanofibers, are prepared via different processes. Their widths are calculated from the respective turbidity plots of their water dispersions, based on the theory of light scattering by thin and long particles. The turbidity-derived widths of the seven nanocelluloses range from 2 to 10 nm, and show good correlations with the thicknesses of nanocellulose particles spread on flat mica surfaces determined using atomic force microscopy.

  17. Morphodynamics structures induced by variations of the channel width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duro, Gonzalo; Crosato, Alessandra; Tassi, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    In alluvial channels, forcing effects, such as a longitudinally varying width, can induce the formation of steady bars (Olesen, 1984). The type of bars that form, such as alternate, central or multiple, will mainly depend on the local flow width-to-depth ratio and on upstream conditions (Struiksma et al., 1985). The effects on bar formation of varying the channel width received attention only recently and investigations, based on flume experiments and mathematical modelling, are mostly restricted to small longitudinal sinusoidal variations of the channel width (e.g. Repetto et al., 2002; Wu and Yeh, 2005, Zolezzi et al., 2012; Frascati and Lanzoni, 2013). In this work, we analyze the variations in equilibrium bed topography in a longitudinal width-varying channel with characteristic scales of the Waal River (The Netherlands) using two different 2D depth-averaged morphodynamic models, one based on the Delft3D code and one on Telemac-Mascaret system. In particular, we explore the effects of changing the wavelength of sinusoidal width variations in a straight channel, focusing on the effects of the spatial lag between bar formation and forcing that is observed in numerical models and laboratory experiments (e.g. Crosato et al, 2011). We extend the investigations to finite width variations in which longitudinal changes of the width-to-depth ratio are such that they may affect the type of bars that become unstable (alternate, central or multiple bars). Numerical results are qualitatively validated with field observations and the resulting morphodynamic pattern is compared with the physics-based predictor of river bar modes by Crosato and Mosselman (2009). The numerical models are finally used to analyse the experimental conditions of Wu and Yeh (2005). The study should be seen as merely exploratory. The aim is to investigate possible approaches for future research aiming at assessing the effects of artificial river widening and narrowing to control bar formation in

  18. Interatomic Coulombic decay widths of helium trimer: Ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kolorenč, Přemysl; Sisourat, Nicolas

    2015-12-14

    We report on an extensive study of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) widths in helium trimer computed using a fully ab initio method based on the Fano theory of resonances. Algebraic diagrammatic construction for one-particle Green’s function is utilized for the solution of the many-electron problem. An advanced and universal approach to partitioning of the configuration space into discrete states and continuum subspaces is described and employed. Total decay widths are presented for all ICD-active states of the trimer characterized by one-site ionization and additional excitation of an electron into the second shell. Selected partial decay widths are analyzed in detail, showing how three-body effects can qualitatively change the character of certain relaxation transitions. Previously unreported type of three-electron decay processes is identified in one class of the metastable states.

  19. Autoionization widths by Stieltjes imaging applied to Lanczos pseudospectra

    SciTech Connect

    Kopelke, S.; Gokhberg, K.; Cederbaum, L. S.; Tarantelli, F.; Averbukh, V.

    2011-01-14

    Excited states of atoms and molecules lying above the ionization threshold can decay by electron emission in a process commonly known as autoionization. The autoionization widths can be calculated conveniently using Fano formalism and discretized atomic and molecular spectra by a standard procedure referred to as Stieltjes imaging. The Stieltjes imaging procedure requires the use of the full discretized spectrum of the final states of the autoionization, making its use for poly-atomic systems described by high-quality basis sets impractical. Following our previous work on photoionization cross-sections, here we show that also in the case of autoionization widths, the full diagonalization bottleneck can be overcome by the use of Lanczos pseudospectra. We test the proposed method by calculating the well-documented autoionization widths of inner-valence-excited neon and apply the new technique to autoionizing states of hydrofluoric acid and benzene.

  20. Estimate of cusp loss width in multicusp negative ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morishita, T.; Ogasawara, M.; Hatayama, A.

    1998-02-01

    Expression of cusp loss width derived by Bosch and Merlino is applied to JAERI's Kamaboko source. The width is related to the ambipolar diffusion coefficient across the cusp magnetic field. Electron-ion collision is found 1.2-7.4 times larger as compared with electron-neutral collision. Averaged cusp magnetic field in the diffusion coefficient is taken as a parameter in the simulation code for Kamaboko source. When the averaged magnetic field is 48 G, simulation results agree well with JAERI's experiment in a wide range of pressure and arc power variation. The value of 48 G is reasonable from the consideration of confining the equation of ion source plasma. The obtained width is about 10 times the value evaluated by two times ion Larmor radius on the surface of cusp magnet.

  1. Impact of Increased Football Field Width on Player High-Speed Collision Rate.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jacob R; Khalsa, Siri S; Smith, Brandon W; Park, Paul

    2017-07-01

    High-acceleration head impact is a known risk for mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) based on studies using helmet accelerometry. In football, offensive and defensive players are at higher risk of mTBI due to increased speed of play. Other collision sport studies suggest that increased playing surface size may contribute to reductions in high-speed collisions. We hypothesized that wider football fields lead to a decreased rate of high-speed collisions. Computer football game simulation was developed using MATLAB. Four wide receivers were matched against 7 defensive players. Each offensive player was randomized to one of 5 typical routes on each play. The ball was thrown 3 seconds into play; ball flight time was 2 seconds. Defensive players were delayed 0.5 second before reacting to ball release. A high-speed collision was defined as the receiver converging with a defensive player within 0.5 second of catching the ball. The simulation counted high-speed collisions for 1 team/season (65 plays/game for 16 games/season = 1040 plays/season) averaged during 10 seasons, and was validated against existing data using standard field width (53.3 yards). Field width was increased in 1-yard intervals up to 58.3 yards. Using standard field width, 188 ± 4 high-speed collisions were seen per team per season (18% of plays). When field width increased by 3 yards, high-speed collision rate decreased to 135 ± 3 per team per season (28% decrease; P < 0.0001). Even small increases in football field width can lead to substantial decline in high-speed collisions, with potential for reducing instances of mTBI in football players. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Numerical simulation for influence of pulse width on the temperature field of unidirectional carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Boshi; Jin, Guangyong; Wei, Zhi; Wang, Di; Ma, Yao

    2014-12-01

    The unidirectional carbon fiber material is commonly used in the Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (CFRP). The COMSOL Multiphysics finite element analysis software was utilized in this paper. And the 3D anisotropy model, which based on heat conduction equation, was established to simulate the temperature field of the carbon fiber irradiated by pulse laser. The research focused on the influences of the laser width on the material temperature field. The thermal analysis results indicated that during the process of irradiation, the temperature field distribution of the carbon fiber was different from the distribution of laser spot on the surface. The incident laser is Gauss laser, but the temperature field distribution presented oval. It resulted from the heat transfer coefficient of carbon fiber was different in the axial and in the radial. The temperature passed along the fiber axial faster than the radial. Under the condition of the laser energy density constant, and during the laser irradiation time, the depth of the carbon fiber temperature field increased with the pulse width increasing, and the area of the carbon fiber temperature field increased with the pulse width increasing, However, the temperature of the laser irradiated center showed a trend of decrease with the increasing of pulse width. The results showed that when the laser affection was constant, the laser energy affected on the carbon fiber per unit time was increased with the decrease of the pulse width. Due to the limits of the heat transfer coefficient of the material and laser irradiation time, the energy was injected in carbon fiber within a short time. With the reducing of the heat conduction area, the depth and the area of the temperature field would be also decreased. With the increase of pulse width, the time of energy injected in carbon fiber was increased, and the laser energy affected on the carbon fiber per unit time was decrease. With the heat conduction area increasing, the depth and

  3. Experimental Stark widths and shifts of Ti II spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, J.; Aguilera, J. A.; Aragón, C.

    2016-10-01

    Stark widths and shifts of Ti II lines with wavelengths in the range 2500-4600 Å have been determined by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The temperature and electron density of the plasma vary in the ranges 11 970-15 520 K and (2.0-7.2) × 1017 cm-3, respectively, for the different measurement instants from 0.6 to 1.8 μs. The samples used are fused glass discs with different titanium concentrations, selected to control the self-absorption of the lines. The Stark widths and shifts are compared with the experimental and theoretical data available in the literature.

  4. Direct measurement of the W boson decay width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahmed, S. N.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alton, A.; Alves, G. A.; Anderson, E. W.; Arnoud, Y.; Avila, C.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doulas, S.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Duensing, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frame, K. C.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Huang, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krivkova, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Mutaf, Y.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nomerotski, A.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Neil, D.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramberg, E.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sabirov, B. M.; Sajot, G.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, Y.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Tripathi, S. M.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; van Kooten, R.; Varelas, N.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, Q.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Zanabria, M.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2002-08-01

    Based on 85 pb-1 data of pp¯ collisions at (s)=1.8 TeV collected using the DØ detector at Fermilab during the 1994-1995 run of the Tevatron, we present a direct measurement of the total decay width of the W boson ΓW. The width is determined from the transverse mass spectrum in the W-->e+νe decay channel and found to be ΓW=2.23+0.15- 0.14(stat)+/-0.10(syst) GeV, consistent with the expectation from the standard model.

  5. Width effects in transonic flow over a rectangular cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; ...

    2015-07-24

    A previous experiment by the present authors studied the flow over a finite-width rectangular cavity at freestream Mach numbers 1.5–2.5. In addition, this investigation considered the influence of three-dimensional geometry that is not replicated by simplified cavities that extend across the entire wind-tunnel test section. The latter configurations have the attraction of easy optical access into the depths of the cavity, but they do not reproduce effects upon the turbulent structures and acoustic modes due to the length-to-width ratio, which is becoming recognized as an important parameter describing the nature of the flow within narrower cavities.

  6. Characteristics of pulse width for an enhanced second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Hyodo, Masaharu; Okada-Shudo, Yoshiko; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zhu, Yong; Wang, Guiling; Chen, Chuangtian; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2017-03-01

    Temporal characteristics of a cavity enhancement second harmonic (SH) generation for picosecond laser pulse are investigated. We experimentally measured pulse width changes that were indued by group velocity mismatching (GVM), SH process, and enhancement cavity. It indicates that the generated pulse width is a combined effect of the GVM and SH process. Meanwhile, the effect of the enhancement cavity can be avoided by controlling its free spectrum range. A interferometric autocorrelator with a KBBF-PCD as nonlinear crystal is also composed and this extends the measurement light wavelength below 410 nm.

