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Sample records for alpha tau k5

  1. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Alpha Tau (K5 III) -- Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter Kenneth G.

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for (alpha) Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from Alpha Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfven waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These wakes cause non-thermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant .4lf\\en wave heating. We discuss implications of this interpretation for understanding the nature of magnetic dynamos operating in late-type giants.

  2. The Atmospheric Dynamics of alpha Tau (K5 III) - Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo in Late-Type Giant Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Airapetian, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for alpha Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from alpha Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfven waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These waves cause non-thermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant Alfven wave heating.

  3. The Atmospheric Dynamics of Alpha Tau (K5 III) - Clues to Understanding the Magnetic Dynamo in Late-Type Giant Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Airapetian, Vladimir

    2008-01-01

    Using HST/GHRS, HST/STIS and FUSE archival data for a Tau and the CHIANTI spectroscopic code, we have derived line shifts, volumetric emission measures, and plasma density estimates, and calculated filling factors for a number of UV lines forming between 10,000 K and 300,000 K in the outer atmosphere of this red giant star. The data suggest the presence of low-temperature extended regions and high-temperature compact regions, associated with magnetically open and closed structures in the stellar atmosphere, respectively. The signatures of UV lines from a Tau can be consistently understood via a model of upward-traveling Alfv6n waves in a gravitationally stratified atmosphere. These waves cause nonthermal broadening in UV lines due to unresolved wave motions and downward plasma motions in compact magnetic loops heated by resonant Alfven wave heating.

  4. Chromospheric heating by acoustic shocks - A confrontation of GHRS observations of Alpha Tauri (K5 III) with ab initio calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judge, P. G.; Cuntz, M.

    1993-01-01

    We compare ab initio calculations of semiforbidden C II line profiles near 2325 A with recently published observations of the inactive red giant Alpha Tau (K5 III) obtained using the GHRS on board the Hubble Space Telescope. Our one-dimensional, time-dependent calculations assume that the chromosphere is heated by stochastic acoustic shocks generated by photospheric convection. We calculate various models using results from traditional (mixing length) convection zone calculations as input to hydrodynamical models. The semiforbidden C II line profiles and ratios provide sensitive diagnostics of chromospheric velocity fields, electron densities, and temperatures. We identify major differences between observed and computed line profiles which are related to basic gas dynamics and which are probably not due to technical modeling restrictions. If the GHRS observations are representative of chromospheric conditions at all epochs, then one (or more) of our model assumptions must be incorrect. Several possibilities are examined. We predict time variability of semiforbidden C II lines for comparison with observations. Based upon data from the IUE archives, we argue that photospheric motions associated with supergranulation or global pulsation modes are unimportant in heating the chromosphere of Alpha Tau.

  5. Far-Infrared and Millimeter Continuum Studies of K-Giants: Alpha Boo and Alpha Tau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Martin; Carbon, Duane F.; Welch, William J.; Lim, Tanya; Forster, James R.; Goorvitch, David; Thigpen, William (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have imaged two normal, non-coronal, infrared-bright K-giants, alpha Boo and alpha Tau, in the 1.4-millimeter and 2.8-millimeter continuum using BIMA. These stars have been used as important absolute calibrators for several infrared satellites. Our goals are: (1) to probe the structure of their upper photospheres; (2) to establish whether these stars radiate as simple photospheres or possess long-wavelength chromospheres; and (3) to make a connection between millimeter-wave and far-infrared absolute flux calibrations. To accomplish these goals we also present ISO Long Wavelength Spectrometer (LWS) measurements of both these K-giants. The far-infrared and millimeter continuum radiation is produced in the vicinity of the temperature minimum in a Boo and a Tau, offering a direct test of the model photospheres and chromospheres for these two cool giants. We find that current photospheric models predict fluxes in reasonable agreement with those observed for those wavelengths which sample the upper photosphere, namely less than or equal to 170 micrometers in alpha Tau and less than or equal to 125 micrometers in alpha Boo. It is possible that alpha Tau is still radiative as far as 0.9 - 1.4 millimeters. We detect chromospheric radiation from both stars by 2.8 millimeters (by 1.4 millimeters in alpha Boo), and are able to establish useful bounds on the location of the temperature minimum. An attempt to interpret the chromospheric fluxes using the two-component "bifurcation model" proposed by Wiedemann et al. (1994) appears to lead to a significant contradiction.

  6. Short-Term Chromospheric Variability in alpha Tauri (K5 III): Results from IUE Time Series Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuntz, Manfred; Deeney, Bryan D.; Brown, Alexander; Stencel, Robert E.

    1996-01-01

    We evaluate time series observations of chromospheric lines (Mg II, Mg I, and C II) for the K giant alpha Tau obtained using the IUE LWP camera at high dispersion. These observations cover a time span of about 2 weeks in 1994 February-March and were designed to resolve variations occurring within hours, days, and weeks. We consider the observational results in relation to theoretical acoustic heating models, motivated by the fact that alpha Tau may exhibit a basal (i.e., minimum) level of chromospheric activity. The data reveal flux variations between the extremes of 8% in Mg II h+k and 15% in each emission component. These variations occur on timescales as short as 8 hr but not on timescales longer than approx.3 days. For the h and k components, flux variations occurring on a timescale as short as 1.5 hr are also found. These changes are often not correlated (and are sometimes even anticorrelated), leading to remarkable differences in the h/k ratios. We argue that these results are consistent with the presence of strong acoustic shocks, which can lead to variable Mg II line emission when only a small number of strong shocks are propagating through the atmosphere. We deduce the electron density in the C II lambda 2325 line formation region to be log(base e) of N. approx. equals 9.0, in agreement with previous studies. Our data provide evidence that the Mg II basal flux limit for K giants might be a factor of 4 higher than suggested by Rutten et al.

  7. On the Behavior of the Effective QCD Coupling {alpha}{sub {tau}}(s)at Low Scales

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2002-12-11

    The hadronic decays of the {tau} lepton can be used to determine the effective charge {alpha}{tau}(m{sub {tau}{prime}}{sup 2}) for a hypothetical {tau}-lepton with mass in the range 0 < m{sub {tau}{prime}} < m{sub {tau}}. This definition provides a fundamental definition of the QCD coupling at low mass scales. We study the behavior of {alpha}{sub {tau}} at low mass scales directly from first principles and without any renormalization-scheme dependence by looking at the experimental data from the OPAL Collaboration. The results are consistent with the freezing of the physical coupling at mass scales s = m{sub {tau}{prime}}{sup 2} of order 1 GeV{sup 2} with a magnitude {alpha}{sub {tau}} {approx} 0.9 {+-} 0.1.

  8. Alpha-synuclein and tau: teammates in neurodegeneration?

    PubMed

    Moussaud, Simon; Jones, Daryl R; Moussaud-Lamodière, Elisabeth L; Delenclos, Marion; Ross, Owen A; McLean, Pamela J

    2014-10-29

    The accumulation of α-synuclein aggregates is the hallmark of Parkinson's disease, and more generally of synucleinopathies. The accumulation of tau aggregates however is classically found in the brains of patients with dementia, and this type of neuropathological feature specifically defines the tauopathies. Nevertheless, in numerous cases α-synuclein positive inclusions are also described in tauopathies and vice versa, suggesting a co-existence or crosstalk of these proteinopathies. Interestingly, α-synuclein and tau share striking common characteristics suggesting that they may work in concord. Tau and α-synuclein are both partially unfolded proteins that can form toxic oligomers and abnormal intracellular aggregates under pathological conditions. Furthermore, mutations in either are responsible for severe dominant familial neurodegeneration. Moreover, tau and α-synuclein appear to promote the fibrillization and solubility of each other in vitro and in vivo. This suggests that interactions between tau and α-synuclein form a deleterious feed-forward loop essential for the development and spreading of neurodegeneration. Here, we review the recent literature with respect to elucidating the possible links between α-synuclein and tau.

  9. Tau-crystallin/alpha-enolase: one gene encodes both an enzyme and a lens structural protein

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    tau-Crystallin has been a major component of the cellular lenses of species throughout vertebrate evolution, from lamprey to birds. Immunofluorescence analysis of the embryonic turtle lens, using antiserum to lamprey tau-crystallin showed that the protein is expressed throughout embryogenesis and is present at high concentrations in all parts of the lens. Partial peptide sequence for the isolated turtle protein and deduced sequences for several lamprey peptides all revealed a close similarity to the glycolytic enzyme enolase (E.C. 4.2.1.11). A full-sized cDNA for putative duck tau- crystallin was obtained and sequenced, confirming the close relationship with alpha-enolase. Southern blot analysis showed that the duck genome contains a single alpha-enolase gene, while Northern blot analysis showed that the message for tau-crystallin/alpha-enolase is present in embryonic duck lens at 25 times the abundance found in liver. tau-Crystallin possesses enolase activity, but the activity is greatly reduced, probably because of age-related posttranslational modification. It thus appears that a highly conserved, important glycolytic enzyme has been used as a structural component of lens since the start of vertebrate evolution. Apparently the enzyme has not been recruited for its catalytic activity but for some distinct structural property. tau-Crystallin/alpha-enolase is an example of a multifunctional protein playing two very different roles in evolution but encoded by a single gene. PMID:2462567

  10. TRIM28 regulates the nuclear accumulation and toxicity of both alpha-synuclein and tau

    PubMed Central

    Rousseaux, Maxime WC; de Haro, Maria; Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A; De Maio, Antonia; Park, Jeehye; Jafar-Nejad, Paymaan; Al-Ramahi, Ismael; Sharma, Ajay; See, Lauren; Lu, Nan; Vilanova-Velez, Luis; Klisch, Tiemo J; Westbrook, Thomas F; Troncoso, Juan C; Botas, Juan; Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2016-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases are driven by the toxic gain-of-function of specific proteins within the brain. Elevated levels of alpha-synuclein (α-Syn) appear to drive neurotoxicity in Parkinson's disease (PD); neuronal accumulation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD); and their increased levels cause neurodegeneration in humans and model organisms. Despite the clinical differences between AD and PD, several lines of evidence suggest that α-Syn and tau overlap pathologically. The connections between α-Syn and tau led us to ask whether these proteins might be regulated through a shared pathway. We therefore screened for genes that affect post-translational levels of α-Syn and tau. We found that TRIM28 regulates α-Syn and tau levels and that its reduction rescues toxicity in animal models of tau- and α-Syn-mediated degeneration. TRIM28 stabilizes and promotes the nuclear accumulation and toxicity of both proteins. Intersecting screens across comorbid proteinopathies thus reveal shared mechanisms and therapeutic entry points. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19809.001 PMID:27779468

  11. Tau and alpha-synuclein brainstem pathology in Alzheimer disease: relation with extrapyramidal signs.

    PubMed

    Attems, Johannes; Quass, Magdalena; Jellinger, Kurt A

    2007-01-01

    Extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS) in Alzheimer disease (AD) often increase with disease severity. Their neuropathological substrate is a matter of discussion. We investigated tau and alpha-synuclein (AS) pathologies in brainstem in AD patients with and without EPS. Among 160 elderly subjects with autopsy-proven AD (110 female, 50 male, aged 61-102, mean 84.1 +/- 8.3 SD years), 151 (94.4%) being demented, 35 (21.9%) had clinically reported EPS (rigidity, bradykinesia, gait impairment). Neuropathological examination included standardized classification of AD according to current criteria, and semiquantitative assessment of neuronal loss in substantia nigra (SN), locus coeruleus (LC), and of tau and AS lesions in brainstem, and, in addition, of cerebrovascular lesions. The prevalence of EPS was only slightly more frequent in higher Braak stages. Tau pathology in brainstem significantly increased with increasing Braak stages, while AS lesions did not. EPS correlated best with SN cell loss (P < 0.001) and much less with AS pathology in several brain areas (P < 0.05), except in medulla oblongata (P < 0.001). Although both pathologies in substantia nigra correlated with neuron loss (P < 0.001), nigral tau lesions, present in 88.5% of EPS positive cases (without AS lesions in 55.6%), did not correlate with EPS. Additional cerebrovascular changes apparently did not influence the development of EPS symptoms in fully developed AD. With other recent data, these results suggest that neuronal loss in SN, partly related to tau lesions, is a major pathological substrate of EPS in AD, but some cases with and without EPS may show no or only minimal nigral changes. However, often associated with nigral tau lesions and higher Braak stages, EPS in elderly patients may be a surrogate marker for severe neuritic AD pathology.

  12. Estrogen dissociates Tau and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor subunit in postischemic hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Gómez, Gloria Patricia; Arango-Davila, Cesar; Gallego-Gómez, Juan Carlos; Barrera-Ocampo, Alvaro; Pimienta, Hernan; Garcia-Segura, Luis Miguel

    2006-08-21

    During cerebral ischemia, part of the damage associated with the hyperactivation of glutamate receptors results from the hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau. Previous studies have shown that estradiol treatment reduces neural damage after cerebral ischemia. Here, we show that transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery results in the hyperphosphorylation of Tau and in a significant increase in the association of Tau with glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid type glutamate receptor subunits 2/3 in the hippocampus. Estradiol treatment decreased hippocampal injury, inhibited glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and decreased the hyperphosphorylation of Tau and the interaction of Tau with glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor. These findings suggest that ischemia produces a strong association between Tau and alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid receptor, and estradiol can exert at least part of its neuroprotective activity through inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta.

  13. AlphaScreen HTS and live-cell bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assays for identification of Tau-Fyn SH3 interaction inhibitors for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cochran, J Nicholas; Diggs, Pauleatha V; Nebane, N Miranda; Rasmussen, Lynn; White, E Lucile; Bostwick, Robert; Maddry, Joseph A; Suto, Mark J; Roberson, Erik D

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disease, and with Americans' increasing longevity, it is becoming an epidemic. There are currently no effective treatments for this disorder. Abnormalities of Tau track more closely with cognitive decline than the most studied therapeutic target in AD, amyloid-β, but the optimal strategy for targeting Tau has not yet been identified. On the basis of considerable preclinical data from AD models, we hypothesize that interactions between Tau and the Src-family tyrosine kinase, Fyn, are pathogenic in AD. Genetically reducing either Tau or Fyn is protective in AD mouse models, and a dominant negative fragment of Tau that alters Fyn localization is also protective. Here, we describe a new AlphaScreen assay and a live-cell bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) assay using a novel BRET pair for quantifying the Tau-Fyn interaction. We used these assays to map the binding site on Tau for Fyn to the fifth and sixth PXXP motifs to show that AD-associated phosphorylation at microtubule affinity regulating kinase sites increases the affinity of the Tau-Fyn interaction and to identify Tau-Fyn interaction inhibitors by high-throughput screening. This screen has identified a variety of chemically tractable hits, suggesting that the Tau-Fyn interaction may represent a good drug target for AD.

  14. Seeded aggregation and toxicity of {alpha}-synuclein and tau: cellular models of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Takashi; Watanabe, Sayuri T; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2010-11-05

    The deposition of amyloid-like filaments in the brain is the central event in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Here we report cellular models of intracytoplasmic inclusions of α-synuclein, generated by introducing nucleation seeds into SH-SY5Y cells with a transfection reagent. Upon introduction of preformed seeds into cells overexpressing α-synuclein, abundant, highly filamentous α-synuclein-positive inclusions, which are extensively phosphorylated and ubiquitinated and partially thioflavin-positive, were formed within the cells. SH-SY5Y cells that formed such inclusions underwent cell death, which was blocked by small molecular compounds that inhibit β-sheet formation. Similar seed-dependent aggregation was observed in cells expressing four-repeat Tau by introducing four-repeat Tau fibrils but not three-repeat Tau fibrils or α-synuclein fibrils. No aggregate formation was observed in cells overexpressing three-repeat Tau upon treatment with four-repeat Tau fibrils. Our cellular models thus provide evidence of nucleation-dependent and protein-specific polymerization of intracellular amyloid-like proteins in cultured cells.

  15. Alpha 1-Antichymotrypsin, an Inflammatory Protein Overexpressed in the Brains of Patients with Alzheimer's Disease, Induces Tau Hyperphosphorylation through c-Jun N-Terminal Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Tyagi, Ethika; Fiorelli, Tina; Norden, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    The association of inflammatory proteins with neuritic plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients has led to the hypothesis that inflammation plays a pivotal role in the development of pathology in AD. Earlier studies have shown that alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) enhances amyloid beta fibrillization and accelerated plaque formation in APP transgenic mice. Later studies from our laboratory have shown that purified ACT induces tau hyperphosphorylation and degeneration in neurons. In order to understand the mechanisms by which inflammatory proteins enhance tau hyperphosphorylation, we injected interleukin-1β (IL-1β) intracerebroventricularly into mice expressing human ACT, human tau, or both transgenes. It was found that the hyperphosphorylation of tau in ACT and ACT/htau mice after IL-1β injection correlated with increased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). We verified the involvement of JNK in ACT-induced tau phosphorylation by utilizing JNK inhibitors in cultured primary neurons treated with ACT, and we found that the inhibitor showed complete prevention of ACT-induced tau phosphorylation. These results indicate that JNK is one of the major kinases involved in the ACT-mediated tau hyperphosphorylation and suggest that inhibitors of this kinase may protect against inflammation-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and neurodegeneration associated with AD. PMID:24175110

  16. Tau physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics: [tau] production and related [tau] properties; general discussion of [tau] decays; leptonic decays; hadronic decays; the [tau] in atomic physics; and the [tau] neutrino: [nu][sub [tau

  17. Tau physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1993-03-01

    This report discusses the following topics: {tau} production and related {tau} properties; general discussion of {tau} decays; leptonic decays; hadronic decays; the {tau} in atomic physics; and the {tau} neutrino: {nu}{sub {tau}}

  18. Persistent Sub-Yearly Chromospheric Variations in Lower Main-Sequence Stars: Tau Booe and alpha Com

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maulik, Davesh; Donahue, Robert A.; Baliunas, Sallie L.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discoveries of extrasolar planetary systems around lower main-sequence stars such as tau Booe (HD 120136) has prompted further investigation into their stellar activity. A cursory analysis of tau Booe for cyclic chromospheric activity, based on its 30-yr record of Ca 2 H and K fluxes obtained as part of the HK Project from Mount Wilson Observatory, finds an intermediate, sub-yearly period (approximately 117 d) in chromospheric activity in addition to, and separate from, both its rotation (3.3 d) and long-term variability. As a persistent subyearly period in surface magnetic activity is unprecedented, we investigate this apparent anomaly further by examining chromospheric activity levels of other stars with similar mass, searching for variability in chromospheric activity with periods of less than one year, but longer than measured or predicted rotation. An examination of the time series of 40 mid-to-late F dwarfs yielded one other star for further analysis: alpha Com (HD 114378, P approximately 132 d). The variations for these two stars were checked for persistence and coherence. Based on these determinations, we eliminate the possibilities of rotation, long-term activity cycle, and the evolution of active regions as the cause of this variation in both stars. In particular, for tau Booe we infer that the phenomenon may be chromospheric in origin; however, beyond this, it is difficult to identify anything further regarding the cause of the activity variations, or even whether the observed modulation in the two stars have the same origin.

  19. Sulfur Mustard Disrupts Human Alpha(3)Beta(4)-Integrin Receptors in Concert With Alpha(6)Beta(4)-Integrin Receptors and Collapse of the Keratin K5/K14 Cytoskeleton

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    blisters. We know that genetic disorders effecting altered assembly of keratins K5/K14 can cause epidermolysis bullosa simplex and blisters that occur in...phenotype resembles blisters produced by junctional epidermolysis bullosa and by mutations that disrupt assembly of (x3p 1 integrins 7 or a6 34 integrins and...of the epidermal basement membrane," J Cell Biol, 137, 729-742, 1997. 8. L. Pulkkinen, and J. Uitto, "Hemidesmosomal variants of epidermolysis bullosa

  20. The Effects of Alpha Boswellic Acid on Reelin Expression and Tau Phosphorylation in Human Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Esmat; Katouli, Fatemeh Hedayati; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Shasaltaneh, Marzieh Dehghan; Parandavar, Elham; Bayati, Samaneh; Afrasiabi, Ali; Nazari, Reza

    2017-03-01

    Reelin is an extracellular glycoprotein which contributes to synaptic plasticity and function of memory in the adult brain. It has been indicated that the Reelin signaling cascade participates in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Besides the neurons, glial cells such as astrocytes also express Reelin protein. While functional loss of astrocytes has been reported to be associated with AD, dysfunction of astrocytic Reelin signaling pathway has not received much attention. Therefore, we investigated the effects of α-boswellic acid (ABA) as one of the major component of Boswellia serrata resin on primary fetal human astrocytes under a stress paradigm as a possible model for AD through study on Reelin cascade. For this aim, we used streptozotocin (STZ), in which from an outlook generates Alzheimer's hallmarks in astrocytes, and assayed Reelin expression, Tau and Akt phosphorylation as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and apoptosis in the presences of ABA. Our results indicated that while STZ (100 µM) down-regulated the expression of Reelin, ABA (25 µM) up-regulated its expression (p < 0.01) for 24 h. ABA efficiently reduced hyperphosphorylated Tau (Ser404) in STZ-treated astrocytes (p < 0.01). Furthermore, STZ-induced apoptosis by increasing cleaved caspase three (p < 0.01) and ROS generation (p < 0.01), a further pathological hallmark of Tauopathy. On the other hand, ABA decreased ROS generation and promoted proliferation of astrocytes through elevating Survivin expression (p < 0.01). These results showed that ABA could be considered as a potent therapeutic agent for prevention and decreasing the progression of Alzheimer's hallmarks in astrocytes; however, more in vivo studies would be needed.

  1. Propene activation by the oxo-iron active species of taurine/alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase (TauD) enzyme. How does the catalysis compare to heme-enzymes?

    PubMed

    de Visser, Sam P

    2006-08-02

    Density functional calculations on the oxygenation reaction of propene by a model for taurine/alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase (TauD) enzyme are presented. The oxo-iron active species of TauD is shown to be a powerful and aggressive oxidant, which is able to hydroxylate C-H bonds and epoxidize C=C bonds with low barriers. In the case of propene oxygenation, the hydroxylation and epoxidation mechanisms are competitive on a dominant quintet spin state surface. We have compared the mechanism and thermodynamics of TauD with oxo-iron heme catalysts, such as the cytochromes P450, and found some critical differences. The TauD model is found to be much more reactive toward oxygenation of substrates than oxo-iron complexes in a heme environment with much lower reaction barriers. We have analyzed this and assigned this to the strength of the O-H bond formed after hydrogen abstraction from a substrate, which is at least 10 kcal mol(-)(1) stronger in five-coordinated oxo-iron nonheme complexes than in six-coordinated oxo-iron heme complexes. Since, the metal in TauD enzymes is five-coordinated, whereas in heme-enzymes it is six-coordinated there are some critical differences in the valence molecular orbitals. Thus, in oxo-iron heme catalysts one of the antibonding pi orbitals is replaced by a low-lying nonbonding delta orbital resulting in a lower overall spin state. Moreover, heme-enzymes have an extra oxidation equivalent located on the heme, which is missing in non-heme oxo-iron catalysts. As a result, the oxo-iron species of TauD reacts via single-state reactivity on a dominant quintet spin state surface, whereas oxo-iron heme catalysts react via two-state reactivity on competing doublet and quartet spin states.

  2. Tau physics and tau factories

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Substantial progress in tau lepton physics requires larger and cleaner samples of /tau/'s produced in e/sup +/e/sup minus/ ..-->.. /tau//sup +//tau//sup minus/. Single-tagging of the /tau/ pair is crucial. Possibilities for such progress at particle factories are discussed with emphasis on the Tau-Charm Factory concept. 30 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Alpha{sub s} at Low Q{sup 2} from e+e- and tau Data

    SciTech Connect

    Menke, Sven

    2001-06-04

    It has been shown in recent analyses by ALEPH [1] and OPAL [2] that precision QCD tests are possible with hadronic {tau} decays by comparing spectral moments of the hadronic decay ratio of the {tau} with QCD calculations. In principle e{sup +}e{sup -} data can be used in a similar manner by evaluating spectral moments of R. The current e{sup +}e{sup -} data is compared with the OPAL {tau} data and a prediction is made on the achievable accuracy of QCD tests with the projected precision of PEP-N [3].

