Science.gov

Sample records for alpha reduced widths

  1. High-resolution measurement of absolute {alpha}-decay widths in {sup 16}O

    SciTech Connect

    Wheldon, C.; Ashwood, N. I.; Barr, M.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; Kokalova, Tz.; Malcolm, J. D.; Spencer, S. J.; Ziman, V. A.; Faestermann, Th.; Kruecken, R.; Wirth, H.-F.; Hertenberger, R.; Lutter, R.; Bergmaier, A.

    2011-06-15

    By using a large-acceptance position-sensitive silicon detector array in coincidence with the high-resolution Munich Q3D spectrograph, unambiguous measurements have been made of the absolute {alpha}-particle decay widths from excited states in {sup 16}O* in the energy range 13.85 to 15.87 MeV. Carbon targets have been bombarded with 42-MeV {sup 6}Li beams to induce {sub 6}{sup 12}C({sub 3}{sup 6}Li, d){sub 8}{sup 16}O* reactions. The deuteron ejectiles were measured in the Q3D and the results gated by {sup 4}He+{sup 12}C breakup products detected in the silicon array, the efficiency of which was modeled using Monte Carlo simulations. By comparing total population and breakup-gated spectra, the following absolute {alpha}-decay widths have been measured with high resolution: {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}0/{Gamma}{sub tot} = 0.87{+-}0.11 (13.980 MeV), 1.04{+-}0.15 (14.302 MeV), 0.92{+-}0.10 (14.399 MeV), 0.59{+-}0.04 (14.815 MeV), 0.88{+-}0.18 (15.785 MeV), and {Gamma}{sub {alpha}}1/{Gamma}{sub tot}=1.14{+-}0.08 (14.660 MeV), 0.46{+-}0.06 (14.815 MeV).

  2. Measurement of {alpha} and neutron decay widths of excited states of {sup 14}C

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, P. J.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; Freer, M.; McEwan, P.; Price, D.; Ziman, V.; Bohlen, H. G.; Kokalova, Tz.; Schulz, Ch.; Torabi, R.; Oertzen, W. von; Wheldon, C.; Catford, W.; Harlin, C.; Kalpakchieva, R.; Massey, T. N.

    2008-07-15

    The {sup 12}C({sup 16}O,{sup 14}O){sup 14}C reaction was studied at a beam energy of 234 MeV. The {sup 14}O ejectile was detected by a Q3D spectrometer at forward angles. The energies and angles of the excited {sup 14}C recoil break-up fragments were measured in coincidence with the {sup 14}O ejectile using a double sided silicon strip detector array at backward angles. A complete kinematic reconstruction of the reaction was performed to reconstruct the {sup 14}C*{yields}{sup 10}Be+{alpha} and {sup 14}C*{yields}{sup 13}C+n decay channels and the branching ratios and widths of these decays were calculated. Theoretical decay branches were calculated using barrier penetrability factors and were compared to the measured ratios to provide information on the spins, parities, and configurations of the states. Neutron emission was found to be favored for the 11.73, 12.96, 14.87, 16.72, and 18.6 MeV states. The 14.87, 18.6, and 21.4 MeV states were found to have a considerable width for {alpha}-decay and are candidates for the three bodied molecular cluster structure of {sup 14}C.

  3. The transmission correlation in the QSO Ly(alpha) forest produced by finite width lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Lin; Bond, J. Richard

    1994-03-01

    The transmission of a quasar spectrum (flux divided by the continuum) is correlated because of the finite width of absorption lines. We describe a technique for calculating the transmission correlation function produced by randomly distributed lines. We also introduce straightforward procedure for measuring the pixel-pixel transmission correlation function xipp directly from observed quasar spectra. We apply the method to 12 Sargent, Boksenberg, & Steidel Quasi-Stellar Objects (QSO) spectra and compare these with theoretical transmission correlation functions and with xipp measured from computer-simulated quasar spectra of Ly(alpha) forest models with Poisson-distributed lines. The simulations are designed to mimic the observed spectrum as closely as possible, with the same wavelength sampling, instrumental resolution, continuum and noise properties. The comparisons with line distributions that are power laws in column density and redshift, and Gaussians in line width b reveal an excess in the observed xipp at Delta(v) is approximately or equal to 150 km/s, if we adopt the Carswell et al. (1991) parameters for the Gaussian (mean b0 = 30 km/s, dispersion sigmab = 10 km/s). One possibility is that the Ly(alpha) forest lines are actually clustered at velocity separation scales Delta(v) is approximately or equal to 150 km/s. Another possibility we explore is that the b-distribution has more large b clouds and a larger dispersion. We find the observed xipp is barely consistent with b0 = 40 km/s and sigmab = 25 km/s. We show that the measured xipp is relatively insensitive to the noise level and to errors in the continuum determination, unlike the traditional line counting methods, where the outcome is quite vulnerable to both. It also requires no line deblending and thus offers a powerful tool for extracting information from the crowded Ly(alpha) forest.

  4. Facial width-to-height ratio relates to alpha status and assertive personality in capuchin monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Carmen Emilia; Wilson, Vanessa A D; Morton, F Blake; Brosnan, Sarah F; Paukner, Annika; Bates, Timothy C

    2014-01-01

    Social dominance hierarchies play a pivotal role in shaping the behaviour of many species, and sex differences within these hierarchies often exist. To date, however, few physical markers of dominance have been identified. Such markers would be valuable in terms of understanding the etiology of dominant behaviour and changes in social hierarchies over time. Animals may also use such traits to evaluate the potential dominance of others relative to themselves (i.e. a physical "cue"). Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR), for example, has been suggested as a cue to dominance in humans, with links to both dominant behaviour and the perception of dominance in other individuals. Whether this association is present in non-human animals is currently not known. Therefore, here we examine within-species links between fWHR and dominant behaviour in 64 brown capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) aged between 2 and 40 years. fWHR was positively associated with alpha status and with a dimensional rating of assertive personality in both males and females. Moreover, fWHR showed significant sexual dimorphism in adults but not juveniles, suggesting a developmental change may occur during puberty. In a sub-sample, sex differences were mediated by weight, suggesting fWHR dimorphism does not exceed what would be expected by differences in body weight. This is the first report of an association between face shape and behaviour in a non-human species. Results are discussed in terms of the role that face-behaviour associations might play within capuchin societies, and the possible selective forces that might have led to the evolution of fWHR-dominance associations in humans.

  5. Facial Width-To-Height Ratio Relates to Alpha Status and Assertive Personality in Capuchin Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Lefevre, Carmen Emilia; Wilson, Vanessa A. D.; Morton, F. Blake; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Paukner, Annika; Bates, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Social dominance hierarchies play a pivotal role in shaping the behaviour of many species, and sex differences within these hierarchies often exist. To date, however, few physical markers of dominance have been identified. Such markers would be valuable in terms of understanding the etiology of dominant behaviour and changes in social hierarchies over time. Animals may also use such traits to evaluate the potential dominance of others relative to themselves (i.e. a physical “cue”). Facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR), for example, has been suggested as a cue to dominance in humans, with links to both dominant behaviour and the perception of dominance in other individuals. Whether this association is present in non-human animals is currently not known. Therefore, here we examine within-species links between fWHR and dominant behaviour in 64 brown capuchin monkeys (Sapajus spp.) aged between 2 and 40 years. fWHR was positively associated with alpha status and with a dimensional rating of assertive personality in both males and females. Moreover, fWHR showed significant sexual dimorphism in adults but not juveniles, suggesting a developmental change may occur during puberty. In a sub-sample, sex differences were mediated by weight, suggesting fWHR dimorphism does not exceed what would be expected by differences in body weight. This is the first report of an association between face shape and behaviour in a non-human species. Results are discussed in terms of the role that face-behaviour associations might play within capuchin societies, and the possible selective forces that might have led to the evolution of fWHR-dominance associations in humans. PMID:24705247

  6. H{alpha} EQUIVALENT WIDTHS FROM THE 3D-HST SURVEY: EVOLUTION WITH REDSHIFT AND DEPENDENCE ON STELLAR MASS

    SciTech Connect

    Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G.; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Brammer, Gabriel; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Lundgren, Britt; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind E.; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Nelson, Erica; Da Cunha, Elisabete; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Kriek, Mariska

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the evolution of the H{alpha} equivalent width, EW(H{alpha}), with redshift and its dependence on stellar mass, using the first data from the 3D-HST survey, a large spectroscopic Treasury program with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3. Combining our H{alpha} measurements of 854 galaxies at 0.8 < z < 1.5 with those of ground-based surveys at lower and higher redshift, we can consistently determine the evolution of the EW(H{alpha}) distribution from z = 0 to z = 2.2. We find that at all masses the characteristic EW(H{alpha}) is decreasing toward the present epoch, and that at each redshift the EW(H{alpha}) is lower for high-mass galaxies. We find EW(H{alpha}) {approx}(1 + z){sup 1.8} with little mass dependence. Qualitatively, this measurement is a model-independent confirmation of the evolution of star-forming galaxies with redshift. A quantitative conversion of EW(H{alpha}) to specific star formation rate (sSFR) is model dependent because of differential reddening corrections between the continuum and the Balmer lines. The observed EW(H{alpha}) can be reproduced with the characteristic evolutionary history for galaxies, whose star formation rises with cosmic time to z {approx} 2.5 and then decreases to z = 0. This implies that EW(H{alpha}) rises to 400 A at z = 8. The sSFR evolves faster than EW(H{alpha}), as the mass-to-light ratio also evolves with redshift. We find that the sSFR evolves as (1 + z){sup 3.2}, nearly independent of mass, consistent with previous reddening insensitive estimates. We confirm previous results that the observed slope of the sSFR-z relation is steeper than the one predicted by models, but models and observations agree in finding little mass dependence.

  7. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of season, vegetation, and buffer width

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effectiveness of vegetative buffer strips (VBS) for reducing herbicide transport in runoff may be affected by season, plant species composition, and buffer width. A plot-scale study was conducted from 2007-2012 on an eroded claypan soil with the objectives of: 1) assessing the effects of season ...

  8. Progesterone's 5 alpha-reduced metabolite, 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP, mediates lateral displacement of hamsters.

    PubMed

    Frye, Cheryl A; Rhodes, Madeline E

    2005-03-15

    5 alpha-Pregnan-3 alpha-ol-20-one (3 alpha,5 alpha-THP), progesterone (P4)'s 5 alpha-reduced, 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidoreduced product, facilitates lordosis of rodents in part via agonist-like actions at GABA(A)/benzodiazepine receptor complexes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Whether 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP influences another reproductively-relevant behavior, lateral displacement, of hamsters was investigated. Lateral displacement is the movement that female hamsters make with their perineum towards male-like tactile stimulation. This behavior facilitates, and is essential for, successful mating. Hamsters in behavioral estrus had greater lateral displacement responses when endogenous progestin levels were elevated compared to when progestin levels were lower. Administration of P4, a prohormone for 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP, dose-dependently (500 > 200 > 100, 50, or 0 microg) enhanced lateral displacement of ovariectomized hamsters that had been primed with SC estradiol benzoate (5 or 10 microg). Inhibiting P4's metabolism to 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP by co-administering finasteride, a 5 alpha-reductase inhibitor, or indomethacin, a 3 alpha-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase inhibitor, either systemically or to the VTA, significantly decreased lateral displacement and midbrain progestin levels of naturally receptive or hormone-primed hamsters compared to controls. These data suggest that lateral displacement is progestin-sensitive and requires the formation of 3 alpha,5 alpha-THP in the midbrain VTA.

  9. Eicosapentaenoic acid reduces membrane fluidity, inhibits cholesterol domain formation, and normalizes bilayer width in atherosclerotic-like model membranes.

    PubMed

    Mason, R Preston; Jacob, Robert F; Shrivastava, Sandeep; Sherratt, Samuel C R; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2016-12-01

    Cholesterol crystalline domains characterize atherosclerotic membranes, altering vascular signaling and function. Omega-3 fatty acids reduce membrane lipid peroxidation and subsequent cholesterol domain formation. We evaluated non-peroxidation-mediated effects of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), other TG-lowering agents, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and other long-chain fatty acids on membrane fluidity, bilayer width, and cholesterol domain formation in model membranes. In membranes prepared at 1.5:1 cholesterol-to-phospholipid (C/P) mole ratio (creating pre-existing domains), EPA, glycyrrhizin, arachidonic acid, and alpha linolenic acid promoted the greatest reductions in cholesterol domains (by 65.5%, 54.9%, 46.8%, and 45.2%, respectively) compared to controls; other treatments had modest effects. EPA effects on cholesterol domain formation were dose-dependent. In membranes with 1:1 C/P (predisposing domain formation), DHA, but not EPA, dose-dependently increased membrane fluidity. DHA also induced cholesterol domain formation without affecting temperature-induced changes in-bilayer unit cell periodicity relative to controls (d-space; 57Å-55Å over 15-30°C). Together, these data suggest simultaneous formation of distinct cholesterol-rich ordered domains and cholesterol-poor disordered domains in the presence of DHA. By contrast, EPA had no effect on cholesterol domain formation and produced larger d-space values relative to controls (60Å-57Å; p<0.05) over the same temperature range, suggesting a more uniform maintenance of lipid dynamics despite the presence of cholesterol. These data indicate that EPA and DHA had different effects on membrane bilayer width, membrane fluidity, and cholesterol crystalline domain formation; suggesting omega-3 fatty acids with differing chain length or unsaturation may differentially influence membrane lipid dynamics and structural organization as a result of distinct phospholipid/sterol interactions.

  10. Predicting bone remodeling around tissue- and bone-level dental implants used in reduced bone width.

    PubMed

    Eser, Atilim; Tonuk, Ergin; Akca, Kivanc; Dard, Michel M; Cehreli, Murat Cavit

    2013-09-03

    The objective of this study was to predict time-dependent bone remodeling around tissue- and bone-level dental implants used in patients with reduced bone width. The remodeling of bone around titanium tissue-level, and titanium and titanium-zirconium alloy bone-level implants was studied under 100 N oblique load for one month by implementing the Stanford theory into three-dimensional finite element models. Maximum principal stress, minimum principal stress, and strain energy density in peri-implant bone and displacement in x- and y- axes of the implant were evaluated. Maximum and minimum principal stresses around tissue-level implant were higher than bone-level implants and both bone-level implants experienced comparable stresses. Total strain energy density in bone around titanium implants slightly decreased during the first two weeks of loading followed by a recovery, and the titanium-zirconium implant showed minor changes in the axial plane. Total strain energy density changes in the loading and contralateral sides were higher in tissue-level implant than other implants in the cortical bone at the horizontal plane. The displacement values of the implants were almost constant over time. Tissue-level implants were associated with higher stresses than bone-level implants. The time-dependent biomechanical outcome of titanium-zirconium alloy bone-level implant was comparable to the titanium implant.

  11. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; ...

    2011-01-01

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from themore » simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.« less

  12. Reduced model simulations of the scrape-off-layer heat-flux width and comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; D’Ippolito, D. A.; Ahn, J.-W.; Maingi, R.; Maqueda, R. J.; Lundberg, D. P.; Stotler, D. P.; Zweben, S. J.; Boedo, J.; Umansky, M.

    2011-01-01

    Reduced model simulations of turbulence in the edge and scrape-off-layer (SOL) region of a spherical torus or tokamak plasma are employed to address the physics of the scrape-off-layer heat flux width. The simulation model is an electrostatic two-dimensional fluid turbulence model, applied in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field at the outboard midplane of the torus. The model contains curvature-driven-interchange modes, sheath losses, and both perpendicular turbulent diffusive and convective (blob) transport. These transport processes compete with classical parallel transport to set the SOL width. Midplane SOL profiles of density, temperature and parallel heat flux are obtained from the simulation and compared with experimental results from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) to study the scaling of the heat flux width with power and plasma current. It is concluded that midplane turbulence is the main contributor to the SOL heat flux width for the low power H-mode discharges studied, while additional physics is required to explain the plasma current scaling of the SOL heat flux width observed experimentally in higher power discharges. Intermittent separatrix spanning convective cells are found to be the main mechanism that sets the near-SOL width in the simulations. The roles of sheared flows and blob trapping vs. emission are discussed.

  13. Anomalous fluctuations of s-wave reduced neutron widths of 192,194Pt resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul Edward; Becvar, F.; Krticka, Milan; Harvey, John A; Guber, Klaus H

    2010-01-01

    We obtained an unprecedentedly large number of s-wave neutron widths through R-matrix analysis of neutron cross-section measurements on enriched Pt samples. Careful analysis of these data rejects the validity of the Porter-Thomas distribution with a statistical significance of at least 99.997%.

  14. Vegetative buffer strips for reducing herbicide transport in runoff: effects of season, vegetation, and buffer width

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of vegetative buffer strip (VBS) width, vegetation, and season of the year on herbicide transport in runoff has not been well documented for runoff prone soils. A multi-year replicated plot-scale study was conducted on an eroded claypan soil with the following objectives: 1) assess the ef...

  15. A pulse width modulated picket fence pulser to reduce accelerator start-up transients

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A; Balmes, Anthony A; Bradley, Joseph T; Netz, Dana; Sandoval, Jacob B

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a solid state modulator used to control the input beam to the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center 'LANSCE' 800 MeV accelerator. This electrostatic Ground Level Deflector (GLD) chops the beam after the 750 keV injection energy. Two GLD's are utilized, one for the 'H+' beam and another for the 'H-' beam. These modulators are mounted on the vacuum beam pipe and directly operate sets of deflection plates. To minimize the accelerator beam start up transients, the beam is let into the accelerator cavity structures by a pulse width modulated picket fence operating between 0 and 12 kV. As the deflection plate structure appears as a capacitive load, a totem-pole switching network is utilized to facilitate rise and fall times of {approx}50 ns that is able to sink and source current to minimize beam induced sidewall activation. This paper will describe the system design and provides operational results as now presently utilized on the LANSCE accelerator system.

  16. Does formate reduce alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia to glutamate?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maughan, Q.; Miller, S. L.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The reported reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate and ammonia by formate is much slower than described (Morowitz et al., 1995). The formate reduction if any is small under these conditions. Glutamate is produced from a reduction by a second molecule of alpha-ketoglutarate involving an oxidative decarboxylation.

  17. Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin in diabetes: a hyperglycemia related phenomenon associated with reduced antithrombin III activity.

    PubMed

    Ceriello, A; Giugliano, D; Quatraro, A; Stante, A; Dello Russo, P; Torella, R

    1989-01-01

    Increased alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) activity and concentration, and decreased antithrombin III (ATIII) plasma concentration are reported in diabetic subjects. In diabetes an inverse correlation between ATIII activity and blood glucose, HbA1, alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration, and a direct correlation between both alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration with blood glucose and HbA1 are found. Moreover, a direct correlation between alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration fails. In both diabetic and normal subjects induced hyperglycemia increases alpha 2M activity and alpha 2M concentration reduces ATIII activity, while ATIII concentration is not affected. These data which show that hyperglycemia may increase alpha 2M molecule levels while altering only the biological function of ATIII, provide evidence that hyperglycemia may decrease, directly, the biological function of some proteins and may condition the levels of some risk factors for the development of diabetic complications such as alpha 2M.

  18. 8-Iso-prostaglandin f(2alpha) reduces trophoblast invasion and matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Staff, A C; Ranheim, T; Henriksen, T; Halvorsen, B

    2000-06-01

    Preeclampsia is a common pregnancy complication in the latter half of gestation diagnosed by hypertension and proteinuria. A key feature of preeclampsia is an altered placentation with reduced trophoblast invasion. Normal placentation requires controlled invasion of trophoblasts into the maternal uterine wall, with secretion of specific proteolytic enzymes able to degrade basement membranes and extracellular matrix, such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). 8-Iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) (8-iso-PGF(2alpha)) is a marker of oxidative stress in vivo and is biologically active. We have recently reported an elevated content of free 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) in preeclamptic gestational tissue at delivery. Assuming an elevated level of 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) during the invasion period of the pregnancy, we hypothesized that 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) could reduce invasion of JAR cells, a choriocarcinoma cell line. We investigated JAR cell invasion with 2 types of Transwell assays and demonstrated that 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) (10 micromol/L) resulted in reduced cell invasion in both the colorimetric and radioactivity Transwell assays (P<0.01). Zymograms revealed reduced MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in conditioned media from JAR cells incubated with 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) (10 micromol/L) (P<0.02). 8-Iso-PGF(2alpha) (10 micromol/L) also reduced the collagenase type IV activity in the conditioned media of JAR cells (P=0.04). No effects on MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA levels were observed after incubation with 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) (10 micromol/L), whereas protein levels were significantly decreased (P<0.02), suggesting a posttranscriptional regulation. We hypothesize a potential role for 8-iso-PGF(2alpha) in the reduced trophoblast invasion in preeclampsia.

  19. Experimental investigation of heat transfer augmentation inside double pipe heat exchanger equipped with reduced width twisted tapes inserts using polymeric nanofluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazbehian, Mohammad; Maddah, Heydar; Mohammadiun, Hamid; Alizadeh, Mostafa

    2016-11-01

    In this study, we report a further enhancement in heat transfer coefficients of base fluid in combination with structural modifications of tape inserts. Polyvinyl Alcohol and TiO2 with mean diameter of 15 nm were chosen as base fluid and nano-particles, respectively. The experiments are carried out in plain tube with four longitudinal internal fins and reduced width twisted tape (RWTT) inserts of twist ratio varying form 2-5 and width of 12-16. Experiments are undertaken to determine heat transfer coefficients and friction factor of TiO2/PVA nanofluid up to 2.0 % volume concentration at an average temperature of 30 °C. The investigations are undertaken in the Reynolds number range of 800-30,000 for flow in tubes and with tapes of different width length ratios. The experiments was verified with well-known correlations. The average Nusselt number and friction factor in the tube fitted with the full-length twisted tapes at y/w = 3.0, and 5.0, are respectively 50-130, and 30-95 % higher than those in the plain tube; 90-220 and 100-270 % when the working fluid is nanofluid, respectively. For the reduced width twisted tapes, the heat transfer rate is decreased with decreasing tapes width. The average Nusselt numbers in the tube fitted with the RWTT of 16, 14 and 12 are respectively, 210-390, 190-320 and 170-290 % of that in the plain tube. With the similar trend mentioned above, RWTT with higher width length yield higher thermal enhancement factor in comparison with smaller width. The use of RWTT led to the highest thermal performance factor up to 1.75. Maximum thermal performance factor which was obtained belonged to twists with twist ratio of 2 and width of 16 with φ = 0.5 % and Reynolds number range of 800-30,000.

  20. alpha-Chaconine inhibits angiogenesis in vitro by reducing matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming-Kun; Chen, Pei-Hsieng; Shih, Yuan-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ting; Huang, En-Tze; Liu, Cheng-Ruei; Chen, Pin-Shern

    2010-01-01

    alpha-Chaconine, a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid in potato sprouts, was found to possess anti-carcinogenic properties, such as inhibiting proliferation, migration, invasion, and inducing apoptosis of tumor cells. However, the effect of alpha-chaconine on tumor angiogenesis remains unclear. In the present study, we examined the effect of alpha-chaconine on angiogenesis in vitro. Data demonstrated that alpha-chaconine inhibited proliferation of bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAECs) in a dose-dependent manner. When treated with non-toxic doses of alpha-chaconine, cell migration, invasion and tube formation were markedly suppressed. Furthermore, alpha-chaconine reduced the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), which is involved in angiogenesis. Our biochemical assays indicated that alpha-chaconine potently suppressed the phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) and Akt, while it did not affect phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulating kinase (ERK) and p38. In addition, alpha-chaconine significantly increased the cytoplasmic level of inhibitors of kappaBalpha (IkappaBalpha) and decreased the nuclear level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB), suggesting that alpha-chaconine could inhibit NF-kappaB activity. Furthermore, the treatment of inhibitors specific for JNK (SP600125), PI3K (LY294002) or NF-kappaB (pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate) to BAECs reduced tube formation. Taken together, the results suggested that alpha-chaconine inhibited migration, invasion and tube formation of BAECs by reducing MMP-2 activities, as well as JNK and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways and inhibition of NF-kappaB activity. These findings reveal a new therapeutic potential for alpha-chaconine on anti-angiogenic therapy.

  1. 5Alpha-Reduced Steroids Are Major Metabolites in the Early Equine Embryo Proper and Its Membranes.

    PubMed

    Raeside, James I; Christie, Heather L; Betteridge, Keith J

    2015-09-01

    Steroid production and metabolism by early conceptuses are very important for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy in horses. Our earlier work suggested the possible formation of 5alpha-reduced steroids in equine conceptuses. We have now demonstrated the formation of 5alpha-reduced metabolites of androstenedione, testosterone, and progesterone by the embryo and its membranes. A total of 44 conceptuses were collected from 26 mares between 20 and 31 days of pregnancy. Tissues from the embryo proper and from the separated components of the conceptus (bilaminar and trilaminar trophoblast, allantois) were incubated with tritium-labeled substrates. 5Alpha-reduced metabolites (5alpha-dihydro- and 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydro- steroids) as radiolabeled products were identified from a series of chromatographic steps using four solvent systems for high-performance liquid chromatography. Use of a 5alpha-reductase inhibitor confirmed the metabolites were indeed 5alpha-reduced steroids. For the embryo, the only products from androstenedione were 5alpha-dihydroandrostenedione and 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydroandrostenedione, with no evidence of more polar metabolites; there was some 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydrotestosterone but no 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone from testosterone, and formation of androstenedione was followed by the production of 5alpha-dihydroandrostenedione and 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydroandrostenedione. The major 5alpha-reduced product from progesterone was 3beta,5alpha-tetrahydroprogesterone, with lesser amounts of 5alpha-dihydroprogesterone. For the membranes, reductions to tetrahydro, 5alpha-reduced steroids were prominent in most instances, but also present were considerable amounts of products more polar than the substrates. The well-recognized activity of some 5alpha-reduced steroids--for example, 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone in male sexual differentiation--provokes interest in their even earlier appearance, as seen in this study, and suggests a possible role for them in

  2. Reduced upper limits on the equivalent width of interstellar Li I 670.8 towards SN 1987 A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baade, D.; Cristiani, S.; Lanz, T.; Malaney, R. A.; Sahu, K. S.; Vladilo, G.

    1991-11-01

    A new search for interstellar Li I 670.8 along the line of sight to SN 1987 A has been carried out using all 34 known high-resolution Reticon spectra obtained at the European Southern Observatory. The most probably 3-sigma detection limit in equivalent width is 7.3 x 10 exp -6 nm. For the cloud at radial velocity +286 km/s, standard relations then imply a maximum abundance, Li/H, of 1.7 x 10 exp -11 in the gaseous interstellar medium of the LMC. If depletion to dust grains is the same for both lithium and potassium, this figure has to be increased by 1.1 dex. Accordingly, conventional present-day reasoning suggests that the elemental abundance of lithium does not exceed 2.7 x 10 exp -10. However, the cumulative uncertainties are such that a primordial abundance which is an order of magnitude higher is not firmly ruled out. Constraints on primordial nucleosynthesis models are, therefore, only weak.

  3. Design and evaluation of single nozzle with a non-conductive tip for reducing applied voltage and pattern width in electrohydrodynamic jet printing (EHDP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Yong; Park, Jaehong; Hwang, Jungho

    2010-05-01

    We investigated the effect of a non-conductive tip inserted into a capillary nozzle (inner diameter of 860 µm) on jet formation and pattern width in electrohydrodynamic jet printing. Simulated and experimental results showed that the non-conductive tip stabilized the jet, and reduced the effective nozzle diameter and the onset voltage needed for the cone-jet mode, by eliminating the backflow near the apex of the liquid cone while a tiny backflow away from the apex of the liquid cone still remained. Silver nanocolloid patterns with an average width of 18.5 µm (standard deviation: 1.5 µm) were obtained with an applied voltage of 2.7 kV, a flow rate of 3 µl min-1 and a stage velocity of 200 mm s-1.

  4. Bright illumination reduces parietal EEG alpha activity during a sustained attention task.

    PubMed

    Min, Byoung-Kyong; Jung, Young-Chul; Kim, Eosu; Park, Jin Young

    2013-11-13

    The influence of the illumination condition on our cognitive-performance seems to be more critical in the modern life, wherein, most people work in an office under a specific illumination condition. However, neurophysiological changes in a specific illumination state and their cognitive interpretation still remain unclear. Thereby, in the present study, the effect of different illumination conditions on the same cognitive performance was evaluated particularly by EEG wavelet analyses. During a sustained attention task, we observed that the higher illumination condition yielded significantly lower parietal tonic electroencephalogram (EEG) alpha activity before the presentation of the probe digit and longer reaction times, than that of the other illumination conditions. Although previous studies suggest that lower prestimulus EEG alpha activity is related to higher performance in an upcoming task, the reduced prestimulus alpha activity under higher illumination was associated with delayed reaction times in the present study. Presumably, the higher background illumination condition seems to be too bright for normal attentional processing and distracted participants' attention during a sustained attention task. Such a bottom-up effect by stimulus salience seemed to overwhelm a prestimulus top-down effect reflected in prestimulus alpha power during the bright background condition. This finding might imply a dynamic competition between prestimulus top-down and poststimulus bottom-up processes. Our findings provide compelling evidence that the illumination condition substantially modulates our attentional processing. Further refinement of the illumination parameters and subsequent exploration of cognitive-modulation are necessary to facilitate our cognitive performance.

  5. Attenuation of cardiac contractility in Na,K-ATPase alpha1 isoform-deficient hearts under reduced calcium conditions.

    PubMed

    Moseley, Amy E; Cougnon, Marc H; Grupp, Ingrid L; El Schultz, Jo; Lingrel, Jerry B

    2004-11-01

    We have previously reported that genetic reduction of the Na,K-ATPase alpha1 isoform (alpha1(+/-)) results in a hypocontractile cardiac phenotype. This observation was surprising and unexpected. In order to determine if calcium overload contributes to the depressed phenotype, cardiac performance was examined by perfusing the hearts with buffer containing 2 or 1.5 mM calcium. At 2 mM calcium, +dP/dt for the alpha1(+/-) hearts (1374 +/- 180) was significantly less than that of wild-type (2656 +/- 75, P < 0.05). At 1.5 mM calcium, a larger decrease in +dP/dt occurred (vs. 2 mM calcium) for the alpha1(+/-) hearts (517 +/- 92) compared to wild-type (2238 +/- 157). At 2 mM calcium, -dP/dt was 50% lower in alpha1(+/-) hearts (-1903 +/- 141) than wild-type (-982 +/- 143). At 1.5 mM calcium relaxation was further reduced in alpha1(+/-) compared to wild-type (-443 +/- 56 vs. - 1691 +/- 109). We also tested whether the compensatory upregulation of the Na,K-ATPase alpha2 isoform in the alpha1(+/-) hearts contributes to the hypocontractile phenotype. At 8 x 10(-6) M ouabain, that would completely inhibit the alpha2 isoform, a 30% increase in contractility was obtained in alpha1(+/-) hearts compared to no ouabain treatment, while a 63% faster time-to-peak (TTP) and 67% faster half-time-to-relaxation (RT(1/2)) were observed in alpha1(+/-) hearts treated with ouabain. These results suggest that upregulation of the alpha2 isoform may play a role in slower TTP and RT(1/2) in the alpha1(+/-) hearts. Furthermore, lowering extracellular calcium in the perfusate did not alleviate the depressed contractile phenotype in the alpha1(+/-) hearts and resulted in further depressed cardiac contractility suggesting that these hearts are not calcium overloaded.

  6. Phase width reduction project summary

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D.J.; Xie, Z.Q.; McMahan, M. A.

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of the phase width reduction project, 1993--96, was to reduce the phase width of the 88-Inch Cyclotron beam on target from 5--10 ns to 1--2 ns for certain experiments, such as Gammasphere, which use time-of-flight identification. Since reducing the phase width also reduces beam intensity, tuning should be done to also optimize the transmission. The Multi-turn Collimator slits in the cyclotron center region were used to collimate the early turns radially, thus reducing the phase width from about 5 ns to 1--2 ns FWHM for a Gammasphere beam. The effect of the slits on phase width was verified with a Fast Faraday Cup and with particle and gamma-ray detectors in the external beamline.

  7. An isozyme of acid alpha-glucosidase with reduced catalytic activity for glycogen.

    PubMed Central

    Beratis, N G; LaBadie, G U; Hirschhorn, K

    1980-01-01

    Both the common and a variant isozyme of acid alpha-glucosidase have been purified from a heterozygous placenta with CM-Sephadex, ammonium sulfate precipitation, dialysis, Amicon filtration, affinity chromatography by Sephadex G-100, and DEAE-cellulose chromatography. Three and two activity peaks, from the common and variant isozymes, respectively, were obtained by DEAE-cellulose chromatography using a linear NaCl gradient. The three peaks of activity of the common isozyme were eluted with 0.08, 0.12, and 0.17 M NaCl, whereas the two peaks of the variant, with 0.01 and 0.06 M NaCl. The pH optimum and thermal denaturation at 57 degrees C were the same in all enzyme peaks of both isozymes. Rabbit antiacid alpha-glucosidase antibodies produced against the common isozyme were found to cross-react with both peaks of the variant isozyme. The two isozymes shared antigenic identity and had similar Km's with maltose as substrate. Normal substrate saturation kinetics were observed with the common isozyme when glycogen was the substrate, but the variant produced an S-shaped saturation curve indicating a phase of negative and positive cooperativity at low and high glycogen concentrations, respectively. The activity of the variant was only 8.6% and 19.2% of the common isozyme when assayed with nonsaturating and saturating concentrations of glycogen, respectively. A similar rate of hydrolysis of isomaltose by both isozymes was found indicating that the reduced catalytic activity of the variant isozyme toward glycogen is not the result of a reduced ability of this enzyme to cleave the alpha-1,6 linkages of glycogen. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 PMID:6770674

  8. Foam-stabilizing effects and cling formation patterns of iso-alpha-acids and reduced iso-alpha-acids in lager beer.

    PubMed

    Kunimune, Takeshi; Shellhammer, Thomas H

    2008-09-24

    Foam-stabilizing properties and cling formation patterns of iso-alpha-acids and reduced iso-alpha-acids were investigated using an unhopped lager beer. Unhopped beer was dosed with iso-alpha-acid (Iso), rho-iso-alpha-acid (Rho), tetrahydro-iso-alpha-acid (Tetra), and hexahydro-iso-alpha-acid (Hexa), separately, over a range of concentrations from 2 to 10 ppm. A uniform foam was created by Inpack 2000 Flasher Head and was measured by a NIBEM Foam Stability Tester (NIBEM-TPH) followed by a NIBEM Cling Meter (NIBEM-CLM) to determine the relationship between the concentration and NIBEM-30 and the cling formation ability of each compound. The foam-stabilizing power was determined to be Tetra, Hexa, Iso, and Rho from the strongest to weakest. Linear regression models were created using the NIBEM-TPH data set, and on the basis of 95% confidence intervals, the foam stability of Tetra or Hexa became significantly larger than that of Iso when 2.4 or 4.2 ppm of Tetra or Hexa was used as a replacement for Iso, respectively. Cling formation patterns could be categorized into three groups: "ring", "mesh", and "powdery". The control beer had the lowest foam stability and did not yield any foam cling.

  9. Overt expression of AP-1 reduces alpha myosin heavy chain expression and contributes to heart failure from chronic volume overload.

    PubMed

    Freire, Grace; Ocampo, Catherina; Ilbawi, Nadim; Griffin, Andrew J; Gupta, Madhu

    2007-10-01

    Reduced expression of alpha-MHC plays a significant role in cardiac contractile dysfunction from hemodynamic overload. Previously, Pur proteins and YY1 have been shown to play a role in alpha-MHC repression during heart failure induced by pressure overload and by spontaneous hypertension, respectively. This was not observed in volume-overload-induced heart failure, suggesting additional regulatory mechanisms for alpha-MHC repression. The present study was performed to identify volume overload responsive transcription factors involved in alpha-MHC gene regulation. DNA binding activity of several transcription factors was evaluated in a functionally characterized rat model of heart failure induced by aorto-caval shunt. After 10 weeks of shunt, severe LV dilatation and reduced LV function were accompanied by increased expression of ANF and beta-MHC, and decreased expression of alpha-MHC. This was associated with dramatic (10-fold) activation of AP-1 together with increased expression of c-fos and c-jun. AP-1 activation was not observed following 4 weeks of shunt when cardiac function was preserved. In cultured cardiomyocytes, induction of AP-1 by PMA attenuated alpha-MHC mRNA by 60%. Transient transfection assays mapped PMA responsive sequence to -582 to -588 bp of alpha-MHC promoter. Deletion or mutation of these nucleotides had minimal effect on basal promoter activity but played a dominant role in PMA-mediated repression of alpha-MHC promoter activity. Over-expression of c-fos and c-jun in cardiomyocytes inhibited alpha-MHC promoter activity in a concentration dependent manner. Data suggest a repressive role of AP-1 in alpha-MHC expression and its possible involvement in the transition from compensatory hypertrophy to heart failure in chronic volume overload.

  10. Failure of isolated rat tibial periosteal cells to 5 alpha reduce testosterone to 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.T.; Bleiberg, B.; Colvard, D.S.; Keeting, P.E.; Evans, G.; Spelsberg, T.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Periosteal cells were isolated from tibiae of adult male rats after collagenase treatment. Northern blot analysis of total cytoplasmic RNA extracted from the isolated periosteal cells was positive for expression of genes encoding the osteoblast marker proteins osteocalcin (BGP) and pre-pro-alpha 2(I) chain of type 1 precollagen. The isolated periosteal cells were incubated with 1 nM (3H)testosterone (({sup 3}H)T) for up to 240 minutes and the reaction products separated by high-performance liquid chromatography. ({sup 3}H)5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (({sup 3}H)DHT) was not detected in extracts of periosteal cell incubations. In contrast, ({sup 3}H)DHT was produced in a time-dependent manner by cells from seminal vesicles. These results suggest that testosterone 5 alpha-reductase activity is not expressed by osteoblasts in rat tibial periosteum and that the anabolic effects of androgens in this tissue are not mediated by locally produced DHT.

  11. Essential oil of Myrtus communis inhibits inflammation in rats by reducing serum IL-6 and TNF-alpha.

    PubMed

    Maxia, Andrea; Frau, Maria Assunta; Falconieri, Danilo; Karchuli, Manvendra Singh; Kasture, Sanjay

    2011-10-01

    The topical antiinflammatory activity of the essential oil of Myrtus communis L. was studied using croton oil induced ear edema and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in mice, and cotton pellet induced granuloma, and serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in rats. On topical application, the oil exhibited a significant decrease in the ear edema as well as MPO activity. The oil also inhibited cotton pellet-induced granuloma and serum TNF-alpha and IL-6. It can be concluded that the essential oil of Myrtus communis reduces leukocyte migration to the damaged tissue and exhibits antiinflammatory activity.

  12. Treatment with alpha-lipoic acid reduces asymmetric dimethylarginine in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mittermayer, Friedrich; Pleiner, Johannes; Francesconi, Mario; Wolzt, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Elevated asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) concentrations predict cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). It has been shown that alpha-lipoic acid (ALA) improves endothelial function and oxidative stress in these patients. The present study investigated if ALA reduces ADMA in patients with T2DM. Plasma concentrations of ADMA, L-arginine and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) were determined in a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study in patients with T2DM. Intravenous ALA (n = 16) or placebo (n = 14) was administered daily for 3 weeks. ALA reduced ADMA while no change was observed with placebo (mean change -0.05 micromol/1[95% CI: -0.01; -0.09] vs. 0.01 micromol/1 [95% CI: -0.05; -0.03]; ANOVA p = 0.031). SDMA and L-arginine were not affected by ALA. In conclusion ALA treatment reduces ADMA in patients with T2DM. Long-term studies need to demonstrate if ALA may cause cardiovascular risk reduction.

  13. Development of reduced-fat mayonnaise using 4alphaGTase-modified rice starch and xanthan gum.

    PubMed

    Mun, Saehun; Kim, Young-Lim; Kang, Choon-Gil; Park, Kwan-Hwa; Shim, Jae-Yong; Kim, Yong-Ro

    2009-06-01

    In this study a disproportionating enzyme, 4-alpha-glucanotransferase (4alphaGTase), was used to modify the structural properties of rice starch to produce a suitable fat substitute in reduced-fat (RF) mayonnaise. The mayonnaise fat was partially substituted with the 4alphaGTase-treated starch paste at levels up to 50% in combination with xanthan gum and the physical and rheological properties of the modified RF mayonnaise samples were investigated. All mayonnaises prepared in this study exhibited shear thinning behavior and yield stress. Viscoelastic properties of mayonnaise were characterized using dynamic oscillatory shear test and it was observed that mayonnaises exhibited weak gel-like properties. The magnitude of elastic and loss moduli was also affected by 4alphaGTase-treated starch concentration and presence of xanthan gum. In relation to microstructure, RF mayonnaise prepared with 3.8 or 5.6 wt% of 4alphaGTase-treated starch and xanthan gum showed smaller droplets. The use of 5.6 wt% of 4alphaGTase-treated starch and 0.1 wt% of xanthan gum produced a RF mayonnaise with similar rheological properties and appearances as FF mayonnaise with gum. This study demonstrated a high feasibility for using 4alphaGTase-treated rice starch as a viable fat replacer in mayonnaise.

  14. beta-Naphthoflavone protects from peritonitis by reducing TNF-alpha-induced endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sheng-Yao; Liou, Je-Wen; Cheng, Tsung-Lin; Peng, Shih-Yi; Lin, Chi-Chen; Chu, Yuan-Yuan; Luo, Wei-Cheng; Huang, Zheng-Kai; Jiang, Shinn-Jong

    2015-12-01

    β-Naphthoflavone (β-NF), a ligand of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, has been shown to possess anti-oxidative properties. We investigated the anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory potential of β-NF in human microvascular endothelial cells treated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Pretreatment with β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species, translocation of p67(phox), and TNF-α-induced monocyte binding and transmigration. In addition, β-NF significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. The mRNA expression levels of the inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 were reduced by β-NF, as was the infiltration of white blood cells, in a peritonitis model. The inhibition of adhesion molecules was associated with suppressed nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and Akt, and suppressed phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38. The translocation of Egr-1, a downstream transcription factor involved in the MEK-ERK signaling pathway, was suppressed by β-NF treatment. Our findings show that β-NF inhibits TNF-α-induced NF-kB and ERK1/2 activation and ROS generation, thereby suppressing the expression of adhesion molecules. This results in reduced adhesion and transmigration of leukocytes in vitro and prevents the infiltration of leukocytes in a peritonitis model. Our findings also suggest that β-NF might prevent TNF-α-induced inflammation.

  15. alpha-MSH tripeptide analogs activate the melanocortin 1 receptor and reduce UV-induced DNA damage in human melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A; Ruwe, Andrew; Kavanagh-Starner, Renny; Kadekaro, Ana Luisa; Swope, Viki; Haskell-Luevano, Carrie; Koikov, Leonid; Knittel, James J

    2009-10-01

    One skin cancer prevention strategy that we are developing is based on synthesizing and testing melanocortin analogs that reduce and repair DNA damage resulting from exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation, in addition to stimulating pigmentation. Previously, we reported the effects of tetrapeptide analogs of alpha-melanocortin (alpha-MSH) that were more potent and stable than the physiological alpha-MSH, and mimicked its photoprotective effects against UV-induced DNA damage in human melanocytes. Here, we report on a panel of tripeptide analogs consisting of a modified alpha-MSH core His(6)-d-Phe(7)-Arg(8), which contained different N-capping groups, C-terminal modifications, or arginine mimics. The most potent tripeptides in activating cAMP formation and tyrosinase of human melanocytes were three analogs with C-terminal modifications. The most effective C-terminal tripeptide mimicked alpha-MSH in reducing hydrogen peroxide generation and enhancing nucleotide excision repair following UV irradiation. The effects of these three analogs required functional MC1R, as they were absent in human melanocytes that expressed non-functional receptor. These results demonstrate activation of the MC1R by tripeptide melanocortin analogs. Designing small analogs for topical delivery should prove practical and efficacious for skin cancer prevention.

  16. Hypoxia reduces constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in human proximal renal tubular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xuan; Kimura, Hideki . E-mail: hkimura@fmsrsa.fukui-med.ac.jp; Hirota, Kiichi; Sugimoto, Hidehiro; Yoshida, Haruyoshi

    2005-10-07

    Chronic hypoxia has been reported to be associated with macrophage infiltration in progressive forms of kidney disease. Here, we investigated the regulatory effects of hypoxia on constitutive and TNF-{alpha}-stimulated expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in cultured human proximal renal tubular cells (HPTECs). Hypoxia reduced constitutive MCP-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent fashion for up to 48 h. Hypoxia also inhibited MCP-1 up-regulation by TNF-{alpha}. Treatment with actinomycin D showed that hypoxic down-regulation of MCP-1 expression resulted mainly from a decrease in the transcription but not the mRNA stability. Immunoblot and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that treatment with hypoxia or an iron chelator, desferrioxamine, induced nuclear accumulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} (HIF-1{alpha}) in HPTECs. Desferrioxamine mimicked hypoxia in the reduction of MCP-1 expression. However, overexpression of a dominant negative form of HIF-1{alpha} did not abolish the hypoxia-induced reduction of MCP-1 expression in HPTECs. These results suggest that hypoxia is an important negative regulator of monocyte chemotaxis to the renal inflamed interstitium, by reducing MCP-1 expression partly via hypoxia-activated signals other than the HIF-1 pathway.

  17. Antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid inhibits osteoclast differentiation by reducing nuclear factor-kappaB DNA binding and prevents in vivo bone resorption induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand and tumor necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyon Jong; Chang, Eun-Ju; Kim, Hyun-Man; Lee, Seung Bok; Kim, Hyun-Duck; Su Kim, Ghi; Kim, Hong-Hee

    2006-05-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and bone mineral density or osteoporosis has recently been reported. As bone loss occurring in osteoporosis and inflammatory diseases is primarily due to increases in osteoclast number, reactive oxygen species (ROS) may be relevant to osteoclast differentiation, which requires receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) frequently present in inflammatory conditions has a profound synergy with RANKL in osteoclastogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of alpha-lipoic acid (alpha-LA), a strong antioxidant clinically used for some time, on osteoclast differentiation and bone resorption. At concentrations showing no growth inhibition, alpha-LA potently suppressed osteoclastogenesis from bone marrow-derived precursor cells driven either by a high-dose RANKL alone or by a low-dose RANKL plus TNF-alpha (RANKL/TNF-alpha). alpha-LA abolished ROS elevation by RANKL or RANKL/TNF-alpha and inhibited NF-kappaB activation in osteoclast precursor cells. Specifically, alpha-LA reduced DNA binding of NF-kappaB but did not inhibit IKK activation. Furthermore, alpha-LA greatly suppressed in vivo bone loss induced by RANKL or TNF-alpha in a calvarial remodeling model. Therefore, our data provide evidence that ROS plays an important role in osteoclast differentiation through NF-kappaB regulation and the antioxidant alpha-lipoic acid has a therapeutic potential for bone erosive diseases.

  18. Pregabalin action at a model synapse: binding to presynaptic calcium channel alpha2-delta subunit reduces neurotransmission in mice.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Indu; Taylor, Charles P

    2006-12-28

    Pregabalin, ((S)-3-(aminomethyl)-5-methylhexanoic acid, also known as (S)-3-isobutyl GABA, Lyricatrade mark) is approved for treatment of certain types of peripheral neuropathic pain and as an adjunctive therapy for partial seizures of epilepsy both the EU and the USA and also for generalized anxiety disorder in the EU. Though pregabalin binds selectively to the alpha(2)-delta (alpha(2)-delta) auxiliary subunit of voltage-gated calcium channels, the cellular details of pregabalin action are unclear. The high density of alpha(2)-delta in skeletal muscle fibers raises the question of whether pregabalin alters excitation-contraction coupling. We used the mouse soleus neuromuscular junction from mice containing an artificially mutated alpha(2)-delta Type 1 protein (R217A) as a model to examine the effect of pregabalin. Pregabalin reduced nerve-evoked muscle contractions by 16% at a clinically relevant concentration of 10 muM in wildtype mice. When acetylcholine receptors were blocked with curare, pregabalin had no effect on contraction from direct stimulation of muscle, suggesting a lack of drug effects on contraction coupling. Our data are consistent with pregabalin having no effect on striated muscle L-type calcium channel function. However, in mice expressing mutant (R217A) alpha(2)-delta Type 1, there was no significant effect of pregabalin on nerve-evoked muscle contraction. We propose that pregabalin reduces presynaptic neurotransmitter release without altering postsynaptic receptors or contraction coupling and that these effects require high affinity binding to alpha(2)-delta Type 1 auxiliary subunit of presynaptic voltage-gated calcium channels.

  19. Brief Report: Reduced Temporal-Central EEG Alpha Coherence During Joint Attention Perception in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Jaime, Mark; McMahon, Camilla M; Davidson, Bridget C; Newell, Lisa C; Mundy, Peter C; Henderson, Heather A

    2016-04-01

    Although prior studies have demonstrated reduced resting state EEG coherence in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), no studies have explored the nature of EEG coherence during joint attention. We examined the EEG coherence of the joint attention network in adolescents with and without ASD during congruent and incongruent joint attention perception and an eyes-open resting condition. Across conditions, adolescents with ASD showed reduced right hemisphere temporal-central alpha coherence compared to typically developing adolescents. Greater right temporal-central alpha coherence during joint attention was positively associated with social cognitive performance in typical development but not in ASD. These results suggest that, in addition to a resting state, EEG coherence during joint attention perception is reduced in ASD.

  20. Reduced Temporal-Central EEG Alpha Coherence during Joint Attention Perception in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Jaime, Mark; McMahon, Camilla M.; Davidson, Bridget C.; Newell, Lisa C.; Mundy, Peter C.; Henderson, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Although prior studies have demonstrated reduced resting state EEG coherence in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), no studies have explored the nature of EEG coherence during joint attention. We examined the EEG coherence of the joint attention network in adolescents with and without ASD during congruent and incongruent joint attention perception and an eyes-open resting condition. Across conditions, adolescents with ASD showed reduced right hemisphere temporal–central alpha coherence compared to typically developing adolescents. Greater right temporal–central alpha coherence during joint attention was positively associated with social cognitive performance in typical development but not in ASD. These results suggest that, in addition to a resting state, EEG coherence during joint attention perception is reduced in ASD. PMID:26659813

  1. The natural xanthone alpha-mangostin reduces oxidative damage in rat brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Márquez-Valadez, Berenice; Lugo-Huitrón, Rafael; Valdivia-Cerda, Verónica; Miranda-Ramírez, Luis Rubén; Pérez-De La Cruz, Verónica; González-Cuahutencos, Octavio; Rivero-Cruz, Isabel; Mata, Rachel; Santamaría, Abel; Pedraza-Chaverrí, José

    2009-02-01

    The antiperoxidative properties of alpha-mangostin, a xanthone isolated from mangosteen fruit, were tested for the first time in nerve tissue exposed to different toxic insults. Two reliable biological preparations (rat brain homogenates and synaptosomal P2 fractions) were exposed to the toxic actions of a free radical generator (ferrous sulfate), an excitotoxic agent (quinolinate), and a mitochondrial toxin (3-nitropropionate). alpha-Mangostin decreased the lipoperoxidative action of FeSO(4) in both preparations in a concentration-dependent manner, and completely abolished the peroxidative effects of quinolinate, 3-nitropropionate and FeSO(4) + quinolinate at all concentrations tested. Interestingly, when tested alone in brain homogenates, alpha-mangostin significantly decreased the lipoperoxidation even below basal levels. alpha-Mangostin also prevented the decreased reductant capacity of mitochondria in synaptosomal fractions. Our results suggest that alpha-mangostin exerts a robust antiperoxidative effect in brain tissue preparations probably through its properties as a free radical scavenger. In light of these findings, this antioxidant should be tested in other neurotoxic models involving oxidative stress.

  2. Hyperglycemia reduces integrin subunits alpha v and alpha 5 on the surface of dermal fibroblasts contributing to deficient migration.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maira Estanislau S; Monteiro, Kelly S; Kato, Ellen E; Sampaio, Sandra C; Braga, Tarcio T; Câmara, Niels O S; Lamers, Marcelo L; Santos, Marinilce F

    2016-10-01

    Deficient wound healing is a common multifactorial complication in diabetic patients, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved are poorly defined. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of hyperglycemia on integrins expression in rat dermal fibroblasts and addressed its role in cell adhesion and migration. Diabetes Mellitus was induced in rats by streptozotocin injection and maintained for 30 days. Primary cultures of dermal fibroblasts from control and diabetic rats were maintained under low glucose (5 mM D-glucose) or high glucose (30 mM D-glucose) for 7 days. Cell adhesion and migration were studied by kymography, transwell, and time-lapse assays, and the expressions of integrin subunits αv and α5 were studied by immunocytochemistry and western blotting. Fibroblasts derived from diabetic rats confirmed a reduced migration speed and delayed spreading compared to fibroblasts derived from control rats. The membrane fraction of diabetic-derived fibroblasts showed a decrease of integrin subunits α5 and αv, which was confirmed by immunocytochemistry assays. A reduction in the pericellular fibronectin matrix was also observed. The exposure of diabetic-derived cells to a higher concentration of exogenous fibronectin improved migration velocity and the expression of αv but did not completely restore their migration capacity. In conclusion, the mechanisms involved in the deleterious effects of Diabetes Mellitus on wound healing include the ability of fibroblasts to secrete and to adhere to fibronectin.

  3. The 5-alpha reductase inhibitor finasteride reduces dyskinesia in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Frau, Roberto; Savoia, Paola; Fanni, Silvia; Fiorentini, Chiara; Fidalgo, Camino; Tronci, Elisabetta; Stancampiano, Roberto; Meloni, Mario; Cannas, Antonino; Marrosu, Francesco; Bortolato, Marco; Devoto, Paola; Missale, Cristina; Carta, Manolo

    2017-05-01

    Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID) is a disabling motor complication occurring in Parkinson's disease patients (PD) after long-term l-DOPA treatment. Although its etiology remains unclear, there is accumulating evidence that LID relies on an excessive dopamine receptor transmission, particularly at the downstream signaling of D1 receptors. We previously reported that the pharmacological blockade of 5-alpha reductase (5AR), the rate limiting enzyme in neurosteroids synthesis, rescued a number of behavioral aberrations induced by D1 receptor-selective and non-selective agonists, without inducing extrapyramidal symptoms. Thus, the present study was designed to verify whether the 5AR inhibitor finasteride (FIN) may counteract the dyskinesias induced by dopaminergic agonists in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats. First, we assessed the acute and chronic effect of different doses of FIN (30-60mg/kg) on LID, in male 6-OHDA-lesioned dyskinetic rats. Thereafter, to fully characterize the therapeutic potential of FIN on LID and its impact on l-DOPA efficacy, we assessed abnormal involuntary movements and forelimb use in hemiparkinsonian male rats chronically injected with FIN (30-60mg/kg/24days) either prior to- or concomitant with l-DOPA administration. In addition, to investigate whether the impact of FIN on LID may be ascribed to a modulation of the D1- or D2/D3-receptor function, dyskinesias were assessed in l-DOPA-primed 6-OHDA-lesioned rats that received FIN in combination with selective direct dopaminergic agonists. Finally, we set to investigate whether FIN may produce similar effect in female hemiparkinsonian rats, as seen in males. The results indicated that FIN administrations significantly dampened LID in all tested treatment regimens, without interfering with the ability of l-DOPA to ameliorate forelimb use in the stepping test. The antidyskinetic effect appears to be due to modulation of both D1- and D2/D3-receptor function, as FIN also reduced abnormal

  4. Alpha-1 antitrypsin reduces ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha-1antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional protein with proteinase inhibitor and anti-inflammatory activities. Recent studies showed that AAT has therapeutic effect for diseases associated with inflammation, such as type 1 diabetes and arthritis. Proinflammatory cytokines are primary mediators of...

  5. Repeated sauna therapy reduces urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2alpha).

    PubMed

    Masuda, Akinori; Miyata, Masaaki; Kihara, Takashi; Minagoe, Shinichi; Tei, Chuwa

    2004-03-01

    We have reported that repeated sauna therapy improves impaired vascular endothelial function in a patient with coronary risk factors. We hypothesized that sauna therapy decreases urinary 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2alpha) (PGF(2alpha)) levels as a marker of oxidative stress and conducted a randomized, controlled study. Twenty-eight patients with at least one coronary risk factor were divided into a sauna group (n = 14) and non-sauna group (n = 14). Sauna therapy was performed with a 60 degrees C far infrared-ray dry sauna for 15 minutes and then bed rest with a blanket for 30 minutes once a day for two weeks. Systolic blood pressure and increased urinary 8-epi-PGF(2alpha) levels in the sauna group were significantly lower than those in the non-sauna group at two weeks after admission (110 +/- 15 mmHg vs 122 +/- 13 mmHg, P < 0.05, 230 +/- 67 pg/mg x creatinine vs 380 +/- 101 pg/mg x creatinine, P < 0.0001, respectively). These results suggest that repeated sauna therapy may protect against oxidative stress, which leads to the prevention of atherosclerosis.

  6. Metallothionein treatment reduces proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-alpha and apoptotic cell death during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE).

    PubMed

    Penkowa, M; Hidalgo, J

    2001-07-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for the human autoimmune disease multiple sclerosis (MS). Proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) are considered important for induction and pathogenesis of EAE/MS disease, which is characterized by significant inflammation and neuroglial damage. We have recently shown that the exogenous administration of the antioxidant protein zinc-metallothionein-II (Zn-MT-II) significantly decreased the clinical symptoms, mortality, and leukocyte infiltration of the CNS during EAE. However, it is not known how EAE progression is regulated nor how cytokine production and cell death can be reduced. We herewith demonstrate that treatment with Zn-MT-II significantly decreased the CNS expression of IL-6 and TNF-alpha during EAE. Zn-MT-II treatment could also significantly reduce apoptotic cell death of neurons and oligodendrocytes during EAE, as judged by using TUNEL and immunoreactivity for cytochrome c and caspases 1 and 3. In contrast, the number of apoptotic lymphocytes and macrophages was less affected by Zn-MT-II treatment. The Zn-MT-II-induced decrease in proinflammatory cytokines and apoptosis during EAE could contribute to the reported diminution of clinical symptoms and mortality in EAE-immunized rats receiving Zn-MT-II treatment. Our results demonstrate that MT-II reduces the CNS expression of proinflammatory cytokines and the number of apoptotic neurons during EAE in vivo and that MT-II might be a potentially useful factor for treatment of EAE/MS.

  7. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  8. Alpha 1-antitrypsin reduces inflammation and enhances mouse pancreatic islet transplant survival.

    PubMed

    Koulmanda, Maria; Bhasin, Manoj; Fan, Zhigang; Hanidziar, Dusan; Goel, Nipun; Putheti, Prabhakar; Movahedi, Babak; Libermann, Towia A; Strom, Terry B

    2012-09-18

    The promise of islet cell transplantation cannot be fully realized in the absence of improvements in engraftment of resilient islets. The marginal mass of islets surviving the serial peritransplant insults may lead to exhaustion and thereby contribute to an unacceptably high rate of intermediate and long-term graft loss. Hence, we have studied the effects of treatment with alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) in a syngeneic nonautoimmune islet graft model. A marginal number of syngeneic mouse islets were transplanted into nonautoimmune diabetic hosts and islet function was analyzed in control and AAT treated hosts. In untreated controls, marginal mass islet transplants did not restore euglycemia. Outcomes were dramatically improved by short-term AAT treatment. Transcriptional profiling identified 1,184 differentially expressed transcripts in AAT-treated hosts at 3 d posttransplantation. Systems-biology-based analysis revealed AAT down-regulated regulatory hubs formed by inflammation-related molecules (e.g., TNF-α, NF-κB). The conclusions yielded by the systems-biology analysis were rigorously confirmed by QRT-PCR and immunohistology. These data suggest that short-term AAT treatment of human islet transplant recipients may be worthy of a clinical trial.

  9. The alpha1 adrenergic receptor antagonist prazosin reduces heroin self-administration in rats with extended access to heroin administration.

    PubMed

    Greenwell, Thomas N; Walker, Brendan M; Cottone, Pietro; Zorrilla, Eric P; Koob, George F

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have reported that noradrenergic antagonists alleviate some of the symptoms of opiate withdrawal and dependence. Clinical studies also have shown that modification of the noradrenergic system may help protect patients from relapse. The present study tested the hypothesis that a dysregulated noradrenergic system has motivational significance in heroin self-administration of dependent rats. Prazosin, an alpha1-adrenergic antagonist (0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 mg/kg, i.p.), was administered to adult male Wistar rats with a history of limited (1 h/day; short access) or extended (12 h/day; long access) access to intravenous heroin self-administration. Prazosin dose-dependently reduced heroin self-administration in long-access rats but not short-access rats, with 2 mg/kg of systemic prazosin significantly decreasing 1 h and 2 h heroin intake. Prazosin also reversed some changes in meal pattern associated with extended heroin access, including the taking of smaller and briefer meals (at 3 h), while also increasing total food intake and slowing the eating rate within meals (both 3 h and 12 h). Thus, prazosin appears to stimulate food intake in extended access rats by restoring meals to the normal size and duration. The data suggest that the alpha1 adrenergic system may contribute to mechanisms that promote dependence in rats with extended access.

  10. The free radical spin-trap alpha-PBN attenuates periinfarct depolarizations following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats without reducing infarct volume.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, Torben; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2003-11-14

    The effect of the free radical spin-trap alpha-phenyl-butyl-tert-nitrone (alpha-PBN) in permanent focal cerebral ischemia in rats was examined in two series of experiments. In the first, rats were subjected to permanent occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO) and treated 1 h after occlusion with a single dose of alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg) or saline. Body temperature was measured and controlled for the first 24 h to obtain identical temperature curves in the two groups. Cortical infarct volumes were determined on histological sections 7 days later. alpha-PBN did not significantly reduce infarct volume (control: 28.3+/-16.3 mm3 vs. alpha-PBN 23.7+/-7.4 mm3). In the second series of experiments, periinfarct depolarizations (PIDs) were recorded with an extracellular DC electrode at two locations in the ischemic penumbra for the initial 3 h following MCAO. alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg, single dose in conjunction with occlusion) significantly reduced the total number (median value of 3 PIDs in the control groups vs. 1 PID in alpha-PBN groups, p<0.001) and total duration of the PIDs (median value 662 s in the control groups vs. 162 s in the alpha-PBN groups, p<0.006). In spite of this, cortical infarct volumes determined 7 days later in the same rats were not smaller in alpha-PBN-treated rats. The study thus demonstrates that attenuation of PIDs does not always lead to smaller infarcts if permanent arterial occlusion is followed by long survival time and does not support the hypothesis that PIDs per se are critical determinants of infarct size in this situation.

  11. Resonances and resonance widths

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, T.

    1986-05-01

    Two-dimensional betatron resonances are much more important than their simple one-dimensional counterparts and exhibit a strong dependence on the betatron phase advance per cell. A practical definition of ''width'' is expanded upon in order to display these relations in tables. A primarily pedagogical introduction is given to explain the tables, and also to encourage a wider capability for deriving resonance behavior and wider use of ''designer'' resonances.

  12. Toxicity and residual action of the photoactivated compound, cyano-alpha-terthienyl, and its efficacy for reducing pre-imaginal populations of mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Dosdall, L M; Galloway, M M; Arnason, J T

    1992-06-01

    The photoactivated compound, cyano-alpha-terthienyl (cyano-alpha-T), was highly toxic to pre-imagines of the mosquitoes Culex restuans, Cx. tarsalis and Culiseta inornata when synergized with piperonyl butoxide (PBO). Lethal concentrations for 50% mortality, determined during an outdoor trial using caged fourth-instar Culex spp. larvae, were 19.4, 15.4 and 12.9 g/ha at 24, 48 and 72 h after treatment, respectively. No residual activity of cyano-alpha-T was observed beyond 24 h following treatment. In artificial pool tests, greatest population reductions were achieved using dosages of 20 and 40 g/ha; statistically significant reductions were not observed following applications of 5 g/ha. Cyano-alpha-T plus PBO was more effective for reducing mosquito populations than alpha-terthienyl (alpha-T) plus PBO at comparable dosages, although it exhibited slightly lower insecticidal activity at a dosage of 20 g/ha than a formulation of Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Vectobac 12 AS, 0.12 ml/m2). Greatest effectiveness of cyano-alpha-T plus PBO was observed in pools with low organic content relative to pools high in organic content.

  13. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increases long-chain fatty acid oxidation and reduces cell viability with incremental palmitic acid concentration in 293T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jambor de Sousa, Ulrike L.; Koss, Michael D.; Fillies, Marion; Gahl, Anja; Scheeder, Martin R.L.; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Geary, Nori; Langhans, Wolfgang; Leonhardt, Monika . E-mail: monika.leonhardt@inw.agrl.ethz.ch

    2005-12-16

    To test the cellular response to an increased fatty acid oxidation, we generated a vector for an inducible expression of the rate-limiting enzyme carnitine palmitoyl-transferase 1{alpha} (CPT1{alpha}). Human embryonic 293T kidney cells were transiently transfected and expression of the CPT1{alpha} transgene in the tet-on vector was activated with doxycycline. Fatty acid oxidation was measured by determining the conversion of supplemented, synthetic cis-10-heptadecenoic acid (C17:1n-7) to C15:ln-7. CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid oxidation about 6-fold. Addition of palmitic acid (PA) decreased viability of CPT1{alpha} over-expressing cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Both, PA and CPT1{alpha} over-expression increased cell death. Interestingly, PA reduced total cell number only in cells over-expressing CPT1{alpha}, suggesting an effect on cell proliferation that requires PA translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. This inducible expression system should be well suited to study the roles of CPT1 and fatty acid oxidation in lipotoxicity and metabolism in vivo.