  7. Fjords in viscous fingering: selection of width and opening scale

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark; Ristroph, Leif; Thrasher, Matthew; Swinney, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Our experiments on viscous fingering of air into oil contained between closely spaced plates reveal two selection rules for the fjords of oil that separate fingers of air. (Fjords are the building blocks of solutions of the zero-surface-tension Laplacian growth equation.) Experiments in rectangular and circular geometries yield fjords with base widths {lambda}{sub c}/2, where {lambda}{sub c} is the most unstable wavelength from a linear stability analysis. Further, fjords open at an angle of 8.0{sup o}{+-}1.0{sup o}. These selection rules hold for a wide range of pumping rates and fjord lengths, widths, and directions.

  8. Automated width measurements of Martian dust devil tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statella, Thiago; Pina, Pedro; da Silva, Erivaldo Antônio

    2016-03-01

    Studying dust devils is important to better understand Mars climate and resurfacing phenomena. This paper presents an automated approach to calculate the width of tracks in orbital images. The method is based on Mathematical Morphology and was applied to a set of 200 HiRISE and MOC images of five Mars quadrangles, which were Aeolis, Argyre, Noachis, Hellas and Eridania. Information obtained by our method was compared with results of manual analysis performed by other authors. In addition, we show that track widths do not follow a normal distribution.

  9. Y-12 Alpha Calutron

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-23

    The Alpha Calutron video shows the world's only Alpha Calutron magnets located in Building 9731 at the Y-12 National Security Complex, the first building completed on the site early in 1943. The calutrons were used to separate the first isotopes other than uranium.

  10. ALPHA CONTAMINATION MONITORING

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This project was conducted to determine the alpha hazard existing in the vicinity of the missile launch pad following the destruction of a missile ...were used for plutonium particle collection. Because all warhead-carrying missiles were properly launched after Project 2.3 was approved, no alpha contamination data was obtained.

  11. Sample size determination for multiple comparison studies treating confidence interval width as random.

    PubMed

    Pan, Z; Kupper, L L

    1999-06-30

    Methods for optimal sample size determination are developed using four popular multiple comparison procedures (Scheffe's, Bonferroni's, Tukey's and Dunnett's procedures), where random samples of the same size n are to be selected from k (>/=2) normal populations with common variance sigma2, and where primary interest concerns inferences about a family of L linear contrasts among the k population means. For a simultaneous coverage probability of (1-alpha), the optimal sample size is defined to be the smallest integer value n*m such that, simultaneously for all L confidence intervals, the width of the lth confidence interval will be no greater than tolerance 2deltal (l=1,2,...,L) with tolerance probability at least (1-gamma), treating the pooled sample variance S2p as a random variable. Using Scheffe's procedure as an illustration, comparisons are made to usual sample size methods that incorrectly ignore the stochastic nature of S2p. The latter approach can lead to serious underestimation of required sample sizes and hence to unacceptably low values of the actually tolerance probability (1-gamma'). Our approach guarantees a lower bound of [1-(alpha+gamma)] for the probability that the L confidence intervals will both cover the parametric functions of interest and also be sufficiently narrow. Recommendations are provided regarding the choices among the four multiple comparison procedures for sample size determination and inference-making. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Richard D.; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  13. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  14. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  15. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  16. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  17. The implications of grading on the emission line width of core–shell nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, Chinmay; Sonawane, Kiran G.; Sudarsan, V.; Mahamuni, Shailaja

    2017-04-01

    An excitonic coupling with phonons leads to broadening of the emission line. The narrow excitonic emission line width observed in CdZnS/ZnS alloy core graded shell nanocrystals (NCs) with varying compositions is studied using temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements. Contrary to the consensus that a narrow emission line width is observable with a reduction in size (due to the increased exciton–acoustic phonon coupling coefficient σ), an increased value is noted with reduced size. Based on a theoretical approach to graded core–shell NCs, the relationship between the electron–hole wave function overlap and exciton lifetime is invoked to understand this anomaly. Smaller alloy core–shell NCs (CdZnS/ZnS-I) have a longer lifetime than larger NCs (CdZnS/ZnS-II), indicating reduced electron–hole wave function overlap for CdZnS/ZnS-I NCs and hence a larger ‘effective size’ of NCs, even though the actual size is smaller. The experimental findings demonstrate that graded core–shell NCs reveal an additional functionality, facilitating control of the emission line width of NCs via minimal interaction with the solid state environment.

  18. An H-alpha velocity study of S252

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, W. F.; Gary, G. A.; Odell, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The H II region S252 (NGC 2175) was studied by means of H-alpha radial velocities and line widths. The velocity structure appears to be dominated by the western ionization front, abutting a dense neutral cloud which is a CO source, and by symmetry abut the ionizing star. This data, together with other studies of CO, H167-alpha, and the H II radio continuum, allow construction of a model of S252. The H II model is basically a double blister formed by a luminous hot star being located between two orthogonal, elongated neutral clouds.

  19. The H-alpha/H-beta ratio in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Liggett, M.; Patterson, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation involves the study of an extensive body of data accumulated of simultaneous H-alpha and H-beta cinematography of flares. The data were obtained with two telescopes simultaneously photographing flares in H-alpha and H-beta. The results of measurements in a number of flares are presented in a table. The flares were selected purely by optical quality of the data. That the measured ratios are not too different from those in stellar flares is suggested by the last two columns of the table. These columns show that a variety of possible line width ratios could give an integrated intensity ratio of less than unity.

  20. An H-alpha velocity study of S252

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, W. F.; Gary, G. A.; Odell, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The H II region S252 (NGC 2175) was studied by means of H-alpha radial velocities and line widths. The velocity structure appears to be dominated by the western ionization front, abutting a dense neutral cloud which is a CO source, and by symmetry abut the ionizing star. This data, together with other studies of CO, H167-alpha, and the H II radio continuum, allow construction of a model of S252. The H II model is basically a double blister formed by a luminous hot star being located between two orthogonal, elongated neutral clouds.

  1. Late reperfusion of a totally occluded infarct-related artery increases granulocyte-colony stimulation factor and reduces stroma-derived factor-1alpha blood levels in patients with ongoing ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Tang; Chen, Shih-Jen; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Yang, Ning-I; Lee, Chen-Chin; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Verma, Subodh; Wang, Chao-Hung

    2009-07-01

    After acute myocardial infarction (AMI), reopening of a totally occluded infarct-related artery (IRA) at a subacute stage is still controversial in symptom-free patients. However, in patients with persistent ischemic symptoms and inadequate collaterals to the infarct area, recanalization is thought to provide beneficial effects. In addition to augmenting myocardial perfusion, we hypothesized that the benefit of recanalization involves the manipulation of circulating stem cell-mobilizing cytokines. This study included 30 patients with a totally occluded IRA and ongoing ischemic symptoms (the study group) and 30 patients with a partially occluded IRA (the control group). All patients underwent successful angioplasty and/or stenting. Before and immediately after the coronary intervention, blood granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), stem-cell factor (SCF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and stroma-derived factor-1 (SDF-1alpha) were measured. After recanalization, G-CSF levels significantly increased in the study group compared to the control group (P=0.03). SDF-1alpha levels in the study group decreased relative to the controls (P=0.02). However, no significant changes in VEGF or SCF levels between the two groups were found. In the multivariate analysis, reopening of a totally occluded IRA was independently and significantly associated with changes in G-CSF and SDF-1alpha levels after recanalization. In conclusion, our data suggest that the benefits of late reperfusion of a totally occluded IRA in patients with ongoing myocardial ischemia may involve mechanisms associated with stem cell-mobilizing and plaque-stabilizing cytokines. This study provides the rationale to investigate serial changes in cytokines and the numbers of circulating progenitors after reperfusion in the future.

  2. Reexamination of the {alpha}-{alpha}''fishbone'' potential

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J. P.; McEwen, J. E.; Elhanafy, M.; Smith, E.; Woodhouse, R.; Papp, Z.

    2011-09-15

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the {alpha}-{alpha} fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-{alpha} resonance energies, experimental phase shifts, and three-{alpha} binding energies. We found that, essentially, a simple Gaussian can provide a good description of two-{alpha} and three-{alpha} experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  3. All-electronic line width reduction in a semiconductor diode laser using a crystalline microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rury, Aaron S.; Mansour, Kamjou; Yu, Nan

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the capability to significantly suppress the frequency noise of a semiconductor distributed feedback diode laser using a universally applicable approach: a combination of a high-Q crystalline whispering gallery mode microresonator reference and the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme using an all-electronic servo loop. An out-of-loop delayed self-heterodyne measurement system demonstrates the ability of this approach to reduce a test laser's absolute line width by nearly a factor of 100. In addition, in-loop characterization of the laser stabilized using this method demonstrates a 1-kHz residual line width with reference to the resonator frequency. Based on these results, we propose that utilization of an all-electronic loop combined with the use of the wide transparency window of crystalline materials enable this approach to be readily applicable to diode lasers emitting in other regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, especially in the UV and mid-IR.

  4. Low Loss, Finite Width Ground Plane, Thin Film Microstrip Lines on Si Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Margomenos, Alexandros; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1999-01-01

    Si RFICs on standard, 2 Omega-cm. Si wafers require novel transmission lines to reduce the loss caused by the resistive substrate. One such transmission line is commonly called Thin Film Microstrip (TFMS), which is created by depositing a metallic ground plane, thin insulating layers, and the microstrip lines on the Si wafer. Thus, the electric fields are isolated from the Si wafer. In this paper, it is shown through experimental results that the ground plane of TFMS may be finite width and comparable to the strip width in size while still achieving low loss on 2 Omega-cm Si. Measured effective permittivity shows that the field interaction with the Si wafer is small.