  4. HST/COS SPECTRA OF DF Tau AND V4046 Sgr: FIRST DETECTION OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN ABSORPTION AGAINST THE Ly{alpha} EMISSION LINE

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Hao; Linsky, Jeffrey L.; France, Kevin E-mail: jlinsky@jilau1.colorado.edu

    2011-03-20

    We report the first detection of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) absorption in the Ly{alpha} emission line profiles of two classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs), DF Tau and V4046 Sgr, observed by the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. This absorption is the energy source for many of the Lyman-band H{sub 2} fluorescent lines commonly seen in the far-ultraviolet spectra of CTTSs. We find that the absorbed energy in the H{sub 2} pumping transitions from a portion of the Ly{alpha} line significantly differ from the amount of energy in the resulting fluorescent emission. By assuming additional absorption in the H I Ly{alpha} profile along our light of sight, we can correct the H{sub 2} absorption/emission ratios so that they are close to unity. The required H I absorption for DF Tau is at a velocity close to the radial velocity of the star, consistent with H I absorption in the edge-on disk and interstellar medium. For V4046 Sgr, a nearly face-on system, the required absorption is between +100 km s{sup -1} and +290 km s{sup -1}, most likely resulting from H I gas in the accretion columns falling onto the star.

  5. Calpain- and caspase-mediated alphaII-spectrin and tau proteolysis in rat cerebrocortical neuronal cultures after ecstasy or methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Warren, Matthew W; Zheng, Wenrong; Kobeissy, Firas H; Cheng Liu, Ming; Hayes, Ronald L; Gold, Mark S; Larner, Stephen F; Wang, Kevin K W

    2007-08-01

    Abuse of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA or Ecstasy) and methamphetamine (Meth or Speed) is a growing international problem with an estimated 250 million users of psychoactive drugs worldwide. It is important to demonstrate and understand the mechanism of neurotoxicity so potential prevention and treatment therapies can be designed. In this study rat primary cerebrocortical neuron cultures were challenged with MDMA and Meth (1 or 2 mM) for 24 and 48 h and compared to the excitotoxin N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The neurotoxicity of these drugs, as assessed by microscopy, lactate dehydrogenase release and immunoblot, was shown to be both dose- and time-dependent. Immunoblot analysis using biomarkers of cell death showed significant proteolysis of both alphaII-spectrin and tau proteins. Breakdown products of alphaII-spectrin (SBDPs) of 150, 145, and 120 kDa and tau breakdown products (TBDPs) of 45, 32, 26, and 14 kDa were observed. The use of the protease inhibitors calpain inhibitor SJA6017 and caspase inhibitors z-VAD-fmk and Z-D-DCB, attenuated drug-induced alphaII-spectrin and tau proteolysis. The calpain inhibitor reduced the calpain-induced breakdown products SBDP145 and TBDP14, but there was an offset increase in the caspase-mediated breakdown products SBDP120 and TBDP45. The caspase inhibitors, on the other hand, decreased SBDP120 and TBDP45. These data suggest that both MDMA and Meth trigger concerted proteolytic attacks of the structural proteins by both calpain and caspase family of proteases. The ability of the protease inhibitors to reduce the damage caused by these drugs suggests that the treatment arsenal could include similar drugs as possible tools to combat the drug-induced neurotoxicity in vivo.

  6. Kinetic and spectroscopic investigation of Co{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, and N-oxalylglycine inhibition of the Fe{sup II}/{alpha}-ketoglutarate dioxygenase, TauD

    SciTech Connect

    Kalliri, Efthalia; Grzyska, Piotr K.; Hausinger, Robert P. . E-mail: hausinge@msu.edu

    2005-12-09

    Co{sup II}, Ni{sup II}, and N-oxalylglycine (NOG) are well-known inhibitors of Fe{sup II}/{alpha}-ketoglutarate ({alpha}KG)-dependent hydroxylases, but few studies describe their kinetics and no spectroscopic investigations have been reported. Using taurine/{alpha}KG dioxygenase (TauD) as a paradigm for this enzyme family, time-dependent inhibition assays showed that Co{sup II} and Ni{sup II} follow slow-binding inhibition kinetics. Whereas Ni{sup II}-substituted TauD was non-chromophoric, spectroscopic studies of the Co{sup II}-substituted enzyme revealed a six-coordinate site (protein alone or with {alpha}KG) that became five-coordinate upon taurine addition. The Co{sup II} spectrum was not perturbed by a series of anions or oxidants, suggesting the Co{sup II} is inaccessible and could be used to stabilize the protein. NOG competed weakly (K {sub i} {approx} 290 {mu}M) with {alpha}KG for binding to TauD, with the increased electron density of NOG yielding electronic transitions for NOG-Fe{sup II}-TauD and taurine-NOG-Fe{sup II}-TauD at 380 nm ({epsilon} {sub 38} 90-105 M{sup -1} cm{sup -1}). The spectra of the NOG-bound TauD species did not change significantly upon oxygen exposure, arguing against the formation of an oxygen-bound state mimicking an early intermediate in catalysis.

  7. Highly potent and specific GSK-3beta inhibitors that block tau phosphorylation and decrease alpha-synuclein protein expression in a cellular model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kozikowski, Alan P; Gaisina, Irina N; Petukhov, Pavel A; Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; King, LaShaunda T; Blond, Sylvie Y; Duka, Tetyana; Rusnak, Milan; Sidhu, Anita

    2006-02-01

    Research by Klein and co-workers suggests that the inhibition of GSK-3beta by small molecules may offer an important strategy in the treatment of a number of central nervous system (CNS) disorders including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and bipolar disorders. Based on results from kinase-screening assays that identified a staurosporine analogue as a modest inhibitor of GSK-3beta, a series of 3-indolyl-4-indazolylmaleimides was prepared for study in both enzymatic and cell-based assays. Most strikingly, whereas we identified ligands having poor to high potency for GSK-3beta inhibition, only ligands with a Ki value of less than 8 nM, namely maleimides 18 and 22, were found to inhibit Tau phosphorylation at a GSK-3beta-specific site (Ser 396/404). Accordingly, maleimides 18 and 22 may protect neuronal cells against cell death by decreasing the level of alpha-Syn protein expression. We conclude that the GSK-3beta inhibitors described herein offer promise in defending cells against MPP+-induced neurotoxicity and that such compounds will be valuable to explore in animal models of Parkinson's disease as well as in other Tau-related neurodegenerative disease states.

  8. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid β1-42, Tau, and Alpha-Synuclein Predict the Heterogeneous Progression of Cognitive Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ju-Hee

    2016-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with heterogeneous pathological and clinical features. Cognitive dysfunction, a frequent non-motor complication, is a risk factor for poor prognosis and shows inter-individual variation in its progression. Of the clinical studies performed to identify biomarkers of PD progression, the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is the largest study that enrolled drug-naïve and very early stage PD patients. The baseline characteristics of the PPMI cohort were recently published. The diagnostic utility of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, including alpha-synuclein (α-syn), total tau, phosphorylated tau at Thr181, and amyloid β1-42, was not satisfactory. However, the baseline data on CSF biomarkers in the PPMI study suggested that the measurement of the CSF biomarkers enables the prediction of future cognitive decline in PD patients, which was consistent with previous studies. To prove the hypothesis that the interaction between Alzheimer's pathology and α-syn pathology is important to the progression of cognitive dysfunction in PD, longitudinal observational studies must be followed. In this review, the neuropathological nature of heterogeneous cognitive decline in PD is briefly discussed, followed by a summarized interpretation of baseline CSF biomarkers derived from the data in the PPMI study. The combination of clinical, biochemical, genetic and imaging biomarkers of PD constitutes a feasible strategy to predict the heterogeneous progression of PD.

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid β1-42, Tau, and Alpha-Synuclein Predict the Heterogeneous Progression of Cognitive Dysfunction in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ju-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease with heterogeneous pathological and clinical features. Cognitive dysfunction, a frequent non-motor complication, is a risk factor for poor prognosis and shows inter-individual variation in its progression. Of the clinical studies performed to identify biomarkers of PD progression, the Parkinson’s Progression Markers Initiative (PPMI) study is the largest study that enrolled drug-naïve and very early stage PD patients. The baseline characteristics of the PPMI cohort were recently published. The diagnostic utility of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, including alpha-synuclein (α-syn), total tau, phosphorylated tau at Thr181, and amyloid β1-42, was not satisfactory. However, the baseline data on CSF biomarkers in the PPMI study suggested that the measurement of the CSF biomarkers enables the prediction of future cognitive decline in PD patients, which was consistent with previous studies. To prove the hypothesis that the interaction between Alzheimer’s pathology and α-syn pathology is important to the progression of cognitive dysfunction in PD, longitudinal observational studies must be followed. In this review, the neuropathological nature of heterogeneous cognitive decline in PD is briefly discussed, followed by a summarized interpretation of baseline CSF biomarkers derived from the data in the PPMI study. The combination of clinical, biochemical, genetic and imaging biomarkers of PD constitutes a feasible strategy to predict the heterogeneous progression of PD. PMID:27240810

  10. Tau Structures

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesus; Jiménez, Juan S.; Sayas, Carmen L.; Bolós, Marta; Zabala, Juan C.; Rivas, Germán; Hernández, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that plays an important role in axonal stabilization, neuronal development, and neuronal polarity. In this review, we focus on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary tau structures. We describe the structure of tau from its specific residues until its conformation in dimers, oligomers, and larger polymers in physiological and pathological situations. PMID:27877124

  11. Combustion-derived nanoparticles, the neuroenteric system, cervical vagus, hyperphosphorylated alpha synuclein and tau in young Mexico City residents.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Pérez-Guillé, Beatriz; Mukherjee, Partha S; Gónzalez-Maciel, Angélica

    2017-11-01

    Mexico City (MC) young residents are exposed to high levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), have high frontal concentrations of combustion-derived nanoparticles (CDNPs), accumulation of hyperphosphorylated aggregated α-synuclein (α-Syn) and early Parkinson's disease (PD). Swallowed CDNPs have easy access to epithelium and submucosa, damaging gastrointestinal (GI) barrier integrity and accessing the enteric nervous system (ENS). This study is focused on the ENS, vagus nerves and GI barrier in young MC v clean air controls. Electron microscopy of epithelial, endothelial and neural cells and immunoreactivity of stomach and vagus to phosphorylated ɑ-synuclein Ser129 and Hyperphosphorylated-Tau (Htau) were evaluated and CDNPs measured in ENS. CDNPs were abundant in erythrocytes, unmyelinated submucosal, perivascular and intramuscular nerve fibers, ganglionic neurons and vagus nerves and associated with organelle pathology. ɑSyn and Htau were present in 25/27 MC gastric,15/26 vagus and 18/27 gastric and 2/26 vagus samples respectively. We strongly suggest CDNPs are penetrating and damaging the GI barrier and reaching preganglionic parasympathetic fibers and the vagus nerve. This work highlights the potential role of CDNPs in the neuroenteric hyperphosphorylated ɑ-Syn and tau pathology as seen in Parkinson and Alzheimer's diseases. Highly oxidative, ubiquitous CDNPs constitute a biologically plausible path into Parkinson's and Alzheimer's pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. An active-site phenylalanine directs substrate binding and C-H cleavage in the alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase TauD.

    PubMed

    McCusker, Kevin P; Klinman, Judith P

    2010-04-14

    Enzymes that cleave C-H bonds are often found to depend on well-packed hydrophobic cores that influence the distance between the hydrogen donor and acceptor. Residue F159 in taurine alpha-ketoglutarate dioxygenase (TauD) is demonstrated to play an important role in the binding and orientation of its substrate, which undergoes a hydrogen atom transfer to the active site Fe(IV)=O. Mutation of F159 to smaller hydrophobic side chains (L, V, A) leads to substantially reduced rates for substrate binding and for C-H bond cleavage, as well as increased contribution of the chemical step to k(cat) under steady-state turnover conditions. The greater sensitivity of these substrate-dependent processes to mutation at position 159 than observed for the oxygen activation process supports a previous conclusion of modularity of function within the active site of TauD (McCusker, K. P.; Klinman, J. P. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 2009, 106, 19791-19795). Extraction of intrinsic deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) using single turnover transients shows 2- to 4-fold increase in the size of the KIE for F159V in relation to wild-type and F159L. It appears that there is a break in behavior following removal of a single methylene from the side chain of F159L to generate F159V, whereby the protein active site loses its ability to restore the internuclear distance between substrate and Fe(IV)=O that supports optimal hydrogenic wave function overlap.

  13. Effects of Abeta1-42 fibrils and of the tetrapeptide Pr-IIGL on the phosphorylation state of the tau-protein and on the alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lain, Enzo; Penke, Botond; Delacourte, André; Gündisch, Daniela; Schröder, Hannsjörg; Witter, Brigitte

    2005-02-01

    In order to investigate the possible links connecting beta-amyloid (Abeta) accumulation, tau-hyperphosphorylation and nicotinic receptor expression, rat embryonic primary hippocampal cultures were incubated with amyloidogenic peptides. Exposure to 0.5 microm fibrillar Abeta(1-42) for 3 days caused retraction of dendrites, shrinkage of cell bodies and a decrease in the expression of microtubule-associated proteins 2b (MAP2b), without affecting the total number of neurons and their viability. No impact on the tau-phosphorylation sites Ser-202, Thr231/Ser235, Ser262 and Ser396/Ser404 was found. The total number of homomeric alpha7-nicotinic receptors (alpha7-nAChRs) and their affinity for [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin remained unaltered. Upon incubation with the putatively protective tetrapeptide propionyl-isoleucine-isoleucine-glycine-leucine (Pr-IIGL), an analogue of the region [31-34] of Abeta, cell bodies were swollen in the region of the apical dendrite. These morphological alterations, different from those elicited by Abeta(1-42), did not involve MAP2 expression changes. In contrast to Abeta(1-42), Pr-IIGL caused a massive hyperphosphorylation of the tau-protein at Ser-202 and at Ser396/Ser404. The total number of homomeric alpha7-nAChRs and their affinity for [(125)I]alpha-bungarotoxin were unaffected. In conclusion, the present results show a toxic effect of Abeta(1-42) on the cytoskeletal structure at concentrations normally present in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients, but raise some doubts about the role of Abeta(1-42) fibrils as a direct trigger of tau-hyperphosphorylation. The tetrapeptide Pr-IIGL cannot be considered protective with regard to cell morphology. Although it prevents the Abeta(1-42)-induced retraction of dendrites, it exhibits other toxic properties. The homomeric alpha7-nAChRs were not affected either by Abeta(1-42) incubation or by Pr-IIGL-induced tau-hyperphosphorylation.

  14. Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of AA Tau, DN Tau, UX Tau A, T Tau, RY Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrba, F. J.; Chugainov, P. F.; Weaver, W. B.; Stauffer, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a UBVRI photometric monitoring campaign for three classical T Tauri stars (AA Tau, DN Tau, and UX Tau A) and two weak emission line T Tauri stars (Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7). Observations were obtained at three sites during a core observing period spanning UT 1985 October 14 through UT 1985 December 25, with additional observations continuing until UT 1986 April 6. Concurrent spectrophotometric observations were obtained for all main program stars except Lk Ca 7 and additionally for T Tau, RW Aur, and RY Tau. Periodic photometric variability, assumed to be the stars' rotation periods, were found for AA Tau, DN Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7, respectively, as 8.2, 6.3, 3.4, and 5.7 days. Several U-filter flares were observed for Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7, which are strongly concentrated toward phases of minimum light. Correlations are found between H-alpha line strengths and V magnitudes for AA Tau and RY Tau. An analysis of absolute color variations of classical T Tauri stars confirms that hot spots are the predominant cause of these stars' variability. Our overall results are consistent with earlier findings that long-lived cool spots are responsible for most of the variability found for weak-emission T Tauri stars, while temporal hot spots are primarily responsible for the observed variability found in classical T Tauri stars.

  15. Photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of AA Tau, DN Tau, UX Tau A, T Tau, RY Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrba, F. J.; Chugainov, P. F.; Weaver, W. B.; Stauffer, J. S.

    1993-01-01

    We report the results of a UBVRI photometric monitoring campaign for three classical T Tauri stars (AA Tau, DN Tau, and UX Tau A) and two weak emission line T Tauri stars (Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7). Observations were obtained at three sites during a core observing period spanning UT 1985 October 14 through UT 1985 December 25, with additional observations continuing until UT 1986 April 6. Concurrent spectrophotometric observations were obtained for all main program stars except Lk Ca 7 and additionally for T Tau, RW Aur, and RY Tau. Periodic photometric variability, assumed to be the stars' rotation periods, were found for AA Tau, DN Tau, Lk Ca 4, and Lk Ca 7, respectively, as 8.2, 6.3, 3.4, and 5.7 days. Several U-filter flares were observed for Lk Ca 4 and Lk Ca 7, which are strongly concentrated toward phases of minimum light. Correlations are found between H-alpha line strengths and V magnitudes for AA Tau and RY Tau. An analysis of absolute color variations of classical T Tauri stars confirms that hot spots are the predominant cause of these stars' variability. Our overall results are consistent with earlier findings that long-lived cool spots are responsible for most of the variability found for weak-emission T Tauri stars, while temporal hot spots are primarily responsible for the observed variability found in classical T Tauri stars.

  16. Tau Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, D.; Oliva, P.

    2016-10-01

    Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays and UHE neutrinos may lead to a new deep astronomy. However the most recent results on their correlations and clustering seem to most authors inconclusive. We briefly remind some UHECR models and past and recent results. Our reading and overlapping of IR-gamma-UHECR maps and their correlations seem to answer to several key puzzles, offering a first hope of the UHECR astronomy, mostly ruled by lightest nuclei from nearby Universe. Regarding the UHE neutrino we recently noted that the flavor ratio and the absence of double bang in IceCube within highest energetic ten events may suggest still a dominant noisy prompt component. However a first correlated UHE crossing muon with expected location (through going upward muon neutrino or horizontally) in IceCube is in our view a milestone in neutrino astronomy road map, possibly partially related, to galactic UHECR narrow clustering. The disturbing and persistent atmospheric neutrino noises, both conventional and prompt, call for a better filtered neutrino astronomy: the tau neutrino ones. There are no yet (at present, detectable) TeV-PeVs or more energetic tau neutrino of atmospheric, conventional or prompt nature; only astrophysical ones might soon shine. Double bangs in IceCube and in particular the tau air-showers in large array are the unique definitive expected signatures of astrophysical signals. In particular tau air-shower amplify in a huge way the otherwise single lepton track, once in decay in flight, into a richest three of secondaries (up to a million of billion Cherenkov photons for PeV tau energy) whose wide areas may extend up to nearly kilometer size. Such airshowers are very directional. PeVs energetic tau lepton penetrate hundreds meters inside the rock before its decay. Therefore horizontal tau air-shower in front of deep, wide valleys or mountain cliff [D. Fargion, A. Aiello, R. Conversano; 26th ICRC, He 6.1.09, 6 p. 396-398. (1999). Ed. D. Kieda, et al. arxiv

  17. Optimizing Your K-5 Engineering Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppola, Matthew Perkins; Merz, Alice H.

    2017-01-01

    Today, elementary school teachers continue to revisit old lessons and seek out new ones, especially in engineering. Optimization is the process by which an existing product or procedure is revised and refined. Drawn from the authors' experiences working directly with students in grades K-5 and their teachers and preservice teachers, the…

  18. Optimizing Your K-5 Engineering Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppola, Matthew Perkins; Merz, Alice H.

    2017-01-01

    Today, elementary school teachers continue to revisit old lessons and seek out new ones, especially in engineering. Optimization is the process by which an existing product or procedure is revised and refined. Drawn from the authors' experiences working directly with students in grades K-5 and their teachers and preservice teachers, the…

  19. A semiempirical atmosphere for alpha Tauri from neutral iron lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, L. W.

    1977-01-01

    A semiempirical model photosphere is constructed for the K5 III star Alpha Tau. The technique employed is based on measurements of the central fluxes in a series of lines in multiplets. Observations of four multiplets having a range in excitation potential yield the excitation temperature as a function of the optical depth in a reference line. If the temperature structure of an assumed starting model is changed to force agreement between the observed and predicted line source functions under the assumption that excitation and electron kinetic temperatures are equal, the final semiempirical model is cooler by 150 K in the outer layers and warmer by 150 K in deeper layers than the theoretical model with the parameters adopted for Alpha Tau.

  20. Tau Proteins Cross the Blood-Brain Barrier.

    PubMed

    Banks, William A; Kovac, Andrej; Majerova, Petra; Bullock, Kristin M; Shi, Min; Zhang, Jing

    2017-01-01

    Tauopathies are a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injuries. It has been demonstrated that amyloid-beta peptides, alpha-synuclein, and prion proteins cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB), contributing to their abilities to induce disease. Very little is known about whether tau proteins can cross the BBB. Here we systematically characterized several key forms of tau proteins to cross the BBB, including Tau-441 (2N4R), Tau-410 (2N3R), truncated tau 151-391 (0N4R), and truncated tau 121-227. All of these tau proteins crossed the BBB readily and bidirectonally; however, only Tau-410 had a saturable component to its influx. The tau proteins also entered the blood after their injection into the brain, with Tau 121-227 having the slowest exit from brain. The tau proteins varied in regards to their enzymatic stability in brain and blood and in their peripheral pharmacokinetics. These results show that blood-borne tau proteins could contribute to brain tauopathies. The result also suggest that the CNS can contribute to blood levels of tau, raising the possibility that, as suggested for other misfolded proteins, blood levels of tau proteins could be used as a biomarker of CNS disease.

  1. Tau--an inhibitor of deacetylase HDAC6 function.

    PubMed

    Perez, Mar; Santa-Maria, Ismael; Gomez de Barreda, Elena; Zhu, Xiongwei; Cuadros, Raquel; Cabrero, Jose Roman; Sanchez-Madrid, Francisco; Dawson, Hana N; Vitek, Michael P; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A; Avila, Jesus

    2009-06-01

    Analysis of brain microtubule protein from patients with Alzheimer's disease showed decreased alpha tubulin levels along with increased acetylation of the alpha tubulin subunit, mainly in those microtubules from neurons containing neurofibrillary tau pathology. To determine the relationship of tau protein and increased tubulin acetylation, we studied the effect of tau on the acetylation-deacetylation of tubulin. Our results indicate that tau binds to the tubulin-deacetylase, histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6), decreasing its activity with a consequent increase in tubulin acetylation. As expected, increased acetylation was also found in tubulin from wild-type mice compared with tubulin from mice lacking tau because of the tau-mediated inhibition of the deacetylase. In addition, we found that an excess of tau protein, as a HDAC6 inhibitor, prevents induction of autophagy by inhibiting proteasome function.

  2. Comparing Fit and Reliability Estimates of a Psychological Instrument Using Second-Order CFA, Bifactor, and Essentially Tau-Equivalent (Coefficient Alpha) Models via AMOS 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Ryan A.; Yang, Yanyun; Beitra, Danette; McCaffrey, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of composite reliability within a hierarchical modeling framework has recently become of particular interest given the growing recognition that the underlying assumptions of coefficient alpha are often untenable. Unfortunately, coefficient alpha remains the prominent estimate of reliability when estimating total scores from a scale with…

  3. Comparing Fit and Reliability Estimates of a Psychological Instrument Using Second-Order CFA, Bifactor, and Essentially Tau-Equivalent (Coefficient Alpha) Models via AMOS 22

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Ryan A.; Yang, Yanyun; Beitra, Danette; McCaffrey, Stacey

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of composite reliability within a hierarchical modeling framework has recently become of particular interest given the growing recognition that the underlying assumptions of coefficient alpha are often untenable. Unfortunately, coefficient alpha remains the prominent estimate of reliability when estimating total scores from a scale with…

  4. The Tau Code

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesús

    2009-01-01

    In this short review, I will focus on how a unique tau gene may produce many tau isoforms through alternative splicing and how the phosphorylation of these isoforms by different kinases may affect their activity and behaviour. Indeed, each of the different tau isoforms may play a distinct role under both physiological and pathological conditions. Thus, I will discuss whether a tau code exists that might explain the involvement of different tau isoforms in different cellular functions. PMID:20552052

  5. An unbiased approach to identifying tau kinases that phosphorylate tau at sites associated with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Annalisa; Brewerton, Suzanne; Bell, Amanda; Sargent, Samantha; Glover, Sarah; Hardy, Clare; Moore, Roger; Calley, John; Ramachandran, Devaki; Poidinger, Michael; Karran, Eric; Davies, Peter; Hutton, Michael; Szekeres, Philip; Bose, Suchira

    2013-08-09

    Neurofibrillary tangles, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer disease (AD), are composed of paired helical filaments of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau. The accumulation of these proteinaceous aggregates in AD correlates with synaptic loss and severity of dementia. Identifying the kinases involved in the pathological phosphorylation of tau may identify novel targets for AD. We used an unbiased approach to study the effect of 352 human kinases on their ability to phosphorylate tau at epitopes associated with AD. The kinases were overexpressed together with the longest form of human tau in human neuroblastoma cells. Levels of total and phosphorylated tau (epitopes Ser(P)-202, Thr(P)-231, Ser(P)-235, and Ser(P)-396/404) were measured in cell lysates using AlphaScreen assays. GSK3α, GSK3β, and MAPK13 were found to be the most active tau kinases, phosphorylating tau at all four epitopes. We further dissected the effects of GSK3α and GSK3β using pharmacological and genetic tools in hTau primary cortical neurons. Pathway analysis of the kinases identified in the screen suggested mechanisms for regulation of total tau levels and tau phosphorylation; for example, kinases that affect total tau levels do so by inhibition or activation of translation. A network fishing approach with the kinase hits identified other key molecules putatively involved in tau phosphorylation pathways, including the G-protein signaling through the Ras family of GTPases (MAPK family) pathway. The findings identify novel tau kinases and novel pathways that may be relevant for AD and other tauopathies.