  14. Women at altitude: short-term exposure to hypoxia and/or alpha(1)-adrenergic blockade reduces insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Braun, B; Rock, P B; Zamudio, S; Wolfel, G E; Mazzeo, R S; Muza, S R; Fulco, C S; Moore, L G; Butterfield, G E

    2001-08-01

    After short-term exposure to high altitude (HA), men appear to be less sensitive to insulin than at sea level (SL). We hypothesized that the same would be true in women, that reduced insulin sensitivity would be directly related to the rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations at altitude, and that the addition of alpha-adrenergic blockade would potentiate the reduction. To test the hypotheses, 12 women consumed a high-carbohydrate meal at SL and after 16 h at simulated 4,300-m elevation (HA). Subjects were studied twice at each elevation: once with prazosin (Prz), an alpha(1)-adrenergic antagonist, and once with placebo (Pla). Mathematical models were used to assess insulin resistance based on fasting [homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR)] and postprandial [composite model insulin sensitivity index (C-ISI)] glucose and insulin concentrations. Relative to SL-Pla (HOMA-IR: 1.86 +/- 0.35), insulin resistance was greater in HA-Pla (3.00 +/- 0.45; P < 0.05), SL-Prz (3.46 +/- 0.51; P < 0.01), and HA-Prz (2.82 +/- 0.43; P < 0.05). Insulin sensitivity was reduced in HA-Pla (C-ISI: 4.41 +/- 1.03; P < 0.01), SL-Prz (5.73 +/- 1.01; P < 0.05), and HA-Prz (4.18 +/- 0.99; P < 0.01) relative to SL-Pla (8.02 +/- 0.92). Plasma epinephrine was significantly elevated in HA-Pla (0.57 +/- 0.08 ng/ml; P < 0.01), SL-Prz (0.42 +/- 0.07; P < 0.05), and HA-Prz (0.82 +/- 0.07; P < 0.01) relative to SL-Pla (0.28 +/- 0.04), but correlations with HOMA-IR, HOMA-beta-cell function, and C-ISI were weak. In women, short-term exposure to simulated HA reduced insulin sensitivity compared with SL. The change does not appear to be directly mediated by a concurrent rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations.

  15. Diatomic predissociation line widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Child, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    Predissociation by rotation and curve crossing in diatomic molecules is discussed. The pattern of predissociation line widths is seen as providing a highly sensitive yardstick for the determination of unknown potential curves. In addition, the computation of such a pattern for given potential curves is considered a matter of routine, unless the predissociation happens to occur from an adiabatic potential curve. Analytic formulas are used to provide physical insight into the details of the predissociation pattern, to the extent that a direct inversion procedure is developed for determination of the repulsive potential curves for Type 1 predissociations.

  16. Osteoclast formation is strongly reduced both in vivo and in vitro in the absence of CD47/SIRP{alpha}-interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, Pernilla . E-mail: pernilla.lundberg@odont.umu.se; Koskinen, Cecilia; Baldock, Paul A.; Loethgren, Hanna; Stenberg, Asa; Lerner, Ulf H.; Oldenborg, Per-Arne

    2007-01-12

    Physical interaction between the cell surface receptors CD47 and signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRP{alpha}) was reported to regulate cell migration, phagocytosis, cytokine production, and macrophage fusion. However, it is unclear if the CD47/SIRP{alpha}-interaction can also regulate macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL)-stimulated formation of osteoclasts. Here, we show that functional blocking antibodies to either CD47 or SIRP{alpha} strongly reduced formation of multinucleated tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP){sup +} osteoclasts in cultures of murine hematopoietic cells, stimulated in vitro by M-CSF and RANKL. In addition, the numbers of osteoclasts formed in M-CSF/RANKL-stimulated bone marrow macrophage cultures from CD47 {sup -/-} mice were strongly reduced, and bones of CD47 {sup -/-} mice exhibited significantly reduced osteoclast numbers, as compared with wild-type controls. We conclude that the CD47/SIRP{alpha} interaction is important for M-CSF/RANKL-stimulated osteoclast formation both in vivo and in vitro, and that absence of CD47 results in decreased numbers of osteoclasts in CD47 {sup -/-} mice.

  17. New evidence that both T-type calcium channels and GABAA channels are responsible for the potent peripheral analgesic effects of 5alpha-reduced neuroactive steroids.

    PubMed

    Pathirathna, Sriyani; Brimelow, Barbara C; Jagodic, Miljen M; Krishnan, Kathiresan; Jiang, Xin; Zorumski, Charles F; Mennerick, Steven; Covey, Douglas F; Todorovic, Slobodan M; Jevtovic-Todorovic, Vesna

    2005-04-01

    Neurosteroids are potent blockers of neuronal low-voltage activated (T-type) Ca(2+) channels and potentiators of GABA(A) ligand-gated channels, but their effects in peripheral pain pathways have not been studied previously. To investigate potential analgesic effects and the ion channels involved, we tested the ability of locally injected 5alpha-reduced neurosteroids to modulate peripheral thermal nociception to radiant heat in adult rats in vivo and to modulate GABA(A) and T-type Ca(2+) channels in vitro. The steroid anesthetic alphaxalone (ALPX), the endogenous neurosteroid allopregnanolone (3alpha5alphaP), and a related compound ((3alpha,5alpha,17beta)-3-hydroxyandrostane-17-carbonitrile, (ACN)), induced potent, dose-dependent, enantioselective anti-nociception in vivo and modulation of both T-type Ca(2+) currents and GABA(A)-mediated currents in vitro. Analgesic effects of ALPX were incompletely antagonized by co-injections of the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline. The neurosteroid analogue ((3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxy-13,24-cyclo-18,21-dinorchol-22-en-24-ol (CDNC24), a compound with GABAergic but not T-type activity, was not analgesic. However, (3beta,5alpha,17beta)-17-hydroxyestrane-3-carbonitrile (ECN)), which has effects on T-type channels but not on GABA(A) receptors, also induced potent enantioselective peripheral anti-nociception. ECN increased pain thresholds less than ALPX, 3alpha5alphaP and ACN. However, when an ineffective dose of CDNC24 was combined with ECN, anti-nociceptive activity was greatly enhanced, and this effect was bicuculline-sensitive. These results strongly suggest that GABA(A) channels do not contribute to baseline pain transmission, but they can enhance anti-nociception mediated by blockade of T-type Ca(2+) channels. In conclusion, we demonstrate that potent peripheral analgesia induced by 5alpha-reduced neurosteroid is mediated in part by effects on T-type Ca(2+) channels. Our results also reveal a role of GABA-gated ion channels

  18. The human alpha defensin HD5 neutralizes JC polyomavirus infection by reducing endoplasmic reticulum traffic and stabilizing the viral capsid.

    PubMed

    Zins, Stephen R; Nelson, Christian D S; Maginnis, Melissa S; Banerjee, Rahul; O'Hara, Bethany A; Atwood, Walter J

    2014-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a fatal disease with limited treatment options, both clinically and in the research pipeline. Potential therapies would target and neutralize its etiologic agent, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV). The innate immune response to JCPyV infection has not been studied, and little is known about the initial host response to polyomavirus infection. This study examined the ability of a human alpha defensin, HD5, to neutralize JCPyV infection in human fetal glial cells. We show that HD5, by binding to the virion, blocks infection. The JCPyV-HD5 complexes bind to and enter host cells but are reduced in their ability to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where virions are normally uncoated. Furthermore, HD5 binding to the virion stabilizes the capsid and prevents genome release. Our results show that HD5 neutralizes JCPyV infection at an early postentry step in the viral life cycle by stabilizing the viral capsid and disrupting JCPyV trafficking. This study provides a naturally occurring platform for developing antivirals to treat PML and also expands on the known capabilities of human defensins.

  19. The Human Alpha Defensin HD5 Neutralizes JC Polyomavirus Infection by Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Traffic and Stabilizing the Viral Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Zins, Stephen R.; Nelson, Christian D. S.; Maginnis, Melissa S.; Banerjee, Rahul; O'Hara, Bethany A.

    2014-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a fatal disease with limited treatment options, both clinically and in the research pipeline. Potential therapies would target and neutralize its etiologic agent, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV). The innate immune response to JCPyV infection has not been studied, and little is known about the initial host response to polyomavirus infection. This study examined the ability of a human alpha defensin, HD5, to neutralize JCPyV infection in human fetal glial cells. We show that HD5, by binding to the virion, blocks infection. The JCPyV-HD5 complexes bind to and enter host cells but are reduced in their ability to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where virions are normally uncoated. Furthermore, HD5 binding to the virion stabilizes the capsid and prevents genome release. Our results show that HD5 neutralizes JCPyV infection at an early postentry step in the viral life cycle by stabilizing the viral capsid and disrupting JCPyV trafficking. This study provides a naturally occurring platform for developing antivirals to treat PML and also expands on the known capabilities of human defensins. PMID:24198413

  20. Estradiol reduces nonclassical transcription at cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate response elements in glioma cells expressing estrogen receptor alpha.

    PubMed

    Mhyre, Andrew J; Shapiro, Robert A; Dorsa, Daniel M

    2006-04-01

    Estradiol can protect the brain from a variety of insults by activating membrane-initiated signaling pathways, and thereby modulate gene expression and lead to functional changes in neurons. These direct neuronal effects of the hormone have been well documented; however, it is less understood what effects estradiol may have on nonneuronal cells of the central nervous system. There is evidence that estradiol levels can induce the release of glial-derived growth factors and other cytokines, suggesting that estradiol may both directly and indirectly protect neurons. To determine whether 17beta-estradiol (E2) can activate rapid signaling and modulate nonclassical transcription in astrocytes, we stably transfected the C6 rat glioblastoma cell line with human estrogen receptor (ER) alpha (C6ERalpha) or rat ERbeta (C6ERbeta). Introduction of a cAMP response element-luciferase reporter gene into C6, C6ERalpha, and C6ERbeta cells leads to the observation that E2 treatment reduced isoproterenol-stimulated luciferase activity by 35% in C6ERalpha but had no effect on reporter gene expression in C6ERbeta or untransfected C6 cells. A similar effect was seen with a membrane-impermeable estrogen (E2-BSA), suggesting the modulation of nonclassical transcription by estradiol treatment is mediated by the activation of a membrane-initiated signaling pathway. Furthermore, pretreatment with wortmannin (phosphatidylinsositol 3-kinase) or U73122 (phospholipase C) attenuated the E2-induced reduction in nonclassical transcription. We conclude that E2 treatment reduces cAMP response element-mediated transcription in glioma cells expressing ERalpha and that this reduction is dependent on the activation of membrane-initiated signaling. These findings suggest a novel model of estrogen rapid signaling in astrocytes that leads to modulation of nonclassical transcription.

  1. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R reduces thrombin generation when displayed on the surface of cells expressing tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Richard F; Pepler, Laura; Bhagirath, Vinai; Liaw, Patricia C; Sheffield, William P

    2014-11-01

    The M358R variant of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is a potent soluble inhibitor of thrombin. Previously we engineered AR-API M358R, a membrane-bound form of this protein and showed that it inhibited exogenous thrombin when expressed on transfected cells lacking tissue factor (TF). To determine the suitability of AR-API M358R for gene transfer to vascular cells to limit thrombogenicity, we tested the ability of AR-API M358R to inhibit endogenous thrombin generated in plasma via co-expression co-expressing it on the surface of cells expressing TF. Transfected AR-API M358R formed inhibitory complexes with thrombin following exposure of recalcified, defibrinated plasma to TF on T24/83 cells, but discontinuously monitored thrombin generation was unaffected. Similarly, AR-API M358R expression did not reduce continuously monitored thrombin generation by T24/83 cell suspensions exposed to recalcified normal plasma in a Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope-type thrombin generation assay (TGA); in contrast, 1 μM hirudin variant 3 or soluble API M358R abolished thrombin generation. Gene transfer of TF to HEK 293 conferred the ability to support TF-dependent thrombin generation on HEK 293 cells. Co-transfection of HEK 293 cells with a 9:1 excess of DNA encoding AR-API M358R to that encoding TF reduced peak thrombin generation approximately 3-fold compared to controls. These in vitro results suggest that surface display of API M358R inhibits thrombin generation when the tethered serpin is expressed in excess of TF, and suggest its potential to limit thrombosis in appropriate vascular beds in animal models.

  2. The widths of the α decaying states of 12C within the three-cluster model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, D. V.; Jensen, A. S.; Fynbo, H. O. U.

    2003-05-01

    We estimate the widths of the alpha decaying states of 12C (1+, 1-, 1-1, 2+, 2-, 3-, and 4+) within the three-alpha cluster model. We solve the Faddeev equations using the hyperspheric approach and calculate the decisive effective hyper-radial barriers. We calculate the widths in the WKB approximation and compare with experimental data.

  3. Eugenol reduces acute pain in mice by modulating the glutamatergic and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) pathways.

    PubMed

    Dal Bó, Wladmir; Luiz, Ana Paula; Martins, Daniel F; Mazzardo-Martins, Leidiane; Santos, Adair R S

    2013-10-01

    Eugenol is utilized together with zinc oxide in odontological clinical for the cementation of temporary prostheses and the temporary restoration of teeth and cavities. This work explored the antinociceptive effects of the eugenol in different models of acute pain in mice and investigated its possible modulation of the inhibitory (opioid) and excitatory (glutamatergic and pro-inflammatory cytokines) pathways of nociceptive signaling. The administration of eugenol (3-300 mg/kg, p.o., 60 min or i.p., 30 min) inhibited 82 ± 10% and 90 ± 6% of the acetic acid-induced nociception, with ID₅₀ values of 51.3 and 50.2 mg/kg, respectively. In the glutamate test, eugenol (0.3-100 mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the response behavior by 62 ± 5% with an ID₅₀ of 5.6 mg/kg. In addition, the antinociceptive effect of eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) in the glutamate test was prevented by the i.p. treatment for mice with naloxone. The pretreatment of mice with eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) was able to inhibit the nociception induced by the intrathecal (i.t.) injection of glutamate (37 ± 9%), kainic (acid kainite) (41 ± 12%), α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) (55 ± 5%), and substance P (SP) (39 ± 8%). Furthermore, eugenol (10 mg/kg, i.p.) also inhibited biting induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, 65 ± 8%). These results extend our current knowledge of eugenol and confirm that it promotes significant antinociception against different mouse models of acute pain. The mechanism of action appears to involve the modulation of the opioid system and glutamatergic receptors (i.e., kainate and AMPA), and the inhibition of TNF-α. Thus, eugenol could represent an important compound in the treatment for acute pain.

  4. Reducing renal uptake of 90Y- and 177Lu-labeled alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone peptide analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Yubin; Fisher, Darrell R.; Quinn, Thomas P.

    2006-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to improve the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-[1,2,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid-Re-Cys,D-Phe,Arg]alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH), through coupling a negatively charged glutamic acid (Glu) to the peptide sequence. A new peptide of DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH was designed, synthesized and labeled with 90Y and 177Lu. Pharmacokinetics of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Glu,Arg)CCNSH were determined in B16/F1 murine melanoma-bearing C57 mice. Both exhibited significantly less renal uptake than 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH at 30 min and at 2, 3, and 24 h after dose administration. The renal uptake values of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH were 28.16% and 28.81% of those of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-RE(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 hr post-injection. We also showed higher tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios 2.28 and 1.69 times that of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Arg)CCMSH, respectively, at 4 h post-injection. The90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH activity accumulation was low in normal organs except for kidneys. Coupling a negatively charged amino acid (Glu) to the CCMSH peptide sequence dramatically reduced the renal uptake values and increased the tumor-to-kidney uptake ratios of 90Y- and 177Lu-DOTA-Re(Glu,Arg)CCMSH, facilitating their potential applications as radiopharmaceuticals for targeted radionuclide therapy of melanoma.

  5. Corticosteroid-binding globulin cleavage is paradoxically reduced in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: Implications for cortisol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nenke, Marni A; Holmes, Mark; Rankin, Wayne; Lewis, John G; Torpy, David J

    2016-01-15

    High-affinity corticosteroid-binding globulin (haCBG) is cleaved by neutrophil elastase (NE) resulting in permanent transition to the low cortisol-binding affinity form (laCBG), thereby increasing cortisol availability at inflammatory sites. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major inhibitor of NE. AAT deficiency (AATD) predisposes patients to early-onset emphysema due to increased proteolytic destruction from the inherent proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance. We hypothesized that AATD may result in increased CBG cleavage in vivo. We collected demographic data and blood samples from 10 patients with AATD and 28 healthy controls measuring total CBG and haCBG levels by parallel in-house ELISAs, as well as AAT, total and free cortisol levels. haCBG was higher (median [range]); 329 [210-551] vs. 250 [175-365] nmol/L; P<0.005, and laCBG lower; 174 [68-229] vs. 220 [119-348] nmol/L; P=0.016 in the AATD group, compared with controls. The ratio of haCBG:total CBG was also higher in AATD; 72 [53-83] vs. 54 [41-72] %; P=0.0001). There was a negative correlation between haCBG:total CBG and AAT levels (P<0.05, R=-0.64). Paradoxically, proteolytic cleavage of CBG was reduced in AATD, despite the recognized increase in NE activity. This implies that NE activity is not the mechanism for systemic CBG cleavage in basal, low inflammatory conditions. Relatively low levels of laCBG may have implications for cortisol action in AATD.

  6. Platelets of the Wistar Furth rat have reduced levels of alpha-granule proteins. An animal model resembling gray platelet syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, C W; Hutson, N K; Steward, S A; Saito, N; Cramer, E M

    1991-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar Furth (WF) strain have hereditary macrothrombocytopenia (large mean platelet volume [MPV] with increased platelet size heterogeneity and reduced platelet count). Ultrastructural studies suggest that this anomaly results from erratic subdivision of megakaryocyte cytoplasm into platelets. In this study, we have examined protein profiles of platelets of WF rats for biochemical abnormalities associated with this anomaly. Marked decreases in protein bands with an Mr of 185, 57, 53, 16, 13, and 8 kd were observed in one-dimensional reduced SDS-PAGE gels in WF platelets compared with platelets of Wistar, Long Evans, and Sprague-Dawley rats. These proteins were released into the supernatant when washed platelets were treated with thrombin suggesting that they were alpha-granule proteins. These abnormalities were not present in offspring of crosses between Wistar Furth and Wistar rats; however, they were present in platelets of offspring with large MPV derived from backcrosses of (WF X Wistar) F1 males to WF females, but not in backcross offspring with normal platelet size. Immunoblotting confirmed decreased levels of thrombospondin, fibrinogen, and platelet factor 4 in WF platelets. Electron microscopic examination revealed that platelet alpha granules were usually smaller in Wistar Furth than in Wistar rats. In addition, immunogold electron microscopy demonstrated that the surface connected canalicular system of the large Wistar Furth platelets, contained dense material composed of alpha-granule proteins, not present in Wistar platelets. From these results, we conclude that the Wistar Furth rat platelet phenotype of large mean platelet volume and decreased levels of alpha-granule proteins represents an animal model resembling gray platelet syndrome. The autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance of the large MPV phenotype and platelet alpha-granule protein deficiencies suggests that a component common to both formation of platelet alpha granules, and

  7. Effect of mild-thiol reducing agents and alpha2,3-sialyltransferase expression on secretion and sialylation of recombinant EPO in CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kern Hee; Jeong, Yeon Tae; Kwak, Chan Yeong; Choi, One; Kim, Jung Hoe

    2013-05-01

    We have previously reported that N-acetylcysteine (NAC) not only delayed apoptosis but also enhanced the production of recombinant erythropoietin (EPO) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell culture. To investigate the production enhancement mechanism, the effects of similar thiolreducing agents were studied. Intriguingly, all mild reducing agents examined including mercaptoethanesulfonic acid (MESNA), thiolactic acid (TLA), and thioglycolate (TG) were shown to block apoptosis and increase EPO production. A pulse-chase study of EPO secretion revealed that all four thiol-reducing agents increased the EPO secretion rate; among them TLA showed the highest rate. In terms of product quality, the sialic acid content of the glycoprotein is one of the most important factors. It was reported that a number of glycoproteins produced by CHO cells often have incomplete sialylation, particularly under high-producing conditions. Human alpha2,3-sialyltransferase (alpha2,3-ST) was introduced into EPO-producing CHO cells in order to compensate for the reduced sialylation during supplementation with NAC. When alpha2,3-ST was expressed in the presence of NAC, reduced sialylation was restored and an even more sialylated EPO was produced. Thus, our study is significant in that it offers increased EPO production while still allowing the prevention of decreased sialylation of EPO.

  8. Simulated Microgravity Reduces TNF-Alpha Activity, Suppresses Glucose Uptake and Enhances Arginine Flux in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Brian W.; Leeper-Woodford, Sandra K.; Hashemi, Brian B.; Smith, Scott M.; Sams, Clarence F.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The present studies were designed to determine effects of microgravity upon lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF - alpha) activity and indices of insulin and fuel homeostasis of pancreatic islets of Langerhans. Islets (1726+/-117,150 u IEU) from Wistar Furth rats were treated as: 1) HARV (High Aspect Ratio Vessel cell culture) , 2) HARV plus LPS 3) static culture, 4) static culture plus LPS TNF-alpha (L929 cytotoxicity assay) was significantly increased in LPS-induced HARV and static cultures, yet the increase was more pronounced in the static culture group (p<0.05). A decrease in insulin concentration was demonstrated in the LPS stimulated HARV culture (p<0.05). We observed a greater glucose concentration and increased disappearance of arginine in islets cultured in HARVs. While nitrogenous compound analysis indicated a ubiquitous reliance upon glutamine in all experimental groups, arginine was converted to ornithine at a two-fold greater rate in the islets cultured in the HARV microgravity paradigm (p<0.05). These studies demonstrate alterations in LPS induced TNF-alpha production of pancreatic islets of Langerhans, favoring a lesser TNF activity in the HARV paradigm. These alterations in fuel homeostasis may be promulgated by gravity averaged cell culture methods or by three dimensional cell assembly.

  9. The small-molecule TNF-alpha modulator, UTL-5g, reduces side effects induced by cisplatin and enhances the therapeutic effect of cisplatin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shaw, JiaJiu; Chen, Ben; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Lee, An-Rong; Media, Joseph; Valeriote, Frederick A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated a small-molecule modulator of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), UTL-5g (also referred to as GBL-5g), as a potential chemoprotective agent against cisplatin-induced side effects including nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity. Pretreatment of UTL-5g i.p. in BDF1 mice reduced the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine induced by cisplatin treatment. The levels of both aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) in these animals were also reduced by UTL-5g. Pretreatment of UTL-5g did not significantly affect the number of white blood cells (WBC) under current experimental conditions, yet it markedly increased blood platelet counts by more than threefold. Therapeutic assessment in SCID mice inoculated with human HCT-15 tumor cells showed that UTL-5g did not attenuate the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin but increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. The LD50 of UTL-5g was determined to be > 2,000 mg/kg by an acute toxicity study. In summary, our studies showed that 1) UTL-5g significantly reduces nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity induced by cisplatin in mice, presumably by lowering the levels of TNF-alpha, 2) UTL-5g markedly increased blood platelet counts in mice and 3) UTL-5g treatment increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin against HCT-15 cells inoculated in SCID mice.

  10. The Width of a Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Gila

    2014-01-01

    This paper's aim is to discuss the concept of width of a proof put forward by Timothy Gowers. It explains what this concept means and attempts to show how it relates to other concepts discussed in the existing literature on proof and proving. It also explores how the concept of width of a proof might be used productively in the mathematics…

  11. Identification of the 109Xe and 105Te Alpha-Decay Chain

    SciTech Connect

    Liddick, S. N.; Grzywacz, R.; Mazzocchi, C.; Page, R. D.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Darby, I. G.; Drafta, G.; Goodin, C.; Gross, Carl J; Hamilton, J. H.; Hecht, A. A.; Hwang, J. K.; Ilyushkin, S.; Joss, D. T.; Korgul, A.; Krolas, W.; Lagergren, K.; Li, K.; Tantawy, M. N.; Thomson, J.; Winger, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    The alpha-decay chain 109Xe-->105Te-->101Sn was identified at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Advances in digital electronics have made possible the identification of both alpha emitters in the same experiment despite the disparate half-lives of 13+/_2ms and 620+/_70ns for 109Xe and 105Te, respectively. Two alpha-decay transitions were observed from 109Xe with Q/alpha values of 4067 +/_ 10 and 4217 +/_ 8keV. One transition between the ground states of 105Te and 101Sn was observed with a Q/alpha value of 4889 +/_6keV. Using the measured half-lives, branching ratios, and Q/alpha values the reduced alpha-decay widths, delta squared, were determined. Comparison of the delta squared value for 105Te with 213Po indicates a "superallowed" character in the alpha emission of 105Te.

  12. Formation of 5alpha-reduced androgens in the testes and urogenital tract of the grey short-tailed opossum, Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Jean D; Renfree, Marilyn B; Auchus, Richard J; Pask, Andrew J; Shaw, Geoffrey

    2009-01-01

    Testicular 5alpha-reduced androgens, largely 5alpha-androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol (androstanediol), are responsible for virilisation of pouch young in one marsupial (the tammar wallaby), but are not formed until later in development in another marsupial (the brushtail possum) and in rodents. Because the mechanism of virilisation of the urogenital tract in the grey short-tailed opossum Monodelphis domestica has never been defined, androgen formation and metabolism were investigated in this species. Testis fragments from grey short-tailed opossums of a wide range of ages were incubated with [3H]-progesterone and the metabolites were separated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The only 19-carbon metabolites identified in the youngest ages (5-26 days) and the major metabolites in adult testes were testosterone and androstenedione. At 30, 42 and 49 days of age, dihydrotestosterone and small amounts of androstanediol were present. Time-sequence studies indicated that dihydrotestosterone and androstanediol were formed from the 5alpha-reduction (and 3-keto reduction) of testosterone. In a second series of experiments, tissue fragments of a variety of urogenital tract tissues were incubated with [3H]-testosterone and the metabolites separated by HPLC. During the interval in which male urogenital tract differentiation takes place in this species (between Days 15 and 28), the major metabolite identified was dihydrotestosterone. We conclude that the timing of 5alpha-reductase expression in the testes of the grey short-tailed possum resembles that of rodents and the brushtail possum rather than that of the tammar wallaby and that dihydrotestosterone is probably the intracellular androgen responsible for virilisation of the urogenital tract in this species.

  13. Characterization of the lys2 gene of Acremonium chrysogenum encoding a functional alpha-aminoadipate activating and reducing enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hijarrubia, M J; Aparicio, J F; Casqueiro, J; Martín, J F

    2001-02-01

    A 5.2-kb NotI DNA fragment isolated from a genomic library of Acremonium chrysogenum by hybridization with a probe internal to the Penicillium chrysogenum lys2 gene, was able to complement an alpha-aminoadipate reductase-deficient mutant of P. chrysogenum (lysine auxotroph L-G-). Enzyme assays showed that the alpha-aminoadipate reductase activity was restored in all the transformants tested. The lys2-encoded enzyme catalyzed both the activation and reduction of alpha-aminoadipic acid to its semialdehyde, as shown by reaction of the product with p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde. The reaction required NADPH, and was not observed in the presence of NADH. Sequence analysis revealed that the gene encodes a protein with relatively high similarity to members of the superfamily of acyladenylate-forming enzymes. The Lys2 protein contained all nine motifs that are conserved in the adenylating domain of this enzyme family, a peptidyl carrier domain, and a reduction domain. In addition, a new NADP-binding motif located at the N-terminus of the reduction domain that may form a Rossmann-like betaalphabeta-fold has been identified and found to be shared by all known Lys2 proteins. The lys2 gene was mapped to chromosome I (2.2 Mb, the smallest chromosome) of A. chrysogenum C10 (the chromosome that contains the "late" cephalosporin cluster) and is transcribed as a monocistronic 4.5-kb mRNA although at relatively low levels compared with the beta-actin gene.

  14. Serous ovarian carcinoma patients with high alpha-folate receptor had reducing survival and cytotoxic chemo-response.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Li; Chang, Ming-Cheng; Huang, Chia-Yen; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Lin, Han-Wei; Chen, Chi-An; Hsieh, Chang-Yao; Cheng, Wen-Fang

    2012-06-01

    The alpha-folate receptor (α-FR) is highly-expressed in various non-mucinous tumors of epithelial origin, including ovarian carcinoma. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between alpha-folate receptor (α-FR) and the clinico-pathologic features and outcomes of serous ovarian carcinoma patients and the possible mechanism of α-FR to chemo-resistance. Therefore, semi-quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reactions for α-FR expression were performed in the 91 specimens of serous ovarian carcinomas. The expression of α-FR in each ovarian cancer tissue specimen was defined as the ratio of density of α-FR to density of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). In vitro apoptotic experiments were tested in the original OVCAR-3 tumor cells and various OVCAR-3 α-FR-transfectants. Patients with an increased α-FR expression level had poorer responses to chemotherapy (per α-FR expression level increase: odds ratio (OR): 8.97 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-57.36), p = 0.021). An increased α-FR expression level was an independently poor prognostic factor for disease free interval (DFI) (per α-FR expression level increase: hazard ratio (HR): 2.45 (95% CI: 1.16-5.18), p = 0.02) and had a negative impact on overall survival (OS) of these serous ovarian cancer patients (per α-FR expression level increase: HR: 3.6 (95% CI: 0.93-13.29), p = 0.03) by multivariate analyses. α-FR inhibited cytotoxic drug-induced apoptosis in our in vitro apoptotic assays. α-FR could induce chemo-resistance via regulating the expression of apoptosis-related molecules, Bcl-2 and Bax. Therefore, α-FR can be a potential biomarker for the prediction of chemotherapeutic responses and clinical prognosis. It also could be the target of ovarian cancer treatment.

  15. Bounding the Higgs boson width through interferometry.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Lance J; Li, Ye

    2013-09-13

    We study the change in the diphoton-invariant-mass distribution for Higgs boson decays to two photons, due to interference between the Higgs resonance in gluon fusion and the continuum background amplitude for gg→γγ. Previously, the apparent Higgs mass was found to shift by around 100 MeV in the standard model in the leading-order approximation, which may potentially be experimentally observable. We compute the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections to the apparent mass shift, which reduce it by about 40%. The apparent mass shift may provide a way to measure, or at least bound, the Higgs boson width at the Large Hadron Collider through "interferometry." We investigate how the shift depends on the Higgs width, in a model that maintains constant Higgs boson signal yields. At Higgs widths above 30 MeV, the mass shift is over 200 MeV and increases with the square root of the width. The apparent mass shift could be measured by comparing with the ZZ* channel, where the shift is much smaller. It might be possible to measure the shift more accurately by exploiting its strong dependence on the Higgs transverse momentum.

  16. Breakup effects on alpha spectroscopic factors of 16O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, S.; Basu, C.; Sugathan, P.; Jhinghan, A.; Behera, B. R.; Saneesh, N.; Kaur, G.; Thakur, M.; Mahajan, R.; Dubey, R.; Mitra, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The triton angular distribution for the 12C(7Li,t)16O* reaction is measured at 20 MeV, populating discrete states of 16O. Continuum discretized coupled reaction channel calculations are used to to extract the alpha spectroscopic properties of 16O states instead of the distorted wave born approximation theory to include the effects of breakup on the transfer process. The alpha reduced width, spectroscopic factors and the asymptotic normalization constant (ANC) of 16O states are extracted. The error in the spectroscopic factor is about 35% and in that of the ANC about 27%.

  17. Reduction of mouse egg surface integrin alpha9 subunit (ITGA9) reduces the egg's ability to support sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    PubMed

    Vjugina, Ulyana; Zhu, Xiaoling; Oh, Eugene; Bracero, Nabal J; Evans, Janice P

    2009-04-01

    The involvement of egg integrins in mammalian sperm-egg interactions has been controversial, with data from integrin inhibitor studies contrasting with evidence from knockouts showing that specific integrin subunits are not essential for fertility. An alpha(4)/alpha(9) (ITGA4/ITGA9) integrin subfamily member has been implicated in fertilization but not extensively examined, so we tested the following three hypotheses: 1) an ITGA4/ITGA9 integrin participates in sperm-egg interactions, 2) short-term acute knockdown by RNA interference of integrin subunits would result in a fertilization phenotype differing from that of chronic depletion via knockout, and 3) detection of a fertilization phenotype is sensitive to in vitro fertilization (IVF) assay conditions. We show that mouse and human eggs express the alpha(9) integrin subunit (ITGA9). RNA interference-mediated knockdown resulted in reduced levels of Itga9 mRNA and surface protein in mouse eggs. RNA interference attempts to knockdown ITGA9's likely beta partner, beta(1) (ITGB1), resulted in reduced Itgb1 mRNA but no reduction in ITGB1 surface protein. Therefore, studies using a function-blocking anti-ITGB1 antibody tested the hypothesis that ITGB1 participates in gamete interactions. Analyses of sperm-egg interactions with Itga9-knockdown eggs and anti-ITGB1 antibody-treated eggs in IVF assays using specific sperm:egg ratios revealed the following: 1) a reduction, but not complete loss, of sperm-egg binding and fusion was observed and 2) the reduction of sperm-egg binding and fusion was not detected in inseminations with high sperm:egg ratios. These data demonstrate that ITGA9 and ITGB1 participate in sperm-egg interactions but clearly are not the only molecules involved. This also shows that careful design of IVF parameters allows detection of deficiencies in gamete interactions.

  18. Inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase alpha restores restimulation-induced cell death and reduces immunopathology in XLP-1

    PubMed Central

    Ruffo, Elisa; Malacarne, Valeria; Larsen, Sasha E.; Das, Rupali; Patrussi, Laura; Wülfing, Christoph; Biskup, Christoph; Kapnick, Senta M.; Verbist, Katherine; Tedrick, Paige; Schwartzberg, Pamela L.; Baldari, Cosima T.; Rubio, Ignacio; Nichols, Kim E.; Snow, Andrew L.; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Graziani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP-1) is an often-fatal primary immunodeficiency associated with the exuberant expansion of activated CD8+ T cells following Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. XLP-1 is caused by defects in SAP, an adaptor protein that modulates T cell receptor (TCR)-induced signaling. SAP-deficient T cells exhibit impaired TCR restimulation-induced cell death (RICD) and diminished TCR-induced inhibition of diacylglycerol kinase alpha (DGKα), leading to increased diacylglycerol metabolism and decreased signaling through Ras and PKCθ. Here, we show that down-regulation of DGKα activity in SAP-deficient T cells restores diacylglycerol signaling at the immune synapse and rescues RICD via induction of the pro-apoptotic proteins NUR77 and NOR1. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of DGKα prevents the excessive CD8+ T cell expansion and IFNγ production that occur in Sap-deficient mice following Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus infection without impairing lytic activity. Collectively, these data highlight DGKα as a viable therapeutic target to reverse the life-threatening EBV-associated immunopathology that occurs in XLP-1 patients. PMID:26764158

  19. Alpha-ketoglutarate reduces ethanol toxicity in Drosophila melanogaster by enhancing alcohol dehydrogenase activity and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Bayliak, Maria M; Shmihel, Halyna V; Lylyk, Maria P; Storey, Kenneth B; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2016-09-01

    Ethanol at low concentrations (<4%) can serve as a food source for fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, whereas at higher concentrations it may be toxic. In this work, protective effects of dietary alpha-ketoglutarate (AKG) against ethanol toxicity were studied. Food supplementation with 10-mM AKG alleviated toxic effects of 8% ethanol added to food, and improved fly development. Two-day-old adult flies, reared on diet containing both AKG and ethanol, possessed higher alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity as compared with those reared on control diet or diet with ethanol only. Native gel electrophoresis data suggested that this combination diet might promote post-translational modifications of ADH protein with the formation of a highly active ADH form. The ethanol-containing diet led to significantly higher levels of triacylglycerides stored in adult flies, and this parameter was not altered by AKG supplement. The influence of diet on antioxidant defenses was also assessed. In ethanol-fed flies, catalase activity was higher in males and the levels of low molecular mass thiols were unchanged in both sexes compared to control values. Feeding on a mixture of AKG and ethanol did not affect catalase activity but caused a higher level of low molecular mass thiols compared to ethanol-fed flies. It can be concluded that both a stimulation of some components of antioxidant defense and the increase in ADH activity may be responsible for the protective effects of AKG diet supplementation in combination with ethanol. The results suggest that AKG might be useful as a treatment option to neutralize toxic effects of excessive ethanol intake and to improve the physiological state of D. melanogaster and other animals, potentially including humans.

  20. Brief Report: Reduced Temporal-Central EEG Alpha Coherence during Joint Attention Perception in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaime, Mark; McMahon, Camilla M.; Davidson, Bridget C.; Newell, Lisa C.; Mundy, Peter C.; Henderson, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Although prior studies have demonstrated reduced resting state EEG coherence in adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), no studies have explored the nature of EEG coherence during joint attention. We examined the EEG coherence of the joint attention network in adolescents with and without ASD during congruent and incongruent joint attention…

  1. Masses, widths, and leptonic widths of the higher upsilon resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovelock, D. M.; Horstkotte, J. E.; Klopfenstein, C.; Lee-Franzini, J.; Romero, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Youssef, S.; Franzini, P.; Son, D.; Tuts, P. M.; Zhao, T.; Herb, S.; Dietl, H.; Eigen, G.; Fonseca, V.; Lorenz, E.; Mageras, G.; Han, K.; Imlay, R.; Metcalf, W.; Sreedhar, V.

    1985-02-01

    The masses, total widths, and leptonic widths of three triplet s-wave bb¯ states Υ(4S), Υ(5S), and Υ(6S) are determined from measurements of the e+e- annihilation cross section into hadrons for 10.55

  2. Relation between index finger width and hand width anthropometric measures.

    PubMed

    Komandur, Sashidharan; Johnson, Peter W; Storch, Richard L; Yost, Michael G

    2009-01-01

    Measures of hand and finger anthropometry are very important for designing many hand held devices as well as understanding anthropometric effects on the operation of such devices. Many historical datasets have measured and recorded gross hand dimensions but do not often record the finer dimensions of the hand such as finger anthropometry. Knowing the size and mass of fingers across genders can be critical to the design and operation of hand held devices. In this paper we compare two empirical linear models that predicts index finger width at the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint (a finger anthropometric measure) based on hand-width (hand anthropometric measure). This will be especially useful for deriving population measures of finger anthropometry from large historical data sets where only gross hand dimensions are available.

  3. Double bond in the side chain of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-22-ene-vitamin D(3) is reduced during its metabolism: studies in chronic myeloid leukemia (RWLeu-4) cells and rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Sunita Rao, D; Balkundi, D; Uskokovic, M R; Tserng, K; Clark, J W; Horst, R L; Satyanarayana Reddy, G

    2001-08-01

    1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3)] is mainly metabolized via the C-24 oxidation pathway and undergoes several side chain modifications which include C-24 hydroxylation, C-24 ketonization, C-23 hydroxylation and side chain cleavage between C-23 and C-24 to form the final product, calcitroic acid. In a recent study we reported that 1alpha,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(2) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2)] like 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), is also converted into the same final product, calcitroic acid. This finding indicated that 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2) also undergoes side chain cleavage between C-23 and C-24. As the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2) when compared to the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3), has a double bond between C-22 and C-23 and an extra methyl group at C-24 position, it opens the possibility for both (a) double bond reduction and (b) demethylation to occur during the metabolism of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(2). We undertook the present study to establish firmly the possibility of double bond reduction in the metabolism of vitamin D(2) related compounds. We compared the metabolism of 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-22-ene-vitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)-22-ene-D(3)], a synthetic vitamin D analog whose side chain differs from that of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) only through a single modification namely the presence of a double bond between C-22 and C-23. Metabolism studies were performed in the chronic myeloid leukemic cell line (RWLeu-4) and in the isolated perfused rat kidney. Our results indicate that both 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-22-ene-D(3) and 1alpha,25(OH)(2)D(3) are converted into common metabolites namely, 1alpha,24(R),25-trihydroxyvitamin D(3) [1alpha,24(R),25(OH)(3)D(3)], 1alpha,25-dihydroxy-24-oxovitamin D(3) [1alpha,25(OH)(2)-24-oxo-D(3)], 1alpha,23(S),25-trihydroxy-24-oxovitamin D(3) and 1alpha,23-dihydroxy-24,25,26,27-tetranorvitamin D(3). This finding indicates that the double bond in the side chain of 1alpha,25(OH)(2)-22-ene-D(3) is reduced during its metabolism. Along with

  4. Alpha-lipoic acid supplementation reduces mTORC1 signaling in skeletal muscle from high fat fed, obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuyun; Dungan, Cory M; Carrier, Bradley; Rideout, Todd C; Williamson, David L

    2014-12-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is hyperactive in liver, adipose and skeletal muscle tissues of obese rodents. Alpha-lipoic acid (αLA) has been well accepted as a weight-loss treatment, though there are limited studies on its effect on mTOR signaling in high-fat fed, obese rodents. Therefore, the goal of this study was to determine mTOR signaling and oxidative protein alterations in skeletal muscle of high-fat fed, obese rats after αLA supplementation. Phosphorylation of the mTOR substrate, eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and eIF4B were significantly reduced (p < 0.05) in muscle from αLA supplemented rats. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an mTOR inhibitory kinase, was higher (p < 0.05) in the αLA group. Protein expression of markers of oxidative metabolism, acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC), cytochrome c oxidase IV (COX IV), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), and PPAR gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1α) were significantly higher (p < 0.05) after αLA supplementation compared to non-supplemented group. Our findings show that αLA supplementation limits the negative ramifications of consuming a high fat diet on skeletal muscle markers of oxidative metabolism and mTORC1 signaling.

  5. Oral glucosylceramide reduces 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene induced inflammatory response in mice by reducing TNF-alpha levels and leukocyte infiltration.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Sakai, Shota; Aida, Kazuhiko; Hirata, Takashi

    2011-06-01

    Sphingolipids are constituents of cellular membranes and play important roles as second messengers mediating cell functions. As significant components in foods, sphingolipids have been proven to be critical for human health. Moreover, diverse metabolic intermediates of sphingolipids are known to play key roles both in proinflammatory and in anti-inflammatory effects. However, the effect of dietary sphingolipids on inflammation is a complicated field that needs to be further assessed. Our study evaluated the effects of orally administered maize glucosylceramide (GluCer), one of the most conventional dietary sphingolipids, on inflammation using the 2,4-dinitro-1-fluorobenzene-treated BALB/c murine model. Oral administration of GluCer inhibited ear swelling and leukocyte infiltration to the inflammatory site, suggesting that dietary GluCer has anti-inflammatory properties. ELISA analyses revealed that oral administration of GluCer for 6 days had not modified the Th1/Th2 balance, but significantly down-regulated the activation of TNF-α at the inflammatory site. Based on these results, the down-regulation of TNF-α by dietary GluCer may suppress vascular permeability and reduce the migration of inflammatory cells. Our findings increase understanding of the actions of dietary sphingolipids on the balance of the immune response.

  6. Simultaneous quantification of GABAergic 3alpha,5alpha/3alpha,5beta neuroactive steroids in human and rat serum.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Patrizia; O'Buckley, Todd K; Alward, Sarah E; Marx, Christine E; Shampine, Lawrence J; Girdler, Susan S; Morrow, A Leslie

    2009-01-01

    The 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone enhance GABAergic neurotransmission and produce inhibitory neurobehavioral and anti-inflammatory effects. Despite substantial information on the progesterone derivative (3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THP, allopregnanolone), the physiological significance of the other endogenous GABAergic neuroactive steroids has remained elusive. Here, we describe the validation of a method using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to simultaneously identify serum levels of the eight 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced derivatives of progesterone, deoxycorticosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone. The method shows specificity, sensitivity and enhanced throughput compared to other methods already available for neuroactive steroid quantification. Administration of pregnenolone to rats and progesterone to women produced selective effects on the 3alpha,5alpha- and 3alpha,5beta-reduced neuroactive steroids, indicating differential regulation of their biosynthetic pathways. Pregnenolone administration increased serum levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP (+1488%, p<0.001), (3alpha,5alpha)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5alpha-THDOC, +205%, p<0.01), (3alpha,5alpha)-3-hydroxyandrostan-17-one (3alpha,5alpha-A, +216%, p<0.001), (3alpha,5alpha,17beta)-androstane-3,17-diol (3alpha,5alpha-A-diol, +190%, p<0.01). (3alpha,5beta)-3-hydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5beta-THP) and (3alpha,5beta)-3-hydroxyandrostan-17-one (3alpha,5beta-A) were not altered, while (3alpha,5beta)-3,21-dihydroxypregnan-20-one (3alpha,5beta-THDOC) and (3alpha,5beta,17beta)-androstane-3,17-diol (3alpha,5beta-A-diol) were increased from undetectable levels to 271+/-100 and 2.4+/-0.9 pg+/-SEM, respectively (5/8 rats). Progesterone administration increased serum levels of 3alpha,5alpha-THP (+1806%, p<0.0001), 3alpha,5beta-THP (+575%, p<0.001), 3alpha,5alpha

  7. Modeling Solar Lyman Alpha Irradiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Rottman, G. J.; Willson, R. C.; Donnelly, R. F.; London, J.

    1990-01-01

    Solar Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analyses. Models developed with multiple linear regression analysis, including daily values and 81-day running means of solar indices, predict reasonably well both the short- and long-term variations observed in Lyman alpha. It is shown that the full disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm offers the best proxy for Lyman alpha, and that the total irradiance corrected for sunspot effect also has a high correlation with Lyman alpha.

  8. Effect of step width manipulation on tibial stress during running.

    PubMed

    Meardon, Stacey A; Derrick, Timothy R

    2014-08-22

    Narrow step width has been linked to variables associated with tibial stress fracture. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of step width on bone stresses using a standardized model of the tibia. 15 runners ran at their preferred 5k running velocity in three running conditions, preferred step width (PSW) and PSW±5% of leg length. 10 successful trials of force and 3-D motion data were collected. A combination of inverse dynamics, musculoskeletal modeling and beam theory was used to estimate stresses applied to the tibia using subject-specific anthropometrics and motion data. The tibia was modeled as a hollow ellipse. Multivariate analysis revealed that tibial stresses at the distal 1/3 of the tibia differed with step width manipulation (p=0.002). Compression on the posterior and medial aspect of the tibia was inversely related to step width such that as step width increased, compression on the surface of tibia decreased (linear trend p=0.036 and 0.003). Similarly, tension on the anterior surface of the tibia decreased as step width increased (linear trend p=0.029). Widening step width linearly reduced shear stress at all 4 sites (p<0.001 for all). The data from this study suggests that stresses experienced by the tibia during running were influenced by step width when using a standardized model of the tibia. Wider step widths were generally associated with reduced loading of the tibia and may benefit runners at risk of or experiencing stress injury at the tibia, especially if they present with a crossover running style.

  9. 23 CFR 658.15 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Width. 658.15 Section 658.15 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.15 Width. (a) No State shall impose a width...

  10. Activation of Alpha 7 Cholinergic Nicotinic Receptors Reduce Blood–Brain Barrier Permeability following Experimental Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Kobori, Nobuhide; Redell, John B.; Hylin, Michael J.; Hood, Kimberly N.; Moore, Anthony N.

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major human health concern that has the greatest impact on young men and women. The breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) is an important pathological consequence of TBI that initiates secondary processes, including infiltration of inflammatory cells, which can exacerbate brain inflammation and contribute to poor outcome. While the role of inflammation within the injured brain has been examined in some detail, the contribution of peripheral/systemic inflammation to TBI pathophysiology is largely unknown. Recent studies have implicated vagus nerve regulation of splenic cholinergic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (nAChRa7) signaling in the regulation of systemic inflammation. However, it is not known whether this mechanism plays a role in TBI-triggered inflammation and BBB breakdown. Following TBI, we observed that plasma TNF-α and IL-1β levels, as well as BBB permeability, were significantly increased in nAChRa7 null mice (Chrna7−/−) relative to wild-type mice. The administration of exogenous IL-1β and TNF-α to brain-injured animals worsened Evans Blue dye extravasation, suggesting that systemic inflammation contributes to TBI-triggered BBB permeability. Systemic administration of the nAChRa7 agonist PNU-282987 or the positive allosteric modulator PNU-120596 significantly attenuated TBI-triggered BBB compromise. Supporting a role for splenic nAChRa7 receptors, we demonstrate that splenic injection of the nicotinic receptor blocker α-bungarotoxin increased BBB permeability in brain-injured rats, while PNU-282987 injection decreased such permeability. These effects were not seen when α-bungarotoxin or PNU-282987 were administered to splenectomized, brain-injured rats. Together, these findings support the short-term use of nAChRa7-activating agents as a strategy to reduce TBI-triggered BBB permeability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Breakdown of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) in response to traumatic brain injury (TBI

  11. The alpha-2A adrenoceptor agonist guanfacine improves sustained attention and reduces overactivity and impulsiveness in an animal model of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

    PubMed Central

    Sagvolden, Terje

    2006-01-01

    Background ADHD is currently defined as a cognitive/behavioral developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral. Overactivity, impulsiveness, and inattentiveness are presently regarded as the main clinical symptoms. There is no biological marker, but there is considerable evidence to suggest that ADHD behavior is associated with poor dopaminergic and noradrenergic modulation of neuronal circuits that involve the frontal lobes. The best validated animal model of ADHD, the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat (SHR), shows pronounced overactivity, impulsiveness, and deficient sustained attention. While dopamine release is decreased in SHR prefrontal cortex, norepinephrine concentrations are elevated. The noradrenergic system appears to be hyperactive as a result of impaired alpha-2A adrenoceptor regulation. Thus, the present study tested behavioral effects of the centrally acting alpha-2A adrenoceptor agonist guanfacine on SHR behavior. Methods The present study tested behavioral effects of guanfacine at doses of 0.075, 0.15, 0.30 and 0.60 mg base/kg i.p. in both male SHRs and their controls, the Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY). ADHD-like behavior was tested with a visual discrimination task measuring overactivity, impulsiveness and inattentiveness. Results The striking impulsiveness, overactivity, and reduced sustained attention during baseline conditions in the SHR improved by treatment with guanfacine. The most pronounced improvement in SHR behavior was seen following the two highest doses (0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg) of guanfacine when SHR behaviors virtually normalized. The positive effects of the drug were most marked towards the end of the session. Conclusion The results indicate that guanfacine improved poor noradrenergic modulation of neuronal circuits that involve the frontal lobes in an animal model of ADHD. The present results support the beneficial effects of guanfacine on ADHD behavior reported clinically and experimentally in primate models of frontal function

  12. Combination of interferon alpha with either Ara-C or ATRA in vitro reduces the selective action of interferon against CML CFU-GM.

    PubMed

    Marley, S B; Davidson, R J; Goldman, J M; Gordon, M Y

    2000-08-01

    Although interferon (IFN)-alpha has no specific inhibitory effect on the plating efficiency of granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (CFU-GM) from patients with chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML), it does selectively inhibit the replating ability (secondary colony formation) of CML CFU-GM. Thus, amplification of CFU-GM may be a target for IFN-alpha and other agents used in the treatment of CML. Here we examined whether cytarabine (Ara-C) or all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) exert similar effects and whether they might in combination with IFN-alpha enhance its efficacy. We found that Ara-C preferentially inhibits the formation of CML CFU-GM compared to normal CFU-GM, but this inhibition was not increased by addition of IFN-alpha. When Ara-C was added to cultures containing IFN-alpha, the inhibition of replating by CML progenitors was abrogated. ATRA increased significantly the plating efficiency of normal CFU-GM. The addition of IFN-alpha to ATRA had no effect on CML or normal colony numbers. However, addition of ATRA to cultures containing IFN-alpha reversed the selective inhibition of CML CFU-GM replating seen in cultures containing IFN-alpha alone. In four IFN-alpha/Ara-C experiments, secondary CML patient-derived colonies were examined by fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH). All of them were Ph chromosome positive. No significant effects on CFU-GM production were observed when CML primitive haemopoietic progenitor cells were investigated in a delta (delta) assay. Thus we conclude that combining IFN-alpha with Ara-C or ATRA neutralises the effect of IFN-alpha on CML CFU-GM. This observation provides a rationale for treating patients with alternating courses of IFN-alpha and Ara-C or ATRA, rather than giving either of these two agents in combination with IFN-alpha.

  13. Overexpression of the calpain-specific inhibitor calpastatin reduces human alpha-Synuclein processing, aggregation and synaptic impairment in [A30P]αSyn transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Diepenbroek, Meike; Casadei, Nicolas; Esmer, Hakan; Saido, Takaomi C.; Takano, Jiro; Kahle, Philipp J.; Nixon, Ralph A; Rao, Mala V.; Melki, Ronald; Pieri, Laura; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Krueger, Rejko; Masliah, Eliezer; Riess, Olaf; Nuber, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Lewy bodies, a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), contain aggregated alpha-synuclein (αSyn), which is found in several modified forms and can be discovered phosphorylated, ubiquitinated and truncated. Aggregation-prone truncated species of αSyn caused by aberrant cleavage of this fibrillogenic protein are hypothesized to participate in its sequestration into inclusions subsequently leading to synaptic dysfunction and neuronal death. Here, we investigated the role of calpain cleavage of αSyn in vivo by generating two opposing mouse models. We crossed into human [A30P]αSyn transgenic (i) mice deficient for calpastatin, a calpain-specific inhibitor, thus enhancing calpain activity (SynCAST(−)) and (ii) mice overexpressing human calpastatin leading to reduced calpain activity (SynCAST(+)). As anticipated, a reduced calpain activity led to a decreased number of αSyn-positive aggregates, whereas loss of calpastatin led to increased truncation of αSyn in SynCAST(−). Furthermore, overexpression of calpastatin decreased astrogliosis and the calpain-dependent degradation of synaptic proteins, potentially ameliorating the observed neuropathology in [A30P]αSyn and SynCAST(+) mice. Overall, our data further support a crucial role of calpains, particularly of calpain 1, in the pathogenesis of PD and in disease-associated aggregation of αSyn, indicating a therapeutic potential of calpain inhibition in PD. PMID:24619358

  14. Exposure of the eggs to 17alpha-methyl testosterone reduced hatching success and growth and elicited teratogenic effects in postembryonic life stages of crayfish.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Günter

    2007-12-30

    Testosterone is regularly found in the tissues of decapod crustaceans. Although this vertebrate-type sex hormone is not the principal factor of sex differentiation in crustaceans, it was shown to be capable of acting on the reproductive organs of shrimps and crabs. In the present study I have exposed developing eggs and stage 5 juveniles of the parthenogenetic all female marbled crayfish to 17alpha-methyl testosterone in order to test whether in freshwater crayfish sex can be changed from female to male by this androgen. MT did not elicit sex change, neither when administered during embryonic development nor during juvenile stage 5, the main period of proliferation of the oocytes. However, exposure to 100 microg/L MT from 64% to 84% embryonic development resulted in prolonged embryonic development, reduced hatching success, reduced growth of the juveniles, and severe malformations of the appendages in the juveniles. The marbled crayfish is recommended to be considered for toxicity tests due to its easy culture in the laboratory and its genotypical uniformity.

  15. Tetrahydro iso-alpha acids from hops improve glucose homeostasis and reduce body weight gain and metabolic endotoxemia in high-fat diet-fed mice.

    PubMed

    Everard, Amandine; Geurts, Lucie; Van Roye, Marie; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Cani, Patrice D

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and related metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a low-grade inflammatory state possibly through changes in gut microbiota composition and the development of higher plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS) levels, i.e. metabolic endotoxemia. Various phytochemical compounds have been investigated as potential tools to regulate these metabolic features. Humulus lupulus L. (hops) contains several classes of compounds with anti-inflammatory potential. Recent evidence suggests that hops-derived compounds positively impact adipocyte metabolism and glucose tolerance in obese and diabetic rodents via undefined mechanisms. In this study, we found that administration of tetrahydro iso-alpha acids (termed META060) to high-fat diet (HFD)-fed obese and diabetic mice for 8 weeks reduced body weight gain, the development of fat mass, glucose intolerance, and fasted hyperinsulinemia, and normalized insulin sensitivity markers. This was associated with reduced portal plasma LPS levels, gut permeability, and higher intestinal tight junction proteins Zonula occludens-1 and occludin. Moreover, META060 treatment increased the plasma level of the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 and decreased the plasma level of the pro-inflammatory cytokine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. In conclusion, this research allows us to decipher a novel mechanism contributing to the positive effects of META060 treatment, and supports the need to investigate such compounds in obese and type 2 diabetic patients.

  16. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation by reducing the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}/retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, Adam J.; Luo Zhengyu; Vincent, Karen A.; Akita, Geoffrey Y.; Cheng, Seng H.; Gregory, Richard J.; Jiang Canwen

    2007-12-21

    In response to cellular hypoxia, cardiomyocytes adapt to consume less oxygen by shifting ATP production from mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation to glycolysis. The transcriptional activation of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes by hypoxia is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). In this study, we examined whether HIF-1 was involved in the suppression of mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. We showed that either hypoxia or adenovirus-mediated expression of a constitutively stable hybrid form (HIF-1{alpha}/VP16) suppressed mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by an accumulation of intracellular neutral lipid. Both treatments also reduced the mRNA levels of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mitochondrial import of fatty acids for {beta}-oxidation. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression of HIF-1{alpha}/VP16 in cardiomyocytes under normoxic conditions also mimicked the reduction in the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})/retinoid X receptor (RXR), in the presence or absence of a PPAR{alpha} ligand. These results suggest that HIF-1 may be involved in hypoxia-induced suppression of fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes by reducing the DNA binding activity of PPAR{alpha}/RXR.

  17. Turner syndrome isochromosome karyotype correlates with decreased dental crown width.

    PubMed

    Rizell, S; Barrenäs, M-L; Andlin-Sobocki, A; Stecksén-Blicks, C; Kjellberg, H

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this project was to study possible influences of Turner syndrome (TS) karyotype and the number of X chromosomes with intact short arm (p-arm) on dental crown width. Primary and permanent mesio-distal crown width was measured on plaster casts from 112 TS females. The influence on crown width of four karyotypes: 1. monosomy (45,X), 2. mosaic (45,X/46,XX), 3. isochromosome, and 4. other, and the number of intact X chromosomal p-arms were investigated. In comparisons between karyotypes, statistically significant differences were found for isochromosome karyotype maxillary second premolars, canines, laterals, mandibular first premolars, and canines, indicating that this karyotype was the most divergent as shown by the most reduced crown width. When each karyotype group were compared versus controls, all teeth in the isochromosome group were significantly smaller than controls (P < 0.01-0.001). The 45,X/46,XX karyotype expressed fewer and smaller differences from controls, while 45,X individuals seemed to display an intermediate tooth width compared with 45,X/46,XX and isochromosomes. No significant difference in crown width was found comparing the groups with one or two intact X chromosomal p-arms. Both primary and permanent teeth proved to have a significantly smaller crown width in the entire group of TS females compared to healthy females. We conclude that the isochromosome group deviates most from other karyotypes and controls, exhibiting the smallest dental crown width, while individuals with 45,X/46,XX mosaicism seemed to have a less affected crown width. An influence of the number of intact p-arms on crown width could not be demonstrated in this study.

  18. Reduced interferon-alpha production by Epstein-Barr virus transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines and lectin-stimulated lymphocytes in congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia type I.

    PubMed

    Wickramasinghe, S N; Hasan, R; Smythe, J

    1997-08-01

    The concentrations of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha) in supernatants from cultures of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) transformed B-lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from seven patients with congenital dyserythropoietic anaemia (CDA) type I were below the 95% confidence limits for those derived from six healthy subjects. In contrast, the concentrations of IFN-alpha in supernatants from cultures of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from four patients with other types of CDA and four patients with hereditary sideroblastic anaemia were normal. Supernatants from cultures of peripheral blood lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin or pokeweed mitogen contained less IFN-alpha when the cells were derived from patients with CDA type I than when derived from healthy subjects. Since patients with CDA type I show a substantial haematological response to treatment with IFN-alpha, the data suggest that impaired IFN-alpha production may be an important pathogenetic mechanism in CDA type I.

  19. Alpha-chaconine-reduced metastasis involves a PI3K/Akt signaling pathway with downregulation of NF-kappaB in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yuan-Wei; Chen, Pin-Shern; Wu, Cheng-Hsun; Jeng, Ya-Fang; Wang, Chau-Jong

    2007-12-26

    Alpha-chaconine, isolated from Solanum tuberosum Linn., is a naturally occurring steroidal glycoalkaloid in potato sprouts. Some reports demonstrated that alpha-chaconine had various anticarcinogenic properties. The aim of this study is to investigate the inhibitory effect of alpha-chaconine on lung adenocarcinoma cell metastasis in vitro. We chose the highly metastatic A549 cells, which were treated with various concentrations of alpha-chaconine to clarify the potential of inhibiting A549 cells invasion and migration. Data showed that alpha-chaconine inhibited A549 cell invasion/migration according to wound healing assay and Boyden chamber assay. Our results also showed that alpha-chaconine could inhibit phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Akt, whereas it did not affected phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulating kinase (ERK) and p38. In addition, alpha-chaconine significantly decreased the nuclear level of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) and the binding ability of NF-kappaB. These results suggested that alpha-chaconine inhibited A549 cell metastasis by a reduction of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) activities involving suppression of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/NF-kappaB (PI3K/Akt/NF-kappaB) signaling pathway. Inhibiting metastasis by alpha-chaconine might offer a pivotal mechanism for its effective chemotherapeutic action.

  20. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering.

    PubMed

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G

    2015-12-03

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles ((4)He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei--nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons--is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the 'adiabatic projection method' to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  1. Ab initio alpha-alpha scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean; Rupak, Gautam; Epelbaum, Evgeny; Krebs, Hermann; Lähde, Timo A.; Luu, Thomas; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2015-12-01

    Processes such as the scattering of alpha particles (4He), the triple-alpha reaction, and alpha capture play a major role in stellar nucleosynthesis. In particular, alpha capture on carbon determines the ratio of carbon to oxygen during helium burning, and affects subsequent carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning stages. It also substantially affects models of thermonuclear type Ia supernovae, owing to carbon detonation in accreting carbon-oxygen white-dwarf stars. In these reactions, the accurate calculation of the elastic scattering of alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei—nuclei with even and equal numbers of protons and neutrons—is important for understanding background and resonant scattering contributions. First-principles calculations of processes involving alpha particles and alpha-like nuclei have so far been impractical, owing to the exponential growth of the number of computational operations with the number of particles. Here we describe an ab initio calculation of alpha-alpha scattering that uses lattice Monte Carlo simulations. We use lattice effective field theory to describe the low-energy interactions of protons and neutrons, and apply a technique called the ‘adiabatic projection method’ to reduce the eight-body system to a two-cluster system. We take advantage of the computational efficiency and the more favourable scaling with system size of auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations to compute an ab initio effective Hamiltonian for the two clusters. We find promising agreement between lattice results and experimental phase shifts for s-wave and d-wave scattering. The approximately quadratic scaling of computational operations with particle number suggests that it should be possible to compute alpha scattering and capture on carbon and oxygen in the near future. The methods described here can be applied to ultracold atomic few-body systems as well as to hadronic systems using lattice quantum chromodynamics to describe the interactions of

  2. Reduced volume and increased training intensity elevate muscle Na+-K+ pump alpha2-subunit expression as well as short- and long-term work capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Bangsbo, Jens; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Wendell, Jesper; Nybo, Lars; Thomassen, Martin

    2009-12-01

    The present study examined muscle adaptations and alterations in work capacity in endurance-trained runners as a result of a reduced amount of training combined with speed endurance training. For a 6- to 9-wk period, 17 runners were assigned to either a speed endurance group with a 25% reduction in the amount of training but including speed endurance training consisting of six to twelve 30-s sprint runs 3-4 times/wk (SET group n = 12) or a control group (n = 5), which continued the endurance training ( approximately 55 km/wk). For the SET group, the expression of the muscle Na(+)-K(+) pump alpha(2)-subunit was 68% higher (P < 0.05) and the plasma K(+) level was reduced (P < 0.05) during repeated intense running after 9 wk. Performance in a 30-s sprint test and the first of the supramaximal exhaustive runs was improved (P < 0.05) by 7% and 36%, respectively, after the speed endurance training period. In the SET group, maximal O(2) uptake was unaltered, but the 3-km (3,000-m) time was reduced (P < 0.05) from 10.4 +/- 0.1 to 10.1 +/- 0.1 min and the 10-km (10,000-m) time was improved from 37.3 +/- 0.4 to 36.3 +/- 0.4 min (means +/- SE). Muscle protein expression and performance remained unaltered in the control group. The present data suggest that both short- and long-term exercise performances can be improved with a reduction in training volume if speed endurance training is performed and that the Na(+)-K(+) pump plays a role in the control of K(+) homeostasis and in the development of fatigue during repeated high-intensity exercise.

  3. Combined Intraperitoneal and Intrathecal Etanercept Reduce Increased Brain Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and Asymmetric Dimethylarginine Levels and Rescues Spatial Deficits in Young Rats after Bile Duct Ligation

    PubMed Central

    Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Hsu, Mei-Hsin; Tain, You-Lin; Yu, Hong-Ren; Huang, Li-Tung

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rats subjected to bile duct ligation (BDL) exhibit increased systemic oxidative stress and brain dysfunction characteristic of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), including fatigue, neurotransmitter alterations, cognitive and motor impairment, and brain inflammation. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) are both increased in plasma and brain in encephalopathy induced by chronic liver failure. This study first determined the temporal profiles of TNF-α and ADMA in the plasma, brain cortex, and hippocampus in young BDL rats. Next, we examined whether etanercept was beneficial in preventing brain damage. Methods: Young rats underwent sham ligation or BDL at day 17 ± 1 for 4 weeks. Treatment group rats were administered etanercept (10 mg/kg) intraperitoneally (IP) three times per week with or without etanercept (100 μg) intrathecally (IT) three times in total. Results: We found increased plasma TNF-α, soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (sTNFR1), soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor 2 (sTNFR2), and ADMA levels, increased cortical TNF-α mRNA and protein and ADMA, and hippocampal TNF-α mRNA and protein, and spatial defects in young BDL rats. The increase in cortex TNF-α mRNA and ADMA were reduced by IP etanercept or combined IP and IT etanercept. Dually IP/IT etanercept administration reduced the increased cortical and hippocampal TNF-α mRNA and protein level as well as spatial deficits. Conclusions: We conclude that combined intraperitoneal and intrathecal etanercept reduce increased brain TNF-α and ADMA levels and rescues spatial deficits in young rats after BDL. PMID:27445694

  4. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors sensitize reduced glucocorticoid response mediated by TNF{alpha} in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Kenji . E-mail: knjond@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Nagashima, Masahiro; Kawakubo, Yo; Inoue, Shota; Hirano, Toshihiko; Oka, Kitaro

    2006-12-08

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential drugs administered topically or systematically for the treatment of autoimmune skin diseases such as pemphigus. However, a certain proportion of patients does not respond well to GCs. Although studies on the relationship between cytokines and GC insensitivity in local tissues have attracted attention recently, little is known about the underlying mechanism(s) for GC insensitivity in epidermal keratinocytes. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) {alpha} reduces GC-induced transactivation of endogenous genes as well as a reporter plasmid which contains GC responsive element (GRE) in human epidermal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT). The GC insensitivity by TNF{alpha} was not accompanied by changes in mRNA expressions of GR isoforms ({alpha} or {beta}). However, we observed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) significantly sensitized the GC-induced transactivation of anti-inflammatory genes (glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 gene in the presence of TNF{alpha}. Additionally, we observed that TNF{alpha} reduced prednisolone (PSL)-dependent nuclear translocation of GR, which was restored by pre-treatment of MEK-1 inhibitors. This is the first study demonstrating a role of the MEK-1/ERK cascade in TNF{alpha}-mediated GC insensitivity. Our data suggest that overexpression of TNF{alpha} leads to topical GC insensitivity by reducing GR nuclear translocation in keratinocytes, and our findings also suggest that inhibiting the MEK-1/ERK cascade may offer a therapeutic potential for increasing GC efficacy in epidermis where sufficient inflammatory suppression is required.