  5. Width of the {phi} meson in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Polyanskiy, A. Yu.; Hartmann, M.; Kiselev, Yu. T.; Paryev, E. Ya.; Buescher, M.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S. N.; Dzyuba, A. A.; Gebel, R.; Hejny, V.; Kaempfer, B.; Keshelashvili, I.; Koptev, V. P.; Lorentz, B.; Maeda, Y.; Merzliakov, S. I.; and others

    2012-01-15

    The ratios of the cross sections for {phi}-meson production induced by 2.83-GeV protons on Cu, Ag, and Au nuclei to the respective cross section for C nuclei were measured at the ANKE-COSY facility in the momentum range of 0.6-1.6 GeV/c and the angular range of 0 Degree-Sign -8 Degree-Sign . The product {phi} mesons were identified by their decay {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The procedure used to separate kaon pairs was described in detail, and all sources of the background and their contribution to the resulting error in the values found for the above cross-section ratios were analyzed. The A dependence of the cross section for {phi}-meson production was shown to obey the A{sup 0.56{+-}0.03} law. The total width of the {phi} meson at a normal nuclear density was extracted from a comparison of the measured cross-section ratios with the results of calculations based on two theoretical models. The resulting width value exceeds substantially both the vacuum width and the width expected in the absence of the nuclear-matter effect on the properties of the {phi} meson.

  6. Analyzing bin-width effect on the computed entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwani, Sri; Nahar, Julita; Twining, Carole

    2017-08-01

    The Shannon entropy is a mathematical expression for quantifying the amount of randomness which can be used to measure information content. It is used in objective function. Mutual Information (MI) uses Shannon entropy in order to determine shared information content of two images. The Shannon entropy, which was originally derived by Shannon in the context of lossless encoding of messages, is also used to define an optimum message length used in the Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle for groupwise registration. Majority of papers used histogram for computing MI, and hence the entropy. We therefore, aim to analyze the effect of bin-width on the computed entropy. We first derived the Shannon entropy from the integral of probability density function (pdf), and found that Gaussian has maximum entropy over all possible distribution. We also show that the entropy of the flat distribution is less than the entropy of the Gaussian distribution with the same variance. We then investigated the bin-width effect on the computed entropy, and analyzed the relationship between the computed entropy and the integral entropy when we vary bin-width, but fix variance and the number of samples. We then found that the value of the computed entropy lies within the theoretical predictions at small and large bin-widths. We also show two types of bias in entropy estimator.

  7. An Improved determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

    2012-01-01

    We present an improved determination of the total width of the top quark, {Lambda}{sub t}, using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The total width {Lambda}{sub t} is extracted from the partial decay width {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) and the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Wb). {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) is obtained from the t-channel single top quark production cross section and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb) is measured in t{bar t} events. For a top mass of 172.5 GeV, the resulting width is {Lambda}{sub t} = 2.00{sub -0.43}{sup +0.47} GeV. This translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.29{sub -0.63}{sup +0.90}) x 10{sup -25} s. We also extract an improved direct limit on the CKM matrix element 0.81 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L. and a limit of |V{sub tb'}| < 0.59 for a high mass fourth generation bottom quark assuming unitarity of the fourth generation quark mixing matrix.

  8. Width adjustment: relative dominance in unstable alluvial streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the relative dominance of width adjustment in unstable streams are described. Specifically, the role of the following factors affecting the fluvial environment were investigated: vertical processes and fluvial action, bed-material particle, cohesive strength of bank material, and riparian vegetation.

  9. 13. DETAIL: A CLOSEUP VIEW OF TWO UNEQUAL WIDTH CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL: A CLOSE-UP VIEW OF TWO UNEQUAL WIDTH CONCRETE BRACKETS AND THE LARGE CAST ANCONE WHICH SUPPORTS A QUIRK IN THE CONCRETE BALUSTRADE. - Delphi Bridge on U.S. Route 421, Spanning Deer Creek at U.S. Route 421, Delphi, Carroll County, IN

  10. Detonation cell widths in hydrogen-air-diluent mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Stamps, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper I report on the influence of steam and carbon dioxide on the detonability of hydrogen-air mixtures. Data were obtained on the detonation cell width in a heated detonation tube that is 0.43 m in diameter and 13.1 m long. The detonation cell widths were correlated using a characteristic length calculated from a chemical kinetic model. The addition of either diluent to a hydrogen-air mixture increased the cell width for all equivalence ratios. For equal diluent concentrations, however, carbon dioxide not only yielded larger increases in the cell width than steam, but its efficacy relative to steam was predicted to increase with increasing concentration. The range of detonable hydrogen concentrations in a hydrogen-air mixture initially at 1 atm pressure was found to be between 11.6 percent and 74.9 percent for mixtures at 20{degree}C and 9.4 percent and 76.9 percent for mixtures at 100{degree}C. The detonation limit was between 38.8 percent and 40.5 percent steam for a stoichiometric hydrogen-air-steam mixture initially at 100{degree}C and 1 atm. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The Height + Width Rule in Children's Judgments of Quantity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Norman H.; Cuneo, Diane O.

    1978-01-01

    In eight experiments, judgments of rectangle area by five-year-olds followed a reliable adding rule: height + width. In collateral work, the children judged the amount of liquid in a glass by a height-only rule. Implications for the Piagetian theories of centration and compensation are drawn. (SJL)

  12. An Empirical Expression for the Line Widths of Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Linda R.; Peterson, Dean B.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogen-broadened line widths of 116 (sup 14)NH(sub 3) ground state transitions have been measured at 0.006 cm(sup -1) resolution using a Bruker spectrometer in the 24 to 210 cm(sup -1) region. The rotational variation of the experimental widths with J(sup '),K(sup ') = 1,0 to 10,10 has been reproduced to 2.4 % using an heuristically derived expression of the form

    gamma = a(sub 0) + a(sub 1) J(sup ') + a (sub 2) K(sup ') + a(sub 3) J(sup ')(sup 2) + a(sub 4) J(sup ') K(sup ')

    where J(sup ') and K(sup ') are the lower state symmetric top quantum numbers. This function has also been applied to the measured widths of the 58 transitions of nu(sub 1) at 3 (micro)m, each broadened by N(sub 2), O(sub 2), Ar, H(sub 2), and He. The rms of the observed minus calculated widths are 5% or better for the five foreign broadeners. The values of the fitted constants suggest that for some broadeners the expression might also be written as

    gamma = a(sub 0) + b(sub 1) J(sup ') + b(sub 2)(J(sup ' )- K(sup ')) + b(sub 3) J(sup ')(J(sup ') - K(sup '))

    .

  13. Influence of terrace widths on Au(111) reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauraud, D.; Durinck, J.; Drouet, M.; Vernisse, L.; Bonneville, J.; Coupeau, C.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of steps on the herringbone pattern appearing at the Au (111 ) surface is explored. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigations show that the number of alternating fcc and hcp regions decreases with the decreasing width of the terrace, in fair agreement with atomistic simulations. It is demonstrated that the steps locally release the tensile surface stresses, leading to a reorganization of the herringbone pattern.

  14. Backscattering patterns of step index optical fibers: angular width.

    PubMed

    Ho, P S; Marhic, M E; Epstein, M

    1975-11-01

    Angular widths of laser backscattering patterns from optical fibers with thin claddings due to rays reflected by core-cladding interface are investigated. Calculated and measured values are presented and found to be in good agreement. A summary of different backscattering patterns from clad fibers is given.

  15. Improved determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Graf C. P.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; La Cruz I. Heredia-De; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-05-04

    We present an improved determination of the total width of the top quark, {Gamma}{sub t}, using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The total width {Gamma}{sub t} is extracted from the partial decay width {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) and the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Wb). {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) is obtained from the t-channel single top-quark production cross section and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb) is measured in t{bar t} events. For a top mass of 172.5 GeV, the resulting width is {Gamma}{sub t} = 2.00{sub -0.43}{sup +0.47} GeV. This translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.29{sub -0.63}{sup +0.90}) x 10{sup -25} s. We also extract an improved direct limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix element 0.81 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L. and a limit of |V{sub tb}| < 0.59 for a high-mass fourth-generation bottom quark assuming unitarity of the fourth-generation quark-mixing matrix.

  16. An Empirical Expression for the Line Widths of Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Linda R.; Peterson, Dean B.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogen-broadened line widths of 116 (sup 14)NH(sub 3) ground state transitions have been measured at 0.006 cm(sup -1) resolution using a Bruker spectrometer in the 24 to 210 cm(sup -1) region. The rotational variation of the experimental widths with J(sup '),K(sup ') = 1,0 to 10,10 has been reproduced to 2.4 % using an heuristically derived expression of the form

    gamma = a(sub 0) + a(sub 1) J(sup ') + a (sub 2) K(sup ') + a(sub 3) J(sup ')(sup 2) + a(sub 4) J(sup ') K(sup ')

    where J(sup ') and K(sup ') are the lower state symmetric top quantum numbers. This function has also been applied to the measured widths of the 58 transitions of nu(sub 1) at 3 (micro)m, each broadened by N(sub 2), O(sub 2), Ar, H(sub 2), and He. The rms of the observed minus calculated widths are 5% or better for the five foreign broadeners. The values of the fitted constants suggest that for some broadeners the expression might also be written as

    gamma = a(sub 0) + b(sub 1) J(sup ') + b(sub 2)(J(sup ' )- K(sup ')) + b(sub 3) J(sup ')(J(sup ') - K(sup '))

    .

  17. Shifts and widths of Feshbach resonances in atomic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor; Melezhik, Vladimir S.; Schmelcher, Peter

    2012-12-01

    We develop and analyze a theoretical model which yields the shifts and widths of Feshbach resonances in an atomic waveguide. It is based on a multichannel approach for confinement-induced resonances (CIRs) and atomic transitions in the waveguides in the multimode regime. In this scheme we replace the single-channel scalar interatomic interaction by the four-channel tensorial potential modeling resonances of broad, narrow, and overlapping character according to the two-channel parametrization of Lange [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.79.013622 79, 013622 (2009)]. As an input the experimentally known parameters of Feshbach resonances in the absence of the waveguide are used. We calculate the shifts and widths of s-, d-, and g-wave magnetic Feshbach resonances of Cs atoms emerging in harmonic waveguides as CIRs and resonant enhancement of the transmission at zeros of the free space scattering length. We have found the linear dependence of the width of the resonance on the longitudinal atomic momentum and quadratic dependence on the waveguide width. Our model opens possibilities for quantitative studies of the scattering processes in ultracold atomic gases in waveguides beyond the framework of s-wave resonant scattering.