  6. Phosphorylation of tau is regulated by PKN.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, T; Kawamata, T; Mukai, H; Hasegawa, H; Isagawa, T; Yasuda, M; Hashimoto, T; Terashima, A; Nakai, M; Mori, H; Ono, Y; Tanaka, C

    2001-03-30

    For the phosphorylation state of microtubule-associated protein, tau plays a pivotal role in regulating microtubule networks in neurons. Tau promotes the assembly and stabilization of microtubules. The potential for tau to bind to microtubules is down-regulated after local phosphorylation. When we investigated the effects of PKN activation on tau phosphorylation, we found that PKN triggers disruption of the microtubule array both in vitro and in vivo and predominantly phosphorylates tau in microtubule binding domains (MBDs). PKN has a catalytic domain highly homologous to protein kinase C (PKC), a kinase that phosphorylates Ser-313 (= Ser-324, the number used in this study) in MBDs. Thus, we identified the phosphorylation sites of PKN and PKC subtypes (PKC-alpha, -betaI, -betaII, -gamma, -delta, -epsilon, -zeta, and -lambda) in MBDs. PKN phosphorylates Ser-258, Ser-320, and Ser-352, although all PKC subtypes phosphorylate Ser-258, Ser-293, Ser-324, and Ser-352. There is a PKN-specific phosphorylation site, Ser-320, in MBDs. HIA3, a novel phosphorylation-dependent antibody recognizing phosphorylated tau at Ser-320, showed immunoreactivity in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the active form of PKN, but not in Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing tau and the inactive form of PKN. The immunoreactivity for phosphorylated tau at Ser-320 increased in the presence of a phosphatase inhibitor, FK506 treatment, which means that calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B) may be involved in dephosphorylating tau at Ser-320 site. We also noted that PKN reduces the phosphorylation recognized by the phosphorylation-dependent antibodies AT8, AT180, and AT270 in vivo. Thus PKN serves as a regulator of microtubules by specific phosphorylation of tau, which leads to disruption of tubulin assembly.

  7. What Renders TAU Toxic

    PubMed Central

    Götz, Jürgen; Xia, Di; Leinenga, Gerhard; Chew, Yee Lian; Nicholas, Hannah R.

    2013-01-01

    TAU is a microtubule-associated protein that under pathological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD) forms insoluble, filamentous aggregates. When 20 years after TAU’s discovery the first TAU transgenic mouse models were established, one declared goal that was achieved was the modeling of authentic TAU aggregate formation in the form of neurofibrillary tangles. However, as we review here, it has become increasingly clear that TAU causes damage much before these filamentous aggregates develop. In fact, because TAU is a scaffolding protein, increased levels and an altered subcellular localization (due to an increased insolubility and impaired clearance) result in the interaction of TAU with cellular proteins with which it would otherwise either not interact or do so to a lesser degree, thereby impairing their physiological functions. We specifically discuss the non-axonal localization of TAU, the role phosphorylation has in TAU toxicity and how TAU impairs mitochondrial functions. A major emphasis is on what we have learned from the four available TAU knock-out models in mice, and the knock-out of the TAU/MAP2 homolog PTL-1 in worms. It has been proposed that in human pathological conditions such as AD, a rare toxic TAU species exists which needs to be specifically removed to abrogate TAU’s toxicity and restore neuronal functions. However, what is toxic in one context may not be in another, and simply reducing, but not fully abolishing TAU levels may be sufficient to abrogate TAU toxicity. PMID:23772223

  8. [Phosphorylation of tau protein].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Ishiguro, K

    1990-05-01

    In aged human brain and particularly in Alzheimer's disease brain, paired helical filaments (PHFs) accumulate in the neuronal cell. Recently, it has been found that the highly phosphorylated tau protein, one of the microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs), is a component of PHF. The authors attempted to clarify the mechanism underlying the accumulation of PHF from the following two aspects; 1) What is the mechanism of phosphorylation of tau protein? 2) Is the highly phosphorylated tau protein capable of forming PHFs? From rat or bovine microtubule proteins we partially purified and characterized a novel protein kinase that specifically phosphorylated tau and MAP2 among many proteins in the brain extract, and which formed a PHF epitope on the phosphorylated human tau. This enzyme was one of the protein serine/threonine kinases and was independent of known second messengers. The phosphorylation of tau by this enzyme was stimulated by tubulin under the condition of microtubule formation, suggesting that the phosphorylation of tau could occur concomitantly with microtubule formation in the brain. Since this kinase was usually bound to tau but not directly to tubulin, the enzyme was associated with microtubules through tau. From these properties related to tau, this kinase is designated as tau protein kinase. The tau that been phosphorylated with this kinase using [gamma-32P]ATP as a phosphate donor, was digested by endoprotinase Lys-C to produce three labeled fragments, K1, K2 and K3. These three fragments were sequenced and the phosphorylation sites on tau by this kinase were identified. The K2 fragment overlapped with the tau-1 site known to be one of the phosphorylation site in PHF. This result strengthens the possibility that tau protein phosphorylated by tau protein kinase is incorporated into PHF. Tubulin binding sites on tau were located between K1 and K3 fragments, while K2 fragment was located in the neighboring to N-terminus of K1. No phosphorylated sites were

  9. Unraveling duality violations in hadronic tau decays

    SciTech Connect

    Cata, Oscar; Cata, Oscar; Golterman, Maarten; Peris, Santiago

    2008-03-03

    There are some indications from recent determinations of the strong coupling constant alpha_s and the gluon condensate that the Operator Product Expansion may not be accurate enough to describe non-perturbative effects in hadronic tau decays. This breakdown of the Operator Product Expansion is usually referred to as being due to"Duality Violations." With the help of a physically motivated model, we investigate these duality violations. Based on this model, we argue how they may introduce a non-negligible systematic error in the current analysis, which employs finite-energy sum rules with pinched weights. In particular, this systematic effect might affect the precision determination of alpha_s from tau decays. With a view to a possible future application to real data, we present an alternative method for determining the OPE coefficients that might help estimating, and possibly even reducing, this systematic error.

  10. Gifted Education and National Standards: A K-5 Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwell-Braun, Debra A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a program evaluation of a K-5 Gifted Education Program. Program evaluation addressed how well the gifted education program studied met the National Association of Gifted Children standards. In addition, this study included stakeholder perceptions of the current gifted education program K-5. This program…

  11. Propagation of Tau aggregates.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Michel; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2017-05-30

    Since 2009, evidence has accumulated to suggest that Tau aggregates form first in a small number of brain cells, from where they propagate to other regions, resulting in neurodegeneration and disease. Propagation of Tau aggregates is often called prion-like, which refers to the capacity of an assembled protein to induce the same abnormal conformation in a protein of the same kind, initiating a self-amplifying cascade. In addition, prion-like encompasses the release of protein aggregates from brain cells and their uptake by neighbouring cells. In mice, the intracerebral injection of Tau inclusions induced the ordered assembly of monomeric Tau, followed by its spreading to distant brain regions. Short fibrils constituted the major species of seed-competent Tau. The existence of several human Tauopathies with distinct fibril morphologies has led to the suggestion that different molecular conformers (or strains) of aggregated Tau exist.

  12. Amyloidogenesis of Tau protein.

    PubMed

    Nizynski, Bartosz; Dzwolak, Wojciech; Nieznanski, Krzysztof

    2017-08-17

    The role of microtubule-associated protein Tau in neurodegeneration has been extensively investigated since the discovery of Tau amyloid aggregates in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The process of formation of amyloid fibrils is known as amyloidogenesis and attracts much attention as a potential target in the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative conditions linked to protein aggregation. Cerebral deposition of amyloid aggregates of Tau is observed not only in AD but also in numerous other tauopathies and prion diseases. Amyloidogenesis of intrinsically unstructured monomers of Tau can be triggered by mutations in the Tau gene, post-translational modifications, or interactions with polyanionic molecules and aggregation-prone proteins/peptides. The self-assembly of amyloid fibrils of Tau shares a number of characteristic features with amyloidogenesis of other proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases. For example, in vitro experiments have demonstrated that the nucleation phase, which is the rate-limiting stage of Tau amyloidogenesis, is shortened in the presence of fragmented preformed Tau fibrils acting as aggregation templates ("seeds"). Accordingly, Tau aggregates released by tauopathy-affected neurons can spread the neurodegenerative process in the brain through a prion-like mechanism, originally described for the pathogenic form of prion protein. Moreover, Tau has been shown to form amyloid strains-structurally diverse self-propagating aggregates of potentially various pathological effects, resembling in this respect prion strains. Here, we review the current literature on Tau aggregation and discuss mechanisms of propagation of Tau amyloid in the light of the prion-like paradigm. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  13. Tau polarisation at LEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemany, Ricard

    1999-04-01

    The measurements of the tau polarisation at LEP I are reviewed. Special emphasis is given to the new preliminary results presented at this conference. The ALEPH collaboration has studied the polarisation as a function of the polar angle using a new method based on the tau direction reconstruction and fully exploiting the angular correlations. A second traditional approach, based on the single tau decays has been also developed. The DELPHI collaboration has also studied the full data sample using an individual tau decay method and an inclusive hadronic selection. The results from the four experiments are presented with discussion of the compatibility among the methods and experiments.

  14. Pioglitazone prevents tau oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Hamano, Tadanori; Shirafuji, Norimichi; Makino, Chiemi; Yen, Shu-Hui; Kanaan, Nicholas M; Ueno, Asako; Suzuki, Jinya; Ikawa, Masamichi; Matsunaga, Akiko; Yamamura, Osamu; Kuriyama, Masaru; Nakamoto, Yasunari

    2016-09-23

    Tau aggregation and amyloid β protein (Aβ) deposition are the main causes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) activation modulates Aβ production. To test whether the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone (PIO) is also effective in preventing tau aggregation in AD, we used a cellular model in which wild-type tau protein (4R0N) is overexpressed (M1C cells) (Hamano et al., 2012) as well as primary neuronal cultures. PIO reduced both phosphorylated and total tau levels, and inactivated glycogen synthase kinase 3β, a major tau kinase, associated with activation of Akt. In addition, PIO decreased cleaved caspase3 and C-terminal truncated tau species by caspase, which is expected to decrease tau aggregation. A fractionation study showed that PIO reduced high molecular-weight (120 kDa), oligomeric tau species in Tris Insoluble, sarkosyl-soluble fractions. Tau decrease was reversed by adding GW9662, a PPARγ antagonist. Together, our current results support the idea that PPARγ agonists may be useful therapeutic agents for AD.

  15. [Tau Positron Emission Tomography].

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Makoto

    2017-07-01

    Accumulation of fibrillar tau protein aggregates is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related neurodegenerative dementias, including a subgroup of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Visualization of tau lesions in the brains of living subjects enables a pathology-based diagnosis of dementing illnesses in the prodromal stage, and offers objective measures of disease progression and outcomes of disease-modifying therapies. With this rationale, diverse classes of low-molecular-weight chemicals capable of binding to a β-pleated sheet structure have been developed to be used for in vivo positron emission tomography (PET) of tau pathologies. Clinical PET studies of AD patients with such tau probes have provided the following insights: (1) Tau fibrils accumulate in the hippocampal formation in an age-dependent manner that is independent of amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) pathology; (2) The deposition of Aβ may trigger a spatial expansion of tau pathology, in transition from normal aging to advanced AD; and (3) Tau accumulation is intimately associated with local neuronal loss, leading to cortical atrophy and focal symptoms. In contrast, studies of FTLD have shown a limited performance of first-generation PET probes in capturing non-AD-type tau lesions. New compounds have accordingly been developed and clinically tested, proving to yield a high contrast for tau deposits with high specificity. These second-generation probes are being evaluated primarily by pharmaceutical companies, in line with their growing demands for neuroimaging-based biomarkers serving for clinical trials of anti-Aβ and anti-tau therapies. Meanwhile, a consortium flexibly linking academia and industry to facilitate the utilization of research tools, including tau PET probes, has been established in Japan, for the ultimate purpose of elucidating the molecular etiology of tauopathies and creating diagnostic and therapeutic agents based on such an understanding.

  16. Measurement of the tau lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1982-10-01

    If the tau lepton couples to the charged weak current with universal strength, its lifetime can be expressed in terms of the muon's lifetime, the ratio of the masses of the muon and the tau, and the tau's branching ratio into e anti nu/sub e/ nu/sub tau/ as tau/sub tau/ = tau/sub ..mu../ (m/sub ..mu..//m/sub tau/)/sup 5/ B(tau ..-->.. e anti nu/sub e/nu/sub tau/) = 2.8 +- 0.2 x 10/sup -13/ s. This paper describes the measurement of the tau lifetime made by the Mark II collaboration, using a new high precision drift chamber in contunction with the Mark II detector at PEP. The results of other tau lifetime measurements are summarized.

  17. The switch in alternative splicing of cyclic AMP-response element modulator protein CREM{tau}2{alpha} (activator) to CREM{alpha} (repressor) in human myometrial cells is mediated by SRp40.

    PubMed

    Tyson-Capper, Alison J; Bailey, Jarrod; Krainer, Adrian R; Robson, Stephen C; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas

    2005-10-14

    The transcription factor cAMP-response element modulator (CREM) protein, plays a major role in cAMP-responsive gene regulation. Biological consequences resulting from the transcriptional stimuli of CREM are dictated by the expression of multiple protein isoforms generated by extensive alternative splicing of its precursor mRNA. We have previously shown that alternative splicing enables the expression of the CREM gene to be "switched" within the human myometrium during pregnancy from the production of CREMtau(2alpha), a potent transcriptional activator to the synthesis of CREMalpha, a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore we have recently reported that this change in the expression of CREM spliced variants is likely to have important ramifications on the regulation of downstream cAMP-response element-responsive target genes involved in uterine activity during gestation. We have investigated the splicing factors involved in controlling the expression of myometrial CREM splice variants. Data presented here from transient transfections indicate that the switch in the synthesis of CREMtau(2)alpha to CREMalpha that occurs during pregnancy is regulated primarily by an SR protein family member, SRp40. We also show that expression of this splicing factor is tightly regulated in the myometrium during pregnancy. SRp40 regulates the splicing of CREM via its interactions with multiple ESE motifs present in the alternatively exons of CREM. In vitro splicing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays were employed to confirm the functionality of the SRp40-binding ESEs, thus providing a mechanistic explanation of how SRp40 regulates the switch in splicing from production of CREMtau(2)alpha to CREMalpha.

  18. A Perspective on Tau Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Peter C

    1998-11-10

    It will soon be the twenty fifth anniversary of the discovery of the tau lepton. It has been an amazing twenty five years for tau physics and for the strong interaction physics that can be deduced from studies of tau decays. The discovery of the tau was based on the elucidation of the nature of about one hundred tau pairs. At this Fifth International Workshop on Tau Lepton Physics new results in tau physics are based on hundreds of thousands or even millions of tau pairs. In the next two decades we will see the data on tau pairs increase by at least a factor of ten. The theoretical work and theoretical understanding of tau physics and tau neutrino physics has also expanded enormously, and this theory will continue to grow in its reach and its depth. Given the vastness of this field and the recognition that there is always great uncertainty in predicting future directions and accomplishments in a scientific field; any perspective of the future of a scientific field is substantially dependent on the author's opinions and guesses. I have limited this talk to seven topics: tau research facilities in the next decades, searching for unexpected tau decay modes, searching for additional tau decay mechanisms, radiative tau decays, tau decay modes of the W, B, and D, searching for CP violation in tau decay, and rethinking the Tau-Charm factory.

  19. Searching for anomalous {tau}{nu}W couplings

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1997-09-01

    The capability of current and future measurements at low and high energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} colliders to probe for the existence of anomalous, CP-conserving, {tau}{nu}W dipole moment-type couplings is examined. At present, constraints on the universality of the {tau} charged and neutral current interactions as well as the shape of the {tau}{r_arrow}scr(l) energy spectrum provide the strongest bounds on such anomalous couplings. The presence of these dipole moments are shown to influence, e.g., the extraction of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub {tau}}{sup 2}) from {tau} decays and can lead to apparent violations of CVC expectations. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  20. An Algorithm to Find a K5 Minor

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-02-01

    February 1991 UILU-ENG-91-2212 ACT-117 Applied Computagion Theory AD-A232 901 AN ALGORITHM TO FIND A K5 MINOR P. J. McGuinness A. E. KezdyI DTIC...algorithm to find a K 5 minor Patrick J. McGuinness and Andr6 E. Kdzdy Abstract We present an 0(n 2) algorithm that, given a graph, either returns a K, minor...describe parallel algorithms to find Kuratowski homeomorphs and K3,3 homeomorphs, when such homeomorphs are present. Extending Kuratowski’s result, Wagner

  1. Math and Economics: Implementing Authentic Instruction in Grades K-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Althauser, Krista; Harter, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to outline a partnership program that involved a local elementary school district, an institution of higher education, the local business community, and a state economic education advocacy group to integrate economics into math in grades K-5. The "Economics: Math in Real Life" program was provided in…

  2. Juneau Indian Studies Elementary Curriculum Guide. Grades K-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cadiente, Ronalda

    Designed to provide instruction in Tlingit culture as an integral part of the K-5 social studies curriculum, this guide presents teachers with extensive lesson plans and numerous resource materials. The units of study focus on the culture and environment of southeast Alaska and emphasize experiential learning activities. Each grade…

  3. Sexism in Textbooks in Pittsburgh Public Schools, Grades K-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scardina, Florence

    Thirty-six textbooks used by the Pittsburgh public schools at grade levels K-5 were reviewed to see how they treat girls vs. boys and men vs. women. Language, reading, science, social studies, and mathematics texts were evaluated. Blatant sexism is found in all areas. Different ideas of behavior and mores are propagated for boys than for girls;…

  4. Bringing History Home: A K-5 Curriculum Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillpot, Elise

    2009-01-01

    Bringing history home, an elementary history curriculum and professional development project, began in 2001. As originally conceived, the project's main purpose was to move history from the margins described by Bruce VanSledright into the mainstream of the K-5 school day. Seven years later, the Bringing History Home (BHH) instructional units are…

  5. The Common Core: Insights into the K-5 Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Maureen; Overturf, Brenda J.

    2012-01-01

    The role of the Common Core English Language Arts Standards in grades K-5 literacy instruction is the focus of the article. The authors begin by raising four questions: (1) What is the essential philosophy of the Common Core State Standards?; (2) What do educators need to know to use the College and Career Readiness Standards and Common Core State…

  6. Bringing History Home: A K-5 Curriculum Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillpot, Elise

    2009-01-01

    Bringing history home, an elementary history curriculum and professional development project, began in 2001. As originally conceived, the project's main purpose was to move history from the margins described by Bruce VanSledright into the mainstream of the K-5 school day. Seven years later, the Bringing History Home (BHH) instructional units are…

  7. Tau protein and tau aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bulic, Bruno; Pickhardt, Marcus; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is characterized by pathological aggregation of two proteins, tau and Abeta-amyloid, both of which are considered to be toxic to neurons. In this review we summarize recent advances on small molecule inhibitors of protein aggregation with emphasis on tau, with activities mediated by the direct interference of self-assembly. The inhibitors can be clustered in several compound classes according to their chemical structure, with subsequent description of the structure-activity relationships, showing that hydrophobic interactions are prevailing. The description is extended to the pharmacological profile of the compounds in order to evaluate their drug-likeness, with special attention to toxicity and bioavailability. The collected data indicate that following the improvements of the in vitro inhibitory potencies, the consideration of the in vivo pharmacokinetics is an absolute prerequisite for the development of compounds suitable for a transfer from bench to bedside.

  8. Measurements of the tau Mass and Mass Difference of the tau^+ and tau^- at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2009-10-30

    The authors present the result of a precision measurement of the mass of the {tau} lepton, M{sub {tau}}, based on 423 fb{sup -1} of data recorded at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector. Using a pseudomass endpoint method, they determine the mass to be 1776.68 {+-} 0.12(stat) {+-} 0.41(syst) MeV. They also measure the mass difference between the {tau}{sup +} and {tau}{sup -}, and obtain (M{sub {tau}{sup +}} - M{sub {tau}{sup -}})/M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} = (-3.4 {+-} 1.3(stat) {+-} 0.3(syst)) x 10{sup -4}, where M{sub AVG}{sup {tau}} is the average value of M{sub {tau}{sup +}} and M{sub {tau}{sup -}}.

  9. Hyperphosphorylation-induced tau oligomers.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Gong, Cheng-Xin; Liu, Fei

    2013-01-01

    In normal adult brain the microtubule associated protein (MAP) tau contains 2-3 phosphates per mol of the protein and at this level of phosphorylation it is a soluble cytosolic protein. The normal brain tau interacts with tubulin and promotes its assembly into microtubules and stabilizes these fibrils. In Alzheimer disease (AD) brain tau is three to fourfold hyperphosphorylated. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau binds to normal tau instead of the tubulin and this binding leads to the formation of tau oligomers. The tau oligomers can be sedimented at 200,000 × g whereas the normal tau under these conditions remains in the supernatant. The abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau is capable of sequestering not only normal tau but also MAP MAP1 and MAP2 and causing disruption of the microtubule network promoted by these proteins. Unlike Aβ and prion protein (PrP) oligomers, tau oligomerization in AD and related tauopathies is hyperphosphorylation-dependent; in vitro dephosphorylation of AD P-tau with protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibits and rehyperphosphorylation of the PP2A-AD P-tau with more than one combination of tau protein kinases promotes its oligomerization. In physiological assembly conditions the AD P-tau readily self-assembles into paired helical filaments. Missense tau mutations found in frontotemporal dementia apparently lead to tau oligomerization and neurofibrillary pathology by promoting its abnormal hyperphosphorylation. Dysregulation of the alternative splicing of tau that alters the 1:1 ratio of the 3-repeat: 4-repeat taus such as in Down syndrome, Pick disease, and progressive supranuclear palsy leads to the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau.

  10. Analysis of E. coli K5 capsular polysaccharide heparosan

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Mellisa; Wang, Zhenyu; Laremore, Tatiana N.; Zhang, Fuming; Zhong, Weihong; Pu, Dennis; Zagorevski, Dmitri V.; Dordick, Jonathan S.; Linhardt, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    Heparosan is the key precursor for the preparation of bioengineered heparin, a potential replacement for porcine intestinal heparin, an important anticoagulant drug. The molecular weight (MW) distribution of heparosan produced by the fermentation of E. coli K5 was investigated. Large-slab isocratic and mini-slab gradient polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were used to analyze the MW and polydispersity of heparosan. A preparative method that allowed fractionation by continuous-elution PAGE was used to obtain heparosan MW standards. The MWs of the heparosan standards were determined by electrospray ionization Fourier-transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FT-MS). A ladder of the standards was then used to determine the MW properties of polydisperse heparosan samples. Unbleached and bleached heparosan produced by fermentation of E. coli K5 had similar number-averaged MWs (MN), weight-averaged MWs (MW), and MW ranges of 3,000 to 150,000 Da. PMID:20407891

  11. Tau physics results from SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Daoudi, M.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-08-10

    Results on {tau} physics at SLD are presented. They are based on 4,316 {tau}-pair events selected from a 150 k Z{sup 0} data sample collected at the SLC. These results include measurements of the {tau} lifetime ({tau}{sub r} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1 {+-} 3.3 fs), the {tau} Michel parameters ({rho} = 0.71 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, {zeta} = 1.03 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.05, and {zeta}{delta} = 0.84 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.05), and the {tau} neutrino helicity (h{sub {nu}} = {minus}0.81 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.03).