  5. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .... Width, as an element of quality, does not apply to tobacco in strip form. (See Elements of Quality Chart... Heavy Fleshy Medium Thin Oil Lean Oily Rich Color intensity Pale Weak Moderate Strong Deep. Width... quality...

  6. 7 CFR 29.1085 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... Width, as an element of quality, does not apply to tobacco in strip form. (See Elements of Quality Chart... Heavy Fleshy Medium Thin Oil Lean Oily Rich Color intensity Pale Weak Moderate Strong Deep. Width... quality...

  7. Prussian blue-gold nanoparticles-ionic liquid functionalized reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite as label for ultrasensitive electrochemical immunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein.

    PubMed

    Gao, Qi; Liu, Na; Ma, Zhanfang

    2014-06-04

    In this work, poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) protected Prussian blue/gold nanoparticles/ionic liquid functionalized reduced graphene oxide (IL-rGO-Au-PDDA-PB) nanocomposite was fabricated. The resulting nanocomposite exhibited high biocompatibility, conductivity and catalytic activity. To assess the performance of the nanocomposite, a sensitive sandwich-type immunosensor was constructed for detecting alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Greatly enhanced sensitivity for this immunosensor was based on triple signal amplification strategies. Firstly, IL-rGO modified electrode was used as biosensor platform to capture a large amount of antibody due to its increased surface area, thus amplifying the detection response. Secondly, a large number of Au-PDDA-PB was conjugated on the surface of IL-rGO, which meant the enrichment of the signal and the more immobilization of label antibody. Finally, the catalytic reaction between H2O2 and the IL-rGO-Au-PDDA-PB nanocomposite further enhanced the signal response. The signals increased linearly with AFP concentrations in the range of 0.01-100 ng mL(-1). The detection limit for AFP was 4.6 pg mL(-1). The immunosensor showed high sensitivity, excellent selectivity and good stability. Moreover, the immunosensor was applied to the analysis of AFP in serum sample with satisfactory result.

  8. Vanadium oxides on aluminum oxide supports. 1. Surface termination and reducibility of vanadia films on alpha-Al2O3(0001).

    PubMed

    Todorova, Tanya K; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Veronica; Sauer, Joachim

    2005-12-15

    Using density functional theory and statistical thermodynamics, we obtained the phase diagram of thin VnOm films of varying thickness (approximately 2-6 A, 1-6 vanadium layers) supported on alpha-Al2O3(0001). Depending on the temperature, oxygen pressure, and vanadium concentration, films with different thickness and termination may form. In ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), at room temperature and for low vanadium concentrations, an ultrathin (1 x 1) O=V-terminated film is most stable. As more vanadium is supplied, the thickest possible films form. Their structures and terminations correspond to previous findings for the (0001) surface of bulk V2O3 [Kresse et al., Surf. Sci. 2004, 555, 118]. The presence of surface vanadyl (O=V) groups is a prevalent feature. They are stable up to at least 800 K in UHV. Vanadyl oxygen atoms induce a V(2p) core-level shift of about 2 eV on the surface V atoms. The reducibility of the supported films is characterized by the energy of oxygen defect formation. For the stable structures, the results vary between 4.11 and 3.59 eV per 1/2O2. In contrast, oxygen removal from the V2O5(001) surface is much easier (1.93 eV). This provides a possible explanation for the lower catalytic activity of vanadium oxides supported on alumina compared to that of crystalline vanadia particles.

  9. Lavandula Reduces Heart Injury via Attenuating Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha and Oxidative Stress in A Rat Model of Infarct-Like Myocardial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Vakili, Abedin; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Zahedi khorasani, Mahdi; Darabian, Mohsen

    2017-01-01

    Objective Lavender is used in herbal medicine for different therapeutic purposes. Nonetheless, potential therapeutic effects of this plant in ischemic heart disease and its possible mechanisms remain to be investigated. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, lavender oil at doses of 200, 400 or 800 mg/kg was administered through gastric gavage for 14 days before infarct-like myocardial injury (MI). The carotid artery and left ventricle were cannulated to record arterial blood pressure (BP) and cardiac function. At the end of experiment, the heart was removed and histopathological alteration, oxidative stress biomarkers as well as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) level were evaluated. Results Induction of M.I caused cardiac dysfunction, increased levels of lipid peroxidation, TNF-α and troponin I in heart tissue (P<0.001). Pretreatment with lavender oil at doses of 200 and 400 mg/kg significantly reduced myocardial injury, troponin I and TNF-α. In addition, it improved cardiac function and antioxidant enzyme activity (P<0.01). Conclusion Our finding showed that lavender oil has cardioprotective effect through inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammatory pathway in the rat model with infarct-like MI. We suggest that lavender oil may be helpful in prevention or attenuation of heart injury in patients with high risk of myocardial infarction and/or ischemic heart disease. PMID:28367419

  10. Ru(bpy)32+/nanoporous silver-based electrochemiluminescence immunosensor for alpha fetoprotein enhanced by gold nanoparticles decorated black carbon intercalated reduced graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenjuan; Lv, Xiaohui; Wang, Qi; Ma, Hongmin; Wu, Dan; Yan, Tao; Hu, Lihua; Du, Bin; Wei, Qin

    2016-01-01

    A highly sensitive sandwich-type electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was proposed for the quantitative determination of alpha fetoprotein (AFP) using gold nanoparticles decorated black carbon intercalated reduced graphene oxide (Au-rGO@CB) as sensing platform and nanoporous silver (NPS) loaded Ru(bpy)32+ as labels. In this work, intercalation of CB inhibited the accumulation of rGO and Au-rGO@CB was firstly used to immobilize primary antibody (Ab1) in ECL system. NPS prepared by the dealloying of binary alloy has high pore volume and surface areas, which was used to load amount of secondary antibodies (Ab2) and Ru(bpy)32+, which could greatly enhance the ECL intensity. Under optimal conditions, the designed immunosensor exhibited wider linear range from 0.0001 to 30 ng/mL with a relative lower detection limit of 33 fg/mL for AFP detection. Overall, the designed immunosensor exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity, good repeatability and stability. This proposed method provided a potential application for clinical monitoring of AFP. PMID:26829062

  11. Alpha1-chimaerin, a Rac1 GTPase-activating protein, is expressed at reduced mRNA levels in the brain of Alzheimer's disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tomoko; Konishi, Yoshihiro; Shimohama, Shun; Beach, Thomas G.; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Alpha1-chimaerin is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rac1, a member of the Rho small GTPase family, whose action leads to the inactivation of Rac1. Rac1 activity is upregulated in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the role of α1-chimaerin. In this study, we investigated the expression and localization of α1-chimaerin mRNA in postmortem human brains from patients with Alzheimer's disease and control subjects. In situ hybridization studies demonstrated that α1-chimaerin was expressed by neurons in the neo-cortex of the temporal lobe and the hippocampus of both controls and Alzheimer's disease cases, with the signal intensity dramatically decreased in patients with Alzheimer's disease. Real-time PCR analysis confirmed a significant reduction of α1-chimaerin mRNA expression in the temporal cortex of Alzheimer's disease cases. In contrast, α2-chimaerin mRNA levels showed no significant difference between the groups. The present study showed reduced α1-chimaerin expression in the brain of Alzheimer's disease cases, suggesting a role in the upregulation of Rac1 activity during the disease process. PMID:25676811

  12. 23 CFR 658.15 - Width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS § 658.15 Width. (a) No State shall impose a width limitation of more or less than 102 inches, or its approximate metric equivalent, 2.6 meters (102.36 inches)...

  13. THE LYMAN ALPHA MORPHOLOGY OF LOCAL STARBURST GALAXIES: RELEASE OF CALIBRATED IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Oestlin, Goeran; Hayes, Matthew; Kunth, Daniel; Atek, Hakim; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Leitherer, Claus; Petrosian, Artashes E-mail: matthew.hayes@unige.ch

    2009-09-15

    We present reduced and calibrated high resolution Lyman-alpha (Ly{alpha}) images for a sample of six local star-forming galaxies. Targets were selected to represent a range in luminosity and metallicity and to include both known Ly{alpha} emitters and nonemitters. Far ultraviolet imaging was carried out with the Solar Blind Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) in the F122M (Ly{alpha} online) and F140LP (continuum) filters. The resulting Ly{alpha} images are the product of careful modeling of both the stellar and nebular continua, facilitated by supporting HST imaging at {lambda} {approx} 2200, 3300, 4400, 5500, H{alpha}, and 8000 A, combined with Starburst 99 evolutionary synthesis models, and prescriptions for dust extinction on the continuum. In all, the resulting morphologies in Ly{alpha}, H{alpha}, and UV continuum are qualitatively very different and we show that the bulk of Ly{alpha} emerges in a diffuse component resulting from resonant scattering events. Ly{alpha} escape fractions, computed from integrated H{alpha} luminosities and recombination theory, are found never to exceed 14%. Internal dust extinction is estimated in each pixel and used to correct Ly{alpha} fluxes. However, the extinction corrections are far too small (by factors from 2.6 to infinity) to reconcile the emerging global Ly{alpha} luminosities with standard recombination predictions. Surprisingly, when comparing the global equivalent widths of Ly{alpha} and H{alpha}, the two quantities appear to be anticorrelated, which may be due to the evolution of mechanical feedback from the starburst. This calls for caution in the interpretation of Ly{alpha} observations in terms of star formation rates. The images presented have a physical resolution 3 orders of magnitude better than attainable at high redshifts from the ground with current instrumentation and our images may therefore serve as useful templates for comparing with observations and modeling of

  14. Human Alpha-1-Antitrypsin (hAAT) therapy reduces renal dysfunction and acute tubular necrosis in a murine model of bilateral kidney ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Maicas, Nuria; van der Vlag, Johan; Bublitz, Janin; Florquin, Sandrine; Bakker-van Bebber, Marinka; Dinarello, Charles A.; Verweij, Vivienne; Masereeuw, Roos; Joosten, Leo A.

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective effects of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), the major serum serine protease inhibitor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of human AAT (hAAT) monotherapy during the early and recovery phase of ischemia-induced acute kidney injury. Mild renal ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury was induced in male C57Bl/6 mice by bilateral clamping of the renal artery and vein for 20 min. hAAT (80 mg/kg, Prolastin®) was administered daily intraperitoneally (i.p.) from day -1 until day 7 after surgery. Control animals received the same amount of human serum albumin (hAlb). Plasma, urine and kidneys were collected at 2h, 1, 2, 3, 8 and 15 days after reperfusion for histological and biochemical analysis. hAAT partially preserved renal function and tubular integrity after induction of bilateral kidney I/R injury, which was accompanied with reduced renal influx of macrophages and a significant decrease of neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) protein levels in urine and plasma. During the recovery phase, hAAT significantly decreased kidney injury molecule-1 (KIM-1) protein levels in urine but showed no significant effect on renal fibrosis. Although the observed effect size of hAAT administration was limited and therefore the clinical relevance of our findings should be evaluated carefully, these data support the potential of this natural protein to ameliorate ischemic and inflammatory conditions. PMID:28235038

  15. Limit Cycles Can Reduce the Width of the Habitable Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haqq-Misra, Jacob; Kopparapu, Ravi Kumar; Batalha, Natasha E.; Harman, Chester E.; Kasting, James F.

    2016-08-01

    The liquid water habitable zone (HZ) describes the orbital distance at which a terrestrial planet can maintain above-freezing conditions through regulation by the carbonate-silicate cycle. Recent calculations have suggested that planets in the outer regions of the HZ cannot maintain stable, warm climates, but rather should oscillate between long, globally glaciated states and shorter periods of climatic warmth. Such conditions, similar to “Snowball Earth” episodes experienced on Earth, would be inimical to the development of complex land life, including intelligent life. Here, we build on previous studies with an updated energy balance climate model to calculate this “limit cycle” region of the HZ where such cycling would occur. We argue that an abiotic Earth would have a greater CO2 partial pressure than today because plants and other biota help to enhance the storage of CO2 in soil. When we tune our abiotic model accordingly, we find that limit cycles can occur but that previous calculations have overestimated their importance. For G stars like the Sun, limit cycles occur only for planets with CO2 outgassing rates less than that on modern Earth. For K- and M-star planets, limit cycles should not occur; however, M-star planets may be inhospitable to life for other reasons. Planets orbiting late G-type and early K-type stars retain the greatest potential for maintaining warm, stable conditions. Our results suggest that host star type, planetary volcanic activity, and seafloor weathering are all important factors in determining whether planets will be prone to limit cycling.

  16. Reduced odor responses from antennal neurons of G(q)alpha, phospholipase Cbeta, and rdgA mutants in Drosophila support a role for a phospholipid intermediate in insect olfactory transduction.

    PubMed

    Kain, Pinky; Chakraborty, Tuhin Subra; Sundaram, Susinder; Siddiqi, Obaid; Rodrigues, Veronica; Hasan, Gaiti

    2008-04-30

    Mechanisms by which G-protein-coupled odorant receptors transduce information in insects still need elucidation. We show that mutations in the Drosophila gene for G(q)alpha (dgq) significantly reduce both the amplitude of the field potentials recorded from the whole antenna in responses to odorants as well as the frequency of evoked responses of individual sensory neurons. This requirement for G(q)alpha is for adult function and not during antennal development. Conversely, brief expression of a dominant-active form of G(q)alpha in adults leads to enhanced odor responses. To understand signaling downstream of G(q)alpha in olfactory sensory neurons, genetic interactions of dgq were tested with mutants in genes known to affect phospholipid signaling. dgq mutant phenotypes were further enhanced by mutants in a PLCbeta (phospholipase Cbeta) gene, plc21C. Interestingly although, the olfactory phenotype of mutant alleles of diacylglycerol kinase (rdgA) was rescued by dgq mutant alleles. Our results suggest that G(q)alpha-mediated olfactory transduction in Drosophila requires a phospholipid second messenger the levels of which are regulated by a cycle of phosphatidylinositol 1,4-bisphosphate breakdown and regeneration.

  17. Alpha Interferon Inhibits Human Herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) Reactivation in Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cells and Reduces HHV-8 Load in Cultured Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Monini, Paolo; Carlini, Francesca; Stürzl, Michael; Rimessi, Paola; Superti, Fabiana; Franco, Marina; Melucci-Vigo, Gianna; Cafaro, Aurelio; Goletti, Delia; Sgadari, Cecilia; Butto’, Stefano; Leone, Patrizia; Leone, Pasqualina; Chiozzini, Chiara; Barresi, Caterina; Tinari, Antonella; Bonaccorsi, Angela; Capobianchi, Maria R.; Giuliani, Massimo; di Carlo, Aldo; Andreoni, Massimo; Rezza, Giovanni; Ensoli, Barbara

    1999-01-01

    Infection by human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is associated with the development of Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). Since regression of KS can be achieved by treatment of the patients with alpha interferon (IFN-α), we analyzed the effects of IFN-α or anti-IFN-α antibodies (Ab) on HHV-8 latently infected primary effusion lymphoma-derived cell lines (BCBL-1 and BC-1) and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients with all forms of KS and from at-risk subjects. IFN-α inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the amplification of HHV-8 DNA in BCBL-1 cells induced to lytic infection with tetradecanoyl phorbol acetate (TPA). This effect was associated with the inhibition of the expression of HHV-8 nut-1 and kaposin genes that are induced early and several hours, respectively, after TPA treatment. In addition, IFN-α inhibited virus production and/or release from BCBL-1 cells. Inhibition of nut-1 and kaposin genes by IFN-α was also observed in BC-1 cells induced with n-butyrate. Conversely, the addition of anti-IFN-α Ab to TPA-induced BCBL-1 cells resulted in a larger number of mature enveloped particles and in a more extensive cytopathic effect due to the neutralization of the endogenous IFN produced by these cells. IFN was also produced by cultured PBMC from HHV-8-infected individuals, and this was associated with a loss of viral DNA during culture. However, the addition of anti-IFN-α Ab or anti-type I IFN receptor Ab promoted the maintenance of HHV-8 DNA in these cells that was associated with the detection of the latency-associated kaposin RNA. Finally, the addition of IFN-α reduced the HHV-8 load in PBMC. Thus, IFN-α appears to have inhibitory effects on HHV-8 persistent infection of PBMC. These results suggest that, in addition to inhibiting the expression of angiogenic factors that are key to KS development, IFN-α may induce KS regression by reducing the HHV-8 load and/or inhibiting virus reactivation. PMID:10196299

  18. A diet containing alpha-cellulose and fish oil reduces aberrant crypt foci formation and modulates other possible markers for colon cancer risk in azoxymethane-treated rats.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Leana J; Landström, Eva K; Royle, Peter J; Bird, Anthony R; McIntosh, Graeme H

    2002-08-01

    There is a need for better understanding of the roles of dietary fats and fibers in colon cancer risk. We examined the effect of different dietary fiber and fat sources on an azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer in rats. In a 2 x 3 factorial design, rats were fed a semipurified diet containing soy-derived fiber (Fibrim), alpha-cellulose (Solkafloc) or resistant starch (RS; Hi-maize) at 10 g dietary fiber/100 g diet, combined with fish oil (FO) or sunflower seed oil (SSO) at 10 g/100 g diet, and lard added to all diets at 10 g/100 g, to provide a total of 20 g mixed fat/100 g diet. Sprague-Dawley rats (28 d of age) consumed diets for 4 wk and then two doses of AOM (15 mg/kg body) were administered 1 wk apart by subcutaneous injection. Rats were killed after 13 wk of consuming experimental diets. Colons were fixed in formalin and aberrant crypt foci (ACF) were quantified after staining. ACF counts were higher (+66%, P < 0.01) in rats fed SSO and RS, than in those fed alpha-cellulose and FO. Rats fed FO had 19% fewer ACF than those fed SSO (P < 0.05). alpha-Cellulose was associated with the highest cecal butyrate concentration (P < 0.001), the highest beta-glucuronidase specific activity (P < 0.001) and the lowest cecal water cytotoxicity (P < 0.001) relative to soy fiber- and RS-fed rats. There were inverse correlations between the number of ACF and cecal butyrate concentration (r = -0.33, P < 0.05) and between cecal water cytotoxicity and beta-glucuronidase activity (r = -0.70, P < 0.001). The greatest protection was associated with alpha-cellulose as the fiber source and FO as the fat source as measured by colon ACF numbers in rats.

  19. Terrace width variations in complex lunar craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearce, Steven J.; Melosh, H. J.

    1986-01-01

    The widths of terrace structures in complex craters on the moon are compared to existing theoretical models of their origin. Terrace widths in an individual crater increase monotonically outward toward the crater rim. Similarly, the width W of the terraces lying closest to the rim of a crater of diameter D increases monotonically, obeying a least-squares power-law relation WS (km) = 0.09D exp 0.87 km). A simple model of slumping that ignores inertial forces and assumes a constant bedrock yield strength is in good agreement with the observations.

  20. Design of athermal phonon light detector for reducing alpha recoil background of next-gen CUORE 0 νββ experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Joseph; Pyle, Matt; Kolomensky, Yury; Cuore Collaboration; Cdms Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The current generation of bolometric 0 νββ experiments, including CUORE, expect degraded alpha recoils to be the dominant background restricting experimental sensitivity. The CUPID project will aim to improve the sensitivity of CUORE by over an order of magnitude, and search for 0 νββ in the entire region of parameter space consistent with the inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Surface contamination of Cu support structures for CUORE's 130Te crystal bolometers is primarily responsible for these unwanted alpha recoils. Electronic signals produced near Qββ (2.53 MeV) have been shown to produce Cherenkov radiation on the order of 100 eV in 130Te crystals. The heavier and slower alpha particles of comparable energy in the region of interest do not produce a Cherenkov signal, allowing for discrimination via a high-resolution cryogenic light detector. A photon detector with energy resolution <10 eV is necessary. We will discuss how athermal phonon collection calorimeter technology developed by the CDMS collaboration over the past decade can be scaled to produce such a sensitive detector, while also satisfying requirements for scintillating crystal alternatives. We will also present the current status of the detector development. NSF: NSF PHY-1314881.

  1. New parameter in diagnosis of acute appendicitis: Platelet distribution width

    PubMed Central

    Dinc, Bulent; Oskay, Alten; Dinc, Selcan Enver; Bas, Bilge; Tekin, Sabri

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of the mean platelet volume and platelet distribution width in acute appendicitis. METHODS: This retrospective, case-controlled study compared 295 patients with acute appendicitis (Group I), 100 patients with other intra-abdominal infections (Group II), and 100 healthy individuals (Group III) between January 2012 and January 2013. The age, gender, and white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, mean platelet volume, and platelet distribution width values from blood samples were compared among the groups. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS for Windows 21.0 software. In addition, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values and likelihood ratios, and diagnostic accuracy were calculated. RESULTS: The mean ages of patients were 29.9 ± 12.0 years for Group I, 31.5 ± 14.0 years for Group II, and 30.4 ± 13.0 years for Group III. Demographic features such as age and gender were not significantly different among the groups. White blood cell count, neutrophil percentage and platelet distribution width were significantly higher in Group I compared to groups II and III (P < 0.05). Diagnostically, the sensitivity, specificity and diagnostic accuracy were 73.1%, 94.0%, and 78% for white blood cell count, 70.0%, 96.0%, and 76.0% for neutrophil percentage, 29.5%, 49.0%, and 34.0% for mean platelet volume, and 97.1%, 93.0%, and 96.0% for platelet distribution width, respectively. The highest diagnostic accuracy detected was for platelet distribution width between Group I and Group III (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Platelet distribution width analysis can be used for diagnosis of acute appendicitis without requiring additional tests, thus reducing the cost and loss of time. PMID:25684947

  2. Bipartite Graphs of Large Clique-Width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korpelainen, Nicholas; Lozin, Vadim V.

    Recently, several constructions of bipartite graphs of large clique-width have been discovered in the literature. In the present paper, we propose a general framework for developing such constructions and use it to obtain new results on this topic.

  3. Reduced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and transforming growth factor-beta1 expression in the lungs of inbred mice that fail to develop fibroproliferative lesions consequent to asbestos exposure.

    PubMed

    Brass, D M; Hoyle, G W; Poovey, H G; Liu, J Y; Brody, A R

    1999-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta mRNA and protein expression and the degree of fibroproliferative response to inhaled asbestos fibers are clearly reduced in the 129 inbred mouse strain as compared with typical fibrogenesis observed in the C57BL/6 inbred strain. The C57BL/6 mice showed prominent lesions at bronchiolar-alveolar duct (BAD) junctions where asbestos fibers deposit and responding macrophages accumulate. The 129 mice, however, were generally indistinguishable from controls even though the numbers of asbestos fibers deposited in the lungs of all exposed animals were the same. Quantitative morphometry of H&E-stained lung sections comparing the C57BL/6 and 129 mice showed significantly less mean cross-sectional area of the BAD junctions in the 129 animals, apparent at both 48 hours and 4 weeks after exposure. In addition, fewer macrophages had accumulated at these sites in the 129 mice. Nuclear bromodeoxyuridine immunostaining demonstrated that the number of proliferating cells at first alveolar duct bifurcations and in adjacent terminal bronchioles was significantly reduced in the 129 strain compared with C57BL/6 mice at 48 hours after exposure (P < 0.01). TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 gene expression, as measured by in situ hybridization, was reduced in the 129 mice at 48 hours after exposure, and expression of TNF-alpha and TGF-beta1 protein, as measured by immunohistochemistry, was similarly reduced or absent in the 129 animals. We postulate that the protection afforded the 129 mice is related to reduction of growth factor expression by the bronchiolar-alveolar epithelium and lung macrophages.

  4. Alpha Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions such as high blood pressure and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Find out more about this class of medication. ... these conditions: High blood pressure Enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia) Though alpha blockers are commonly used to treat ...

  5. Alpha fetoprotein

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alpha fetoprotein - series References Cunningham FG, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al. Prenatal diagnosis and fetal therapy. In: Cunningham FG, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al, eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. ...

  6. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an apparently normal individual has a child with hemoglobin H disease or alpha thalassemia minor. It can ... gene on one chromosome 25% 25% 25% 25% hemoglobin H disease there is a 25% chance with ...

  7. Discovery of {sup 109}Xe and {sup 105}Te: Superallowed {alpha} Decay near Doubly Magic {sup 100}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Liddick, S. N.; Batchelder, J. C.; Grzywacz, R.; Bingham, C. R.; Mazzocchi, C.; Drafta, G.; Tantawy, M. N.; Page, R. D.; Darby, I. G.; Joss, D. T.; Thomson, J.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Gross, C. J.; Goodin, C.; Hamilton, J. H.; Hwang, J. K.; Li, K.; Hecht, A. A.; Ilyushkin, S.; Korgul, A.

    2006-08-25

    Two new {alpha} emitters {sup 109}Xe and {sup 105}Te were identified through the observation of the {sup 109}Xe{yields}{sup 105}Te{yields}{sup 101}Sn {alpha}-decay chain. The {sup 109}Xe nuclei were produced in the fusion-evaporation reaction {sup 54}Fe({sup 58}Ni,3n){sup 109}Xe and studied using the Recoil Mass Spectrometer at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility. Two transitions at E{sub {alpha}}=4062{+-}7 keV and E{sub {alpha}}=3918{+-}9 keV were interpreted as the l=2 and l=0 transitions from the 7/2{sup +} ground state in {sup 109}Xe (T{sub 1/2}=13{+-}2 ms) to the 5/2{sup +} ground state and a 7/2{sup +} excited state, located at 150{+-}13 keV in {sup 105}Te. The observation of the subsequent decay of {sup 105}Te marks the discovery of the lightest known {alpha}-decaying nucleus. The measured transition energy E{sub {alpha}}=4703{+-}5 keV and half-life T{sub 1/2}=620{+-}70 ns were used to determine the reduced {alpha}-decay width {delta}{sup 2}. The ratio {delta}{sub {sup 105}Te}{sup 2}/{delta}{sub {sup 213}Po}{sup 2} of {approx}3 indicates a superallowed character of the {alpha} emission from {sup 105}Te.

  8. Reasons for reduced activities of 17 alpha-hydroxylase and C17-C20 lyase in spite of increased contents of cytochrome P-450 in mature rat testis fetally irradiated with 60Co.

    PubMed

    Inano, H; Ishii-Ohba, H; Suzuki, K; Ikeda, K

    1990-05-01

    Pregnant rats received whole body irradiation with 2.6 Gy gamma-ray from a 60Co source at Day 20 of gestation. When pups were 4 months old, activities of electron transport system and steroid monooxygenase in tests were assayed. The content of total cytochrome P-450 in the irradiated testes had increased to 170% of that in non-irradiated rats, but NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase activity had reduced to 36% of the control. Also, amounts of cytochrome b5 in testicular microsomal fraction were decreased markedly after irradiation, but no significant change of NADH-cytochrome b5 reductase activity was observed in the treated pups. Because both 17 alpha-hydroxylase and C17-C20 lyase activities tended to be decreased by fetal irradiation, testosterone production from progesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone was reduced to about 30% of the control. From these results, it has been suggested that the testicular cytochrome P-450 is radioresistant but steroid monooxygenase activities are reduced after the fetal irradiation. We propose that the discrepancy arises from the marked decrement of NADPH-cytochrome P-450 reductase activity.

  9. Mesiodistal width and proximal enamel thickness of maxillary first bicuspids.

    PubMed

    Macha, Aurélio de Carvalho; Vellini-Ferreira, Flávio; Scavone-Junior, Helio; Ferreira, Rívea Inês

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at evaluating measurements relative to the mesiodistal crown width and enamel thickness of maxillary first bicuspids. The sample consisted of 40 extracted sound bicuspids (20 right and 20 left), selected from white patients (mean age: 23.7 +/- 4.2 years), who were treated orthodontically with tooth extraction at a private clinic in São Paulo, SP, Brazil. All teeth were embedded in acrylic resin and cut along their long axis through the proximal surfaces, parallel to the buccal side, to obtain 0.6-mm central sections. The mesiodistal crown width and proximal enamel thickness were measured using a stereoscopic microscope connected to a computer. Measurements for right and left teeth, as well as the mesial and distal enamel thicknesses in the total sample, were compared by the Wilcoxon test (alpha = 0.05). The mesiodistal crown width mean values found were 7.51 mm (+/- 0.54) on the right side and 7.53 mm (+/- 0.35) on the left side. The mean enamel thickness on the distal surfaces for both sides was 1.29 mm (right: s.d. = 0.12 and left: s.d. = 0.18). The mean values for the mesial surfaces were 1.08 mm (+/- 0.14) and 1.19 mm (+/- 0.25), on the right and the left sides, respectively. No significant differences were found between the crown measurements and enamel thicknesses on the left and right sides. However, enamel thickness was significantly greater on the distal surfaces. Reliable measurements of enamel thickness are useful to guide stripping, which may be an attractive alternative to tooth extraction because it allows the transverse arch dimension to be maintained.

  10. The Variable Line Width of Achernar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivinius, Th.; Townsend, R. H. D.; Baade, D.; Carciofi, A. C.; Leister, N.; Štefl, S.

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopic observations of Achernar over the past decades, have shown the photospheric line width, as measured by the rotational parameter v sin i, to vary in correlation with the emission activity. Here we present new observations, covering the most recent activity phase, and further archival data collected from the archives. The v sin i variation is confirmed. On the basis of the available data it cannot be decided with certainty whether the increased line width precedes the emission activity, i.e. is a signature of the ejection mechanism, or postdates it, which would make it a signature of re-accretion of some of the disk-material. However, the observed evidence leans towards the re-accretion hypothesis. Two further stars showing the effect of variable line width in correlation with emission activity, namely 66 Oph and π Aqr, are presented as well.

  11. Relative Width and Height of Handwritten Letter.

    PubMed

    Lizega Rika, Joseba

    2017-02-28

    This is an exploratory study that analyzes the width and the height of letters in two texts written by each of the 21 writers analyzed. After detrending the linear, text, and allograph trends, we proceeded to comparing the sizes obtained in different texts. The different detrended series were compared by means of correlation and t-test. According to the results regarding the width of letters, the texts of 19 of 21 writers correlated strongly, whereas the texts of two writers did not correlate with the limits of the threshold. With regard to the height of letters, texts written by between 18 and 21 writers of 21 writers correlated strongly, whereas texts that did not correlate were within the threshold value. Regarding both the width and the height of letters, of 21 writers, texts written by between 19 and 21 individuals were found to correlate strongly.

  12. Equivalent Widths in the Spectrum of Sirius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G.; Qiu, H. M.; Chen, Y. Q.; Li, Z. W.

    2000-02-01

    The equivalent widths of total 546 lines (26 elements are included) in the spectrum of the bright Am star Sirius from 380 to 930 nm are tabulated. The high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum was obtained with the Coudé Echelle Spectrograph attached to the 2.16 m telescope at Beijing Astronomical Observatory (Xinglong, China). Here we also give the results of the equivalent widths comparison between our measurements and those of Strom et al. and Sadakane & Ueta.

  13. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1996-06-11

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone. 5 figs.

  14. Background canceling surface alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1996-01-01

    A background canceling long range alpha detector which is capable of providing output proportional to both the alpha radiation emitted from a surface and to radioactive gas emanating from the surface. The detector operates by using an electrical field between first and second signal planes, an enclosure and the surface or substance to be monitored for alpha radiation. The first and second signal planes are maintained at the same voltage with respect to the electrically conductive enclosure, reducing leakage currents. In the presence of alpha radiation and radioactive gas decay, the signal from the first signal plane is proportional to both the surface alpha radiation and to the airborne radioactive gas, while the signal from the second signal plane is proportional only to the airborne radioactive gas. The difference between these two signals is proportional to the surface alpha radiation alone.

  15. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist-mediated inhibition of [3H]noradrenaline release from rat hippocampus is reduced by 4-aminopyridine, but that caused by an adenosine analogue or omega-conotoxin is not.

    PubMed

    Hu, P S; Fredholm, B B

    1989-07-01

    The inhibitory effect of an adenosine analogue, R-PIA, and an alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist, UK 14,304, on [3H]NA efflux from field-stimulated rat hippocampal slices was examined. The effect of 0.1 microM UK 14,304 was mimicked by 30 nM omega-conotoxin and by 10 microM cadmium chloride, inhibitors of N- and L-type Ca2+ channels. R-PIA (1 microM) had no effect per se, but caused a clear-cut inhibition after blockade of the pre-synaptic alpha 2-receptor by yohimbine. 4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) caused a dose-dependent increase in evoked transmitter release. At 30 microM 4-AP did not affect the actions of omega-conotoxin or cadmium chloride. The pre-synaptic effect of R-PIA was similarly unaffected by 30 microM 4-AP. The pre-synaptic effect of UK 14,304 was virtually abolished by 4-AP (30 microM). The effect of UK 14,304 (0.1 microM) could be partly restored by reducing the Ca2+ concentration during treatment with 4-AP (22% inhibition compared to 42% with normal Ca2+). The magnitude of increase in evoked [3H]NA efflux by yohimbine (1 microM) was decreased by 4-AP in a concentration-dependent manner from 142% increase in controls to 21% at 100 microM 4-AP. The present results indicate that NA release is reduced by somewhat different mechanisms by pre-synaptic alpha 2- and adenosine A1-receptors. Furthermore, the results indicate that pre-synaptic A1-receptors on hippocampal NA neurons do not primarily regulate 4-AP-dependent potassium channels, but they might act directly on a Ca2+ conductance.

  16. The Apollo Alpha Spectrometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagoda, N.; Kubierschky, K.; Frank, R.; Carroll, J.

    1973-01-01

    Located in the Science Instrument Module of Apollo 15 and 16, the Alpha Particle Spectrometer was designed to detect and measure the energy of alpha particles emitted by the radon isotopes and their daughter products. The spectrometer sensor consisted of an array of totally depleted silicon surface barrier detectors. Biased amplifier and linear gate techniques were utilized to reduce resolution degradation, thereby permitting the use of a single 512 channel PHA. Sensor identification and in-flight radioactive calibration were incorporated to enhance data reduction.

  17. 14 CFR 121.115 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Route width. 121.115 Section 121.115 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Approval of Areas and Routes for Supplemental Operations §...

  18. 14 CFR 121.95 - Route width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Route width. 121.95 Section 121.95 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR CARRIERS..., FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Approval of Routes: Domestic and Flag Operations § 121.95 Route...

  19. You can't stop the music: reduced auditory alpha power and coupling between auditory and memory regions facilitate the illusory perception of music during noise.

    PubMed

    Müller, Nadia; Keil, Julian; Obleser, Jonas; Schulz, Hannah; Grunwald, Thomas; Bernays, René-Ludwig; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Weisz, Nathan

    2013-10-01

    Our brain has the capacity of providing an experience of hearing even in the absence of auditory stimulation. This can be seen as illusory conscious perception. While increasing evidence postulates that conscious perception requires specific brain states that systematically relate to specific patterns of oscillatory activity, the relationship between auditory illusions and oscillatory activity remains mostly unexplained. To investigate this we recorded brain activity with magnetoencephalography and collected intracranial data from epilepsy patients while participants listened to familiar as well as unknown music that was partly replaced by sections of pink noise. We hypothesized that participants have a stronger experience of hearing music throughout noise when the noise sections are embedded in familiar compared to unfamiliar music. This was supported by the behavioral results showing that participants rated the perception of music during noise as stronger when noise was presented in a familiar context. Time-frequency data show that the illusory perception of music is associated with a decrease in auditory alpha power pointing to increased auditory cortex excitability. Furthermore, the right auditory cortex is concurrently synchronized with the medial temporal lobe, putatively mediating memory aspects associated with the music illusion. We thus assume that neuronal activity in the highly excitable auditory cortex is shaped through extensive communication between the auditory cortex and the medial temporal lobe, thereby generating the illusion of hearing music during noise.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: alpha thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... a blood disorder that reduces the production of hemoglobin . Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that ... alpha thalassemia , a reduction in the amount of hemoglobin prevents enough oxygen from reaching the body's tissues. ...

  1. A recombinant single-chain human class II MHC molecule (HLA-DR1) as a covalently linked heterotrimer of alpha chain, beta chain, and antigenic peptide, with immunogenicity in vitro and reduced affinity for bacterial superantigens.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X; Bavari, S; Ulrich, R; Sadegh-Nasseri, S; Ferrone, S; McHugh, L; Mage, M

    1997-08-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules bind to numerous peptides and display these on the cell surface for T cell recognition. In a given immune response, receptors on T cells recognize antigenic peptides that are a minor population of MHC class II-bound peptides. To control which peptides are presented to T cells, it may be desirable to use recombinant MHC molecules with covalently bound antigenic peptides. To study T cell responses to such homogeneous peptide-MHC complexes, we engineered an HLA-DR1 cDNA coding for influenza hemagglutinin, influenza matrix, or HIV p24 gag peptides covalently attached via a peptide spacer to the N terminus of the DR1 beta chain. Co-transfection with DR alpha cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of HLA-DR1 molecules that reacted with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes. This suggested that the spacer and peptide did not alter expression or folding of the molecule. We then engineered an additional peptide spacer between the C terminus of a truncated beta chain (without transmembrane or cytoplasmic domains) and the N terminus of full-length DR alpha chain. Transfection of this cDNA into mouse L cells resulted in surface expression of the entire covalently linked heterotrimer of peptide, beta chain, and alpha chain with the expected molecular mass of approximately 66 kDa. These single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules reacted with mAb specific for correctly folded HLA-DR epitopes, and identified one mAb with [MHC + peptide] specificity. Affinity-purified soluble secreted single-chain molecules with truncated alpha chain moved in electrophoresis as compact class II MHC dimers. Cell surface two-chain or single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with a covalent HA peptide stimulated HLA-DR1-restricted HA-specific T cells. They were immunogenic in vitro for peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The two-chain and single-chain HLA-DR1 molecules with covalent HA peptide had reduced binding

  2. Alpha-Lipoic Acid Reduces LDL-Particle Number and PCSK9 Concentrations in High-Fat Fed Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Bradley; Wen, Shin; Zigouras, Sophia; Browne, Richard W.; Li, Zhuyun; Patel, Mulchand S.; Williamson, David L.; Rideout, Todd C.

    2014-01-01

    We characterized the hypolipidemic effects of alpha-lipoic acid (LA, R-form) and examined the associated molecular mechanisms in a high fat fed Zucker rat model. Rats (n = 8) were assigned to a high fat (HF) diet or the HF diet with 0.25% LA (HF-LA) for 30 days and pair fed to remove confounding effects associated with the anorectic properties of LA. Compared with the HF controls, the HF-LA group was protected against diet-induced obesity (102.5±3.1 vs. 121.5±3.6,% change BW) and hypercholesterolemia with a reduction in total-C (−21%), non-HDL-C (−25%), LDL-C (−16%), and total LDL particle number (−46%) and an increase in total HDL particles (∼22%). This cholesterol-lowering response was associated with a reduction in plasma PCSK9 concentration (−70%) and an increase in hepatic LDLr receptor protein abundance (2 fold of HF). Compared with the HF-fed animals, livers of LA-supplemented animals were protected against TG accumulation (−46%), likely through multiple mechanisms including: a suppressed lipogenic response (down-regulation of hepatic acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase expression); enhanced hepatic fat oxidation (increased carnitine palmitoyltransferase Iα expression); and enhanced VLDL export (increased hepatic diacylglycerol acyltransferase and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression and elevated plasma VLDL particle number). Study results also support an enhanced fatty acid uptake (2.8 fold increase in total lipase activity) and oxidation (increased CPT1β protein abundance) in muscle tissue in LA-supplemented animals compared with the HF group. In summary, in the absence of a change in caloric intake, LA was effective in protecting against hypercholesterolemia and hepatic fat accumulation under conditions of strong genetic and dietary predisposition toward obesity and dyslipidemia. PMID:24595397

  3. Vanadium oxides on aluminum oxide supports. 2. Structure, vibrational properties, and reducibility of V2O5 clusters on alpha-Al2O3(0001).

    PubMed

    Brázdová, Veronika; Ganduglia-Pirovano, M Verónica; Sauer, Joachim

    2005-12-15

    The structure, stability, and vibrational properties of isolated V2O5 clusters on the Al2O3(0001) surface have been studied by density functional theory and statistical thermodynamics. The most stable structure does not possess vanadyl oxygen atoms. The positions of the oxygen atoms are in registry with those of the alumina support, and both vanadium atoms occupy octahedral sites. Another structure with one vanadyl oxygen atom is only 0.12 eV less stable. Infrared spectra are calculated for the two structures. The highest frequency at 922 cm(-1) belongs to a V-O stretch in the V-O-Al interface bonds, which supports the assignment of such a mode to the band observed around 941 cm(-1) for vanadia particles on alumina. Removal of a bridging oxygen atom from the most stable cluster at the V-O-Al interface bond costs 2.79 eV. Removal of a (vanadyl) oxygen atom from a thin vanadia film on alpha-Al2O3 costs 1.3 eV more, but removal from a V2O5(001) single-crystal surface costs 0.9 eV less. Similar to the V2O5(001) surface, the facile reduction is due to substantial structure relaxations that involve formation of an additional V-O-V bond and yield a pair of V(IV)(d1) sites instead of a V(III)(d2)/V(V)(d0) pair.

  4. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  5. Blueberries reduce pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha and IL-6 production in mouse macrophages by inhibiting NF Kappa B activation and the MAPK pathway

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blueberries (BB) have been reported to attenuate atherosclerosis in apoE deficient (ApoE-/-) mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of BB in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine production in mouse macrophages. ApoE-/- mice were fed AIN-93G diet (CD) or CD formulated to contain 1% fre...

  6. Solution conformation of a neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA that discriminates {alpha}3 vs. {alpha}6 nAChR subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, Seung-Wook; Kim, Do-Hyoung; Olivera, Baldomero M.; McIntosh, J. Michael; Han, Kyou-Hoon . E-mail: khhan600@kribb.re.kr

    2006-06-23

    {alpha}-Conotoxin OmIA from Conus omaria is the only {alpha}-conotoxin that shows a {approx}20-fold higher affinity to the {alpha}3{beta}2 over the {alpha}6{beta}2 subtype of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. We have determined a three-dimensional structure of {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. {alpha}-Conotoxin OmIA has an '{omega}-shaped' overall topology with His{sup 5}-Asn{sup 12} forming an {alpha}-helix. Structural features of {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA responsible for its selectivity are suggested by comparing its surface characteristics with other functionally related {alpha}4/7 subfamily conotoxins. Reduced size of the hydrophilic area in {alpha}-conotoxin OmIA seems to be associated with the reduced affinity towards the {alpha}6{beta}2 nAChR subtype.

  7. Effects of pacing magnitudes and forms on bistability width in a modeled ventricular tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaodong; Liu, Xuemei; Zheng, Lixian; Mi, Yuanyuan; Qian, Yu

    2013-07-01

    Bistability in periodically paced cardiac tissue is relevant to cardiac arrhythmias and its control. In the present paper, one-dimensional tissue of the phase I Luo-Rudy model is numerically investigated. The effects of various parameters of pacing signals on bistability width are studied. The following conclusions are obtained: (i) Pacing can be classified into two types: pulsatile and sinusoidal types. Pulsatile pacing reduces bistability width as its magnitude is increased. Sinusoidal pacing increases the width as its amplitude is increased. (ii) In a pacing period the hyperpolarizing part plays a more important role than the depolarizing part. Variations of the hyperpolarizing ratio in a period evidently change the width of bistability and its variation tendency. (iii) A dynamical mechanism is proposed to qualitatively explain the phenomena, which reveals the reason for the different effects of pulsatile and sinusoidal pacing on bistability. The methods for changing bistability width by external pacing may help control arrhythmias in cardiology.

  8. Testing Computability by Width Two OBDDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ron, Dana; Tsur, Gilad

    Property testing is concerned with deciding whether an object (e.g. a graph or a function) has a certain property or is “far” (for some definition of far) from every object with that property. In this paper we give lower and upper bounds for testing functions for the property of being computable by a read-once width-2 Ordered Binary Decision Diagram (OBDD), also known as a branching program, where the order of the variables is known. Width-2 OBDDs generalize two classes of functions that have been studied in the context of property testing - linear functions (over GF(2)) and monomials. In both these cases membership can be tested in time that is linear in 1/ɛ. Interestingly, unlike either of these classes, in which the query complexity of the testing algorithm does not depend on the number, n, of variables in the tested function, we show that (one-sided error) testing for computability by a width-2 OBDD requires Ω(log(n)) queries, and give an algorithm (with one-sided error) that tests for this property and performs tilde{O}(log(n)/ɛ) queries.

  9. Effects of Lane Width, Lane Position and Edge Shoulder Width on Driving Behavior in Underground Urban Expressways: A Driving Simulator Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Wang, Junhua; Fu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the effects of lane width, lane position and edge shoulder width on driving behavior for a three-lane underground urban expressway. A driving simulator was used with 24 volunteer test subjects. Five lane widths (2.85, 3.00, 3.25, 3.50, and 3.75 m) and three shoulder widths (0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 m) were studied. Driving speed, lane deviation and subjective perception of driving behavior were collected as performance measures. The results show that lane and shoulder width have significant effects on driving speed. Average driving speed increases from 60.01 km/h in the narrowest lane to 88.05 km/h in the widest lane. While both narrower lanes and shoulders result in reduced speed and lateral lane deviation, the effect of lane width is greater than that of shoulder width. When the lane and shoulder are narrow, drivers in the left or right lane tend to shy away from the tunnel wall, even encroaching into the neighboring middle lane. As the lane or shoulder gets wider, drivers tend to stay in the middle of the lane. An interesting finding is that although few participants acknowledged that lane position had any great bearing on their driving behaviors, the observed driving speed is statistically higher in the left lane than in the other two lanes when the lane width is narrow (in 2.85, 3 and 3.25 m lanes). These findings provided support for amending the current design specifications of urban underground roads, such as the relationship between design speed and lane width, speed limit, and combination form of lanes. PMID:27754447

  10. Replacement of the Lys linker with an Arg linker resulting in improved melanoma uptake and reduced renal uptake of Tc-99m-labeled Arg-Gly-Asp-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone hybrid peptide.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianquan; Guo, Haixun; Padilla, R Steve; Berwick, Marianne; Miao, Yubin

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to reduce the non-specific renal uptake of Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-conjugated alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alpha-MSH) hybrid peptide through structural modification or L-lysine co-injection. The RGD motif {cyclic(Arg-Gly-Asp-DTyr-Asp)} was coupled to [Cys(3,4,10), D-Phe7, Arg11] alpha-MSH3-13 {(Arg11)CCMSH} through the Arg linker (substituting the Lys linker) to generate a novel RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH hybrid peptide. The melanoma targeting and pharmacokinetic properties of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were determined in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing C57 mice. The effect of L-lysine co-injection on the renal uptake was determined through the co-injection of L-lysine with 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH or 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. Replacement of the Lys linker with an Arg linker exhibited a profound effect in reducing the non-specific renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, as well as increasing the tumor uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH compared to 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH. 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH exhibited high tumor uptake (21.41+/-3.74% ID/g at 2 h post-injection) and prolonged tumor retention (6.81+/-3.71% ID/g at 24 h post-injection) in B16/F1 melanoma-bearing mice. The renal uptake values of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH were 40.14-64.08% of those of 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH (p<0.05) at 0.5, 2, 4 and 24 h post-injection. Co-injection of L-lysine was effective in decreasing the renal uptakes of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH by 27.7% and 99mTc-RGD-Lys-(Arg11)CCMSH by 52.1% at 2 h post-injection. Substitution of the Lys linker with an Arg linker dramatically improved the melanoma uptake and reduced the renal uptake of 99mTc-RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH, warranting the further evaluation of 188Re-labeled RGD-Arg-(Arg11)CCMSH as a novel MC1 receptor-targeting therapeutic peptide for melanoma treatment in the future.

  11. A low-glycemic index diet and exercise intervention reduces TNF(alpha) in isolated mononuclear cells of older, obese adults.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Karen R; Haus, Jacob M; Solomon, Thomas P J; Patrick-Melin, Aimee J; Cook, Marc; Rocco, Michael; Barkoukis, Hope; Kirwan, John P

    2011-06-01

    Low-glycemic index diets and exercise independently improve glucose tolerance and reduce diabetes risk. However, the combined effect of a low-glycemic index diet and exercise on inflammation and glucose metabolism is not known. Therefore, we randomized 28 insulin-resistant adults (age: 66 ± 1 y; BMI: 34.2 ± 0.7 kg · m(-2)) to a 12-wk, low (LGI = 40) or high- (HGI = 80) glycemic index diet plus aerobic exercise (5 d · wk(-1), 60 min · d(-1), 80-85% heart rate(max)) intervention. All food and fluids were provided during the study. Inflammation was assessed from cytokine (TNFα and IL-6) secretion using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) stimulated overnight with LPS. Glycemic response was determined following ingestion of a 75-g glucose solution. Fasting blood samples were collected for additional cytokine [TNFα, IL-6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1)] analysis. Both interventions decreased BMI (P < 0.001), fasting plasma glucose (P = 0.01), and insulin (P = 0.02). The glycemic response was reduced only in the LGI group (P = 0.04). Plasma and MNC-derived TNFα secretion were reduced in the LGI group (P = 0.02) but increased in the HGI group (P = 0.02). Secretion of IL-6 from MNC and plasma IL-6 and MCP-1 concentrations were reduced in the LGI group. The change in MNC-derived TNFα (r = 0.43; P = 0.04) and plasma MCP-1 (r = 0.44; P = 0.04) correlated with decreases in the glycemic response. These data highlight the importance of diet composition in the treatment and prevention of inflammation and hyperglycemia. A low-glycemic index diet has antiinflammatory and antidiabetogenic effects when combined with exercise in older, obese prediabetics.

  12. Laminar flow heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of power-law fluids inside tubes with varying width twisted tape inserts

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, A.G.

    2000-02-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of heat transfer and flow friction of a generalized power-law fluid in tape generated swirl flow inside a 25.0 mm i.d. circular tube, are presented. In order to reduce excessive pressure drops associated with full width twisted tapes, with less corresponding reduction in heat transfer coefficients, reduced width twisted tapes of widths ranging from 11.0 to 23.8 mm, which are lower than the tube inside diameter are used. Reduced width twisted tape inserts give 18%--56% lower isothermal friction factors than the full width tapes. Uniform wall temperature Nusselt numbers decrease only slightly by 5%--25%, for tape widths of 19.7 and 11.0 mm, respectively. Based on the constant pumping power criterion, the tapes of width 19.7 mm perform more or less like full width tapes. Correlations are presented for isothermal and heating friction factors and Nusselt numbers (under uniform wall temperature condition) for a fully developed laminar swirl flow, which are applicable to full width as well as reduced width twisted tapes, using a modified twist ratio as pitch to width ratio of the tape. The reduced width tapes offer 20%--50% savings in the tape material as compared to the full width tapes.

  13. Width Criterion For Weld-Seam-Tracking Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lincir, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Image-processing algorithm in "through-torch-vision" (T3V) system developed to guide gas/tungsten arc welding robot along weld seam modified, according to proposal, reducing incidence of inaccurate tracking of weld seam. Developmental system intended to provide closed-loop control of motion of welding robot along weld seam on basis of lines in T3V image identified by use of image-processing algorithm and assumed to coincide with edges of weld seam. Use of width criterion prevents tracking of many false pairs of lines, with consequent decrease in incidence of inaccurate tracking and increase in confidence in weld-tracking capability of robotic welding system.

  14. Anti-Interleukin-1 Beta/Tumor Necrosis Factor-Alpha IgY Antibodies Reduce Pathological Allergic Responses in Guinea Pigs with Allergic Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Wei-Xu, Hu; Wen-Yun, Zhou; Xi-Ling, Zhu; Zhu, Wen; Li-Hua, Wu; Xiao-Mu, Wu; Hui-Ping, Wei; Wen-Ding, Wang; Dan, He; Qin, Xiang; Guo-Zhu, Hu

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether the combined blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α can alleviate the pathological allergic inflammatory reaction in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in allergic rhinitis (AR) guinea pigs. Healthy guinea pigs treated with saline were used as the healthy controls. The AR guinea pigs were randomly divided into (1) the AR model group treated with intranasal saline; (2) the 0.1% nonspecific IgY treatment group; (3) the 0.1% anti-TNF-α IgY treatment group; (4) the 0.1% anti-IL-1β IgY treatment group; (5) the 0.1% combined anti-IL-1β and TNF-α IgY treatment group; and (6) the fluticasone propionate treatment group. The inflammatory cells were evaluated using Wright's staining. Histopathology was examined using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The results showed that the number of eosinophils was significantly decreased in the peripheral blood, nasal lavage fluid, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (P < 0.05), and eosinophil, neutrophil, and lymphocyte infiltration and edema were significantly reduced or absent in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues (P < 0.05) in the combined 0.1% anti-IL-1β- and TNF-α IgY-treated guinea pigs. The data suggest that topical blockade of IL-1β and TNF-α could reduce pathological allergic inflammation in the nasal mucosa and lung tissues in AR guinea pigs.

  15. Artifacts for Calibration of Submicron Width Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grunthaner, Frank; Grunthaner, Paula; Bryson, Charles, III

    2003-01-01

    Artifacts that are fabricated with the help of molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) are undergoing development for use as dimensional calibration standards with submicron widths. Such standards are needed for calibrating instruments (principally, scanning electron microscopes and scanning probe microscopes) for measuring the widths of features in advanced integrated circuits. Dimensional calibration standards fabricated by an older process that involves lithography and etching of trenches in (110) surfaces of single-crystal silicon are generally reproducible to within dimensional tolerances of about 15 nm. It is anticipated that when the artifacts of the present type are fully developed, their critical dimensions will be reproducible to within 1 nm. These artifacts are expected to find increasing use in the semiconductor-device and integrated- circuit industries as the width tolerances on semiconductor devices shrink to a few nanometers during the next few years. Unlike in the older process, one does not rely on lithography and etching to define the critical dimensions. Instead, one relies on the inherent smoothness and flatness of MBE layers deposited under controlled conditions and defines the critical dimensions as the thicknesses of such layers. An artifact of the present type is fabricated in two stages (see figure): In the first stage, a multilayer epitaxial wafer is grown on a very flat substrate. In the second stage, the wafer is cleaved to expose the layers, then the exposed layers are differentially etched (taking advantage of large differences between the etch rates of the different epitaxial layer materials). The resulting structure includes narrow and well-defined trenches and a shelf with thicknesses determined by the thicknesses of the epitaxial layers from which they were etched. Eventually, it should be possible to add a third fabrication stage in which durable, electronically inert artifacts could be replicated in diamondlike carbon from a master made by

  16. Reduced embryonic survival in rainbow trout resulting from paternal exposure to the environmental estrogen 17 alpha- ethynylestradiol during late sexual maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kim H.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Nagler, James J.

    2007-11-01

    Exposure of fishes to environmental estrogens is known to affect sexual development and spawning, but little information exists regarding effects on gametes. This study evaluated embryonic survival of offspring from male rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to 17a-ethynylestradiol (EE2)using an in vitro fertilization protocol. Males were exposed at either 1800 or 6700 degree days (8d) (i.e. 161 or 587 days post-fertilization (dpf)) to test for effects on testes linked to reproductive ontogeny. At 18008d, fish were beginning testicular differentiation and were exposed to 109 ng EE2/l for 21 days. At 67008d, fish have testes containing spermatocytes and spermatids and were exposed for 56 days to either 0.8, 8.3, or 65 ng EE2/l. Semen was collected at full sexual maturity in each group and used to fertilize eggs pooled from several non-exposed females. Significant decreases in embryonic survival were observed only with the 67008d exposure. In 0.8 and 8.3 ng EE2/l treatments, embryo survival was significantly reduced at 19 dpf when compared with the control. In contrast, an immediate decrease in embryonic survival at 0.5 dpf was observed in the 65 ng EE2/l treatment. Blood samples collected at spawning from 67008d exposed males revealed a significant decrease in 11-ketotestosterone and a significant increase in luteinizing hormone levels for the 65 ng EE2/l treatment when compared with the other treatment groups. Results indicate that sexually maturing male rainbow trout are susceptible to EE2 exposure with these fish exhibiting two possible mechanisms of reduced embryonic survival through sperm varying dependant

  17. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  18. Relating shortening, erosion, and exhumation to orogen width during Alpine collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, Claudio; Berger, Alfons; Bellahsen, Nicolas; Bousquet, Romain

    2014-05-01

    The width of orogens may change through time depending on the amount of shortening, on the efficiency of erosion, on the strength and thickness of the plates, or on the occurrence of pre-existing and newly formed weaknesses within the plates. The effect of erosion rates on the width of the Alps was controversially discussed, based on estimates of paleo-erosion rates and paleo-widths of the orogen. However, both parameters are difficult to reconstruct. In this contribution we investigate the causes of present-day, along-strike changes of width of the Eastern and the Central Alps to understand its width changes through time. Based on a series of 6 orogen-scale cross-sections and their retro-deformation we set the width of the thickened accreted lower plate in relation to the amount of collisional shortening and exhumation. We conclude that higher amounts of shortening systematically coincide with smaller widths of the thickened, accreted lower plate, i.e. the width of the mountain chain north of the South-Alpine indenters. Changes of width by a factor 2 along orogen segments of less than 200 km length cannot result from long-term climatic differences and sedimentary or paleontological evidences suggesting such differences are lacking. Therefore, erosional processes did not directly control the width of the orogen, which did not behave as a critical taper. Higher amounts of shortening coincide with larger amplitudes of orogen-scale, upright folds, with larger amounts of exhumation, and with higher exhumation rates. Hence, erosion did play a major role in reducing by up to 35 km the vertical crustal thickness in order to accommodate and allow shortening by folding, but along-strike changes of erosion rates were governed by different amounts of shortening, not by different climate.

  19. Investigating Starburst Galaxy Emission Line Equivalent Widths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meskhidze, Helen; Richardson, Chris T.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling star forming galaxies with spectral synthesis codes allows us to study the gas conditions and excitation mechanisms that are necessary to reproduce high ionization emission lines in both local and high-z galaxies. Our study uses the locally optimally-emitting clouds model to develop an atlas of starburst galaxy emission line equivalent widths. Specifically, we address the following question: What physical conditions are necessary to produce strong high ionization emission lines assuming photoionization via starlight? Here we present the results of our photoionization simulations: an atlas spanning 15 orders of magnitude in ionizing flux and 10 orders of magnitude in hydrogen density that tracks over 150 emission lines ranging from the UV to the near IR. Each simulation grid contains ~1.5x104 photoionization models calculated by supplying a spectral energy distribution, grain content, and chemical abundances. Specifically, we will be discussing the effects on the emission line equivalent widths of varying the metallicity of the cloud, Z = 0.2 Z⊙ to Z = 5.0 Z⊙, and varying the star-formation history, using the instantaneous and continuous evolution tracks and the newly released Starburst99 Geneva rotation tracks.

  20. Optical antennas with sinusoidal modulation in width.

    PubMed

    Dikken, Dirk Jan; Segerink, Frans B; Korterik, Jeroen P; Pfaff, Stefan S; Prangsma, Jord C; Herek, Jennifer L

    2016-08-08

    Small metal structures sustaining plasmon resonances in the optical regime are of great interest due to their large scattering cross sections and ability to concentrate light to subwavelength volumes. In this paper, we study the dipolar plasmon resonances of optical antennas with a constant volume and a sinusoidal modulation in width. We experimentally show that by changing the phase of the width-modulation, with a small 10 nm modulation amplitude, the resonance shifts over 160 nm. Using simulations we show how this simple design can create resonance shifts greater than 600 nm. The versatility of this design is further shown by creating asymmetric structures with two different modulation amplitudes, which we experimentally and numerically show to give rise to two resonances. Our results on both the symmetric and asymmetric antennas show the capability to control the localization of the fields outside the antenna, while still maintaining the freedom to change the antenna resonance wavelength. The antenna design we tested combines a large spectral tunability with a small footprint: all the antenna dimensions are factor 7 to 13 smaller than the wavelength, and hold potential as a design element in meta-surfaces for beam shaping.

  1. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slicker, James M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a flyback DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  2. Pulse width modulation inverter with battery charger

    DOEpatents

    Slicker, James M.

    1985-01-01

    An inverter is connected between a source of DC power and a three-phase AC induction motor, and a microprocessor-based circuit controls the inverter using pulse width modulation techniques. In the disclosed method of pulse width modulation, both edges of each pulse of a carrier pulse train are equally modulated by a time proportional to sin .theta., where .theta. is the angular displacement of the pulse center at the motor stator frequency from a fixed reference point on the carrier waveform. The carrier waveform frequency is a multiple of the motor stator frequency. The modulated pulse train is then applied to each of the motor phase inputs with respective phase shifts of 120.degree. at the stator frequency. Switching control commands for electronic switches in the inverter are stored in a random access memory (RAM) and the locations of the RAM are successively read out in a cyclic manner, each bit of a given RAM location controlling a respective phase input of the motor. The DC power source preferably comprises rechargeable batteries and all but one of the electronic switches in the inverter can be disabled, the remaining electronic switch being part of a "flyback" DC-DC converter circuit for recharging the battery.

  3. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists potentiate responses mediated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors in the cat nictitating membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Shepperson, N. B.

    1984-01-01

    Alpha 1 but not alpha 2-adrenoceptors mediate contractions of the cat nictitating membrane. The contractions of this tissue evoked by alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists, but not those evoked by angiotensin II, are potentiated by pre-dosing with alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists. This potentiation is reversed by the alpha 2-adrenoceptor antagonist, WY 26392. Pressor responses evoked by alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists or angiotensin II were not affected by alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists. Contractions of the nictitating membrane evoked by noradrenaline were reduced by pretreatment with WY 26392. These results suggest that in some tissues the role of alpha 2-adrenoceptors may be to modulate responses to alpha 1-adrenoceptors, rather than to evoke a discrete response themselves. PMID:6148985

  4. Device-width dependence of plateau width in quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaji, S.; Hirakawa, K.; Nagata, M.

    1993-02-01

    Hall bar type devices having a total length of 2900 μm, a source and drain electrode width of 400 μm and different widths w ranging from 10 to 120 μm in its central 600 μm long part are fabricated from a GaAs/AlGaAs wafer with electron mobility of 21 m 2V -1s -1. The current at which the quantum Hall plateau for i=2 at B=9.7T at T=1.2K disappears is proportional to w. The average critical current density is Jcr=(1.6±0.2) A m -1

  5. Poly(I:C) reduces expression of JAM-A and induces secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} via distinct NF-{kappa}B pathways in human nasal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkuni, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Masaki, Tomoyuki; Fuchimoto, Jun; Kamekura, Ryuta; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Himi, Tetsuo; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-01-01

    Human nasal epithelium is an important physical barrier and innate immune defense protecting against inhaled substances and pathogens. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, which plays a key role in the innate immune response, has not been well characterized in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs), including the epithelial tight junctional barrier. In the present study, mRNAs of TLR1-10 were detected in hTERT-transfected HNECs, which can be used as an indispensable and stable model of normal HNECs, similar to primary cultured HNECs. To investigate the changes of tight junction proteins and the signal transduction pathways via TLRs in HNECs in vitro, hTERT-transfected HNECs were treated with TLR2 ligand P{sub 3}CSK{sub 4}, TLR3 ligand poly(I:C), TLR4 ligand LPS, TLR7/8 ligand CL097, TLR8 ligand ssRNA40/LyoVec, and TLR9 ligand ODN2006. In hTERT-transfected HNECs, treatment with poly(I:C) significantly reduced expression of the tight junction protein JAM-A and induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-{alpha}. Both the reduction of JAM-A expression and the induction of secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} after treatment with poly(I:C) were modulated by distinct signal transduction pathways via EGFR, PI3K, and p38 MAPK and finally regulated by a TLR3-mediated NF-{kappa}B pathway. The control of TLR3-mediated signaling pathways in HNECs may be important not only in infection by viral dsRNA but also in autoimmune diseases caused by endogenous dsRNA released from necrotic cells.

  6. Solar-Cycle Changes in GONG P-Mode Widths and Amplitudes 1995-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komm R. W.; Howe, R.; Hill, F.

    1999-01-01

    We search for a solar cycle variation in mode widths and amplitudes derived from 3-month GONG time series. The variation of mode width and amplitude observed in GONG data are the combined effects of fill factor, temporal variation, and measurement uncertainties. The largest variation is caused by the fill factor resulting in modes with increased width and reduced amplitude when fill is lower. We assume that the solar cycle variation is the only other systematic variation beside the temporal window function effect. We correct all currently available data sets for the fill factor and simultaneously derive the solar cycle variation. We find an increase of about 3% on average in mode width from the previous minimum to Oct. 1998 and a decrease of about 7% and 6% in mode amplitude and mode area (width x amplitude). We find no l dependence of the solar-cycle changes. As a function of frequency, these changes show a maximum between 2.7 and 3.3 mHz with about 47% higher than average values for mode width and about 29% and 36% higher ones for mode amplitude and area. We estimate the significance of these rather small changes by a pre-whitening method and find that the results are significant at or above the 99.9% level with mode area showing the highest level of significance and mode width the lowest. The variation in background amplitude is most likely not significant and is consistent with a zero change.