  18. A local basal area adjustment for crown width prediction

    Treesearch

    Don C. Bragg

    2001-01-01

    Nonlinear crown width regressive equations were developed for 24 species common to the upper Lake States of Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Of the species surveyed, 15 produced statistically significant (P 0.05) local basal area effect coefficients showing a reduction in crown...

  19. Evaluation of a Simple Theoretical Expression for Hadley Cell Width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, K.; Garrett, T. J.; Reichler, T.; Staten, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    The latitudinal width of Earth's Hadley cell has a simple expression that is a function of the planetary radius, and the atmosphere's angular velocity, stability, and depth: the cell width varies as the square root of the Brunt-Vaisala frequency and the tropospheric depth such that a deep, stable atmosphere extends further poleward. There are multiple avenues to this expression based on either the dynamics (Schneider (1977); Held (2000)) or the statistical mechanics (Garrett et al (2016)) of the cell. Here, we contrast these approaches and test the expression for application to other planetary bodies within the solar system. In general, we find the expression accounts for the wide range of cell widths, ranging from very narrow (Jupiter) to very wide (Titan). However, there is a choice of atmospheric depth to be considered in the calculation, and we find that the effective depth that leads to best agreement with observed cell widths is closest to the tropospheric density scale height rather than the depth of the troposphere itself, as has commonly been assumed. There remain significant discrepancies that require explanation, however. For example, the effective depth for Earth is 11.3 km rather than 8.5 km and Uranus has an effective depth of 20 km compared to its tropospheric scale height of 27.7 km. We discuss possible explanations for these differences.

  20. 14 CFR 29.815 - Main aisle width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main aisle width. 29.815 Section 29.815 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations §...

  1. THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE OF DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-05-20

    Using a sample of 100 H I-selected damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) systems, observed with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on the Keck I telescope, we present evidence that the scatter in the well-studied correlation between the redshift and metallicity of a DLA is largely due to the existence of a mass-metallicity relationship at each redshift. To describe the fundamental relations that exist between redshift, metallicity, and mass, we use a fundamental plane description, which is described by the following equation: [M/H] = (- 1.9 {+-} 0.5) + (0.74 {+-} 0.21) {center_dot} log {Delta}v{sub 90} - (0.32 {+-} 0.06) {center_dot} z. Here, we assert that the velocity width, {Delta}v{sub 90}, which is defined as the velocity interval containing 90% of the integrated optical depth, traces the mass of the underlying dark matter halo. This description provides two significant improvements over the individual descriptions of the mass-metallicity correlation and metallicity-redshift correlation. Firstly, the fundamental equation reduces the scatter around both relationships by about 20%, providing a more stringent constraint on numerical simulations modeling DLAs. Secondly, it confirms that the dark matter halos that host DLAs satisfy a mass-metallicity relationship at each redshift between redshifts 2 through 5.

  2. Depth of field affects perceived depth-width ratios in photographs of natural scenes.

    PubMed

    Nefs, Harold T

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to find out how much influence depth of field has on the perceived ratio of depth and width in photographs of natural scenes. Depth of field is roughly defined as the distance range that is perceived as sharp in the photograph. Four different semi-natural scenes consisting of a central and two flanking figurines were used. For each scene, five series of photos were made, in which the distance in depth between the central figurine and the flanking figurines increased. These series of photographs had different amounts of depth of field. In the first experiment participants adjusted the position of the two flanking figurines relative to a central figurine, until the perceived distance in the depth dimension equaled the perceived lateral distance between the two flanking figurines. Viewing condition was either monocular or binocular (non-stereo). In the second experiment, the participants did the same task but this time we varied the viewing distance. We found that the participants' depth/width settings increased with increasing depth of field. As depth of field increased, the perceived depth in the scene was reduced relative to the perceived width. Perceived depth was reduced relative to perceived width under binocular viewing conditions compared to monocular viewing conditions. There was a greater reduction when the viewing distance was increased. As photographs of natural scenes contain many highly redundant or conflicting depth cues, we conclude therefore that local image blur is an important cue to depth. Moreover, local image blur is not only taken into account in the perception of egocentric distances, but also affects the perception of depth within the scene relative to lateral distances within the scene.

  3. The effects of stance width and foot posture on lumbar muscle flexion-relaxation phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Hu, Boyi; Shan, Xinhai; Zhou, Jie; Ning, Xiaopeng

    2014-03-01

    Characterizing the lumbar muscle flexion-relaxation phenomenon is a clinically relevant approach in understanding the neuromuscular alternations of low back pain patients. Previous studies have indicated that changes in stance posture could directly influence trunk kinematics and potentially change the lumbar tissue synergy. In this study, the effects of stance width and foot posture on the lumbar muscle relaxation responses during trunk flexion were investigated. Thirteen volunteers performed trunk flexion using three different stance widths and 'toe-forward' or 'toe-out' foot postures (six conditions in total). Lumbar muscle electromyography was collected from the L3 and L4 level paraspinals; meanwhile three magnetic motion sensors were placed over the S1, T12, and C7 vertebrae to track lumbar and trunk kinematics. The lumbar angle at which muscle activity diminished to a near resting level was recorded. At the systemic level, the boundary where the internal moment started to shift from active to passive tissues was identified. For the L3 paraspinals, the flexion relaxation lumbar angle reduced 1.3° with the increase of stance width. When changed from 'toe-forward' to 'toe-out' foot posture, the flexion relaxation lumbar angle reduced 1.4° and 1.1° for the L3 and L4 paraspinals respectively. However, the active and passive lumbar tissue load shifting boundary was not affected. Findings of this study suggest that changes in stance width and foot posture altered the lumbar tissue load sharing mechanism. Therefore, in a clinical setting, it is critical to maintain consistent stance postures when examining the characteristics of lumbar tissue synergy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = Aν{sup μ} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, η = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have η < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ≤η ≤ 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have η > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  5. Lithologic controls on valley width and strath terrace formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Sarah A.; Montgomery, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Valley width and the degree of bedrock river terrace development vary with lithology in the Willapa and Nehalem river basins, Pacific Northwest, USA. Here, we present field-based evidence for the mechanisms by which lithology controls floodplain width and bedrock terrace formation in erosion-resistant and easily friable lithologies. We mapped valley surfaces in both basins, dated straths using radiocarbon, compared valley width versus drainage area for basalt and sedimentary bedrock valleys, and constructed slope-area plots. In the friable sedimentary bedrock, valleys are 2 to 3 times wider, host flights of strath terraces, and have concavity values near 1; whereas the erosion-resistant basalt bedrock forms narrow valleys with poorly developed, localized, or no bedrock terraces and a channel steepness index half that of the friable bedrock and an average channel concavity of about 0.5. The oldest dated strath terrace on the Willapa River, T2, was active for nearly 10,000 years, from 11,265 to 2862 calibrated years before present (cal YBP), whereas the youngest terrace, T1, is Anthropocene in age and recently abandoned. Incision rates derived from terrace ages average 0.32 mm y- 1 for T2 and 11.47 mm y- 1 for T1. Our results indicate bedrock weathering properties influence valley width through the creation of a dense fracture network in the friable bedrock that results in high rates of lateral erosion of exposed bedrock banks. Conversely, the erosion-resistant bedrock has concavity values more typical of detachment-limited streams, exhibits a sparse fracture network, and displays evidence for infrequent episodic block erosion and plucking. Lithology thereby plays a direct role on the rates of lateral erosion, influencing valley width and the potential for strath terrace planation and preservation.

  6. Utilizing a constant peak width transform for isothermal gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Jeremy S; Wilson, Ryan B; Fitz, Brian D; Reed, Jason T; Synovec, Robert E

    2011-06-10

    A computational approach to partially address the general elution problem (GEP), and better visualize, isothermal gas chromatograms is reported. The theoretical computational approach is developed and applied experimentally. We report a high speed temporally increasing boxcar summation (TIBS) transform that, when applied to the raw isothermal GC data, converts the chromatographic data from the initial time domain (in which the peak widths in isothermal GC increase as a function of their retention factors, k), to a data point based domain in which all peaks have the same peak width in terms of number of points in the final data vector, which aides in preprocessing and data analysis, while minimizing data storage size. By applying the TIBS transform, the resulting GC chromatogram (initially collected isothermally), appears with an x-axis point scale as if it were instrumentally collected using a suitable temperature program. A high speed GC isothermal separation with a test mixture containing 10 compounds had a run time of ∼25 s. The peak at a retention factor k ∼0.7 had a peak width of ∼55 ms, while the last eluting peak at k ∼89 (i.e., retention time of ∼22 s) had a peak width of ∼2000 ms. Application of the TIBS transform increased the peak height of the last eluting peak 45-fold, and S/N ∼20-fold. All peaks in the transformed test mixture chromatogram had the width of an unretained peak, in terms of number of data points. A simulated chromatogram at unit resolution, studied using the TIBS transform, provided additional insight into the benefits of the algorithm.

  7. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  8. The muscle-specific laminin receptor alpha7 beta1 integrin negatively regulates alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, D; Echtermayer, F; Schöber, S; Balzac, F; Retta, S F; Silengo, L; Tarone, G

    1999-02-01

    alpha7 beta1 is the major integrin complex expressed in differentiated muscle cells where it functions as a laminin receptor. In this work we have expressed the alpha7 integrin subunit in CHO cells to investigate the functional properties of this receptor. After transfection with alpha7 CHO cells acquired the ability to adhere and spread on laminin 1 consistent with the laminin receptor activity of the alpha7 beta1. alpha7 transfectants, however, showed a 70% reduction in the ability to adhere to fibronectin and were unable to assemble a fibronectin matrix. The degree of reduction was inversely related to the level of alpha7 expression. To define the mechanisms underlying this adhesive defect we analyzed surface expression and functional properties of the alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor. Although cell surface expression of alpha5 beta1 was reduced by a factor of 20-25% in alpha7 transfectants compared to control untransfected cells, this slight reduction was not sufficient to explain the dramatic reduction in cell adhesion (70%) and matrix assembly (close to 100%). Binding studies showed that the affinity of 125I-fibronectin for its surface receptor was decreased by 50% in alpha7 transfectants, indicating that the alpha5 beta1 integrin is partially inactivated in these cells. Inactivation can be reversed by Mn2+, a cation known to increase integrin affinity for their ligands. In fact, incubation of cells with Mn2+ restored fibronectin binding affinity, adhesion to fibronectin, and assembly of fibronectin matrix in alpha7 transfectants. These data indicate that alpha7 expression leads to the functional down regulation of alpha5beta1 integrin by decreasing ligand binding affinity and surface expression. In conclusion, the data reported establish the existence of a negative cooperativity between alpha7 and alpha5 integrins that may be important in determining functional regulation of integrins during myogenic differentiation.