  12. Zinc Binding Directly Regulates Tau Toxicity Independent of Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunpeng; Wu, Zhihao; Cao, Yu; Lang, Minglin; Lu, Bingwei; Zhou, Bing

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Tau hyperphosphorylation is thought to underlie tauopathy. Working in a Drosophila tauopathy model expressing a human Tau mutant (hTauR406W, or Tau*), we show that zinc contributes to the development of Tau toxicity through two independent actions: by increasing Tau phosphorylation and, more significantly, by directly binding to Tau. Elimination of zinc binding through amino acid substitution of Cys residues has a minimal effect on phosphorylation levels yet essentially eliminates Tau toxicity. The toxicity of the zinc-binding-deficient mutant Tau* (Tau*C2A) and overexpression of native Drosophila Tau, also lacking the corresponding zinc-binding Cys residues, are largely impervious to zinc concentration. Importantly, restoration of zinc-binding ability to Tau* by introduction of a zinc-binding residue (His) into the original Cys positions restores zinc-responsive toxicities in proportion to zinc-binding affinities. These results indicate zinc binding is a substantial contributor to tauopathy and have implications for therapy development. PMID:25066125

  13. Parkin is protective for substantia nigra dopamine neurons in a tau gene transfer neurodegeneration model.

    PubMed

    Klein, Ronald L; Dayton, Robert D; Henderson, Karen M; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2006-06-19

    Parkin is a ubiquitin ligase involved in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Elevating parkin expression in cells reduces markers of oxidative stress while blocking parkin expression increases oxidative stress. In parkin gene knock down mouse and fly models, mitochondria function is deficient. Parkin is neuroprotective against a variety of toxic insults, while it remains unclear which of the above properties of parkin may mediate the protective actions. One of the models for which parkin is protective is overexpression of alpha-synuclein, a protein that self-aggregates in Parkinson disease. The microtubule-associated protein tau is another protein that self-aggregates in specific neurodegenerative diseases that also involve loss of dopamine neurons such as frontotemporal dementia with parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration. We recently developed a tau-induced dopaminergic degeneration model in rats using adeno-associated virus vectors. In this study, we successfully targeted either a mixed tau/parkin vector or mixed tau/control vector to the rat substantia nigra. While there was significant loss of dopamine neurons in the tau/control group relative to uninjected substantia nigra, there was no cell loss in the tau/parkin group. We found no difference in total tau levels between tau/control and tau/parkin groups. Parkin therefore protects dopamine neurons against tau as it does against alpha-synuclein, which further supports parkin as a therapeutic target for diseases involving loss of dopamine neurons.

  14. YES 2K5: Young Engineers and Scientists Mentorship Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boice, D. C.; Asbell, H. E.

    2005-12-01

    The Young Engineers and Scientists (YES) Program is a community partnership between Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and local high schools in San Antonio, Texas (USA). YES has been highly successful during the past 13 years, and YES 2K5 continued this trend. It provides talented high school juniors and seniors a bridge between classroom instruction and real-world, research experiences in physical sciences (including space science and astronomy) and engineering. YES 2K5 consists of two parts: 1) an intensive three-week summer workshop held at SwRI where students experience the research environment first-hand; develop skills and acquire tools for solving scientific problems, attend mini-courses and seminars on electronics, computers and the Internet, careers, science ethics, and other topics; and select individual research projects to be completed during the academic year; and 2) a collegial mentorship where students complete individual research projects under the guidance of their mentors during the academic year and earn honors credit. At the end of the school year, students publicly present and display their work, acknowledging their accomplishments and spreading career awareness to other students and teachers. YES 2K5 developed a website for the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) from the perspective of a high school student. Over the past 13 years, all YES graduates have entered college, several have worked for SwRI, and three scientific publications have resulted. Student evaluations indicate the effectiveness of YES on their academic preparation and choice of college majors. We acknowledge funding from the NASA MMS Mission, the NASA E/PO program, and local charitable foundations.

  15. A Space Physicist's Adventure in K-5 Space Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldwin, M. B.

    2002-12-01

    A UCLA partnership with El Marino Language Elementary School in Culver City CA has provided the opportunity to work with primary grade teachers and students. Our activities have been based around NASA OSS's Sun-Earth Day and Space Day. This year's project is centered around Lockheed-Martin's Student Signatures in Space program and includes a 2-hour after-school Professional Development Workshop for K-5 teachers, solar viewing, and an in class "fun with magnets" activity. The presentation will include a discussion of what NASA K-3 activities have been used and the motivation of the author to form a University-Elementary School partnership.

  16. Melasma: successful treatment with pidobenzone 4% (K5lipogel).

    PubMed

    Zanieri, Fabio; Assad, Gelareh Bani; Campolmi, Piero; Lotti, Torello

    2008-07-01

    Melasma (a term derived from the Greek word "melas" meaning black) is an acquired blotchy, irregularly patterned, brown or sometimes gray brown hypermelanosis of the face and occasionally the neck. Its etiology is poorly understood but mainly related to sunlight and genetic predisposition. Melasma seems to be more frequent in darker skinned people, especially women. Its treatment is always difficult and the condition usually relapses. The treatment with pidobenzone 4% (K5 lipogel), twice per day for 16 weeks has proved to be safe and effective. Pidobenzone 4% lipogel, according to the present study, seems also to represent a useful, reliable, and safe treatment of the different types of melasma.

  17. A novel tau-tubulin kinase from bovine brain.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Tomizawa, K; Sato, K; Ohtake, A; Omori, A

    1995-09-18

    During purification of tau protein kinase I and II from the bovine brain extract, a new tau protein kinase was detected and purified with phosphocellulose, gel filtration, S-Sepharose and AF-Heparin column chromatography. The molecular mass of the enzyme was determined to be 32 kDa by gel filtration and activity staining on SDS-PAGE. The enzyme is a Ser/Thr protein kinase phosphorylating tau, beta-tubulin, MAP2 and alpha-casein. Employing many synthetic peptides, the recognition site of this enzyme appears to be -SR-. The enzyme requires no second messenger and is inhibited with high concentration of heparin, but not by inhibitors of CKI. These results indicate that this enzyme, tau-tubulin kinase is novel and distinct from TPKI, II and CKI, II.

  18. [Anti-HIV effects of IFN-tau in human macrophages: role of cellular antiviral factors and interleukin-6].

    PubMed

    Maneglier, B; Rogez-Kreuz, C; Dereuddre-Bosquet, N; Martal, J; Devillier, P; Dormont, D; Clayette, P

    2008-01-01

    Tau interferon (IFN-tau) was shown to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication in vitro more strongly than human IFN-alpha, particularly in human macrophages. IFN-tau efficiently inhibited the early steps of HIV biological cycle, decreasing intracellular HIV RNA and inhibiting the initiation of the reverse transcription of viral RNA into proviral DNA. In this study, the in vitro immunomodulatory effects of IFN-tau were explored in human macrophages. We found that IFN-tau increased the synthesis of the cellular antiviral factors, such as 2',5'-oligoadenylate synthetase/RNase L and MxA protein. These results suggested that IFN-tau induces the same antiviral pathways in macrophages as other type I IFNs. We found that IFN-tau increased the production of interleukins (IL)-10 and IL-6, but not of IL-1ss or TNF-alpha, in not infected and in in vitro HIV-1/Ba-L-infected macrophages. We also found that the neutralization of IL-6 biological activity in the cell culture supernatants of IFN-tau-treated macrophages led to a decrease in the antiretroviral effects of IFN-tau towards HIV RNA. In conclusion, anti-HIV effects of IFN-tau are mediated by several modes of action, mediated either directly by IFN-tau or via other cytokines, such as IL-6, also known to be induced by IFN-alpha.

  19. Review of tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, D.P.

    1991-07-01

    Measurements of the {tau} decay modes are reviewed and compared with the predictions of the Standard Model. While the agreement is generally good, the status of the 1-prong puzzle'' remains controversial and a discrepancy between the measured leptonic branching fractions and the {tau} lifetime persists. Prospects for precision measurements at a Tau-Charm Factory are also reviewed. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Measurements of the decays tau/sup -/. -->. rho/sup -/. nu. /sub tau/, tau/sup -/. -->. pi. /sup -/. nu. /sub tau/ and tau/sup -/. -->. K*-(892). nu. /sub tau/ using the MARK II detector at SPEAR

    SciTech Connect

    Dorfan, J.

    1981-04-01

    Measurements of the branching fractions for the Cabibbo favored decays tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and the Cabibbo suppressed decay mode tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/ (892)..nu../sub tau/ are presented. The energy dependence of the tau/sup +/tau/sup -/ production cross section is obtained for the decays tau/sup -/ ..-->.. rho/sup -/..nu../sub tau/ and these spectra agree well with the classification of the tau/sup -/ as a spin-1/2 point particle. Fits to the production cross section yield a measurement of M/sub tau/ = (1787 +- 10) MeV/c/sup 2/ for the tau mass. Ninety-five percent confidence upper limits for the forbidden decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. K*/sup -/(1430)..nu../sub tau/ and the tau neutrino mass are presented.

  1. Neuronal activity enhances tau propagation and tau pathology in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jessica W; Hussaini, S Abid; Bastille, Isle M; Rodriguez, Gustavo A; Mrejeru, Ana; Rilett, Kelly; Sanders, David W; Cook, Casey; Fu, Hongjun; Boonen, Rick A C M; Herman, Mathieu; Nahmani, Eden; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Y Helen; Diamond, Marc I; Clelland, Catherine L; Wray, Selina; Duff, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Tau protein can transfer between neurons transneuronally and trans-synaptically, which is thought to explain the progressive spread of tauopathy observed in the brain of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Here we show that physiological tau released from donor cells can transfer to recipient cells via the medium, suggesting that at least one mechanism by which tau can transfer is via the extracellular space. Neuronal activity has been shown to regulate tau secretion, but its effect on tau pathology is unknown. Using optogenetic and chemogenetic approaches, we found that increased neuronal activity stimulates the release of tau in vitro and enhances tau pathology in vivo. These data have implications for disease pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies.

  2. Gamma (K5 Based) Compressor Blade Material Design - Alpha Extrusion on a Small Scale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young-Won

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the 2003 study is to develop a mechanically processed, high temperature TiAl alloy for use in the Turbine Based Combined Cycle compressor. An aging study with 3 temperatures and 4 time periods at each temperature will be conducted to determine the optimum aging condition. High-magnification microscopic analyses shall be employed to define the size distribution of carbide as a function of aging temperature/time. The contractor shall define optimum materials' conditions by conducting tensile and creep testing for two over-aging conditions for both alloys and fatigue testing for one over-aging condition for each alloy.

  3. A High-throughput Screening Assay for Determining Cellular Levels of Total Tau Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dehdashti, Seameen J.; Zheng, Wei; Gever, Joel R.; Wilhelm, Robert; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Sittampalam, Gurusingham; McKew, John C.; Austin, Christopher P.; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2014-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein (MAP) tau has been implicated in the pathology of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. In the past decade, the hyperphosphorylated and aggregated states of tau protein have been important targets in the drug discovery field for the potential treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Although several compounds have been reported to reduce the hyperphosphorylated state of tau or impact the stabilization of tau, their therapeutic activities are still to be validated. Recently, reduction of total cellular tau protein has emerged as an alternate intervention point for drug development and a potential treatment of tauopathies. We have developed and optimized a homogenous assay, using the AlphaLISA and HTRF assay technologies, for the quantification of total cellular tau protein levels in the SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell line. The signal-to-basal ratios were 375 and 5.3, and the Z’ factors were 0.67 and 0.60 for the AlphaLISA and HTRF tau assays, respectively. The clear advantages of this homogeneous tau assay over conventional total tau assays, such as ELISA and Western blot, are the elimination of plate wash steps and miniaturization of the assay into 1536-well plate format for the ultra–high-throughput screening of large compound libraries. PMID:23905996

  4. Boronate-tau mediated uptake in neurons.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Mar; Cuadros, Raquel; Pallas-Bazarra, Noemi; García, Carlos; Langa, Elena; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    We modified tau protein with boronic acid to facilitate its delivery into non neural or neural cultured cells lacking tau protein. Our results indicate that the incorporated tau promotes the formation of cytoplasmic extensions in non-neuronal cells, as well as the appearance of neurites in cultured tau knockout hippocampal neurons. In addition, boronated tau is incorporated into hippocampal neurons of tau knockout mice after intracranial injection in vivo. These findings describe a novel method to deliver exogenous tau protein into cells.

  5. Plasma tau in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Janelidze, Shorena; Insel, Philip S; Andreasson, Ulf; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Baker, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A; Jeromin, Andreas; Hanlon, David; Song, Linan; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Weiner, Michael W; Hansson, Oskar; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-10-25

    To test whether plasma tau is altered in Alzheimer disease (AD) and whether it is related to changes in cognition, CSF biomarkers of AD pathology (including β-amyloid [Aβ] and tau), brain atrophy, and brain metabolism. This was a study of plasma tau in prospectively followed patients with AD (n = 179), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 195), and cognitive healthy controls (n = 189) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and cross-sectionally studied patients with AD (n = 61), mild cognitive impairment (n = 212), and subjective cognitive decline (n = 174) and controls (n = 274) from the Biomarkers for Identifying Neurodegenerative Disorders Early and Reliably (BioFINDER) study at Lund University, Sweden. A total of 1284 participants were studied. Associations were tested between plasma tau and diagnosis, CSF biomarkers, MRI measures, (18)fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and cognition. Higher plasma tau was associated with AD dementia, higher CSF tau, and lower CSF Aβ42, but the correlations were weak and differed between ADNI and BioFINDER. Longitudinal analysis in ADNI showed significant associations between plasma tau and worse cognition, more atrophy, and more hypometabolism during follow-up. Plasma tau partly reflects AD pathology, but the overlap between normal aging and AD is large, especially in patients without dementia. Despite group-level differences, these results do not support plasma tau as an AD biomarker in individual people. Future studies may test longitudinal plasma tau measurements in AD. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. Plasma tau in Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Zetterberg, Henrik; Janelidze, Shorena; Insel, Philip S.; Andreasson, Ulf; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Baker, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Jeromin, Andreas; Hanlon, David; Song, Linan; Shaw, Leslie M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Weiner, Michael W.; Hansson, Oskar; Blennow, Kaj

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To test whether plasma tau is altered in Alzheimer disease (AD) and whether it is related to changes in cognition, CSF biomarkers of AD pathology (including β-amyloid [Aβ] and tau), brain atrophy, and brain metabolism. Methods: This was a study of plasma tau in prospectively followed patients with AD (n = 179), patients with mild cognitive impairment (n = 195), and cognitive healthy controls (n = 189) from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and cross-sectionally studied patients with AD (n = 61), mild cognitive impairment (n = 212), and subjective cognitive decline (n = 174) and controls (n = 274) from the Biomarkers for Identifying Neurodegenerative Disorders Early and Reliably (BioFINDER) study at Lund University, Sweden. A total of 1284 participants were studied. Associations were tested between plasma tau and diagnosis, CSF biomarkers, MRI measures, 18fluorodeoxyglucose-PET, and cognition. Results: Higher plasma tau was associated with AD dementia, higher CSF tau, and lower CSF Aβ42, but the correlations were weak and differed between ADNI and BioFINDER. Longitudinal analysis in ADNI showed significant associations between plasma tau and worse cognition, more atrophy, and more hypometabolism during follow-up. Conclusions: Plasma tau partly reflects AD pathology, but the overlap between normal aging and AD is large, especially in patients without dementia. Despite group-level differences, these results do not support plasma tau as an AD biomarker in individual people. Future studies may test longitudinal plasma tau measurements in AD. PMID:27694257

  7. Dopa Decarboxylase Modulates Tau Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kow, Rebecca L; Sikkema, Carl; Wheeler, Jeanna M; Wilkinson, Charles W; Kraemer, Brian C

    2017-06-15

    The microtubule-associated protein tau accumulates into toxic aggregates in multiple neurodegenerative diseases. We found previously that loss of D2-family dopamine receptors ameliorated tauopathy in multiple models including a Caenorhabditis elegans model of tauopathy. To better understand how loss of D2-family dopamine receptors can ameliorate tau toxicity, we screened a collection of C. elegans mutations in dopamine-related genes (n = 45) for changes in tau transgene-induced behavioral defects. These included many genes responsible for dopamine synthesis, metabolism, and signaling downstream of the D2 receptors. We identified one dopamine synthesis gene, dopa decarboxylase (DDC), as a suppressor of tau toxicity in tau transgenic worms. Loss of the C. elegans DDC gene, bas-1, ameliorated the behavioral deficits of tau transgenic worms, reduced phosphorylated and detergent-insoluble tau accumulation, and reduced tau-mediated neuron loss. Loss of function in other genes in the dopamine and serotonin synthesis pathways did not alter tau-induced toxicity; however, their function is required for the suppression of tau toxicity by bas-1. Additional loss of D2-family dopamine receptors did not synergize with bas-1 suppression of tauopathy phenotypes. Loss of the DDC bas-1 reduced tau-induced toxicity in a C. elegans model of tauopathy, while loss of no other dopamine or serotonin synthesis genes tested had this effect. Because loss of activity upstream of DDC could reduce suppression of tau by DDC, this suggests the possibility that loss of DDC suppresses tau via the combined accumulation of dopamine precursor levodopa and serotonin precursor 5-hydroxytryptophan. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Results of tests of weathered K5NA closeout material in the MSFC Hot Gas Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, W. G.

    1982-01-01

    The application of K5NA over hypolon was investigated. The effects of using K5NA over painted cork surfaces, the effects of weathering on the unpainted K5NA surfaces are determined, and the use of water versus solvent for tooling K5NA in place were compared. It is concluded that: (1) K5NA can be applied to hypalon surfaces; (2) K5NA can be left unpainted; and (3) K5NA can be tested with water or solvent.

  9. Decays of the heavy lepton, tau (1785)

    SciTech Connect

    Blocker, C.A.

    1980-04-01

    The structure of the weak hadronic current coupled to the tau is investigated via some of the hadronic decays of the tau. The vector current coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. rho ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The axial-vector coupling is determined by measuring the tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/ branching ratio. The Cabibbo structure of the hadronic current is established by observing the decay tau ..-->.. K*(890)..nu../sub tau/ and measuring its branching ratio. The branching ratios for the decays tau ..-->.. e anti ..nu../sub e/..nu../sub tau/ and tau ..-->.. ..mu.. anti ..nu../sub ..mu../..nu../sub tau/ are measured as a normalization for the hadronic decays and as a check on the validity of the measurements. The leptonic branching ratios agree well with previous experiments. From a kinematic fit to the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, an upper limit (95% confidence level) of 245 MeV is placed on the tau neutrino mass. From a simultaneous fit of the center of mass energy dependence of the tau production cross section and the pion energy spectrum in the decay tau ..-->.. ..pi.. ..nu../sub tau/, the tau mass is determined to be 1.787 +- .010 GeV/c. All properties of the tau measured here are consistent with it being a sequential lepton coupled to the ordinary weak hadronic current.

  10. Image-Based Analysis of Intracellular Tau Aggregation by Using Tau-BiFC Cell Model.

    PubMed

    Lim, Sungsu; Kim, Dohee; Kim, Dong Jin; Kim, Yun Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal tau aggregation is a pathological hallmark of neurodegenerative disease classified as tauopathy. Preventing tau aggregation becomes an important therapeutic strategy to cure tau-mediated neurodegeneration. Here, we describe a method to investigate intracellular tau aggregation by using a recently developed tau aggregation cell-based model named tau-BiFC. High-throughput and high-contents screening method for quantifying intracellular tau aggregation would expedite the discovery of drugs that inhibit tau aggregation.

  11. Survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 Under Simulated Martian Surface Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Davidson, Mark M.; Pacala, Stephen W.; Bakermans, Corien; Onstott, Tullis

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft launched to Mars can retain viable terrestrial microorganisms on board that may survive the interplanetary transit. Such biota might compromise the search for life beyond Earth if capable of propagating on Mars. The current study explored the survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5, a psychrotolerant microorganism obtained from a Siberian permafrost cryopeg, under simulated martian surface conditions of high ultraviolet irradiation, high desiccation, low temperature, and low atmospheric pressure. First, a desiccation experiment compared the survival of P. cryohalolentis cells embedded, or not embedded, within a medium/salt matrix (MSM) maintained at 25 degrees C for 24 hr within a laminar flow hood. Results indicate that the presence of the MSM enhanced survival of the bacterial cells by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. Second, tests were conducted in a Mars Simulation Chamber to determine the UV tolerance of the microorganism. No viable vegetative cells of P. cryohalolentis were detected after 8 hr of exposure to Mars-normal conditions of 4.55 W/m(2) UVC irradiation (200-280 nm), -12.5 degrees C, 7.1 mbar, and a Mars gas mix composed of CO2 (95.3%), N2 (2.7%), Ar (1.6%), O2 (0.2%), and H(2)O (0.03%). Third, an experiment was conducted within the Mars chamber in which total atmospheric opacities were simulated at tau = 0.1 (dust-free CO2 atmosphere at 7.1 mbar), 0.5 (normal clear sky with 0.4 = dust opacity and 0.1 = CO2-only opacity), and 3.5 (global dust storm) to determine the survivability of P. cryohalolentis to partially shielded UVC radiation. The survivability of the bacterium increased with the level of UVC attenuation, though population levels still declined several orders of magnitude compared to UVC-absent controls over an 8 hr exposure period.

  12. Survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 under simulated martian surface conditions.

    PubMed

    Smith, David J; Schuerger, Andrew C; Davidson, Mark M; Pacala, Stephen W; Bakermans, Corien; Onstott, Tullis C

    2009-03-01

    Spacecraft launched to Mars can retain viable terrestrial microorganisms on board that may survive the interplanetary transit. Such biota might compromise the search for life beyond Earth if capable of propagating on Mars. The current study explored the survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5, a psychrotolerant microorganism obtained from a Siberian permafrost cryopeg, under simulated martian surface conditions of high ultraviolet irradiation, high desiccation, low temperature, and low atmospheric pressure. First, a desiccation experiment compared the survival of P. cryohalolentis cells embedded, or not embedded, within a medium/salt matrix (MSM) maintained at 25 degrees C for 24 h within a laminar flow hood. Results indicate that the presence of the MSM enhanced survival of the bacterial cells by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. Second, tests were conducted in a Mars Simulation Chamber to determine the UV tolerance of the microorganism. No viable vegetative cells of P. cryohalolentis were detected after 8 h of exposure to Mars-normal conditions of 4.55 W/m(2) UVC irradiation (200-280 nm), -12.5 degrees C, 7.1 mbar, and a Mars gas mix composed of CO(2) (95.3%), N(2) (2.7%), Ar (1.6%), O(2) (0.2%), and H(2)O (0.03%). Third, an experiment was conducted within the Mars chamber in which total atmospheric opacities were simulated at tau = 0.1 (dust-free CO(2) atmosphere at 7.1 mbar), 0.5 (normal clear sky with 0.4 = dust opacity and 0.1 = CO(2)-only opacity), and 3.5 (global dust storm) to determine the survivability of P. cryohalolentis to partially shielded UVC radiation. The survivability of the bacterium increased with the level of UVC attenuation, though population levels still declined several orders of magnitude compared to UVC-absent controls over an 8 h exposure period.

  13. Tau physics at future facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, M.L.

    1994-12-01

    This paper dicusses and projects the tau research which may be carried out at CESR, at BEPC, at the SLC, in the next few years at LEP I, at the asymmetric B-factories under construction in Japan and the United States and, if built, a tau-charm factory. As the size of tau data sets increases, there is an increasing need to reduce the effects of systematic errors on the precision and search range of experiments. In most areas of tau physics there is a large amount of progress to be made, but in a few areas it will be difficult to substantially improve the precision of present measurements.

  14. Tau immunotherapy for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jan Torleif; Sigurdsson, Einar M

    2015-06-01

    Targeting pathological tau protein in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and related tauopathies has shown great potential in animal models. Given that tau lesions correlate better with the degree of dementia than do amyloid-β (Aβ) plaques, their clearance may be clinically more efficacious than removing Aβ when cognitive deficits become evident in AD. Several complementary mechanisms of antibody-mediated removal of tau aggregates are likely to act in concert and the importance of each one may depend on antibody properties, the disease, and its stage. Clinical trials of tau immunotherapy are already underway and several more are likely to be initiated in the near future.

  15. Effects of tau domain-specific antibodies and intravenous immunoglobulin on tau aggregation and aggregate degradation.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Villanueva, Jose O; Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Loeffler, David A; Martić, Sanela

    2015-01-20

    Tau pathology, including neurofibrillary tangles, develops in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The aggregation and hyperphosphorylation of tau are potential therapeutic targets for AD. Administration of anti-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology in transgenic "tauopathy" mice; however, the optimal tau epitopes and conformations to target are unclear. Also unknown is whether intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) products, currently being evaluated in AD trials, exert effects on pathological tau. This study examined the effects of anti-tau antibodies targeting different tau epitopes and the IVIG Gammagard on tau aggregation and preformed tau aggregates. Tau aggregation was assessed by transmission electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy, and the binding affinity of the anti-tau antibodies for tau was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Antibodies used were anti-tau 1-150 ("D-8"), anti-tau 259-266 ("Paired-262"), anti-tau 341-360 ("A-10"), and anti-tau 404-441 ("Tau-46"), which bind to tau's N-terminus, microtubule binding domain (MBD) repeat sequences R1 and R4, and the C-terminus, respectively. The antibodies Paired-262 and A-10, but not D-8 and Tau-46, reduced tau fibrillization and degraded preformed tau aggregates, whereas the IVIG reduced tau aggregation but did not alter preformed aggregates. The binding affinities of the antibodies for the epitope for which they were specific did not appear to be related to their effects on tau aggregation. These results confirm that antibody binding to tau's MBD repeat sequences may inhibit tau aggregation and indicate that such antibodies may also degrade preformed tau aggregates. In the presence of anti-tau antibodies, the resulting tau morphologies were antigen-dependent. The results also suggested the possibility of different pathways regulating antibody-mediated inhibition of tau aggregation and antibody-mediated degradation of preformed tau aggregates.