  7. Red cell distribution width and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Danese, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Red cell distribution width (RDW) is an index which primarily reflects impaired erythropoiesis and abnormal red blood cell survival. In last years the interest in this marker has considerably grown and now a lot of data are available indicating that this simple and inexpensive parameter is a strong and independent risk factor for death in the general population. Moreover, several investigations have been performed to investigate the role of RDW in cardiovascular and thrombotic disorders. Contrarily, there are relatively few reports focusing on RDW in the area of oncology and to date none review have been performed in this specific field. As such, the aim of this narrative review is to summarize some interesting results obtained in studies performed in patients affected by solid and hematological tumors. Even if larger studies are needed before these preliminary findings can be generalized, it seems plausible to affirm that RDW can be useful by adding prognostic information in patients with oncologic disease. PMID:27867951

  8. Direct measurement of the W boson width

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-09-01

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W {yields} e{nu} candidates selected in 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 {+-} 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model and is the most precise direct measurement result from a single experiment to date.

  9. Direct measurement of the W boson width.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anzelc, M S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calfayan, P; Calpas, B; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Carrera, E; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; DeVaughan, K; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Escalier, M; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De La Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Mättig, P; Magaña-Villalba, R; Mal, P K; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vesterinen, M; Vilanova, D; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Wenger, A; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M R J; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Xu, C; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Ye, Z; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2009-12-04

    We present a direct measurement of the width of the W boson using the shape of the transverse mass distribution of W --> enu candidate events. Data from approximately 1 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity recorded at square root of s = 1.96 TeV by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp collider are analyzed. We use the same methods and data sample that were used for our recently published W boson mass measurement, except for the modeling of the recoil, which is done with a new method based on a recoil library. Our result, 2.028 +/- 0.072 GeV, is in agreement with the predictions of the standard model.

  10. Neutron decay widths of excited states of {sup 11}Be

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, P. J.; Freer, M.; Ashwood, N. I.; Bloxham, T.; Curtis, N.; McEwan, P.; Bohlen, H. G.; Dorsch, T.; Kokalova, Tz.; Schulz, Ch.; Wheldon, C.

    2009-01-15

    The two-neutron transfer reaction {sup 9}Be({sup 16}O, {sup 14}O){sup 11}Be[{sup 10}Be +n] has been used to measure the branching ratios for the neutron decay of excited states of {sup 11}Be. The {sup 14}O ejectile was detected by a Q3D spectrometer at forward angles. The energies and angles of the {sup 10}Be fragments of the decaying {sup 11}Be* recoil were measured in coincidence with the {sup 14}O ejectile using a double-sided silicon strip detector array at backward angles. This enabled a kinematic reconstruction of the reaction to be performed. Theoretical decay branch ratios were calculated using barrier penetrability factors and were compared to the measured ratios to provide information on the relative reduced widths of the states. The decay widths have been used to link states in {sup 11}Be with a common structure and structurally to states in the daughter nucleus {sup 10}Be. The 3/2{sup -} 8.82-MeV state was identified as a candidate for a molecular band head.

  11. Food extracts consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia reduce protein concentrations of androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha in human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jaskirat; Xie, Chanlu; Yao, Mu; Hua, Sheng; Vignarajan, Soma; Jardine, Greg; Hambly, Brett D; Sved, Paul; Dong, Qihan

    2010-04-01

    Active surveillance is an emerging management option for the rising number of men with low-grade, clinically localized prostate cancer. However, 30-40% of men on active surveillance will progress to high-grade disease over 5 y. With the ultimate aim of developing a food-based chemoprevention strategy to retard cancer progression in these otherwise healthy men, we have developed a blend of food extracts commonly consumed in Mediterranean countries and East Asia. The effect of the food extracts known as Blueberry Punch (BBP) on prostate cancer cell growth and key signaling pathways were examined in vitro and in vivo. BBP reduced prostate cancer cell growth in a dose-dependent manner (0.08-2.5%) at 72 h in vitro due to the reduction in cell proliferation and viability. Prostate cancer cell xenograft-bearing mice, administered 10% BBP in drinking water for 2 wk, had a 25% reduction in tumor volume compared with the control (water only). In vitro, BBP reduced protein concentrations in 3 signaling pathways necessary for the proliferation and survival of prostate cancer cells, namely androgen receptor, phospho-protein kinase B/protein kinase B, and phospho-cytosolic phospholipase A(2)alpha. The downstream effectors of these pathways, including prostate-specific antigen and glycogen synthase kinase 3beta, were also reduced. Thus, this palatable food supplement is a potential candidate for testing in clinical trials and may ultimately prove effective in retarding the progression of low-grade, early-stage prostate cancer in men managed by active surveillance.

  12. Changing step width alters lower extremity biomechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Brindle, Richard A; Milner, Clare E; Zhang, Songning; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2014-01-01

    Step width is a spatiotemporal parameter that may influence lower extremity biomechanics at the hip and knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical response of the lower extremity joints to step width changes during running. Lower extremity data from 30 healthy runners, half of them male, were collected during running in three step width conditions: preferred, wide, and narrow. Dependent variables and step width were analyzed using a mixed model ANOVA and pairwise t-tests for post hoc comparisons. Step width was successfully altered in the wide and narrow conditions. Generally, frontal plane peak values decreased as step width increased from narrow to preferred to wide. Peak hip adduction and rearfoot eversion angles decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Peak knee abduction moment and knee abduction impulse also decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Although men and women ran differently, gender only influenced the effect of step width on peak rearfoot inversion moment. In conclusion, step width influences lower extremity biomechanics in healthy runners. When step width increased from narrow to wide, peak values of frontal plane variables decreased. In addition to previously reported changes at the rearfoot, the hip and knee joint biomechanics were also influenced by changes in step width.

  13. Activation of the adenosine A3 receptor in RAW 264.7 cells inhibits lipopolysaccharide-stimulated tumor necrosis factor-alpha release by reducing calcium-dependent activation of nuclear factor-kappaB and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Lynn; Pingle, Sandeep C; Hallam, Daniel M; Rybak, Leonard P; Ramkumar, Vickram

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates the immune system and promotes inflammation via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4, which regulates the synthesis and release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and other inflammatory cytokines. Previous studies have shown that the nucleoside adenosine suppresses LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release in human UB939 macrophages by activating an adenosine A(3) receptor (A(3)AR) subtype on these cells. In this study, we examined the mechanism(s) underlying A(3)AR-dependent inhibition of TNF-alpha release in a mouse (RAW 264.7) cell line. Treatment of RAW 264.7 cells with LPS (3 mug/ml) increased TNF-alpha release, which was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by adenosine analogs N(6)-(3-iodobenzyl)-adenosine-5'-N-methyluronamide (IB-MECA) and R-phenylisopropyladenosine and reversed by selective A(3)AR blockade. The increase in TNF-alpha release was preceded by an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release by IB-MECA, a selective agonist of the A(3)AR, or with BAPTA-AM, an intracellular Ca(2+) chelator, reduced LPS-stimulated TNF-alpha release. Activation of the A(3)AR or inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) release also reduced LPS-stimulated nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation. Similar inhibition by A(3)AR was observed for LPS-stimulated inducible nitric-oxide synthase. These data support the contention that inhibition of LPS-stimulated release of inflammatory molecules, such as TNF-alpha and NO via the A(3)AR, involves suppression of intracellular Ca(2+)signaling, leading to suppression of NF-kappaB and ERK1/2 pathways.

  14. Real time pulse width monitor for Intensified Charge Coupled Device (ICCD) electro-optic shutters

    SciTech Connect

    Yates, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    A method is described or controlling and measuring the pulse width of electrical gate pulses used for optical shuttering of image intensifier. The intensifiers are coupled to high frame rate Charge-Coupled-Devices (CCD) or Focus-Projection Scan (FPS) vidicon TV cameras for readout and telemetry of time resolved image sequences. The shutter duration or gate width of individual shutters is measured in real time and encoded in the video frame corresponding to a given shutter interval. The shutter information is updated once catch video frame by strobing new data with each TV camera vertical sync pulse. This circuitry is used in conjunction with commercial video insertion/annotation equipment to provide die shutter width information in alpha numeric text form along with the time resolved video image on a frame-by-frame basis. The measurement technique and circuitry involving a combination of high speed digital counters and analog integrators for measurements in the Ins to 1024 ns range are described. The accuracy obtained is compared with measurements obtained using batch speed DSOs. The measured data are provided in 10-bit Binary (Bi) and four decades of Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) and also displayed on four digit seven segment displays. The control circuitry including digital and analog input means for gate width selection are described. The implementation of both measurement and control circuitry into an Intensified Shuttered CCD (ISCCD) radiometric system for recording fast shuttered images at RS-170 to 4 KHz frame rates is presented.

  15. Global synchronization of parallel processors using clock pulse width modulation

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Ellavsky, Matthew R.; Franke, Ross L.; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M.; Haring, Rudolf A.; Jeanson, Mark J.; Kopcsay, Gerard V.; Liebsch, Thomas A.; Littrell, Daniel; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D.; Schenck, Brandon E.; Swetz, Richard A.

    2013-04-02

    A circuit generates a global clock signal with a pulse width modification to synchronize processors in a parallel computing system. The circuit may include a hardware module and a clock splitter. The hardware module may generate a clock signal and performs a pulse width modification on the clock signal. The pulse width modification changes a pulse width within a clock period in the clock signal. The clock splitter may distribute the pulse width modified clock signal to a plurality of processors in the parallel computing system.

  16. Lyman Alpha Emitting Galaxies at 2 < z < 3: Towards a Calibrated Probe of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Caryl Gronwall

    2012-12-03

    The goal of this project was to establish the physical properties of Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies from redshifts of 2 to 3 in order to better calibrate the use of LAEs as probes of the large scale structure of the universe for upcoming dark energy experiments, such as the Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX). We have obtained narrow-band imaging of the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDF-S) in two different narrow-band filters centered at Ly{alpha} at z=2.1 and 3.1. The resulting of samples of LAEs were used to determine the LAE luminosity function, equivalent width distribution and clustering properties (bias) of LAEs at these redshifts. While the results from the ECDF-S appear robust, they are based on a single field. To explore the effects of cosmic variance and galaxy environment on the physical properties of LAEs, we have also obtained narrow-band data at both redshifts (z = 2:1 and 3:1) in three additional fields (SDSS 1030+-05, the Extended Hubble Deep Field South, and CW 1255+01). The narrow-band imaging data has been reduced and LAE catalogs are being generated. We have calculated preliminary luminosity functions, equivalent width distributions, and clustering properties. We have also obtained follow-up spectroscopy in the optical (using VLT/FORS) and in the near-infrared (using Magellan/MMIRS). Since individual LAEs have too little S/N to enable meaningful fits for stellar population parameters, our previous work has analyzed stacked Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). SED fitting was performed on several subsets of LAEs selected by their rest-UV luminosity, UV spectral slope, Ly alpha luminosity, Equivalent Width, or rest-optical (IRAC) luminosity.

  17. Reduced volume but increased training intensity elevates muscle Na+-K+ pump alpha1-subunit and NHE1 expression as well as short-term work capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Iaia, F Marcello; Thomassen, Martin; Kolding, Helle; Gunnarsson, Thomas; Wendell, Jesper; Rostgaard, Thomas; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Krustrup, Peter; Nybo, Lars; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2008-03-01

    The present study examined muscle adaptations and alterations in work capacity in endurance-trained runners after a change from endurance to sprint training. Fifteen runners were assigned to either a sprint training (ST, n = 8) or a control (CON, n = 7) group. ST replaced their normal training by 30-s sprint runs three to four times a week, whereas CON continued the endurance training (approximately 45 km/wk). After the 4-wk sprint period, the expression of the muscle Na+-K+ pump alpha1-subunit and Na+/H+-exchanger isoform 1 was 29 and 30% higher (P < 0.05), respectively. Furthermore, plasma K+ concentration was reduced (P < 0.05) during repeated intense running. In ST, performance in a 30-s sprint test, Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test, and two supramaximal exhaustive runs was improved (P < 0.05) by 7, 19, 27, and 19%, respectively, after the sprint training period, whereas pulmonary maximum oxygen uptake and 10-k time were unchanged. No changes in CON were observed. The present data suggest a role of the Na+-K+ pump in the control of K+ homeostasis and in the development of fatigue during repeated high-intensity exercise. Furthermore, performance during intense exercise can be improved and endurance performance maintained even with a reduction in training volume if the intensity of training is very high.

  18. GAS MOTION STUDY OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 2 USING FUV AND OPTICAL SPECTRAL LINES {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Takuya; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ouchi, Masami; Ono, Yoshiaki; Rauch, Michael; Janice Lee; Okamura, Sadanori

    2013-03-01

    We present the results of Magellan/MMIRS and Keck/NIRSPEC spectroscopy for five Ly{alpha} emitters (LAEs) at z {approx_equal} 2.2 for which high-resolution FUV spectra from Magellan/MagE are available. We detect nebular emission lines including H{alpha} on the individual basis and low-ionization interstellar (LIS) absorption lines in a stacked FUV spectrum, and measure average offset velocities of the Ly{alpha} line, {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}}, and LIS absorption lines, {Delta}v {sub abs}, with respect to the systemic velocity defined by the nebular lines. For a sample of eight z {approx} 2-3 LAEs without active galactic nucleus from our study and the literature, we obtain {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} = 175 {+-} 35 km s{sup -1}, which is significantly smaller than that of Lyman-break Galaxies (LBGs), {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} {approx_equal} 400 km s{sup -1}. The stacked FUV spectrum gives {Delta}v {sub abs} = -179 {+-} 73 km s{sup -1}, comparable to that of LBGs. These positive {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} and negative {Delta}v {sub abs} suggest that LAEs also have outflows. In contrast to LBGs, however, the LAEs' {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} is as small as |{Delta}v {sub abs}|, suggesting low neutral hydrogen column densities. Such a low column density with a small number of resonant scattering may cause the observed strong Ly{alpha} emission of LAEs. We find an anti-correlation between Ly{alpha} equivalent width (EW) and {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} in a compilation of LAE and LBG samples. Although its physical origin is not clear, this anti-correlation result appears to challenge the hypothesis that a strong outflow, by means of a reduced number of resonant scattering, produces a large EW. If LAEs at z > 6 have similarly small {Delta}v {sub Ly{alpha}} values, constraints on the reionization history derived from the Ly{alpha} transmissivity may need to be revised.

  19. Thread Graphs, Linear Rank-Width and Their Algorithmic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganian, Robert

    The introduction of tree-width by Robertson and Seymour [7] was a breakthrough in the design of graph algorithms. A lot of research since then has focused on obtaining a width measure which would be more general and still allowed efficient algorithms for a wide range of NP-hard problems on graphs of bounded width. To this end, Oum and Seymour have proposed rank-width, which allows the solution of many such hard problems on a less restricted graph classes (see e.g. [3,4]). But what about problems which are NP-hard even on graphs of bounded tree-width or even on trees? The parameter used most often for these exceptionally hard problems is path-width, however it is extremely restrictive - for example the graphs of path-width 1 are exactly paths.

  20. Beta/alpha continuous air monitor

    DOEpatents

    Becker, Gregory K.; Martz, Dowell E.

    1989-01-01

    A single deep layer silicon detector in combination with a microcomputer, recording both alpha and beta activity and the energy of each pulse, distinguishing energy peaks using a novel curve fitting technique to reduce the natural alpha counts in the energy region where plutonium and other transuranic alpha emitters are present, and using a novel algorithm to strip out radon daughter contribution to actual beta counts.

  1. Beta/alpha continuous air monitor

    DOEpatents

    Becker, G.K.; Martz, D.E.

    1988-06-27

    A single deep layer silicon detector in combination with a microcomputer, recording both alpha and beta activity and the energy of each pulse, distinquishing energy peaks using a novel curve fitting technique to reduce the natural alpha counts in the energy region where plutonium and other transuranic alpha emitters are present, and using a novel algorithm to strip out radon daughter contribution to actual beta counts. 7 figs.

  2. ENERGY-DEPENDENT GAMMA-RAY BURST PULSE WIDTH DUE TO THE CURVATURE EFFECT AND INTRINSIC BAND SPECTRUM

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Z. Y.; Ma, L.; Zhao, X. H.; Yin, Y.; Bao, Y. Y.

    2012-06-20

    Previous studies have found that the width of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) pulse is energy dependent and that it decreases as a power-law function with increasing photon energy. In this work we have investigated the relation between the energy dependence of the pulse and the so-called Band spectrum by using a sample including 51 well-separated fast rise and exponential decay long-duration GRB pulses observed by BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory). We first decompose these pulses into rise and decay phases and find that the rise widths and the decay widths also behave as a power-law function with photon energy. Then we investigate statistically the relations between the three power-law indices of the rise, decay, and total width of the pulse (denoted as {delta}{sub r}, {delta}{sub d}, and {delta}{sub w}, respectively) and the three Band spectral parameters, high-energy index ({alpha}), low-energy index ({beta}), and peak energy (E{sub p} ). It is found that (1) {alpha} is strongly correlated with {delta}{sub w} and {delta}{sub d} but seems uncorrelated with {delta}{sub r}; (2) {beta} is weakly correlated with the three power-law indices, and (3) E{sub p} does not show evident correlations with the three power-law indices. We further investigate the origin of {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha}. We show that the curvature effect and the intrinsic Band spectrum could naturally lead to the energy dependence of the GRB pulse width and also the {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} and {delta}{sub w}-{alpha} correlations. Our results hold so long as the shell emitting gamma rays has a curved surface and the intrinsic spectrum is a Band spectrum or broken power law. The strong {delta}{sub d}-{alpha} correlation and inapparent correlations between {delta}{sub r} and the three Band spectral parameters also suggest that the rise and decay phases of the GRB pulses have different origins.

  3. Relationship between width of greater trochanters and width of iliac wings in tronchanteric bursitis.

    PubMed

    Viradia, Neal K; Berger, Alex A; Dahners, Laurence E

    2011-09-01

    Trochanteric bursitis is a common disorder that is characterized by inflammation of the bursa, superficial to the greater trochanter of the femur, leading to pain in the lateral hip, and often occurs because of acute trauma or repetitive friction involving the iliotibial band, the greater trochanter, and the bursa. In the study reported here, we hypothesized that the increased incidence of bursitis may be the result of the increased prominence of the trochanter in relation to the wings of the iliac crest. Distances between the outermost edges of trochanters and iliac wings were measured in 202 patients from the University of North Carolina Health Care System-101 without a known diagnosis and 101 with a clinical diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis. To determine significance, t tests for nonpaired data were used. Mean (SD) difference between trochanter and iliac wing widths was 28 (20) mm in the group diagnosed with trochanteric bursitis and 17 (18) mm in the control group. The difference between the groups in this regard was significant (P<.00005). In addition, mean (SD) ratio of trochanter widths to iliac wing widths was 1.09 (.06) in the bursitis group and 1.05 (.06) in the control group. The difference between these groups was significant (P<.0005) in this regard as well. Having trochanters wider in relation to iliac wings was associated with the diagnosis of trochanteric bursitis.

  4. Distinct myeloid suppressor cell subsets correlate with plasma IL-6 and IL-10 and reduced interferon-alpha signaling in CD4⁺ T cells from patients with GI malignancy.

    PubMed

    Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Young, Gregory S; Bauer, Todd; Binkley, Elaine; Bloomston, Mark; Bill, Matthew A; Bekaii-Saab, Tanios; Carson, William E; Lesinski, Gregory B

    2011-09-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) promotes anti-tumor immunity through its actions on immune cells. We hypothesized that elevated percentages of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in peripheral blood would be associated with impaired response to IFN-α in patients with gastrointestinal (GI) malignancies. This study evaluated relationships between plasma IL-6, IL-10, circulating MDSC subsets, and IFN-α-induced signal transduction in 40 patients with GI malignancies. Plasma IL-6 and IL-10 were significantly higher in patients versus normal donors. CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD11b(+)CD15(+) and CD33(+)HLADR(-/low)CD14(+) MDSC subsets were also elevated in patients versus normal donors (P < 0.0001). Plasma IL-6 was correlated with CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD15(+) MDSC (P = 0.008) and IL-10 with CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD15(-) MDSC (P = 0.002). The percentage of CD15(+) and CD15(-) but not CD14(+) MDSC subsets were inversely correlated with IFN-α-induced STAT1 phosphorylation in CD4(+) T cells, while co-culture with in vitro generated MDSC led to reduced IFN-α responsiveness in both PBMC and the CD4(+) subset of T cells from normal donors. Exploratory multivariable Cox proportional hazards models revealed that an increased percentage of the CD33(+)HLADR(-)CD15(-) MDSC subset was associated with reduced overall survival (P = 0.049), while an increased percentage of the CD33(+)HLADR(-/low)CD14(+) subset was associated with greater overall survival (P = 0.033). These data provide evidence for a unique relationship between specific cytokines, MDSC subsets, and IFN-α responsiveness in patients with GI malignancies.

  5. Antibody-mediated reduction of .alpha.-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, Peter G.; Gallop, Mark A.

    1998-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an .alpha.-ketoamide to the corresponding .alpha.-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  6. Antibody-mediated reduction of {alpha}-ketoamides

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, P.G.; Gallop, M.A.

    1998-06-09

    Monoclonal antibodies raised against a 4-nitrophenyl phosphonate hapten catalyze the stereospecific reduction of an {alpha}-ketoamide to the corresponding {alpha}-hydroxyamide in the presence of an appropriate reducing agent.

  7. Statistical evaluation of metal fill widths for emulated metal fill in parasitic extraction methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    J-Me, Teh; Noh, Norlaili Mohd.; Aziz, Zalina Abdul

    2015-05-01

    In the chip industry today, the key goal of a chip development organization is to develop and market chips within a short time frame to gain foothold on market share. This paper proposes a design flow around the area of parasitic extraction to improve the design cycle time. The proposed design flow utilizes the usage of metal fill emulation as opposed to the current flow which performs metal fill insertion directly. By replacing metal fill structures with an emulation methodology in earlier iterations of the design flow, this is targeted to help reduce runtime in fill insertion stage. Statistical design of experiments methodology utilizing the randomized complete block design was used to select an appropriate emulated metal fill width to improve emulation accuracy. The experiment was conducted on test cases of different sizes, ranging from 1000 gates to 21000 gates. The metal width was varied from 1 x minimum metal width to 6 x minimum metal width. Two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's least significant difference test were used to analyze the interconnect net capacitance values of the different test cases. This paper presents the results of the statistical analysis for the 45 nm process technology. The recommended emulated metal fill width was found to be 4 x the minimum metal width.

  8. Nondeletional alpha-thalassemia: first description of alpha Hph alpha and alpha Nco alpha mutations in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Ayala, S; Colomer, D; Aymerich, M; Pujades, A; Vives-Corrons, J L

    1996-07-01

    Several different deletions underlie the molecular basis of alpha-thalassemia. The most common alpha-thalassemia determinant in Spain is the rightward deletion (-alpha 3.7). To our knowledge, however, no cases of alpha-thalassemia due to nondeletional mutations have so far been described in this particular Mediterranean area. Here, we report the existence of nondeletional forms of alpha-thalassemia in ten Spanish families. The alpha 2-globin gene was characterized in ten unrelated patients and their relatives only when the presence of deletional alpha-thalassemia was ruled out. The alpha 2-globin gene analysis was performed using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by restriction enzyme analysis or by allelespecific priming. This allowed the identification of a 5-base pair (bp) deletion at the donor site of IVS I (alpha Hph alpha) in 9 cases and the alpha 2 initiation codon mutation (alpha Nco alpha) in one case. Although these alpha 2-globin gene mutations are found in other mediterranean areas, our results demonstrate their presence in the Spanish population and suggest that the alpha Hph alpha/alpha alpha genotype is probably the most common nondeletional form of alpha-thalassemia in Spain.

  9. Alpha-decay properties of /sup 205-208/Fr: Identification of /sup 206/Fr/sup m/

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, B.G.; Toth, K.S.; Carter, H.K.; Mlekodaj, R.L.; Spejewski, E.H.

    1981-05-01

    Alpha-particle and ..gamma..-ray spectral measurements were made for /sup 205-208/Fr. A new a emitter (T/sub 1/2/ = 0.7 +- 0.1 sec and E/sub a/ = 6.930 +- 0.005 MeV) was observed and identified with the decay of a previously unknown isomer in /sup 206/Fr. From the a particle and g ray intensities, a decay branching ratios were deduced for /sup 205-208/Fr utilizing available information concerning the nuclides' (electron capture+positron) decay properties. Reduced widths were calculated and compared with those of neighboring nuclei.

  10. Development of the Global Width Database for Large Rivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai; O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Trigg, Mark A.; Miller, Zachary F.; Pavelsky, Tamlin M.; Bates, Paul D.

    2014-04-01

    River width is a fundamental parameter of river hydrodynamic simulations, but no global-scale river width database based on observed water bodies has yet been developed. Here we present a new algorithm that automatically calculates river width from satellite-based water masks and flow direction maps. The Global Width Database for Large Rivers (GWD-LR) is developed by applying the algorithm to the SRTM Water Body Database and the HydroSHEDS flow direction map. Both bank-to-bank river width and effective river width excluding islands are calculated for river channels between 60S and 60N. The effective river width of GWD-LR is compared with existing river width databases for the Congo and Mississippi Rivers. The effective river width of the GWD-LR is slightly narrower compared to the existing databases, but the relative difference is within ±20% for most river channels. As the river width of the GWD-LR is calculated along the river channels of the HydroSHEDS flow direction map, it is relatively straightforward to apply the GWD-LR to global and continental-scale river modeling.

  11. Influence of pulse width and target density on pulsed laser deposition of thin YBaCuO film.

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, S.

    1999-01-20

    We have studied the effects of temporal pulse width and target density on the deposition of thin films of YBaCuO. A 248nm excimer laser and an 825nm Ti-sapphire laser were used to conduct the experiments with pulse widths of 27 ns, 16 ns, and 150 fs, and target densities of 80% and 90%. Scanning electron microscope photomicrographs and profilometer traces show a striking difference between nanosecond and femtosecond laser irradiation. Shortening the pulse width reduced particulate formation, provided stoichiometry, and improved the film properties. Decreasing the target density raised the ablation rate, produced thicker but nonuniform films, and reduced particulate formation.

  12. Some geometric constraints on ring-width trend

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phipps, R.L.

    2005-01-01

    Simulations of tree rings from trees of undisturbed forest sites are used to describe natural, long-term width trends. Ring-width trends of canopy-sized white oak are simulated from regressions of BAI (ring area) data of real trees. Examples are given of a tree from a typical re-growth forest in Illinois and of a more slowly growing tree from an old-growth forest in Kentucky. The long-term width trend was simulated as being toward constant ring width regardless of growth rate of the tree. Conditions by which either increasing or decreasing ring-width trends could be simulated from the same linear BAI trend are examined. I conclude that curvilinear width trends, either increasing or decreasing, represent width adjustments to changes in growth rate (BAI trend) after which the width trend stabilizes to a near-constant value. Interpretation of ring-width trends of trees from undisturbed stands may be useful in assessing stand disturbance history. Copyright ?? 2005 by the Tree-Ring Society.

  13. a Measurement of the Mass, Full Width, and Radiative Width of the Positive B(1237) Meson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collick, Bruce David

    An experiment was performed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to investigate the coherent production of mesons on nuclear targets (lead and copper). The experiment used and 200 GeV/c incident meson beam and a high resolution forward spectrometer consisting of proportional and drift chambers plus a liquid argon photon calorimeter. This thesis reports the results of the process (pi)('+) + A (--->) (pi)('+) (omega) + A. The (pi)('+)(omega) spectrum was found to be dominated by the B('+)(1237) meson. A fit was performed on the line shape of the (pi)('+)(omega) mass spectrum and values of 1.271 (+OR-) 0.011 GeV and 0.232 (+OR-) 0.029 GeV were found for the mass and total width. The helicity zero decay probability of the (omega), (VBAR)F(,0)(VBAR)('2), was measured to be (VBAR)F(,0)(VBAR)('2) = 0.15 (+OR-) 0.035. The t distributions were analyzed allowing the electromagnetic and hadronic production processes to interfer. From these distributions a radiative width of 230 (+OR-) 61 was extracted.

  14. Finite-width currents, magnetic shear, and the current-driven ion-cyclotron instability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakshi, P.; Ganguli, G.; Palmadesso, P.

    1983-01-01

    Our earlier results that non-local effects due to even a small magnetic shear produce a significant reduction of the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability driven by a uniform current are now generalized to finite width currents. Externally prescribed as well as self-consistent shears are considered. If the current width Lc exceeds the shear length Ls, the previous results are recovered. Shear becomes less effective with reduction of Lc, and for typical parameters, the growth rate attains its (shearless) local value for Lc/Ls approximately less than 10 to the minus 2. Non-local effects of the finite current width itself come into play if Lc is further reduced to a few ion Larmor radii and can quench the instability. Previously announced in STAR as N83-28996

  15. Implications of Satellite Swath Width on Global Aerosol Optical Thickness Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colarco, Peter; Kahn, Ralph; Remer, Lorraine; Levy, Robert; Welton, Ellsworth

    2012-01-01

    We assess the impact of swath width on the statistics of aerosol optical thickness (AOT) retrieved by satellite as inferred from observations made by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We sub-sample the year 2009 MODIS data from both the Terra and Aqua spacecraft along several candidate swaths of various widths. We find that due to spatial sampling there is an uncertainty of approximately 0.01 in the global, annual mean AOT. The sub-sampled monthly mean gridded AOT are within +/- 0.01 of the full swath AOT about 20% of the time for the narrow swath sub-samples, about 30% of the time for the moderate width sub-samples, and about 45% of the time for the widest swath considered. These results suggest that future aerosol satellite missions with only a narrow swath view may not sample the true AOT distribution sufficiently to reduce significantly the uncertainty in aerosol direct forcing of climate.

  16. A Partial Width Calculation of OZI-Allowed Charmonium Decays in a Coupled Channel Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Hirano, M.; Katō, K.

    2009-09-01

    Okubo-Zweig-Iizuka-allowed partial decay widths, masses, and total decay width of charmonium states are studied in a nonrelativistic coupled-channel framework based on microscopic effective quark interactions. With the help of the complex scale transformation, the coupled channel equation is easily solved under the proper boundary condition for resonances. The obtained result as a whole is very successful and encouraging for the traditional charmonium states including ψ(4040) whose features of mass and partial decay widths have been argued historically. The coupling mechanisms of these states are investigated by reducing artificially the channel coupling strengths little by little and finally turning the coupling off. The situations turn out to be quite different from what we would have naively supposed. Other solutions than the traditional charmonium states were obatined at the same time. Some of them are discussed in relation with new particles observed recently.

  17. Measuring Slit Width and Separation in a Diffraction Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gan, K. K.; Law, A. T.

    2009-01-01

    We present a procedure for measuring slit width and separation in single- and double-slit diffraction experiments. Intensity spectra of diffracted laser light are measured with an optical sensor (PIN diode). Slit widths and separations are extracted by fitting to the measured spectra. We present a simple fitting procedure to account for the…

  18. alpha-Hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH)

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    alpha - Hexachlorocyclohexane ( alpha - HCH ) ; CASRN 319 - 84 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Ass

  19. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much_gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  20. Excitation of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes by energetic particles and fusion alpha particles in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1992-07-01

    The stability of high-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) in the presence of fusion alpha particles or energetic ions in tokamaks is investigated. The TAE modes are discrete in nature and thus can easily tap the free energy associated with energetic particle pressure gradient through wave particle resonant interaction. A quadratic form is derived for the high-n TAE modes using gyro-kinetic equation. The kinetic effects of energetic particles are calculated perturbatively using the ideal MHD solution as the lowest order eigenfunction. The finite Larmor radius (FLR) effects and the finite drift orbit width (FDW) effects are included for both circulating and trapped energetic particles. It is shown that, for circulating particles, FLR and FDW effects have two opposite influences on the stability of the high-n TAE modes. First, they have the usual stabilizing effects by reducing the wave particle interaction strength. Second, they also have destabilizing effects by allowing more particles to resonate with the TAE modes. It is found that the growth rate induced by the circulating alpha particles increase linearly with toroidal mode number n for small {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}}, and decreases as 1/n for {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} {much gt} 1. The maximum growth rate is obtained at {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} on the order of unity and is nearly constant for the range of 0.7 < {upsilon}{sub {alpha}}/{upsilon}{sub A} < 2.5. On the other hand, the trapped particle response is dominated by the precessional drift resonance. The bounce resonant contribution is negligible. The growth rate peaks sharply at the value of {kappa}{sub {theta}}{rho}{sub {alpha}} such that the precessional drift resonance occurs for the most energetic trapped particles. The maximum growth rate due to the energetic trapped particles is comparable to that of circulating particles.

  1. Controlling ρ width effects for a precise value of α in B → ρρ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronau, Michael; Rosner, Jonathan L.

    2017-03-01

    It has been pointed out that the currently most precise determination of the weak phase ϕ2 = α of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix achieved in B → ρρ decays is susceptible to a small correction at a level of (Γρ /mρ) 2 due to an I = 1 amplitude caused by the ρ width. Using Breit-Wigner distributions for the two pairs of pions forming ρ mesons, we study the I = 1 contribution to B → ρρ decay rates as function of the width and location of the ρ band. We find that in the absence of a particular enhancement of the I = 1 amplitude reducing a single band to a width Γρ at SuperKEKB leads to results which are completely insensitive to the ρ width. If the I = 1 amplitude is dynamically enhanced relative to the I = 0 , 2 amplitude one could subject its contribution to a ;magnifying glass; measurement using two separated ρ bands of width Γρ. Subtraction of the I = 1 contribution from the measured decay rate would lead to a very precise determination of the I = 0 , 2 amplitude needed for performing the isospin analysis.

  2. Alpha Hydroxy Acids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cosmetics Home Cosmetics Products & Ingredients Ingredients Alpha Hydroxy Acids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... for Industry: Labeling for Cosmetics Containing Alpha Hydroxy Acids The following information is intended to answer questions ...

  3. The Alpha Centauri System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderblom, David R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Alpha Centauri star system, which is the closest star system to the sun. Discusses the difficulties associated with measurements involving Alpha Centauri, along with some of the recent advances in stellar seismology. Raises questions about the possibilities of planets around Alpha Centauri. (TW)

  4. Manipulation of two alpha-endo-beta-1,4-glucanase genes, AtCel6 and GmCel7, reduces susceptibility to Heterodera glycines in soybean roots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant endo-beta-1,4-glucanases (EGases) include cell-wall-modifying enzymes that are involved in nematode-induced growth of syncytia (feeding structures) in nematode-infected roots. EGases in the alpha and beta subfamilies contain signal peptides and are secreted, while those in the gamma subfamily ...

  5. Accurate vessel width measurement from fundus photographs: a new concept.

    PubMed Central

    Rassam, S M; Patel, V; Brinchmann-Hansen, O; Engvold, O; Kohner, E M

    1994-01-01

    Accurate determination of retinal vessel width measurement is important in the study of the haemodynamic changes that accompany various physiological and pathological states. Currently the width at the half height of the transmittance and densitometry profiles are used as a measure of retinal vessel width. A consistent phenomenon of two 'kick points' on the slopes of the transmittance and densitometry profiles near the base, has been observed. In this study, mathematical models have been formulated to describe the characteristic curves of the transmittance and the densitometry profiles. They demonstrate the kick points being coincident with the edges of the blood column. The horizontal distance across the kick points would therefore indicate the actual blood column width. To evaluate this hypothesis, blood was infused through two lengths of plastic tubing of known diameters, and photographed. In comparison with the known diameters, the half height underestimated the blood column width by 7.33% and 6.46%, while the kick point method slightly overestimated it by 1.40% and 0.34%. These techniques were applied to monochromatic fundus photographs. In comparison with the kick point method, the half height underestimated the blood column width in veins by 16.67% and in arteries by 15.86%. The characteristics of the kick points and their practicality have been discussed. The kick point method may provide the most accurate measurement of vessel width possible from these profiles. Images PMID:8110693

  6. Extension of H-alpha/H-beta Photometry to Additional Luminosity Classes and Emission Line Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hintz, Eric G.; Joner, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    In Joner & Hintz (2015) they presented a fully calibrated H-alpha index based on spectroscopic observations of main sequence stars ranging from O9 to K2. In that work they provided relations between the H-alpha index, temperature, and equivalent width. In Didelon (1982) the relation between spectral type and equivalent width is examined with a clear difference between luminosity classes. In this poster we will present results from a spectroscopic examination of the H-alpha/H-beta relations. First we will examine the equivalent width as a function of luminosity class. Then we will examine the extension of the H-alpha system for application to emission line objects.We would like to acknowledge use of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory 1.2-m Telescope.

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Electron Density Distribution of Alpha,Alpha-Trehalose Dihydrate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alpha,alpha-rehalose is of interest because of its cryoprotective and antidessicant properties, and because it possesses various technical anomalies such as 13C NMR spectra that give misleading indications of intramolecular structural symmetry. It is a non-reducing disaccharide, with the glycosidic...

  8. Bank stability and channel width adjustment, East Fork River, Wyoming.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    Frequent surveys of eight cross sections located in self-formed reaches of the East Fork River, Wyoming, during the 1974 snowmelt flood showed a close relation between channel morphology and scour and fill. Those cross sections narrower than the mean reach width filled at discharges less than bankfull and scoured at discharges greater than bankfull. Those cross sections wider than the mean reach width scoured at discharges less than bankfull and filled at discharges greater than bankfull. Bank stability, and to some extent the adjustment of stream channel width, in the East Fork River study reach appears to be controlled by the processes of scour and fill. -from Author

  9. On the computations of decay widths of Fano resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miteva, T.; Kazandjian, S.; Sisourat, N.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present an ab initio approach to the computation of decay widths of Fano resonances. The method relies on Fano theory, in which a resonance is described as a bound state embedded in and interacting with a continuum of states. In our approach, we use the Configuration Interaction (CI) method to describe the bound-like and continuum-like parts of the resonance wave function. The aim of this Fano-CI method is to provide decay widths of resonances at a low computational cost such that large systems can be treated. Along with the implementation of the method, we present benchmark calculations of decay widths of Auger and ICD processes in Ne atom, and Ne2 and NeAr dimers. Our results are in good agreement with the decay widths from other theoretical and experimental works. This makes the Fano-CI approach a promising method for the treatment of Fano resonances.

  10. Widths of some classes of convex functions and bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konovalov, V. N.; Maiorov, Vitalii E.

    2010-02-01

    We consider classes of uniformly bounded convex functions defined on convex compact bodies in \\mathbb{R}^d and satisfying a Lipschitz condition and establish the exact orders of their Kolmogorov, entropy, and pseudo-dimension widths in the L_1-metric. We also introduce the notions of pseudo-dimension and pseudo-dimension widths for classes of sets and determine the exact orders of the entropy and pseudo-dimension widths of some classes of convex bodies in \\mathbb{R}^drelative to the pseudo-metric defined as the d-dimensional Lebesgue volume of the symmetric difference of two sets. We also find the exact orders of the entropy and pseudo-dimension widths of the corresponding classes of characteristic functions in L_p-spaces, 1\\le p\\le\\infty.

  11. Stark Widths Of Ionized Xenon UV Lines Of Low Intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Cirisan, M.; Djurovic, S.; Pelaez, R. J.; Aparicio, J. A.; Mar, S.

    2007-04-23

    Stark width measurements of several low intensity Xe II spectral lines (5d - 4f transitions) in UV region, are presented here for the first time. These measurements were obtained from helium - xenon pulsed arc plasma.

  12. Optical waveguide device with an adiabatically-varying width

    DOEpatents

    Watts; Michael R. , Nielson; Gregory N.

    2011-05-10

    Optical waveguide devices are disclosed which utilize an optical waveguide having a waveguide bend therein with a width that varies adiabatically between a minimum value and a maximum value of the width. One or more connecting members can be attached to the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width thereof to support the waveguide bend or to supply electrical power to an impurity-doped region located within the waveguide bend near the maximum value of the width. The impurity-doped region can form an electrical heater or a semiconductor junction which can be activated with a voltage to provide a variable optical path length in the optical waveguide. The optical waveguide devices can be used to form a tunable interferometer (e.g. a Mach-Zehnder interferometer) which can be used for optical modulation or switching. The optical waveguide devices can also be used to form an optical delay line.

  13. Peak width issues with generalised 2D correlation NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirwan, Gemma M.; Adams, Michael J.

    2008-12-01

    Two-dimensional spectral correlation analysis is shown to be sensitive to fluctuations in spectral peak width as a function of perturbation variable. This is particularly significant where peak width fluctuations are of similar order of magnitude as the peak width values themselves and where changes in peak width are not random but are, for example, proportional to intensity. In such cases these trends appear in the asynchronous matrix as false peaks that serve to interfere with interpretation of the data. Complex, narrow band spectra such as provided by 1H NMR spectroscopy are demonstrated to be prone to such interference. 2D correlation analysis was applied to a series of NMR spectra corresponding to a commercial wine fermentation, in which the samples collected over a period of several days exhibit dramatic changes in concentration of minor and major components. The interference due to changing peak width effects is eliminated by synthesizing the recorded spectra using a constant peak width value prior to performing 2D correlation analysis.

  14. Crack width monitoring of concrete structures based on smart film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Benniu; Wang, Shuliang; Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xu; Yang, Guang; Qiu, Minfeng

    2014-04-01

    Due to its direct link to structural security, crack width is thought to be one of the most important parameters reflecting damage conditions of concrete structures. However, the width problem is difficult to solve with the existing structural health monitoring methods. In this paper, crack width monitoring by means of adhering enameled copper wires with different ultimate strains on the surface of structures is proposed, based on smart film crack monitoring put forward by the present authors. The basic idea of the proposed method is related to a proportional relationship between the crack width and ultimate strain of the broken wire. Namely, when a certain width of crack passes through the wire, some low ultimate strain wires will be broken and higher ultimate strain wires may stay non-broken until the crack extends to a larger scale. Detection of the copper wire condition as broken or non-broken may indicate the width of the structural crack. Thereafter, a multi-layered stress transfer model and specimen experiment are performed to quantify the relationship. A practical smart film is then redesigned with this idea and applied to Chongqing Jiangjin Yangtze River Bridge.

  15. Tunable pulse width and multi-megawatt peak-power pulses from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Ryutarou; Maeda, Kazuo; Watanabe, Goro; Tei, Kazuyoku; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Enokidani, Jun; Sumida, Shin

    2016-03-01

    We report on tunable pulse width and high peak power pulse generation from a nonlinearly compressed monolithic fiber MOPA system. The master seed source employs a Mach-Zehnder intensity modulator (MZIM). This seed source has operational flexibility with respect to pulse width, 90 ps to 2 ns and repetition rate, 200 kHz to 2 MHz. The seed pulses are amplified by a monolithic three-stage amplifier system based on polarization maintain Yb-doped fibers. The maximum output power was 32 W at the shortest pulse condition, the pulse width of 90 ps and the repetition rate of 750 kHz. A spectral width after amplification was broadened to 0.73 nm at RMS width. Both of ASE and SRS are not observed in the spectrum. After amplification, we also demonstrated pulse compression with a small piece of chirped volume Bragg-grating (CVBG) which has the dispersion rate of 81 ps/nm. As a result of pulse compression, the shortest pulse width was reduced from 90 ps to 3.5 ps, which brought an increase of the peak power up to 3.2 MW. The compressed pulses are clean with little structure in their wings. We can expand the operation range of the monolithic fiber MOPA system in pulse width, 3.5 ps to 2 ns.

  16. Tree-ring width reveals the preparation of the 1974 Mt. Etna eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, Ruedi; Houlié, Nicolas; Cherubini, Paolo

    2017-03-01

    Reduced near-infrared reflectance observed in September 1973 in Skylab images of the western flank of Mt. Etna has been interpreted as an eruption precursor of the January 1974 eruption. Until now, it has been unclear when this signal started, whether it was sustained and which process(es) could have caused it. By analyzing tree-ring width time-series, we show that the reduced near-infrared precursory signal cannot be linked to a reduction in annual tree growth in the area. However, comparing the tree-ring width time-series with both remote sensing observations and volcano-seismic activity enables us to discuss the starting date of the pre-eruptive period of the 1974 eruption.

  17. Tree-ring width reveals the preparation of the 1974 Mt. Etna eruption

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Ruedi; Houlié, Nicolas; Cherubini, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Reduced near-infrared reflectance observed in September 1973 in Skylab images of the western flank of Mt. Etna has been interpreted as an eruption precursor of the January 1974 eruption. Until now, it has been unclear when this signal started, whether it was sustained and which process(es) could have caused it. By analyzing tree-ring width time-series, we show that the reduced near-infrared precursory signal cannot be linked to a reduction in annual tree growth in the area. However, comparing the tree-ring width time-series with both remote sensing observations and volcano-seismic activity enables us to discuss the starting date of the pre-eruptive period of the 1974 eruption. PMID:28266610

  18. On the Assimilation of Tree-Ring-Width Chronologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, Walter; Reich, Sebastian; Cubasch, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    Data assimilation (DA) of climate proxy records is currently acknowledged as a promising approach to the paleoclimate reconstruction problem, with the potential to bring physical consistency to reconstructed fields. Previous paleo-DA studies have typically assumed a linear relationship between climate forcing and the resulting proxy data, whereas there exist growing evidence of complex, potentially non-linear, proxy formation processes. Accordingly, it appears natural to simulate the proxy response to climate in a more realistic fashion, by way of proxy-specific forward models. Following this train of thought, we investigate the assimilation of the most traditional climate proxy type, Tree-Ring-Width (TRW) chronologies, using the process-based tree-ring growth forward model Vaganov-Shashkin-Lite (VSL) and ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) techniques. Used as observation operator, VSL's formulation implies three compounding, challenging features: (i) time averaging, (ii) "switching recording" of 2 variables and (iii) bounded response windows leading to "thresholded response". DA experiments involving VSL-based pseudo-TRW observations are performed first for a chaotic 2-scale dynamical system, used as a cartoon of the atmosphere-land system, and then for an atmospheric general circulation model of intermediate complexity. Our results reveal that VSL's nonlinearities may considerable deteriorate the performance of EnKF for Time-Averaged (TA) estimation, as compared to the utilization of a TA linear observation operator. Moreover, we show that this assimilation skill loss can be considerably reduced by embedding VSL's formulation into fuzzy logic theory, which fosters new interpretations of tree-ring growth limitation processes.

  19. Influence of sample width on the magnetoresistance and planar Hall effect of Co/Cu multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    C. Lima, S.; Baibich, M. N.

    2016-01-01

    We have studied Co/Cu multilayers to understand the effect of the sample's width on their magnetoresistance (MR). By keeping constant both the length and the thickness and exploring the widths within the range of usual magnetic domain sizes in those nanostructures, we were able to observe effects on the MR curve, as well as infer linked changes in the magnetization process. Associating MR and Planar Hall Effect (PHE) measurements, coupled to an analysis of the MR plots' symmetry, we were able to establish that, apart from the expected antiferromagnetic coupling, reducing the width forces the magnetization to stay aligned to the current channel, thus inducing more symmetric, closer to model Giant Magnetoresistance (GMR). Also, the sample edges might contribute by adding extra coupling through magnetostatic interaction. The added effects result in a counter-intuitive trend that goes from the near ideal wide samples through intermediate sizes with fairly abrupt changes in MR, and finally to the closer to bell-shaped ideal GMR at narrow widths.

  20. Precision Measurement of {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} Decay Width via the Primakoff Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Liping Gin

    2013-08-01

    A precision measurement of the {eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} decay width via the Primakoff effect is underway in Hall D at Jefferson Lab. The decay width will be extracted from measured differential cross sections at forward angles on two light targets, liquid hydrogen and 4He, using a 11.5 GeV tagged photon beam. Results of this experiment will not only potentially resolve a long standing discrepancy between the Primakoff and the collider measurements, but will also reduce the experimental uncertainty by a factor of two on the average value of previous experimental results listed by the Particle Data Group(PDG). It will directly improve all other eta partial decay widths which rely on the accuracy of the eta radiative decay width. The projected 3% precision on the {Gamma}({eta} --> {gamma} {gamma} ) measurement will have a significant impact on the experimental determination of the fundamental parameters in QCD, such as the ratio of light quark masses (m{sub u},m{sub d},m{sub s}) and the {eta} - {eta}' mixing angle. It will be a sensitive probe for understanding QCD symmetries and the origin and the dynamics of QCD symmetry breaking.

  1. Giant dipole resonance width in nuclei near Sn at low temperature and high angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharya, Srijit; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Pandit, Deepak; Pal, Surajit; Bhattacharya, S.; Bhattacharya, C.; Banerjee, K.; Kundu, S.; Rana, T. K.; Dey, A.; Mukherjee, G.; Ghosh, T.; Gupta, D.; Banerjee, S. R.

    2008-02-15

    High energy {gamma} rays in coincidence with low energy yrast {gamma} rays have been measured from {sup 113}Sb, at excitation energies of 109 and 122 MeV, formed by bombarding {sup 20}Ne on {sup 93}Nb at projectile energies of 145 and 160 MeV, respectively, to study the role of angular momentum (J) and temperature (T) over giant dipole resonance (GDR) width ({gamma}). The maximum populated angular momenta for fusion were 67({Dirac_h}/2{pi}) and 73({Dirac_h}/2{pi}), respectively, for the above-mentioned beam energies. The high energy photons were detected using a Large Area Modular BaF{sub 2} Detector Array (LAMBDA) along with a 24-element multiplicity filter. After pre-equilibrium corrections, the excitation energy E* was averaged over the decay steps of the compound nucleus (CN). The average values of temperature, angular momentum, CN mass, etc., have been calculated using the statistical model code CASCADE. Using those average values, results show the systematic increase of GDR width with T, which is consistent with Kusnezov parametrization and the thermal shape fluctuation model (TSFM). The rise of GDR width with temperature also supports the assumptions of adiabatic coupling in the TSFM. But the GDR widths and corresponding reduced plots with J are not consistent with those of the theoretical model at high spins.

  2. Optimal caliper width for propensity score matching of three treatment groups: a Monte Carlo study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongji; Cai, Hongwei; Li, Chanjuan; Jiang, Zhiwei; Wang, Ling; Song, Jiugang; Xia, Jielai

    2013-01-01

    Propensity score matching is a method to reduce bias in non-randomized and observational studies. Propensity score matching is mainly applied to two treatment groups rather than multiple treatment groups, because some key issues affecting its application to multiple treatment groups remain unsolved, such as the matching distance, the assessment of balance in baseline variables, and the choice of optimal caliper width. The primary objective of this study was to compare propensity score matching methods using different calipers and to choose the optimal caliper width for use with three treatment groups. The authors used caliper widths from 0.1 to 0.8 of the pooled standard deviation of the logit of the propensity score, in increments of 0.1. The balance in baseline variables was assessed by standardized difference. The matching ratio, relative bias, and mean squared error (MSE) of the estimate between groups in different propensity score-matched samples were also reported. The results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that matching using a caliper width of 0.2 of the pooled standard deviation of the logit of the propensity score affords superior performance in the estimation of treatment effects. This study provides practical solutions for the application of propensity score matching of three treatment groups.

  3. On the radial width of CMEs between 0.1 and 0.4 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savani, N. P.; Forsyth, R. J.; Rouillard, A. P.; Owens, M. J.; Davies, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    The launch of the two STEREO spacecraft in 2006 has heralded a new era of opportunities to make remote observations of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). An example CME on the 16th February 2008 with an approximately circular cross section was tracked through successive images obtained by the Heliospheric Imager (HI) instrument onboard the STEREO-A spacecraft. The cylindrical nature of force-free constant alpha flux ropes is used to determine the radial size of the CME. The radial velocity and longitude of propagation are determined. With these parameters known, the radial size is calculated from the images taking projection effects into account. A power law is obtained for the resulting radial width behaviour with heliocentric distance as the CME travels between 0.1 and 0.4 AU. We compare our results to those obtained in published studies based on in-situ spacecraft observations of ICMEs between 0.3 and 1.0 AU.

  4. Variations in solar Lyman alpha irradiance on short time scales

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pap, J. M.

    1992-01-01

    Variations in solar UV irradiance at Lyman alpha are studied on short time scales (from days to months) after removing the long-term changes over the solar cycle. The SME/Lyman alpha irradiance is estimated from various solar indices using linear regression analysis. In order to study the nonlinear effects, Lyman alpha irradiance is modeled with a 5th-degree polynomial as well. It is shown that the full-disk equivalent width of the He line at 1083 nm, which is used as a proxy for the plages and active network, can best reproduce the changes observed in Lyman alpha. Approximately 72 percent of the solar-activity-related changes in Lyman alpha irradiance arise from plages and the network. The network contribution is estimated by the correlation analysis to be about 19 percent. It is shown that significant variability remains in Lyman alpha irradiance, with periods around 300, 27, and 13.5d, which is not explained by the solar activity indices. It is shown that the nonlinear effects cannot account for a significant part of the unexplained variation in Lyman alpha irradiance. Therefore, additional events (e.g., large-scale motions and/or a systematic difference in the area and intensity of the plages and network observed in the lines of Ca-K, He 1083, and Lyman alpha) may explain the discrepancies found between the observed and estimated irradiance values.

  5. Dependence of divertor heat flux widths on heating power, flux expansion, and plasma current in the NSTX

    SciTech Connect

    Maingi, Rajesh; Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Ahn, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    We report the dependence of the lower divertor surface heat flux profiles, measured from infrared thermography and mapped magnetically to the mid-plane on loss power into the scrape-off layer (P{sub LOSS}), plasma current (I{sub p}), and magnetic flux expansion (f{sub exp}), as well as initial results with lithium wall conditioning in NSTX. Here we extend previous studies [R. Maingi et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 363-365 (2007) 196-200] to higher triangularity similar to 0.7 and higher I{sub p} {le} 1.2 MA. First we note that the mid-plane heat flux width mapped to the mid-plane, {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} is largely independent of P{sub LOSS} for P{sub LOSS} {ge} 4 MW. {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} is also found to be relatively independent of f{sub exp}; peak heat flux is strongly reduced as f{sub exp} is increased, as expected. Finally, {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} is shown to strongly contract with increasing I{sub p} such that {lambda}{sub q}{sup mid} {alpha} I{sub p}{sup -1.6} with a peak divertor heat flux of q{sub div,peak} similar to 15 MW/m{sup 2} when I{sub p} = 1.2 MA and P{sub LOSS} similar to 6 MW. These relationships are then used to predict the divertor heat flux for the planned NSTX-Upgrade, with heating power between 10 and 15 MW, B{sub t} = 1.01 and I{sub p}= 2.0 MA for 5 s.

  6. Interpreting EEG alpha activity.

    PubMed

    Bazanova, O M; Vernon, D

    2014-07-01

    Exploring EEG alpha oscillations has generated considerable interest, in particular with regards to the role they play in cognitive, psychomotor, psycho-emotional and physiological aspects of human life. However, there is no clearly agreed upon definition of what constitutes 'alpha activity' or which of the many indices should be used to characterize it. To address these issues this review attempts to delineate EEG alpha-activity, its physical, molecular and morphological nature, and examine the following indices: (1) the individual alpha peak frequency; (2) activation magnitude, as measured by alpha amplitude suppression across the individual alpha bandwidth in response to eyes opening, and (3) alpha "auto-rhythmicity" indices: which include intra-spindle amplitude variability, spindle length and steepness. Throughout, the article offers a number of suggestions regarding the mechanism(s) of alpha activity related to inter and intra-individual variability. In addition, it provides some insights into the various psychophysiological indices of alpha activity and highlights their role in optimal functioning and behavior.

  7. Deciduous neonatal line: Width is associated with duration of delivery.

    PubMed

    Hurnanen, Jaana; Visnapuu, Vivian; Sillanpää, Matti; Löyttyniemi, Eliisa; Rautava, Jaana

    2017-02-01

    The delivery-related neonatal line (NNL) appears into the enamel of primary teeth and first permanent molars at birth and is a marker of live birth process. It varies in width and its location, is different in each deciduous tooth type, and is indicative of gestation time. It is unclear which triggers determine NNL at birth. Our objective was to investigate the effect of the duration and mode of delivery on NNL width. NNL of 129 teeth, a collection derived from a long-term, prospectively followed population cohort, was measured under light microscope. Altogether, 54 sections with most optimal plane of sectioning were analysed for the duration and mode of delivery. NNL was detected in 98% of the deciduous teeth with the median width of 9.63μm (min 3.16μm, max 27.58μm). A prolonged duration of vaginal delivery was highly significantly associated with a narrower NNL (r=-0.41, p=0.0097). No significant association was found between the width of NNL and mode of delivery (p=0.36). NNL is demonstrable in virtually all deciduous teeth. The width seems to be inversely proportional to the duration of delivery. Causes of the inverse proportion are speculated to result from altered amelogenesis induced by prolonged and intensified delivery-associated stress. Further research is needed to clarify the underlying mechanisms.

  8. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    DOEpatents

    Mihalka, Alex M.

    1986-01-01

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20-50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the DC input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  9. Variation in the Width of Transition Region Network Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, K. P.

    2016-12-01

    The transition region network seen in solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lines is the extension of the chromospheric network. The network appears as an irregular web-like pattern over the solar surface outside active regions. The average width of transition region network boundaries is obtained from the two-dimensional autocorrelation function of SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/ Coronal Diagnostic Spectrometer (CDS) synoptic images of the Sun in two emission lines, He i 586 Å and O v 630 Å during 1996 - 2012. The width of the network boundaries is found to be roughly correlated with the solar cycle variation with a lag of about ten months. A comparison of the widths in the two emission lines shows that they are larger for the He i line. The SOHO/CDS data also show large asymmetry in boundary widths in the horizontal (x) and vertical (y) image directions, which is shown to be caused by image distortions that are due to instrumental effects. Since the network boundary widths are related to the magnetic flux concentration along the boundaries, the results are expected to have implications on the flux transport on the solar surface, solar cycle, and the mass and energy budget of network loops and jets.

  10. The width of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Borgonovo, Luis

    2015-03-01

    The emission processes active in the highly relativistic jets of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain unknown. In this paper, we propose a new measure to describe spectra: the width of the EFE spectrum, a quantity dependent only on finding a good fit to the data. We apply this to the full sample of GRBs observed by Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Compton Gamma-ray Observatory/Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE). The results from the two instruments are fully consistent. We find that the median widths of spectra from long and short GRBs are significantly different (chance probability <10-6). The width does not correlate with either duration or hardness, and this is thus a new, independent distinction between the two classes. Comparing the measured spectra with widths of spectra from fundamental emission processes - synchrotron and blackbody radiation - the results indicate that a large fraction of GRB spectra are too narrow to be explained by synchrotron radiation from a distribution of electron energies: for example, 78 per cent of long GRBs and 85 per cent of short GRBs are incompatible with the minimum width of standard slow cooling synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian distribution of electrons, with fast cooling spectra predicting even wider spectra. Photospheric emission can explain the spectra if mechanisms are invoked to give a spectrum much broader than a blackbody.

  11. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihalka, A. M.

    1986-04-01

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20 to 50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the dc input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  12. Late reperfusion of a totally occluded infarct-related artery increases granulocyte-colony stimulation factor and reduces stroma-derived factor-1alpha blood levels in patients with ongoing ischemia after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Tang; Chen, Shih-Jen; Cherng, Wen-Jin; Yang, Ning-I; Lee, Chen-Chin; Cheng, Chi-Wen; Verma, Subodh; Wang, Chao-Hung

    2009-07-01

    After acute myocardial infarction (AMI), reopening of a totally occluded infarct-related artery (IRA) at a subacute stage is still controversial in symptom-free patients. However, in patients with persistent ischemic symptoms and inadequate collaterals to the infarct area, recanalization is thought to provide beneficial effects. In addition to augmenting myocardial perfusion, we hypothesized that the benefit of recanalization involves the manipulation of circulating stem cell-mobilizing cytokines. This study included 30 patients with a totally occluded IRA and ongoing ischemic symptoms (the study group) and 30 patients with a partially occluded IRA (the control group). All patients underwent successful angioplasty and/or stenting. Before and immediately after the coronary intervention, blood granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), stem-cell factor (SCF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and stroma-derived factor-1 (SDF-1alpha) were measured. After recanalization, G-CSF levels significantly increased in the study group compared to the control group (P=0.03). SDF-1alpha levels in the study group decreased relative to the controls (P=0.02). However, no significant changes in VEGF or SCF levels between the two groups were found. In the multivariate analysis, reopening of a totally occluded IRA was independently and significantly associated with changes in G-CSF and SDF-1alpha levels after recanalization. In conclusion, our data suggest that the benefits of late reperfusion of a totally occluded IRA in patients with ongoing myocardial ischemia may involve mechanisms associated with stem cell-mobilizing and plaque-stabilizing cytokines. This study provides the rationale to investigate serial changes in cytokines and the numbers of circulating progenitors after reperfusion in the future.

  13. Interatomic Coulombic decay widths of helium trimer: Ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Kolorenč, Přemysl; Sisourat, Nicolas

    2015-12-14

    We report on an extensive study of interatomic Coulombic decay (ICD) widths in helium trimer computed using a fully ab initio method based on the Fano theory of resonances. Algebraic diagrammatic construction for one-particle Green’s function is utilized for the solution of the many-electron problem. An advanced and universal approach to partitioning of the configuration space into discrete states and continuum subspaces is described and employed. Total decay widths are presented for all ICD-active states of the trimer characterized by one-site ionization and additional excitation of an electron into the second shell. Selected partial decay widths are analyzed in detail, showing how three-body effects can qualitatively change the character of certain relaxation transitions. Previously unreported type of three-electron decay processes is identified in one class of the metastable states.

  14. Morphodynamics structures induced by variations of the channel width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duro, Gonzalo; Crosato, Alessandra; Tassi, Pablo

    2014-05-01

    In alluvial channels, forcing effects, such as a longitudinally varying width, can induce the formation of steady bars (Olesen, 1984). The type of bars that form, such as alternate, central or multiple, will mainly depend on the local flow width-to-depth ratio and on upstream conditions (Struiksma et al., 1985). The effects on bar formation of varying the channel width received attention only recently and investigations, based on flume experiments and mathematical modelling, are mostly restricted to small longitudinal sinusoidal variations of the channel width (e.g. Repetto et al., 2002; Wu and Yeh, 2005, Zolezzi et al., 2012; Frascati and Lanzoni, 2013). In this work, we analyze the variations in equilibrium bed topography in a longitudinal width-varying channel with characteristic scales of the Waal River (The Netherlands) using two different 2D depth-averaged morphodynamic models, one based on the Delft3D code and one on Telemac-Mascaret system. In particular, we explore the effects of changing the wavelength of sinusoidal width variations in a straight channel, focusing on the effects of the spatial lag between bar formation and forcing that is observed in numerical models and laboratory experiments (e.g. Crosato et al, 2011). We extend the investigations to finite width variations in which longitudinal changes of the width-to-depth ratio are such that they may affect the type of bars that become unstable (alternate, central or multiple bars). Numerical results are qualitatively validated with field observations and the resulting morphodynamic pattern is compared with the physics-based predictor of river bar modes by Crosato and Mosselman (2009). The numerical models are finally used to analyse the experimental conditions of Wu and Yeh (2005). The study should be seen as merely exploratory. The aim is to investigate possible approaches for future research aiming at assessing the effects of artificial river widening and narrowing to control bar formation in

  15. Fast and Robust Nanocellulose Width Estimation Using Turbidimetry.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Michiko; Saito, Tsuguyuki; Nishiyama, Yoshiharu; Iwamoto, Shinichiro; Yano, Hiroyuki; Isogai, Akira; Endo, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    The dimensions of nanocelluloses are important factors in controlling their material properties. The present study reports a fast and robust method for estimating the widths of individual nanocellulose particles based on the turbidities of their water dispersions. Seven types of nanocellulose, including short and rigid cellulose nanocrystals and long and flexible cellulose nanofibers, are prepared via different processes. Their widths are calculated from the respective turbidity plots of their water dispersions, based on the theory of light scattering by thin and long particles. The turbidity-derived widths of the seven nanocelluloses range from 2 to 10 nm, and show good correlations with the thicknesses of nanocellulose particles spread on flat mica surfaces determined using atomic force microscopy.

  16. Why momentum width matters for atom interferometry with Bragg pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szigeti, S. S.; Debs, J. E.; Hope, J. J.; Robins, N. P.; Close, J. D.

    2012-02-01

    We theoretically consider the effect of the atomic source's momentum width on the efficiency of Bragg mirrors and beamsplitters and, more generally, on the phase sensitivity of Bragg pulse atom interferometers. By numerical optimization, we show that an atomic cloud's momentum width places a fundamental upper bound on the maximum transfer efficiency of a Bragg mirror pulse, and furthermore limits the phase sensitivity of a Bragg pulse atom interferometer. We quantify these momentum width effects, and precisely compute how mirror efficiencies and interferometer phase sensitivities vary as functions of Bragg order and source type. Our results and methodology allow for an efficient optimization of Bragg pulses and the comparison of different atomic sources, and will help in the design of large momentum transfer Bragg mirrors and beamsplitters for use in atom-based inertial sensors.

  17. Automated width measurements of Martian dust devil tracks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Statella, Thiago; Pina, Pedro; da Silva, Erivaldo Antônio

    2016-03-01

    Studying dust devils is important to better understand Mars climate and resurfacing phenomena. This paper presents an automated approach to calculate the width of tracks in orbital images. The method is based on Mathematical Morphology and was applied to a set of 200 HiRISE and MOC images of five Mars quadrangles, which were Aeolis, Argyre, Noachis, Hellas and Eridania. Information obtained by our method was compared with results of manual analysis performed by other authors. In addition, we show that track widths do not follow a normal distribution.

  18. Fjords in viscous fingering: selection of width and opening scale

    SciTech Connect

    Mineev-weinstein, Mark; Ristroph, Leif; Thrasher, Matthew; Swinney, Harry

    2008-01-01

    Our experiments on viscous fingering of air into oil contained between closely spaced plates reveal two selection rules for the fjords of oil that separate fingers of air. (Fjords are the building blocks of solutions of the zero-surface-tension Laplacian growth equation.) Experiments in rectangular and circular geometries yield fjords with base widths {lambda}{sub c}/2, where {lambda}{sub c} is the most unstable wavelength from a linear stability analysis. Further, fjords open at an angle of 8.0{sup o}{+-}1.0{sup o}. These selection rules hold for a wide range of pumping rates and fjord lengths, widths, and directions.