  9. Functional roles of the alpha isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Lingrel, Jerry; Moseley, Amy; Dostanic, Iva; Cougnon, Marc; He, Suiwen; James, Paul; Woo, Alison; O'Connor, Kyle; Neumann, Jonathan

    2003-04-01

    The Na,K-ATPase is composed of two subunits, alpha and beta, and each subunit consists of multiple isoforms. In the case of alpha, four isoforms, alpha1, alpha2, alpha3, and alpha4 are present in mammalian cells. The distribution of these isoforms is tissue- and developmental-specific, suggesting that they may play specific roles, either during development or coupled to specific physiological processes. In order to understand the functional properties of each of these isoforms, we are using gene targeting, where animals are produced lacking either one copy or both copies of the corresponding gene or have a modified gene. To date, we have produced animals lacking the alpha1 and alpha2 isoform genes. Animals lacking both copies of the alpha1 isoform gene are not viable, while animals lacking both copies of the alpha2 isoform gene make it to birth, but are either born dead or die very soon after. In the case of animals lacking one copy of the alpha1 or alpha2 isoform gene, the animals survive and appear healthy. Heart and EDL muscle from animals lacking one copy of the alpha2 isoform exhibit an increase in force of contraction, while there is reduced force of contraction in both muscles from animals lacking one copy of the alpha1 isoform gene. These studies indicate that the alpha1 and alpha2 isoforms carry out different physiological roles. The alpha2 isoform appears to be involved in regulating Ca(2+) transients involved in muscle contraction, while the alpha1 isoform probably plays a more generalized role. While we have not yet knocked out the alpha3 or alpha4 isoform genes, studies to date indicate that the alpha4 isoform is necessary to maintain sperm motility. It is thus possible that the alpha2, alpha3, and alpha4 isoforms are involved in specialized functions of various tissues, helping to explain their tissue- and developmental-specific regulation.

  10. Ultraviolet-mediated antimycotic activity of alpha-terthienyl on Microsporum cookei.

    PubMed

    Mares, D; Fasulo, M P; Bruni, A

    1990-01-01

    Alpha-terthienyl (alpha-T) in the presence of UV-A irradiation reduced the growth rate of Microsporum cookei. In the dark, alpha-T accumulated in small diffuse vacuoles within the hyphae. After UV-A treatment, alpha-T caused damage to the membranes of the nucleus, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Plasmolytic and autolytic changes occurred resulting in plasma membrane breakage and cell wall aberrations. UV-A activated alpha-T would appear to target membrane proteins.

  11. Alpha-actinin-4 is required for normal podocyte adhesion.

    PubMed

    Dandapani, Savita V; Sugimoto, Hikaru; Matthews, Benjamin D; Kolb, Robert J; Sinha, Sumita; Gerszten, Robert E; Zhou, Jing; Ingber, Donald E; Kalluri, Raghu; Pollak, Martin R

    2007-01-05

    Mutations in the alpha-actinin-4 gene ACTN4 cause an autosomal dominant human kidney disease. Mice deficient in alpha-actinin-4 develop a recessive phenotype characterized by kidney failure, proteinuria, glomerulosclerosis, and retraction of glomerular podocyte foot processes. However, the mechanism by which alpha-actinin-4 deficiency leads to glomerular disease has not been defined. Here, we examined the effect of alpha-actinin-4 deficiency on the adhesive properties of podocytes in vivo and in a cell culture system. In alpha-actinin-4-deficient mice, we observed a decrease in the number of podocytes per glomerulus compared with wild-type mice as well as the presence of podocyte markers in the urine. Podocyte cell lines generated from alpha-actinin-4-deficient mice were less adherent than wild-type cells to glomerular basement membrane (GBM) components collagen IV and laminin 10 and 11. We also observed markedly reduced adhesion of alpha-actinin-4-deficient podocytes under increasing shear stresses. This adhesion deficit was restored by transfecting cells with alpha-actinin-4-GFP. We tested the strength of the integrin receptor-mediated linkages to the cytoskeleton by applying force to microbeads bound to integrin using magnetic pulling cytometry. Beads bound to alpha-actinin-4-deficient podocytes showed greater displacement in response to an applied force than those bound to wild-type cells. Consistent with integrin-dependent alpha-actinin-4-mediated adhesion, phosphorylation of beta1-integrins on alpha-actinin-4-deficient podocytes is reduced. We rescued the phosphorylation deficit by transfecting alpha-actinin-4 into alpha-actinin-4-deficient podocytes. These results suggest that alpha-actinin-4 interacts with integrins and strengthens the podocyte-GBM interaction thereby stabilizing glomerular architecture and preventing disease.

  12. Modulating alpha-actinin-4 dynamics in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jean-Louis R; Hosseini-Abardeh, Mona; Farah, Kevin; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2009-03-01

    Podocytes are epithelial cells that line the outer aspect of renal blood vessels and provide a platform for the kidney's filtering apparatus, the slit diaphragm. Mutations in alpha-actinin-4, an actin bundling protein highly expressed in podocytes, result in increased affinity for actin and cause a familial form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. We hypothesized that such gain-of-affinity mutations would override alpha-actinin-4's sensitivity to regulatory factors such as calcium (acting via two EF-hand motifs), and phosphoinositides. We generated calcium- (mutEF) and phosphoinositide- (mutPI) insensitive variants of alpha-actinin-4, comparing their properties to a disease-associated mutant (K256E) and to the wildtype (wt) protein. alpha-Actinin-4(mutPI) displayed increased affinity for actin, while the affinity of alpha-actinin-4(mutEF) was unchanged. Addition of calcium to actin sedimentation assays caused a decrease in the association of alpha-actinin-4(wt) with filamentous actin, while phosphoinositides generally increased this association. Similar to alpha-actinin-4(K256E), alpha-actinin-4(mutPI) was mislocalized in cultured podocytes, being preferentially associated with filamentous actin and focal adhesions. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed a rapid turnover of alpha-actinin-4(wt) and alpha-actinin-4(mutEF) along stress fibers and focal adhesions, while the turnover of alpha-actinin-4(K256E) and alpha-actinin-4(mutPI) was dramatically reduced at these subcellular locales. Equibiaxial mechanical stimulation of podocytes, a mimic of intraglomerular forces, reduced podocyte surface area by 50%; this decrease was more severe (70%) in the presence of high-affinity mutants of alpha-actinin-4. These data suggest that dynamic regulation of alpha-actinin-4/actin interactions may be necessary for maintaining podocyte structure in response to glomerular hydrostatic forces.

  13. Evolution of valleys width : A Mars-Earth comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochat, Stéphane; Loget, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The analyses of the valleys on Mars are used to reconstruct the climate on Early Mars (~ 3.5 Gy). Thus, many studies indicate a strong analogy between earth and mars networks (dendritic organization, drainage density Strahler ordering) which is compatible with a widespread rain (today Mars is arid, cold and the water can only be vapor/snow). But, many features are too different with the Earth classic valleys networks to conclude definitively on the Early climate of Mars. Here, we study the evolution of the width of valleys with drainage area. This method lies on the relationship between the evolution of the channel width (W) versus the discharge of the river or the upstream drainage area (A) such as Wc= bA0.5 (e.g Leopold and Maddock, 1953; Montgomery and Gran, 2001). On Mars, one of the difficulties is to plot the width of the channel but recent studies on Mars and on Earth indicate that the valley bottom width Wv strictly follows the same evolution than the channel width (e.g. Mattheus and Rodriguez 2011, Phillips, 2011). Thereby, we analyzed 366 basins on Earth from 4.10-02 to 6.1006 km2 and 355 basins on Mars from 7.10-02 to 2.8.1006 km2. For Earth Wv= bA0.46 with 0.005< b< 0.047. For Mars Wv= bA0.27 with 0.046< b< 0.19. Martian valleys are ten times wider for small tributaries (< 100 km2) but ten times smaller for large tributaries >100.000 km2). Our observations are compatible with an inefficient system with strong supply of water, on small systems, which is less and less transmitted at the outlet, on large systems. The origins of this inefficiency will be discussed. Leopold, L. B. and T. Maddock (1953). The hydraulic geometry of stream channels and some physiographic implications. United States Geological Survey Professional Paper. Montgomery, D. R. and K. B. Gran (2001). "Downstream Variations in the Width of Bedrock Channels." Water Resour. Res. Jonathan D. Phillips (2011): Drainage area and incised valley fills in Texas rivers: A potential explanation

  14. Alpha One Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Languages French (Francais) German (Deutsch) Italian (Italiano) Spanish (Español) Portuguese (Portugues) Swedish (Svenska) Donate One Time Monthly Keep In Touch | About Us | Contact Us | What is the Alpha-1 ...

  15. alpha2-Adrenoreceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Imbert, T

    2001-06-01

    A review of the literature relating to the therapeutic potential of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists published between 1990 and 2000 is presented. Although extensively studied since the early 1970s in a wide spectrum of therapeutic applications, the distinction of alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes and some emerging evidence concerning new applications in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and schizophrenia, have refreshed an interest in this class of agents.