  16. UX Tau A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is an artist's rendition of the one-million-year-old star system called UX Tau A, located approximately 450 light-years away. Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope showed a gap in the dusty planet-forming disk swirling around the system's central sun-like star.

    Spitzer saw a gap in UX Tau A's disk that extends from 0.2 to 56 astronomical units (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). The gap extends from the equivalent of Mercury to Pluto in our solar system, and is sandwiched between thick inner and outer disks on either side. Astronomers suspect that the gap was carved out by one or more forming planets.

    Such dusty disks are where planets are thought to be born. Dust grains clump together like snowballs to form larger rocks, and then the bigger rocks collide to form the cores of planets. When rocks revolve around their central star, they act like cosmic vacuum cleaners, picking up all the gas and dust in their path and creating gaps.

    Although gaps have been detected in disks swirling around young stars before, UX Tau A is special because the gap is sandwiched between two thick disks of dust. An inner thick dusty disk hugs the central star, then, moving outward, there is a gap, followed by another thick doughnut-shaped disk. Other systems with gaps contain very little to no dust near the central star. In other words, those gaps are more like big holes in the centers of disks.

    Some scientists suspect that these holes could have been carved out by a process called photoevaporation. Photoevaporation occurs when radiation from the central star heats up the gas and dust around it to the point where it evaporates away. The fact that there is thick disk swirling extremely close to UX Tau A's central star rules out the photoevaporation scenario. If photoevaporation from the star played a role, then large amounts of dust would not be floating so close to the star.

  17. Tau Lorentz Structure with Polarization at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K

    2004-01-29

    We present a measurement of the tau neutrino helicity (h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}}) and the Michel parameters ({rho}, {zeta} and {delta}) by analyzing the {tau} decays {tau} {yields} {pi}(K){nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau} {yields} e{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau} {yields} {mu}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} in e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} Z{sup 0} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}. The analysis uses the 1993-1995 SLD data sample of 4316 {tau}-pair events produced with highly polarized electrons. We obtain preliminary results of h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} = -0.81 {+-} 0.18 {+-} 0.03, {rho} = 0.71 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.04, {zeta} = 1.03 {+-} 0.36 {+-} 0.05 and {zeta}{delta} = 0.84 {+-} 0.27 {+-} 0.05.

  18. Tau energy loss and ultrahigh energy skimming tau neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yu Seon; Luu, Minh Vu; Reno, Mary Hall; Sarcevic, Ina

    2017-08-01

    We consider propagation of high-energy earth-skimming taus produced in interactions of astrophysical tau neutrinos. For astrophysical tau neutrinos, we take generic power-law flux, E-2 and the cosmogenic flux initiated by the protons. We calculate tau energy loss in several approaches, such as dipole models and the phenomenological approach in which parametrization of the F2 is used. We evaluate the tau neutrino charged-current cross section using the same approaches for consistency. We find that uncertainty in the neutrino cross section and in the tau energy loss partially compensate giving very small theoretical uncertainty in the emerging tau flux for distances ranging from 2 to 100 km and for the energy range between 1 06 and 1 011 GeV , focusing on energies above 1 08 GeV . When we consider uncertainties in the neutrino cross section, inelasticity in neutrino interactions and the tau energy loss, which are not correlated, i.e. they are not all calculated in the same approach, theoretical uncertainty ranges from about 30% and 60% at 1 08 GeV to about factors of 3.3 and 3.8 at 1 011 GeV for the E-2 flux and the cosmogenic flux, respectively, for the distance of 10 km rock. The spread in predictions significantly increases for much larger distances, e.g., ˜1 ,000 km . Most of the uncertainty comes from the treatment of photonuclear interactions of the tau in transit through large distances. We also consider Monte Carlo calculation of the tau propagation and we find that the result for the emerging tau flux is in agreement with the result obtained using analytic approach. Our results are relevant to several experiments that are looking for skimming astrophysical taus, such as the Pierre Auger Observatory, HAWC and Ashra. We evaluate the aperture for the Auger and discuss briefly application to the other two experiments.

  19. Tau identification at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Levy, Stephen; /Chicago U., EFI

    2005-07-01

    Methods for reconstructing and identifying the hadronic decays of tau leptons with the CDF and D0 detectors at the Fermilab Tevatron collider in Run II are described. Precision electroweak measurements of W and Z gauge boson cross sections are presented as well as results of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with hadronically decaying tau leptons in the final state.

  20. Increased suppression of oncolytic adenovirus carrying mutant k5 on colorectal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Junkai; Xiao Tian; Gu Jinfa; Wei Na; He Lingfeng; Ding Miao; Liu Xinyuan

    2008-09-19

    Angiogenesis plays a key role in the development of a wide variety of malignant tumors. The approach of targeting antiangiogenesis has become an important field of cancer gene therapy. In this study, the antiangiogenesis protein K5 (the kringle 5 of human plasminogen) has been mutated by changing leucine71 to arginine to form mK5. Then the ZD55-mK5, which is an oncolytic adenovirus expressing mK5, was constructed. It showed stronger inhibition on proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cell. Moreover, in tube formation and embryonic chorioallantoic membrane assay, ZD55-mK5 exhibited more effective antiangiogenesis than ZD55-K5. In addition, ZD55-mK5 generated obvious suppression on the growth of colorectal tumor xenografts and prolonged the life span of nude mice. These results indicate that ZD55-mK5 is a potent agent for inhibiting the tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth.

  1. Interactions between Tau and α-synuclein augment neurotoxicity in a Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Bidisha; Jackson, George R.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and pathological studies have suggested considerable overlap between tauopathies and synucleinopathies. Several genome-wide association studies have identified alpha-Synuclein (SNCA) and Tau (MAPT) polymorphisms as common risk factors for sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the mechanisms by which subtle variations in the expression of wild-type SNCA and MAPT influence risk for PD and the underlying cellular events that effect neurotoxicity remain unclear. To examine causes of neurotoxicity associated with the α-Syn/Tau interaction, we used the fruit fly as a model. We utilized misexpression paradigms in three different tissues to probe the α-Syn/Tau interaction: the retina, dopaminergic neurons and the larval neuromuscular junction. Misexpression of Tau and α-Syn enhanced a rough eye phenotype and loss of dopaminergic neurons in fly tauopathy and synucleinopathy models, respectively. Our findings suggest that interactions between α-Syn and Tau at the cellular level cause disruption of cytoskeletal organization, axonal transport defects and aberrant synaptic organization that contribute to neuronal dysfunction and death associated with sporadic PD. α-Syn did not alter levels of Tau phosphorylated at the AT8 epitope. However, α-Syn and Tau colocalized in ubiquitin-positive aggregates in eye imaginal discs. The presence of Tau also led to an increase in urea soluble α-Syn. Our findings have important implications in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying α-Syn/Tau-mediated synaptic dysfunction, which likely arise in the early asymptomatic phase of sporadic PD. PMID:24430504

  2. Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Model TAU Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Verheyen, An; Diels, Annick; Dijkmans, Joyce; Oyelami, Tutu; Meneghello, Giulia; Mertens, Liesbeth; Versweyveld, Sofie; Borgers, Marianne; Buist, Arjan; Peeters, Pieter; Cik, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal dementia are amongst the most common forms of dementia characterized by the formation and deposition of abnormal TAU in the brain. In order to develop a translational human TAU aggregation model suitable for screening, we transduced TAU harboring the pro-aggregating P301L mutation into control hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells followed by differentiation into cortical neurons. TAU aggregation and phosphorylation was quantified using AlphaLISA technology. Although no spontaneous aggregation was observed upon expressing TAU-P301L in neurons, seeding with preformed aggregates consisting of the TAU-microtubule binding repeat domain triggered robust TAU aggregation and hyperphosphorylation already after 2 weeks, without affecting general cell health. To validate our model, activity of two autophagy inducers was tested. Both rapamycin and trehalose significantly reduced TAU aggregation levels suggesting that iPSC-derived neurons allow for the generation of a biologically relevant human Tauopathy model, highly suitable to screen for compounds that modulate TAU aggregation.

  3. Using Human iPSC-Derived Neurons to Model TAU Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Verheyen, An; Diels, Annick; Dijkmans, Joyce; Oyelami, Tutu; Meneghello, Giulia; Mertens, Liesbeth; Versweyveld, Sofie; Borgers, Marianne; Buist, Arjan; Peeters, Pieter; Cik, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia are amongst the most common forms of dementia characterized by the formation and deposition of abnormal TAU in the brain. In order to develop a translational human TAU aggregation model suitable for screening, we transduced TAU harboring the pro-aggregating P301L mutation into control hiPSC-derived neural progenitor cells followed by differentiation into cortical neurons. TAU aggregation and phosphorylation was quantified using AlphaLISA technology. Although no spontaneous aggregation was observed upon expressing TAU-P301L in neurons, seeding with preformed aggregates consisting of the TAU-microtubule binding repeat domain triggered robust TAU aggregation and hyperphosphorylation already after 2 weeks, without affecting general cell health. To validate our model, activity of two autophagy inducers was tested. Both rapamycin and trehalose significantly reduced TAU aggregation levels suggesting that iPSC-derived neurons allow for the generation of a biologically relevant human Tauopathy model, highly suitable to screen for compounds that modulate TAU aggregation. PMID:26720731

  4. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-5 - Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. 1.401(k)-5 Section 1.401(k)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Plans, Etc. § 1.401(k)-5 Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events....

  5. 29 CFR 71.52 - Specific exemptions pursuant to subsection (k)(5) of the Privacy Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Specific exemptions pursuant to subsection (k)(5) of the... § 71.52 Specific exemptions pursuant to subsection (k)(5) of the Privacy Act. (a) The following systems of records are eligible for exemption under 5 U.S.C. 552a(k)(5) because they contain...

  6. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-5 - Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events. 1.401(k)-5 Section 1.401(k)-5 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE.... § 1.401(k)-5 Special rules for mergers, acquisitions and similar events....

  7. CP violation in hadronic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Datta, Alakabha; Kiers, Ken; London, David; Szynkman, Alejandro; O'Donnell, Patrick J.

    2007-04-01

    We reexamine CP violation in the {delta}S=0 decays {tau}{yields}N{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (N=2,3,4). We assume that the new physics (NP) is a charged Higgs boson. We show that there is no NP contribution to {tau}{yields}{pi}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, which means that no CP violation is expected in this decay. On the other hand, NP can contribute to {tau}{yields}N{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (N=3,4). These are dominated by the intermediate resonant decays {tau}{yields}{omega}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{yields}{rho}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{yields}a{sub 1}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}. We show that the only sizeable CP-violating effects which are possible are in {tau}{yields}a{sub 1}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}{yields}4{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (polarization-dependent rate asymmetry) and {tau}{yields}{omega}{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} (triple-product asymmetry)

  8. Anti-tau antibody administration increases plasma tau in transgenic mice and patients with tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Yanamandra, Kiran; Patel, Tirth K; Jiang, Hong; Schindler, Suzanne; Ulrich, Jason D; Boxer, Adam L; Miller, Bruce L; Kerwin, Diana R; Gallardo, Gilbert; Stewart, Floy; Finn, Mary Beth; Cairns, Nigel J; Verghese, Philip B; Fogelman, Ilana; West, Tim; Braunstein, Joel; Robinson, Grace; Keyser, Jennifer; Roh, Joseph; Knapik, Stephanie S; Hu, Yan; Holtzman, David M

    2017-04-19

    Tauopathies are a group of disorders in which the cytosolic protein tau aggregates and accumulates in cells within the brain, resulting in neurodegeneration. A promising treatment being explored for tauopathies is passive immunization with anti-tau antibodies. We previously found that administration of an anti-tau antibody to human tau transgenic mice increased the concentration of plasma tau. We further explored the effects of administering an anti-tau antibody on plasma tau. After peripheral administration of an anti-tau antibody to human patients with tauopathy and to mice expressing human tau in the central nervous system, there was a dose-dependent increase in plasma tau. In mouse plasma, we found that tau had a short half-life of 8 min that increased to more than 3 hours after administration of anti-tau antibody. As tau transgenic mice accumulated insoluble tau in the brain, brain soluble and interstitial fluid tau decreased. Administration of anti-tau antibody to tau transgenic mice that had decreased brain soluble tau and interstitial fluid tau resulted in an increase in plasma tau, but this increase was less than that observed in tau transgenic mice without these brain changes. Tau transgenic mice subjected to acute neuronal injury using 3-nitropropionic acid showed increased interstitial fluid tau and plasma tau. These data suggest that peripheral administration of an anti-tau antibody results in increased plasma tau, which correlates with the concentration of extracellular and soluble tau in the brain. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. The non-anticoagulant heparin-like K5 polysaccharide derivative K5-N,OSepi attenuates myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Collino, Massimo; Pini, Alessandro; Mastroianni, Rosanna; Benetti, Elisa; Lanzi, Cecilia; Bani, Daniele; Chini, Jacopo; Manoni, Marco; Fantozzi, Roberto; Masini, Emanuela

    2012-01-01

    Heparin and low molecular weight heparins have been demonstrated to reduce myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, although their use is hampered by the risk of haemorrhagic and thrombotic complications. Chemical and enzymatic modifications of K5 polysaccharide have shown the possibility of producing heparin-like compounds with low anticoagulant activity and strong anti-inflammatory effects. Using a rat model of regional myocardial I/R, we investigated the effects of an epimerized N-,O-sulphated K5 polysaccharide derivative, K5-N,OSepi, on infarct size and histological signs of myocardial injury caused by 30 min. ligature of the left anterior descending coronary artery followed by 1 or 24 h reperfusion. K5-N,OSepi (0.1–1 mg/kg given i.v. 15 min. before reperfusion) significantly reduced the extent of myocardial damage in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, we investigated the potential mechanism(s) of the cardioprotective effect(s) afforded by K5-N,OSepi. In left ventricular samples, I/R induced mast cell degranulation and a robust increase in lipid peroxidation, free radical-induced DNA damage and calcium overload. Markers of neutrophil infiltration and activation were also induced by I/R in rat hearts, specifically myeloperoxidase activity, intercellular-adhesion-molecule-1 expression, prostaglandin-E2 and tumour-necrosis-factor-α production. The robust increase in oxidative stress and inflammatory markers was blunted by K5-N,OSepi, in a dose-dependent manner, with maximum at 1 mg/kg. Furthermore, K5-N,OSepi administration attenuated the increase in caspase 3 activity, Bid and Bax activation and ameliorated the decrease in expression of Bcl-2 within the ischaemic myocardium. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the cardioprotective effect of the non-anticoagulant K5 derivative K5-N,OSepi is secondary to a combination of anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:22248092

  10. Unique pathological tau conformers from Alzheimer’s brains transmit tau pathology in nontransgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Changolkar, Lakshmi; Stieber, Anna; Iba, Michiyo; McBride, Jennifer D.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous tau aggregates are hallmark lesions in numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Cell culture and animal studies showed that tau fibrils can undergo cell-to-cell transmission and seed aggregation of soluble tau, but this phenomenon was only robustly demonstrated in models overexpressing tau. In this study, we found that intracerebral inoculation of tau fibrils purified from AD brains (AD-tau), but not synthetic tau fibrils, resulted in the formation of abundant tau inclusions in anatomically connected brain regions in nontransgenic mice. Recombinant human tau seeded by AD-tau revealed unique conformational features that are distinct from synthetic tau fibrils, which could underlie the differential potency in seeding physiological levels of tau to aggregate. Therefore, our study establishes a mouse model of sporadic tauopathies and points to important differences between tau fibrils that are generated artificially and authentic ones that develop in AD brains. PMID:27810929

  11. Unique pathological tau conformers from Alzheimer's brains transmit tau pathology in nontransgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing L; Narasimhan, Sneha; Changolkar, Lakshmi; He, Zhuohao; Stieber, Anna; Zhang, Bin; Gathagan, Ronald J; Iba, Michiyo; McBride, Jennifer D; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2016-11-14

    Filamentous tau aggregates are hallmark lesions in numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Cell culture and animal studies showed that tau fibrils can undergo cell-to-cell transmission and seed aggregation of soluble tau, but this phenomenon was only robustly demonstrated in models overexpressing tau. In this study, we found that intracerebral inoculation of tau fibrils purified from AD brains (AD-tau), but not synthetic tau fibrils, resulted in the formation of abundant tau inclusions in anatomically connected brain regions in nontransgenic mice. Recombinant human tau seeded by AD-tau revealed unique conformational features that are distinct from synthetic tau fibrils, which could underlie the differential potency in seeding physiological levels of tau to aggregate. Therefore, our study establishes a mouse model of sporadic tauopathies and points to important differences between tau fibrils that are generated artificially and authentic ones that develop in AD brains. © 2016 Guo et al.

  12. Therapeutic strategies for tau mediated neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Yoshiyama, Yasumasa; Lee, Virginia M Y; Trojanowski, John Q

    2014-01-01

    Based on the amyloid hypothesis, controlling β-amyloid protein (Aβ) accumulation is supposed to suppress downstream pathological events, tau accumulation, neurodegeneration and cognitive decline. However, in recent clinical trials, Aβ removal or reducing Aβ production has shown limited efficacy. Moreover, while active immunisation with Aβ resulted in the clearance of Aβ, it did not prevent tau pathology or neurodegeneration. This prompts the concern that it might be too late to employ Aβ targeting therapies once tau mediated neurodegeneration has occurred. Therefore, it is timely and very important to develop tau directed therapies. The pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration are unclear but hyperphosphorylation, oligomerisation, fibrillisation and propagation of tau pathology have been proposed as the likely pathological processes that induce loss of function or gain of toxic function of tau, causing neurodegeneration. Here we review the strategies for tau directed treatments based on recent progress in research on tau and our understanding of the pathomechanisms of tau mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:23085937

  13. Hadronic Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, I.M.; /Victoria U.

    2007-10-25

    Precision measurements of the exclusive branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}, where the h represent either a pion or a kaon, from the BABAR Experiment are presented. The branching fraction for {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the first resonant plus non-resonant measurement of this mode and the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also a first measurement. In addition we present the new measurement of the branching fraction of {tau}{sup -} {yields} {phi}K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}}.

  14. Mutated tau, amyloid and neuroinflammation in Alzheimer disease-A brief review.

    PubMed

    Hung, A S M; Liang, Y; Chow, Tony C H; Tang, H C; Wu, Sharon L Y; Wai, M S M; Yew, D T

    2016-05-01

    This review discussed the importance of mutated tau, amyloid and neuroinflammatory factors and microglia in Alzheimer disease. In particular tau, CD4 and TNF alpha were included in the review and the colocalizations of these factors were highlighted. It is important to realize the Alzheimer disease may result from the interactions of these factors. Some of these factors may coexist at the same region and at the same time e.g. mutated tau and amyloid in plaques. A summary scheme of etiology leading to the disease was included. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. First results from the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph - The chromosphere of Alpha Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Robinson, Richard D.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Ake, Thomas B.; Ebbets, Dennis C.

    1991-01-01

    The K5 III star Alpha Tau was observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on November 27, 1990 as part of the Science Assessment Program for the HST. The spectra show intersystem and permitted chromospheric emission lines of semiforbidden C II and Si II, Fe II, Fe I, Ni II, and Co II. Resolved profiles of the semiforbidden C II lines indicate a complex chromospheric turbulent velocity distribution with mean value of roughly 24 km/s, while their observed wavelengths indicate a 4 km/s downflow of the semiforbidden C II plasma. Twenty-five new emission lines have been found in the 2320-2370 A region, 17 of which have been identified with the aid of Skylab data obtained above the solar limb, including four lines from Co II (UV 8) and an Fe I (UV 12) line.

  16. First results from the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph - The chromosphere of Alpha Tauri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Robinson, Richard D.; Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Ake, Thomas B.; Ebbets, Dennis C.

    1991-01-01

    The K5 III star Alpha Tau was observed with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph on November 27, 1990 as part of the Science Assessment Program for the HST. The spectra show intersystem and permitted chromospheric emission lines of semiforbidden C II and Si II, Fe II, Fe I, Ni II, and Co II. Resolved profiles of the semiforbidden C II lines indicate a complex chromospheric turbulent velocity distribution with mean value of roughly 24 km/s, while their observed wavelengths indicate a 4 km/s downflow of the semiforbidden C II plasma. Twenty-five new emission lines have been found in the 2320-2370 A region, 17 of which have been identified with the aid of Skylab data obtained above the solar limb, including four lines from Co II (UV 8) and an Fe I (UV 12) line.

  17. Theory of {tau} mesonic decays

    SciTech Connect

    Li, B.A.

    1997-02-01

    Studies of {tau} mesonic decays are presented. A mechanism for the axial-vector current at low energies is proposed. The VMD is used to treat the vector current. All the meson vertices of both normal parity and abnormal parity (Wess-Zumino-Witten anomaly) are obtained from an effective chiral theory of mesons. a{sub 1} dominance is found in the decay modes of the {tau} lepton: 3{pi}, f(1285){pi}. Both the {rho} and the a{sub 1} meson contribute to the decay {tau}{r_arrow}K{sup {asterisk}}K{nu}; it is found that the vector current is dominant. CVC is tested by studying e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}. The branching ratios of {tau}{r_arrow}{omega}{pi}{nu} and K{bar K}{nu} are calculated. In terms of a similar mechanism the {Delta}s=1 decay modes of the {tau} lepton are studied and K{sub a} dominance is found in {tau}{r_arrow}K{sup {asterisk}}{pi}{nu} and K{sup {asterisk}}{eta}{nu}. The suppression of {tau}{r_arrow}K{rho}{nu} is revealed. The branching ratio of {tau}{r_arrow}{eta}K{nu} is computed. As a test of this theory, the form factors of {pi}{r_arrow}e{gamma}{nu} and K{r_arrow}e{gamma}{nu} are determined. The theoretical results agree with data reasonably well. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Closing the tau loop: the missing tau mutation.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Allan; Lonergan, Roisin; Olszewska, Diana A; O'Dowd, Sean; Cummins, Gemma; Magennis, Brian; Fallon, Emer M; Pender, Niall; Huey, Edward D; Cosentino, Stephanie; O'Rourke, Killian; Kelly, Brendan D; O'Connell, Martin; Delon, Isabelle; Farrell, Michael; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Rowland, Lewis P; Fahn, Stanley; Craig, Peter; Hutton, Michael; Lynch, Tim

    2015-10-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a group of disorders characterized by behavioural, executive, language impairment and sometimes features of parkinsonism and motor neuron disease. In 1994 we described an Irish-American family with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 associated with extensive tau pathology. We named this disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex. We subsequently identified mutations in the MAPT gene. Eleven MAPT gene splice site stem loop mutations were identified over time except for 5' splice site of exon 10. We recently identified another Irish family with autosomal dominant early amnesia and behavioural change or parkinsonism associated with the 'missing' +15 mutation at the intronic boundary of exon 10. We performed a clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging study on the proband and four siblings, including two affected siblings. We sequenced MAPT and performed segregation analysis. We looked for a biological effect of the tau variant by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA extracted from human embryonic kidney cells transfected with exon trapping constructs. We found a c.915+15A>C exon 10/intron 10 stem loop mutation in all affected subjects but not in the unaffected. The c.915+15A>C variant caused a shift in tau splicing pattern to a predominantly exon 10+ pattern presumably resulting in predominant 4 repeat tau and little 3 repeat tau. This strongly suggests that the c.915+15A>C variant is a mutation and that it causes frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 in this pedigree by shifting tau transcription and translation to +4 repeat tau. Tau (MAPT) screening should be considered in families where amnesia or atypical parkinsonism coexists with behavioural disturbance early in the disease process. We describe the final missing stem loop tau mutation predicted 15 years ago. Mutations have now been identified at all predicted sites within the 'stem' when the stem