  19. Experimental Stark widths and shifts of Ti II spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manrique, J.; Aguilera, J. A.; Aragón, C.

    2016-10-01

    Stark widths and shifts of Ti II lines with wavelengths in the range 2500-4600 Å have been determined by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. The temperature and electron density of the plasma vary in the ranges 11 970-15 520 K and (2.0-7.2) × 1017 cm-3, respectively, for the different measurement instants from 0.6 to 1.8 μs. The samples used are fused glass discs with different titanium concentrations, selected to control the self-absorption of the lines. The Stark widths and shifts are compared with the experimental and theoretical data available in the literature.

  20. Characteristics of pulse width for an enhanced second harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yun; Hyodo, Masaharu; Okada-Shudo, Yoshiko; Zhu, Yun; Wang, Xiaoyang; Zhu, Yong; Wang, Guiling; Chen, Chuangtian; Watanabe, Shuntaro; Watanabe, Masayoshi

    2017-03-01

    Temporal characteristics of a cavity enhancement second harmonic (SH) generation for picosecond laser pulse are investigated. We experimentally measured pulse width changes that were indued by group velocity mismatching (GVM), SH process, and enhancement cavity. It indicates that the generated pulse width is a combined effect of the GVM and SH process. Meanwhile, the effect of the enhancement cavity can be avoided by controlling its free spectrum range. A interferometric autocorrelator with a KBBF-PCD as nonlinear crystal is also composed and this extends the measurement light wavelength below 410 nm.

  1. Width effects in transonic flow over a rectangular cavity

    DOE PAGES

    Beresh, Steven J.; Wagner, Justin L.; Henfling, John F.; ...

    2015-07-24

    A previous experiment by the present authors studied the flow over a finite-width rectangular cavity at freestream Mach numbers 1.5–2.5. In addition, this investigation considered the influence of three-dimensional geometry that is not replicated by simplified cavities that extend across the entire wind-tunnel test section. The latter configurations have the attraction of easy optical access into the depths of the cavity, but they do not reproduce effects upon the turbulent structures and acoustic modes due to the length-to-width ratio, which is becoming recognized as an important parameter describing the nature of the flow within narrower cavities.

  2. ALPHA CONTAMINATION MONITORING

    DTIC Science & Technology

    This project was conducted to determine the alpha hazard existing in the vicinity of the missile launch pad following the destruction of a missile ...were used for plutonium particle collection. Because all warhead-carrying missiles were properly launched after Project 2.3 was approved, no alpha contamination data was obtained.

  3. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  4. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  5. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, Richard D.; MacArthur, Duncan W.

    1996-01-01

    An electrostatic detector for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure.

  6. Event counting alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    Bolton, R.D.; MacArthur, D.W.

    1996-08-27

    An electrostatic detector is disclosed for atmospheric radon or other weak sources of alpha radiation. In one embodiment, nested enclosures are insulated from one another, open at the top, and have a high voltage pin inside and insulated from the inside enclosure. An electric field is produced between the pin and the inside enclosure. Air ions produced by collision with alpha particles inside the decay volume defined by the inside enclosure are attracted to the pin and the inner enclosure. With low alpha concentrations, individual alpha events can be measured to indicate the presence of radon or other alpha radiation. In another embodiment, an electrical field is produced between parallel plates which are insulated from a single decay cavity enclosure. 6 figs.

  7. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  8. The implications of grading on the emission line width of core–shell nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadnis, Chinmay; Sonawane, Kiran G.; Sudarsan, V.; Mahamuni, Shailaja

    2017-04-01

    An excitonic coupling with phonons leads to broadening of the emission line. The narrow excitonic emission line width observed in CdZnS/ZnS alloy core graded shell nanocrystals (NCs) with varying compositions is studied using temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements. Contrary to the consensus that a narrow emission line width is observable with a reduction in size (due to the increased exciton–acoustic phonon coupling coefficient σ), an increased value is noted with reduced size. Based on a theoretical approach to graded core–shell NCs, the relationship between the electron–hole wave function overlap and exciton lifetime is invoked to understand this anomaly. Smaller alloy core–shell NCs (CdZnS/ZnS-I) have a longer lifetime than larger NCs (CdZnS/ZnS-II), indicating reduced electron–hole wave function overlap for CdZnS/ZnS-I NCs and hence a larger ‘effective size’ of NCs, even though the actual size is smaller. The experimental findings demonstrate that graded core–shell NCs reveal an additional functionality, facilitating control of the emission line width of NCs via minimal interaction with the solid state environment.

  9. The H-alpha/H-beta ratio in solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zirin, H.; Liggett, M.; Patterson, A.

    1982-01-01

    The present investigation involves the study of an extensive body of data accumulated of simultaneous H-alpha and H-beta cinematography of flares. The data were obtained with two telescopes simultaneously photographing flares in H-alpha and H-beta. The results of measurements in a number of flares are presented in a table. The flares were selected purely by optical quality of the data. That the measured ratios are not too different from those in stellar flares is suggested by the last two columns of the table. These columns show that a variety of possible line width ratios could give an integrated intensity ratio of less than unity.

  10. An H-alpha velocity study of S252

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, W. F.; Gary, G. A.; Odell, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    The H II region S252 (NGC 2175) was studied by means of H-alpha radial velocities and line widths. The velocity structure appears to be dominated by the western ionization front, abutting a dense neutral cloud which is a CO source, and by symmetry abut the ionizing star. This data, together with other studies of CO, H167-alpha, and the H II radio continuum, allow construction of a model of S252. The H II model is basically a double blister formed by a luminous hot star being located between two orthogonal, elongated neutral clouds.

  11. Reexamination of the {alpha}-{alpha}''fishbone'' potential

    SciTech Connect

    Day, J. P.; McEwen, J. E.; Elhanafy, M.; Smith, E.; Woodhouse, R.; Papp, Z.

    2011-09-15

    The fishbone potential of composite particles simulates the Pauli effect by nonlocal terms. We determine the {alpha}-{alpha} fishbone potential by simultaneously fitting to two-{alpha} resonance energies, experimental phase shifts, and three-{alpha} binding energies. We found that, essentially, a simple Gaussian can provide a good description of two-{alpha} and three-{alpha} experimental data without invoking three-body potentials.

  12. Low Loss, Finite Width Ground Plane, Thin Film Microstrip Lines on Si Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Margomenos, Alexandros; Katehi, Linda P. B.

    1999-01-01

    Si RFICs on standard, 2 Omega-cm. Si wafers require novel transmission lines to reduce the loss caused by the resistive substrate. One such transmission line is commonly called Thin Film Microstrip (TFMS), which is created by depositing a metallic ground plane, thin insulating layers, and the microstrip lines on the Si wafer. Thus, the electric fields are isolated from the Si wafer. In this paper, it is shown through experimental results that the ground plane of TFMS may be finite width and comparable to the strip width in size while still achieving low loss on 2 Omega-cm Si. Measured effective permittivity shows that the field interaction with the Si wafer is small.

  13. All-electronic line width reduction in a semiconductor diode laser using a crystalline microresonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rury, Aaron S.; Mansour, Kamjou; Yu, Nan

    2015-07-01

    This study examines the capability to significantly suppress the frequency noise of a semiconductor distributed feedback diode laser using a universally applicable approach: a combination of a high-Q crystalline whispering gallery mode microresonator reference and the Pound-Drever-Hall locking scheme using an all-electronic servo loop. An out-of-loop delayed self-heterodyne measurement system demonstrates the ability of this approach to reduce a test laser's absolute line width by nearly a factor of 100. In addition, in-loop characterization of the laser stabilized using this method demonstrates a 1-kHz residual line width with reference to the resonator frequency. Based on these results, we propose that utilization of an all-electronic loop combined with the use of the wide transparency window of crystalline materials enable this approach to be readily applicable to diode lasers emitting in other regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, especially in the UV and mid-IR.

  14. Functional roles of the alpha isoforms of the Na,K-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Lingrel, Jerry; Moseley, Amy; Dostanic, Iva; Cougnon, Marc; He, Suiwen; James, Paul; Woo, Alison; O'Connor, Kyle; Neumann, Jonathan

    2003-04-01

    The Na,K-ATPase is composed of two subunits, alpha and beta, and each subunit consists of multiple isoforms. In the case of alpha, four isoforms, alpha1, alpha2, alpha3, and alpha4 are present in mammalian cells. The distribution of these isoforms is tissue- and developmental-specific, suggesting that they may play specific roles, either during development or coupled to specific physiological processes. In order to understand the functional properties of each of these isoforms, we are using gene targeting, where animals are produced lacking either one copy or both copies of the corresponding gene or have a modified gene. To date, we have produced animals lacking the alpha1 and alpha2 isoform genes. Animals lacking both copies of the alpha1 isoform gene are not viable, while animals lacking both copies of the alpha2 isoform gene make it to birth, but are either born dead or die very soon after. In the case of animals lacking one copy of the alpha1 or alpha2 isoform gene, the animals survive and appear healthy. Heart and EDL muscle from animals lacking one copy of the alpha2 isoform exhibit an increase in force of contraction, while there is reduced force of contraction in both muscles from animals lacking one copy of the alpha1 isoform gene. These studies indicate that the alpha1 and alpha2 isoforms carry out different physiological roles. The alpha2 isoform appears to be involved in regulating Ca(2+) transients involved in muscle contraction, while the alpha1 isoform probably plays a more generalized role. While we have not yet knocked out the alpha3 or alpha4 isoform genes, studies to date indicate that the alpha4 isoform is necessary to maintain sperm motility. It is thus possible that the alpha2, alpha3, and alpha4 isoforms are involved in specialized functions of various tissues, helping to explain their tissue- and developmental-specific regulation.

  15. THE FUNDAMENTAL PLANE OF DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Neeleman, Marcel; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-05-20

    Using a sample of 100 H I-selected damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) systems, observed with the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on the Keck I telescope, we present evidence that the scatter in the well-studied correlation between the redshift and metallicity of a DLA is largely due to the existence of a mass-metallicity relationship at each redshift. To describe the fundamental relations that exist between redshift, metallicity, and mass, we use a fundamental plane description, which is described by the following equation: [M/H] = (- 1.9 {+-} 0.5) + (0.74 {+-} 0.21) {center_dot} log {Delta}v{sub 90} - (0.32 {+-} 0.06) {center_dot} z. Here, we assert that the velocity width, {Delta}v{sub 90}, which is defined as the velocity interval containing 90% of the integrated optical depth, traces the mass of the underlying dark matter halo. This description provides two significant improvements over the individual descriptions of the mass-metallicity correlation and metallicity-redshift correlation. Firstly, the fundamental equation reduces the scatter around both relationships by about 20%, providing a more stringent constraint on numerical simulations modeling DLAs. Secondly, it confirms that the dark matter halos that host DLAs satisfy a mass-metallicity relationship at each redshift between redshifts 2 through 5.

  16. The muscle-specific laminin receptor alpha7 beta1 integrin negatively regulates alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor function.

    PubMed

    Tomatis, D; Echtermayer, F; Schöber, S; Balzac, F; Retta, S F; Silengo, L; Tarone, G

    1999-02-01

    alpha7 beta1 is the major integrin complex expressed in differentiated muscle cells where it functions as a laminin receptor. In this work we have expressed the alpha7 integrin subunit in CHO cells to investigate the functional properties of this receptor. After transfection with alpha7 CHO cells acquired the ability to adhere and spread on laminin 1 consistent with the laminin receptor activity of the alpha7 beta1. alpha7 transfectants, however, showed a 70% reduction in the ability to adhere to fibronectin and were unable to assemble a fibronectin matrix. The degree of reduction was inversely related to the level of alpha7 expression. To define the mechanisms underlying this adhesive defect we analyzed surface expression and functional properties of the alpha5 beta1 fibronectin receptor. Although cell surface expression of alpha5 beta1 was reduced by a factor of 20-25% in alpha7 transfectants compared to control untransfected cells, this slight reduction was not sufficient to explain the dramatic reduction in cell adhesion (70%) and matrix assembly (close to 100%). Binding studies showed that the affinity of 125I-fibronectin for its surface receptor was decreased by 50% in alpha7 transfectants, indicating that the alpha5 beta1 integrin is partially inactivated in these cells. Inactivation can be reversed by Mn2+, a cation known to increase integrin affinity for their ligands. In fact, incubation of cells with Mn2+ restored fibronectin binding affinity, adhesion to fibronectin, and assembly of fibronectin matrix in alpha7 transfectants. These data indicate that alpha7 expression leads to the functional down regulation of alpha5beta1 integrin by decreasing ligand binding affinity and surface expression. In conclusion, the data reported establish the existence of a negative cooperativity between alpha7 and alpha5 integrins that may be important in determining functional regulation of integrins during myogenic differentiation.

  17. Improved determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Graf C. P.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; La Cruz I. Heredia-De; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; et al.

    2012-05-04

    We present an improved determination of the total width of the top quark, {Gamma}{sub t}, using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The total width {Gamma}{sub t} is extracted from the partial decay width {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) and the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Wb). {Gamma}(t {yields} Wb) is obtained from the t-channel single top-quark production cross section and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb) is measured in t{bar t} events. For a top mass of 172.5 GeV, the resulting width is {Gamma}{sub t} = 2.00{sub -0.43}{sup +0.47} GeV. This translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.29{sub -0.63}{sup +0.90}) x 10{sup -25} s. We also extract an improved direct limit on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix element 0.81 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L. and a limit of |V{sub tb}| < 0.59 for a high-mass fourth-generation bottom quark assuming unitarity of the fourth-generation quark-mixing matrix.

  18. Shifts and widths of Feshbach resonances in atomic waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidian, Shahpoor; Melezhik, Vladimir S.; Schmelcher, Peter

    2012-12-01

    We develop and analyze a theoretical model which yields the shifts and widths of Feshbach resonances in an atomic waveguide. It is based on a multichannel approach for confinement-induced resonances (CIRs) and atomic transitions in the waveguides in the multimode regime. In this scheme we replace the single-channel scalar interatomic interaction by the four-channel tensorial potential modeling resonances of broad, narrow, and overlapping character according to the two-channel parametrization of Lange [Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.79.013622 79, 013622 (2009)]. As an input the experimentally known parameters of Feshbach resonances in the absence of the waveguide are used. We calculate the shifts and widths of s-, d-, and g-wave magnetic Feshbach resonances of Cs atoms emerging in harmonic waveguides as CIRs and resonant enhancement of the transmission at zeros of the free space scattering length. We have found the linear dependence of the width of the resonance on the longitudinal atomic momentum and quadratic dependence on the waveguide width. Our model opens possibilities for quantitative studies of the scattering processes in ultracold atomic gases in waveguides beyond the framework of s-wave resonant scattering.

  19. An Improved determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

    2012-01-01

    We present an improved determination of the total width of the top quark, {Lambda}{sub t}, using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The total width {Lambda}{sub t} is extracted from the partial decay width {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) and the branching fraction {Beta}(t {yields} Wb). {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) is obtained from the t-channel single top quark production cross section and {Beta}(t {yields} Wb) is measured in t{bar t} events. For a top mass of 172.5 GeV, the resulting width is {Lambda}{sub t} = 2.00{sub -0.43}{sup +0.47} GeV. This translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.29{sub -0.63}{sup +0.90}) x 10{sup -25} s. We also extract an improved direct limit on the CKM matrix element 0.81 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L. and a limit of |V{sub tb'}| < 0.59 for a high mass fourth generation bottom quark assuming unitarity of the fourth generation quark mixing matrix.

  20. 13. DETAIL: A CLOSEUP VIEW OF TWO UNEQUAL WIDTH CONCRETE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL: A CLOSE-UP VIEW OF TWO UNEQUAL WIDTH CONCRETE BRACKETS AND THE LARGE CAST ANCONE WHICH SUPPORTS A QUIRK IN THE CONCRETE BALUSTRADE. - Delphi Bridge on U.S. Route 421, Spanning Deer Creek at U.S. Route 421, Delphi, Carroll County, IN

  1. Width of the {phi} meson in nuclear matter

    SciTech Connect

    Polyanskiy, A. Yu.; Hartmann, M.; Kiselev, Yu. T.; Paryev, E. Ya.; Buescher, M.; Chiladze, D.; Dymov, S. N.; Dzyuba, A. A.; Gebel, R.; Hejny, V.; Kaempfer, B.; Keshelashvili, I.; Koptev, V. P.; Lorentz, B.; Maeda, Y.; Merzliakov, S. I.; and others

    2012-01-15

    The ratios of the cross sections for {phi}-meson production induced by 2.83-GeV protons on Cu, Ag, and Au nuclei to the respective cross section for C nuclei were measured at the ANKE-COSY facility in the momentum range of 0.6-1.6 GeV/c and the angular range of 0 Degree-Sign -8 Degree-Sign . The product {phi} mesons were identified by their decay {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The procedure used to separate kaon pairs was described in detail, and all sources of the background and their contribution to the resulting error in the values found for the above cross-section ratios were analyzed. The A dependence of the cross section for {phi}-meson production was shown to obey the A{sup 0.56{+-}0.03} law. The total width of the {phi} meson at a normal nuclear density was extracted from a comparison of the measured cross-section ratios with the results of calculations based on two theoretical models. The resulting width value exceeds substantially both the vacuum width and the width expected in the absence of the nuclear-matter effect on the properties of the {phi} meson.

  2. An Empirical Expression for the Line Widths of Ammonia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Linda R.; Peterson, Dean B.

    1994-01-01

    The hydrogen-broadened line widths of 116 (sup 14)NH(sub 3) ground state transitions have been measured at 0.006 cm(sup -1) resolution using a Bruker spectrometer in the 24 to 210 cm(sup -1) region. The rotational variation of the experimental widths with J(sup '),K(sup ') = 1,0 to 10,10 has been reproduced to 2.4 % using an heuristically derived expression of the form

    gamma = a(sub 0) + a(sub 1) J(sup ') + a (sub 2) K(sup ') + a(sub 3) J(sup ')(sup 2) + a(sub 4) J(sup ') K(sup ')

    where J(sup ') and K(sup ') are the lower state symmetric top quantum numbers. This function has also been applied to the measured widths of the 58 transitions of nu(sub 1) at 3 (micro)m, each broadened by N(sub 2), O(sub 2), Ar, H(sub 2), and He. The rms of the observed minus calculated widths are 5% or better for the five foreign broadeners. The values of the fitted constants suggest that for some broadeners the expression might also be written as

    gamma = a(sub 0) + b(sub 1) J(sup ') + b(sub 2)(J(sup ' )- K(sup ')) + b(sub 3) J(sup ')(J(sup ') - K(sup '))

    .

  3. Width adjustment: relative dominance in unstable alluvial streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    The mechanisms that control the relative dominance of width adjustment in unstable streams are described. Specifically, the role of the following factors affecting the fluvial environment were investigated: vertical processes and fluvial action, bed-material particle, cohesive strength of bank material, and riparian vegetation.

  4. 14 CFR 29.815 - Main aisle width.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Main aisle width. 29.815 Section 29.815 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Design and Construction Personnel and Cargo Accommodations §...

  5. Ultraviolet-mediated antimycotic activity of alpha-terthienyl on Microsporum cookei.

    PubMed

    Mares, D; Fasulo, M P; Bruni, A

    1990-01-01

    Alpha-terthienyl (alpha-T) in the presence of UV-A irradiation reduced the growth rate of Microsporum cookei. In the dark, alpha-T accumulated in small diffuse vacuoles within the hyphae. After UV-A treatment, alpha-T caused damage to the membranes of the nucleus, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. Plasmolytic and autolytic changes occurred resulting in plasma membrane breakage and cell wall aberrations. UV-A activated alpha-T would appear to target membrane proteins.

  6. The alpha channeling effect

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N. J.

    2015-12-10

    Alpha particles born through fusion reactions in a tokamak reactor tend to slow down on electrons, but that could take up to hundreds of milliseconds. Before that happens, the energy in these alpha particles can destabilize on collisionless timescales toroidal Alfven modes and other waves, in a way deleterious to energy confinement. However, it has been speculated that this energy might be instead be channeled into useful energy, so as to heat fuel ions or to drive current. Such a channeling needs to be catalyzed by waves Waves can produce diffusion in energy of the alpha particles in a way that is strictly coupled to diffusion in space. If these diffusion paths in energy-position space point from high energy in the center to low energy on the periphery, then alpha particles will be cooled while forced to the periphery. The energy from the alpha particles is absorbed by the wave. The amplified wave can then heat ions or drive current. This process or paradigm for extracting alpha particle energy collisionlessly has been called alpha channeling. While the effect is speculative, the upside potential for economical fusion is immense. The paradigm also operates more generally in other contexts of magnetically confined plasma.

  7. Utilizing a constant peak width transform for isothermal gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, Jeremy S; Wilson, Ryan B; Fitz, Brian D; Reed, Jason T; Synovec, Robert E

    2011-06-10

    A computational approach to partially address the general elution problem (GEP), and better visualize, isothermal gas chromatograms is reported. The theoretical computational approach is developed and applied experimentally. We report a high speed temporally increasing boxcar summation (TIBS) transform that, when applied to the raw isothermal GC data, converts the chromatographic data from the initial time domain (in which the peak widths in isothermal GC increase as a function of their retention factors, k), to a data point based domain in which all peaks have the same peak width in terms of number of points in the final data vector, which aides in preprocessing and data analysis, while minimizing data storage size. By applying the TIBS transform, the resulting GC chromatogram (initially collected isothermally), appears with an x-axis point scale as if it were instrumentally collected using a suitable temperature program. A high speed GC isothermal separation with a test mixture containing 10 compounds had a run time of ∼25 s. The peak at a retention factor k ∼0.7 had a peak width of ∼55 ms, while the last eluting peak at k ∼89 (i.e., retention time of ∼22 s) had a peak width of ∼2000 ms. Application of the TIBS transform increased the peak height of the last eluting peak 45-fold, and S/N ∼20-fold. All peaks in the transformed test mixture chromatogram had the width of an unretained peak, in terms of number of data points. A simulated chromatogram at unit resolution, studied using the TIBS transform, provided additional insight into the benefits of the algorithm.

  8. Lithologic controls on valley width and strath terrace formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Sarah A.; Montgomery, David R.

    2016-04-01

    Valley width and the degree of bedrock river terrace development vary with lithology in the Willapa and Nehalem river basins, Pacific Northwest, USA. Here, we present field-based evidence for the mechanisms by which lithology controls floodplain width and bedrock terrace formation in erosion-resistant and easily friable lithologies. We mapped valley surfaces in both basins, dated straths using radiocarbon, compared valley width versus drainage area for basalt and sedimentary bedrock valleys, and constructed slope-area plots. In the friable sedimentary bedrock, valleys are 2 to 3 times wider, host flights of strath terraces, and have concavity values near 1; whereas the erosion-resistant basalt bedrock forms narrow valleys with poorly developed, localized, or no bedrock terraces and a channel steepness index half that of the friable bedrock and an average channel concavity of about 0.5. The oldest dated strath terrace on the Willapa River, T2, was active for nearly 10,000 years, from 11,265 to 2862 calibrated years before present (cal YBP), whereas the youngest terrace, T1, is Anthropocene in age and recently abandoned. Incision rates derived from terrace ages average 0.32 mm y- 1 for T2 and 11.47 mm y- 1 for T1. Our results indicate bedrock weathering properties influence valley width through the creation of a dense fracture network in the friable bedrock that results in high rates of lateral erosion of exposed bedrock banks. Conversely, the erosion-resistant bedrock has concavity values more typical of detachment-limited streams, exhibits a sparse fracture network, and displays evidence for infrequent episodic block erosion and plucking. Lithology thereby plays a direct role on the rates of lateral erosion, influencing valley width and the potential for strath terrace planation and preservation.

  9. FREQUENCY DEPENDENCE OF PULSE WIDTH FOR 150 RADIO NORMAL PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. L.; Wang, H. G.

    2014-11-01

    The frequency dependence of the pulse width is studied for 150 normal pulsars, mostly selected from the European Pulsar Network, for which the 10% multifrequency pulse widths can be well fit with the Thorsett relationship W {sub 10} = Aν{sup μ} + W {sub 10,} {sub min}. The relative fraction of pulse width change between 0.4 GHz and 4.85 GHz, η = (W {sub 4.85} – W {sub 0.4})/W {sub 0.4}, is calculated in terms of the best-fit relationship for each pulsar. It is found that 81 pulsars (54%) have η < –10% (group A), showing considerable profile narrowing at high frequencies, 40 pulsars (27%) have –10% ≤η ≤ 10% (group B), meaning a marginal change in pulse width, and 29 pulsars (19%) have η > 10% (group C), showing a remarkable profile broadening at high frequencies. The fractions of the group-A and group-C pulsars suggest that the profile narrowing phenomenon at high frequencies is more common than the profile broadening phenomenon, but a large fraction of the group-B and group-C pulsars (a total of 46%) is also revealed. The group-C pulsars, together with a portion of group-B pulsars with slight pulse broadening, can hardly be explained using the conventional radius-to-frequency mapping, which only applies to the profile narrowing phenomenon. Based on a recent version of the fan beam model, a type of broadband emission model, we propose that the diverse frequency dependence of pulse width is a consequence of different types of distribution of emission spectra across the emission region. The geometrical effect predicting a link between the emission beam shrinkage and spectrum steepening is tested but disfavored.

  10. Modulating alpha-actinin-4 dynamics in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Michaud, Jean-Louis R; Hosseini-Abardeh, Mona; Farah, Kevin; Kennedy, Chris R J

    2009-03-01

    Podocytes are epithelial cells that line the outer aspect of renal blood vessels and provide a platform for the kidney's filtering apparatus, the slit diaphragm. Mutations in alpha-actinin-4, an actin bundling protein highly expressed in podocytes, result in increased affinity for actin and cause a familial form of focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. We hypothesized that such gain-of-affinity mutations would override alpha-actinin-4's sensitivity to regulatory factors such as calcium (acting via two EF-hand motifs), and phosphoinositides. We generated calcium- (mutEF) and phosphoinositide- (mutPI) insensitive variants of alpha-actinin-4, comparing their properties to a disease-associated mutant (K256E) and to the wildtype (wt) protein. alpha-Actinin-4(mutPI) displayed increased affinity for actin, while the affinity of alpha-actinin-4(mutEF) was unchanged. Addition of calcium to actin sedimentation assays caused a decrease in the association of alpha-actinin-4(wt) with filamentous actin, while phosphoinositides generally increased this association. Similar to alpha-actinin-4(K256E), alpha-actinin-4(mutPI) was mislocalized in cultured podocytes, being preferentially associated with filamentous actin and focal adhesions. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments revealed a rapid turnover of alpha-actinin-4(wt) and alpha-actinin-4(mutEF) along stress fibers and focal adhesions, while the turnover of alpha-actinin-4(K256E) and alpha-actinin-4(mutPI) was dramatically reduced at these subcellular locales. Equibiaxial mechanical stimulation of podocytes, a mimic of intraglomerular forces, reduced podocyte surface area by 50%; this decrease was more severe (70%) in the presence of high-affinity mutants of alpha-actinin-4. These data suggest that dynamic regulation of alpha-actinin-4/actin interactions may be necessary for maintaining podocyte structure in response to glomerular hydrostatic forces.

  11. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink and fishbone modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; White, R.B. )

    1994-10-01

    The effects of alpha particles on the internal kink and fishbone modes are studied analytically. The nonadiabatic contribution from untrapped alpha particles is negligible. Finite inverse aspect ratio, plasma [beta], and plasma shaping effects can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in the pitch angle space and reduce the bounce-averaged magnetic drift frequency. The decrease of the drift magnitude and drift reversal effects on the ideal kink mode is small, but the [beta][sub [alpha

  12. Evolution of valleys width : A Mars-Earth comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochat, Stéphane; Loget, Nicolas

    2013-04-01

    The analyses of the valleys on Mars are used to reconstruct the climate on Early Mars (~ 3.5 Gy). Thus, many studies indicate a strong analogy between earth and mars networks (dendritic organization, drainage density Strahler ordering) which is compatible with a widespread rain (today Mars is arid, cold and the water can only be vapor/snow). But, many features are too different with the Earth classic valleys networks to conclude definitively on the Early climate of Mars. Here, we study the evolution of the width of valleys with drainage area. This method lies on the relationship between the evolution of the channel width (W) versus the discharge of the river or the upstream drainage area (A) such as Wc= bA0.5 (e.g Leopold and Maddock, 1953; Montgomery and Gran, 2001). On Mars, one of the difficulties is to plot the width of the channel but recent studies on Mars and on Earth indicate that the valley bottom width Wv strictly follows the same evolution than the channel width (e.g. Mattheus and Rodriguez 2011, Phillips, 2011). Thereby, we analyzed 366 basins on Earth from 4.10-02 to 6.1006 km2 and 355 basins on Mars from 7.10-02 to 2.8.1006 km2. For Earth Wv= bA0.46 with 0.005< b< 0.047. For Mars Wv= bA0.27 with 0.046< b< 0.19. Martian valleys are ten times wider for small tributaries (< 100 km2) but ten times smaller for large tributaries >100.000 km2). Our observations are compatible with an inefficient system with strong supply of water, on small systems, which is less and less transmitted at the outlet, on large systems. The origins of this inefficiency will be discussed. Leopold, L. B. and T. Maddock (1953). The hydraulic geometry of stream channels and some physiographic implications. United States Geological Survey Professional Paper. Montgomery, D. R. and K. B. Gran (2001). "Downstream Variations in the Width of Bedrock Channels." Water Resour. Res. Jonathan D. Phillips (2011): Drainage area and incised valley fills in Texas rivers: A potential explanation

  13. Alpha One Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    Languages French (Francais) German (Deutsch) Italian (Italiano) Spanish (Español) Portuguese (Portugues) Swedish (Svenska) Donate One Time Monthly Keep In Touch | About Us | Contact Us | What is the Alpha-1 ...

  14. Coaching the alpha male.

    PubMed

    Ludeman, Kate; Erlandson, Eddie

    2004-05-01

    Highly intelligent, confident, and successful, alpha males represent about 70% of all senior executives. Natural leaders, they willingly take on levels of responsibility most rational people would find overwhelming. But many of their quintessential strengths can also make alphas difficult to work with. Their self-confidence can appear domineering. Their high expectations can make them excessively critical. Their unemotional style can keep them from inspiring their teams. That's why alphas need coaching to broaden their interpersonal tool kits while preserving their strengths. Drawing from their experience coaching more than 1,000 senior executives, the authors outline an approach tailored specifically for the alpha. Coaches get the alpha's attention by inundating him with data from 360-degree feedback presented in ways he will find compelling--both hard-boiled metrics and vivid verbatim comments from colleagues about his strengths and weaknesses. A 360-degree assessment is a wake-up call for most alphas, providing undeniable proof that their behavior doesn't work nearly as well as they think it does. That paves the way for a genuine commitment to change. In order to change, the alpha must venture into unfamiliar--and often uncomfortable--psychological territory. He must admit vulnerability, accept accountability not just for his own work for others', connect with his underlying emotions, learn to motivate through a balance of criticism and validation, and become aware of unproductive behavior patterns. The goal of executive coaching is not simply to treat the alpha as an individual problem but to improve the entire team dynamic. Initial success creates an incentive to persevere, and the virtuous cycle reverberates throughout the entire organization.

  15. alpha2-Adrenoreceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Imbert, T

    2001-06-01

    A review of the literature relating to the therapeutic potential of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists published between 1990 and 2000 is presented. Although extensively studied since the early 1970s in a wide spectrum of therapeutic applications, the distinction of alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes and some emerging evidence concerning new applications in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and schizophrenia, have refreshed an interest in this class of agents.

  16. Theory based scaling of edge turbulence and implications for the scrape-off layer width

    SciTech Connect

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; Zweben, S. J.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulence and plasma parameter data from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is examined and interpreted based on various theoretical estimates. In particular, quantities of interest for assessing the role of turbulent transport on the midplane scrape-off layer heat flux width are assessed. Because most turbulence quantities exhibit large scatter and little scaling within a given operation mode, this paper focuses on length and time scales and dimensionless parameters between operational modes including Ohmic, low (L), and high (H) modes using a large NSTX edge turbulence database. These are compared with theoretical estimates for drift and interchange rates, profile modification saturation levels, a resistive ballooning condition, and dimensionless parameters characterizing L and H mode conditions. It is argued that the underlying instability physics governing edge turbulence in different operational modes is, in fact, similar, and is consistent with curvature-driven drift ballooning. Saturation physics, however, is dependent on the operational mode. Five dimensionless parameters for drift-interchange turbulence are obtained and employed to assess the importance of turbulence in setting the scrape-off layer heat flux width λq and its scaling. An explicit proportionality of the width λq to the safety factor and major radius (qR) is obtained under these conditions. Lastly, quantitative estimates and reduced model numerical simulations suggest that the turbulence mechanism is not negligible in determining λq in NSTX, at least for high plasma current discharges.

  17. Theory based scaling of edge turbulence and implications for the scrape-off layer width

    DOE PAGES

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; Zweben, S. J.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulence and plasma parameter data from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) is examined and interpreted based on various theoretical estimates. In particular, quantities of interest for assessing the role of turbulent transport on the midplane scrape-off layer heat flux width are assessed. Because most turbulence quantities exhibit large scatter and little scaling within a given operation mode, this paper focuses on length and time scales and dimensionless parameters between operational modes including Ohmic, low (L), and high (H) modes using a large NSTX edge turbulence database. These are compared with theoretical estimates for drift and interchange rates, profile modificationmore » saturation levels, a resistive ballooning condition, and dimensionless parameters characterizing L and H mode conditions. It is argued that the underlying instability physics governing edge turbulence in different operational modes is, in fact, similar, and is consistent with curvature-driven drift ballooning. Saturation physics, however, is dependent on the operational mode. Five dimensionless parameters for drift-interchange turbulence are obtained and employed to assess the importance of turbulence in setting the scrape-off layer heat flux width λq and its scaling. An explicit proportionality of the width λq to the safety factor and major radius (qR) is obtained under these conditions. Lastly, quantitative estimates and reduced model numerical simulations suggest that the turbulence mechanism is not negligible in determining λq in NSTX, at least for high plasma current discharges.« less

  18. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  19. Optimized mixture of hops rho iso-alpha acids-rich extract and acacia proanthocyanidins-rich extract reduces insulin resistance in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and improves glucose and insulin control in db/db mice

    PubMed Central

    Darland, Gary; Konda, Veera Reddy; Pacioretty, Linda M.; Chang, Jyh-Lurn; Bland, Jeffrey S.; Babish, John G.

    2012-01-01

    Rho iso-alpha acids-rich extract (RIAA) from Humulus lupulus (hops) and proanthocyanidins-rich extracts (PAC) from Acacia nilotica exert anti-inflammatory and anti-diabetic activity in vitro and in vivo. We hypothesized that a combination of these two extracts would exert enhanced effects in vitro on inflammatory markers and insulin signaling, and on nonfasting glucose and insulin in db/db mice. Over 49 tested combinations, RIAA:PAC at 5:1 (6.25 µg/mL) exhibited the greatest reductions in TNFα-stimulated lipolysis and IL-6 release in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, comparable to 5 µg/mL troglitazone. Pretreatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes with this combination (5 µg/mL) also led to a 3-fold increase in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake that was comparable to 5 µg/mL pioglitazone or 901 µg/mL aspirin. Finally, db/db mice fed with RIAA:PAC at 5:1 (100 mg/kg) for 7 days resulted in 22% decrease in nonfasting glucose and 19% decrease in insulin that was comparable to 0.5 mg/kg rosiglitazone and better than 100 mg/kg metformin. RIAA:PAC mixture may have the potential to be an alternative when conventional therapy is undesirable or ineffective, and future research exploring its long-term clinical application is warranted. PMID:23198019

  20. Determination of the width of the top quark.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Ancu, L S; Aoki, M; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Atramentov, O; Avila, C; BackusMayes, J; Badaud, F; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bazterra, V; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Blazey, G; Blessing, S; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brandt, O; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Brown, J; Bu, X B; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Calpas, B; Camacho-Pérez, E; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M A; Casey, B C K; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chen, G; Chevalier-Théry, S; Cho, D K; Cho, S W; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clutter, J; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Croc, A; Cutts, D; Ćwiok, M; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; De la Cruz-Burelo, E; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; DeVaughan, K; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dorland, T; Dubey, A; Dudko, L V; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dutt, S; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Facini, G; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerbaudo, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Ginther, G; Golovanov, G; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Head, T; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegab, H; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Heredia-De la Cruz, I; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hoang, T; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Hubacek, Z; Huske, N; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jamin, D; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Joshi, J; Juste, A; Kaadze, K; Kajfasz, E; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y N; Khatidze, D; Kirby, M H; Kohli, J M; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurča, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Lee, W M; Lellouch, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna-Garcia, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madar, R; Magaña-Villalba, R; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martínez-Ortega, J; McCarthy, R; McGivern, C L; Meijer, M M; Melnitchouk, A; Menezes, D; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mondal, N K; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Nayyar, R; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Obrant, G; Orduna, J; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padilla, M; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Parihar, V; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petrillo, G; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Popov, A V; Prewitt, M; Price, D; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Razumov, I; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Santos, A S; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, K J; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Svoisky, P; Takahashi, M; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S

    2011-01-14

    We extract the total width of the top quark, Γ(t), from the partial decay width Γ(t → Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top-quark production and from the branching fraction B(t → Wb) measured in tt events using up to 2.3  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron pp Collider. The result is Γ(t) = 1.99(-0.55)(+0.69)  GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of τ(t) = (3.3(-0.9)(+1.3)) × 10(-25)   s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b' quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V(tb')| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  1. Magnetohydrodynamic disc winds and line width distributions - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chajet, L. S.; Hall, P. B.

    2017-02-01

    We study AGN emission line profiles combining an improved version of the accretion disc-wind model of Murray & Chiang with the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model of Emmering et al. Here, we extend our previous work to consider central objects with different masses and/or luminosities. We have compared the dispersions in our model C IV line-width distributions to observational upper limit on that dispersion, considering both smooth and clumpy torus models. Following Fine et al., we transform that scatter in the profile line-widths into a constraint on the torus geometry and show how the half-opening angle of the obscuring structure depends on the mass of the central object and the accretion rate. We find that the results depend only mildly on the dimensionless angular momentum, one of the two integrals of motion that characterize the dynamics of the self-similar ideal MHD outflows.

  2. Lattice QCD calculation of the {rho} meson decay width

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, S.; Fukugita, M.; Ishikawa, K-I.; Okawa, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Kuramashi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Kanaya, K.; Namekawa, Y.; Sasaki, K.

    2007-11-01

    We present a lattice QCD calculation of the {rho} meson decay width via the P-wave scattering phase shift for the I=1 two-pion system. Our calculation uses full QCD gauge configurations for N{sub f}=2 flavors generated using a renormalization group improved gauge action and an improved Wilson fermion action on a 12{sup 3}x24 lattice at m{sub {pi}}/m{sub {rho}}=0.41 and the lattice spacing 1/a=0.92 GeV. The phase shift calculated with the use of the finite size formula for the two-pion system in the moving frame shows a behavior consistent with the existence of a resonance at a mass close to the vector meson mass obtained in spectroscopy. The decay width estimated from the phase shift is consistent with the experiment, when the quark mass is scaled to the realistic value.

  3. A Direct Measurement of the $W$ Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Vine, Troy

    2008-08-01

    A direct measurement of the W boson total decay width is presented in proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the CDF II detector. The measurement is made by fitting a simulated signal to the tail of the transverse mass distribution in the electron and muon decay channels. An integrated luminosity of 350 pb-1 is used, collected between February 2002 and August 2004. Combining the results from the separate decay channels gives the decay width as 2.038 ± 0.072 GeV in agreement with the theoretical prediction of 2.093 ± 0.002 GeV. A system is presented for the management of detector calibrations using a relational database schema. A description of the implementation and monitoring of a procedure to provide general users with a simple interface to the complete set of calibrations is also given.

  4. Characterizing the width of amphibian movements during postbreeding migration.

    PubMed

    Coster, Stephanie S; Veysey Powell, Jessica S; Babbitt, Kimberly J

    2014-06-01

    Habitat linkages can help maintain connectivity of animal populations in developed landscapes. However, the lack of empirical data on the width of lateral movements (i.e., the zigzagging of individuals as they move from one point to point another) makes determining the width of such linkages challenging. We used radiotracking data from wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) and spotted salamanders (Ambystoma maculatum) in a managed forest in Maine (U.S.A.) to characterize movement patterns of populations and thus inform planning for the width of wildlife corridors. For each individual, we calculated the polar coordinates of all locations, estimated the vector sum of the polar coordinates, and measured the distance from each location to the vector sum. By fitting a Gaussian distribution over a histogram of these distances, we created a population-level probability density function and estimated the 50th and 95th percentiles to determine the width of lateral movement as individuals progressed from the pond to upland habitat. For spotted salamanders 50% of lateral movements were ≤13 m wide and 95% of movements were ≤39 m wide. For wood frogs, 50% of lateral movements were ≤17 m wide and 95% of movements were ≤ 51 m wide. For both species, those individuals that traveled the farthest from the pond also displayed the greatest lateral movement. Our results serve as a foundation for spatially explicit conservation planning for pond-breeding amphibians in areas undergoing development. Our technique can also be applied to movement data from other taxa to aid in designing habitat linkages.

  5. A Spectral Method for the Equal Width Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Archilla, Bosco

    1996-05-01

    A spectral discretization of the equal width equation (EWE) is presented. The method is shown to be convergent and nonlinearly stable. Time-stepping is performed with high-order Adams methods. The spectral accuracy of the scheme reveals some features of the EWE that the methods previously used could not bare out properly. For instance, we may now study the changes in amplitude and velocity of solitary waves after collisions.

  6. Beam Width Robustness of a 670 GHz Imaging Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, K. B.; Llombart, N.; Dengler, R. J.; Siegel, P. H.

    2009-01-01

    Detection of a replica bomb belt concealed on a mannequin at 4 m standoff range is achieved using a 670 GHz imaging radar. At a somewhat larger standoff range of 4.6 m, the radar's beam width increases substantially, but the through-shirt image quality remains good. This suggests that a relatively modest increase in aperture size over the current design will be sufficient to detect person-borne concealed weapons at ranges exceeding 25 meters.

  7. Pulse-Width-Modulating Driver for Brushless dc Motor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomon, Phil M.

    1991-01-01

    High-current pulse-width-modulating driver for brushless dc motor features optical coupling of timing signals from low-current control circuitry to high-current motor-driving circuitry. Provides high electrical isolation of motor-power supply, helping to prevent fast, high-current motor-driving pulses from being coupled through power supplies into control circuitry, where they interfere with low-current control signals.

  8. Pulse-Width Dependent Radiation Effects on Electronic Components

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    d’un accelerateur lineaire ( LINAC ) a et6 realisee par le CRDO et d’autres groupes. Par contre, l’emploi du LINAC donne normalement des impulsions plus... LINAC ) has been performed by DREO and other groups. However, the use of a LINAC normally entails wider pulses than those expected on the battlefield...nuclear weapon on electronics, an electron linear accelerator ( LINAC ) is often used. The pulse widths available from most LINACs are longer than the

  9. Evolution and diversity of subduction zones controlled by slab width.

    PubMed

    Schellart, W P; Freeman, J; Stegman, D R; Moresi, L; May, D

    2007-03-15

    Subducting slabs provide the main driving force for plate motion and flow in the Earth's mantle, and geodynamic, seismic and geochemical studies offer insight into slab dynamics and subduction-induced flow. Most previous geodynamic studies treat subduction zones as either infinite in trench-parallel extent (that is, two-dimensional) or finite in width but fixed in space. Subduction zones and their associated slabs are, however, limited in lateral extent (250-7,400 km) and their three-dimensional geometry evolves over time. Here we show that slab width controls two first-order features of plate tectonics-the curvature of subduction zones and their tendency to retreat backwards with time. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations of free subduction, we show that trench migration rate is inversely related to slab width and depends on proximity to a lateral slab edge. These results are consistent with retreat velocities observed globally, with maximum velocities (6-16 cm yr(-1)) only observed close to slab edges (<1,200 km), whereas far from edges (>2,000 km) retreat velocities are always slow (<2.0 cm yr(-1)). Models with narrow slabs (< or =1,500 km) retreat fast and develop a curved geometry, concave towards the mantle wedge side. Models with slabs intermediate in width ( approximately 2,000-3,000 km) are sublinear and retreat more slowly. Models with wide slabs (> or =4,000 km) are nearly stationary in the centre and develop a convex geometry, whereas trench retreat increases towards concave-shaped edges. Additionally, we identify periods (5-10 Myr) of slow trench advance at the centre of wide slabs. Such wide-slab behaviour may explain mountain building in the central Andes, as being a consequence of its tectonic setting, far from slab edges.

  10. Comparator threshold settings and the effective pixel width of the PICASSO detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, F. C. M.; Rigon, L.; Fardin, L.; Arfelli, F.; Bergamaschi, A.; Dreossi, D.; Longo, M.; Schmitt, B.; Vallazza, E.; Longo, R.

    2014-05-01

    Charge sharing plays an important role in the performance of single-photon counting microstrip detectors, since the comparator threshold defines the effective pixel width. In this contribution, the PICASSO (Phase Imaging for Clinical Application with Silicon detector and Synchrotron radiatiOn) single-photon counting microstrip detector oriented in edge-on configuration has been used to study its spatial resolution as a function of the comparator threshold. The experiment was carried out with monochromatic x-rays at the SYRMEP beamline of the Elettra synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste (Italy). The Edge Spread Function (i.e. the integral of the Line spread Function, LSF) was measured by horizontally translating vertical slits from a bar-pattern test-object in front of the detector, at four different photon energies (19, 20, 22, and 25 keV) and for several different values of the comparator threshold. The effect of charge sharing between strips on the spatial resolution has been quantified by calculating the horizontal Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). Moreover, the composite LSF from neighboring pixels was obtained: this allowed estimating the optimal threshold for each photon energy by selecting the threshold at which the composite LSF would approach unity along the entire width of the pixel. The results show that at thresholds lower than half of the photon energy, charge sharing increases the effective pixel width, causing a drop of the MTF, and it is responsible for the appearance of peaks in the composite LSF. Conversely, at thresholds higher than half of the photon energy, the effective pixel width is reduced and the spatial resolution is increased, but the collection efficiency is compromised, as demonstrated by the presence of valleys in the composite LSF.

  11. Effects of trigger laser pulse width on the jitter time of GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wei; Gui, Huaimeng; Zhang, Lin; Ma, Cheng; Li, Mengxia; Xu, Ming; Wang, Luyi

    2013-07-01

    The effects of trigger laser pulse width on the jitter time of a GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) is investigated in the experiment. The laser is split into two optical beams by a cross grating to excite two 3 mm gap GaAs PCSSs in parallel at the same time. This work reveals that the jitter time of the GaAs PCSS is reduced as the trigger laser pulse width decreases. Our results overcome a significant obstacle that hinders the testing and theory of GaAs PCSSs in high-time-precision synchronous control.

  12. Predictors of the peak width for networks with exponential links

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Troutman, B.M.; Karlinger, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    We investigate optimal predictors of the peak (S) and distance to peak (T) of the width function of drainage networks under the assumption that the networks are topologically random with independent and exponentially distributed link lengths. Analytical results are derived using the fact that, under these assumptions, the width function is a homogeneous Markov birth-death process. In particular, exact expressions are derived for the asymptotic conditional expectations of S and T given network magnitude N and given mainstream length H. In addition, a simulation study is performed to examine various predictors of S and T, including N, H, and basin morphometric properties; non-asymptotic conditional expectations and variances are estimated. The best single predictor of S is N, of T is H, and of the scaled peak (S divided by the area under the width function) is H. Finally, expressions tested on a set of drainage basins from the state of Wyoming perform reasonably well in predicting S and T despite probable violations of the original assumptions. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag.

  13. A New Measurement of the Pi0 Radiative Decay Width

    SciTech Connect

    Larin, I; Clinton, E; Ambrozewicz, P; Lawrence, D; Nakagawa, I; Prok, Y; Teymurazyan, A; Ahmidouch, A; Baker, K; Benton, L; Bernstein, A M; Burkert, V; Cole, P; Collins, P; Dale, D; Danagoulian, S; Davidenko, G; Demirchyan, R; Deur, A; Dolgolenko, A; Dzyubenko, Georgiy; Ent, R; Evdokimov, A; Feng, J; Gabrielyan, M; Gan, L; Gasparian, A; Gevorkyan, S; Glamazdin, A; Goryachev, V; Gyurjyan, V; Hardy, K; He, J; Ito, M; Jiang, L; Kashy, D; Khandaker, M; Kingsberry, P; Kolarkar, A; Konchatnyi, M; Korsch, W; Kowalski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kubarovsky, V; Li, X; Martel, P; Mecking, B; Milbrath, B; Minehart, R; Miskimen, R; Mochalov, V; Mtingwa, S; Overby, S; Pasyuk, E; Payen, M; Pedroni, R; Ritchie, B; Rodrigues, T E; Salgado, C; Shahinyan, A; Sitnikov, A; Sober, D; Stepanyan, S; Stephens, W; Underwood, J; Vishnyakov, V; Wood, M

    2011-04-01

    High precision measurements of the differential cross sections for $\\pi^0$ photoproduction at forward angles for two nuclei, $^{12}$C and $^{208}$Pb, have been performed for incident photon energies of 4.9 - 5.5 GeV to extract the ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width. The experiment was done at Jefferson Lab using the Hall~B photon tagger and a high-resolution multichannel calorimeter. The ${\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma}$ decay width was extracted by fitting the measured cross sections using recently updated theoretical models for the process. The resulting value for the decay width is $\\Gamma{(\\pi^0 \\to \\gamma\\gamma)} = 7.82 \\pm 0.14 ~({\\rm stat.}) \\pm 0.17 ~({\\rm syst.}) ~{\\rm eV}$. With the 2.8\\% total uncertainty, this result is a factor of 2.5 more precise than the current PDG average of this fundamental quantity and it is consistent with current theoretical predictions.

  14. Axial couplings and strong decay widths of heavy hadrons.

    PubMed

    Detmold, William; Lin, C-J David; Meinel, Stefan

    2012-04-27

    We calculate the axial couplings of mesons and baryons containing a heavy quark in the static limit using lattice QCD. These couplings determine the leading interactions in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory and are central quantities in heavy quark physics, as they control strong decay widths and the light quark mass dependence of heavy hadron observables. Our analysis makes use of lattice data at six different pion masses, 227 MeVwidths with experimental data for Σ(c)(*) decays, we obtain Γ[Σ(b)(*)→Λ(b)π(±)]=4.2(1.0), 4.8(1.1), 7.3(1.6), 7.8(1.8) MeV for the Σ(b)(+), Σ(b)(-), Σ(b)(*+), Σ(b)(*-) initial states, respectively. We also derive upper bounds on the widths of the Ξ(b)(I(*)) baryons.

  15. Quantum corral resonance widths: lossy scattering as acoustics.

    PubMed

    Barr, Matthew C; Zaletel, Michael P; Heller, Eric J

    2010-09-08

    We present an approach to predicting extrinsic electron resonance widths within quantum corral nanostructures based on analogies with acoustics. Established quantum mechanical methods for calculating resonance widths, such as multiple scattering theory, build up the scattering atom by atom, ignoring the structure formed by the atoms, such as walls or enclosures. Conversely, particle-in-a-box models, assuming continuous walls, have long been successful in predicting quantum corral energy levels, but not resonance widths. In acoustics, partial reflection from walls and various enclosures has long been incorporated for determining reverberation times. Pursuing an exact analogy between the local density of states of a quantum corral and the acoustic impedance of a concert hall, we show electron lifetimes in nanoscopic structures of arbitrary convex shape are well accounted for by the Sabine formula for acoustic reverberation times. This provides a particularly compact and intuitive prescription for extrinsic finite lifetimes in a particle-in-a-box with leaky walls, including quantum corral atomic walls, given single particle scattering properties.

  16. Curium-244 alpha-sources for space research

    PubMed

    Radchenko; Andreichikov; Wanke; Gavrilo; Korchuganov; Rieder; Ryabinin; Economou

    2000-10-01

    Special alpha-proton-X-ray spectrometric complexes (APXS) have been developed in order to perform chemical analyses of the Mars atmosphere and rock surface compounds by alpha back-scattering, alpha-proton measurements, and X-ray fluorescence. The sources were prepared by high temperature condensation of metal curium vapour onto silicon substrates. They are silicon disks with curium-244 fixed on their surfaces as a silicide. The sources have overall dimensions as follows: disk diameter 8 mm; thickness 0.3 mm; and 6 mm diameter active spot. The source activities are 5 +/- 1 mCi and the alpha-line half-widths are equal to (1.7-2.5) and (2.9-4.5)% of full width at 10% of Maximum (Maximum is equal to 5.8 MeV). Thermovacuum (from 196 to 1000 degrees C), mechanical, and resource tests were performed and demonstrated that the sources maintained their characteristics. The applicability of the sources for the above-mentioned analytical purposes was confirmed during NASA Mars Pathfinder mission.

  17. Maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width groups

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Alam, Mohammad Khursheed; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the maxillary and mandibular anterior crown width/height ratio and its relation to various arch perimeters, arch length, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups. Materials and Methods: The calculated sample size was 128 subjects. The crown width/height, arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width of the maxilla and mandible were obtained via digital calliper (Mitutoyo, Japan). A total of 4325 variables were measured. The sex differences in the crown width and height were evaluated. Analysis of variance was applied to evaluate the differences between arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups. Results: Males had significantly larger mean values for crown width and height than females (P ≤ 0.05) for maxillary and mandibular arches, both. There were no significant differences observed for the crown width/height ratio in various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width (intercanine, interpremolar, and intermolar) groups (P ≤ 0.05) in maxilla and mandible, both. Conclusions: Our results indicate sexual disparities in the crown width and height. Crown width and height has no significant relation to various arch length, arch perimeter, and arch width groups of maxilla and mandible. Thus, it may be helpful for orthodontic and prosthodontic case investigations and comprehensive management. PMID:26929686

  18. Repair of a Bacterial Small β-Barrel Toxin Pore Depends on Channel Width.

    PubMed

    von Hoven, Gisela; Rivas, Amable J; Neukirch, Claudia; Meyenburg, Martina; Qin, Qianqian; Parekh, Sapun; Hellmann, Nadja; Husmann, Matthias

    2017-02-14

    Membrane repair emerges as an innate defense protecting target cells against bacterial pore-forming toxins. Here, we report the first paradigm of Ca(2+)-dependent repair following attack by a small β-pore-forming toxin, namely, plasmid-encoded phobalysin of Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae In striking contrast, Vibrio cholerae cytolysin, the closest ortholog of phobalysin, subverted repair. Mutational analysis uncovered a role of channel width in toxicity and repair. Thus, the replacement of serine at phobalysin´s presumed channel narrow point with the bulkier tryptophan, the corresponding residue in Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (W318), modulated Ca(2+) influx, lysosomal exocytosis, and membrane repair. And yet, replacing tryptophan (W318) with serine in Vibrio cholerae cytolysin enhanced toxicity. The data reveal divergent strategies evolved by two related small β-pore-forming toxins to manipulate target cells: phobalysin leads to fulminant perturbation of ion concentrations, closely followed by Ca(2+) influx-dependent membrane repair. In contrast, V. cholerae cytolysin causes insidious perturbations and escapes control by the cellular wounded membrane repair-like response.IMPORTANCE Previous studies demonstrated that large transmembrane pores, such as those formed by perforin or bacterial toxins of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin family, trigger rapid, Ca(2+) influx-dependent repair mechanisms. In contrast, recovery from attack by the small β-pore-forming Staphylococcus aureus alpha-toxin or aerolysin is slow in comparison and does not depend on extracellular Ca(2+) To further elucidate the scope of Ca(2+) influx-dependent repair and understand its limitations, we compared the cellular responses to phobalysin and V. cholerae cytolysin, two related small β-pore-forming toxins which create membrane pores of slightly different sizes. The data indicate that the channel width of a small β-pore-forming toxin is a critical determinant of both primary

  19. THE HETDEX PILOT SURVEY. II. THE EVOLUTION OF THE Ly{alpha} ESCAPE FRACTION FROM THE ULTRAVIOLET SLOPE AND LUMINOSITY FUNCTION OF 1.9 < z < 3.8 LAEs

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, Guillermo A.; Adams, Joshua J.; Gebhardt, Karl; Hao Lei; Fry, Alexander B.; Jeong, Donghui; Komatsu, Eiichiro; Murphy, Jeremy D.; Hill, Gary J.; Drory, Niv; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Kelzenberg, Ralf; Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, Caryl; Schneider, Donald P.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Gawiser, Eric; MacQueen, Phillip; Roth, Martin M.

    2011-07-20

    We study the escape of Ly{alpha} photons from Ly{alpha} emitting galaxies (LAEs) and the overall galaxy population using a sample of 99 LAEs at 1.9 < z < 3.8 detected through integral-field spectroscopy of blank fields by The Hobby Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment Pilot Survey. For 89 LAEs with broadband counterparts we measure ultraviolet (UV) luminosities and UV slopes, and estimate E(B - V) under the assumption of a constant intrinsic UV slope for LAEs. These quantities are used to estimate dust-corrected star formation rates (SFRs). Comparison between the observed Ly{alpha} luminosity and that predicted by the dust-corrected SFR yields the Ly{alpha} escape fraction. We also measure the Ly{alpha} luminosity function and luminosity density ({rho}{sub Ly{alpha}}) at 2 < z < 4. Using this and other measurements from the literature at 0.3 < z < 7.7 we trace the redshift evolution of {rho}{sub Ly{alpha}.} We compare it to the expectations from the star formation history of the universe and characterize the evolution of the Ly{alpha} escape fraction of galaxies. LAEs at 2 < z < 4 selected down to a luminosity limit of L(Ly{alpha}) > (3-6) x 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} (0.25-0.5 L*), have a mean (E(B - V)) = 0.13 {+-} 0.01, implying an attenuation of {approx}70% in the UV. They show a median UV uncorrected SFR = 11 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, dust-corrected SFR = 34 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, and Ly{alpha} equivalent widths (EWs) which are consistent with normal stellar populations. We measure a median Ly{alpha} escape fraction of 29%, with a large scatter and values ranging from a few percent to 100%. The Ly{alpha} escape fraction in LAEs correlates with E(B - V) in a way that is expected if Ly{alpha} photons suffer from similar amounts of dust extinction as UV continuum photons. This result implies that a strong enhancement of the Ly{alpha} EW with dust, due to a clumpy multi-phase interstellar medium (ISM), is not a common process in LAEs at these redshifts. It also

  20. Poster — Thur Eve — 02: Measurement of CT radiation profile width using Fuji CR imaging plate raw data

    SciTech Connect

    Bjarnason, T A; Yang, C J

    2014-08-15

    Measuring the CT collimation width and assessing the shape of the overall profile is a relatively straightforward quality control (QC) measure that impacts both image quality and patient dose, and is often required at acceptance and routine testing. Most CT facilities have access to computed radiography (CR) systems, so performing CT collimation profile assessments using CR plates requires no additional equipment. Previous studies have shown how to effectively use CR plates to measure the radiation profile width. However, a major limitation of the previous work is that the full dynamic range of CR detector plates are not used, since the CR processing technology reduces the dynamic range of the DICOM output to 2{sup 10}, requiring the sensitivity and latitude settings of CR reader to be adjusted to prevent clipping of the CT profile data. Such adjustments to CR readers unnecessarily complicate the QC procedure. These clipping artefacts hinder the ability to accurately assess CT collimation width because the full-width at half maximum value of the penumbras are not properly determined if the maximum dose of the profile is not available. Furthermore, any inconsistencies in the radiation profile shape are lost if the profile plateau is clipped off. In this work we developed an opensource Matlab script for straightforward CT profile width measurements using raw CR data that also allows assessment of the profile shape without clipping, and applied this approach during CT QC.

  1. Alpha irradiation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Keeton, S C; Mount, M E

    1999-03-26

    With the end of the Cold War and the associated limitations imposed on the nuclear weapons stockpile by strategic arms treaties, much has changed in the stockpile stewardship program. Weapons that were originally designed for stockpile lives on the order of 15 to 20 years are now being evaluated for much longer periods: in some cases as much as 60 years. As such, issues that were once considered to be of no consequence are being reexamined. Among these is the extent of the radiation dose received by secondary organics over time that results from the intrinsic alpha source of the weapon components. This report describes the results of work performed to estimate the alpha radiation deposition in the organic components of an LLNL system at specific points in its stockpile life. Included are discussions of the development of the intrinsic time- and energy-dependent alpha source term per unit mass, estimation of the effective source and absorber material thicknesses, development of a simplified model for the total intrinsic alpha source term and energy deposition in the absorber, and the alpha radiation deposition in the organic components of a selected LLNL weapon.

  2. Neuroprotection by Alpha 2-Adrenergic Agonists in Cerebral Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yonghua; Kimelberg, Harold K.

    2005-01-01

    Ischemic brain injury is implicated in the pathophysiology of stroke and brain trauma, which are among the top killers worldwide, and intensive studies have been performed to reduce neural cell death after cerebral ischemia. Alpha 2-adrenergic agonists have been shown to improve the histomorphological and neurological outcome after cerebral ischemic injury when administered during ischemia, and recent studies have provided considerable evidence that alpha 2-adrenergic agonists can protect the brain from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Thus, alpha 2-adrenergic agonists are promising potential drugs in preventing cerebral ischemic injury, but the mechanisms by which alpha 2-adrenergic agonists exert their neuroprotective effect are unclear. Activation of both the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor and imidazoline receptor may be involved. This mini review examines the recent progress in alpha 2-adrenergic agonists - induced neuroprotection and its proposed mechanisms in cerebral ischemic injury. PMID:18369397

  3. ALPHA MIS: Reference manual

    SciTech Connect

    Lovin, J.K.; Haese, R.L.; Heatherly, R.D.; Hughes, S.E.; Ishee, J.S.; Pratt, S.M.; Smith, D.W.

    1992-02-01

    ALPHA is a powerful and versatile management information system (MIS) initiated and sponsored and by the Finance and Business Management Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, who maintain and develop it in concert with the Business Systems Division for its Information Center. A general-purpose MIS, ALPHA allows users to access System 1022 and System 1032 databases to obtain and manage information. From a personal computer or a data terminal, Energy Systems employees can use ALPHA to control their own report reprocessing. Using four general commands (Database, Select, Sort, and Report) they can (1) choose a mainframe database, (2) define subsets within it, (3) sequentially order a subset by one or more variables, and (4) generate a report with their own or a canned format.

  4. Defined solid angle alpha counting at NPL.

    PubMed

    Arinc, Arzu; Parfitt, Michael J; Keightley, John D; Wilson, Alan

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes the design of and first measurements with the new defined solid angle (DSA) alpha counter at the National Physical Laboratory, UK, with the aim of enabling high-precision radionuclide standardisations for alpha-emitting radionuclides and half-life measurements. The counter may be employed at three source-detector distances in order to monitor the measured activities with calculated geometrical efficiencies. Initial results are promising but further work is required to reduce the dominant uncertainty associated with the source activity distribution.

  5. Fan-less long range alpha detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-05-10

    A fan-less long range alpha detector is disclosed which operates by using an electrical field between a signal plane and the surface or substance to be monitored for air ions created by collisions with alpha radiation. Without a fan, the detector can operate without the possibility of spreading dust and potential contamination into the atmosphere. A guard plane between the signal plane and the electrically conductive enclosure and maintained at the same voltage as the signal plane, reduces leakage currents. The detector can easily monitor soil, or other solid or liquid surfaces. 2 figures.

  6. Axial couplings and strong decay widths of heavy hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, C.-J. David Lin, Stefan Meinel

    2012-04-01

    We calculate the axial couplings of mesons and baryons containing a heavy quark in the static limit using lattice QCD. These couplings determine the leading interactions in heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory and are central quantities in heavy quark physics, as they control strong decay widths and the light-quark mass dependence of heavy hadron observables. Our analysis makes use of lattice data at six different pion masses, 227 MeV < m{sub {pi}} < 352 MeV, two lattice spacings, a = 0.085, 0.112 fm, and a volume of (2.7 fm){sup 3}. Our results for the axial couplings are g{sub 1} = 0.449(51), g{sub 2} = 0.84(20), and g{sub 3} = 0.71(13), where g{sub 1} governs the interaction between heavy-light mesons and pions and g{sub 2,3} are similar couplings between heavy-light baryons and pions. Using our lattice result for g{sub 3}, and constraining 1/m{sub Q} corrections in the strong decay widths with experimental data for {Sigma}{sub c}{sup (*)} decays, we obtain {Gamma}[{Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)} {yields} {Lambda}{sub b} {pi}{sup {+-}}] = 4.2(1.0), 4.8(1.1), 7.3(1.6), 7.8(1.8) MeV for the {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *+}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup *-} initial states, respectively. We also derive upper bounds on the widths of the {Xi}{sub b}{sup prime(*)} baryons.

  7. Importance of Mean Red Cell Distribution Width in Hypertensive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bilal, Ahmed; Farooq, Junaid H; Assad, Salman; Ghazanfar, Haider; Ahmed, Imran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Red cell distribution width (RDW), expressed in femtoliters (fl), is a measure of the variation in the size of circulating erythrocytes and is often expressed as a direct measurement of the width of the distribution. We aim to observe the mean value of red cell distribution width (RDW) in hypertensive patients. Increased RDW can be used as a tool for early diagnosis, as an inflammatory marker, and a mortality indicator in hypertensive patients due to its close relation to inflammation. Materials and methodology Hypertensive patients who had the condition for more than one year duration, diagnosed according to the Joint National Committee (JNC 7) criteria were subjected to complete blood count and RDW measurement. One hundred patients, aged between 12 years and 65 years were enrolled from the outpatient department of medicine at the Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Results The mean age (± SD) of the patients was 51.48 ± 10.08 years. Out of 100 patients 69% were males whereas 31% were females. The overall frequency of hypertension more than five years was 55% subjects whereas 45% individuals had duration of hypertension less than five years. Mean RDW in females was found to be 49.35±8.42 fl while mean RDW in males was 44.78±7.11 fl. An independent sample t-test was applied to assess if there was any significant difference between age and gender. No significant difference between age and gender was found (p<0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to assess any association of RDW with gender. RDW values in females was found to be statistically significantly higher than in males (U=603, p=0.01). Linear regression showed that mean RDW value increased with increasing age (P <0.001). Conclusions A significant number of patients with hypertension have increased levels of RDW. Therefore, it is recommended that serum RDW should be checked regularly in patients with hypertension. PMID:28070471

  8. The width of the plateaus of the quantum Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groshev, Atanas; Scho¨n, Gerd

    1994-02-01

    We suggest that in high quality samples in the quantum Hall regime the interaction between localized states dominates over disorder effects. It leads to the formation of a Wigner crystal, which melts at a critical value ν c≈0.2 of the filling factor of the localized states. This leads to a finite width of the plateaus of the integer quantum Hall effect Δν=2ν c. This result describes well recent experimental data on single AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunctions (electron and hole gases) and double 2DEG systems.