  16. Coaching the alpha male.

    PubMed

    Ludeman, Kate; Erlandson, Eddie

    2004-05-01

    Highly intelligent, confident, and successful, alpha males represent about 70% of all senior executives. Natural leaders, they willingly take on levels of responsibility most rational people would find overwhelming. But many of their quintessential strengths can also make alphas difficult to work with. Their self-confidence can appear domineering. Their high expectations can make them excessively critical. Their unemotional style can keep them from inspiring their teams. That's why alphas need coaching to broaden their interpersonal tool kits while preserving their strengths. Drawing from their experience coaching more than 1,000 senior executives, the authors outline an approach tailored specifically for the alpha. Coaches get the alpha's attention by inundating him with data from 360-degree feedback presented in ways he will find compelling--both hard-boiled metrics and vivid verbatim comments from colleagues about his strengths and weaknesses. A 360-degree assessment is a wake-up call for most alphas, providing undeniable proof that their behavior doesn't work nearly as well as they think it does. That paves the way for a genuine commitment to change. In order to change, the alpha must venture into unfamiliar--and often uncomfortable--psychological territory. He must admit vulnerability, accept accountability not just for his own work for others', connect with his underlying emotions, learn to motivate through a balance of criticism and validation, and become aware of unproductive behavior patterns. The goal of executive coaching is not simply to treat the alpha as an individual problem but to improve the entire team dynamic. Initial success creates an incentive to persevere, and the virtuous cycle reverberates throughout the entire organization.

  17. Theory based scaling of edge turbulence and implications for the scrape-off layer width

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; Zweben, S. J.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulence and plasma parameter data from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is examined and interpreted based on various theoretical estimates. In particular, quantities of interest for assessing the role of turbulent transport on the midplane scrape-off layer heat flux width are assessed. Because most turbulence quantities exhibit large scatter and little scaling within a given operation mode, this paper focuses on length and time scales and dimensionless parameters between operational modes including Ohmic, low (L), and high (H) modes using a large NSTX edge turbulence database. These are compared with theoretical estimates for drift and interchange rates, profile modification saturation levels, a resistive ballooning condition, and dimensionless parameters characterizing L and H mode conditions. It is argued that the underlying instability physics governing edge turbulence in different operational modes is, in fact, similar, and is consistent with curvature-driven drift ballooning. Saturation physics, however, is dependent on the operational mode. Five dimensionless parameters for drift-interchange turbulence are obtained and employed to assess the importance of turbulence in setting the scrape-off layer heat flux width λq and its scaling. An explicit proportionality of the width λq to the safety factor and major radius (qR) is obtained under these conditions. Lastly, quantitative estimates and reduced model numerical simulations suggest that the turbulence mechanism is not negligible in determining λq in NSTX, at least for high plasma current discharges.

  18. Theory based scaling of edge turbulence and implications for the scrape-off layer width

    DOE PAGES

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; Zweben, S. J.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulence and plasma parameter data from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is examined and interpreted based on various theoretical estimates. In particular, quantities of interest for assessing the role of turbulent transport on the midplane scrape-off layer heat flux width are assessed. Because most turbulence quantities exhibit large scatter and little scaling within a given operation mode, this paper focuses on length and time scales and dimensionless parameters between operational modes including Ohmic, low (L), and high (H) modes using a large NSTX edge turbulence database. These are compared with theoretical estimates for drift and interchange rates, profile modificationmore » saturation levels, a resistive ballooning condition, and dimensionless parameters characterizing L and H mode conditions. It is argued that the underlying instability physics governing edge turbulence in different operational modes is, in fact, similar, and is consistent with curvature-driven drift ballooning. Saturation physics, however, is dependent on the operational mode. Five dimensionless parameters for drift-interchange turbulence are obtained and employed to assess the importance of turbulence in setting the scrape-off layer heat flux width λq and its scaling. An explicit proportionality of the width λq to the safety factor and major radius (qR) is obtained under these conditions. Lastly, quantitative estimates and reduced model numerical simulations suggest that the turbulence mechanism is not negligible in determining λq in NSTX, at least for high plasma current discharges.« less

  19. Blob-Filament characteristics in XGC1 simulations and implications for the SOL width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keramidas Charidakos, Ioannis; Myra, James; Parker, Scott; Ku, Seung-Hoe; Chowdhury, Jugal; Churchill, Randy; Hager, Robert; Chang, Choong-Seock

    2016-10-01

    Blob-filament structures, formed due to plasma stratification, caused by strong turbulence near the separatrix, have been believed to be responsible for the convective transport at the SOL. Detachment of those coherent structures from the bulk can account for the intermittent nature of edge transport and their dynamics impact the heat flux width. The SOL width is a parameter of paramount importance in modern tokamaks as it controls the amount of power deposited at the divertor plates, directly affecting thus the viability of fusion. So far, studies of blobs have been confined to reduced fluid models and simplified geometries, leaving out important pieces of physics. Here, we analyze the results of simulations performed with the full-f, gyrokinetic code XGC1 which includes both turbulence and kinetic neoclassical effects in realistic divertor geometry. The blob contribution to the SOL width is estimated from examining the radial blob velocity and the parallel confinement time. We acknowledge computing resources on Titan at OLCF through the 2015 INCITE and the 2016 ALCC Awards. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  20. [alpha-Neurotoxins and alpha-conotoxins--nicotinic cholinoreceptor blockers].

    PubMed

    Utkin, Iu N; Kasheverov, I E; Tsetlin, V I

    1999-11-01

    The review is devoted to the competitive blockers of different nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, alpha-neurotoxins from snake venoms, and alpha-conotoxins from marine snails of the Conidae family. The relationship between the structure and function of these toxins is discussed. Recent data on the mechanism of alpha-neurotoxin and alpha-conotoxin interaction with the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor are presented.

  1. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink and fishbone modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; White, R.B. )

    1994-10-01

    The effects of alpha particles on the internal kink and fishbone modes are studied analytically. The nonadiabatic contribution from untrapped alpha particles is negligible. Finite inverse aspect ratio, plasma [beta], and plasma shaping effects can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in the pitch angle space and reduce the bounce-averaged magnetic drift frequency. The decrease of the drift magnitude and drift reversal effects on the ideal kink mode is small, but the [beta][sub [alpha

  2. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  3. Lattice QCD calculation of the {rho} meson decay width

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K-I.; Okawa, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Kuramashi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Kanaya, K.; Namekawa, Y.; Sasaki, K.

    2007-11-01

    We present a lattice QCD calculation of the {rho} meson decay width via the P-wave scattering phase shift for the I=1 two-pion system. Our calculation uses full QCD gauge configurations for N{sub f}=2 flavors generated using a renormalization group improved gauge action and an improved Wilson fermion action on a 12{sup 3}x24 lattice at m{sub {pi}}/m{sub {rho}}=0.41 and the lattice spacing 1/a=0.92 GeV. The phase shift calculated with the use of the finite size formula for the two-pion system in the moving frame shows a behavior consistent with the existence of a resonance at a mass close to the vector meson mass obtained in spectroscopy. The decay width estimated from the phase shift is consistent with the experiment, when the quark mass is scaled to the realistic value.

  4. Magnetohydrodynamic disc winds and line width distributions - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chajet, L. S.; Hall, P. B.

    2017-02-01

    We study AGN emission line profiles combining an improved version of the accretion disc-wind model of Murray & Chiang with the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of Emmering et al. Here, we extend our previous work to consider central objects with different masses and/or luminosities. We have compared the dispersions in our model C IV line-width distributions to observational upper limit on that dispersion, considering both smooth and clumpy torus models. Following Fine et al., we transform that scatter in the profile line-widths into a constraint on the torus geometry and show how the half-opening angle of the obscuring structure depends on the mass of the central object and the accretion rate. We find that the results depend only mildly on the dimensionless angular momentum, one of the two integrals of motion that characterize the dynamics of the self-similar ideal MHD outflows.

  5. Frequency width of open channels in multiple scattering media.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Jeroen; Goorden, Sebastianus A; Mosk, Allard P

    2016-11-14

    We report optical measurements of the spectral width of open transmission channels in a three-dimensional diffusive medium. The light transmission through a sample is enhanced by efficiently coupling to open transmission channels using repeated digital optical phase conjugation. The spectral properties are investigated by enhancing the transmission, fixing the incident wavefront and scanning the wavelength of the laser. We measure the transmitted field to extract the field correlation function and the enhancement of the total transmission. We find that optimizing the total transmission leads to a significant increase in the frequency width of the field correlation function. Additionally we find that the enhanced transmission persists over an even larger frequency bandwidth. This result shows open channels in the diffusive regime are spectrally much wider than previous measurements in the localized regime suggest.

  6. Determination of the width of the top quark.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Ćwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L

    2011-01-14

    We extract the total width of the top quark, Γ(t), from the partial decay width Γ(t → Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top-quark production and from the branching fraction B(t → Wb) measured in tt events using up to 2.3  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron pp Collider. The result is Γ(t) = 1.99(-0.55)(+0.69)  GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of τ(t) = (3.3(-0.9)(+1.3)) × 10(-25)   s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b' quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V(tb')| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  7. Packing defects and the width of biopolymer bundles.

    PubMed

    Gov, Nir S

    2008-07-01

    The formation of bundles composed of actin filaments and cross-linking proteins is an essential process in the maintenance of the cells' cytoskeleton. It has also been recreated by in-vitro experiments, where actin networks are routinely produced to mimic and study the cellular structures. It has been observed that these bundles seem to have a well-defined width distribution, which has not been adequately described theoretically. We propose here that packing defects of the filaments, quenched and random, contribute an effective repulsion that counters the cross-linking adhesion energy and leads to a well-defined bundle width. This is a two-dimensional strain-field version of the classic Rayleigh instability of charged droplets.

  8. A Direct Measurement of the $W$ Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, Troy

    2008-08-01

    A direct measurement of the W boson total decay width is presented in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the CDF II detector. The measurement is made by fitting a simulated signal to the tail of the transverse mass distribution in the electron and muon decay channels. An integrated luminosity of 350 pb-1 is used, collected between February 2002 and August 2004. Combining the results from the separate decay channels gives the decay width as 2.038 ± 0.072 GeV in agreement with the theoretical prediction of 2.093 ± 0.002 GeV. A system is presented for the management of detector calibrations using a relational database schema. A description of the implementation and monitoring of a procedure to provide general users with a simple interface to the complete set of calibrations is also given.