  19. Closing the tau loop: the missing tau mutation

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Allan; Lonergan, Roisin; Olszewska, Diana A.; O’Dowd, Sean; Cummins, Gemma; Magennis, Brian; Fallon, Emer M.; Pender, Niall; Huey, Edward D.; Cosentino, Stephanie; O’Rourke, Killian; Kelly, Brendan D.; O’Connell, Martin; Delon, Isabelle; Farrell, Michael; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Rowland, Lewis P.; Fahn, Stanley; Craig, Peter; Hutton, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal lobar degeneration comprises a group of disorders characterized by behavioural, executive, language impairment and sometimes features of parkinsonism and motor neuron disease. In 1994 we described an Irish-American family with frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 associated with extensive tau pathology. We named this disinhibition-dementia-parkinsonism-amyotrophy complex. We subsequently identified mutations in the MAPT gene. Eleven MAPT gene splice site stem loop mutations were identified over time except for 5’ splice site of exon 10. We recently identified another Irish family with autosomal dominant early amnesia and behavioural change or parkinsonism associated with the ‘missing’ +15 mutation at the intronic boundary of exon 10. We performed a clinical, neuropsychological and neuroimaging study on the proband and four siblings, including two affected siblings. We sequenced MAPT and performed segregation analysis. We looked for a biological effect of the tau variant by performing real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of RNA extracted from human embryonic kidney cells transfected with exon trapping constructs. We found a c.915+15A>C exon 10/intron 10 stem loop mutation in all affected subjects but not in the unaffected. The c.915+15A>C variant caused a shift in tau splicing pattern to a predominantly exon 10+ pattern presumably resulting in predominant 4 repeat tau and little 3 repeat tau. This strongly suggests that the c.915+15A>C variant is a mutation and that it causes frontotemporal dementia linked to chromosome 17 in this pedigree by shifting tau transcription and translation to +4 repeat tau. Tau (MAPT) screening should be considered in families where amnesia or atypical parkinsonism coexists with behavioural disturbance early in the disease process. We describe the final missing stem loop tau mutation predicted 15 years ago. Mutations have now been identified at all predicted sites within the ‘stem’ when the

  20. The effects of estrogen, its antagonist ICI 182, 780, and interferon-tau on the expression of estrogen receptors and integrin alphaV beta 3 on cycle day 16 in bovine endometrium

    PubMed Central

    Kimmins, Sarah; Russell, Gerald L; Lim, Hai Choo; Hall, Brian K; MacLaren, Leslie A

    2003-01-01

    We have shown previously that downregulation of intercaruncular stromal integrin αvβ3 in bovine endometrium on day 16 of the estrous cycle coincided with the antibody recognition of estrogen receptors (ER) in the luminal epithelium. In pregnancy, these changes were not observed. Our hypothesis was that on day 16 of the estrous cycle, estrogen from the dominant follicle causes a reduction in integrin αvβ3 and affects ERα in the luminal epithelium. The pregnancy recognition protein, interferon-τ (IFN-τ), may prevent downregulation of integrin αvβ3 and suppress ERα expression in the luminal epithelium. On days 14 to 16, heifers received uterine infusions of the anti-estrogen ICI 182, 780, estradiol 17β, IFN-τ or the saline control. On day 16, reproductive tracts were collected for analysis of integrin αvβ3 and ERα. Estrogen receptor α immunoreactivity was largely restricted to the luminal epithelium in control animals. Using anti-ERα recognizing the amino terminus, estrogen-treated animals showed reactivity in the stroma, shallow and deep glands and myometrium as is typical of estrus, whereas ICI 182, 870 treated heifers showed little or no reactivity. In contrast, carboxyl terminus-directed antibodies showed a widespread distribution of ERα with reactivity detected in the uterine epithelium, stroma and myometrium of both estrogen and ICI 182, 780 treated animals. Heifers treated with IFN-τ had low ERα reactivity overall. Control and IFN-τ treated heifers had lower intercaruncular stromal expression of integrin αvβ3 in comparison to estrogen and ICI 182, 780 treatments. Overall, the results suggest that on day 16 of the estrous cycle, estrogen effects on integrin αvβ3 are indirect and do not directly involve ERα in the luminal epithelium. During pregnancy, interferon-tau may block ERα in the luminal epithelium but likely does not rescue integrin αvβ3 expression. PMID:12756058

  1. Extracellular Tau Oligomers Induce Invasion of Endogenous Tau into the Somatodendritic Compartment and Axonal Transport Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Eric; Breckenridge, Leigham; McMahon, Lloyd; Som, Sreemoyee; McConnell, Ian; Bloom, George S.

    2017-01-01

    Aggregates composed of the microtubule associated protein, tau, are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease and non-Alzheimer’s tauopathies. Extracellular tau can induce the accumulation and aggregation of intracellular tau, and tau pathology can be transmitted along neural networks over time. There are six splice variants of central nervous system tau, and various oligomeric and fibrillar forms are associated with neurodegeneration in vivo. The particular extracellular forms of tau capable of transferring tau pathology from neuron to neuron remain ill defined, however, as do the consequences of intracellular tau aggregation on neuronal physiology. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of extracellular tau monomers, oligomers, and filaments comprising various tau isoforms on the behavior of cultured neurons. We found that 2N4R or 2N3R tau oligomers provoked aggregation of endogenous intracellular tau much more effectively than monomers or fibrils, or of oligomers made from other tau isoforms, and that a mixture of all six isoforms most potently provoked intracellular tau accumulation. These effects were associated with invasion of tau into the somatodendritic compartment. Finally, we observed that 2N4R oligomers perturbed fast axonal transport of membranous organelles along microtubules. Intracellular tau accumulation was often accompanied by increases in the run length, run time and instantaneous velocity of membranous cargo. This work indicates that extracellular tau oligomers can disrupt normal neuronal homeostasis by triggering axonal tau accumulation and loss of the polarized distribution of tau, and by impairing fast axonal transport. PMID:28482642

  2. Extracellular Tau Oligomers Induce Invasion of Endogenous Tau into the Somatodendritic Compartment and Axonal Transport Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Eric; Breckenridge, Leigham; McMahon, Lloyd; Som, Sreemoyee; McConnell, Ian; Bloom, George S

    2017-01-01

    Aggregates composed of the microtubule associated protein, tau, are a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and non-Alzheimer's tauopathies. Extracellular tau can induce the accumulation and aggregation of intracellular tau, and tau pathology can be transmitted along neural networks over time. There are six splice variants of central nervous system tau, and various oligomeric and fibrillar forms are associated with neurodegeneration in vivo. The particular extracellular forms of tau capable of transferring tau pathology from neuron to neuron remain ill defined, however, as do the consequences of intracellular tau aggregation on neuronal physiology. The present study was undertaken to compare the effects of extracellular tau monomers, oligomers, and filaments comprising various tau isoforms on the behavior of cultured neurons. We found that 2N4R or 2N3R tau oligomers provoked aggregation of endogenous intracellular tau much more effectively than monomers or fibrils, or of oligomers made from other tau isoforms, and that a mixture of all six isoforms most potently provoked intracellular tau accumulation. These effects were associated with invasion of tau into the somatodendritic compartment. Finally, we observed that 2N4R oligomers perturbed fast axonal transport of membranous organelles along microtubules. Intracellular tau accumulation was often accompanied by increases in the run length, run time and instantaneous velocity of membranous cargo. This work indicates that extracellular tau oligomers can disrupt normal neuronal homeostasis by triggering axonal tau accumulation and loss of the polarized distribution of tau, and by impairing fast axonal transport.

  3. Interaction of Tau with Fe65 links tau to APP.

    PubMed

    Barbato, Christian; Canu, Nadia; Zambrano, Nicola; Serafino, Annalucia; Minopoli, Giuseppina; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; Amadoro, Giuseppina; Russo, Tommaso; Calissano, Pietro

    2005-03-01

    The beta-amyloid precursor protein APP and the microtubule-associated protein Tau play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the possible molecular events linking these two proteins are still unknown. Here, we show that Fe65, one of the ligands of the APP cytodomain, is associated with Tau in vivo and in vitro, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation, co-localization, and FRET experiments. Deletion studies indicated that the N-terminal domain of Tau and the PTB1 domain of Fe65 are required for this association. This interaction is regulated by the phosphorylation of Tau at selected sites, by glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), and requires an intact microtubule network. Furthermore, laser scanner microscopy and co-immunoprecipitation experiments provide preliminary evidence of possible complex(es) involving Tau, Fe65, APP. These findings open new perspectives for the study of the possible crosstalk between these proteins in the pathogenesis of AD.

  4. Accelerated Human Mutant Tau Aggregation by Knocking Out Murine Tau in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Héraud, Céline; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Suain, Valèrie; De Decker, Robert; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Many models of human tauopathies have been generated in mice by expression of a human mutant tau with maintained expression of mouse endogenous tau. Because murine tau might interfere with the toxic effects of human mutant tau, we generated a model in which a pathogenic human tau protein is expressed in the absence of wild-type tau protein, with the aim of facilitating the study of the pathogenic role of the mutant tau and to reproduce more faithfully a human tauopathy. The Tg30 line is a tau transgenic mouse model overexpressing human 1N4R double-mutant tau (P301S and G272V) that develops Alzheimer's disease-like neurofibrillary tangles in an age-dependent manner. By crossing Tg30 mice with mice invalidated for their endogenous tau gene, we obtained Tg30xtau−/− mice that express only exogenous human double-mutant 1N4R tau. Although Tg30xtau−/− mice express less tau protein compared with Tg30, they exhibit signs of decreased survival, increased proportion of sarkosyl-insoluble tau in the brain and in the spinal cord, increased number of Gallyas-positive neurofibrillary tangles in the hippocampus, increased number of inclusions in the spinal cord, and a more severe motor phenotype. Deletion of murine tau accelerated tau aggregation during aging of this mutant tau transgenic model, suggesting that murine tau could interfere with the development of tau pathology in transgenic models of human tauopathies. PMID:21281813

  5. Tau Induces Cooperative Taxol Binding to Microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Jennifer; Santangelo, Christian; Victoria, Makrides; Fygenson, Deborah

    2004-03-01

    Taxol and tau are two ligands which stabilize the microtubule (MT) lattice. Taxol is an anti-mitotic drug that binds β tubulin in the MT interior. Tau is a MT-associated protein that binds both α and β tubulin on the MT exterior. Both taxol and tau reduce MT dynamics and promote tubulin polymerization. Tau alone also acts as a buttress to bundle, stiffen, and space MTs. A structural study recently suggested that taxol and tau may interact by binding to the same site. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, we find that tau induces taxol to bind MTs cooperatively depending on the tau concentration. We develop a model that correctly fits the data in the absence of tau and yields a measure of taxol cooperativity when tau is present.

  6. A Quantitative Analysis of Brain Soluble Tau and the Tau Secretion Factor.

    PubMed

    Han, Pengcheng; Serrano, Geidy; Beach, Thomas G; Caselli, Richard J; Yin, Junxiang; Zhuang, Ningning; Shi, Jiong

    2017-01-09

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) represent products of insoluble tau protein in the brains of patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau level is a biomarker in AD diagnosis. The soluble portion of tau protein in brain parenchyma is presumably the source for CSF tau but this has not previously been quantified. We measured CSF tau and soluble brain tau at autopsy in temporal and frontal brain tissue samples from 7 cognitive normal, 12 mild cognitively impaired, and 19 AD subjects. Based on the measured brain soluble tau, we calculated the whole brain tau load and estimated tau secretion factor. Our results suggest that the increase in NFT in AD is likely attributable to post-translational processes; the increase in CSF tau in AD patients is due to an accelerated carrier-based secretion. Moreover, cognitive dysfunction assessed by final Mini-Mental State Examination scores correlated with the secretion factor but not with the soluble tau.

  7. Characterization of a Unique Undergraduate Multidisciplinary STEM K-5 Teacher Preparation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The K-5 school years are crucial, setting the framework for all subjects as well as critical thinking skills. The single most important component in a classroom is the teacher. However, in a formative timeframe for elementary-school aged children, the number of K-5 teachers that are educated with a Science, Technology, Engineering or Math…

  8. Characterization of tau fibrillization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shaohua; Brunden, Kurt R; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2010-03-01

    The assembly of tau proteins into paired helical filaments, the building blocks of neurofibrillary tangles, is linked to neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. A greater understanding of this assembly process could identify targets for the discovery of drugs to treat Alzheimer's disease and related disorders. By using recombinant human tau, we have delineated events leading to the conversion of normal soluble tau into tau fibrils. Atomic force microscopy and transmission electron microscopy methodologies were used to determine the structure of tau assemblies that formed when soluble tau was incubated with heparin for increasing lengths of time. Tau initially oligomerizes into spherical nucleation units of 18- to 21-nm diameter that appear to assemble linearly into nascent fibrils. Among the earliest tau fibrils are species that resemble a string of beads formed by linearly aligned spheres that with time seem to coalesce to form straight and twisted ribbon-like filaments, as well as paired helical filaments similar to those found in human tauopathies. An analysis of fibril cross sections at later incubation times revealed three fundamental axial structural features. By monitoring tau fibrillization, we showed that different tau filament morphologies coexist. Temporal changes in the predominant tau structural species suggest that tau fibrillization involves the generation of structural intermediates, resulting in the formation of tau fibrils with verisimilitude to their authentic human counterparts. 2010 The Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  9. The role of tau in neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Gendron, Tania F; Petrucelli, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    Since the identification of tau as the main component of neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies, and the discovery that mutations in the tau gene cause frontotemporal dementia, much effort has been directed towards determining how the aggregation of tau into fibrillar inclusions causes neuronal death. As evidence emerges that tau-mediated neuronal death can occur even in the absence of tangle formation, a growing number of studies are focusing on understanding how abnormalities in tau (e.g. aberrant phosphorylation, glycosylation or truncation) confer toxicity. Though data obtained from experimental models of tauopathies strongly support the involvement of pathologically modified tau and tau aggregates in neurodegeneration, the exact neurotoxic species remain unclear, as do the mechanism(s) by which they cause neuronal death. Nonetheless, it is believed that tau-mediated neurodegeneration is likely to result from a combination of toxic gains of function as well as from the loss of normal tau function. To truly appreciate the detrimental consequences of aberrant tau function, a better understanding of all functions carried out by tau, including but not limited to the role of tau in microtubule assembly and stabilization, is required. This review will summarize what is currently known regarding the involvement of tau in the initiation and development of neurodegeneration in tauopathies, and will also highlight some of the remaining questions in need of further investigation. PMID:19284597

  10. Segregation of Alloying Components of Steels R6M5K5 and R6M5K5-MP and its Relation with their Structure and Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kremnev, L. S.; Sapronov, I. Yu.

    2014-03-01

    The distribution of alloying components in local regions of the martensitic matrix of high-speed steels R6M5K5 and R6M5K5-MP produced by the conventional process and by the method of powder metallurgy is studied. It is shown that the alloying components are segregated in the martensite, and the segregation is related to the content of retained austenite after hardening and to the microhardness and heat resistance of the steels after final heat treatment.

  11. Tau decays into K* mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Mankel, R.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Hast, C.; Kapitza, H.; Kolanoski, H.; Kosche, A.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Wegener, D.; Eckstein, P.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Waldi, R.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Eckmann, R.; Kuipers, H.; Mai, O.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Krieger, P.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Frankl, C.; Reßing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Schechelnitsky, S.; Danilov, M.; Doutskoy, A.; Gershtein, Yu.; Golutvin, A.; Korolko, I.; Kostina, G.; Litvintsev, D.; Lubimov, V.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Snizhko, A.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.

    1995-06-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the storage ring DORIS II we have measured τ decays into three charged mesons containing K * mesons. Exploiting the good particle identification capabilities of the detector we have determined the following branching ratios:Brleft( {tau ^ - to overline {K^{*0} } π ^ - v_tau } right) = left( {0.25 ± 0.10 ± 0.05} right)% , B r (τ-→ K *0 K - v τ)= (0.20±0.05±0.04)%, and B r (τ-→ K *- X 0 v τ) =(1.15±0.15-0.18 +0.13)%.

  12. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-08-08

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5 months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE.

  13. The. tau. -lepton and its associated neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A. )

    1990-10-10

    This paper discusses the {tau}-lepton and the prospects for future improvements. It is shown how a better understanding of the {tau} properties could be used for testing fundamental aspects of the electroweak and strong interactions.

  14. Vitamin B12 Inhibits Tau Fibrillization via Binding to Cysteine Residues of Tau.

    PubMed

    Rafiee, Saharnaz; Asadollahi, Kazem; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Ahmadian, Shahin; Saboury, Ali Akbar

    2017-09-06

    Two mechanisms underlie the inhibitory/acceleratory action of chemical compounds on tau aggregation including the regulation of cellular kinases and phosphatases activity and direct binding to tau protein. Vitamin B12 is one of the tau polymerization inhibitors, and its deficiency is linked to inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequently hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau protein. Regarding the structure and function of vitamin B12 and tau protein, we assumed that vitamin B12 is also able to directly bind to tau protein. Hence, we investigated the interaction of vitamin B12 with tau protein in vitro using fluorometry and circular dichrosim. Interaction studies was followed by investigation into the effect of vitamin B12 on tau aggregation using ThT fluorescence, circular dichroism, transmission electron microscopy, and SDS-PAGE. The results indicated that vitamin B12 interacts with tau protein and prevents fibrillization of tau protein. Blocking the cysteine residues of tau confirmed the cysteine-mediated binding of vitamin B12 to tau and showed that binding to cysteine is essential for inhibitory effect of vitamin B12 on tau aggregation. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that vitamin B12 inhibits tau aggregation and that tau oligomers formed in the presence of vitamin B12 are mostly SDS-soluble. We propose that direct binding of vitamin B12 is another mechanism underlying the inhibitory role of vitamin B12 on tau aggregation and neurodegeneration.

  15. Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Hast, Carsten; /SLAC

    2009-01-22

    Recent results of tau lepton decay studies based on luminosities between 350 fb{sup -1} and 469 fb{sup -1} collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. The analyses reported here are Charged Current Lepton Universality and measurements of |V{sub us}| using {tau}{sup -} {yields} e{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {mu}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}}, and K{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied. decays, as well as searches for Second Class Currents in {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays, studies of Lepton Flavor Violations, and a tau mass measurement and CPT-Test. If not explicitly mentioned, charge conjugate decay modes are also implied.

  16. Tau Trigger at the ATLAS Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Benslama, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Belanger-Champange, C.; Brenner, R.; Bosman, M.; Casado, P.; Osuna, C.; Perez, E.; Vorwerk, V.; Czyczula, Z.; Dam, M.; Xella, S.; Demers, S.; Farrington, S.; Igonkina, O.; Kanaya, N.; Tsuno, S.; Ptacek, E.; Reinsch, A.; Strom, David M.; Torrence, E.; /Oregon U. /Sydney U. /Lancaster U. /Birmingham U.

    2011-11-09

    Many theoretical models, like the Standard Model or SUSY at large tan({beta}), predict Higgs bosons or new particles which decay more abundantly to final states including tau leptons than to other leptons. At the energy scale of the LHC, the identification of tau leptons, in particular in the hadronic decay mode, will be a challenging task due to an overwhelming QCD background which gives rise to jets of particles that can be hard to distinguish from hadronic tau decays. Equipped with excellent tracking and calorimetry, the ATLAS experiment has developed tau identification tools capable of working at the trigger level. This contribution presents tau trigger algorithms which exploit the main features of hadronic tau decays and describes the current tau trigger commissioning activities. Many of the SM processes being investigated at ATLAS, as well as numerous BSM searches, contain tau leptons in their final states. Being able to trigger effectively on the tau leptons in these events will contribute to the success of the ATLAS experiment. The tau trigger algorithms and monitoring infrastructure are ready for the first data, and are being tested with the data collected with cosmic muons. The development of efficiency measurements methods using QCD and Z {yields} {tau}{tau} events is well advanced.

  17. A Tau-Charm Factory at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Seth, K.K.

    1994-04-01

    It is proposed that a Tau Charm Factory represents a natural extension of CEBAF into higher energy domains. The exciting nature of the physics of charm quarks and tau leptons is briefly reviewed and it is suggested that the concept of a linac-ring collider as a Tau Charm Factory at CEBAF should be seriously studied.

  18. Congeneric and (Essentially) Tau-Equivalent Estimates of Score Reliability: What They Are and How to Use Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, James M.

    2006-01-01

    Coefficient alpha, the most commonly used estimate of internal consistency, is often considered a lower bound estimate of reliability, though the extent of its underestimation is not typically known. Many researchers are unaware that coefficient alpha is based on the essentially tau-equivalent measurement model. It is the violation of the…

  19. UX Tau A Artist Concept

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-11-28

    This artist concept is of the one-million-year-old star system called UX Tau A, approximately 450 light-years away. NASA Spitzer Space Telescope showed a gap in the dusty planet-forming disk swirling around the system central sun-like star.

  20. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; Prosper, Harrison B.; Sato, Nobuo

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $\\Theta$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $h\\tau\\tau$ coupling through the $\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  1. Neurofibrillary tangle-like tau pathology induced by synthetic tau fibrils in primary neurons over-expressing mutant tau.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing L; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2013-03-18

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the transmissibility of fibrillar species of tau protein, but this has never been directly tested in neurons, the cell type most affected by formation of tau inclusions in neurodegenerative tauopathies. Here we show that synthetic tau fibrils made from recombinant protein not only time-dependently recruit normal tau into neurofibrillary tangle-like insoluble aggregates in primary hippocampal neurons over-expressing human tau, but also induce neuritic tau pathology in non-transgenic neurons. This study provides highly compelling support for the protein-only hypothesis of pathological tau transmission in primary neurons and describes a useful neuronal model for studying the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Tau-66: evidence for a novel tau conformation in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Ghoshal, N; García-Sierra, F; Fu, Y; Beckett, L A; Mufson, E J; Kuret, J; Berry, R W; Binder, L I

    2001-06-01

    We have characterized a novel monoclonal antibody, Tau-66, raised against recombinant human tau. Immunohistochemistry using Tau-66 reveals a somatic-neuronal stain in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) that is more intense in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain than in normal brain. In hippocampus, Tau-66 yields a pattern similar to STG, except that neurofibrillary lesions are preferentially stained if present. In mild AD cases, Tau-66 stains plaques lacking obvious dystrophic neurites (termed herein 'diffuse reticulated plaques') in STG and the hippocampus. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis reveals that Tau-66 is specific for tau, as there is no cross-reactivity with MAP2, tubulin, Abeta(1-40), or Abeta(1-42), although Tau-66 fails to react with tau or any other polypeptide on western blots. The epitope of Tau-66, as assessed by ELISA testing of tau deletion mutants, appears discontinuous, requiring residues 155-244 and 305-314. Tau-66 reactivity exhibits buffer and temperature sensitivity in an ELISA format and is readily abolished by SDS treatment. Taken together these lines of evidence indicate that the Tau-66 epitope is conformation-dependent, perhaps involving a close interaction of the proline-rich and the third microtubule-binding regions. This is the first indication that tau can undergo this novel folding event and that this conformation of tau is involved in AD pathology.

  3. Evidence for B+ --> tau+ nu_tau Decays using Hadronic B Tags

    SciTech Connect

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-11

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} using 467.8 x 10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. We select a sample of events with on completely reconstructed B{sup -} in an hadronic decay mode (B{sup -} --> D{sup (*)0}X{sup -} and B{sup -} --> J/{psi} X{sup -}). We examine the rest of the event to search for a B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We identify the {tau}{sup +} lepton in the following modes: {tau}{sup +} --> e{sup +} {nu}{sub e}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} --> {pi}{sup +}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup +} --> {rho}{anti {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We find an excess of events with respect to expected background, which excludes the null signal hypothesis at the level of 3.3 {sigma} and can be converted to a branching fraction central value of B(B{sup +} --> {tau}{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}})= (1.80{sup + 0.57}{sub - 0.54}(stat.) {+-} 0.26 (syst.)) x 10{sup -4}.

  4. Increased misfolding and truncation of tau in APP/PS1/tau transgenic mice compared to mutant tau mice.

    PubMed

    Héraud, Céline; Goufak, Doris; Ando, Kunie; Leroy, Karelle; Suain, Valérie; Yilmaz, Zehra; De Decker, Robert; Authelet, Michèle; Laporte, Vincent; Octave, Jean-Noël; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Neurofibrillary degeneration in transgenic models of tauopathies has been observed to be enhanced when these models are crossed with transgenic models developing an Aβ pathology. The mechanisms leading to this enhanced tau pathology are not well understood. We have performed a detailed analysis of tau misprocessing in a new transgenic mouse model combining APP, PS1 and tau mutations (5xFAD×Tg30 mice) by comparison with littermates expressing only a FTD mutant tau (Tg30 mice). These 5xFAD×Tg30 mice showed a more severe deficient motor phenotype than Tg30 mice and developed with age a dramatically accelerated NFT load in the brain compared to Tg30 mice. Insoluble tau in 5xFAD×Tg30 mice compared to insoluble tau in Tg30 mice showed increased phosphorylation, enhanced misfolding and truncation changes mimicking more closely the post-translational changes characteristic of PHF-tau in Alzheimer's disease. Endogenous wild-type mouse tau was recruited at much higher levels in insoluble tau in 5xFAD×Tg30 than in Tg30 mice. Extracellular amyloid load, Aβ40 and Aβ42, β-CTFs and β-CTF phosphorylation levels were lower in 5xFAD×Tg30 mice than in 5xFAD mice. Despite this reduction of Aβ, a significant hippocampal neuronal loss was observed in 5xFAD×Tg30 but not in 5xFAD mice indicating its closer association with increased tau pathology. This 5xFAD×Tg30 model thus mimics more faithfully tau pathology and neuronal loss observed in AD and suggests that additional post-translational changes in tau and self-recruitment of endogenous tau drive the enhanced tau pathology developing in the presence of Aβ pathology. © 2013.