  9. Leptonic partial widths of the excited {psi} states

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, X. H.; Yuan, C. Z.; Wang, P.

    2010-10-01

    The resonance parameters of the excited {psi}-family resonances, namely, the {psi}(4040), {psi}(4160), and {psi}(4415), were determined by fitting the R values measured by experiments. It is found that the previously reported leptonic partial widths of these states were merely one possible solution among a four-fold ambiguity. By fitting the most precise experimental data on the R values measured by the BES collaboration, this work presents all four sets of solutions. These results may affect the interpretation of the charmonium and charmonium-like states above 4 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  10. On the width of Σ hypernuclei and Σ- atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, R.; Oset, E.

    1982-12-01

    The self-energy of a Σ particle in symmetric nuclear matter is investigated by using a boson exchange model for the ΣN interaction. The imaginary part of the self-energy is shown to be strongly density dependent and has saturation properties around ϱ ≌ 0.7 ϱo. This peculiar feature allows our results to be in good agreement with the Σ atom data while simultaneously providing a width of about 5 Mev or smaller for all nuclei and different states. Permanent address: Departamento de Física Atómica y Nuclear, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain.

  11. What sets the line widths in tidal disruption events?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Nathaniel; Kasen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The optical and UV spectra of flares from the tidal disruption of stars by massive black holes (TDEs) vary greatly between individual events. In particular, the line widths can differ by at least a factor of five even for events with similar values inferred for the black hole mass. Additionally, the lines narrow over time in some events, and this detail has proven difficult to explain based on hydrodynamical modeling. We present radiative transfer calculations to help understand these aspects of line formation from TDEs, with a focus on the role of electron scattering in both static and outflowing reprocessing envelopes.

  12. Excitation-energy dependence of the giant dipole resonance width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, G.; Berg, F. D.; Hagel, K.; Kühn, W.; Metag, V.; Novotny, R.; Pfeiffer, M.; Schwalb, O.; Charity, R. J.; Gobbi, A.; Freifelder, R.; Henning, W.; Hildenbrand, K. D.; Holzmann, R.; Mayer, R. S.; Simon, R. S.; Wessels, J. P.; Casini, G.; Olmi, A.; Stefanini, A. A.

    1992-07-01

    High-energy γ rays have been measured in coincidence with heavy fragents in deeply inelastic reactions of 136Xe+48Ti at 18.5 MeV/nucleon. The giant dipole resonance (GDR) strength function is deduced from an analysis of the photon spectra within the statistical model. The GDR width Γ is studied as a function of the fragment excitation energy E*. A saturation at about Γ=10 MeV is observed for E*/A>=1.0 MeV/nucleon.

  13. Effect of stance width on multidirectional postural responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, S. M.; Fung, J.; Horak, F. B.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The effect of stance width on postural responses to 12 different directions of surface translations was examined. Postural responses were characterized by recording 11 lower limb and trunk muscles, body kinematics, and forces exerted under each foot of 7 healthy subjects while they were subjected to horizontal surface translations in 12 different, randomly presented directions. A quasi-static approach of force analysis was done, examining force integrals in three different epochs (background, passive, and active periods). The latency and amplitude of muscle responses were quantified for each direction, and muscle tuning curves were used to determine the spatial activation patterns for each muscle. The results demonstrate that the horizontal force constraint exerted at the ground was lessened in the wide, compared with narrow, stance for humans, a similar finding to that reported by Macpherson for cats. Despite more trunk displacement in narrow stance, there were no significant changes in body center of mass (CoM) displacement due to large changes in center of pressure (CoP), especially in response to lateral translations. Electromyographic (EMG) magnitude decreased for all directions in wide stance, particularly for the more proximal muscles, whereas latencies remained the same from narrow to wide stance. Equilibrium control in narrow stance was more of an active postural strategy that included regulating the loading/unloading of the limbs and the direction of horizontal force vectors. In wide stance, equilibrium control relied more on an increase in passive stiffness resulting from changes in limb geometry. The selective latency modulation of the proximal muscles with translation direction suggests that the trunk was being actively controlled in all directions. The similar EMG latencies for both narrow and wide stance, with modulation of only the muscle activation magnitude as stance width changed, suggest that the same postural synergy was only slightly modified

  14. Width of the confining string in Yang-Mills theory.

    PubMed

    Gliozzi, F; Pepe, M; Wiese, U-J

    2010-06-11

    We investigate the transverse fluctuations of the confining string connecting two static quarks in (2+1)D SU(2) Yang-Mills theory using Monte Carlo calculations. The exponentially suppressed signal is extracted from the large noise by a very efficient multilevel algorithm. The resulting width of the string increases logarithmically with the distance between the static quark charges. Corrections at intermediate distances due to universal higher-order terms in the effective string action are calculated analytically. They accurately fit the numerical data.

  15. Microsecond pulse width, intense, light-ion beam accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rej, D. J.; Bartsch, R. R.; Davis, H. A.; Faehl, R. J.; Greenly, J. B.; Waganaar, W. J.

    1993-10-01

    A relatively long-pulse width (0.1-1 μs) intense ion beam accelerator has been built for materials processing applications. An applied Br, magnetically insulated extraction ion diode with dielectric flashover ion source is installed directly onto the output of a 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Marx generator. The diode is designed with the aid of multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations. Initial operation of the accelerator at 0.4 MV indicates satisfactory performance without the need for additional pulse shaping. The effect of a plasma opening switch on diode behavior is considered.

  16. Total width of 125 GeV Higgs boson.

    PubMed

    Barger, Vernon; Ishida, Muneyuki; Keung, Wai-Yee

    2012-06-29

    By using the LHC and Tevatron measurements of the cross sections to various decay channels relative to the standard model Higgs boson, the total width of the putative 125 GeV Higgs boson is determined as 6.1(-2.9)(+7.7) MeV. We describe a way to estimate the branching fraction for the Higgs-boson decay to dark matter. We also discuss a no-go theorem for the γγ signal of the Higgs boson at the LHC.

  17. Molecular basis of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and emphysema associated with the alpha 1-antitrypsin Mmineral springs allele.

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, D T; Vogelmeier, C; Hubbard, R C; Stier, L E; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    springs alpha 1AT cDNA and expressing comparable levels of human alpha 1AT mRNA transcripts. Pulse-chase labeling of these cells with [35S]methionine demonstrated less secretion of human alpha 1AT from the Mmineral springs cells than from the M1 cells, and evaluation of cell lysates also demonstrated lower amounts of intracellular human alpha 1AT in the Mmineral springs cells than in the normal M1 control cells. Thus, the Gly-67 --> Glu mutation that characterizes Mmineral springs causes reduced alpha 1AT secretion on the basis of aberrant posttranslational alpha 1AT biosynthesis by a mechanism distinct from that associated with the alpha 1AT Z allele, whereby intracellular aggregation of the mutant protein is etiologic of the alpha 1AT-secretory defect. Furthermore, for the alpha 1AT protein that does reach the circulation, this mutation markedly affects the ability of the molecule to inhibit neutrophil elastase; i.e., the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs allele predisposes to emphysema on the basis of serum apha 1AT deficiency coupled with alpha AT dysfunction. Images PMID:1967187

  18. Alpha Trianguli Australis (K2 II-III) - Hybrid or composite?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayres, T. R.

    1985-01-01

    The prototype hybrid-spectrum giant Alpha Trianguli Australis exhibits a far-ultraviolet continuum which is considerably bluer than would be expected of a star of its optical colors, suggesting the presence of a previously unrecognized companion. If the K-type primary is as luminous as indicated by the widths of its Ca II and H-alpha lines, the companion could be an early F-type dwarf that only recently has arrived on the main sequence. Indeed, the flux of C IV from Alpha TrA - an important measure of hybridness - would not be inconsistent with that expected from a very young chromospherically active F star.

  19. Stark broadening for diagnostics of the electron density in non-equilibrium plasma utilizing isotope hydrogen alpha lines

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Lin; Tan, Xiaohua; Wan, Xiang; Chen, Lei; Jin, Dazhi; Qian, Muyang; Li, Gongping

    2014-04-28

    Two Stark broadening parameters including FWHM (full width at half maximum) and FWHA (full width at half area) of isotope hydrogen alpha lines are simultaneously introduced to determine the electron density of a pulsed vacuum arc jet. To estimate the gas temperature, the rotational temperature of the C{sub 2} Swan system is fit to 2500 ± 100 K. A modified Boltzmann-plot method with b{sub i}-factor is introduced to determine the modified electron temperature. The comparison between results of atomic and ionic lines indicates the jet is in partial local thermodynamic equilibrium and the electron temperature is close to 13 000 ± 400 K. Based on the computational results of Gig-Card calculation, a simple and precise interpolation algorithm for the discrete-points tables can be constructed to obtain the traditional n{sub e}-T{sub e} diagnostic maps of two Stark broadening parameters. The results from FWHA formula by the direct use of FWHM = FWHA and these from the diagnostic map are different. It can be attributed to the imprecise FWHA formula form and the deviation between FWHM and FWHA. The variation of the reduced mass pair due to the non-equilibrium effect contributes to the difference of the results derived from two hydrogen isotope alpha lines. Based on the Stark broadening analysis in this work, a corrected method is set up to determine n{sub e} of (1.10 ± 0.08) × 10{sup 21} m{sup −3}, the reference reduced mass μ{sub 0} pair of (3.30 ± 0.82 and 1.65 ± 0.41), and the ion kinetic temperature of 7900 ± 1800 K.

  20. Drift-based scrape-off particle width in X-point geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiser, D.; Eich, T.

    2017-04-01

    The Goldston heuristic estimate of the scrape-off layer width (Goldston 2012 Nucl. Fusion 52 013009) is reconsidered using a fluid description for the plasma dynamics. The basic ingredient is the inclusion of a compressible diamagnetic drift for the particle cross field transport. Instead of testing the heuristic model in a sophisticated numerical simulation including several physical mechanisms working together, the purpose of this work is to point out basic consequences for a drift-dominated cross field transport using a reduced fluid model. To evaluate the model equations and prepare them for subsequent numerical solution a specific analytical model for 2D magnetic field configurations with X-points is employed. In a first step parameter scans in high-resolution grids for isothermal plasmas are done to assess the basic formulas of the heuristic model with respect to the functional dependence of the scrape-off width on the poloidal magnetic field and plasma temperature. Particular features in the 2D-fluid calculations—especially the appearance of supersonic parallel flows and shock wave like bifurcational jumps—are discussed and can be understood partly in the framework of a reduced 1D model. The resulting semi-analytical findings might give hints for experimental proof and implementation in more elaborated fluid simulations.

  1. Microdosimetry for targeted alpha therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Guatelli, Susanna; Oborn, Bradley M; Allen, Barry J

    2012-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) has the advantage of delivering therapeutic doses to individual cancer cells while reducing the dose to normal tissues. TAT applications relate to hematologic malignancies and now extend to solid tumors. Results from several clinical trials have shown efficacy with limited toxicity. However, the dosimetry for the labeled alpha particle is challenging because of the heterogeneous antigen expression among cancer cells and the nature of short-range, high-LET alpha radiation. This paper demonstrates that it is inappropriate to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of TAT by macrodosimetry. The objective of this work is to review the microdosimetry of TAT as a function of the cell geometry, source-target configuration, cell sensitivity, and biological factors. A detailed knowledge of each of these parameters is required for accurate microdosimetric calculations.

  2. Microdosimetry for Targeted Alpha Therapy of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Guatelli, Susanna; Oborn, Bradley M.; Allen, Barry J.

    2012-01-01

    Targeted alpha therapy (TAT) has the advantage of delivering therapeutic doses to individual cancer cells while reducing the dose to normal tissues. TAT applications relate to hematologic malignancies and now extend to solid tumors. Results from several clinical trials have shown efficacy with limited toxicity. However, the dosimetry for the labeled alpha particle is challenging because of the heterogeneous antigen expression among cancer cells and the nature of short-range, high-LET alpha radiation. This paper demonstrates that it is inappropriate to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of TAT by macrodosimetry. The objective of this work is to review the microdosimetry of TAT as a function of the cell geometry, source-target configuration, cell sensitivity, and biological factors. A detailed knowledge of each of these parameters is required for accurate microdosimetric calculations. PMID:22988479

  3. Direct top-quark width measurement at CDF.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T

    2010-12-03

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width in the lepton+jets decay channel of tt events produced in p p collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb(-1) of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of the hadronically decaying W boson that comes from the top-quark decay are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths (Γ(t)) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale (Δ(JES)) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where Δ(JES) is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of Γ(t) <7.6 GeV and a two-sided 68% CL interval of 0.3 GeV <Γ(t) <4.4  GeV for a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c(2), which are consistent with the standard model prediction.

  4. Origin of multiple band gap values in single width nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Deepika; Kumar, Shailesh; Shukla, Alok; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-11-01

    Deterministic band gap in quasi-one-dimensional nanoribbons is prerequisite for their integrated functionalities in high performance molecular-electronics based devices. However, multiple band gaps commonly observed in graphene nanoribbons of the same width, fabricated in same slot of experiments, remain unresolved, and raise a critical concern over scalable production of pristine and/or hetero-structure nanoribbons with deterministic properties and functionalities for plethora of applications. Here, we show that a modification in the depth of potential wells in the periodic direction of a supercell on relative shifting of passivating atoms at the edges is the origin of multiple band gap values in nanoribbons of the same width in a crystallographic orientation, although they carry practically the same ground state energy. The results are similar when calculations are extended from planar graphene to buckled silicene nanoribbons. Thus, the findings facilitate tuning of the electronic properties of quasi-one-dimensional materials such as bio-molecular chains, organic and inorganic nanoribbons by performing edge engineering.

  5. Origin of multiple band gap values in single width nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Goyal, Deepika; Kumar, Shailesh; Shukla, Alok; Kumar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Deterministic band gap in quasi-one-dimensional nanoribbons is prerequisite for their integrated functionalities in high performance molecular-electronics based devices. However, multiple band gaps commonly observed in graphene nanoribbons of the same width, fabricated in same slot of experiments, remain unresolved, and raise a critical concern over scalable production of pristine and/or hetero-structure nanoribbons with deterministic properties and functionalities for plethora of applications. Here, we show that a modification in the depth of potential wells in the periodic direction of a supercell on relative shifting of passivating atoms at the edges is the origin of multiple band gap values in nanoribbons of the same width in a crystallographic orientation, although they carry practically the same ground state energy. The results are similar when calculations are extended from planar graphene to buckled silicene nanoribbons. Thus, the findings facilitate tuning of the electronic properties of quasi-one-dimensional materials such as bio-molecular chains, organic and inorganic nanoribbons by performing edge engineering. PMID:27808172

  6. Multifractal diffusion entropy analysis: Optimal bin width of probability histograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jizba, Petr; Korbel, Jan

    2014-11-01

    In the framework of Multifractal Diffusion Entropy Analysis we propose a method for choosing an optimal bin-width in histograms generated from underlying probability distributions of interest. The method presented uses techniques of Rényi’s entropy and the mean squared error analysis to discuss the conditions under which the error in the multifractal spectrum estimation is minimal. We illustrate the utility of our approach by focusing on a scaling behavior of financial time series. In particular, we analyze the S&P500 stock index as sampled at a daily rate in the time period 1950-2013. In order to demonstrate a strength of the method proposed we compare the multifractal δ-spectrum for various bin-widths and show the robustness of the method, especially for large values of q. For such values, other methods in use, e.g., those based on moment estimation, tend to fail for heavy-tailed data or data with long correlations. Connection between the δ-spectrum and Rényi’s q parameter is also discussed and elucidated on a simple example of multiscale time series.

  7. Determination of the width of the top quark

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Nijmegen U.

    2010-09-01

    We extract the total width of the top quark, {Lambda}{sub t}, from the partial decay width {Lambda}(t {yields} Wb) measured using the t-channel cross section for single top quark production and from the branching fraction B(t {yields} Wb) measured in t{bar t} events using up to 2.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 Collaboration at the Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The result is {Lambda}{sub t} = 1.99{sub -0.55}{sup +0.69} GeV, which translates to a top-quark lifetime of {tau}{sub t} = (3.3{sub -0.9}{sup +1.3}) x 10{sup -25} s. Assuming a high mass fourth generation b{prime} quark and unitarity of the four-generation quark-mixing matrix, we set the first upper limit on |V{sub tb{prime}}| < 0.63 at 95% C.L.

  8. Zero-width resonances in intense-field molecular photodissociation

    SciTech Connect

    Atabek, Osman; Lefebvre, Roland; Gadea, Florent Xavier

    2006-12-15

    We provide additional evidence for the existence of zero-width resonances in the intense-field photodissociation of H{sub 2}{sup +}. In a previous investigation [Atabek, Chrysos, and Lefebvre, Phys. Rev. A 49, R8 (1994)] the situation, in a two-channel dressed picture, corresponded to a diabatic crossing point classically reachable in both adiabatic potentials. A semiclassical explanation could be modeled after that developed for predissociation in the intermediate-coupling regime. At higher frequencies the crossing point lies between the two turning points. A numerical study shows that zero-width resonances exist also in such a case. An extension of the semiclassical approach provides an explanation for the occurrence of these resonances. It is shown that they survive even when going to a multichannel description. The associated wave functions and probability densities are studied: they are very similar to those of the upper adiabatic potential, with a minor component in the lower adiabatic channel. Some conditions for the production of such long-lived dressed molecular species are stated.

  9. Baryon Masses and Hadronic Decay Widths with Explicit Pionic Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. A.; Canton, L.; Plessas, W.; Schweiger, W.

    2017-03-01

    We report results from studies of baryon ground and resonant states by taking explicit mesonic degrees of freedom into account. We are following a relativistic coupled-channels approach relying on a Poincaré-invariant mass operator in matrix form. Generally, it corresponds to a bare particle that is coupled to a number of further mesonic channels. Here we present results, where the bare particle is either a bare nucleon or a bare Delta coupled to pion-nucleon and pion-Delta channels, respectively. For the pion-baryon vertices we employ coupling constants and form factors from different models in the literature. From the mass-operator eigenvalue equation we obtain the pion-dressing effects on the nucleon mass as well as the mass and pion-decay width of the Delta. The dressed masses become smaller than the bare ones, and a finite width of the Delta is naturally generated. The results are relevant for the construction of constituent-quark models for baryons, which have so far not included explicit mesonic degrees of freedom, but have rather relied on three-quark configurations only.

  10. A New Method for Line Width Roughness Mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayya, K. Subramanya; Yool, Kang; Kim, Hochul; Cho, Han-Ku

    2011-06-01

    Demands of the continuous downscaling of device size impose stringent requirements on the RLS trade-off (R: resolution, L: line width roughness and S: sensitivity). Among the above, line width roughness (LWR) has to be controlled below 10% of critical dimensions (CD). While significant improvement in R&S was achieved, LWR has been relatively high for extreme ultra-violet lithography resists. Herein, we provide a new method for LWR mitigation that overcomes several shortcomings of previously known methods. Our new method is based on a double development method wherein, a polymeric solution in developer is coated on to the patterned surface. The wafer is then subjected to the standard development step during which LWR improvement is affected. In this paper we discuss the hypothesis of our method and provide relevant data to understand the conditions under which LWR improvement is observed. Effect of polymer/developer concentration ratio, solid content and bake temperatures will be discussed. Also, our method will be compared with currently available methods for LWR improvement on pattern transfer.

  11. Longitudinal wave motion in width-constrained auxetic plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Teik-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the longitudinal wave velocity in auxetic plates in comparison to conventional ones, in which the plate is constrained from motion in the width direction. By taking into account the thickness change of the plate and its corresponding change in density, the developed wave velocity is casted not only as a function of Young’s modulus and density, but also in terms of Poisson’s ratio and longitudinal strain. Results show that density and thickness variations compensate for one another when the Poisson’s ratio is positive, but add up when the Poisson’s ratio is negative. Results also reveal that the classical model of longitudinal wave velocity for the plate is accurate when the Poisson’s ratio is about 1/3; at this Poisson’s ratio the influence from density and thickness variations cancel each other. Comparison between the current corrected model and the density-corrected Rayleigh-Lamb model reveals a number of consistent trends, while the discrepancies are elucidated. If the plate material possesses a negative Poisson’s ratio, the deviation of the actual wave velocity from the classical model becomes significant; auxeticity suppresses and enhances the wave velocity in compressive and tensile impacts, respectively. Hence the use of the corrected model is proposed when predicting longitudinal waves in width-constrained auxetic plates, and auxetic materials can be harnessed for effectively controlling wave velocities in thin-walled structures.

  12. Fractal Reference Signals in Pulse-Width Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lurie, Boris; Lurie, Helen

    2005-01-01

    A report proposes the use of waveforms having fractal shapes reminiscent of sawteeth (in contradistinction to conventional regular sawtooth waveforms) as reference signals for pulse-width modulation in control systems for thrusters of spacecraft flying in formation. Fractal reference signals may also be attractive in some terrestrial control systems - especially those in which pulse-width modulation is used for precise control of electric motors. The report asserts that the use of fractal reference signals would enable the synchronous control of several variables of a spacecraft formation, such that consumption of propellant would be minimized, intervals between thruster firings would be long (as preferred for performing scientific observations), and delays in controlling large-thrust maneuvers for retargeting would be minimized. The report further asserts that whereas different controllers would be needed for different modes of operation if conventional pulsewidth modulation were used, the use of fractal reference signals would enable the same controller to function nearly optimally in all regimes of operation, so that only this one controller would be needed.

  13. Bang Time and Burn Width Analysis at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grafil, E.; Herrmann, H. W.; Stoeffl, W.; Kim, Y.; Hoffman, N. M.; Young, C. S.; Mack, J. M.; Watts, P. W.; Carpenter, A. C.; Church, J.; Bernstein, L.; Liebman, J.; Rubery, M.; Horsefield, C. J.; Miller, E. K.

    2011-10-01

    The time of peak fusion reactivity with respect to the impingement of laser light on an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule is known as Nuclear Bang Time (BT). The width of this peak is the Nuclear Burn Width (BW). Accurately measuring BT & BW is essential for constraining hydrodynamic simulations as it is a measure of energy coupling to the target. BT & BW measurements have been performed using a variety of instruments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic is designed to measure fusion gamma-rays in determining BT & BW to within 30 ps precision and accuracy. The GRH consists of four Gas Cherenkov Detectors having variable energy-thresholding capability. For BT measurements, the threshold is typically set >8 MeV so as to isolate DT fusion gamma-rays at 16.75 MeV while thresholding out the lower energy (n,n') gammas. The GRH experimental setup, data and comparison to BT & BW from other diagnostics methods are presented. U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-480419.

  14. The precursory fault width formation of large earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Fumihide; Takeo, Makoto

    2010-03-01

    We collect earthquake (EQ) events for a region of about 5 degree mesh from a focus catalog of Japan with a regionally dependent magnitude window of M >= 3-3.5. The time history of the events draws a zigzagged trajectory in a five dimensional space of EQ epicenter, focal depth (DEP), inter-event interval (INT), and magnitude (MAG). Its components are the time series of the EQ source parameters for which time is the chronological event index. Each series has long-term memory and evidence of deterministic chaos. We thus use physical wavelets (P-Ws) to find the process producing large EQs. The P-Ws convert the moving-average of each series, its first and second order differences at any interval into the displacement, velocity and acceleration (A) in selective frequency region, respectively. The process starts with two unique different triple phase couplings of A on source parameters DEP, INT, and MAG, precursory to every large EQ's (M > about 6) throughout Japan. Each coupling then creates a linear DEP variation (W) on its series, which becomes comparable to the fault width of large EQ's. It suggests that the variation exerts the corresponding shear stress on a local plane in Earth's crust to form the fault plane of width W, rupturing a large EQ.

  15. From Alpha to Omega

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czaja, Paul Clement

    2006-01-01

    The Alpha point of the authors' life as a Montessori educator began in 1959, when he was a graduate student studying philosophy at Fordham University in the Bronx, New York. While studying the works of the great American philosopher William James, the author came across the writings of Maria Montessori and immediately became captivated by her…

  16. [alpha]-Oxocarboxylic Acids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerber, Robert C.; Fernando, Marian S.

    2010-01-01

    Several [alpha]-oxocarboxylic acids play key roles in metabolism in plants and animals. However, there are inconsistencies between the structures as commonly portrayed and the reported acid ionization constants, which result because the acids are predominantly hydrated in aqueous solution; that is, the predominant form is RC(OH)[subscript 2]COOH…

  17. Radial-velocity variations in Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco, and Alpha Her

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M.A.; Patten, B.M.; Goldberg, L. Computer Sciences Corp., Seabrook, MD Iowa State Univ., Ames )

    1989-12-01

    Radial-velocity observations of Alpha Ori, Alpha Sco A, and Alpha Her A are used to study radial-velocity periodicities in M supergiants. The data refer to several metallic lines in the H-alpha region and to H-alpha itself. It is shown that Alpha Ori and Alpha Sco A have cycle lengths of about 1 yr and semiamplitudes of 2 km/s. It is suggested that many semiregular red supergiant varibles such as Alpha Ori may be heading toward chaos. All three stars show short-term stochastic flucutations with an amplitude of 1-2 km/s. It is found that the long-term variability of H-alpha velocities may be a consequence of intermittent failed ejections. 58 refs.

  18. G alpha12 is targeted to the mitochondria and affects mitochondrial morphology and motility.

    PubMed

    Andreeva, Alexandra V; Kutuzov, Mikhail A; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana A

    2008-08-01

    G alpha12 constitutes, along with G alpha13, one of the four families of alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. We found that the N terminus of G alpha12, but not those of other G alpha subunits, contains a predicted mitochondrial targeting sequence. Using confocal microscopy and cell fractionation, we demonstrated that up to 40% of endogenous G alpha12 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells colocalize with mitochondrial markers. N-terminal sequence of G alpha12 fused to GFP efficiently targeted the fusion protein to mitochondria. G alpha12 with mutated mitochondrial targeting sequence was still located in mitochondria, suggesting the existence of additional mechanisms for mitochondrial localization. Lysophosphatidic acid, one of the known stimuli transduced by G alpha12/13, inhibited mitochondrial motility, while depletion of endogenous G alpha12 increased mitochondrial motility. G alpha12Q229L variants uncoupled from RhoGEFs (but not fully functional activated G alpha12Q229L) induced transformation of the mitochondrial network into punctate mitochondria and resulted in a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential. All examined G alpha12Q229L variants reduced phosphorylation of Bcl-2 at Ser-70, while only mutants unable to bind RhoGEFs also decreased cellular levels of Bcl-2. These G alpha12 mutants were also more efficient Hsp90 interactors. These findings are the first demonstration of a heterotrimeric G protein alpha subunit specifically targeted to mitochondria and involved in the control of mitochondrial morphology and dynamics.

  19. AKAP 18 alpha and gamma have opposing effects on insulin release in INS-1E cells.

    PubMed

    Josefsen, Knud; Lee, Ying C; Thams, Peter; Efendic, Suad; Nielsen, Jens H

    2010-01-04

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are known to compartmentalise protein kinase(s) to discrete cellular locations. Here we show that silencing of AKAP 18 alpha or gamma expression results in decreased or increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in INS-1E cells. Glucose stimulates AKAP 18 alpha and inhibits AKAP 18 gamma mRNA expressions while palmitate markedly reduces AKAP 18 alpha expression. Human growth hormone (GH) stimulates AKAP 18 alpha expression and attenuates palmitate-induced suppression of AKAP 18 alpha mRNA level. The roles of AKAP 18 alpha and gamma in mediating insulin release are consistent with their respective regulations by glucose.

  20. Production of glycosylated physiologically "normal" human alpha 1-antitrypsin by mouse fibroblasts modified by insertion of a human alpha 1-antitrypsin cDNA using a retroviral vector.

    PubMed Central

    Garver, R I; Chytil, A; Karlsson, S; Fells, G A; Brantly, M L; Courtney, M; Kantoff, P W; Nienhuis, A W; Anderson, W F; Crystal, R G

    1987-01-01

    Alpha 1-Antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder characterized by reduced serum levels of alpha 1AT, resulting in destruction of the lower respiratory tract by neutrophil elastase. As an approach to augment alpha 1AT levels in this disorder with physiologically normal human alpha 1AT, we have integrated a full-length normal human alpha 1AT cDNA into the genome of mouse fibroblasts. To accomplish this, the retroviral vector N2 was modified by inserting the simian virus 40 early promoter followed by the alpha 1AT cDNA. Southern analysis demonstrated that the intact cDNA was present in the genome of selected clones of the transfected murine fibroblasts psi 2 and infected NIH 3T3. The clones produced three mRNA transcripts (5.8, 4.8, and 2.4 kilobases) containing human alpha 1AT sequences, secreted an alpha 1AT molecule recognized by an anti-human alpha 1AT antibody, with the same molecular mass (52 kDa) as normal human alpha 1AT and that complexed with and inhibited human neutrophil elastase. The psi 2 produced alpha 1AT was glycosylated, and when infused intravenously into mice, it had a serum half-life similar to normal alpha 1AT purified from human plasma and markedly longer than that of nonglycosylated human alpha 1AT cDNA-directed yeast-produced alpha 1AT. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using a retroviral vector to insert the normal human alpha 1AT cDNA into non-alpha 1AT-producing cells, resulting in the synthesis and secretion of physiologically "normal" human alpha 1AT. Images PMID:3029759

  1. Numerical investigation of edge plasma phenomena in an enhanced D-alpha discharge at Alcator C-Mod: Parallel heat flux and quasi-coherent edge oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, D. A.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L.; Zweben, S. J.

    2012-08-15

    Reduced-model scrape-off layer turbulence (SOLT) simulations of an enhanced D-alpha (EDA) H-mode shot observed in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak were conducted to compare with observed variations in the scrape-off-layer (SOL) width of the parallel heat flux profile. In particular, the role of the competition between sheath- and conduction-limited parallel heat fluxes in determining that width was studied for the turbulent SOL plasma that emerged from the simulations. The SOL width decreases with increasing input power and with increasing separatrix temperature in both the experiment and the simulation, consistent with the strong temperature dependence of the parallel heat flux in balance with the perpendicular transport by turbulence and blobs. The particularly strong temperature dependence observed in the case analyzed is attributed to the fact that these simulations produce SOL plasmas which are in the conduction-limited regime for the parallel heat flux. A persistent quasi-coherent (QC) mode dominates the SOLT simulations and bears considerable resemblance to the QC mode observed in C-Mod EDA operation. The SOLT QC mode consists of nonlinearly saturated wave-fronts located just inside the separatrix that are convected poloidally by the mean flow, continuously transporting particles and energy and intermittently emitting blobs into the SOL.

  2. Dietary supplementation with a combination of alpha-lipoic acid, acetyl-L-carnitine, glycerophosphocoline, docosahexaenoic acid, and phosphatidylserine reduces oxidative damage to murine brain and improves cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Suchy, James; Chan, Amy; Shea, Thomas B

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease has a complex etiology composed of nutritional and genetic risk factors and predispositions. Moreover, genetic risk factors for cognitive decline may remain latent pending age-related decline in nutrition, suggesting the potential importance of early nutritional intervention, including preventative approaches. We hypothesized that a combination of multiple nutritional additives may be able to provide neuroprotection. We demonstrate herein that dietary supplementation with a mixture of ALA, ALCAR, GPC, DHA, and PS reduced reactive oxygen species in normal mice by 57% and prevented the increase in reactive oxygen species normally observed in mice lacking murine ApoE when maintained on a vitamin-free, iron-enriched, oxidative-challenge diet. We further demonstrate that supplementation with these agents prevented the marked cognitive decline otherwise observed in normal mice maintained on this challenge diet. These findings add to the growing body of research indicating that key dietary supplementation may delay the progression of age-related cognitive decline.

  3. ENMD-1198, a novel tubulin-binding agent reduces HIF-1alpha and STAT3 activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma(HCC) cells, and inhibits growth and vascularization in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Christian; Lang, Sven A; Mori, Akira; Hellerbrand, Claus; Schlitt, Hans J; Geissler, Edward K; Fogler, William E; Stoeltzing, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) represents a highly vascularized tumor entity and the process of angiogenesis is essential for the growth of HCC. Importantly, the pro-angiogenic transcription factors HIF-1α and STAT3 have been implicated in HCC progression, thus representing interesting targets for molecular targeted therapy. We hypothesized that therapeutic inhibition of HIF-1α could be achieved by using a novel tubulin-binding agent (ENMD-1198). ENMD-1198 is an analog of 2-methoxyestradiol (2ME2) with antiproliferative and antiangiogenic activity. Methods The human HCC cell lines HUH-7 and HepG2 were used for experiments. Effects of ENMD-1198 on constitutive and inducible (hypoxia, growth factors) activation of signaling cascades, including HIF-1α and STAT3, were investigated by Western blotting. Changes in VEGF expression were determined by real-time PCR. Effects of ENMD-1198 on cancer cell migration and invasion were evaluated in in vitro-assays. The growth-inhibitory effects of ENMD-1198 (200 mg/kg/day) were determined in a subcutaneous tumor model (HUH-7). Results ENMD-1198 inhibited the phosphorylation of MAPK/Erk, PI-3K/Akt and FAK. Moreover, activation of HIF-1α and STAT3 was dramatically reduced by ENMD-1198, which resulted in lower VEGF mRNA expression (P < 0.05). In addition, tumor cell migratory and invasive properties were significantly inhibited (P < 0.05, for both). In vivo, treatment with ENMD-1198 led to a significant reduction in tumor growth, tumor vascularization, and numbers of proliferating tumor cells (P < 0.05 for all). Conclusion The novel microtubule destabilizing agent ENMD-1198 is suitable for inhibiting HIF-1α and STAT3 in human HCC cells and leads to reduced tumor growth and vascularization in vivo. Hence, inhibition of HIF-1α and STAT3 could prove valuable for therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:18651980

  4. Prostate formation in a marsupial is mediated by the testicular androgen 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G; Renfree, M B; Leihy, M W; Shackleton, C H; Roitman, E; Wilson, J D

    2000-10-24

    Development of the male urogenital tract in mammals is mediated by testicular androgens. It has been tacitly assumed that testosterone acts through its intracellular metabolite dihydrotestosterone (DHT) to mediate this process, but levels of these androgens are not sexually dimorphic in plasma at the time of prostate development. Here we show that the 3 alpha-reduced derivative of DHT, 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol (5 alpha-adiol), is formed in testes of tammar wallaby pouch young and is higher in male than in female plasma in this species during early sexual differentiation. Administration of 5 alpha-adiol caused formation of prostatic buds in female wallaby pouch young, and in tissue minces of urogenital sinus and urogenital tubercle radioactive 5 alpha-adiol was converted to DHT, suggesting that circulating 5 alpha-adiol acts through DHT in target tissues. We conclude that circulating 5 alpha-adiol is a key hormone in male development.

  5. Summary of Alpha Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1998-08-19

    This paper summarizes the talks on alpha particle transport which were presented at the 5th International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Committee Meeting on "Alpha Particles in Fusion Research" held at the Joint European Torus, England in September 1997.

  6. Improvement of deoxidization efficiency of nitric monoxide by shortening pulse width of semiconductor opening switch pulse power generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakuta, Takatoshi; Yagi, Ippei; Takaki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    The deoxidization efficiency of nitric monoxide (NO) was improved by shortening the pulse width of the voltage applied to a corona reactor. The deoxidization efficiency of NO was evaluated as the NO removal efficiency in nitrogen (N2) gas containing 200 ppm NO. The corona reactor had a coaxial geometry and consisted of center high-voltage wire and outer grounded cylinder electrodes. A nanosecond high-voltage pulse was generated using an inductive energy storage pulse power circuit with a semiconductor opening switch and was applied to the center wire electrode in the corona reactor. Fast recovery diodes were utilized as a semiconductor opening switch. The pulse width of the applied voltage was reduced from 21 to 14 ns with the arrester connected in parallel to the reactor. The energy efficiency for NO removal was improved from 8.2 to 35.7 g kW-1 h-1 with the arrester connected. The pulse width was also reduced to 8 ns by optimizing the circuit parameters. It was confirmed from observation with an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera that the streamer corona discharge transited to a glowlike discharge after the streamer propagated from the center wire electrode to the outer cylinder electrode. The duration of the glowlike phase was reduced with the arrester connected. The energy consumed in the glowlike phase was also reduced from 15.7 to 4.6 mJ with the arrester connected.

  7. Chemical synthesis of methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside and its use for investigation of the action of starch synthase II.

    PubMed

    Damager, Iben; Olsen, Carl Erik; Blennow, Andreas; Denyer, Kay; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik

    2003-01-20

    The branched pentasaccharide methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside was chemically synthesised and investigated as a primer for particulate starch synthase II (SSII) using starch granules prepared from the low-amylose pea mutant lam as the enzyme source. For chemical synthesis, the trichloroacetimidate activation method was used to synthesise methyl O-(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->4)-O-(2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->6)-O-[(2,3,4,6-tetra-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl-(1-->4)]-O-(2,3-di-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranosyl)-(1-->4)-2,3,6-tri-O-benzyl-alpha-D-glucopyranoside, which was then debenzylated to provide the desired branched pentasaccharide methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside as documented by 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy. Using a large excess of the maltoside, the pentasaccharide was tested as a substrate for starch synthase II (SSII). Both of the non-reducing ends of methyl 6'-alpha-maltosyl-alpha-maltotrioside were extended equally resulting in two hexasaccharide products in nearly equal amounts. Thus, SSII catalyses an equimolar and non-processive elongation reaction of this substrate. Accordingly, the presence of the alpha-1,6 linkages does not dictate a specific structure of the pentasaccharide in which only one of the two non-reducing ends are available for extension.

  8. Correlation of Density Pedestal Width and Neutral Penetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, X. Q.; Nevins, W. M.; Cohen, R. H.; Rognlien, T. D.; Umansky, M. V.

    2003-10-01

    Pedestal studies in DIII-D and C-Mod find a good correlation between the width of the H-mode density barrier and the neutral penetration length.[1][2] These results suggest that the width may be set by the combined effects of neutral and plasma transport. This paper is a report on fluid simulations of boundary plasma using BOUT code [3] with neutral source added. Thus both neutral and plasma physics are treated. The plasma transport is self-consistently driven by boundary turbulence due to the resistive X-point mode, while neutral is described by a simple fluid diffusive model. The plasma profiles are evolved on the same time scale as the turbulence for the given heat source from the core plasma and particle source from the neutrals. For prescribed neutral profiles, we find the formation of a density pedestal inside the separatrix in the L-mode even though the calculated plasma diffusion coefficients are almost radially constant and without the formation of a temperature pedestal. These results support the hypothesis that particle fueling can provide the dominant control for the size of the H-mode density barrier. The width of the density barrier, and its relationship to pedestal height and neutral penetration length at the midplane, will be given by using hyperbolic-tangent fit to the simulation data. [1] R.J.Groebner, M.A.Mahdavi, A.W.Leonard, 19th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference(Lyon, France, 14 to 19 October 2002), IAEA-CN-94/EX/C2-3. [2] D.Mossessian, J.W.Hughes, M.Greenwald, et al., ``Local dimensionless identity method as a tool for studying H-mode pedestal'', The 9th Joint US-European TTF workshop (Madison, Wisconsin, April 2nd - 5th, 2003). [3] X.Q.Xu, R.H.Cohen, T.D.Rognlien and J.R.Myra, Physics of Plasma, Vol. 7, 1951-1958 (2000).

  9. STELLAR LOCI. I. METALLICITY DEPENDENCE AND INTRINSIC WIDTHS

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Haibo; Liu, Xiaowei; Xiang, Maosheng; Huang, Yang; Chen, Bingqiu E-mail: x.liu@pku.edu.cn

    2015-02-01

    Stellar loci are widely used for selection of interesting outliers, reddening determinations, and calibrations. However, until now, the dependence of stellar loci on metallicity has not been fully explored, and their intrinsic widths are unclear. In this paper, by combining the spectroscopic and recalibrated imaging data of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Stripe 82, we have built a large, clean sample of dwarf stars with accurate colors and well-determined metallicities to investigate the metallicity dependence and intrinsic widths of the SDSS stellar loci. Typically, 1 dex decrease in metallicity causes 0.20 and 0.02 mag decrease in colors u – g and g – r and 0.02 and 0.02 mag increase in colors r – i and i – z, respectively. The variations are larger for metal-rich stars than for metal-poor ones, and larger for F/G/K stars than for A/M ones. Using the sample, we have performed two-dimensional polynomial fitting to the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors as a function of color g – i and metallicity [Fe/H]. The residuals, at the level of 0.029, 0.008, 0.008, and 0.011 mag for the u – g, g – r, r – i, and i – z colors, respectively, can be fully accounted for by the photometric errors and metallicity uncertainties, suggesting that the intrinsic widths of the loci are at maximum a few millimagnitudes. The residual distributions are asymmetric, revealing that a significant fraction of stars are binaries. In a companion paper, we will present an unbiased estimate of the binary fraction for field stars. Other potential applications of the metallicity-dependent stellar loci are briefly discussed.

  10. Invariantly propagating dissolution fingers in finite-width systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutka, Filip; Szymczak, Piotr

    2016-04-01

    Dissolution fingers are formed in porous medium due to positive feedback between transport of reactant and chemical reactions [1-4]. We investigate two-dimensional semi-infinite systems, with constant width W in one direction. In numerical simulations we solve the Darcy flow problem combined with advection-dispersion-reaction equation for the solute transport to track the evolving shapes of the fingers and concentration of reactant in the system. We find the stationary, invariantly propagating finger shapes for different widths of the system, flow and reaction rates. Shape of the reaction front, turns out to be controlled by two dimensionless numbers - the (width-based) Péclet number PeW = vW/Dφ0 and Damköhler number DaW = ksW/v, where k is the reaction rate, s - specific reactive surface area, v - characteristic flow rate, D - diffusion coefficient of the solute, and φ0 - initial porosity of the rock matrix. Depending on PeW and DaW stationary shapes can be divided into seperate classes, e.g. parabolic-like and needle-like structures, which can be inferred from theoretical predictions. In addition we determine velocity of propagating fingers in time and concentration of reagent in the system. Our simulations are compared with natural forms (solution pipes). P. Ortoleva, J. Chadam, E. Merino, and A. Sen, Geochemical self-organization II: the reactive-infiltration instability, Am. J. Sci, 287, 1008-1040 (1987). M. L. Hoefner, and H. S. Fogler. Pore evolution and channel formation during flow and reaction in porous media, AIChE Journal 34, 45-54 (1988). C. E. Cohen, D. Ding, M. Quintard, and B. Bazin, From pore scale to wellbore scale: impact of geometry on wormhole growth in carbonate acidization, Chemical Engineering Science 63, 3088-3099 (2008). P. Szymczak and A. J. C. Ladd, Reactive-infiltration nstabilities in rocks. Part II: Dissolution of a porous matrix, J. Fluid Mech. 738, 591-630 (2014).

  11. HB Hillingdon [alpha46(CE4)Phe-->Val (alpha1 Or alpha2)]: a new alpha chain hemoglobin variant.

    PubMed

    Babb, Anna; Solaiman, Susannah; Green, Brian N; Mantio, Debbie; Patel, Ketan

    2009-01-01

    Routine antenatal hemoglobinopathy screening detected a new alpha chain variant that eluted with Hb A(2) on cation exchange high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in a lady of Sri Lankan origin who had normal hematological indices. The mutation was identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) as alpha46(CE4)Phe-->Val, inferring that the variant was due to a single base change at codon 46 (TTC>GTC) of the alpha1- or alpha2-globin genes.

  12. Theory based scaling of edge turbulence and implications for the scrape-off layer width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myra, J. R.; Russell, D. A.; Zweben, S. J.

    2016-11-01

    Turbulence and plasma parameter data from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] is examined and interpreted based on various theoretical estimates. In particular, quantities of interest for assessing the role of turbulent transport on the midplane scrape-off layer heat flux width are assessed. Because most turbulence quantities exhibit large scatter and little scaling within a given operation mode, this paper focuses on length and time scales and dimensionless parameters between operational modes including Ohmic, low (L), and high (H) modes using a large NSTX edge turbulence database [Zweben et al., Nucl. Fusion 55, 093035 (2015)]. These are compared with theoretical estimates for drift and interchange rates, profile modification saturation levels, a resistive ballooning condition, and dimensionless parameters characterizing L and H mode conditions. It is argued that the underlying instability physics governing edge turbulence in different operational modes is, in fact, similar, and is consistent with curvature-driven drift ballooning. Saturation physics, however, is dependent on the operational mode. Five dimensionless parameters for drift-interchange turbulence are obtained and employed to assess the importance of turbulence in setting the scrape-off layer heat flux width λq and its scaling. An explicit proportionality of the width λq to the safety factor and major radius (qR) is obtained under these conditions. Quantitative estimates and reduced model numerical simulations suggest that the turbulence mechanism is not negligible in determining λq in NSTX, at least for high plasma current discharges.

  13. Human GABAA receptor alpha 1 and alpha 3 subunits genes and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Parsian, A; Cloninger, C R

    1997-05-01

    gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. GABA effects are largely mediated by binding to the postsynaptic GABAA receptor, causing the opening of an integral chloride-ion channel. The GABAA antagonists picrotoxin and bicuculline reduce some ethanol-induced behaviors, such as motor impairment, sedation, and hypnosis. The role of this receptor in alcoholism is further supported by effective alleviation of alcohol withdrawal symptoms by GABAA agonists. To determine the role of the GABAA receptor (GABR) genes in the development of alcoholism, we have used alpha 1 and alpha 3 simple sequence repeat polymorphisms in a sample of unrelated alcoholics, alcoholic probands with both parents, and psychiatrically normal controls. For the GABR alpha 1 gene, the differences between allele frequencies, when all alleles were compared together, were not significant between total alcoholics, subtypes of alcoholics, and normal controls. However, for GABR alpha 3, the differences between total alcoholics and normal controls were significant when all alleles were compared together. The differences between subtypes of alcoholics and normal controls were not significant. The results of haplotype relative risk analysis for both genes, GABR alpha 1 and GABR alpha 3, were also negative. It is possible that the sample size in the haplotype relative risk is too small to have power to detect the differences in transmitted versus nontransmitted alleles. There is a need for a replication study in a large family sample that will allow haplotype relative risk or affected sib-pair analysis.

  14. Automated docking of alpha-(1-->4)- and alpha-(1-->6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides and maltopentaose into the soybean beta-amylase active site.

    PubMed

    Rockey, W M; Laederach, A; Reilly, P J

    2000-08-01

    The Lamarckian genetic algorithm of AutoDock 3.0 was used to dock alpha-maltotriose, methyl alpha-panoside, methyl alpha-isopanoside, methyl alpha-isomaltotrioside, methyl alpha-(6(1)-alpha-glucopyranosyl)-maltoside, and alpha-maltopentaose into the closed and, except for alpha-maltopentaose, into the open conformation of the soybean beta-amylase active site. In the closed conformation, the hinged flap at the mouth of the active site closes over the substrate. The nonreducing end of alpha-maltotriose docks preferentially to subsites -2 or +1, the latter yielding nonproductive binding. Some ligands dock into less optimal conformations with the nonreducing end at subsite -1. The reducing-end glucosyl residue of nonproductively-bound alpha-maltotriose is close to residue Gln194, which likely contributes to binding to subsite +3. In the open conformation, the substrate hydrogen-bonds with several residues of the open flap. When the flap closes, the substrate productively docks if the nonreducing end is near subsites -2 or -1. Trisaccharides with alpha-(1-->6) bonds do not successfully dock except for methyl alpha-isopanoside, whose first and second glucosyl rings dock exceptionally well into subsites -2 and -1. The alpha-(1-->6) bond between the second and third glucosyl units causes the latter to be improperly positioned into subsite +1; the fact that isopanose is not a substrate of beta-amylase indicates that binding to this subsite is critical for hydrolysis.

  15. Systematics of S- and P-wave radiation widths

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.S.

    1980-09-22

    The question of calculating differences in s- and p-wave radiation widths as a valid evaluation tool is explored. A purely statistical approach such as that provided by the Brink-Axel formula depends upon two factors: 1) an adequate description of the giant dipole resonance shape at energies well below the resonance, and 2) an adequate description of the level densities between the ground state and the excitation of the compound nucleus near the neutron separation energy. Some success has been obtained in certain regions of the periodic table with this simple approach, e.g., in the actinides where all nuclei exhibit similar rigid permanent deformations. However, if the method is to be used as a general evaluation procedure throughout the periodic table and particularly in regions where the radiative transition probabilities are enhanced by direct processes, it appears that much more nuclear structure information needs to be incorporated into the calculations.

  16. Determination of the total width of the η' meson.

    PubMed

    Czerwiński, E; Moskal, P; Grzonka, D; Czyzykiewicz, R; Gil, D; Kamys, B; Khoukaz, A; Klaja, J; Klaja, P; Krzemień, W; Oelert, W; Ritman, J; Sefzick, T; Siemaszko, M; Silarski, M; Smyrski, J; Täschner, A; Wolke, M; Wüstner, P; Zdebik, J; Zieliński, M; Zipper, W

    2010-09-17

    Taking advantage of both the low-emittance proton beam of the cooler synchrotron COSY and the high momentum precision of the COSY-11 detector system, the mass distribution of the η' meson was measured with a resolution of 0.33  MeV/c2 (FWHM), improving the experimental mass resolution by almost an order of magnitude with respect to previous results. Based on the sample of more than 2300 reconstructed pp → ppη' events, the total width of the η' meson was determined to be Γ(η') = 0.226 ± 0.017(stat) ± 0.014(syst)  MeV/c2.

  17. On the two-photon width of the δ(980)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narison, S.

    1986-07-01

    The two-photon width of the δ(980) is evaluated using three-point function sum rules which are able to predict accurately the anomalous π0 --> γ and non-anomalous δ --> ηπ decay rates. The prediction, though smaller than previous results based on vector meson dominance, is still higher than the present Crystal Ball data. An analysis of the three-point function with one-gluon exchange cannot support the previous successful explanation of the data within the four-quark scheme. On leave of absence from Laboratoire de Physique Mathématique, Université des Sciences et Techniques du Languedoc, Place Eugène Batailon, F-34100 Montpellier Cedez, France.

  18. Three-Level 48-Pulse STATCOM with Pulse Width Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bhim; Srinivas, Kadagala Venkata

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, a new control strategy of a three-level 48-pulse static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) is proposed with a constant dc link voltage and pulse width modulation at fundamental frequency switching. The proposed STATCOM is realized using eight units of three-level voltage source converters (VSCs) to form a three-level 48-pulse STATCOM. The conduction angle of each three-level VSC is modulated to control the ac converter output voltage, which controls the reactive power of the STATCOM. A fuzzy logic controller is used to control the STATCOM. The dynamic performance of the STATCOM is studied for the control of the reference reactive power, the reference terminal voltage and under the switching of inductive and capacitive loads.

  19. A closer look at the `characteristic' width of molecular cloud filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panopoulou, G. V.; Psaradaki, I.; Skalidis, R.; Tassis, K.; Andrews, J. J.

    2017-04-01

    Filaments in Herschel molecular cloud images are found to exhibit a 'characteristic width'. This finding is in tension with spatial power spectra of the data, which show no indication of this characteristic scale. We demonstrate that this discrepancy is a result of the methodology adopted for measuring filament widths. First, we perform the previously used analysis technique on artificial scale-free data, and obtain a peaked width distribution of filament-like structures. Next, we repeat the analysis on three Herschel maps and reproduce the narrow distribution of widths found in previous studies - when considering the average width of each filament. However, the distribution of widths measured at all points along a filament spine is broader than the distribution of mean filament widths, indicating that the narrow spread (interpreted as a 'characteristic' width) results from averaging. Furthermore, the width is found to vary significantly from one end of a filament to the other. Therefore, the previously identified peak at 0.1 pc cannot be understood as representing the typical width of filaments. We find an alternative explanation by modelling the observed width distribution as a truncated power-law distribution, sampled with uncertainties. The position of the peak is connected to the lower truncation scale and is likely set by the choice of parameters used in measuring filament widths. We conclude that a 'characteristic' width of filaments is not supported by the available data.

  20. The RS Canum Venaticorum phenomena. I - H-alpha emission in HR 1099

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraquelli, D. A.

    1984-01-01

    Photographic H-alpha spectrophotometry of the active chromosphere star HR 1099 is presented. The data were obtained during both radio-quiescent periods and radio flares during the years 1976-1979. This paper presents the data and data reduction techniques. In particular, the method used to correct the observed H-alpha profiles for the distortion introduced by the irregular 'continuum,' due to the underlying absorption lines, is presented and discussed. The techniques for measuring the equivalent widths and estimating the errors are presented. In addition to the major results presented earlier, it is found that the line widths of the H-alpha emission are broader than can be accounted for by rotation and orbital motion.

  1. Geographical Variablity of the Width of the Tropical Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currey, B.

    2014-12-01

    A number of recent studies have found evidence for a widening of the earth's tropical belt (Seidel et al). Most studies focus on the annual mean zonal mean tropical belt width. The purpose of this research, however, is to determine the longitudinal variability of the width of the tropical belt. We study how well defined the boundaries of the tropical belt are in both hemispheres as a function of longitude as well as season. The sharpness of the tropical boundaries as a function of longitude can provide information, which is otherwise hidden in the more commonly studied zonal averages. Localized widening of the tropical belt is expected to have a bigger climatic impact for a very sharp tropical boundary encompassing a drastic distinction between the climates of the tropics versus the subtropics. An improved understanding of the morphology of the tropical belt can help us determine any changes regarding these regions surrounding the edges of the tropics. By locating the subtropical tropopause break, a region where the tropopauses' altitude drastically shifts, the boundaries of the tropical belt can be observed. By finding the gradient of the tropopause break, we can determine the sharpness of the tropical boundaries. It was found that during each hemisphere's respective summer season the tropical belt edge over the Pacific and Atlantic oceans can display a tendency to be very fickle and thus poorly defined. For all times of the year, however, it is shown that the tropopause break in each hemisphere's respective winter and over land has the tendency to create a well-defined and sharp tropical edge.

  2. Optimal gate-width setting for passive neutrons multiplicity counting

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Evans, Louise G; Schear, Melissa A

    2010-01-01

    When setting up a passive neutron coincidence counter it is natural to ask what coincidence gate settings should be used to optimize the counting precision. If the gate width is too short then signal is lost and the precision is compromised because in a given period only a few coincidence events will be observed. On the other hand if the gate is too large the signal will be maximized but it will also be compromised by the high level of random pile-up or Accidental coincidence events which must be subtracted. In the case of shift register electronics connected to an assay chamber with an exponential dieaway profile operating in the regime where the Accidentals rate dominates the Reals coincidence rate but where dead-time is not a concern, simple arguments allow one to show that the relative precision on the net Reals rate is minimized when the coincidence gate is set to about 1.2 times the lie dieaway time of the system. In this work we show that making the same assumptions it is easy to show that the relative precision on the Triples rates is also at a minimum when the relative precision of the Doubles (or Reals) is at a minimum. Although the analysis is straightforward to our knowledge such a discussion has not been documented in the literature before. Actual measurement systems do not always behave in the ideal we choose to model them. Fortunately however the variation in the relative precision as a function of gate width is rather flat for traditional safeguards counters and so the performance is somewhat forgiving of the exact choice. The derivation further serves to delineate the important parameters which determine the relative counting precision of the Doubles and Triples rates under the regime considered. To illustrate the similarities and differences we consider the relative standard deviation that might be anticipated for a passive correlation count of an axial section of a spent nuclear fuel assembly under practically achievable conditions.

  3. Alpha-conotoxin-ImI: a competitive antagonist at alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive neuronal nicotinic receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Pereira, E F; Alkondon, M; McIntosh, J M; Albuquerque, E X

    1996-09-01

    In the present study, the patch-clamp technique was applied to rat hippocampal neurons or myoballs in culture to study the actions of alpha-conotoxin-ImI on the native alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive, presumably alpha 7-bearing, neuronal nicotinic receptor and on other ligand-gated channels. Preexposure of the neurons for 5 min to alpha-conotoxin-ImI decreased the peak amplitude of alpha-BGT-sensitive currents (referred to as type IA currents) in a concentration-dependent fashion. Several lines of evidence revealed that the inhibitory effect of alpha-conotoxin-ImI was competitive with respect to the agonist (IC50 approximately 85 nM) and reversible by washing. At 300 nM, alpha-conotoxin-ImI decreased by only 15% the peak amplitude of ACh-evoked currents in rat myoballs, did not affect the activation of currents gated by gamma-aminobutyric acid, glycine, N-methyl-D-aspartate, kainate, or quisqualate in hippocampal neurons, but reduced to approximately 60% the peak amplitude and shortened the decay phase of curare-sensitive, serotonin-gated currents in these neurons. The competitive and reversible nature of the alpha-conotoxin-ImI-induced inhibition of native alpha 7-bearing neuronal nicotinic receptors makes this peptide a valuable new tool for the functional and structural characterization of these receptors in the central nervous system.

  4. Fin width dependence on gate controllability of InGaAs channel FinFETs with regrown source/drain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kise, Nobukazu; Kinoshita, Haruki; Yukimachi, Atsushi; Kanazawa, Toru; Miyamoto, Yasuyuki

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we report on the structure and characteristics of an indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) channel fin field effect transistor (FinFET) with a regrown source/drain. The fabrication process we propose is suitable for forming a channel with a high aspect ratio. In simulations, the subthreshold characteristics and drain current (Id) were improved by reducing the fin width. Following the simulations, fabricated devices showed improved gate controllability after the fin width was reduced. A short-channel device (Lch = 50 nm, Hfin = 50 nm, and Wfin = 20 nm) showed an Id of 367 μA/μm and a minimum subthreshold swing (SSmin) of 211 mV/dec at Vd = 0.5 V. The maximum-to-minimum Id ratio was 105.

  5. DNA methyltransferase 1/3a overexpression in sporadic breast cancer is associated with reduced expression of estrogen receptor-alpha/breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhaojin; Xiao, Qinghuan; Zhao, Lin; Ren, Jie; Bai, Xuefeng; Sun, Mingli; Wu, Huizhe; Liu, Xiaojian; Song, Zhiguo; Yan, Yuanyuan; Mi, Xiaoyi; Wang, Enhua; Jin, Feng; Wei, Minjie

    2015-09-01

    DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), including DNMT1, 3a, and 3b, play an important role in the progression of many malignant tumors. However, it remains unclear whether expression of DNMTs is associated with the development of breast cancer. This study aimed to explore the clinical significance of DNMT proteins in sporadic breast cancer. We investigated the expression of DNMT1, 3a, and 3b in 256 breast cancer and 36 breast fibroadenoma, using immunohistochemistry. The expression of DNMT1 and 3a was significantly higher in breast cancer than in fibroadenoma. In breast cancer, the expression of DNMT1 was significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (P = 0.020), and the expression of DNMT3a and 3b was significantly correlated with advanced clinical stages (P = 0.046 and 0.012, respectively). Overexpression of DNMT1/3a was correlated with promoter hypermethylation and reduced expression of ERα and BRCA1. The expression levels of DNMT1 or DNMT3a were associated with a significantly shorter DFS or OS in a subgroup of breast cancer patients (patients with the age ≤50 years old, ERα-negative status, or HER2-postive status). The expression of DNMT1 or a combined expression of DNMT1 and 3a was associated with poor prognosis in patients who received chemotherapy and endocrine therapy, but not in patients who received chemotherapy alone. These findings suggest that DNMT1 and 3a may be involved in the progression and prognosis of sporadic breast cancer.

  6. Molecular characterization of the new defective P(brescia) alpha1-antitrypsin allele.

    PubMed

    Medicina, Daniela; Montani, Nadia; Fra, Anna M; Tiberio, Laura; Corda, Luciano; Miranda, Elena; Pezzini, Alessandro; Bonetti, Fausta; Ingrassia, Rosaria; Scabini, Roberta; Facchetti, Fabio; Schiaffonati, Luisa

    2009-08-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin (alpha(1)AT) deficiency is a hereditary disorder associated with reduced alpha(1)AT serum level, predisposing adults to pulmonary emphysema. Among the known mutations of the alpha(1)AT gene (SERPINA1) causing alpha(1)AT deficiency, a few alleles, particularly the Z allele, may also predispose adults to liver disease. We have characterized a new defective alpha(1)AT allele (c.745G>C) coding for a mutant alpha(1)AT (Gly225Arg), named P(brescia). The P(brescia) alpha(1)AT allele was first identified in combination with the rare defective M(würzburg) allele in an 11-year-old boy showing significantly reduced serum alpha(1)AT level. Subsequently, the P(brescia) allele was found in the heterozygous state with the normal M or the defective Z allele in nine and three adults respectively. In cellular models of the disease, we show that the P(brescia) mutant is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum as ordered polymers and is secreted more slowly than the normal M alpha(1)AT. This behaviour recapitulates the abnormal cellular handling and fate of the Z alpha(1)AT and suggests that the mutation present in the P(brescia) alpha(1)AT causes a conformational change of the protein which, by favouring polymer formation, is etiologic to both severe alpha(1)AT deficiency in the plasma and toxic protein-overload in the liver.

  7. The ALPHA Magnetic Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viertel, G. M.; Capell, M.

    1998-12-01

    The ALPHA Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) will be the first large magnetic spectrometer in space. It is scheduled to be installed on the future International Space Station ALPHA (ISSA) in the year 2002 to perform measurements of the charged particle composition to answer fundamental questions in particle physics and astrophysics. Before installation on ISSA, AMS will fly on the shuttle DISCOVERY for a period of 10 days starting in May 1998. This will enable AMS to perform a test of the apparatus and first measurements. The AMS detector has five major components: A permanent NdFeB magnet, six planes of Silicon double-sided microstrip detectors, a plastic scintillator time of flight hodoscope, a plastic scintillator anticoincidence counter and an Aerogel Cherenkov threshold counter. In addition, there are electronics, support infrastructure and interfaces.

  8. ERR{alpha} regulates osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rajalin, Ann-Marie; Pollock, Hanna; Aarnisalo, Piia

    2010-05-28

    The orphan nuclear receptor estrogen-related receptor-{alpha} (ERR{alpha}) has been reported to have both a positive and a negative regulatory role in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. We have studied the role of ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from ERR{alpha} deficient mice and their differentiation capacities were compared to that of the wild-type cells. ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced cellular proliferation, osteoblastic differentiation, and mineralization. In the complementary experiment, overexpression of ERR{alpha} in MC3T3-E1 cells increased the expression of osteoblastic markers and mineralization. Alterations in the expression of bone sialoprotein (BSP) may at least partially explain the effects on mineralization as BSP expression was reduced in ERR{alpha} deficient MSCs and enhanced upon ERR{alpha} overexpression in MC3T3-E1 cells. Furthermore, a luciferase reporter construct driven by the BSP promoter was efficiently transactivated by ERR{alpha}. Under adipogenic conditions, ERR{alpha} deficient cultures displayed reduced adipocytic differentiation. Our data thus propose a positive role for ERR{alpha} in osteoblastic and adipocytic differentiation. The variability in the results yielded in the different studies implies that ERR{alpha} may play different roles in bone under different physiological conditions.

  9. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width

    SciTech Connect

    Learn, R.; Feigenbaum, E.

    2016-05-27

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. Furthermore, the second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  10. Influence of the transition width on the magnetocaloric effect across the magnetostructural transition of Heusler alloys.

    PubMed

    Cugini, F; Porcari, G; Fabbrici, S; Albertini, F; Solzi, M

    2016-08-13

    We report a complete structural and magneto-thermodynamic characterization of four samples of the Heusler alloy Ni-Co-Mn-Ga-In, characterized by similar compositions, critical temperatures and high inverse magnetocaloric effect across their metamagnetic transformation, but different transition widths. The object of this study is precisely the sharpness of the martensitic transformation, which plays a key role in the effective use of materials and which has its origin in both intrinsic and extrinsic effects. The influence of the transition width on the magnetocaloric properties has been evaluated by exploiting a phenomenological model of the transformation built through geometrical considerations on the entropy versus temperature curves. A clear result is that a large temperature span of the transformation is unfavourable to the magnetocaloric performance of a material, reducing both isothermal entropy change and adiabatic temperature change obtainable in a given magnetic field and increasing the value of the maximum field needed to fully induce the transformation. The model, which is based on standard magnetometric and conventional calorimetric measurements, turns out to be a convenient tool for the determination of the optimum values of transformation temperature span in a trade-off between sheer performance and amplitude of the operating range of a material.This article is part of the themed issue 'Taking the temperature of phase transitions in cool materials'.

  11. Distribution of total radiation widths for neutron resonances of Pt isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, P. E.; Bečvář, F.; Krtička, M.

    2015-05-01

    High quality neutron capture and transmission data were measured on isotopically enriched 192,194,195,196Pt and natural Pt samples at ORELA. R-matrix analysis of this data revealed resonance parameters for 159, 413, 423, 258, and 11 neutron resonances for neutron energies below 5.0, 16.0, 7.5, 16.0, and 5.0 keV for 192,194,195,196,198Pt+n, respectively. Earlier analysis of data on reduced neutron widths, Γ0n, showed that the distributions of Γ0n for 192,194Pt deviate significantly from the Porter-Thomas distribution (PTD) predicted by random matrix theory. In this contribution we report on preliminary results of the analysis of distribution of total radiation widths, Γγ, in 192,194,195,196Pt+n reactions. Comparison of experimental data with predictions made within the nuclear statistical model indicates that standard models of Photon Strength Functions (PSFs) and Nuclear Level Density predict Γγ distributions which are too narrow. We found that satisfactory agreement between experimental and simulated distributions can be obtained only by a strong suppression of the PSFs at low γ-ray energies and/or by violation of the usual assumption that primary transitions from neutron resonances follow the PTD. The shape of PSFs needed for reproduction of our Γγ data also nicely reproduces spectra from several (n,γ) experiments on the neighbor nuclide 198Au.