  9. Characterizing the width of amphibian movements during postbreeding migration.

    PubMed

    Coster, Stephanie S; Veysey Powell, Jessica S; Babbitt, Kimberly J

    2014-06-01

    Habitat linkages can help maintain connectivity of animal populations in developed landscapes. However, the lack of empirical data on the width of lateral movements (i.e., the zigzagging of individuals as they move from one point to point another) makes determining the width of such linkages challenging. We used radiotracking data from wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) in a managed forest in Maine (U.S.A.) to characterize movement patterns of populations and thus inform planning for the width of wildlife corridors. For each individual, we calculated the polar coordinates of all locations, estimated the vector sum of the polar coordinates, and measured the distance from each location to the vector sum. By fitting a Gaussian distribution over a histogram of these distances, we created a population-level probability density function and estimated the 50th and 95th percentiles to determine the width of lateral movement as individuals progressed from the pond to upland habitat. For spotted salamanders 50% of lateral movements were ≤13 m wide and 95% of movements were ≤39 m wide. For wood frogs, 50% of lateral movements were ≤17 m wide and 95% of movements were ≤ 51 m wide. For both species, those individuals that traveled the farthest from the pond also displayed the greatest lateral movement. Our results serve as a foundation for spatially explicit conservation planning for pond-breeding amphibians in areas undergoing development. Our technique can also be applied to movement data from other taxa to aid in designing habitat linkages. © 2014 Society for Conservation Biology.

  10. Pulse-Width Dependent Radiation Effects on Electronic Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    d’un accelerateur lineaire ( LINAC ) a et6 realisee par le CRDO et d’autres groupes. Par contre, l’emploi du LINAC donne normalement des impulsions plus... LINAC ) has been performed by DREO and other groups. However, the use of a LINAC normally entails wider pulses than those expected on the battlefield...nuclear weapon on electronics, an electron linear accelerator ( LINAC ) is often used. The pulse widths available from most LINACs are longer than the

  11. Beam Width Robustness of a 670 GHz Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. B.; Llombart, N.; Dengler, R. J.; Siegel, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of a replica bomb belt concealed on a mannequin at 4 m standoff range is achieved using a 670 GHz imaging radar. At a somewhat larger standoff range of 4.6 m, the radar's beam width increases substantially, but the through-shirt image quality remains good. This suggests that a relatively modest increase in aperture size over the current design will be sufficient to detect person-borne concealed weapons at ranges exceeding 25 meters.

  12. Pulse-Width-Modulating Driver for Brushless dc Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.

    1991-01-01

    High-current pulse-width-modulating driver for brushless dc motor features optical coupling of timing signals from low-current control circuitry to high-current motor-driving circuitry. Provides high electrical isolation of motor-power supply, helping to prevent fast, high-current motor-driving pulses from being coupled through power supplies into control circuitry, where they interfere with low-current control signals.

  13. Beam Width Robustness of a 670 GHz Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. B.; Llombart, N.; Dengler, R. J.; Siegel, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of a replica bomb belt concealed on a mannequin at 4 m standoff range is achieved using a 670 GHz imaging radar. At a somewhat larger standoff range of 4.6 m, the radar's beam width increases substantially, but the through-shirt image quality remains good. This suggests that a relatively modest increase in aperture size over the current design will be sufficient to detect person-borne concealed weapons at ranges exceeding 25 meters.

  14. A Spectral Method for the Equal Width Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Archilla, Bosco

    1996-05-01

    A spectral discretization of the equal width equation (EWE) is presented. The method is shown to be convergent and nonlinearly stable. Time-stepping is performed with high-order Adams methods. The spectral accuracy of the scheme reveals some features of the EWE that the methods previously used could not bare out properly. For instance, we may now study the changes in amplitude and velocity of solitary waves after collisions.

  15. Pulse-Width-Modulating Driver for Brushless dc Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.

    1991-01-01

    High-current pulse-width-modulating driver for brushless dc motor features optical coupling of timing signals from low-current control circuitry to high-current motor-driving circuitry. Provides high electrical isolation of motor-power supply, helping to prevent fast, high-current motor-driving pulses from being coupled through power supplies into control circuitry, where they interfere with low-current control signals.

  16. Evolution and diversity of subduction zones controlled by slab width.

    PubMed

    Schellart, W P; Freeman, J; Stegman, D R; Moresi, L; May, D

    2007-03-15

    Subducting slabs provide the main driving force for plate motion and flow in the Earth's mantle, and geodynamic, seismic and geochemical studies offer insight into slab dynamics and subduction-induced flow. Most previous geodynamic studies treat subduction zones as either infinite in trench-parallel extent (that is, two-dimensional) or finite in width but fixed in space. Subduction zones and their associated slabs are, however, limited in lateral extent (250-7,400 km) and their three-dimensional geometry evolves over time. Here we show that slab width controls two first-order features of plate tectonics-the curvature of subduction zones and their tendency to retreat backwards with time. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations of free subduction, we show that trench migration rate is inversely related to slab width and depends on proximity to a lateral slab edge. These results are consistent with retreat velocities observed globally, with maximum velocities (6-16 cm yr(-1)) only observed close to slab edges (<1,200 km), whereas far from edges (>2,000 km) retreat velocities are always slow (<2.0 cm yr(-1)). Models with narrow slabs (< or =1,500 km) retreat fast and develop a curved geometry, concave towards the mantle wedge side. Models with slabs intermediate in width ( approximately 2,000-3,000 km) are sublinear and retreat more slowly. Models with wide slabs (> or =4,000 km) are nearly stationary in the centre and develop a convex geometry, whereas trench retreat increases towards concave-shaped edges. Additionally, we identify periods (5-10 Myr) of slow trench advance at the centre of wide slabs. Such wide-slab behaviour may explain mountain building in the central Andes, as being a consequence of its tectonic setting, far from slab edges.

  17. Comparator threshold settings and the effective pixel width of the PICASSO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F. C. M.; Rigon, L.; Fardin, L.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, M.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, R.

    2014-05-01

    Charge sharing plays an important role in the performance of single-photon counting microstrip detectors, since the comparator threshold defines the effective pixel width. In this contribution, the PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) single-photon counting microstrip detector oriented in edge-on configuration has been used to study its spatial resolution as a function of the comparator threshold. The experiment was carried out with monochromatic x-rays at the SYRMEP beamline of the Elettra synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy). The Edge Spread Function (i.e. the integral of the Line spread Function, LSF) was measured by horizontally translating vertical slits from a bar-pattern test-object in front of the detector, at four different photon energies (19, 20, 22, and 25 keV) and for several different values of the comparator threshold. The effect of charge sharing between strips on the spatial resolution has been quantified by calculating the horizontal Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). Moreover, the composite LSF from neighboring pixels was obtained: this allowed estimating the optimal threshold for each photon energy by selecting the threshold at which the composite LSF would approach unity along the entire width of the pixel. The results show that at thresholds lower than half of the photon energy, charge sharing increases the effective pixel width, causing a drop of the MTF, and it is responsible for the appearance of peaks in the composite LSF. Conversely, at thresholds higher than half of the photon energy, the effective pixel width is reduced and the spatial resolution is increased, but the collection efficiency is compromised, as demonstrated by the presence of valleys in the composite LSF.

  18. Effects of trigger laser pulse width on the jitter time of GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Gui, Huaimeng; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Cheng; Li, Mengxia; Xu, Ming; Wang, Luyi

    2013-07-01

    The effects of trigger laser pulse width on the jitter time of a GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) is investigated in the experiment. The laser is split into two optical beams by a cross grating to excite two 3 mm gap GaAs PCSSs in parallel at the same time. This work reveals that the jitter time of the GaAs PCSS is reduced as the trigger laser pulse width decreases. Our results overcome a significant obstacle that hinders the testing and theory of GaAs PCSSs in high-time-precision synchronous control.

  19. A New Measurement of the Pi0 Radiative Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, I; Clinton, E; Ambrozewicz, P; Lawrence, D; Nakagawa, I; Prok, Y; Teymurazyan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Baker, K; Benton, L; Bernstein, A M; Burkert, V; Cole, P; Collins, P; Dale, D; Danagoulian, S; Davidenko, G; Demirchyan, R; Deur, A; Dolgolenko, A; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Ent, R; Evdokimov, A; Feng, J; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Gevorkyan, S; Glamazdin, A; Goryachev, V; Gyurjyan, V; Hardy, K; He, J; Ito, M; Jiang, L; Kashy, D; Khandaker, M; Kingsberry, P; Kolarkar, A; Konchatnyi, M; Korsch, W; Kowalski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kubarovsky, V; Li, X; Martel, P; Mecking, B; Milbrath, B; Minehart, R; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mtingwa, S; Overby, S; Pasyuk, E; Payen, M; Pedroni, R; Ritchie, B; Rodrigues, T E; Salgado, C; Shahinyan, A; Sitnikov, A; Sober, D; Stepanyan, S; Stephens, W; Underwood, J; Vishnyakov, V; Wood, M

    2011-04-01

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall~B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8\\% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  20. Predictors of the peak width for networks with exponential links

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate optimal predictors of the peak (S) and distance to peak (T) of the width function of drainage networks under the assumption that the networks are topologically random with independent and exponentially distributed link lengths. Analytical results are derived using the fact that, under these assumptions, the width function is a homogeneous Markov birth-death process. In particular, exact expressions are derived for the asymptotic conditional expectations of S and T given network magnitude N and given mainstream length H. In addition, a simulation study is performed to examine various predictors of S and T, including N, H, and basin morphometric properties; non-asymptotic conditional expectations and variances are estimated. The best single predictor of S is N, of T is H, and of the scaled peak (S divided by the area under the width function) is H. Finally, expressions tested on a set of drainage basins from the state of Wyoming perform reasonably well in predicting S and T despite probable violations of the original assumptions. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Quantum corral resonance widths: lossy scattering as acoustics.

    PubMed

    Barr, Matthew C; Zaletel, Michael P; Heller, Eric J

    2010-09-08

    We present an approach to predicting extrinsic electron resonance widths within quantum corral nanostructures based on analogies with acoustics. Established quantum mechanical methods for calculating resonance widths, such as multiple scattering theory, build up the scattering atom by atom, ignoring the structure formed by the atoms, such as walls or enclosures. Conversely, particle-in-a-box models, assuming continuous walls, have long been successful in predicting quantum corral energy levels, but not resonance widths. In acoustics, partial reflection from walls and various enclosures has long been incorporated for determining reverberation times. Pursuing an exact analogy between the local density of states of a quantum corral and the acoustic impedance of a concert hall, we show electron lifetimes in nanoscopic structures of arbitrary convex shape are well accounted for by the Sabine formula for acoustic reverberation times. This provides a particularly compact and intuitive prescription for extrinsic finite lifetimes in a particle-in-a-box with leaky walls, including quantum corral atomic walls, given single particle scattering properties.