  5. New results on the tau lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1987-11-01

    This is a review of new results on the tau lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/2..pi../sup 0/nu/sub tau/ with much improved precision, and limits on decay modes containing eta mesons, including the second-class-current decay tau/sup -/ ..-->.. ..pi../sup -/eta nu/sub tau/. The implications of these new results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 52 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Prognostic and Functional Significance of MAP4K5 in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Oliver H.; Azizian, Nancy; Guo, Ming; Capello, Michela; Deng, Defeng; Zang, Fenglin; Fry, Jason; Katz, Matthew H.; Fleming, Jason B.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Wolff, Robert A.; Hanash, Samir; Wang, Huamin; Maitra, Anirban

    2016-01-01

    Objectives MAP4K5 plays an important role in regulating a range of cellular responses and is involved in Wnt signaling in hematopoietic cells. However, its functions in human malignancies have not been studied. The major objectives of this study are to examine the expression, functions and clinical significance of MAP4K5 in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Materials and Methods The expression levels of MAP4K5, E-cadherin, vimentin, and carboxylesterase 2 (CES2) were examined by immunohistochemistry in 105 PDAC and matched non-neoplastic pancreas samples from our institution. The RNA sequencing data of 112 PDAC patients were downloaded from the TCGA data portal. Immunoblotting and RNA sequencing analysis were used to examine the expression of MAP4K5 and E-cadherin in pancreatic cancer cell lines. The effect of knockdown MAP4K5 using siRNA on the expression of CDH1 and vimentin were examined by Real-time RT-PCR in Panc-1 and AsPC-1 cells. Statistical analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistics. Results MAP4K5 protein is expressed at high levels specifically in the pancreatic ductal cells of 100% non-neoplastic pancreas samples, but is decreased or lost in 77.1% (81/105) of PDAC samples. MAP4K5-low correlated with the loss of E-cadherin (P = 0.001) and reduced CES2 expression (P = 0.002) in our patient populations. The expression levels of MAP4K5 mRNA directly correlated with the expression levels of CDH1 mRNA (R = 0.2490, P = 0.008) in the second cohort of 112 PDAC patients from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) RNA-seq dataset. Similar correlations between the expression of MAP4K5 and E-cadherin were observed both at protein and mRNA levels in multiple pancreatic cancer cell lines. Knockdown MAP4K5 led to decreased CDH1 mRNA expression in Panc-1 and AsPC-1 cells. MAP4K5-low correlated significantly with reduced overall survival and was an independent prognosticator in patients with stage II PDAC. Conclusions MAP4K5 expression is decreased or lost in

  7. Extracellular monomeric tau protein is sufficient to initiate the spread of tau protein pathology.

    PubMed

    Michel, Claire H; Kumar, Satish; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Tunnacliffe, Alan; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Kaminski, Clemens F; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S

    2014-01-10

    Understanding the formation and propagation of aggregates of the Alzheimer disease-associated Tau protein in vivo is vital for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. Using our recently developed live-cell aggregation sensor in neuron-like cells, we demonstrate that different variants of exogenous monomeric Tau, namely full-length Tau (hTau40) and the Tau-derived construct K18 comprising the repeat domain, initially accumulate in endosomal compartments, where they form fibrillar seeds that subsequently induce the aggregation of endogenous Tau. Using superresolution imaging, we confirm that fibrils consisting of endogenous and exogenous Tau are released from cells and demonstrate their potential to spread Tau pathology. Our data indicate a greater pathological risk and potential toxicity than hitherto suspected for extracellular soluble Tau.

  8. Extracellular Monomeric Tau Protein Is Sufficient to Initiate the Spread of Tau Protein Pathology*

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Claire H.; Kumar, Satish; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Tunnacliffe, Alan; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Kaminski, Clemens F.; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the formation and propagation of aggregates of the Alzheimer disease-associated Tau protein in vivo is vital for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. Using our recently developed live-cell aggregation sensor in neuron-like cells, we demonstrate that different variants of exogenous monomeric Tau, namely full-length Tau (hTau40) and the Tau-derived construct K18 comprising the repeat domain, initially accumulate in endosomal compartments, where they form fibrillar seeds that subsequently induce the aggregation of endogenous Tau. Using superresolution imaging, we confirm that fibrils consisting of endogenous and exogenous Tau are released from cells and demonstrate their potential to spread Tau pathology. Our data indicate a greater pathological risk and potential toxicity than hitherto suspected for extracellular soluble Tau. PMID:24235150

  9. Tau reduction prevents neuronal loss and reverses pathological tau deposition and seeding in mice with tauopathy.

    PubMed

    DeVos, Sarah L; Miller, Rebecca L; Schoch, Kathleen M; Holmes, Brandon B; Kebodeaux, Carey S; Wegener, Amy J; Chen, Guo; Shen, Tao; Tran, Hien; Nichols, Brandon; Zanardi, Tom A; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Swayze, Eric E; Bennett, C Frank; Diamond, Marc I; Miller, Timothy M

    2017-01-25

    Accumulation of hyperphosphorylated tau directly correlates with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease and other primary tauopathies. One therapeutic strategy may be to reduce total tau expression. We identified antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) that selectively decreased human tau mRNA and protein in mice expressing mutant P301S human tau. After reduction of human tau in this mouse model of tauopathy, fewer tau inclusions developed, and preexisting phosphorylated tau and Thioflavin S pathology were reversed. The resolution of tau pathology was accompanied by the prevention of hippocampal volume loss, neuronal death, and nesting deficits. In addition, mouse survival was extended, and pathological tau seeding was reversed. In nonhuman primates, tau ASOs distributed throughout the brain and spinal cord and reduced tau mRNA and protein in the brain, spinal cord, and cerebrospinal fluid. These data support investigation of a tau-lowering therapy in human patients who have tau-positive inclusions even after pathological tau deposition has begun. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  10. Seeding of Normal Tau by Pathological Tau Conformers Drives Pathogenesis of Alzheimer-like Tangles*

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing L.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in Alzheimer disease and related tauopathies are composed of insoluble hyperphosphorylated Tau protein, but the mechanisms underlying the conversion of highly soluble Tau into insoluble NFTs remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that introduction of minute quantities of misfolded preformed Tau fibrils (Tau pffs) into Tau-expressing cells rapidly recruit large amounts of soluble Tau into filamentous inclusions resembling NFTs with unprecedented efficiency, suggesting a “seeding”-recruitment process as a highly plausible mechanism underlying NFT formation in vivo. Consistent with the emerging concept of prion-like transmissibility of disease-causing amyloidogenic proteins, we found that spontaneous uptake of Tau pffs into cells is likely mediated by endocytosis, suggesting a potential mechanism for the propagation of Tau lesions in tauopathy brains. Furthermore, sequestration of soluble Tau by pff-induced Tau aggregates attenuates microtubule overstabilization in Tau-expressing cells, supporting the hypothesis of a Tau loss-of-function toxicity in cells harboring NFTs. In summary, our study establishes a cellular system that robustly develops authentic NFT-like Tau aggregates, which provides mechanistic insights into NFT pathogenesis and a potential tool for identifying Tau-based therapeutics. PMID:21372138

  11. Prefibrillar Tau oligomers alter the nucleic acid protective function of Tau in hippocampal neurons in vivo.

    PubMed

    Violet, Marie; Chauderlier, Alban; Delattre, Lucie; Tardivel, Meryem; Chouala, Meliza Sendid; Sultan, Audrey; Marciniak, Elodie; Humez, Sandrine; Binder, Lester; Kayed, Rakez; Lefebvre, Bruno; Bonnefoy, Eliette; Buée, Luc; Galas, Marie-Christine

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of DNA and RNA oxidative damage is observed in cortical and hippocampal neurons from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains at early stages of pathology. We recently reported that Tau is a key nuclear player in the protection of neuronal nucleic acid integrity in vivo under physiological conditions and hyperthermia, a strong inducer of oxidative stress. In a mouse model of tauopathy (THY-Tau22), we demonstrate that hyperthermia selectively induces nucleic acid oxidative damage and nucleic acid strand breaks in the nucleus and cytoplasm of hippocampal neurons that display early Tau phosphorylation but no Tau fibrils. Nucleic acid-damaged neurons were exclusively immunoreactive for prefibrillar Tau oligomers. A similar association between prefibrillar Tau oligomers and nucleic acid oxidative damage was observed in AD brains. Pretreatment with Methylene Blue (MB), a Tau aggregation inhibitor and a redox cycler, reduced hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization as well as nucleic acid damage. This study clearly highlights the existence of an early and critical time frame for hyperthermia-induced Tau oligomerization, which most likely occurs through increased oxidative stress, and nucleic acid vulnerability during the progression of Tau pathology. These results suggest that at early stages of AD, Tau oligomerization triggers the loss of the nucleic acid protective function of monomeric Tau. This study highlights the existence of a short therapeutic window in which to prevent the formation of pathological forms of Tau and their harmful consequences on nucleic acid integrity during the progression of Tau pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Constraints on the {tau} neutrino mass and mixing from precise measurements of {tau} decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, J.; Taylor, L.

    1997-01-01

    We have derived constraints on the {tau} neutrino mass and fourth generation mixing from an analysis of the partial widths of {tau} lepton decays, in particular, {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}e{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{mu}{sup {minus}}{bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and {tau}{r_arrow}K{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. We present predictions for the {tau} decay widths, allowing for a nonzero {tau} neutrino mass m{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} and for mixing with a neutrino of mass m{sub {nu}{sub L}}{gt}M{sub Z}/2, which is parametrized using a Cabibbo-like mixing angle {theta}{sub L}. By comparison of these theoretical predictions with the experimental measurements, we obtain the following bounds at the 90{percent} confidence level: m{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}}{lt}42 MeV and sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub L}{lt}0.014. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Secretion of full-length tau or tau fragments in a cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Mar; Cuadros, Raquel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-11-10

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. Several studies have suggested that tau may be secreted to extracellular medium and may be responsible of spreading of neurodegeneration. The overexpression of tau in cultured non-neuronal cells leads to the secretion of this protein. The proline-rich region of tau may serve as a membrane-binding site during the secretion of the full-length tau molecule. Tau fragments lacking this proline-region are either not secreted or are secreted in a distinct manner to the full-length molecule.

  14. Changes in tau phosphorylation in hibernating rodents.

    PubMed

    León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; García-Escudero, Vega; Hernández, Félix; Defelipe, Javier; Avila, Jesús

    2013-07-01

    Tau is a cytoskeletal protein present mainly in the neurons of vertebrates. By comparing the sequence of tau molecule among different vertebrates, it was found that the variability of the N-terminal sequence in tau protein is higher than that of the C-terminal region. The N-terminal region is involved mainly in the binding of tau to cellular membranes, whereas the C-terminal region of the tau molecule contains the microtubule-binding sites. We have compared the sequence of Syrian hamster tau with the sequences of other hibernating and nonhibernating rodents and investigated how differences in the N-terminal region of tau could affect the phosphorylation level and tau binding to cell membranes. We also describe a change, in tau phosphorylation, on a casein kinase 1 (ck1)-dependent site that is found only in hibernating rodents. This ck1 site seems to play an important role in the regulation of tau binding to membranes. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Extracellular association of APP and tau fibrils induces intracellular aggregate formation of tau.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Muneaki; Miyata, Haruka; Kametani, Fuyuki; Nonaka, Takashi; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hisanaga, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masato

    2015-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by extracellular amyloid β (Aβ) deposition and intracellular tau aggregation. Many studies have indicated some association between these processes, but it remains unknown how the two pathologies are linked. In this study, we investigated whether expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) influences extracellular seed-dependent intracellular tau accumulation in cultured cells. Treatment of tau-expressing SH-SY5Y cells with Aβ fibrils did not induce intracellular tau aggregation. On the other hand, in cells expressing both tau and APP, treatment with tau fibrils or Sarkosyl-insoluble tau from AD brains induced intracellular tau aggregation. The seed-dependent intracellular tau aggregation was not induced by expression of APP lacking the extracellular domain. The amount of phosphorylated tau aggregates in cultured cells was dose dependently elevated in response to increased levels of APP on the cell membrane. Our results indicate that the extracellular region of APP is involved in uptake of tau fibrils into cells, raising the possibility that APP, but not Aβ, influences cell-to-cell spreading of tau pathologies in AD by serving as a receptor of abnormal tau aggregates.

  16. Tau as a biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schraen-Maschke, Susanna; Sergeant, Nicolas; Dhaenens, Claire-Marie; Bombois, Stephanie; Deramecourt, Vincent; Caillet-Boudin, Marie-Laure; Pasquier, Florence; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Sablonniere, Bernard; Vanmechelen, Eugeen; Buee, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Summary The microtubule associated protein Tau is mainly expressed in neurons of the central nervous system and is crucial in axonal maintenance and axonal transport. The rationale for Tau as a biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases is that it is a major component of abnormal intraneuronal aggregates observed in numerous of these diseases named Tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease. The molecular diversity of Tau is very useful when analysing it in the brain or in the peripheral fluids. Immunohistochemical and biochemical characterisation of Tau aggregates in the brain allows the post-mortem classification and differential diagnosis of Tauopathies. As peripheral biomarker of Alzheimer’s disease in the cerebrospinal fluid, Tau proteins are now validated for diagnosis and predictive purposes. For the future, the detailed characterization of Tau in brain and in peripheral fluids will lead to novel promising biomarkers for differential diagnosis of dementia and monitoring of therapeutics. PMID:20477391

  17. Tau appearance in atmospheric neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Murayama, Hitoshi

    1998-10-24

    If the correct interpretation of the Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data is {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation, the contained data sample should already have more than 10 {tau} appearance events. We study the challenging task of detecting the {tau}, focusing on the decay chain {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} in events with quasi-elastic {tau} production. The background level, which is currently quite uncertain because of a lack of relevant neutral current data, can be measured by the near detector in the K2K experiment. Our estimates of the background suggest that it may be possible to detect {tau} appearance in Super-Kamiokande with 5-10 years of running.

  18. Tau Protein and Adult Hippocampal Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fuster-Matanzo, Almudena; Llorens-Martín, María; Jurado-Arjona, Jerónimo; Avila, Jesús; Hernández, Félix

    2012-01-01

    Tau protein is a microtubule-associated protein found in the axonal compartment that stabilizes neuronal microtubules under normal physiological conditions. Tau metabolism has attracted much attention because of its role in neurodegenerative disorders called tauopathies, mainly Alzheimer disease. Here, we review recent findings suggesting that axonal outgrowth in subgranular zone during adult hippocampal neurogenesis requires a dynamic microtubule network and tau protein facilitates to maintain that dynamic cytoskeleton. Those functions are carried out in part by tau isoform with only three microtubule-binding domains (without exon 10) and by presence of hyperphosphorylated tau forms. Thus, tau is a good marker and a valuable tool to study new axons in adult neurogenesis. PMID:22787440

  19. Increased 4R-Tau Induces Pathological Changes in a Human-Tau Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Schoch, Kathleen M; DeVos, Sarah L; Miller, Rebecca L; Chun, Seung J; Norrbom, Michaela; Wozniak, David F; Dawson, Hana N; Bennett, C Frank; Rigo, Frank; Miller, Timothy M

    2016-06-01

    Pathological evidence for selective four-repeat (4R) tau deposition in certain dementias and exon 10-positioned MAPT mutations together suggest a 4R-specific role in causing disease. However, direct assessments of 4R toxicity have not yet been accomplished in vivo. Increasing 4R-tau expression without change to total tau in human tau-expressing mice induced more severe seizures and nesting behavior abnormality, increased tau phosphorylation, and produced a shift toward oligomeric tau. Exon 10 skipping could also be accomplished in vivo, providing support for a 4R-tau targeted approach to target 4R-tau toxicity and, in cases of primary MAPT mutation, eliminate the disease-causing mutation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥∼20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo. PMID:26126828

  1. Interaction of tau protein with model lipid membranes induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Emmalee M.; Dubey, Manish; Camp, Phillip J.; Vernon, Briana C.; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Chi, Eva Y.

    2012-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of the intrinsically disordered, microtubule-associated tau protein into neurofibrillary tangles is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. However, the mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity remain unknown. Recent work has shown that lipid membrane can induce tau aggregation and that membrane permeabilization may serve as a pathway by which protein aggregates exert toxicity, suggesting that the plasma membrane may play dual roles in tau pathology. This prompted our investigation to assess tau's propensity to interact with membranes and to elucidate the mutually disruptive structural perturbations the interactions induce in both tau and the membrane. We show that although highly charged and soluble, the full-length tau (hTau40) is also highly surface active, selectively inserts into anionic DMPG lipid monolayers and induces membrane morphological changes. To resolve molecular-scale structural details of hTau40 associated with lipid membranes, X-ray and neutron scattering techniques are utilized. X-ray reflectivity indicates hTau40's presence underneath a DMPG monolayer and penetration into the lipid headgroups and tailgroups, whereas grazing incidence X-ray diffraction shows that hTau40 insertion disrupts lipid packing. Moreover, both air/water and DMPG lipid membrane interfaces induce the disordered hTau40 to partially adopt a more compact conformation with density similar to that of a folded protein. Neutron reflectivity shows that tau completely disrupts supported DMPG bilayers while leaving the neutral DPPC bilayer intact. Our results show that hTau40's strong interaction with anionic lipids induces tau structural compaction and membrane disruption, suggesting possible membrane-based mechanisms of tau aggregation and toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22401494

  2. The Polyphenol Altenusin Inhibits in Vitro Fibrillization of Tau and Reduces Induced Tau Pathology in Primary Neurons.

    PubMed

    Chua, Sook Wern; Cornejo, Alberto; van Eersel, Janet; Stevens, Claire H; Vaca, Inmaculada; Cueto, Mercedes; Kassiou, Michael; Gladbach, Amadeus; Macmillan, Alex; Lewis, Lev; Whan, Renee; Ittner, Lars M

    2017-04-19

    In Alzheimer's disease, the microtubule-associated protein tau forms intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). A critical step in the formation of NFTs is the conversion of soluble tau into insoluble filaments. Accordingly, a current therapeutic strategy in clinical trials is aimed at preventing tau aggregation. Here, we assessed altenusin, a bioactive polyphenolic compound, for its potential to inhibit tau aggregation. Altenusin inhibits aggregation of tau protein into paired helical filaments in vitro. This was associated with stabilization of tau dimers and other oligomers into globular structures as revealed by atomic force microscopy. Moreover, altenusin reduced tau phosphorylation in cells expressing pathogenic tau, and prevented neuritic tau pathology induced by incubation of primary neurons with tau fibrils. However, treatment of tau transgenic mice did not improve neuropathology and functional deficits. Taken together, altenusin prevents tau fibrillization in vitro and induced tau pathology in neurons.

  3. Folding of the Tau Protein on Microtubules.

    PubMed

    Kadavath, Harindranath; Jaremko, Mariusz; Jaremko, Łukasz; Biernat, Jacek; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2015-08-24

    Microtubules are regulated by microtubule-associated proteins. However, little is known about the structure of microtubule-associated proteins in complex with microtubules. Herein we show that the microtubule-associated protein Tau, which is intrinsically disordered in solution, locally folds into a stable structure upon binding to microtubules. While Tau is highly flexible in solution and adopts a β-sheet structure in amyloid fibrils, in complex with microtubules the conserved hexapeptides at the beginning of the Tau repeats two and three convert into a hairpin conformation. Thus, binding to microtubules stabilizes a unique conformation in Tau. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  5. In vivo tau imaging: obstacles and progress.

    PubMed

    Villemagne, Victor L; Okamura, Nobuyuki

    2014-06-01

    The military conflicts of the last decade have highlighted the growing problem of traumatic brain injury in combatants returning from the battlefield. The considerable evidence pointing at the accumulation of tau aggregates and its recognition as a risk factor in neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease have led to a major effort to develop selective tau ligands that would allow research into the physiopathologic underpinnings of traumatic brain injury and chronic traumatic encephalopathy in military personnel and the civilian population. These tracers will allow new insights into tau pathology in the human brain, facilitating research into causes, diagnosis, and treatment of traumatic encephalopathy and major neurodegenerative dementias, such as Alzheimer's disease and some variants of frontotemporal lobar degeneration, in which tau plays a role. The field of selective tau imaging has to overcome several obstacles, some of them associated with the idiosyncrasies of tau aggregation and others related to radiotracer design. A worldwide effort has focused on the development of imaging agents that will allow selective tau imaging in vivo. Recent progress in the development of these tracers is enabling the noninvasive assessment of the extent of tau pathology in the brain, eventually allowing the quantification of changes in tau pathology over time and its relation to cognitive performance, brain volumetrics, and other biomarkers, as well as assessment of efficacy and patient recruitment for antitau therapeutic trials. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Formation and Propagation of Tau Oligomeric Seeds

    PubMed Central

    Gerson, Julia E.; Kayed, Rakez

    2013-01-01

    Tau misfolding and aggregation leads to the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which have long been considered one of the main pathological hallmarks for numerous neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and Parkinson’s Disease (PD). However, recent studies completed both in vitro and in vivo suggest that intermediate forms of tau, known as tau oligomers, between the monomeric form and NFTs are the true toxic species in disease and the best targets for anti-tau therapies. However, the exact mechanism by which the spread of pathology occurs is unknown. Evidence suggests that tau oligomers may act as templates for the misfolding of native tau, thereby seeding the spread of the toxic forms of the protein. Recently, researchers have reported the ability of tau oligomers to enter and exit cells, propagating from disease-affected regions to unaffected areas. While the mechanism by which the spreading of misfolded tau occurs has yet to be elucidated, there are a few different models which have been proposed, including cell membrane stress and pore-formation, endocytosis and exocytosis, and non-traditional secretion of protein not enclosed by a membrane. Coming to an understanding of how toxic tau species seed and spread through the brain will be crucial to finding effective treatments for neurodegenerative tauopathies. PMID:23882255

  7. Tau deletion promotes brain insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Marciniak, Elodie; Leboucher, Antoine; Caron, Emilie; Ahmed, Tariq; Tailleux, Anne; Dumont, Julie; Issad, Tarik; Gerhardt, Ellen; Pagesy, Patrick; Vileno, Margaux; Hamdane, Malika; Bantubungi, Kadiombo; Lancel, Steve; Demeyer, Dominique; Eddarkaoui, Sabiha; Vallez, Emmanuelle; Vieau, Didier; Humez, Sandrine; Faivre, Emilie; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Amouyel, Philippe; Balschun, Detlef

    2017-01-01

    The molecular pathways underlying tau pathology–induced synaptic/cognitive deficits and neurodegeneration are poorly understood. One prevalent hypothesis is that hyperphosphorylation, misfolding, and fibrillization of tau impair synaptic plasticity and cause degeneration. However, tau pathology may also result in the loss of specific physiological tau functions, which are largely unknown but could contribute to neuronal dysfunction. In the present study, we uncovered a novel function of tau in its ability to regulate brain insulin signaling. We found that tau deletion leads to an impaired hippocampal response to insulin, caused by altered IRS-1 and PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10) activities. Our data also demonstrate that tau knockout mice exhibit an impaired hypothalamic anorexigenic effect of insulin that is associated with energy metabolism alterations. Consistently, we found that tau haplotypes are associated with glycemic traits in humans. The present data have far-reaching clinical implications and raise the hypothesis that pathophysiological tau loss-of-function favors brain insulin resistance, which is instrumental for cognitive and metabolic impairments in Alzheimer’s disease patients. PMID:28652303

  8. Workshop on Precision Measurements of $\\alpha_s$

    SciTech Connect

    Bethke, Siegfried; Hoang, Andre H.; Kluth, Stefan; Schieck, Jochen; Stewart, Iain W.; Aoki, S.; Beneke, M.; Bethke, S.; Blumlein, J.; Brambilla, N.; Brodsky, S.; /MIT, LNS

    2011-10-01

    These are the proceedings of the Workshop on Precision Measurements of {alpha}{sub s} held at the Max-Planck-Institute for Physics, Munich, February 9-11, 2011. The workshop explored in depth the determination of {alpha}{sub s}(m{sub Z}) in the {ovr MS} scheme from the key categories where high precision measurements are currently being made, including DIS and global PDF fits, {tau}-decays, electro-weak precision observables and Z-decays, event-shapes, and lattice QCD. These proceedings contain a short summary contribution from the speakers, as well as the lists of authors, conveners, participants, and talks.