  12. The alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor directly regulates arterial blood pressure via vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Tanoue, Akito; Nasa, Yoshihisa; Koshimizu, Takaaki; Shinoura, Hitomi; Oshikawa, Sayuri; Kawai, Takayuki; Sunada, Sachie; Takeo, Satoshi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2002-03-01

    To investigate the physiological role of the alpha(1D)-adrenergic receptor (alpha(1D)-AR) subtype, we created mice lacking the alpha(1D)-AR (alpha(1D)(-/-)) by gene targeting and characterized their cardiovascular function. In alpha(1D)-/- mice, the RT-PCR did not detect any transcript of the alpha(1D)-AR in any tissue examined, and there was no apparent upregulation of other alpha(1)-AR subtypes. Radioligand binding studies showed that alpha(1)-AR binding capacity in the aorta was lost, while that in the heart was unaltered in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Non-anesthetized alpha(1D)-/- mice maintained significantly lower basal systolic and mean arterial blood pressure conditions, relative to wild-type mice, and they showed no significant change in heart rate or in cardiac function, as assessed by echocardiogram. Besides hypotension, the pressor responses to phenylephrine and norepinephrine were decreased by 30-40% in alpha(1D)-/- mice. Furthermore, the contractile response of the aorta and the pressor response of isolated perfused mesenteric arterial beds to alpha(1)-AR stimulation were markedly reduced in alpha(1D)-/- mice. We conclude that the alpha(1D)-AR participates directly in sympathetic regulation of systemic blood pressure by vasoconstriction.

  13. Application of the Finite Orbit Width Version of the CQL3D Code to Transport of Fast Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Harvey, R. W.

    2016-10-01

    The CQL3D bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck (FP) code now includes the ``fully'' neoclassical version in which the diffusion and advection processes are averaged over actual drift orbits, rather than using a 1st-order expansion. Incorporation of Finite-Orbit-Width (FOW) effects results in neoclassical radial transport caused by collisions, RF wave heating and by toroidal electric field (radial pinch). We apply the CQL3D-full-FOW code to study the thermalization and radial transport of high-energy particles, such as alpha-particles produced by fusion in ITER or deuterons from NBI in NSTX, under effect of their interaction with auxiliary RF waves. A particular attention is given to visualization of transport in 3D space of velocity +major-radius coordinates. Supported by USDOE Grants FC02-01ER54649, FG02-04ER54744, and SC0006614.

  14. Role of intrinsic width in fragment momentum distributions in heavy ion collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, L. W.; Tripathi, R. K.; Khan, F.

    1994-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the intrinsic widths incorporating correlations in conjunction with dynamical contributions give better agreement with experiments for collisions in the energy range of 200 A MeV to 2.4 GeV than using only intrinsic widths without correlations. The sensitivity of the intrinsic width decreases with increasing projectile mass. A simple recipe for calculating intrinsic width correlations is presented.

  15. Safe Operation and Alignment of the Variable Pulse Width Laser at the US Army Research Laboratory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-01

    pulse at pulse widths between 50 µs to 10 ms. Maximum energy output is only achieved by proper alignment and laser operation. This report provides...not included in the operator’s manual. 15. SUBJECT TERMS pulse width, laser energy , laser alignment, peak power, laser operation 16. SECURITY...Acknowledgments v 1. Introduction 1 2. Energy Output of the Variable Pulse Width Laser 1 3. Operation of the Variable Pulse Width Laser 2 4

  16. Performance of an in-situ alpha spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Pöllänen, R

    2016-03-01

    Equipment was recently developed for detecting alpha particles from flat and smooth surfaces with good energy resolution at ambient air pressure. In this work, the detection efficiencies were determined using different extended-area sources emitting alpha and beta radiation and a mixed nuclide point source emitting alpha radiation. Beta particles are of importance because they can also be detected. Counts originating from alpha and beta particles are mainly at different energies, which make their separation possible. An efficiency of 0.14 was determined for an extended-area (>30cm(2)) homogeneous source emitting alpha radiation at the energy of 5-6MeV, whereas for the beta emitters the efficiencies were 0.07-0.19 depending on the beta-particle emission energies. The use of a collimator reduces the detection efficiencies by a factor of up to ten.

  17. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink and fishbone modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; White, R.B.

    1994-06-01

    The effects of alpha particles on the internal kink and fishbone modes are studied analytically. The nonadiabatic contribution from untrapped alpha particles is negligible. Finite inverse aspect ratio, plasma {beta} and plasma shaping effects can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in the pitch angle space and reduce the bounce-averaged magnetic drift frequency. The drift reversal effect on the ideal kink mode is small, but the {beta}{sub {alpha}} threshold for the fishbone mode can be much lower than previously predicted. Moreover, the fishbone mode could be excited by alpha particles even when the plasma is stable in the ideal MHD limit. In addition, the ion diamagnetic drift frequency (finite ion Larmor radius effect) has a strong destabilizing effect on the fishbone mode when it is comparable with the trapped alpha averaged precessional drift frequency, even though it stabilizes the plasma in the ideal MHD limit.

  18. Isolation and characterization of fibronectin-alpha 1-microglobulin complex in rat plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, C; Enghild, J J; Thøgersen, I B; Salvesen, G; Akerström, B

    1994-01-01

    Molecules containing the 28 kDa immunoregulatory protein alpha 1-microglobulin (alpha 1-m), also known as protein HC, were isolated from rat plasma or serum by immunoaffinity chromatography. Three molecular species were distinguished on the basis of nondenaturing PAGE. Two of these have been described previously: uncomplexed alpha 1-m, and the complex of alpha 1-m with alpha 1-inhibitor-3. The third species was analysed by denaturing PAGE, immunoblotting, proteinase digestion and N-terminal-sequence analyses, and shown to consist of a complex between alpha 1-m and fibronectin. This complex, with a mass of about 560 kDa, was resistant to dissociation in the presence of denaturants, but not in the presence of reducing agents in combination with denaturants, and we conclude that the two components are linked by disulphide bonds. About 60% of the total detectable plasma alpha 1-m exists as high-molecular-mass complexes distributed approximately evenly between fibronectin and alpha 1-inhibitor-3. Immunochemical analyses were used to determine the proportion of the total plasma pools of fibronectin and alpha 1-inhibitor-3 that circulate in complex with alpha 1-m. About 3-7% of the total plasma fibronectin from three different rat strains contained alpha 1-m, whereas 0.3-0.8% of the total plasma alpha 1-inhibitor-3 contained alpha 1-m. Complexes were found at similar levels in plasma and serum, indicating that coagulation is not responsible for complex formation. Moreover, immunochemical analyses of human plasma revealed small amounts of alpha 1-m in complex with fibronectin and alpha 2-macroglobulin (an alpha 1-inhibitor-3 homologue). The existence of a complex between alpha 1-m and fibronectin in rats and humans suggests a mechanism for the incorporation of the immunoregulatory molecule alpha 1-m into the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7519849

  19. AN ATLAS OF z = 5.7 AND z = 6.5 Ly{alpha} EMITTERS ,

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, E. M.; Cowie, L. L.; Barger, A. J.; Capak, P.; Kakazu, Y.; Trouille, L. E-mail: cowie@ifa.hawaii.ed E-mail: trouille@astro.wisc.ed E-mail: kakazu@astro.caltech.ed

    2010-12-10

    We present an atlas of 88 z {approx} 5.7 and 30 z {approx} 6.5 Ly{alpha} emitters obtained from a wide-field narrowband survey. We combined deep narrowband imaging in 120 A bandpass filters centered at 8150 A and 9140 A with deep BVRIz broadband imaging to select high-redshift galaxy candidates over an area of 4180 arcmin{sup 2}. The goal was to obtain a uniform selection of comparable depth over the seven targeted fields in the two filters. For the GOODS-North region of the Hubble Deep Field-North field, we also selected candidates using a 120 A filter centered at 9210 A. We made spectroscopic observations with Keck DEIMOS of nearly all the candidates to obtain the final sample of Ly{alpha} emitters. At the 3.3 A resolution of the DEIMOS observations the asymmetric profile for Ly{alpha} emission can be clearly seen in the spectra of nearly all the galaxies. We show that the spectral profiles are surprisingly similar for many of the galaxies and that the composite spectral profiles are nearly identical at z = 5.7 and z = 6.5. We analyze the distributions of line widths and Ly{alpha} equivalent widths and find that the lines are marginally narrower at the higher redshift, with median values of 0.77 A at z = 6.5 and 0.92 A at z = 5.7. The line widths have a dependence on the Ly{alpha} luminosity of the form {approx}L {sup 0.3}{sub {alpha}}. We compare the surface densities and the luminosity functions at the two redshifts and find that there is a multiplicative factor of two decrease in the number density of bright Ly{alpha} emitters from z = 5.7 to z = 6.5, while the characteristic luminosity is unchanged.

  20. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines With Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Thin Film Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Dalton, Edan; Tentzeris, Manos M.; Papapolymerou, John

    2003-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interconnects built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing 3D circuits on CMOS (low resistivity) Si wafers, GaAs, and ceramic substrates. Thin film microstrip lines (TFMS) with finite width ground planes embedded in the polyimide are often used. However, the closely spaced TFMS lines a r e susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurements a r e used to show that the ground planes must be connected by via holes to reduce coupling in both the forward and backward directions. Furthermore, it is shown that coupled microstrip lines establish a slotline type mode between the two ground planes and a dielectric waveguide type mode, and that the via holes recommended here eliminate these two modes.

  1. Widths of K¯-nuclear deeply bound states in a dynamical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareš, J.; Friedman, E.; Gal, A.

    2005-01-01

    The relativistic mean field (RMF) model is applied to a system of nucleons and a Kbar meson, interacting via scalar and vector boson fields. The model incorporates the standard RMF phenomenology for bound nucleons and, for the Kbar meson, it relates to low-energy Kbar N and K- atom phenomenology. Deeply bound Kbar nuclear states are generated dynamically across the periodic table and are exhibited for 12C and 16O over a wide range of binding energies. Substantial polarization of the core nucleus is found for these light nuclei. Absorption modes are also included dynamically, considering explicitly both the resulting compressed nuclear density and the reduced phase space for Kbar absorption from deeply bound states. The behavior of the calculated width as function of the Kbar binding energy is studied in order to explore limits on the possible existence of narrow Kbar nuclear states.

  2. A Novel Transcranial Magnetic Stimulator Inducing Near Rectangular Pulses with Controllable Pulse Width (cTMS)

    PubMed Central

    Jalinous, Reza; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2013-01-01

    A novel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device with controllable pulse width (PW) and near rectangular pulse shape (cTMS) is described. The cTMS device uses an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) with appropriate snubbers to switch coil currents up to 7 kA, enabling PW control from 5 μs to over 100 μs. The near-rectangular induced electric field pulses use 22–34% less energy and generate 67–72% less coil heating compared to matched conventional cosine pulses. CTMS is used to stimulate rhesus monkey motor cortex in vivo with PWs of 20 to 100 μs, demonstrating the expected decrease of threshold pulse amplitude with increasing PW. The technological solutions used in the cTMS prototype can expand functionality, and reduce power consumption and coil heating in TMS, enhancing its research and therapeutic applications. PMID:18232369

  3. A transcranial magnetic stimulator inducing near-rectangular pulses with controllable pulse width (cTMS).

    PubMed

    Peterchev, Angel V; Jalinous, Reza; Lisanby, Sarah H

    2008-01-01

    A novel transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) device with controllable pulse width (PW) and near-rectangular pulse shape (cTMS) is described. The cTMS device uses an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) with appropriate snubbers to switch coil currents up to 6 kA, enabling PW control from 5 micros to over 100 micros. The near-rectangular induced electric field pulses use 2%-34% less energy and generate 67%-72% less coil heating compared to matched conventional cosine pulses. CTMS is used to stimulate rhesus monkey motor cortex in vivo with PWs of 20 to 100 micros, demonstrating the expected decrease of threshold pulse amplitude with increasing PW. The technological solutions used in the cTMS prototype can expand functionality, and reduce power consumption and coil heating in TMS, enhancing its research and therapeutic applications.

  4. Line width roughness control and pattern collapse solutions for EUV patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrillo, Karen; Huang, George; Ashworth, Dominic; Georger, Jacque; Ren, Liping; Cho, K. Y.; Montgomery, Warren; Wurm, Stefan; Kawakami, Shinichiro; Dunn, Shannon; Ko, Akiteryu

    2011-04-01

    Line width roughness (LWR) control is a critical issue in extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL). The difficulty of controlling LWR and the need to minimize it have grown as the sensitivity of materials and resolution in the resist patterning process has improved. Another critical feature that has become difficult to control in EUVL and 22nm half-pitch systems is pattern collapse. The increase of aspect ratio that comes from further scaling promotes the onset of pattern collapse. Both pattern collapse and LWR are easily observed in EUVL and leading-edge ArF immersion lithography. This paper will demonstrate recent gains in LWR control in leading EUV films using track-based processes, etch-based improvements, and the results of combined techniques. Also the use of a newly developed EUV-specific FIRM™ rinse chemistry to reduce pattern collapse will be discussed along with future development activities and industry requirements for both LWR and pattern collapse.

  5. Transmission phase of a quantum dot and statistical fluctuations of partial-width amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Jalabert, Rodolfo A; Weick, Guillaume; Weidenmüller, Hans A; Weinmann, Dietmar

    2014-05-01

    Experimentally, the phase of the amplitude for electron transmission through a quantum dot (transmission phase) shows the same pattern between consecutive resonances. Such universal behavior, found for long sequences of resonances, is caused by correlations of the signs of the partial-width amplitudes of the resonances. We investigate the stability of these correlations in terms of a statistical model. For a classically chaotic dot, the resonance eigenfunctions are assumed to be Gaussian distributed. Under this hypothesis, statistical fluctuations are found to reduce the tendency towards universal phase evolution. Long sequences of resonances with universal behavior only persist in the semiclassical limit of very large electron numbers in the dot and for specific energy intervals. Numerical calculations qualitatively agree with the statistical model but quantitatively are closer to universality.

  6. Drift effects on the tokamak power scrape-off width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, E. T.; Goldston, R. J.; Kaveeva, E. G.; Mordijck, S.; Rozhansky, V. A.; Senichenkov, I. Yu.; Voskoboynikov, S. P.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experimental analysis suggests that the scrape-off layer (SOL) heat flux width (λq) for ITER will be near 1 mm, sharply narrowing the planned operating window. In this work, motivated by the heuristic drift (HD) model, which predicts the observed inverse plasma current scaling, SOLPS-ITER is used to explore drift effects on λq. Modeling focuses on an H-mode DIII-D discharge. In initial results, target recycling is set to 90%, resulting in sheath-limited SOL conditions. SOL particle diffusivity (DSOL) is varied from 0.1 to 1 m2/s. When drifts are included, λq is insensitive to DSOL, consistent with the HD model, with λq near 3 mm; in no-drift cases, λq varies from 2 to 5 mm. Drift effects depress near-separatrix potential, generating a channel of strong electron heat convection that is insensitive to DSOL. Sensitivities to thermal diffusivities, plasma current, toroidal magnetic field, and device size are also assessed. These initial results will be discussed in detail, and progress toward modeling experimentally relevant high-recycling conditions will be reported. Supported by U.S. DOE Contract DE-SC0010434.

  7. Segmentation and determination of joint space width in foot radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, O.; de Muinck Keizer, D. M.; Bernelot Moens, H. J.; Slump, C. H.

    2016-03-01

    Joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis is frequently assessed using radiographs of hands and feet. Evaluation includes measurements of the joint space width (JSW) and detection of erosions. Current visual scoring methods are timeconsuming and subject to inter- and intra-observer variability. Automated measurement methods avoid these limitations and have been fairly successful in hand radiographs. This contribution aims at foot radiographs. Starting from an earlier proposed automated segmentation method we have developed a novel model based image analysis algorithm for JSW measurements. This method uses active appearance and active shape models to identify individual bones. The model compiles ten submodels, each representing a specific bone of the foot (metatarsals 1-5, proximal phalanges 1-5). We have performed segmentation experiments using 24 foot radiographs, randomly selected from a large database from the rheumatology department of a local hospital: 10 for training and 14 for testing. Segmentation was considered successful if the joint locations are correctly determined. Segmentation was successful in only 14%. To improve results a step-by-step analysis will be performed. We performed JSW measurements on 14 randomly selected radiographs. JSW was successfully measured in 75%, mean and standard deviation are 2.30+/-0.36mm. This is a first step towards automated determination of progression of RA and therapy response in feet using radiographs.

  8. Surface effect on domain wall width in ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Eliseev, Eugene A.; Morozovska, Anna N.; Kalinin, Sergei V.; Li, Yulan; Shen, Jie; Glinchuk, Maya D.; Chen , L.Q.; Gopalan, Venkatraman

    2009-10-15

    We study the effect of the depolarization field on a domain wall structure near the surface of a ferroelectric. Since in real situation bound and screening charges form an electric double layer, the breaking of this layer by the domain wall induces stray depolarization field, which in turn changes the domain wall structure. Power law decay of the stray field results in the power law of polarization saturation near the surface, as compared to exponential saturation in the bulk. Obtained results predict that the surface broadening of ferroelectric domain walls appeared near Curie temperature as well as describe domain wall depth profile in weak ferroelectrics. We qualitatively describe extra-broad domain walls near LiNbO3 and LiTaO3 surfaces observed experimentally at room temperature, which probably originate at high temperatures but did not fully relax their width with temperature decrease allowing for lattice pinning and defect centers. Thus results have broad implication for fundamental issues such as maximal information storage density in ferroelectric data storage, domain wall pinning mechanisms at surfaces and interfaces, and nucleation dynamics.

  9. Evaluation of partial widths and branching ratios from resonance wave functions

    SciTech Connect

    Goldzak, Tamar; Gilary, Ido; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2010-11-15

    A quantum system in a given resonance state has different open channels for decay. Partial widths are the decay rates of the resonance (metastable) state into the different open channels. Here we present a rigorous derivation of the partial widths from the solution of a time-dependent Schroedinger equation with outgoing boundary conditions. We show that the sum of the partial widths obtained from the resonance wave function is equal to the total width. The difference with respect to previous studies on partial widths and branching ratios is discussed.

  10. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y.; You, S. J. Kim, J. H.; Chang, H. Y.

    2014-05-15

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  11. Posttranscriptional derepression of GADD45alpha by genotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Lal, Ashish; Abdelmohsen, Kotb; Pullmann, Rudolf; Kawai, Tomoko; Galban, Stefanie; Yang, Xiaoling; Brewer, Gary; Gorospe, Myriam

    2006-04-07

    The growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene GADD45alpha is potently upregulated in response to stress stimuli. Here, two RNA binding proteins, the mRNA decay-promoting AUF1 and the translational suppressor TIAR, were found to interact specifically with the 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the GADD45alpha mRNA in HeLa cells. These associations were prominent in unstimulated cells, decreasing dramatically after treatment with the genotoxin methyl methanesulfonate (MMS). Analysis of both endogenous and chimeric GADD45alpha mRNA revealed that in untreated cells AUF1 strongly reduced GADD45alpha mRNA stability, whereas TIAR potently inhibited GADD45alpha translation. After genotoxic stress, AUF1 and TIAR dissociated from the GADD45alpha mRNA, thereby allowing coordinated elevations in both GADD45alpha mRNA half-life and translation rate, respectively. We propose that the posttranscriptional derepression of GADD45alpha critically contributes to its potent upregulation after DNA damage.

  12. Aerobic biomineralization of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane in contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmann, A.; de Bruin, W.; Jumelet, J.C.; Rijnaarts, H.H.; Zehnder, A.J.

    1988-02-01

    The factors identified to be important for the aerobic biodegradation of alpha-hexachlorocyclohexane (alpha-HCH) in a soil slurry are temperature, auxiliary carbon source, substrate concentration, and soil inhomogeneities. Temperatures in the range of 20 to 30/sup 0/C were determined to be most favorable for biodegradation of alpha-HCH. No alpha-HCH biodegradation was detected at temperatures below 4/sup 0/C and above 40/sup 0/C. The addition of auxiliary organic carbon compounds showed repressive effects on alpha-HCH biomineralization. Increased oxygen partial pressures reduced the repressive effects of added auxiliary organic carbon compounds. A linear relationship between alpha-HCH concentration and its conversion rate was found in a Lineweaver-Burk plot. Inhomogeneities such as clumping of alpha-HCH significantly affected its biodegradation. Inhomogeneity as an influence on biodegradation has not drawn sufficient attention in the past, even though it certainly has affected both laboratory studies and the application of biotechnological methods to clean up contaminated sites. On the basis of metabolites detected during degradation experiments, the initial steps of aerobic alpha-HCH bioconversion in a soil slurry are proposed.

  13. Tidal stress in Enceladus' ice shell: dependence on the internal ocean width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behounkova, M.; Tobie, G.; Choblet, G.; Cadek, O.

    2013-12-01

    The eruptions of water vapor and ice particles on Enceladus' south pole together with huge heat production suggest the presence of a strong source of energy within Enceladus' interior. The abnormal endogenic power is most likely the consequence of strong tidal dissipation along the ridges and within the ice shell. Here, we study tidal stress associated to tidal flexing in Enceladus' ice shell for simulations described in Behounkova et al. (2013). In these simulations, we have investigated the conditions for the initiation of convection by systematically varying the orbital parameters (eccentricity), ice grain size and width of an internal ocean (D). For the current eccentricity and global ocean (D=360deg), our results show maximum tidal stress is approximately equal to 0.1MPa. For regional oceans of 120deg and 180deg, the maximum tidal stress is reduced by a factor of ~2.2 and ~1.3, respectively. Maximum tidal stresses differ less than 5% for internal oceans covering more than the southern hemisphere (D>180deg). Moreover, tidal stress patterns vary significantly with the ocean width. Whereas the tidal stresses above the rock interface are high even for areas without internal ocean, a considerable stress decrease is observed toward the surface above areas with no internal ocean. This effect is especially pronounced for cases with small internal ocean (D=<120 deg). The maximum tidal stress scales with eccentricity as expected and the tidal stress changes during onset of convection are rather low. Additionally, we will discuss the effect of rheological model (Maxwell vs. Andrade) on the tidal stress pattern and the heating distribution, as well as the possible effect of reduced viscosity in the active south polar terrain.

  14. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    SciTech Connect

    d'Enterria, David; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  15. Voigt equivalent widths and spectral-bin single-line transmittances: Exact expansions and the MODTRAN®5 implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Alexander

    2013-03-01

    Exact expansions for Voigt line-shape total, line-tail and spectral bin equivalent widths and for Voigt finite spectral bin single-line transmittances have been derived in terms of optical depth dependent exponentially-scaled modified Bessel functions of integer order and optical depth independent Fourier integral coefficients. The series are convergent for the full range of Voigt line-shapes, from pure Doppler to pure Lorentzian. In the Lorentz limit, the expansion reduces to the Ladenburg and Reiche function for the total equivalent width. Analytic expressions are derived for the first 8 Fourier coefficients for pure Lorentzian lines, for pure Doppler lines and for Voigt lines with at most moderate Doppler dependence. A strong-line limit sum rule on the Fourier coefficients is enforced to define an additional Fourier coefficient and to optimize convergence of the truncated expansion. The moderate Doppler dependence scenario is applicable to and has been implemented in the MODTRAN5 atmospheric band model radiative transfer software. Finite-bin transmittances computed with the truncated expansions reduce transmittance residuals compared to the former Rodgers-Williams equivalent width based approach by ∼2 orders of magnitude.

  16. Molecular design of hybrid tumour necrosis factor alpha with polyethylene glycol increases its anti-tumour potency.

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsumi, Y.; Kihira, T.; Tsunoda, S.; Kanamori, T.; Nakagawa, S.; Mayumi, T.

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted to increase the anti-tumour potency and reduce the toxic side-effects of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). Natural human TNF-alpha was chemically conjugated with monomethoxy polyethylene glycol (PEG) using succinimidyl coupling of lysine amino groups of TNF-alpha. The number-average molecular weight of PEG-modified TNF-alpha (PEG-TNF-alpha) increased with an increase in the reaction time and the initial molar ratio of PEG relative to TNF-alpha. The resulting modified TNF-alpha was separated into fractions of various molecular weights. The specific activity of separated PEG-TNF-alpha s relative to that of native TNF-alpha gradually decreased with an increase in the degree of PEG modification, but the plasma half-life was drastically increased with the increase in molecular weight of modified TNF-alpha. PEG-TNF-alpha s, in which 29% and 56% of lysine residues were coupled to PEG, had anti-tumour activity approximately 4 and 100 times greater than unmodified TNF-alpha in the murine Meth-A fibrosarcoma model. Extensive PEG modification did not increase its in vivo activity. A high dose of unmodified TNF-alpha induced toxic side-effects, but these were not observed with the modified TNF-alpha s. Optimal PEG modification of TNF-alpha markedly increased its bioavailability and may facilitate its potential anti-tumour therapeutic use. PMID:7734321

  17. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yanlin; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-08-01

    The {alpha}-particle effects on the internal kink mode stability are studied. Finite Grad-Shafranov Shift, plasma {beta}, and plasma shape can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in pitch angle space and reduce average magnetic drift frequency. The drift reversal effect on the ideal kink mode is small, but the {beta}{sub {alpha}} threshold for the fishbone mode can be much lower than previously predicted. In addition, the ion diamagnetic drift has a stronger destabilizing effect.

  18. Pulse Width Modulation Applied to Olfactory Stimulation for Intensity Tuning.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Patrice; Billot, Pierre-Édouard; Millot, Jean-Louis; Gharbi, Tijani

    2015-01-01

    For most olfactometers described in the literature, adjusting olfactory stimulation intensity involves modifying the dilution of the odorant in a neutral solution (water, mineral, oil, etc.), the dilution of the odorant air in neutral airflow, or the surface of the odorant in contact with airflow. But, for most of these above-mentioned devices, manual intervention is necessary for adjusting concentration. We present in this article a method of controlling odorant concentration via a computer which can be implemented on even the most dynamic olfactometers. We used Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), a technique commonly used in electronic or electrical engineering, and we have applied it to odor delivery. PWM, when applied to odor delivery, comprises an alternative presentation of odorant air and clean air at a high frequency. The cycle period (odor presentation and rest) is 200 ms. In order to modify odorant concentration, the ratio between the odorant period and clean air presentation during a cycle is modified. This ratio is named duty cycle. Gas chromatography measurements show that this method offers a range of mixing factors from 33% to 100% (continuous presentation of odor). Proof of principle is provided via a psychophysical experiment. Three odors (isoamyl acetate, butanol and pyridine) were presented to twenty subjects. Each odor was delivered three times with five values of duty cycles. After each stimulation, the subjects were asked to estimate the intensity of the stimulus on a 10 point scale, ranging from 0 (undetectable) to 9 (very strong). Results show a main effect of the duty cycles on the intensity ratings for all tested odors.

  19. Influence of sound source width on human sound localization.

    PubMed

    Greene, Nathaniel T; Paige, Gary D

    2012-01-01

    Free-field sound localization experiments generally assume that a loudspeaker can be approximated by a point-source; however, a large loudspeaker may extend beyond the width that two sources can be discriminated. Humans can accurately discriminate sound source locations within a few degrees, thus one might expect localization precision to decrease as a function of sound source diameter, much as precision is lower for localizing the center of a wide, blurry light source. In order to test the degree to which humans differentially localize small and large sound sources, auditory targets were presented using a single 25.4 cm by 10.2 cm elliptical loudspeaker with the primary axis oriented both horizontally and vertically in different sessions. Subjects were seated with their heads fixed by a bite bar in a darkened, echo-attenuating room facing a cylindrical, acoustically transparent screen at a distance of 2 meters. Auditory targets consisted of repeating bursts (5 Hz) of low frequency band-pass noise (0.2 - 1 kHz, 75 dB SPL). Subjects were instructed to quickly and accurately guide a laser pointer mounted on a cylindrical joystick towards targets, presented randomly within a field ± 40° in azimuth by ± 10° in elevation, with oversampled points located every ten degrees along the primary meridians. Localization accuracy and precision (mean and standard deviation of localization error at oversampled locations) were not significantly different between speaker orientations, and were comparable to baseline measurements recorded using a 7.6 cm circular speaker. We conclude that low frequency sound localization performance is not dependent upon the size of the sound source as predicted theoretically, and is well approximated by a point source.

  20. Stark widths and shifts for spectral lines of Sn IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Andrés-García, I.; Alonso-Medina, A.; Colón, C.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present theoretical Stark widths and shifts calculated corresponding to 66 spectral lines of Sn IV. We use the Griem semi-empirical approach and the COWAN computer code. For the intermediate coupling calculations, the standard method of least-squares fitting from experimental energy levels was used. Data are presented for an electron density of 1017 cm-3 and temperatures T = 1.1-5.0 (104 K). The matrix elements used in these calculations have been determined from 34 configurations of Sn IV: 4d10ns(n = 5-10), 4d10nd(n = 5-8), 4d95s2, 4d95p2, 4d95s5d, 4d85s5p2 and 4d105g for even parity and 4d10np(n = 5-8), 4d10nf (n = 4-6), 4d95snp(n = 5-8), 4d85s25p and 4d95snf (n = 4-10) for odd parity. Also, in order to test the matrix elements used in our calculations, we present calculated values of radiative lifetimes of 14 levels of Sn IV. There is good agreement between our calculations and the experimental radiative lifetimes obtained from the bibliography. The spectral lines of Sn IV are observed in UV spectra of HD 149499 B obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer, the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph and the International Ultraviolet Explorer. Theoretical trends of the Stark broadening parameter versus the temperature for relevant lines are presented. Also our values of Stark broadening parameters have been compared with the data available in the bibliography.

  1. Perception of length to width relations of city squares.

    PubMed

    Nefs, Harold T; van Bilsen, Arthur; Pont, Sylvia C; de Ridder, Huib; Wijntjes, Maarten W A; van Doorn, Andrea J

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we focus on how people perceive the aspect ratio of city squares. Earlier research has focused on distance perception but not so much on the perceived aspect ratio of the surrounding space. Furthermore, those studies have focused on "open" spaces rather than urban areas enclosed by walls, houses and filled with people, cars, etc. In two experiments, we therefore measured, using a direct and an indirect method, the perceived aspect ratio of five city squares in the historic city center of Delft, the Netherlands. We also evaluated whether the perceived aspect ratio of city squares was affected by the position of the observer on the square. In the first experiment, participants were asked to set the aspect ratio of a small rectangle such that it matched the perceived aspect ratio of the city square. In the second experiment, participants were asked to estimate the length and width of the city square separately. In the first experiment, we found that the perceived aspect ratio was in general lower than the physical aspect ratio. However, in the second experiment, we found that the calculated ratios were close to veridical except for the most elongated city square. We conclude therefore that the outcome depends on how the measurements are performed. Furthermore, although indirect measurements are nearly veridical, the perceived aspect ratio is an underestimation of the physical aspect ratio when measured in a direct way. Moreover, the perceived aspect ratio also depends on the location of the observer. These results may be beneficial to the design of large open urban environments, and in particular to rectangular city squares.

  2. A SUCCESSFUL BROADBAND SURVEY FOR GIANT Ly{alpha} NEBULAE. II. SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Prescott, Moire K. M.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.

    2013-01-01

    Using a systematic broadband search technique, we have carried out a survey for large Ly{alpha} nebulae (or Ly{alpha} {sup b}lobs{sup )} at 2 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 within 8.5 deg{sup 2} of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey Booetes field, corresponding to a total survey comoving volume of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 8} h {sup -3} {sub 70} Mpc{sup 3}. Here, we present our spectroscopic observations of candidate giant Ly{alpha} nebulae. Of 26 candidates targeted, 5 were confirmed to have Ly{alpha} emission at 1.7 {approx}< z {approx}< 2.7, 4 of which were new discoveries. The confirmed Ly{alpha} nebulae span a range of Ly{alpha} equivalent widths, colors, sizes, and line ratios, and most show spatially extended continuum emission. The remaining candidates did not reveal any strong emission lines, but instead exhibit featureless, diffuse, blue continuum spectra. Their nature remains mysterious, but we speculate that some of these might be Ly{alpha} nebulae lying within the redshift desert (i.e., 1.2 {approx}< z {approx}< 1.6). Our spectroscopic follow-up confirms the power of using deep broadband imaging to search for the bright end of the Ly{alpha} nebula population across enormous comoving volumes.

  3. Are alpha-gliadins glycosylated?

    PubMed

    Turner, J B; Garner, G V; Gordon, D B; Brookes, S J; Smith, C A

    2002-02-01

    Alpha-gliadins isolated by carboxymethylcellulose chromatography contain noncovalently bound glucose probably due to contaminating proteoglycans and to material shed from the column. Traces of carbohydrate remain strongly bound to alpha-gliadins even after harsh denaturation, but our results indicate alpha-gliadins are not glycoproteins. Suggestions that gliadins are glycoproteins are probably due to contamination with this glucose and the presence of these proteoglycans.

  4. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  5. Influence of outlet channel width to the flow velocity and pressure of a flow focusing microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fhong Soon, Chin; Hiung Yin, Yap; Sek Tee, Kian; Khairul Ahmad, Mohd; Zainizan Sahdan, Mohd; Nayan, Nafarizal

    2016-11-01

    Microencapsulation using flow focusing microfluidic devices attract great interest because of the simple fabrication technique using polymeric material. Simulation of the microfluidic device provides the advantage of reducing the waste of material before actual implementation of the fabrication. This paper reports the design of a flow focusing microfluidic device based on emulsification of two immiscible fluids. The system was build and simulated in COMSOL Multiphysics software by varying the outlet width in examining the effects of the flow and pressure at the outlet. The simulation results reveal that both the flow rate and the pressure decreased dramatically when the ratio of outlet channel to inlet channel (R) is greater than 2. The width of the outlet is critical in ensuring the flow of microcapsules without accumulation of microcapsules at the output pool due to the poor flow rate at the outlet channel and avoidance of leakage problem. The recommended R to achieve the objective of microencapsulation is between 2 and 4.

  6. Spinal alpha3beta2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors tonically inhibit the transmission of nociceptive mechanical stimuli.

    PubMed

    Young, Tracey; Wittenauer, Shannon; McIntosh, J Michael; Vincler, Michelle

    2008-09-10

    The presence of non-alpha4beta2, non-alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in the rat spinal cord has been suggested previously, but the identity of these nAChRs had not been shown. Intrathecal administration of the alpha3beta2*/alpha6beta2* selective alpha-conotoxin MII (alpha-CTX MII) dose- and time-dependently reduced paw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical pressure in normal rats. The pronociceptive effect of alpha-CTX MII was partially blocked by NMDA receptor antagonism and lost completely following ablation of C-fibers. The effect of spinal nerve ligation on alpha-CTX MII-induced mechanical hypersensitivity was also assessed. Sensitivity was lost in the hind paw ipsilateral to spinal nerve ligation, but maintained in the contralateral hind paw at control levels. Radioligand binding in spinal cord membranes revealed high and low affinity alpha-CTX MII binding sites. Spinal nerve ligation did not significantly alter alpha-CTX MII binding ipsilateral to ligation. Finally, no evidence for the presence of alpha6-containing nAChRs was identified. The results of these studies show the presence of 2 populations of alpha-CTX MII-sensitive nAChRs containing the alpha3 and beta2, but not the alpha6, subunits in the rat spinal cord that function to inhibit the transmission of nociceptive mechanical stimuli via inhibiting the release of glutamate from C-fibers. Spinal nerve ligation produces a unilateral loss of alpha-CTX MII-induced mechanical hypersensitivity without altering alpha-CTX MII binding sites. Our data support a peripheral injury-induced loss of a cholinergic inhibitory tone at spinal alpha3beta2* nAChRs, without the loss of the receptors themselves, which may contribute to mechanical hypersensitivity following spinal nerve ligation.

  7. TH-C-18A-04: Validation of Dosimetric Measurement of CT Radiation Profile Width

    SciTech Connect

    Gauntt, D; Al-Senan, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The ACR now requires that the CT radiation profile width be measured at all clinically used collimations. We developed a method for measuring the profile width using dosimetry alone to allow a faster and simpler measurement of beam widths. Methods: A pencil ionization chamber is used to take two dose-length product measurements in air for a wide collimation. One of these is taken with a 1cm tungsten mask on the pencil chamber. The difference between these measurements is the calibration factor, or the DLP in air per unit length. By dividing the doselength product for any given collimation by this factor, we can rapidly determine the beam profile width.We measured the beam width for all available detector configurations and focal spot sizes on three different CT scanners from two different manufacturers. The measurements were done using film, CR cassette, and the present dosimetric method. Results: The beam widths measured dosimetrically are approximately 2% wider than those measured using film or computed radiography; this difference is believed due to off-focus or scattered radiation. After correcting for this, the dosimetric beam widths match the film and CR widths with an RMS difference of approximately 0.2mm. The measured beam widths are largely insensitive to errors in positioning of the mask, or to tilt errors in the pencil chamber. Conclusion: Using the present method, radiation profile widths can be measured quickly, with an accuracy better than 1mm.

  8. GWD-LR: a satellite-based global database of river channel width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamazaki, Dai; O'Loughlin, Fiachra; Trigg, Mark; Bates, Paul

    2015-04-01

    River width is a fundamental parameter of river hydrodynamic simulations, but no global-scale river width database based on observed water bodies has yet been developed. Here we present a new algorithm that automatically calculates river width from satellite-based water masks and flow direction maps. The Global Width Database for Large Rivers (GWD-LR) is developed by applying the algorithm to the SRTM Water Body Database and the HydroSHEDS flow direction map. Both bank-to-bank river width and effective river width excluding islands are calculated for river channels between 60S and 60N. The effective river width of GWD-LR is compared with existing river width databases for the Congo and Mississippi Rivers. The effective river width of the GWD-LR is slightly narrower compared to the existing databases, but the relative difference is within +/-20% for most river channels. As the river width of the GWD-LR is calculated along the river channels of the HydroSHEDS flow direction map, it is relatively straightforward to apply the GWD-LR to global- and continental-scale river modeling.

  9. Three-dimensional MR mapping of angiogenesis with alpha5beta1(alpha nu beta3)-targeted theranostic nanoparticles in the MDA-MB-435 xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Schmieder, Anne H; Caruthers, Shelton D; Zhang, Huiying; Williams, Todd A; Robertson, J David; Wickline, Samuel A; Lanza, Gregory M

    2008-12-01

    Our objectives were 1) to characterize angiogenesis in the MDA-MB-435 xenograft mouse model with three-dimensional (3D) MR molecular imaging using alpha(5)beta(1)(RGD)- or irrelevant RGS-targeted paramagnetic nanoparticles and 2) to use MR molecular imaging to assess the antiangiogenic effectiveness of alpha(5)beta(1)(alpha(nu)beta(3))- vs. alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted fumagillin (50 mug/kg) nanoparticles. Tumor-bearing mice were imaged with MR before and after administration of either alpha(5)beta(1)(RGD) or irrelevant RGS-paramagnetic nanoparticles. In experiment 2, mice received saline or alpha(5)beta(1)(alpha(nu)beta(3))- or alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted fumagillin nanoparticles on days 7, 11, 15, and 19 posttumor implant. On day 22, MRI was performed using alpha(5)beta(1)(alpha(nu)beta(3))-targeted paramagnetic nanoparticles to monitor the antiangiogenic response. 3D reconstructions of alpha(5)beta(1)(RGD)-signal enhancement revealed a sparse, asymmetrical pattern of angiogenesis along the tumor periphery, which occupied <2.0% tumor surface area. alpha(5)beta(1)-targeted rhodamine nanoparticles colocalized with FITC-lectin corroborated the peripheral neovascular signal. alpha(5)beta(1)(alpha(nu)beta(3))-fumagillin nanoparticles decreased neovasculature to negligible levels relative to control; alpha(nu)beta(3)-targeted fumagillin nanoparticles were less effective (P>0.05). Reduction of angiogenesis in MDA-MB-435 tumors from low to negligible levels did not decrease tumor volume. MR molecular imaging may be useful for characterizing tumors with sparse neovasculature that are unlikely to have a reduced growth response to targeted antiangiogenic therapy.

  10. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's Reading Improvement Program for Minorities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marable, June Morehead

    This document discusses the founding and establishment of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority's reading experience pilot project. The efforts of this project were aligned with those of Right to Read and Reading Is Fundamental (RIF). Because of the response from parents and children, plans are being made to increase present operations within the next…

  11. Molecular characterization of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J K; Pearson, W R; Lynch, K R

    1991-02-01

    Three 'alpha 1-adrenoceptors' and three 'alpha 2-adrenoceptors' have now been cloned. How closely do these receptors match the native receptors that have been identified pharmacologically? What are the properties of these receptors, and how do they relate to other members of the cationic amine receptor family? Kevin Lynch and his colleagues discuss these questions in this review.

  12. Calcium: Alpha-Synuclein Interactions in Alpha-Synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rcom-H'cheo-Gauthier, Alexandre N.; Osborne, Samantha L.; Meedeniya, Adrian C. B.; Pountney, Dean L.

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of the pre-synaptic protein, α-synuclein (α-syn), is the key etiological factor in Parkinson's disease (PD) and other alpha-synucleinopathies, such as multiple system atrophy (MSA) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Various triggers for pathological α-syn aggregation have been elucidated, including post-translational modifications, oxidative stress, and binding of metal ions, such as calcium. Raised neuronal calcium levels in PD may occur due to mitochondrial dysfunction and/or may relate to calcium channel dysregulation or the reduced expression of the neuronal calcium buffering protein, calbindin-D28k. Recent results on human tissue and a mouse oxidative stress model show that neuronal calbindin-D28k expression excludes α-syn inclusion bodies. Previously, cell culture model studies have shown that transient increases of intracellular free Ca(II), such as by opening of the voltage-gated plasma calcium channels, could induce cytoplasmic aggregates of α-syn. Raised intracellular free calcium and oxidative stress also act cooperatively to promote α-syn aggregation. The association between raised neuronal calcium, α-syn aggregation, oxidative stress, and neurotoxicity is reviewed in the context of neurodegenerative α-syn disease and potential mechanism-based therapies. PMID:28066161

  13. The Pulse Width Modulator ASIC for Deep Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Gregory A.; Wester, Gene W.; Lam, Barbara; Bennett, Johnny; Franco, Lauro; Woo, Erika

    2004-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory has started the development of a Pulse Width Modulator Application Specific Integrated Circuit (PWMA). This development is leveraging the previous development of the Switch Control ASIC (SCA). The purpose of the development is to provide the control for a selected range of power converter topologies and to meet the stringent environmental requirements of deep space missions. The PWMA will include several power control functions that are not normally included on the off-the-shelf components available today. One key functional requirement is the ability to implement an N + K redundant power converter with the ability to control the charging of a battery. Other applications will be the typical point of load isolated and non-isolated power converters. The purpose the development is not only to provide a much needed flight part, but also to accelerate the engineering process by using a standard cell library from previous ASIC developments. Under previous developments with Boeing and Lockheed Martin, JPL has produced three ASICs. Each ASIC has been implemented by using an analog standard cell library. One such development was the SCA, which is design to provide a floating power switch control. The functional verification of this ASIC has been completed and the cells used have been targeted for the new development of the PWMA. The primary function of the PWMA is to provide the control function of a point of load power converter. The design is an isolated 60 W converter with a 33 V output. In architecting the design, several functions were left up to the power converter design in order to make the ASIC more generic. The ASIC can be used for several power converter topologies and power levels. Some additional features have been added to the ASIC to provide the interfaces for multi-phase topologies and battery control functions. An N+K fault tolerant strategy has been implemented in order to provide the battery control functions. The PWMA has

  14. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle-emitting immunoconjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, R.M.; Kinsey, B.M.; Kassis, A.L.; Ferrara, J.L.M.; Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.; Coleman, C.N.; Adelstein, S.J.; Burakoff, S.J.

    1988-05-20

    Alpha particles are energetic short-range ions whose higher linear energy transfer produces extreme cytotoxicity. An ..cap alpha..-particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate consisting of a bismuth-212-labeled monoclonal immunoglobulin M specific for the murine T cell/neuroectodermal surface antigen Thy 1.2 was prepared. Analysis in vitro showed that the radioimmunoconjugate was selectively cytotoxic to a Thy 1.2/sup +/ EL-4 murine tumor cell line. Approximately three bismuth-212-labeled immunoconjugates per target cell reduced the uptake of (/sup 3/H)thymidine by the EL-4 target cells to background levels. Mice inoculated intraperitoneally with EL-4 cells were cured of their ascites after intraperitoneal injection of 150 microcuries of the antigen-specific radioimmunoconjugate, suggesting a possible role for such conjugates in intracavitary cancer therapy. 18 references, 3 figures.

  15. Microscopic cluster model of {alpha}+n, {alpha}+p, {alpha}+ {sup 3}He, and {alpha}+{alpha} elastic scattering from a realistic effective nuclear interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Dohet-Eraly, J.; Baye, D.

    2011-07-15

    An effective nucleon-nucleon interaction adapted to cluster-model calculations of collisions is derived from the realistic Argonne potential AV18 with the unitary correlation operator method. The unitary correlation is determined from the {alpha}+{alpha} elastic phase shifts calculated in a cluster approach by the generator coordinate method coupled with the microscopic R-matrix method. With this interaction, the elastic phase shifts for the {alpha}+n, {alpha}+p, and {alpha}+{sup 3}He collisions are calculated within the same model. Without further adjustment, a good agreement with experimental data is obtained with a small model space.

  16. Alpha-particle microdosimetry.

    PubMed

    Chouin, Nicolas; Bardies, Manuel

    2011-07-01

    With the increasing availability of alpha emitters, targeted α-particle therapy has emerged as a solution of choice to treat haematological cancers and micrometastatic and minimal residual diseases. Alpha-particles are highly cytotoxic because of their high linear energy transfer (LET) and have a short range of a few cell diameters in tissue, assuring good treatment specificity. These radiologic features make conventional dosimetry less relevant for that context. Stochastic variations in the energy deposited in cell nuclei are important because of the microscopic target size, low number of α- particle traversals, and variation in LET along the α-particle track. Microdosimetry provides a conceptual framework that aims at a systematic analysis of the stochastic distribution of energy deposits in irradiated matter. The different quantities of microdosimetry and the different methods of microdosimetric calculations were described in the early eighties. Since then, numerous models have been published through the years and applied to analyse experimental data or to model realistic therapeutic situations. Major results have been an accurate description of the high toxicity of α-particles, and the description of the predominant effect of activity distribution at the cellular scale on toxicity or efficacy of potential targeted α-particle therapies. This last factor represents a major limitation to the use of microdosimetry in vivo because determination of the source - target distribution is complicated. The future contributions of microdosimetry in targeted α-particle therapy research will certainly depend on the ability to develop high-resolution detectors and on the implementation of pharmaco-kinetic models at the tumour microenvironment scale.

  17. THE FORMATION OF THE H{alpha} LINE IN THE SOLAR CHROMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect

    Leenaarts, J.; Carlsson, M.; Rouppe van der Voort, L. E-mail: mats.carlsson@astro.uio.no

    2012-04-20

    We use state-of-the-art radiation-MHD simulations and three-dimensional (3D) non-LTE radiative transfer computations to investigate H{alpha} line formation in the solar chromosphere and apply the results of this investigation to develop the potential of H{alpha} as a diagnostic of the chromosphere. We show that one can accurately model H{alpha} line formation assuming statistical equilibrium and complete frequency redistribution provided the computation of the model atmosphere included non-equilibrium ionization of hydrogen and the Ly{alpha} and Ly{beta} line profiles are described by Doppler profiles. We find that 3D radiative transfer is essential in modeling hydrogen lines due to the low photon destruction probability in H{alpha}. The H{alpha} opacity in the upper chromosphere is mainly sensitive to the mass density and only weakly sensitive to the temperature. We find that the H{alpha} line-core intensity is correlated with the average formation height: The larger the average formation height is, the lower the intensity will be. The line-core width is a measure of the gas temperature in the line-forming region. The fibril-like dark structures seen in H{alpha} line-core images computed from our model atmosphere are tracing magnetic field lines. These structures are caused by field-aligned ridges of enhanced chromospheric mass density that raise their average formation height, and therefore make them appear dark against their deeper-formed surroundings. We compare with observations, and find that the simulated line-core widths are very similar to the observed ones, without the need for additional microturbulence.

  18. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor turnover in adipose tissue and kidney: irreversible blockade of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors by benextramine

    SciTech Connect

    Taouis, M.; Berlan, M.; Lafontan, M.

    1987-01-01

    The recovery of post- and extrasynaptic alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-binding sites was studied in vivo in male golden hamsters after treatment with an irreversible alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist benextramine, a tetramine disulfide that possesses a high affinity for alpha 2-binding sites. The kidney alpha 2-adrenergic receptor number was measured with (/sup 3/H)yohimbine, whereas (/sup 3/H)clonidine was used for fat cell and brain membrane alpha 2-binding site identification. Benextramine treatment of fat cell, kidney, and brain membranes reduced or completely suppressed, in an irreversible manner, (/sup 3/H) clonidine and (/sup 3/H)yohimbine binding without modifying adenosine (A1-receptor) and beta-adrenergic receptor sites. This irreversible binding was also found 1 and 2 hr after intraperitoneal administration of benextramine to the hamsters. Although it bound irreversibly to peripheral and central alpha 2-adrenergic receptors on isolated membranes, benextramine was unable to cross the blood-brain barrier of the hamster at the concentrations used (10-20 mg/kg). After the irreversible blockade, alpha 2-binding sites reappeared in kidney and adipose tissue following a monoexponential time course. Recovery of binding sites was more rapid in kidney than in adipose tissue; the half-lives of the receptor were 31 and 46 hr, respectively in the tissues. The rates of receptor production were 1.5 and 1.8 fmol/mg of protein/hr in kidney and adipose tissue. Reappearance of alpha 2-binding sites was associated with a rapid recovery of function (antilipolytic potencies of alpha 2-agonists) in fat cells inasmuch as occupancy of 15% of (/sup 3/H)clonidine-binding sites was sufficient to promote 40% inhibition of lipolysis. Benextramine is a useful tool to estimate turnover of alpha 2-adrenergic receptors under normal and pathological situations.

  19. Red cell distribution width in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation

    PubMed Central

    Hellhammer, Katharina; Zeus, Tobias; Verde, Pablo E; Veulemanns, Verena; Kahlstadt, Lisa; Wolff, Georg; Erkens, Ralf; Westenfeld, Ralf; Navarese, Eliano P; Merx, Marc W; Rassaf, Tienush; Kelm, Malte

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To determine the impact of red blood cell distribution width on outcome in anemic patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). METHODS: In a retrospective single center cohort study we determined the impact of baseline red cell distribution width (RDW) and anemia on outcome in 376 patients with aortic stenosis undergoing TAVI. All patients were discussed in the institutional heart team and declined for surgical aortic valve replacement due to high operative risk. Collected data included patient characteristics, imaging findings, periprocedural in hospital data, laboratory results and follow up data. Blood samples for hematology and biochemistry analysis were taken from every patient before and at fixed intervals up to 72 h after TAVI including blood count and creatinine. Descriptive statistics were used for patient’s characteristics. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were used for time to event outcomes. A recursive partitioning regression and classification was used to investigate the association between potential risk factors and outcome variables. RESULTS: Mean age in our study population was 81 ± 6.1 years. Anemia was prevalent in 63.6% (n = 239) of our patients. Age and creatinine were identified as risk factors for anemia. In our study population, anemia per se did influence 30-d mortality but did not predict longterm mortality. In contrast, a RDW > 14% showed to be highly predictable for a reduced short- and longterm survival in patients with aortic valve disease after TAVI procedure. CONCLUSION: Age and kidney function determine the degree of anemia. The anisocytosis of red blood cells in anemic patients supplements prognostic information in addition to that derived from the WHO-based definition of anemia. PMID:26981217

  20. The width of clinically-defined keratinized gingiva in the mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Bosnjak, Andrija; Jorgić-Srdjak, Ksenija; Maricević, Tomislav; Plancak, Darije

    2002-01-01

    Some authors have noticed a clear decrease of the width of keratinized gingiva when they compared the width over deciduous and newly erupted permanent teeth. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the width of keratinized gingiva over permanent and deciduous teeth present in 6 to 11-year old children in an urban environment. The greatest width of keratinized gingiva was found over deciduous canines and permanent incisors. When comparing the width of keratinized gingiva over deciduous canines and molars and permanent first incisors and first molars, statistically significant differences were found only between 6- and 11-year-old groups. The findings do not seem to support previously published data, but do suggest that periodontal mucogingival surgery is not needed before the patient reaches the adult age, since there is a tendency of an increase of the width of keratinized gingiva.

  1. Membrane remodeling, an early event in benzo[alpha]pyrene-induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tekpli, Xavier; Rissel, Mary; Huc, Laurence; Catheline, Daniel; Sergent, Odile; Rioux, Vincent; Legrand, Philippe; Holme, Jorn A.; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Therese; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique

    2010-02-15

    Benzo[alpha]pyrene (B[alpha]P) often serves as a model for mutagenic and carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Our previous work suggested a role of membrane fluidity in B[alpha]P-induced apoptotic process. In this study, we report that B[alpha]P modifies the composition of cholesterol-rich microdomains (lipid rafts) in rat liver F258 epithelial cells. The cellular distribution of the ganglioside-GM1 was markedly changed following B[alpha]P exposure. B[alpha]P also modified fatty acid composition and decreased the cholesterol content of cholesterol-rich microdomains. B[alpha]P-induced depletion of cholesterol in lipid rafts was linked to a reduced expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMG-CoA reductase). Aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and B[alpha]P-related H{sub 2}O{sub 2} formation were involved in the reduced expression of HMG-CoA reductase and in the remodeling of membrane microdomains. The B[alpha]P-induced membrane remodeling resulted in an intracellular alkalinization observed during the early phase of apoptosis. In conclusion, B[alpha]P altered the composition of plasma membrane microstructures through AhR and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dependent-regulation of lipid biosynthesis. In F258 cells, the B[alpha]P-induced membrane remodeling was identified as an early apoptotic event leading to an intracellular alkalinization.

  2. DFT CONFORMATIONAL STUDIES OF ALPHA-MALTOTRIOSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent DFT optimization studies on alpha-maltose improved our understanding of the preferred conformations of alpha-maltose and the present study extends these studies to alpha-maltotriose with three alpha-D-glucopyranose residues linked by two alpha-[1-4] bridges, denoted herein as DP-3's. Combina...

  3. Prothymosin alpha in human blood.

    PubMed Central

    Panneerselvam, C; Haritos, A A; Caldarella, J; Horecker, B L

    1987-01-01

    The major cross-reacting peptide in human plasma detected with a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for thymosin alpha 1 was identified as prothymosin alpha, based on its elution properties in gel-filtration chromatography and its amino acid composition after purification by HPLC. A small quantity (less than 10%) of the total cross-reacting material was recovered in fractions corresponding to lower molecular weight thymosin alpha 1-like peptides. The total quantity of cross-reacting material detected in human blood, expressed as thymosin alpha 1 equivalents, was 11-14 pmol/ml (approximately 90% was recovered in the leukocyte fraction, approximately 10% was in the plasma fraction, and 1-2% was in the erythrocyte fraction). The peptide present in leukocytes was also identified as prothymosin alpha. After correction for the 5-times lower molar reactivity of prothymosin alpha in the thymosin alpha 1 RIA employed in these experiments, we estimate that the content of prothymosin alpha in human blood is 55-70 pmol/ml (0.6-0.8 microgram/ml). The relatively small quantities recovered in the erythrocyte and plasma fractions may be attributed to contamination of the former by leukocytes or to leakage from leukocytes into the plasma. PMID:3474615

  4. EEG Alpha Power and Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doppelmayr, M.; Klimesch, W.; Stadler, W.; Pollhuber, D.; Heine, C.

    2002-01-01

    Tested whether alpha power in different sub-bands is selectively related to intelligence. For 74 Austrian subjects, the EEG was recorded during a resting session and 2 different intelligence tests were performed. Findings show a strong positive correlation between intelligence and alpha power. (SLD)

  5. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Comparison of tibiofemoral joint space width measurements from standing CT and fixed flexion radiography.

    PubMed

    Segal, Neil A; Frick, Eric; Duryea, Jeffrey; Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Torner, James C; Felson, David T; Anderson, Donald D

    2016-08-09

    The objective of this project was to determine the relationship between medial tibiofemoral joint space width measured on fixed-flexion radiographs and the three-dimensional joint space width distribution on low-dose, standing CT (SCT) imaging. At the 84-month visit of the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study, 20 participants were recruited. A commercial SCT scanner for the foot and ankle was modified to image knees while standing. Medial tibiofemoral joint space width was assessed on radiographs at fixed locations from 15-30% of compartment width using validated software and on SCT by mapping the distances between three-dimensional subchondral bone surfaces. Individual joint space width values from radiographs were compared with three-dimensional joint space width values from corresponding sagittal plane locations using paired t-tests and correlation coefficients. For the 4 medial-most tibiofemoral locations, radiographic joint space width values exceeded the minimal joint space width on SCT by a mean of 2.0mm and were approximately equal to the 61st percentile value of the joint space width distribution at each respective sagittal-plane location. Correlation coefficients at these locations were 0.91-0.97 and the offsets between joint space width values from radiographs and SCT measurements were consistent. There were greater offsets and variability in the offsets between modalities closer to the tibial spine. Joint space width measurements on fixed-flexion radiographs are highly correlated with three-dimensional joint space width from SCT. In addition to avoiding bony overlap obscuring the joint, a limitation of radiographs, the current study supports a role for SCT in the evaluation of tibiofemoral OA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart M of... - Determining Roof Widths

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Determining Roof Widths A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part..., Subpt. M, App. A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part 1926—Determining Roof Widths Non-mandatory Guidelines... on low-sloped roofs 50 feet (15.25 m) or less in width. Each example in the appendix shows a...

  8. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart M of... - Determining Roof Widths

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Determining Roof Widths A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part..., Subpt. M, App. A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part 1926—Determining Roof Widths Non-mandatory Guidelines... on low-sloped roofs 50 feet (15.25 m) or less in width. Each example in the appendix shows a...

  9. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart M of... - Determining Roof Widths

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Determining Roof Widths A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part..., Subpt. M, App. A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part 1926—Determining Roof Widths Non-mandatory Guidelines... on low-sloped roofs 50 feet (15.25 m) or less in width. Each example in the appendix shows a...

  10. 29 CFR Appendix A to Subpart M of... - Determining Roof Widths

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Determining Roof Widths A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part..., Subpt. M, App. A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part 1926—Determining Roof Widths Non-mandatory Guidelines... on low-sloped roofs 50 feet (15.25 m) or less in width. Each example in the appendix shows a...

  11. Neotropical migratory breeding bird communities in riparian forests of different widths along the Altamaha River, Georgia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, M.F.; Krementz, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    -We surveyed riparian forest corridors of different widths along the lower Altamaha River in Georgia in 1993 and 1994 to investigate the relationship between forest corridor width and Neotropical breeding bird community diversity and abundance. Species richness and abundance of three of six focal species increased with increasing forest corridor width. We suggest if Neotropical breeding bird communities are a target group, that land managers should consider leaving a 100 m buffer strip along riparian zones.

  12. The impact on floats or hulls during landing as affected by bottom width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewes, E

    1936-01-01

    For floats and hulls having V bottoms the impact force does not necessarily increase with increasing width. Therefore, the weight of the float landing gear, side walls, and other parts, and of the fuselage construction need not be increased with increasing bottom width, but the weight of the bottom construction itself, on the other hand, does not increase with increase in bottom width and is largely determined by the type of construction.

  13. Bundling of actin filaments by elongation factor 1 alpha inhibits polymerization at filament ends

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1 alpha) is an abundant protein that binds aminoacyl-tRNA and ribosomes in a GTP-dependent manner. EF1 alpha also interacts with the cytoskeleton by binding and bundling actin filaments and microtubules. In this report, the effect of purified EF1 alpha on actin polymerization and depolymerization is examined. At molar ratios present in the cytosol, EF1 alpha significantly blocks both polymerization and depolymerization of actin filaments and increases the final extent of actin polymer, while at high molar ratios to actin, EF1 alpha nucleates actin polymerization. Although EF1 alpha binds actin monomer, this monomer-binding activity does not explain the effects of EF1 alpha on actin polymerization at physiological molar ratios. The mechanism for the inhibition of polymerization is related to the actin-bundling activity of EF1 alpha. Both ends of the actin filament are inhibited for polymerization and both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are affected by pH within the same physiological range; at high pH both bundling and the inhibition of actin polymerization are reduced. Additionally, it is seen that the binding of aminoacyl-tRNA to EF1 alpha releases EF1 alpha's inhibiting effect on actin polymerization. These data demonstrate that EF1 alpha can alter the assembly of F-actin, a filamentous scaffold on which non- membrane-associated protein translation may be occurring in vivo. PMID:8947553

  14. Diabetes and Alpha Lipoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Golbidi, Saeid; Badran, Mohammad; Laher, Ismail

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted metabolic disorder where there is increased oxidative stress that contributes to the pathogenesis of this debilitating disease. This has prompted several investigations into the use of antioxidants as a complementary therapeutic approach. Alpha lipoic acid, a naturally occurring dithiol compound which plays an essential role in mitochondrial bioenergetic reactions, has gained considerable attention as an antioxidant for use in managing diabetic complications. Lipoic acid quenches reactive oxygen species, chelates metal ions, and reduces the oxidized forms of other antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, and glutathione. It also boosts antioxidant defense system through Nrf-2-mediated antioxidant gene expression and by modulation of peroxisome proliferator activated receptors-regulated genes. ALA inhibits nuclear factor kappa B and activates AMPK in skeletal muscles, which in turn have a plethora of metabolic consequences. These diverse actions suggest that lipoic acid acts by multiple mechanisms, many of which have only been uncovered recently. In this review we briefly summarize the known biochemical properties of lipoic acid and then discussed the oxidative mechanisms implicated in diabetic complications and the mechanisms by which lipoic acid may ameliorate these reactions. The findings of some of the clinical trials in which lipoic acid administration has been tested in diabetic patients during the last 10 years are summarized. It appears that the clearest benefit of lipoic acid supplementation is in patients with diabetic neuropathy. PMID:22125537

  15. Subunit exchange of polydisperse proteins: mass spectrometry reveals consequences of alphaA-crystallin truncation.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, J Andrew; Benesch, Justin L P; Ding, Lin Lin; Yaron, Orna; Horwitz, Joseph; Robinson, Carol V

    2005-04-15

    The small heat shock protein, alpha-crystallin, plays a key role in maintaining lens transparency by chaperoning structurally compromised proteins. This is of particular importance in the human lens, where proteins are exposed to post-translational modifications over the life-time of an individual. Here, we examine the structural and functional consequences of one particular modification of alphaA-crystallin involving the truncation of 5 C-terminal residues (alphaA(1-168)). Using novel mass spectrometry approaches and established biophysical techniques, we show that alphaA(1-168) forms oligomeric assemblies with a lower average molecular mass than wild-type alphaA-crystallin (alphaA(WT)). Also apparent from the mass spectra of both alphaA(WT) and alphaA(1-168) assemblies is the predominance of oligomers containing even numbers of subunits; interestingly, this preference is more marked for alphaA(1-168). To examine the rate of exchange of subunits between assemblies, we mixed alphaB crystallin with either alphaA(WT) or alphaA(1-168) and monitored in a real-time mass spectrometry experiment the formation of heteroligomers. The results show that there is a significant decrease in the rate of exchange when alphaA(1-168) is involved. These reduced exchange kinetics, however, have no effect upon chaperone efficiency, which is found to be closely similar for both alphaA(WT) and alphaA(1-168). Overall, therefore, our results allow us to conclude that, in contrast to mechanisms established for analogous proteins from plants, yeast, and bacteria, the rate of subunit exchange is not the critical parameter in determining efficient chaperone behavior for mammalian alphaA-crystallin.

  16. Self-consistent study of the alpha particle driven TAE mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of high energy particles with an Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a realistic kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal mode numbers and their radial mode profiles as calculated with the NOVA-K code are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The numerical simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. Particle loss is limited to devices in which the alpha particle gyro radius is a significant fraction of the minor radius.

  17. Fluorescent excitation of photospheric Fe K-alpha emission during solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmar, A. N.; Culhane, J. L.; Rapley, C. G.; Phillips, K. J. H.; Wolfson, C. J.; Acton, L. W.; Dennis, B. R.

    1982-01-01

    The Bent Crystal Spectrometer on the NASA Solar Maximum Mission satellite provides high spectral and temporal resolution observations of the Fe K-alpha lines. Analyses have been conducted of spectra from almost 50 solar flares that occurred during 1980. These data strongly support fluorescent excitation of photospheric iron by photons of E greater than 7.11 keV emitted by the hot coronal plasma produced during the flare. After comparison of the data with a model, the observed K-alpha line widths are discussed along with estimates of the size of the emitting region, the height of the coronal source and the photospheric iron abundance.

  18. Relationship between Standard Deviation and Maximum Fluctuation Width of Ensemble Average Insolation Observed at Multi-points in Large Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takeyoshi; Inoue, Takato; Honda, Nobuyuki; Koaizawa, Kazumasa; Nishino, Shinichi; Suzuoki, Yasuo

    For the detailed impact assessment of the total power output fluctuation of high penetration photovoltaic power generation system in terms of the load-frequency control, this study evaluated the relationship between the standard deviation (STD) including only shorter cycles than 32 minute and the maximum fluctuation width (MFW) calculated with various window width by using the two data-sets of multi-points observed insolation data. The main results are as follows. The R2 of regression line of STD - MFW correlation diagram is larger than 0.85 for various seasons, while the slope of regression line slightly varies with seasons. The slope of regression line is almost the same for various area sizes during the same season, although the variation ranges of both STD and MFW reduce with larger window width due to a so-called smoothing effect. The results suggest that if the STD of geographical average insolation can be calculated by using stochastic method, the MFW can be calculated with a linear function of STD because of the good correlation between STD and MFW independently of seasons and area sizes.