  2. Optimization of Gaussian beam widths in acoustic propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, D. F.

    1989-10-01

    The use of Gaussian beams to compute wave propagation phenomena is a field of current interest and activity. Porter and Bucker (1987) supply an extensive list of references. More recent references can be found in Benites and Aki (1989). Gaussian beams can be traced as rays in range-dependent media providing not only propagation loss, but travel times, multipath structure, and frequency dependence. The well-known ray theory problems of caustics and shadow zones are treated automatically. A beam width minimization technique applied to a Gaussian beam model developed by Dr. H. P. Bucker, is outlined. Porter and Bucker (1987) gives the formulation upon which the techniques is built. A free parameter E is usually determined in a heuristic manner. Here, it is shown that the minimization of beam width assigns a precise value to E. Examples are given showing that the minimized beams give good propagation losses in some cases. A case also shown in the standard Gaussian beams give poor results and the minimized beams give even worse results. The problem appears to arise in beams that pass near boundaries. This problem will have to be corrected before a final judgment can be made on the validity of minimum-width beams.

  3. Axial couplings and strong decay widths of heavy hadrons.

    PubMed

    Detmold, William; Lin, C-J David; Meinel, Stefan

    2012-04-27

    We calculate the axial couplings of mesons and baryons containing a heavy quark in the static limit using lattice QCD. These couplings determine the leading interactions in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory and are central quantities in heavy quark physics, as they control strong decay widths and the light quark mass dependence of heavy hadron observables. Our analysis makes use of lattice data at six different pion masses, 227 MeVwidths with experimental data for Σ(c)(*) decays, we obtain Γ[Σ(b)(*)→Λ(b)π(±)]=4.2(1.0), 4.8(1.1), 7.3(1.6), 7.8(1.8) MeV for the Σ(b)(+), Σ(b)(-), Σ(b)(*+), Σ(b)(*-) initial states, respectively. We also derive upper bounds on the widths of the Ξ(b)(I(*)) baryons.

  4. Narrowed beam width in newer ultrasound machines shortens measurements in the lateral direction: fetal measurement charts may be obsolete.

    PubMed

    Økland, I; Bjåstad, T G; Johansen, T F; Gjessing, H K; Grøttum, P; Eik-Nes, S H

    2011-07-01

    Fetal ultrasound measurements are made in axial, lateral and oblique directions. Lateral resolution is influenced by the beam width of the ultrasound system. To improve lateral resolution and image quality, the beam width has been made narrower; consequently, measurements in the lateral direction are affected and apparently made shorter, approaching the true length. The aims of this study were to explore our database to reveal time-dependent shortening of ultrasound measurements made in the lateral direction, and to assess the extent of beam-width changes by comparing beam-width measurements made on old and new ultrasound machines. A total of 41,941 femur length measurements, collected during the time-period 1987-2005, were analyzed, with time as a covariate. Using three ultrasound machines from the 1990s and three newer machines from 2007, we performed 25 series of blinded beam-width measurements on a tissue-mimicking phantom, measuring at depths of 3-8 cm with a 5-MHz transducer. Regression analysis showed time to be a significant covariate. At the same gestational age, femur length measurement was 1.15 (95% CI, 1.08-1.23) mm shorter in the time-period 1999-2005 than in the time-period 1987-1992. Overall, the beam width was 1.08 (95% CI, 0.50-1.65) mm narrower with the new machines than with the old machines. Technical improvements in modern ultrasound machines that have reduced the beam width affect fetal measurements in the lateral direction. This has clinical implications and new measurement charts are needed. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Properties Of Lyman Alpha Emitters At Z~1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Amy

    Ly-alpha emission-line searches have been widely used to find high-redshift galaxies. For the z>6 galaxies, this line is the only spectroscopic signature that can be used to confirm the redshift of a galaxy selected on the basis of its color properties. Even in the era of JWST and extremely large ground-based facilities, it is likely that Ly-alpha will continue to be an important tracer of the faintest sources at high redshifts. However, Ly-alpha is a difficult line to interpret. Because the line is resonantly scattered by neutral hydrogen, determining its escape path and therefore its dust destruction is an extremely complex problem, both theoretically and observationally. Thus, while we have empirical measurements that a significant fraction of UV-continuum selected samples have Ly- alpha lines with rest-frame equivalent widths greater than 20 Angstrom, our understanding of what determines this fraction is still weak. In particular, we would like to know whether the presence of Ly-alpha emission is related to other properties of the galaxy, such as its extinction, age, metallicity, or morphology. GALEX grism spectra have revolutionized the field by making it possible to find low- redshift Ly-alpha emission line galaxies where the properties can be studied in exquisite detail. From these data, we have found that z~0.3 Ly-alpha emitters are heavily drawn from small, low metallicity galaxies with intense ongoing star formation. We have also found that the Ly-alpha luminosity function evolves rapidly over z=0-1, with the characteristic luminosity being much higher at z=1 than at z=0. However, the latter result is based on a very small number of galaxies at z~1 where we only probe the high luminosity tip of the luminosity function because of the continuum limits used in the GALEX pipeline extraction. We propose to obtain a large sample of Ly-alpha emitters in the sweet spot at z=0.7-1.3 where the intrinsic galaxy structure can be separated from the effects of the

  6. Maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width groups

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups. Materials and Methods: The calculated sample size was 128 subjects. The crown width/height, arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width of the maxilla and mandible were obtained via digital calliper (Mitutoyo, Japan). A total of 4325 variables were measured. The sex differences in the crown width and height were evaluated. Analysis of variance was applied to evaluate the differences between arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups. Results: Males had significantly larger mean values for crown width and height than females (P ≤ 0.05) for maxillary and mandibular arches, both. There were no significant differences observed for the crown width/height ratio in various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups (P ≤ 0.05) in maxilla and mandible, both. Conclusions: Our results indicate sexual disparities in the crown width and height. Crown width and height has no significant relation to various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups of maxilla and mandible. Thus, it may be helpful for orthodontic and prosthodontic case investigations and comprehensive management. PMID:26929686

  7. Hb Bleuland [alpha108(G15)Thr-->Asn, ACC-->AAC (alpha2)]: a new abnormal hemoglobin associated with a mild alpha-thalassemia phenotype.

    PubMed

    Harteveld, Cornelis L; Versteegh, Florens G A; Kok, Peter J M J; van Rooijen-Nijdam, Irene H; van Delft, Peter; Giordano, Piero C

    2006-01-01

    We report a new structural defect of the alpha2-globin chain, not detectable on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or electrophoresis, characterized in a 12-year-old boy of Surinamese-Hindustani origin. The child was suspected to be a carrier of alpha-thalassemia (thal) because of microcytic hypochromic parameters in the absence of iron depletion. Gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR) revealed only normal fragments in the proband, and the pattern of a -alpha4.2 (leftward) deletion in his father and sister. Direct sequencing of the alpha-globin genes revealed an ACC-->AAC transversion at codon 108 of the alpha2-globin gene in the proband, in his mother and in a younger sister. The new mutation predicts a Thr -->Asn amino acid substitution at the corresponding residue. Threonine, a covalent binder with an R-active OH group, situated in the G helix of the alpha-globin chain, is involved in alpha1beta1 contacts. Asparagine, being an equally covalent binder but with a different R-active H2N-C=O group, could make the mutated chain less suitable for tetramer cooperation. Alternatively, an absent or reduced interaction with the alpha hemoglobin (Hb) stabilizing protein (AHSP) could lead to loss of alpha chains. Hb Bleuland is the first mutation described at codon 108 and is therefore interesting in regard to the possible effects and genetic risk. The nearest variant, Hb Suan-Dok [alpha109(G16)Leu -->Arg, CTG-->CGG (alpha2)] was originally observed in a Thai patient affected with Hb H, in combination with an alpha0-thal allele. The same Hb Suan-Dok mutation, recently described in our laboratory in a carrier of African ancestry, was also not detectable as a protein and presented with an alpha-thal phenotype similar to Hb Bleuland.

  8. Curium-244 alpha-sources for space research

    PubMed

    Radchenko; Andreichikov; Wanke; Gavrilo; Korchuganov; Rieder; Ryabinin; Economou

    2000-10-01

    Special alpha-proton-X-ray spectrometric complexes (APXS) have been developed in order to perform chemical analyses of the Mars atmosphere and rock surface compounds by alpha back-scattering, alpha-proton measurements, and X-ray fluorescence. The sources were prepared by high temperature condensation of metal curium vapour onto silicon substrates. They are silicon disks with curium-244 fixed on their surfaces as a silicide. The sources have overall dimensions as follows: disk diameter 8 mm; thickness 0.3 mm; and 6 mm diameter active spot. The source activities are 5 +/- 1 mCi and the alpha-line half-widths are equal to (1.7-2.5) and (2.9-4.5)% of full width at 10% of Maximum (Maximum is equal to 5.8 MeV). Thermovacuum (from 196 to 1000 degrees C), mechanical, and resource tests were performed and demonstrated that the sources maintained their characteristics. The applicability of the sources for the above-mentioned analytical purposes was confirmed during NASA Mars Pathfinder mission.

  9. A mathematical model for meandering rivers with varying width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frascati, Alessandro; Lanzoni, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    The mathematical modeling of the long-term evolution of meandering rivers needs an efficient computation of the flow field. Indeed, the estimate of the near bank velocity, needed to determine the rate at which the outer bank migrates, cannot rely on the full numerical solution of the governing equations when considering the river evolution on geological time scales. The aim of the present contribution is twofold: determining the complete linear response of a meandering river to spatially varying channel axis curvature and width, exploiting the ability of the model to describe the morphological tendencies of alluvial rivers; and developing a computationally efficient tool that can be easily incorporated in long-term planform evolution models. The centrifugally induced secondary flow associated with channel axis curvature and longitudinal convection is accounted for by a suitable parametrization based on the structure of the three-dimensional flow field. Cross section width variations ar