  19. Linear Mixed-Effects Models to Describe Individual Tree Crown Width for China-Fir in Fujian Province, Southeast China

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xu; Yujun, Sun; Xinjie, Wang; Jin, Wang; Yao, Fu

    2015-01-01

    A multiple linear model was developed for individual tree crown width of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb.) Hook in Fujian province, southeast China. Data were obtained from 55 sample plots of pure China-fir plantation stands. An Ordinary Linear Least Squares (OLS) regression was used to establish the crown width model. To adjust for correlations between observations from the same sample plots, we developed one level linear mixed-effects (LME) models based on the multiple linear model, which take into account the random effects of plots. The best random effects combinations for the LME models were determined by the Akaike’s information criterion, the Bayesian information criterion and the -2logarithm likelihood. Heteroscedasticity was reduced by three residual variance functions: the power function, the exponential function and the constant plus power function. The spatial correlation was modeled by three correlation structures: the first-order autoregressive structure [AR(1)], a combination of first-order autoregressive and moving average structures [ARMA(1,1)], and the compound symmetry structure (CS). Then, the LME model was compared to the multiple linear model using the absolute mean residual (AMR), the root mean square error (RMSE), and the adjusted coefficient of determination (adj-R2). For individual tree crown width models, the one level LME model showed the best performance. An independent dataset was used to test the performance of the models and to demonstrate the advantage of calibrating LME models. PMID:25876178

  20. Bayesian multiproxy temperature reconstruction with black spruce ring widths and stable isotopes from the northern Quebec taiga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaretti, Fabio; Huard, David; Naulier, Maud; Savard, Martine; Bégin, Christian; Arseneault, Dominique; Guiot, Joel

    2017-03-01

    Northeastern North America has very few millennium-long, high-resolution climate proxy records. However, very recently, a new tree-ring dataset suitable for temperature reconstructions over the last millennium was developed in the northern Quebec taiga. This dataset is composed of one δ18O and six ring width chronologies. Until now, these chronologies have only been used in independent temperature reconstructions (from δ18O or ring width) showing some differences. Here, we added to the dataset a δ13C chronology and developed a significantly improved millennium-long multiproxy reconstruction (997-2006 CE) accounting for uncertainties with a Bayesian approach that evaluates the likelihood of each proxy model. We also undertook a methodological sensitivity analysis to assess the different responses of each proxy to abrupt forcings such as strong volcanic eruptions. Ring width showed a larger response to single eruptions and a larger cumulative impact of multiple eruptions during active volcanic periods, δ18O showed intermediate responses, and δ13C was mostly insensitive to volcanic eruptions. We conclude that all reconstructions based on a single proxy can be misleading because of the possible reduced or amplified responses to specific forcing agents.

  1. Prevalence of -alpha(3.7) and alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) alleles in sickle cell trait and beta-thalassemia patients in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Nava, María Paulina; Ibarra, Bertha; Magaña, María Teresa; de la Luz Chávez, María; Perea, F Javier

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of alpha-globin gene mutations in three groups of Mexican unrelated individuals. The first two groups were normal and sickle cell trait individuals from the Costa Chica region, a place with a 12.8% frequency of HbS carriers, and the third group comprised of Mexican mestizo patients with beta-thalassemia. We searched for -alpha(3.7) and -alpha(4.2) alpha(+)-thalassemia deletion alleles, as well as the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication through long-gap PCR. The alleles -alpha(3.7) and alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) were found in the heterozygote state only; 19% of the normal subjects had the -alpha(3.7) allele, and 2% showed the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) allele. In individuals with the sickle cell trait, 17% had the -alpha(3.7) deletion, and the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication was observed in 3% of these individuals. We revealed that 16% of the subjects with beta-thalassemia showed the -alpha(3.7) deletion and 28% the alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication. The -alpha(4.2) deletion was not detected in any individual. The frequency of the -alpha(3.7) allele was roughly the same in the three groups studied; this can be explained by the fact that the three groups have common genes from Africa and the Mediterranean, where a high prevalence of alpha(+)-thalassemia has been observed. To our knowledge, the frequency of alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) triplication observed in the Mexican beta-thalassemia patients is the highest reported. As the -alpha(3.7) and alpha alpha alpha(anti3.7) alleles are very common in our selected populations, we believe that there is a need to investigate systematically the alpha-globin gene mutations in all hemoglobinopathies in the Mexican population.

  2. EFFECT OF CHANGING MULTIPLE ARRAY PROCESSOR OUTPUT FILTER BAND WIDTH.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The MAP summation at the TFSO is particularly affected by noise in the frequencies generated by wind, thunder, and animals or personnel near a...seismometer site. In an attempt to decrease this effect, the MAP output filter was changed from a bandwidth of 5.0 - 0.75 cps with 12db per octave slopes... MAP trace by eliminating or reducing most of the higher frequency noise. ’Before and after’ sequences are shown.

  3. Stellar Lyman-alpha emission and the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landsman, Wayne; Simon, Theodore

    1991-01-01

    The UV spectra now available in the IUE archives have been systematically searched for the presence of Lyman-alpha emission in late-type stars. The results provide the first survey of the behavior of the Ly-alpha emission line across most of the cool half of the H-R diagram. The normalized Ly-alpha emission flux is strongest in the chromospherically active RS CVn stars and in the dMe stars. The range of normalized flux values is much smaller among F-type stars than in stars of later spectral type. A dropoff appears in the flux levels of stars at B-V less than 0.30 mag. The measurements are used to search for evidence of possible high column density clouds in the local ISM. The cloud previously identified toward Alpha Oph may be seen in the reduced flux observed toward Beta Oph.

  4. A Hybrid Fiber/Solid-State Regenerative Amplifier with Tunable Pulse Widths for Satellite Laser Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyle, Barry; Poulios, Demetrios

    2013-01-01

    A fiber/solid-state hybrid seeded regenerative amplifier, capable of achieving high output energy with tunable pulse widths, has been developed for satellite laser ranging applications. The regenerative amplifier cavity uses a pair of Nd:YAG zigzag slabs oriented orthogonally to one another in order to make thermal lensing effects symmetrical and simplify optical correction schemes. The seed laser used is a fiber-coupled 1,064-nm narrowband (<0.02 nm) diode laser that is discretely driven in a new short-pulsed mode, enabling continuously tunable seed pulse widths in the 0.2-to-0.4-ns range. The amplifier gain unit consists of a pair of Brewster-cut 6-bounce zigzag Nd:YAG laser slabs, oriented 90deg relative to each other in the amplifier head. This arrangement creates a net-symmetrical thermal lens effect (an opposing singleaxis effect in each slab), and makes thermo-optical corrections simple by optimizing the curvature of the nearest cavity mirror. Each slab is pumped by a single 120-W, pulsed 808-nm laser diode array. In this configuration, the average pump beam distribution in the slabs had a 1-D Gaussian shape, which matches the estimated cavity mode size. A half-wave plate between the slabs reduces losses from Fresnel reflections due to the orthogonal slabs Brewster-cut end faces. Successful "temporal" seeding of the regenerative amplifier cavity results in a cavity Q-switch pulse envelope segmenting into shorter pulses, each having the width of the input seed, and having a uniform temporal separation corresponding to the cavity round-trip time of approx. =10 ns. The pulse energy is allowed to build on successive passes in the regenerative amplifier cavity until a maximum is reached, (when cavity gains and losses are equal), after which the pulse is electro- optically switched out on the next round trip The overall gain of the amplifier is approx. =82 dB (or a factor of 1.26 million). After directing the amplified output through a LBO frequency doubling

  5. Modeling of polypeptide chains as C alpha chains, C alpha chains with C beta, and C alpha chains with ellipsoidal lateral chains.

    PubMed Central

    Fogolari, F; Esposito, G; Viglino, P; Cattarinussi, S

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to reduce the number of degrees of freedom necessary to describe a polypeptide chain we analyze the statistical behavior of polypeptide chains when represented as C alpha chains, C alpha chains with C beta atoms attached, and C alpha chains with rotational ellipsoids as models of side chains. A statistical analysis on a restricted data set of 75 unrelated protein structures is performed. The comparison of the database distributions with those obtained by model calculation on very short polypeptide stretches allows the dissection of local versus nonlocal features of the distributions. The database distribution of the bend angles of polypeptide chains of pseudo bonded C alpha atoms spans a restricted range of values and shows a bimodal structure. On the other hand, the torsion angles of the C alpha chain may assume almost all possible values. The distribution is bimodal, but with a much broader probability distribution than for bend angles. The C alpha - C beta vectors may be taken as representative of the orientation of the lateral chain, as the direction of the bond is close to the direction of the vector joining C alpha to the ad hoc defined center of the "steric mass" of the side chain. Interestingly, both the bend angle defined by C alpha i-C alpha i+1-C beta i+1 and the torsional angle offset of the pseudo-dihedral C alpha i-C alpha i+1-C alpha i+2-C beta i+2 with respect to C alpha i-C alpha i+1-C alpha i+2-C alpha i+3 span a limited range of values. The latter results show that it is possible to give a more realistic representation of polypeptide chains without introducing additional degrees of freedom, i.e., by just adding to the C alpha chain a C beta with given side-chain properties. However, a more realistic description of side chains may be attained by modeling side chains as rotational ellipsoids that have roughly the same orientation and steric hindrance. To this end, we define the steric mass of an atom as proportional to its van der

  6. Alpha motion based on a motion detector, but not on the Müller-Lyer illusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro

    2014-07-01

    This study examined the mechanism of alpha motion, the apparent motion of the Müller-Lyer figure's shaft that occurs when the arrowheads and arrow tails are alternately presented. The following facts were found: (a) reduced exposure duration decreased the amount of alpha motion, and this phenomenon was not explainable by the amount of the Müller-Lyer illusion; (b) the motion aftereffect occurred after adaptation to alpha motion; (c) occurrence of alpha motion became difficult when the temporal frequency increased, and this characteristic of alpha motion was similar to the characteristic of a motion detector that motion detection became difficult when the temporal frequency increased from the optimal frequency. These findings indicated that alpha motion occurs on the basis of a motion detector but not on the Müller-Lyer illusion, and that the mechanism of alpha motion is the same as that of general motion perception.

  7. Inhibitory effects of various plant polyphenols on the toxicity of Staphylococcal alpha-toxin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Oksun; Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Morinaga, Naoko; Miyazaki, Masaru; Noda, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Staphylococcal alpha-toxin, known for its wide spectrum of biological activities, is involved in the pathogenesis of Staphylococcal infectious diseases. In recent years, various phytochemicals have been found to have antimicrobiological, including antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal, and antitoxic activities. We investigated whether several plant polyphenols inhibit alpha-toxin activities in vitro and in vivo. We found hop bract tannin (HBT) and apple condensed tannin (ACT) to exert inhibitory effects on alpha-toxin cytotoxicity. HBT also reduced the murine skin inflammatory effect and the lethality of alpha-toxin. These polyphenols formed aggregates with alpha-toxin and thereby inhibited its activities. Inhibition of alpha-toxin by HBT and ACT was dose dependent, suggesting that these polyphenols may be a useful adjunct to current treatments for alpha-toxin catalyzed Staphylococcal infectious diseases.

  8. Impact of Spectral Notch Width on Neurophysiological Plasticity and Clinical Effectiveness of the Tailor-Made Notched Music Training

    PubMed Central

    Wunderlich, Robert; Lau, Pia; Stein, Alwina; Engell, Alva; Wollbrink, Andreas; Rudack, Claudia; Pantev, Christo

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, the ringing in the ears that is unrelated to any external source, causes a significant loss in quality of life, involving sleep disturbance and depression for 1 to 3% of the general population. While in the first place tinnitus may be triggered by damage to the inner ear cells, the neural generators of subjective tinnitus are located in central regions of the nervous system. A loss of lateral inhibition, tonotopical reorganization and a gain-increase in response to the sensory deprivation result in hypersensitivity and hyperactivity in certain regions of the auditory cortex. In the tailor-made notched music training (TMNMT) patients listen to music from which the frequency spectrum of the tinnitus has been removed. This evokes strong lateral inhibition from neurons tuned to adjacent frequencies onto the neurons involved in the tinnitus percept. A reduction of tinnitus loudness and tinnitus-related neural activity was achieved with TMNMT in previous studies. As the effect of lateral inhibition depends on the bandwidth of the notch, in the current study we altered the notch width to find the most effective notch width for TMNMT. We compared 1-octave notch width with ½-octave and ¼-octave. Participants chose their favorite music for the training that included three month of two hours daily listening. The outcome was measured by means of standardized questionnaires and magnetoencephalography. We found a general reduction of tinnitus distress in all administered tinnitus questionnaires after the training. Additionally, tinnitus-related neural activity was reduced after the training. Nevertheless, notch width did not have an influence on the behavioral or neural effects of TMNMT. This could be due to a non-linear resolution of lateral inhibition in high frequencies. PMID:26406446

  9. Variability of Lyman-alpha and the ultraviolet continuum of 3C 446

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.; Kinney, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    IUE observations have been conducted over the 1230-3175 A range for the violently variable quasar 3C 446, beginning in June 1980, at intervals of 1.2, 2.2, 0.5, and 0.4 yr. Strong absorption of the continuum was found below 1830 A, probably corresponding to a Lyman edge at z of 1.00 + or - 0.01. The absence of Mg II 2798 A absorption implies that the column density is in the lower end of the range, unless the gas is metal-poor. The Lyman-alpha emission line was detected in five spectra; relative to the number of ionizing protons, the line strengths are the same as in normal quasars, and line equivalent widths are small due to the continuum's rise redward of 912 A, which is much steeper than in normal quasars. The Lyman-alpha line and the nearby continuum vary so as to maintain constant equivalent width.

  10. New prediction equations for the estimation of maxillary mandibular canine and premolar widths from mandibular incisors and mandibular first permanent molar widths: A digital model study

    PubMed Central

    Shahid, Fazal; Khamis, Mohd Fadhli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The primary aim of the study was to generate new prediction equations for the estimation of maxillary and mandibular canine and premolar widths based on mandibular incisors and first permanent molar widths. Methods A total of 2,340 calculations (768 based on the sum of mandibular incisor and first permanent molar widths, and 1,572 based on the maxillary and mandibular canine and premolar widths) were performed, and a digital stereomicroscope was used to derive the the digital models and measurements. Mesiodistal widths of maxillary and mandibular teeth were measured via scanned digital models. Results There was a strong positive correlation between the estimation of maxillary (r = 0.85994, r2 = 0.7395) and mandibular (r = 0.8708, r2 = 0.7582) canine and premolar widths. The intraclass correlation coefficients were statistically significant, and the coefficients were in the strong correlation range, with an average of 0.9. Linear regression analysis was used to establish prediction equations. Prediction equations were developed to estimate maxillary arches based on Y = 15.746 + 0.602 × sum of mandibular incisors and mandibular first permanent molar widths (sum of mandibular incisors [SMI] + molars), Y = 18.224 + 0.540 × (SMI + molars), and Y = 16.186 + 0.586 × (SMI + molars) for both genders, and to estimate mandibular arches the parameters used were Y = 16.391 + 0.564 × (SMI + molars), Y = 14.444 + 0.609 × (SMI + molars), and Y = 19.915 + 0.481 × (SMI + molars). Conclusions These formulas will be helpful for orthodontic diagnosis and clinical treatment planning during the mixed dentition stage. PMID:27226963

  11. Venus - Alpha Regio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The eastern edge of Alpha Regio is shown in this image centered at 30 degrees south latitude and 11.8 degrees east longitude (longitude on Venus is measured from 0 degrees to 360 degrees east). Seven circular, dome-like hills, averaging 25 kilometers (15 miles) in diameter with maximum heights of 750 meters (2,475 feet) dominate the scene. These features are interpreted as very thick lava flows that came from an opening on the relatively level ground, which allowed the lava to flow in an even pattern outward from the opening. The complex fractures on top of the domes suggest that if the domes were created by lava flows, a cooled outer layer formed and then further lava flowing in the interior stretched the surface. The domes may be similar to volcanic domes on Earth. Another interpretation is that the domes are the result of molten rock or magma in the interior that pushed the surface layer upward. The near-surface magma then withdrew to deeper levels, causing the collapse and fracturing of the dome surface. The bright margins possibly indicate the presence of rock debris on the slopes of the domes. Some of the fractures on the plains cut through the domes, while others appear to be covered by the domes. This indicates that active processes pre date and post date the dome-like hills. The prominent black area in the northeast corner of the image is a data gap. North is at the top of the image.

  12. An Empirical Evaluation of the Utility of Convex Hull and Standard Ellipse Areas for Assessing Population Niche Widths from Stable Isotope Data

    PubMed Central

    Syväranta, Jari; Lensu, Anssi; Marjomäki, Timo J.; Oksanen, Sari; Jones, Roger I.

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope analyses are increasingly employed to characterise population niche widths. The convex hull area (TA) in a δ13C–δ15N biplot has been used as a measure of isotopic niche width, but concerns exist over its dependence on sample size and associated difficulties in among-population comparisons. Recently a more robust method was proposed for estimating and comparing isotopic niche widths using standard ellipse areas (SEA), but this approach has yet to be tested with empirical stable isotope data. The two methods measure different kind of isotopic niche areas, but both are now widely used to characterise isotopic niche widths of populations. We used simulated data and an extensive empirical dataset from two fish populations to test the influence of sample size on the observed isotopic niche widths (TA and SEA). We resampled the original datasets to generate 5000 new samples for different numbers of observations from 5 to 80 to examine the statistical distributions of niche area estimates for increasing sample size. Our results illustrate how increasing sample size increased the observed TA; even sample sizes much higher than n = 30 did not improve the precision for the TA method. SEA was less sensitive to sample size, but the natural variation in our empirical fish δ13C and δ15N data still resulted in considerable uncertainty around the mean estimates of niche width, reducing the precision particularly with sample sizes n<30. These results confirm that the TA method is less appropriate for estimating population isotopic niche areas using small samples, especially when considerable population level isotope variation is expected. The results also indicate a need for caution when using SEA as a measure of trophic niche widths for consumers, particularly with low sample sizes and when the distribution and range for population isotope values are not known. PMID:23405254

  13. An empirical evaluation of the utility of convex hull and standard ellipse areas for assessing population niche widths from stable isotope data.

    PubMed

    Syväranta, Jari; Lensu, Anssi; Marjomäki, Timo J; Oksanen, Sari; Jones, Roger I

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotope analyses are increasingly employed to characterise population niche widths. The convex hull area (TA) in a δ(13)C-δ(15)N biplot has been used as a measure of isotopic niche width, but concerns exist over its dependence on sample size and associated difficulties in among-population comparisons. Recently a more robust method was proposed for estimating and comparing isotopic niche widths using standard ellipse areas (SEA), but this approach has yet to be tested with empirical stable isotope data. The two methods measure different kind of isotopic niche areas, but both are now widely used to characterise isotopic niche widths of populations. We used simulated data and an extensive empirical dataset from two fish populations to test the influence of sample size on the observed isotopic niche widths (TA and SEA). We resampled the original datasets to generate 5000 new samples for different numbers of observations from 5 to 80 to examine the statistical distributions of niche area estimates for increasing sample size. Our results illustrate how increasing sample size increased the observed TA; even sample sizes much higher than n = 30 did not improve the precision for the TA method. SEA was less sensitive to sample size, but the natural variation in our empirical fish δ(13)C and δ(15)N data still resulted in considerable uncertainty around the mean estimates of niche width, reducing the precision particularly with sample sizes n<30. These results confirm that the TA method is less appropriate for estimating population isotopic niche areas using small samples, especially when considerable population level isotope variation is expected. The results also indicate a need for caution when using SEA as a measure of trophic niche widths for consumers, particularly with low sample sizes and when the distribution and range for population isotope values are not known.

  14. Coupling Between Microstrip Lines with Finite Width Ground Plane Embedded in Polyimide Layers for 3D-MMICs on Si

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Dalton, Edan; Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.; Papapolymerou, John; Williams, W. Dan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Three-dimensional circuits built upon multiple layers of polyimide are required for constructing Si/SiGe monolithic microwave/millimeter-wave integrated circuits on complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) (low resistivity) Si wafers. Thin film microstrip lines (TFMS) with finite width ground planes embedded in the polyimide are often used. However, the closely spaced TFMS lines are susceptible to high levels of coupling, which degrades circuit performance. In this paper, Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) analysis and experimental measurements are used to show that the ground planes must be connected by via holes to reduce coupling in both the forward and backward directions.

  15. Synthesis of a precursor for the preparation of 9 alpha,11 alpha-tritiated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha,17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, P.N.; Damodaran, K.M.

    1984-03-01

    Starting from 11 beta-hydroxytestosterone, the synthesis of a strategic precursor, C-9 (11) unsaturated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide (9a), for the preparation of 9 alpha,11 alpha-tritiated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide has been achieved. The authors optimized the reaction conditions for catalytic reduction employing hydrogen and subsequent base hydrolysis followed by purification on Amberlite XAD-2 resin to obtain the saturated 5 alpha-androstane-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol 17-glucuronide.

  16. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  17. Inhibition of THP-1 cell adhesion to endothelial cells by alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocotrienol is dependent on intracellular concentration of the antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Noriko; Hanyu, Ryuhei; Nonaka, Aya; Okimoto, Yuko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko

    2003-06-15

    Vitamin E analogs such as alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocotrienol have been shown to reduce endothelial expression of adhesion molecules. The reactivity of alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocotrienol in inhibiting lipid peroxidation in vitro was essentially identical but the inhibition of adhesion of THP-1 cells, a monocytic-"like" cell line, to endothelial cells differs substantially. To determine the mechanism underlying this response, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were assessed for their ability to accumulate vitamin E analogs. alpha-Tocotrienol accumulated in HUVECs to levels approximately 10-fold greater than that of alpha-tocopherol. The decrease in expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and the adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs by alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocotrienol was also determined. Both alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocotrienol suppressed VCAM-1 expression and adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. The efficacy of tocotrienol for reduction of VCAM-1 expression and adhesion of THP-1 cells to HUVECs was also 10-fold higher than that of tocopherol. The inhibitory effects of vitamin E analogs on the adhesiveness of endothelial cells clearly correlated with their intracellular concentrations. The data demonstrated that, in assessing the biological responses of antioxidants, intracellular accumulation and metabolism were additional important factors that must be considered.

  18. Arachidonic acid mediates the formation of abundant alpha-helical multimers of alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iljina, Marija; Tosatto, Laura; Choi, Minee L.; Sang, Jason C.; Ye, Yu; Hughes, Craig D.; Bryant, Clare E.; Gandhi, Sonia; Klenerman, David

    2016-09-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein (αS) self-assembles into toxic beta-sheet aggregates in Parkinson’s disease, while it is proposed that αS forms soluble alpha-helical multimers in healthy neurons. Here, we have made αS multimers in vitro using arachidonic acid (ARA), one of the most abundant fatty acids in the brain, and characterized them by a combination of bulk experiments and single-molecule Fӧrster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements. The data suggest that ARA-induced oligomers are alpha-helical, resistant to fibril formation, more prone to disaggregation, enzymatic digestion and degradation by the 26S proteasome, and lead to lower neuronal damage and reduced activation of microglia compared to the oligomers formed in the absence of ARA. These multimers can be formed at physiologically-relevant concentrations, and pathological mutants of αS form less multimers than wild-type αS. Our work provides strong biophysical evidence for the formation of alpha-helical multimers of αS in the presence of a biologically relevant fatty acid, which may have a protective role with respect to the generation of beta-sheet toxic structures during αS fibrillation.

  19. Estrogenic actions of norethisterone and its A-ring reduced metabolites. Induction of in vitro uterine sensitivity to serotonin.

    PubMed

    Oropeza, M V; Campos, M G; Lemus, A E; Garciá, G; Pérez-Palacios, G; Ponce-Monter, H

    1994-01-01

    The estrogen-like effects of norethisterone (NET) seem to be mediated by the interaction of 3 beta 5 alpha- and 3 alpha 5 alpha-tetrahydronorethisterone (3 beta 5 alpha- and 3 alpha 5 alpha-NET, respectively) with the estrogen receptor. Considering that the in vitro uterine contractile response to serotonin (5-HT) is specifically dependent on estrogen, the aim of the present study was to investigate whether NET and its A-ring reduced metabolites administered in vivo to ovariectomized rats induce uterine sensitivity to 5-HT in vitro. The administration of 3 beta NET in vivo, which is the NET metabolite with the highest affinity for the estrogen receptor, induced a maximal contractile response to serotonin similar to that of 17 beta-estradiol treatment. The other metabolites induced less uterine activity. According to the effective dose 50, the order of estrogenic potency was 17 beta-estradiol > 3 beta 5 alpha NET > 3 alpha 5 alpha NET > NET > 5 alpha NET. The estrogenic effect of 3 beta 5 alpha- and 3 alpha 5 alpha NET may be exerted through their interaction with the estrogen receptor, whereas NET and 5 alpha NET, which do not bind to the estrogen receptor and display a minor estrogenic activity, require prior bioconversion to 3 beta 5 alpha NET and perhaps to 3 alpha 5 alpha NET. The A-ring reduced metabolites of NET, mainly the 3 beta 5 alpha NET, may be exerting estrogenic responses and modulating uterine activity when administered in vivo.

  20. Downstream variation in bankfull width of wadeable streams across the conterminous United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bankfull channel width is a fundamental measure of stream size and a key parameter of interest for many applications in hydrology, fluvial geomorphology, and stream ecology. We developed downstream hydraulic geometry relationships for bankfull channel width w as a function of dra...

  1. On the Stark Widths and Shifts of Ar II 472.68 nm Spectral Line

    SciTech Connect

    Mijatovic, Z.; Gajo, T.; Vujicic, B.; Djurovic, S.; Kobilarov, R.

    2008-10-22

    Stark widths and shifts of Ar II 472.68 nm spectral line were measured from T-tube plasmas. Plasma electron density ranged 1.8-2.210{sup 17} cm{sup -3}, while temperature ranged 20000-43000 K. Obtained results of widths and shifts were compared with measured results of other authors.

  2. Dynamical Calculation of Θ+ Mass and Decay width in the Quark Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rostampour, M.; Saadat, H.; Farahani, H.

    2012-08-01

    In this paper we study the mass splitting and the decay width of pentaquark (Θ+) at the ground states in the framework of flux tube, quark delocalization and color screening model. We consider the pentaquark as diquark-triquark configuration and obtained closer values of mass splitting and the decay width of Θ+ to the experimental data.

  3. Generation of an ultra-short electrical pulse with width shorter than the excitation laser

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Shaoqiang; Ma, Cheng; Xu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally a rare phenomenon that the width of an electrical response is shorter than that of the excitation laser. In this work, generation of an ultrashort electrical pulse is by a semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) and the generated electrical pulse width is shorter than that of the excitation laser from diode laser. When the pulse width and energy of the excitation laser are fixed at 25.7 ns and 1.6 μJ respectively, the width of the generated electrical pulse width by 3-mm-gap GaAs PCSS at the bias voltage of 9 kV is only 7.3 ns. The model of photon-activated charge domain (PACD) is used to explain the peculiar phenomenon in our experiment. The ultrashort electrical pulse width is mainly relevant to the time interval of PACD from occurrence to disappearance in the mode. The shorter the time interval is, the narrower the electrical pulse width will become. In more general terms, our result suggests that in nonlinear regime a response signal can have a much short width than the excitation pulses. The result clearly indicates that generating ultrashort electrical pulses can be achieved without the need of ultrashort lasers. PMID:27273512

  4. Lithologic Heterogeneity and Variable Valley Width in the Buffalo River Watershed, AR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, S. L.; Keen-Zebert, A.

    2014-12-01

    Lithologic heterogeneity across catchments is thought to be a key control on the style of incision, whether dominated by vertical or lateral processes, but little field evidence is available to support the claims. Map and field observations from the Buffalo National River (BNR) indicate that valley width is related to variation in lithology along the length of the river. The BNR is a gravel-mantled, ingrown meandering, bedrock river that incises through a sequence of Pennsylvanian, Mississippian, and Ordovician carbonate and clastic sedimentary rocks. Using GIS, valley width was measured at 250 m intervals along the entire length of the river through two sequences of limestone and sandstone reaches that represent the dominant lithologies of the catchment. Preliminary results show measurable and statistically significant differences in valley width between limestone and sandstone reaches. Where limestone strata is exposed at river level the mean width is ~ 360 m and is highly variable with a standard deviation of 227 m. The mean width in sandstone strata is ~240 m with a standard deviation of 88 m. At each transition from limestone to sandstone there is a greater than 20% decrease in valley width downstream, with no visible change in channel width at map scales. It is possible the atypical pattern in valley width in the BNR is due to variation in lithologic resistance. These results support the assumption that lithologic heterogeneity exerts control on stream valley evolution.

  5. 23 CFR 658.16 - Exclusions from length and width determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusions from length and width determinations. 658.16 Section 658.16 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS TRUCK SIZE AND WEIGHT, ROUTE DESIGNATIONS-LENGTH, WIDTH AND WEIGHT LIMITATIONS §...

  6. 16 CFR 500.12 - Measurement of commodities by length and width, how expressed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... in square inches with length and width expressed in the largest whole unit (yard or foot) with any... expressed in square feet with the length and width expressed in the largest whole units (yards or feet) with... statement of the linear dimensions of the largest unit of measurement, a parenthetical declaration of...

  7. 16 CFR 500.12 - Measurement of commodities by length and width, how expressed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... in square inches with length and width expressed in the largest whole unit (yard or foot) with any... expressed in square feet with the length and width expressed in the largest whole units (yards or feet) with... statement of the linear dimensions of the largest unit of measurement, a parenthetical declaration of...

  8. Fixed-Width Confidence Intervals in Linear Regression with Applications to the Johnson-Neyman Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aitkin, Murray A.

    Fixed-width confidence intervals for a population regression line over a finite interval of x have recently been derived by Gafarian. The method is extended to provide fixed-width confidence intervals for the difference between two population regression lines, resulting in a simple procedure analogous to the Johnson-Neyman technique. (Author)

  9. Effect of the push-up exercise at different palmar width on muscle activities.

    PubMed

    Kim, You-Sin; Kim, Do-Yeon; Ha, Min-Seong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of changes in palmar width on the muscle activities of the shoulder and truncus muscles during push-up exercise. [Subjects] Twelve healthy adult males participated in this study as subjects. [Methods] Push-up exercises were performed with three different palmar width in narrow (50%), neutral (100%), and wide positions (150%). We measured the muscle activities of the deltoideus p. acromialis, pectoralis minor, pectoralis major, serratus anterior, biceps brachii, triceps brachii, latissimus dorsi, and infraspinatus. [Results] Pectoralis minor, triceps brachii, and infraspinatus muscle activities were greater during push-ups performed with the 50% palmar width compared with the other palmar widths. Pectoralis major muscle activity was greater during push-ups performed with the 50% and 100% palmar widths compared with the 150% palmar width. Serratus anterior muscle activity was greater during push-ups performed with the 150% palmar width compared with the other palmar widths. [Conclusion] These results are expected to serve as reference materials for push-up exercise applications in training programs for truncus muscle strengthening or rehabilitation programs for scapula patients.

  10. Alpha Oscillatory Dynamics Index Temporal Expectation Benefits in Working Memory.

    PubMed

    Wilsch, Anna; Henry, Molly J; Herrmann, Björn; Maess, Burkhard; Obleser, Jonas

    2015-07-01

    Enhanced alpha power compared with a baseline can reflect states of increased cognitive load, for example, when listening to speech in noise. Can knowledge about "when" to listen (temporal expectations) potentially counteract cognitive load and concomitantly reduce alpha? The current magnetoencephalography (MEG) experiment induced cognitive load using an auditory delayed-matching-to-sample task with 2 syllables S1 and S2 presented in speech-shaped noise. Temporal expectation about the occurrence of S1 was manipulated in 3 different cue conditions: "Neutral" (uninformative about foreperiod), "early-cued" (short foreperiod), and "late-cued" (long foreperiod). Alpha power throughout the trial was highest when the cue was uninformative about the onset time of S1 (neutral) and lowest for the late-cued condition. This alpha-reducing effect of late compared with neutral cues was most evident during memory retention in noise and originated primarily in the right insula. Moreover, individual alpha effects during retention accounted best for observed individual performance differences between late-cued and neutral conditions, indicating a tradeoff between allocation of neural resources and the benefits drawn from temporal cues. Overall, the results indicate that temporal expectations can facilitate the encoding of speech in noise, and concomitantly reduce neural markers of cognitive load.

  11. alpha-Adrenoceptor blocking properties of raubasine in pithed rats.

    PubMed Central

    Demichel, P.; Gomond, P.; Roquebert, J.

    1982-01-01

    1 Raubasine was compared with yohimbine and corynanthine in pithed rats. Antagonist activity at alpha 1-adrenoceptors was evaluated on the pressor response to electrical stimulation of the spinal sympathetic outflow and to phenylephrine administration, both being reduced by raubasine in the dose range 1 to 4 mg/kg. Corynanthine was quantitatively similar, but yohimbine was not only less potent but also in doses of 0.125 to 0.5 mg/kg enhanced the effects of electrical stimulation. 2 Antagonist activity at alpha 2-adrenoceptors was determined against the inhibitory effects of clonidine on tachycardia induced by electrical stimulation of cardiac sympathetic nerves and against the pressor responses to B-HT-933 injection. Raubasine up to 4 mg/kg, like corynanthine, did not affect the pressor responses to B-HT-933 nor did it reduce the inhibitory effect of clonidine. By contrast yohimbine reduced the response to BHT-933 and antagonized clonidine as well as enhancing the tachycardia caused by electrical stimulation. 3 The results indicate that, in vivo, raubasine, like corynanthine, is a selective antagonist at alpha 1-adrenoceptors and that yohimbine is more potent in blocking alpha 2-than alpha 1-adrenoceptors. PMID:6128043

  12. Line width roughness reduction by rational design of photoacid generator for sub-millisecond laser post-exposure bake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jing; Thompson, Michael O.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2014-03-01

    Sub-millisecond laser post-exposure bake (PEB) is an alternative technology to address the excessive acid diffusion for chemically amplified photoresist systems. By rationally designing the resist, laser post-exposure bake is able to improve the resolution and reduce the line width roughness (LWR) compared to patterns exposed under the same conditions but using conventional hotplate PEB. It was found that only the resist with high deprotection activation energy and low diffusion activation energy showed improved performance using laser PEB. Accordingly, a PAG was designed to have low acid diffusivity by binding the counter ions to a molecular glass core while keeping photophysical properties and processing conditions similar to a conventional PAG. By reducing the diffusivity of the counter ions, the PAG was able to further reduce LWR by 60% using laser PEB.

  13. The role of phosphorylation in activation of the alpha 6A beta 1 laminin receptor.

    PubMed

    Hogervorst, F; Kuikman, I; Noteboom, E; Sonnenberg, A

    1993-09-05

    The phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) induces phosphorylation of serine residues in the cytoplasmic domain of the alpha 6A integrin subunit, as well as activation of the alpha 6A beta 1 laminin receptor. We examined whether phosphorylation correlates with the induction of high affinity binding of laminin by the alpha 6A beta 1 receptor. Two potential phosphorylation sites for protein kinase C, serine 1041 and serine 1048, are present in the cytoplasmic domain of the alpha 6A subunit. We introduced point mutations into the alpha 6A cDNA, replacing either one or both of the serine residues with alanine. Wild-type and mutant alpha 6A cDNAs were transfected into K562 cells. All alpha 6A subunit mutants were expressed at levels similar to those of wild-type alpha 6A and formed heterodimers with endogenous beta 1. Analysis of the phosphorylation state of wild-type and mutant alpha 6A subunits in resting K562 cells and after treatment with PMA showed that serine 1041, but not serine 1048, is the target residue of PMA-induced phosphorylation. Cells expressing alpha 6A mutant subunits or wild-type alpha 6A transfectants all bound laminin in the presence, but not in the absence of PMA; however, the extent of binding differed. Cells transfected with alpha 6A containing the serine to alanine mutation showed a 2-3-fold higher binding to laminin than cells transfected with alpha 6A containing serine 1041. The results indicate that phosphorylation of the alpha 6A cytoplasmic domain is not required for the induction of high affinity of the alpha 6A beta 1 receptor by PMA, and suggest that, in contrast, it may reduce the affinity of this integrin for ligand.

  14. Integrin {alpha}6 cleavage: A novel modification to modulate cell migration

    SciTech Connect

    Pawar, Sangita C.; Demetriou, Manolis C.; Nagle, Raymond B.; Bowden, G. Tim; Cress, Anne E. . E-mail: acress@azcc.arizona.edu

    2007-04-01

    Integrins play a major role in cell adhesion and migration. Previous work reported that a cleaved form of integrin {alpha}6 ({alpha}6p) was detected in invasive human prostate cancer tissue, absent in normal prostate tissue and was produced by urokinase-type Plasminogen Activator (uPA) in a plasmin-independent manner. Using site-directed mutagenesis we identified amino acid residues R594 and R595, located in the 'stalk' region of integrin {alpha}6, as essential for cleavage. The cleavage site is located on the extracellular region of the protein between the {beta}-barrel domain and the thigh domain. Prostate cancer cells (PC3N) were stably transfected to overexpress the cleavable, wild-type (PC3N-{alpha}6-WT) or the non-cleavable form of integrin {alpha}6 (PC3N-{alpha}6-RR). The number of cells invading laminin 111- and laminin 332-coated filters by PC3N-{alpha}6-WT cells increased by threefold as compared to PC3N-{alpha}6-RR cells. Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) reduced the invasion of PC3N-{alpha}6-WT cells by approximately 42% through laminin 332-coated filters and plasmin inhibitor aprotinin had no significant effect. Linear cell migration increased production of integrin {alpha}6p in the PC3N-{alpha}6-WT cells and not in the PC3N-{alpha}6-RR cells and 32% of the PC3N-{alpha}6-WT cells migrated on laminin 111 in the linear migration assay as compared to the 5% PC3N-{alpha}6-RR cells. These data taken together suggest that the uPA-mediated cell surface cleavage of the {alpha}6 integrin extracellular domain is involved in tumor cell invasion and migration on laminin.

  15. Expression and function of the human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Jubinsky, P T; Laurie, A S; Nathan, D G; Yetz-Aldepe, J; Sieff, C A

    1994-12-15

    To determine the expression and function of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor alpha chain (GMR alpha) during hematopoiesis and on leukemic cells, monoclonal antibodies were raised by immunizing mice with cells expressing high levels of human GMR alpha. A pool of five antibodies isolated from three different mice was used to characterize GMR alpha. This antibody pool (anti-GMR alpha) immunoprecipitated a protein with the expected molecular weight of GMR alpha from COS cells transiently transfected with the GMR alpha gene. In factor-dependent cells, GMR alpha existed as a phosphoprotein. However, its phosphorylation was not stimulated by the presence of GM-CSF. Anti-GMR alpha inhibited the GM-CSF-dependent growth of cell lines and normal bone marrow cells and inhibited the binding of iodinated GM-CSF to its receptor. Cell surface expression of GMR alpha was examined using anti-GMR alpha and flow cytometry. GMR alpha was readily detectable on both blood monocytes and neutrophils. In adherence-depleted normal bone marrow, two separate populations expressed GMR alpha. The most positive cells were predominantly macrophages, whereas the cells that expressed less GMR alpha were largely myelocytes and metamyelocytes. A small population of lin-CD34+ or CD34+CD38- cells also expressed GMR alpha, but they were not capable of significant growth in colony-forming assays. In contrast, the majority of lin-CD34+ and CD34+CD38- cells were GMR alpha-, yet they produced large numbers of myeloid and erythroid colonies in the same assay. Malignant cells from patients with leukemia were also tested for GMR alpha expression. All of the myeloid leukemias and only rare lymphoid leukemias surveyed tested positive for GMR alpha. These results show that anti-GMR alpha is useful for the functional characterization of the GMR alpha and for the detection of myeloid leukemia and that GMR alpha is expressed on certain lineages throughout hematopoietic

  16. Influence of stimulus pulse width on M-waves, H-reflexes, and torque during tetanic low-intensity neuromuscular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lagerquist, Olle; Collins, David F

    2010-12-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) has been shown to generate contractions that include a central recruitment of motoneurons; however, the effect of pulse width on electromyographic (EMG) and torque responses during NMES are not well documented. Soleus EMG and isometric plantarflexion torque were recorded from 14 subjects with NMES delivered to the tibial nerve using 50, 200, 500, and 1000 μs pulse widths. M-waves were significantly smaller during 20 Hz NMES compared with responses evoked by single pulses of 200, 500, and 1000 μs, but not 50 μs pulse widths. At all pulse widths, stimulation at 20 Hz depressed soleus H-reflexes compared with single pulses. Two seconds of 100 Hz NMES significantly increased H-reflexes and torque during the subsequent 20 Hz NMES with 200, 500, and 1000 μs, but not 50 μs, pulse widths. NMES delivered using wide pulses generated larger contractions with a relatively greater central contribution than narrow pulses. This may help reduce atrophy and produce fatigue-resistant contractions for rehabilitation.

  17. Strain dependence of peak widths of reciprocal-and -space distribution functions of metalic glasses from in-situ x-ray scattering and molecular dynamics simulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Ott, R. T.; Mendelev, M. I.; Besser, M. F.; Kramer, M. J.; Almer, J. D.; Sordelet, D. J.; Iowa State Univ.; Ames Lab.

    2009-01-01

    We have examined the relationship between the variance in the atomic-level hydrostatic pressure, <{Delta}p{sup 2}>{sup 1/2}, and the widths of the first peaks in the reciprocal- and real-space distribution functions for elastically deformed metallic glasses. In situ synchrotron x-ray scattering studies performed on a binary Cu{sub 64.5}Zr{sub 35.5} glass subject to uniaxial loading reveal that the width of the first peak in the reduced-pair distribution function is dependent on the different elastic responses of the partial-pair correlations. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the same binary glass, as well as a single-component glass, subject to hydrostatic deformation show that the widths of the first peaks in the partial-pair distribution functions are affected by length-scale-dependent changes in the relative atomic separation in the first nearest-neighbor shell. Moreover, the MD simulations show that the strain dependencies of the partial-pair peak widths do not necessarily match the strain-dependence of <{Delta}p{sup 2}>{sup 1/2}. The results suggest that the widths of the peaks in the reciprocal- and real-space functions are not solely dependent on <{Delta}p{sup 2}>{sup 1/2} but rather are also affected by the atomic rearrangements associated with elastic deformation.

  18. Effect of slow forced eruption on the vertical levels of the interproximal bone and papilla and the width of the alveolar ridge

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Eun-Young; Lee, Ju-Youn

    2016-01-01

    Objective Forced eruption has been proposed for the reconstruction of deficient bone and soft tissue. The aim of this study was to examine the changes in the alveolar ridge width and the vertical levels of the interproximal bone and papilla following forced eruption. Methods Patients whose hopeless maxillary anterior teeth were expected to undergo severe bone resorption and soft tissue recession upon extraction were recruited. In addition, patients whose maxillary anterior teeth required forced eruption for restoration due to tooth fracture or dental caries were included. Before and after forced eruption, the interproximal bone height was measured by radiographic analysis, and changes in the alveolar ridge width and the interproximal papilla height were measured with an acrylic stent. Results This prospective study demonstrated that the levels of the interproximal alveolar bone and papilla were significantly increased by 1.36 mm and 1.09 mm, respectively, in the vertical direction. However, the alveolar ridge width was significantly reduced by an average of 0.67 mm in the buccolingual direction. The changes in the level of the interproximal alveolar bone and papilla were positively correlated. Conclusions Although the levels of the interproximal bone and papilla were significantly increased, the alveolar ridge width was significantly decreased following forced eruption. There was a modest positive and significant correlation between the changes in the height of the interproximal alveolar bone and the papilla. Based on our findings, modification of vertical forced eruption should be considered when augmentation of the alveolar ridge width is required. PMID:27896212

  19. MFTF-. cap alpha. + T shield design

    SciTech Connect

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    MFTF-..cap alpha..+T is a DT upgrade option of the Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) to study better plasma performance, and test tritium breeding blankets in an actual fusion reactor environment. The central cell insert, designated DT axicell, has a 2-MW/m/sup 2/ neutron wall loading at the first wall for blanket testing. This upgrade is completely shielded to protect the reactor components, the workers, and the general public from the radiation environment during operation and after shutdown. The shield design for this upgrade is the subject of this paper including the design criteria and the tradeoff studies to reduce the shield cost.

  20. Using an r-dependent Gaussian width in calculations of the globally uniform semiclassical wave function.

    PubMed

    Herman, Michael F; Sergeev, Alexey

    2007-01-21

    The globally uniform semiclassical wave function expresses the solution to the time independent Schrodinger equation in terms of fixed width Gaussian wave packets traveling along a set of trajectories. There is a globally uniform wave function (GUWF) for each value of the Gaussian width parameter gamma. Numerical data show that a small Gaussian width is needed in some regions to obtain accurate results, while a broad Gaussian width provides better results in other regions. Since there is a semiclassically valid GUWF for every positive value of gamma, it is reasonable to employ the GUWF corresponding to a Gaussian width that provides good results at each value of r. A criterion for the r dependent choice of gamma is proposed and tested on one and two dimensional model problems. The results show that the use of an r dependent gamma in the GUWF results in improved accuracy for the model problems considered.

  1. Channel width dependence of electrical characteristics of a-Si:H TFTs under bending stresses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyungon; Cho, Kyoungah; Kim, Sangsig

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the electrical characteristics of bendable a-Si:H thin-film transistors (TFTs) with various channel widths as a function of bending stress. Compared with a narrower channel TFT, a wider channel TFT exhibits a stable performance even at a bending strain of 1.3%. Our stress and strain distribution analysis reveals an inverse relationship between the channel width and the channel stress. As the channel width widens from 8 to 50 μm, the stress experienced by the middle channel region decreases from 545 to 277 MPa. Moreover, a 50 μm-channel-width TFT operates stably even after a 15 000 bending cycle while the 8 μm-channel-width TFT fails to operate after a 2000 bending cycle.

  2. Radiocarbon to calendar date conversion: Calendrical band widths as a function of radiocarbon precision

    SciTech Connect

    McCormac, F.G.; Baillie, M.G.L. )

    1993-01-01

    Accurate high-precision [sup 14]C dating (i.e., [plus minus] 20 yr precision or less on the [sup 14]C date) provides the narrowest calendrical band width and, hence, the best age range determination possible. However, because of the structure in the [sup 14]C calibration curve, the calendar age range for a given [sup 14]C precision is not constant throughout the calibration range. In this study, they quantify the calendar band widths for a range of [sup 14]C precisions throughout the calibration range. They show that an estimate of the likely calendar band width in years can be obtained from the expression: Band width (yr) = 2.12 x [sup 14]C precision (1 [sigma]) + 54.6. They also show that calendar band widths are widest around 4000 Bp at the start of the Bronze Age, and become narrow through the later Bronze Age and Iron Age and back into the Neolithic.

  3. AB214. Application of ultrasonic measurement of epididymal width in differential diagnosis of azoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the of epididymal width in identifying non obstructive azoospermia (NOA) and obstructive azoospermia (OA). Methods Using scrotal ultrasound to compare difference of epididymal width between OA (n=18) and NOA (n=10) patients. Results In the patients with OA average bilateral epididymal width is 0.7+0.1 cm, which is higher than the NOA patients (P<0.05) by ultrasonic measurement. The average width of bilateral epididymis increased with the increase of Johnsen score (P<0.05). In ROC analysis, when 0.78, 0.33, 0.53 cm are used as the cut point for bilateral caput epididymis, corpus epididymis, cauda epididymis, respectively, the sensitivity for differential diagnosis is higher. Conclusions There is obvious difference in epididymal width under ultrasound between NOA and OA, which is helpful for differential diagnosis of azoospermia.

  4. Does Height to Width Ratio Correlate with Mean Volume in Gastropods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barriga, R.; Seixas, G.; Payne, J.

    2012-12-01

    Marine organisms' shell shape and size show important biological information. For example, shape and size can dictate how the organism ranges for food and escapes predation. Due to lack of data and analysis, the evolution of shell size in marine gastropods (snails) remains poorly known. In this study, I attempt to find the relationship between height to width ratio and mean volume. I collected height and width measurements from primary literature sources and calculated volume from these measurements. My results indicate that there was no correlation between height to width ratio and mean volume between 500 to 200 Ma, but there was a correlation between 200 Ma to present where there is a steady increase in both height to width ratio and mean volume. This means that shell shape was not an important factor at the beginning of gastropod evolution but after 200 Ma body size evolution was increasingly driven by the height to width ratio.

  5. Amelioration of psoriasis by anti-TNF-alpha RNAi in the xenograft transplantation model.

    PubMed

    Jakobsen, Maria; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Moldt, Brian; Kamp, Søren; Dam, Tomas N; Jensen, Thomas G; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2009-10-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is upregulated in psoriatic skin and represents a prominent target in psoriasis treatment. The level of TNF-alpha-encoding mRNA, however, is not increased in psoriatic skin, and it remains unclear whether intervention strategies based on RNA interference (RNAi) are therapeutically relevant. To test this hypothesis the present study describes first the in vitro functional screening of a panel of short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) targeting human TNF-alpha mRNA and, next, the transfer of the most potent TNF-alpha shRNA variant, as assessed in vitro, to human skin in the psoriasis xenograft transplantation model by the use of lentiviral vectors. TNF-alpha shRNA treatment leads to amelioration of the psoriasis phentotype in the model, as documented by reduced epidermal thickness, normalization of the skin morphology, and reduced levels of TNF-alpha mRNA as detected in skin biopsies 3 weeks after a single vector injection of lentiviral vectors encoding TNF-alpha shRNA. Our data show efficient lentiviral gene delivery to psoriatic skin and therapeutic applicability of anti-TNF-alpha shRNAs in human skin. These findings validate TNF-alpha mRNA as a target molecule for a potential persistent RNA-based treatment of psoriasis and establish the use of small RNA effectors as a novel platform for target validation in psoriasis and other skin disorders.

  6. Conditional expression of constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} in chondrocytes impairs longitudinal bone growth in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Tsukui, Tohru; Imazawa, Yukiko; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Conditional transgenic mice expressing constitutively active estrogen receptor {alpha} (caER{alpha}) in chondrocytes were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of caER{alpha} in chondrocytes impaired longitudinal bone growth in mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer caER{alpha} affects chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This mouse model is useful for understanding the physiological role of ER{alpha}in vivo. -- Abstract: Estrogen plays important roles in the regulation of chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, which are essential steps for longitudinal bone growth; however, the mechanisms of estrogen action on chondrocytes have not been fully elucidated. In the present study, we generated conditional transgenic mice, designated as caER{alpha}{sup ColII}, expressing constitutively active mutant estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} in chondrocytes, using the chondrocyte-specific type II collagen promoter-driven Cre transgenic mice. caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice showed retardation in longitudinal growth, with short bone lengths. BrdU labeling showed reduced proliferation of hypertrophic chondrocytes in the proliferating layer of the growth plate of tibia in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. In situ hybridization analysis of type X collagen revealed that the maturation of hypertrophic chondrocytes was impaired in caER{alpha}{sup ColII} mice. These results suggest that ER{alpha} is a critical regulator of chondrocyte proliferation and maturation during skeletal development, mediating longitudinal bone growth in vivo.

  7. Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Overview

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is flying to the station on STS-134. The AMS experiment is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector being operated by an international team composed of 60 ...

  8. Simulation of the alpha particle heating and the helium ash source in an International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, Lei Guo, Wenfeng; Xiao, Xiaotao; Dai, Zongliang; Wang, Shaojie

    2014-12-15

    A guiding center orbit following code, which incorporates a set of non-singular coordinates for orbit integration, was developed and applied to investigate the alpha particle heating in an ITER-like tokamak with an internal transport barrier. It is found that a relatively large q (safety factor) value can significantly broaden the alpha heating profile in comparison with the local heating approximation; this broadening is due to the finite orbit width effects; when the orbit width is much smaller than the scale length of the alpha particle source profile, the heating profile agrees with the source profile, otherwise, the heating profile can be significantly broadened. It is also found that the stagnation particles move to the magnetic axis during the slowing-down process, thus the effect of stagnation orbits is not beneficial to the helium ash removal. The source profile of helium ash is broadened in comparison with the alpha source profile, which is similar to the heating profile.

  9. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Slavik, C.J.; Rhudy, R.G.; Bushman, R.E.

    1997-11-11

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of {radical}3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency. 4 figs.

  10. Reduced vibration motor winding arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Slavik, Charles J.; Rhudy, Ralph G.; Bushman, Ralph E.

    1997-01-01

    An individual phase winding arrangement having a sixty electrical degree phase belt width for use with a three phase motor armature includes a delta connected phase winding portion and a wye connected phase winding portion. Both the delta and wye connected phase winding portions have a thirty electrical degree phase belt width. The delta and wye connected phase winding portions are each formed from a preselected number of individual coils each formed, in turn, from an unequal number of electrical conductor turns in the approximate ratio of .sqroot.3. The individual coils of the delta and wye connected phase winding portions may either be connected in series or parallel. This arrangement provides an armature winding for a three phase motor which retains the benefits of the widely known and utilized thirty degree phase belt concept, including improved mmf waveform and fundamental distribution factor, with consequent reduced vibrations and improved efficiency.

  11. The Lyman alpha reference sample. VII. Spatially resolved Hα kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herenz, Edmund Christian; Gruyters, Pieter; Orlitova, Ivana; Hayes, Matthew; Östlin, Göran; Cannon, John M.; Roth, Martin M.; Bik, Arjan; Pardy, Stephen; Otí-Floranes, Héctor; Mas-Hesse, J. Miguel; Adamo, Angela; Atek, Hakim; Duval, Florent; Guaita, Lucia; Kunth, Daniel; Laursen, Peter; Melinder, Jens; Puschnig, Johannes; Rivera-Thorsen, Thøger E.; Schaerer, Daniel; Verhamme, Anne

    2016-03-01

    We present integral field spectroscopic observations with the Potsdam Multi-Aperture Spectrophotometer of all 14 galaxies in the z ~ 0.1 Lyman Alpha Reference Sample (LARS). We produce 2D line-of-sight velocity maps and velocity dispersion maps from the Balmer α (Hα) emission in our data cubes. These maps trace the spectral and spatial properties of the LARS galaxies' intrinsic Lyα radiation field. We show our kinematic maps that are spatially registered onto the Hubble Space Telescope Hα and Lyman α (Lyα) images. We can conjecture a causal connection between spatially resolved Hα kinematics and Lyα photometry for individual galaxies, however, no general trend can be established for the whole sample. Furthermore, we compute the intrinsic velocity dispersion σ0, the shearing velocity vshear, and the vshear/σ0 ratio from our kinematic maps. In general LARS galaxies are characterised by high intrinsic velocity dispersions (54 km s-1 median) and low shearing velocities (65 km s-1 median). The vshear/σ0 values range from 0.5 to 3.2 with an average of 1.5. It is noteworthy that five galaxies of the sample are dispersion-dominated systems with vshear/σ0< 1, and are thus kinematically similar to turbulent star-forming galaxies seen at high redshift. When linking our kinematical statistics to the global LARS Lyα properties, we find that dispersion-dominated systems show higher Lyα equivalent widths and higher Lyα escape fractions than systems with vshear/σ0> 1. Our result indicates that turbulence in actively star-forming systems is causally connected to interstellar medium conditions that favour an escape of Lyα radiation. Based on observations collected at the Centro Astronómico Hispano Alemán (CAHA) at Calar Alto, operated jointly by the Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie and the Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (CSIC).The reduced data cubes (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130

  12. Gaussian kernel width optimization for sparse Bayesian learning.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadeh, Yalda; Sheikhzadeh, Hamid

    2015-04-01

    Sparse kernel methods have been widely used in regression and classification applications. The performance and the sparsity of these methods are dependent on the appropriate choice of the corresponding kernel functions and their parameters. Typically, the kernel parameters are selected using a cross-validation approach. In this paper, a learning method that is an extension of the relevance vector machine (RVM) is presented. The proposed method can find the optimal values of the kernel parameters during the training procedure. This algorithm uses an expectation-maximization approach for updating kernel parameters as well as other model parameters; therefore, the speed of convergence and computational complexity of the proposed method are the same as the standard RVM. To control the convergence of this fully parameterized model, the optimization with respect to the kernel parameters is performed using a constraint on these parameters. The proposed method is compared with the typical RVM and other competing methods to analyze the performance. The experimental results on the commonly used synthetic data, as well as benchmark data sets, demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method in reducing the performance dependency on the initial choice of the kernel parameters.

  13. Reducing the width of confidence intervals for the difference between two population means by inverting adaptive tests.

    PubMed

    O'Gorman, Thomas W

    2016-08-08

    In the last decade, it has been shown that an adaptive testing method could be used, along with the Robbins-Monro search procedure, to obtain confidence intervals that are often narrower than traditional confidence intervals. However, these confidence interval limits require a great deal of computation and some familiarity with stochastic search methods. We propose a method for estimating the limits of confidence intervals that uses only a few tests of significance. We compare these limits to those obtained by a lengthy Robbins-Monro stochastic search and find that the proposed method is nearly as accurate as the Robbins-Monro search. Adaptive confidence intervals that are produced by the proposed method are often narrower than traditional confidence intervals when the distributions are long-tailed, skewed, or bimodal. Moreover, the proposed method of estimating confidence interval limits is easy to understand, because it is based solely on the p-values from a few tests of significance.

  14. Importance of Depletion Width on Charge Transport and Interfacial Recombination in Extremely Thin Absorber Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edley, Michael; Jones, Treavor; Baxter, Jason

    The dynamics of charge carrier transport and recombination and their dependence on physical and electrochemical length scales in extremely thin absorber (ETA) solar cells is vital to cell design. We used J-V characterization, transient photocurrent / photovoltage, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to study electron transport and interfacial recombination in ETA cell. ETA cells were composed of ZnO nanowires coated with an ultrathin (5 nm) CdS buffer layer and CdSe absorbers with thicknesses of 10 - 40 nm, with polysulfide electrolyte. In thinner absorbers near short circuit, the depletion region can extend radially into the nanowire, inhibiting interfacial recombination rate. However, depleting the periphery of the nanowire reduces the cross sectional area for charge transport, resulting in longer characteristic collection times. Thicker absorbers suffered more significant bias-dependent collection, and we conclude that slight radial penetration of the depletion region into the nanowires enhances charge collection. This work highlights the importance of considering the impact of depletion width on charge transport and interfacial recombination in the design of liquid junction, semiconductor-sensitized solar cells.

  15. Experiments with humans indicate that decision accuracy drives the evolution of niche width.

    PubMed

    Tosh, Colin R; Ruxton, Graeme D; Krause, Jens; Franks, Daniel W

    2011-12-07

    One theory to explain the high incidence of niche specialization in many animals is that it reduces attentional load during resource-seeking behaviour and thus leads to more accurate resource selection. A recent neural network model refined the predictions of this theory, indicating that a cognitive advantage in specialists is likely to occur under realistic ecological conditions, namely when 'mistakes' (i.e. selection of non-host resources) contribute moderately but positively to fitness. Here, we present a formal empirical test of the predictions of this model. Using a human-computer interactive, we demonstrate that the central prediction of the model is supported: specialist humans are more accurate decision-makers than generalists when their mistakes are rewarded, but not when mistakes are punished. The idea that increased decision accuracy drives the evolution of niche width in animals has been supported in almost all empirical systems in which it has been investigated. Theoretical work supports the idea, and now the predictions of a key theoretical model have been demonstrated in a real biological information-processing system. Considering these interlocking pieces of evidence, we argue that specialization through increased decision accuracy may contribute significantly, along with other mechanisms, to promote niche specialization in animals.

  16. Coupling Between CPW and Slotline Modes in Finite Ground CPW with Unequal Ground Plane Widths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponchak, George E.; Papapolymerou, John; Williams, W. D. (Technical Monitor); Tentzeris, Emmanouil M.

    2002-01-01

    The coupling between the desired CPW mode and the unwanted, slotline, mode is presented for finite ground coplanar waveguides with unequal ground plane widths. Measurements, quasi-static conformal mapping, and Method of Moment analysis are performed to determine the dependence of the slotline mode excitation on the physical dimensions of the FGC line and on the frequency range of operation. Introduction: Finite ground coplanar waveguide (FGC) is often used in low cost Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (MMICs) because of its many advantages over microstrip and conventional CoPlanar Waveguide (CPW). It is uniplanar, which facilitates easy connection of series and shunt elements without via holes, supports a low loss, quasi-TEM mode over a wide frequency band, and since the ground planes are electrically and physically narrow, typically less than lambda/5 wide where lambda is the guided wavelength, they reduce the circuit size and the influence of higher order modes. However, they still support the parasitic slotline mode that plagues all CPW transmission lines.

  17. An experimental study of voice communication over a bandlimited channel using variable bit width delta modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumok, N. Nur

    1989-12-01

    A variable bit width delta modulator (VBWDM) demodulator was designed, built and tested to achieve voice and music communication using a bandlimited channel. Only baseband modulation is applied to the input signal. Since there is no clock used during the digitizing process at the modulator, no bit synchronization is required for signal recovery in the receiver. The modulator is a hybrid design using 7 linear and 3 digital integrated circuits (IC), and the demodulator uses 2 linear ICs. A lowpass filter (LPF) is used to simulate the channel. The average number of bits sent over the channel is measured with a frequency counter at the output of the modulator. The minimum bandwidth required for the LPF is determined according to the intelligibility of the recovered message. Measurements indicate an average bit rate required for intelligible voice transmission is in the range of 2 to 4 kilobits per seconds (kbps) and between 2 to 5 kbps for music. The channel 3 dB bandwidth required is determined to be 1.5 kilohertzs. Besides the hardware simplicity, VBWDM provides an option for intelligible digitized voice transmission at very low bit rates without requiring synchronization. Another important feature of the modulator design is that no bits are sent when no signal is present at the input which saves transmitter power (important for mobile stations) and reduces probability of intercept and jamming in military applications.

  18. Dosimetric consequences of pencil beam width variations in scanned beam particle therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanrion, M. A.; Ammazzalorso, F.; Wittig, A.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Jelen, U.

    2013-06-01

    Scanned ion beam delivery enables the highest degree of target dose conformation attainable in external beam radiotherapy. Nominal pencil beam widths (spot sizes) are recorded during treatment planning system commissioning. Due to changes in the beam-line optics, the actual spot sizes may differ from these commissioning values, leading to differences between planned and delivered dose. The purpose of this study was to analyse the dosimetric consequences of spot size variations in particle therapy treatment plans. For 12 patients with skull base tumours and 12 patients with prostate carcinoma, scanned-beam carbon ion and proton treatment plans were prepared and recomputed simulating spot size changes of (1) ±10% to simulate the typical magnitude of fluctuations, (2) ±25% representing the worst-case scenario and (3) ±50% as a part of a risk analysis in case of fault conditions. The primary effect of the spot size variation was a dose deterioration affecting the target edge: loss of target coverage and broadening of the lateral penumbra (increased spot size) or overdosage and contraction of the lateral penumbra (reduced spot size). For changes ⩽25%, the resulting planning target volume mean 95%-isodose line coverage (CI-95%) deterioration was ranging from negligible to moderate. In some cases changes in the dose to adjoining critical structures were observed.

  19. Characterization of salivary alpha-amylase binding to Streptococcus sanguis

    SciTech Connect

    Scannapieco, F.A.; Bergey, E.J.; Reddy, M.S.; Levine, M.J. )

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the major salivary components which interact with oral bacteria and to determine the mechanism(s) responsible for their binding to the bacterial surface. Strains of Streptococcus sanguis, Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus mutans, and Actinomyces viscosus were incubated for 2 h in freshly collected human submandibular-sublingual saliva (HSMSL) or parotid saliva (HPS), and bound salivary components were eluted with 2% sodium dodecyl sulfate. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western transfer, alpha-amylase was the prominent salivary component eluted from S. sanguis. Studies with {sup 125}I-labeled HSMSL or {sup 125}I-labeled HPS also demonstrated a component with an electrophoretic mobility identical to that of alpha-amylase which bound to S. sanguis. Purified alpha-amylase from human parotid saliva was radiolabeled and found to bind to strains of S. sanguis genotypes 1 and 3 and S. mitis genotype 2, but not to strains of other species of oral bacteria. Binding of ({sup 125}I)alpha-amylase to streptococci was saturable, calcium independent, and inhibitable by excess unlabeled alpha-amylases from a variety of sources, but not by secretory immunoglobulin A and the proline-rich glycoprotein from HPS. Reduced and alkylated alpha-amylase lost enzymatic and bacterial binding activities. Binding was inhibited by incubation with maltotriose, maltooligosaccharides, limit dextrins, and starch.

  20. Alpha oscillatory correlates of motor inhibition in the aged brain

    PubMed Central

    Bönstrup, Marlene; Hagemann, Julian; Gerloff, Christian; Sauseng, Paul; Hummel, Friedhelm C.

    2015-01-01

    Exerting inhibitory control is a cognitive ability mediated by functions known to decline with age. The goal of this study is to add to the mechanistic understanding of cortical inhibition during motor control in aged brains. Based on behavioral findings of impaired inhibitory control with age we hypothesized that elderly will show a reduced or a lack of EEG alpha-power increase during tasks that require motor inhibition. Since inhibitory control over movements has been shown to rely on prior motor memory formation, we investigated cortical inhibitory processes at two points in time—early after learning and after an overnight consolidation phase and hypothesized an overnight increase of inhibitory capacities. Young and elderly participants acquired a complex finger movement sequence and in each experimental session brain activity during execution and inhibition of the sequence was recorded with multi-channel EEG. We assessed cortical processes of sustained inhibition by means of task-induced changes of alpha oscillatory power. During inhibition of the learned movement, young participants showed a significant alpha power increase at the sensorimotor cortices whereas elderly did not. Interestingly, for both groups, the overnight consolidation phase improved up-regulation of alpha power during sustained inhibition. This points to deficits in the generation and enhancement of local inhibitory mechanisms at the sensorimotor cortices in aged brains. However, the alpha power increase in both groups implies neuroplastic changes that strengthen the network of alpha power generation over time in young as well as elderly brains. PMID:26528179