  9. Detecting tau in serum of transgenic animal models after tau immunotherapy treatment.

    PubMed

    d'Abramo, Cristina; Acker, Christopher M; Schachter, Joel B; Terracina, Giuseppe; Wang, Xiaohai; Forest, Stefanie K; Davies, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In the attempt to elucidate if the "peripheral sink hypothesis" could be a potential mechanism of action for tau removal in passive immunotherapy experiments, we have examined tau levels in serum of chronically injected JNPL3 and Tg4510 transgenic animals. Measurement of tau in serum of mice treated with tau antibodies is challenging because of the antibody interference in sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. To address this issue, we have developed a heat-treatment protocol at acidic pH to remove interfering molecules from serum, with excellent recovery of tau. The present data show that pan-tau and conformational antibodies do increase tau in mouse sera. However, these concentrations in serum do not consistently correlate with reductions of tau pathology in brain, suggesting that large elevations of tau species measured in serum are not predictive of efficacy. Here, we describe a reliable method to detect tau in serum of transgenic animals that have undergone tau immunotherapy. Levels of tau in human serum are less than the sensitivity of current assays, although artifactual signals are common. The method may be useful in similarly treated humans, a situation in which false positive signals are likely. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reactive microglia drive tau pathology and contribute to the spreading of pathological tau in the brain.

    PubMed

    Maphis, Nicole; Xu, Guixiang; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Jiang, Shanya; Cardona, Astrid; Ransohoff, Richard M; Lamb, Bruce T; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2015-06-01

    Pathological aggregation of tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. We have previously shown that the deficiency of the microglial fractalkine receptor (CX3CR1) led to the acceleration of tau pathology and memory impairment in an hTau mouse model of tauopathy. Here, we show that microglia drive tau pathology in a cell-autonomous manner. First, tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation occur as early as 2 months of age in hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice. Second, CD45(+) microglial activation correlates with the spatial memory deficit and spread of tau pathology in the anatomically connected regions of the hippocampus. Third, adoptive transfer of purified microglia derived from hTauCx3cr1(-/-) mice induces tau hyperphosphorylation within the brains of non-transgenic recipient mice. Finally, inclusion of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (Kineret®) in the adoptive transfer inoculum significantly reduces microglia-induced tau pathology. Together, our results suggest that reactive microglia are sufficient to drive tau pathology and correlate with the spread of pathological tau in the brain.

  11. Apparent Behavioral Benefits of Tau Overexpression in P301L Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Dave; Munireddy, Sanjay; Alamed, Jennifer; DeLeon, Jason; Diamond, David M.; Bickford, Paula; Hutton, Michael; Lewis, Jada; McGowan, Eileen; Gordon, Marcia N.

    2010-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing human tau containing the P301L tau mutation (JNPL3; tau mice) develop motor neuron loss, paralysis and death between 7 and 12 months. Surprisingly, at 5 and 7 months of age, tau transgenic mice were superior to other genotypes in the rotarod task, and had near perfect scores on the balance beam and coat hanger tests. One tau transgenic mouse was performing at a superior level in the rotarod one day prior to developing paralysis. Cognitive function was also normal in the tau mice evaluated in the radial arm water maze and the Y-maze tasks. We also crossed the tau transgenic mice with Tg2576 amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) transgenic mice. Although AβPP mice were deficient in the radial arm maze task, AβPP+tau mice were not impaired, implying a benefit of the tau transgene. Some mice were homozygous for the retinal degeneration mutation (rd/rd) and excluded from the genotype analysis. Only the water maze task discriminated the rd/rd mice from nontransgenic mice. In conclusion, it seems that the modest tau overexpression or the presence of mutant tau in the JNPL3 tau mice may provide some benefit with respect to motor and cognitive performance before the onset of paralysis. PMID:19096159

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid tau proteins in status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Monti, Giulia; Tondelli, Manuela; Giovannini, Giada; Bedin, Roberta; Nichelli, Paolo F; Trenti, Tommaso; Meletti, Stefano; Chiari, Annalisa

    2015-08-01

    Tau protein is a phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, principally localized at neuronal level in the central nervous system (CNS). Tau levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are considered to index both axonal and neuronal damage. To date, however, no study has specifically evaluated the CSF levels of tau proteins in patients with status epilepticus (SE). We evaluated these established biomarkers of neuronal damage in patients with SE who received a lumbar puncture during SE between 2007 and 2014. Status epilepticus cases due to acute structural brain damage, including CNS infection, were excluded. Clinical, biological, therapeutic, and follow-up data were collected. Group comparison between patients stratified according to SE response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), disability, and epilepsy outcomes were performed. Twenty-eight patients were considered for the analyses (mean age 56 years): 14 patients had abnormally high CSF t-tau level, six patients had abnormally high CSF p-tau level, and only three patients had abnormally low Aβ1-42 level. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau value was higher in patients who developed a refractory SE compared to patients with seizures controlled by AED. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau values were positively correlated with SE duration and were higher in patients treated with propofol anesthesia compared to patients that had not received this treatment. Patients with higher CSF t-tau had higher risk of developing disability (OR = 32.5, p = 0.004) and chronic epilepsy (OR = 12; p = 0.016) in comparison with patients with lower CSF t-tau level. Our results suggest that CSF t-tau level might be proposed as a biomarker of SE severity and prognosis. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate the effects of propofol on tau pathology in this setting. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. RNA stores tau reversibly in complex coacervates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuemei; Lin, Yanxian; Eschmann, Neil A; Zhou, Hongjun; Rauch, Jennifer N; Hernandez, Israel; Guzman, Elmer; Kosik, Kenneth S; Han, Songi

    2017-07-01

    Nonmembrane-bound organelles that behave like liquid droplets are widespread among eukaryotic cells. Their dysregulation appears to be a critical step in several neurodegenerative conditions. Here, we report that tau protein, the primary constituent of Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles, can form liquid droplets and therefore has the necessary biophysical properties to undergo liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in cells. Consonant with the factors that induce LLPS, tau is an intrinsically disordered protein that complexes with RNA to form droplets. Uniquely, the pool of RNAs to which tau binds in living cells are tRNAs. This phase state of tau is held in an approximately 1:1 charge balance across the protein and the nucleic acid constituents, and can thus be maximal at different RNA:tau mass ratios, depending on the biopolymer constituents involved. This feature is characteristic of complex coacervation. We furthermore show that the LLPS process is directly and sensitively tuned by salt concentration and temperature, implying it is modulated by both electrostatic interactions between the involved protein and nucleic acid constituents, as well as net changes in entropy. Despite the high protein concentration within the complex coacervate phase, tau is locally freely tumbling and capable of diffusing through the droplet interior. In fact, tau in the condensed phase state does not reveal any immediate changes in local protein packing, local conformations and local protein dynamics from that of tau in the dilute solution state. In contrast, the population of aggregation-prone tau as induced by the complexation with heparin is accompanied by large changes in local tau conformations and irreversible aggregation. However, prolonged residency within the droplet state eventually results in the emergence of detectable β-sheet structures according to thioflavin-T assay. These findings suggest that the droplet state can incubate tau and predispose the protein toward the

  14. RNA stores tau reversibly in complex coacervates

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yanxian; Eschmann, Neil A.; Zhou, Hongjun; Rauch, Jennifer N.; Hernandez, Israel; Guzman, Elmer; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Han, Songi

    2017-01-01

    Nonmembrane-bound organelles that behave like liquid droplets are widespread among eukaryotic cells. Their dysregulation appears to be a critical step in several neurodegenerative conditions. Here, we report that tau protein, the primary constituent of Alzheimer neurofibrillary tangles, can form liquid droplets and therefore has the necessary biophysical properties to undergo liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in cells. Consonant with the factors that induce LLPS, tau is an intrinsically disordered protein that complexes with RNA to form droplets. Uniquely, the pool of RNAs to which tau binds in living cells are tRNAs. This phase state of tau is held in an approximately 1:1 charge balance across the protein and the nucleic acid constituents, and can thus be maximal at different RNA:tau mass ratios, depending on the biopolymer constituents involved. This feature is characteristic of complex coacervation. We furthermore show that the LLPS process is directly and sensitively tuned by salt concentration and temperature, implying it is modulated by both electrostatic interactions between the involved protein and nucleic acid constituents, as well as net changes in entropy. Despite the high protein concentration within the complex coacervate phase, tau is locally freely tumbling and capable of diffusing through the droplet interior. In fact, tau in the condensed phase state does not reveal any immediate changes in local protein packing, local conformations and local protein dynamics from that of tau in the dilute solution state. In contrast, the population of aggregation-prone tau as induced by the complexation with heparin is accompanied by large changes in local tau conformations and irreversible aggregation. However, prolonged residency within the droplet state eventually results in the emergence of detectable β-sheet structures according to thioflavin-T assay. These findings suggest that the droplet state can incubate tau and predispose the protein toward the

  15. Perceptions of Stress among Native American and Hispanic K-5 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz-Drlik, Jane Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of a nationwide shortage of teachers of color, stable enrollment of Native American students, and increasing enrollments of Hispanic students, the purpose of this study was to examine self-reported stress among Native American, Hispanic, and Caucasian K-5 teachers. This was a mixed-methods study, with both quantitative and…

  16. Perceptions of Stress among Native American and Hispanic K-5 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lotz-Drlik, Jane Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Within the context of a nationwide shortage of teachers of color, stable enrollment of Native American students, and increasing enrollments of Hispanic students, the purpose of this study was to examine self-reported stress among Native American, Hispanic, and Caucasian K-5 teachers. This was a mixed-methods study, with both quantitative and…

  17. Raising the Level of Cultural Awareness of K-5 Aged Students through Multicultural Arts Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sears, Laurie A.

    This practicum was designed to provide K-5 students with diverse cultural experiences through multicultural art education to develop cultural awareness. Community members, parents, museum docents, students, and staff pursued a year-long exploration into the diverse cultures of the world through the study, celebration, and sharing of heritages,…

  18. Mobile Devices and the Teacher Perceived Barriers Impacting Effective Integration in the K-5 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study explored the teacher perceived barriers of using mobile devices in the K-5 classroom. Research confirms teachers face various types of variables and become reluctant to use technology within their curriculum driven lessons. This study sought to understand what teachers perceive as barriers, and how the…

  19. Stress Education Curriculum: Grades K-5, Elementary School Level. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Jennie C.

    Stress is an inevitable part of living, but too much stress can have damaging consequences. Ways in which children can respond positively to stress are covered in this curriculum guide. It was developed to help teachers teach students, grades K-5, ways to cope with stress. Its curriculum objectives include helping students understand stress and…

  20. Stress Education Curriculum: Grades K-5, Elementary School Level. Fourth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotter, Jennie C.

    Stress is an inevitable part of living, but too much stress can have damaging consequences. Ways in which children can respond positively to stress are covered in this curriculum guide. It was developed to help teachers teach students, grades K-5, ways to cope with stress. Its curriculum objectives include helping students understand stress and…

  1. Nutrition Education in Public Elementary School Classrooms, K-5. Statistical Analysis Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Celebuski, Carin; Farris, Elizabeth

    This report presents findings from the survey, Nutrition Education in U.S. Public Schools, Elementary Teacher Survey, K-5, which followed a federal initiative to improve the quantity and quality of nutrition education in public elementary classrooms. Survey results indicated that 52 percent of elementary teachers had formal training to teach about…

  2. Language Assessment Scales, LAS I, for Grades K-5, English/Spanish. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Avila, Edward A.; Duncan, Sharon E.

    Language Assessment Scales, LAS I, are designed for children in grades K-5. LAS I accommodates ethnic and linguistic differences and provides direct language activities taken from the popular culture of both English- and Spanish-speaking peoples. LAS I consists of two independent tests, one in English and the other in Spanish, presented largely on…

  3. Democratic Bodies: Exemplary Practice and Democratic Education in a K-5 Dance Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Alison E.

    2014-01-01

    This research highlights a K-5 dance artist-in-residence as a form of democratic and exemplary dance education that ignited collaboration, promoted equity, fostered student autonomy, and demonstrated rigor in school curriculum. Through examining observation, interview, and performance-based data and calling upon critical, democratic education…

  4. Developing Learning Skills through Children's Literature: An Idea Book for K-5 Classrooms and Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laughlin, Mildred Knight; Watt, Letty S.

    Designed to be planned jointly by teachers and school library media specialists, the 60 units of study described in this book suggest ideas for sharing literature that may be used in developing a scope and sequence of literature experiences for children in grades K-5. For primary grades K-2, the activities are primarily arranged through sharing…

  5. Democratic Bodies: Exemplary Practice and Democratic Education in a K-5 Dance Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Alison E.

    2014-01-01

    This research highlights a K-5 dance artist-in-residence as a form of democratic and exemplary dance education that ignited collaboration, promoted equity, fostered student autonomy, and demonstrated rigor in school curriculum. Through examining observation, interview, and performance-based data and calling upon critical, democratic education…

  6. K-5 Student Experiences in a Dance Residency: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Alison E.; McShane-Hellenbrand, Karen

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the collaborating authors, a researcher and dance artist, confront assumptions surrounding dance's experiential nature and assessment in schools. Presenting findings from a qualitative case study assessment of a three-week, whole-school dance artist-in-residence at a diverse and inclusive metropolitan K-5 school, the authors focus…

  7. Science IDEAS: A Research-Based K-5 Interdisciplinary Instructional Model Linking Science and Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romance, Nancy R.; Vitale, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Science IDEAS is an evidence-based model that reflects interdisciplinary research findings that support the integration of literacy (e.g., reading comprehension) within science instruction in grades K-5. Presented is a framework for planning integrated science and literacy instruction in which six elements (hands-on investigations, reading,…

  8. Mobile Devices and the Teacher Perceived Barriers Impacting Effective Integration in the K-5 Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Tina S.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative, phenomenological study explored the teacher perceived barriers of using mobile devices in the K-5 classroom. Research confirms teachers face various types of variables and become reluctant to use technology within their curriculum driven lessons. This study sought to understand what teachers perceive as barriers, and how the…

  9. The Search for B+ to Tau+ Nu(Tau) at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Corwin, L.A.; /SLAC

    2007-01-08

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} using 288 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed semileptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup o}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} signal is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {nu}{sub {mu}}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}. We measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) = 0.88{sub -0.67}{sup +0.68}(stat.) {+-} 0.11(syst.) x 10{sup -4} and extract an upper limit on the branching fraction, at the 90% confidence level, of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 1.8 x 10{sup -4}. We calculate the product of the B meson decay constant and |V{sub ub}| to be f{sub B} {center_dot} |V{sub ub}| = (7.0{sub -3.6}{sup +2.3}(stat.){sub -0.5}{sup +0.4}(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} GeV.

  10. Selected Topics in Tau Physics from BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Paramesvaran, S.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London

    2012-04-06

    Selected results from {tau} analyses performed using the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory are presented. A precise measurement of the {tau} mass and the {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} mass difference is undertaken using the hadronic decay mode {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup {+-}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. In addition an investigation into the strange decay modes {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is also presented, including a fit to the {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} invariant mass spectrum. Precise values for M(K*(892)) and {Lambda}(K*(892)) are obtained.

  11. Prospect for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling at the LHC

    DOE PAGES

    Askew, Andrew; Jaiswal, Prerit; Okui, Takemichi; ...

    2015-04-01

    The search for a new source of CP violation is one of the most important endeavors in particle physics. A particularly interesting way to perform this search is to probe the CP phase in themore » $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling, as the phase is currently completely unconstrained by all existing data. Recently, a novel variable $$\\Theta$$ was proposed for measuring the CP phase in the $$h\\tau\\tau$$ coupling through the $$\\tau^\\pm \\to \\pi^\\pm \\pi^0 \

  12. Measurement of the Semileptonic Decays B->D tau nu and B->D* tau nu

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, : B.

    2009-02-23

    The authors present measurements of the semileptonic decays B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, B{sup -} {yields} D*{sup 0} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup +} {tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, and {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +} {tau}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}, which are sensitive to non-Standard Model amplitudes in certain scenarios. The data sample consists of 232 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. They select events with a D or D* meson and a light lepton ({ell} = e or {mu}) recoiling against a fully reconstructed B meson. They perform a fit to the joint distribution of lepton momentum and missing mass squared to distinguish signal B {yields} D{sup (*)}{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} ({tau}{sup -} {yields} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}{nu}{sub {tau}}) events from the backgrounds, predominantly B {yields} D{sup (*)} {ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}. They measure the branching-fraction ratios R(D) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D{ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and R(D*) {triple_bond} {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}})/{Beta}(B {yields} D* {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) and, from a combined fit to B{sup -} and {bar B}{sup 0} channels, obtain the results R(D) = (41.6 {+-} 11.7 {+-} 5.2)% and R(D*) = (29.7 {+-} 5.6 {+-} 1.8)%, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic. Normalizing to measured B{sup -} {yields} D{sup (*)0} {ell}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} branching fractions, they obtain {Beta}(B {yields} D{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (0.86 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.06)% and {Beta}(B {yields} D*{tau}{sup -} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}) = (1.62 {+-} 0.31 {+-} 0.10 {+-} 0.05)%, where the additional third uncertainty is from the normalization mode. They also present, for the first time, distributions of

  13. Exclusive branching-fraction measurements of semileptonic tau decays into three charged hadrons, into phipi(-)nu tau, and into phi K(-)nu tau.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Pegna, D Lopes; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; del Amo Sanchez, P; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Watson, A T; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Sherwood, D J; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Dvoretskii, A; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Lee, C L; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Vazquez, W Panduro; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gritsan, A V; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Ricciardi, S; Wilson, F F; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; MacFarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Pappagallo, M; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2008-01-11

    Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 342 fb(-1) collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II electron-positron storage ring operating at a center-of-mass energy near 10.58 GeV, we measure B(tau(-)--> pi(-)pi(-)pi+nu(tau)(ex.K(S0))=(8.83+/-0.01+/-0.13)%, B(tau(-) -->K(-)pi(-)pi+nu tau(ex.K(S0))=(0.273+/-0.002+/-0.009)%, B(tau(-) -->K(-)pi(-)K+nu tau)=(0.1346+/-0.0010+/-0.0036)%, and B(tau(-) -->K(-)K(-)K+nu tau)=(1.58+/-0.13+/-0.12)x10;{-5}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These include significant improvements over previous measurements and a first measurement of B(tau(-) -->K(-)K(-)K+nu tau) in which no resonance structure is assumed. We also report a first measurement of B(tau(-) -->var phi(-)nu tau)=(3.42+/-0.55+/-0.25)x10(-5), a new measurement of B(tau(-) -->var phi K(-)nu tau)=(3.39+/-0.20+/-0.28)x10(-5) and a first upper limit on B(tau(-) -->K(-)K(-)K+nu tau(ex.var phi)).

  14. New Features about Tau Function and Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Miguel; Hernández, Félix; Avila, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Tau is a brain microtubule-associated protein that directly binds to a microtubule and dynamically regulates its structure and function. Under pathological conditions, tau self-assembles into filamentous structures that end up forming neurofibrillary tangles. Prominent tau neurofibrillary pathology is a common feature in a number of neurodegenerative disorders, collectively referred to as tauopathies, the most common of which is Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Beyond its classical role as a microtubule-associated protein, recent advances in our understanding of tau cellular functions have revealed novel insights into their important role during pathogenesis and provided potential novel therapeutic targets. Regulation of tau behavior and function under physiological and pathological conditions is mainly achieved through post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, glycosylation, acetylation, and truncation, among others, indicating the complexity and variability of factors influencing regulation of tau toxicity, all of which have significant implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches in various neurodegenerative disorders. A more comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating tau function and dysfunction will provide us with a better outline of tau cellular networking and, hopefully, offer new clues for designing more efficient approaches to tackle tauopathies in the near future. PMID:27104579

  15. Physics with tau leptons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.P.; /Oxford U.

    2007-04-01

    The {radical}s = 1.96 TeV p{bar p} collisions produced by the Tevatron result in many processes with tau leptons in the final state. The CDF Collaboration has studied these final states in Z and t{bar t} production, and has used tau leptons to search for evidence of Higgs, sparticle, and Z{prime} production.

  16. Determination of the Michel Parameters and the tau Neutrino Helicity in tau Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, Colin P.

    2003-05-07

    Using the CLEO II detector at the e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring CESR, we have determined the Michel parameters {rho}, {zeta}, and {delta} in {tau}{sup {-+}}{nu}{bar {nu}} decay as well as the {tau} neutrino helicity parameter H{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} in {tau}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu} decay. From a data sample of 3.02 x 10{sup 6} {tau} pairs produced at {radical}s = 10.6 GeV, using events of the topology e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} {yields} (l{sup {+-}}{nu}{bar {nu}})({pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}) and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} {yields} ({pi}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}})({pi}{sup {-+}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}), and the determined sign of h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} [1,2], the combined result of the three samples is: {rho} = 0.747 {+-} 0.010 {+-} 0.006, {zeta} = 1.007 {+-} 0.040 {+-} 0.015, {zeta}{delta} = 0.745 {+-}0.026 {+-}0.009, and h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} = -0.995 {+-} 0.010 {+-} 0.003. The results are in agreement with the Standard Model V-A interaction.

  17. Intrinsic Tau Acetylation Is Coupled to Auto-Proteolytic Tau Fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Todd J; Constance, Brian H; Hwang, Andrew W; James, Michael; Yuan, Chao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins are abnormally aggregated in a range of neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recently, tau has emerged as an extensively post-translationally modified protein, among which lysine acetylation is critical for normal tau function and its pathological aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that tau isoforms have different propensities to undergo lysine acetylation, with auto-acetylation occurring more prominently within the lysine-rich microtubule-binding repeats. Unexpectedly, we identified a unique intrinsic property of tau in which auto-acetylation induces proteolytic tau cleavage, thereby generating distinct N- and C-terminal tau fragments. Supporting a catalytic reaction-based mechanism, mapping and mutagenesis studies showed that tau cysteines, which are required for acetyl group transfer, are also essential for auto-proteolytic tau processing. Further mass spectrometry analysis identified the C-terminal 2nd and 4th microtubule binding repeats as potential sites of auto-cleavage. The identification of acetylation-mediated auto-proteolysis provides a new biochemical mechanism for tau self-regulation and warrants further investigation into whether auto-catalytic functions of tau are implicated in AD and other tauopathies.

  18. Intrinsic Tau Acetylation Is Coupled to Auto-Proteolytic Tau Fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Todd J.; Constance, Brian H.; Hwang, Andrew W.; James, Michael; Yuan, Chao-Xing

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins are abnormally aggregated in a range of neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Recently, tau has emerged as an extensively post-translationally modified protein, among which lysine acetylation is critical for normal tau function and its pathological aggregation. Here, we demonstrate that tau isoforms have different propensities to undergo lysine acetylation, with auto-acetylation occurring more prominently within the lysine-rich microtubule-binding repeats. Unexpectedly, we identified a unique intrinsic property of tau in which auto-acetylation induces proteolytic tau cleavage, thereby generating distinct N- and C-terminal tau fragments. Supporting a catalytic reaction-based mechanism, mapping and mutagenesis studies showed that tau cysteines, which are required for acetyl group transfer, are also essential for auto-proteolytic tau processing. Further mass spectrometry analysis identified the C-terminal 2nd and 4th microtubule binding repeats as potential sites of auto-cleavage. The identification of acetylation-mediated auto-proteolysis provides a new biochemical mechanism for tau self-regulation and warrants further investigation into whether auto-catalytic functions of tau are implicated in AD and other tauopathies. PMID:27383765

  19. Microglial internalization and degradation of pathological tau is enhanced by an anti-tau monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Wenjie; Liu, Wencheng; Hu, Xiaoyan; Hanna, Mary; Caravaca, April; Paul, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Microglia have been shown to contribute to the clearance of brain amyloid β peptides (Aβ), the major component of amyloid plaques, in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, it is not known whether microglia play a similar role in the clearance of tau, the major component of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). We now report that murine microglia rapidly internalize and degrade hyperphosphorylated pathological tau isolated from AD brain tissue in a time-dependent manner in vitro. We further demonstrate that microglia readily degrade human tau species released from AD brain sections and eliminate NFTs from brain sections of P301S tauopathy mice. The anti-tau monoclonal antibody MC1 enhances microglia-mediated tau degradation in an Fc-dependent manner. Our data identify a potential role for microglia in the degradation and clearance of pathological tau species in brain and provide a mechanism explaining the potential therapeutic actions of passively administered anti-tau monoclonal antibodies. PMID:26057852

  20. [Present and future of the tau dementia therapy].

    PubMed

    Takashima, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    Neurofibrillarly tangles (NFTs) are seen most patients, who shows dementia, while β amyloid deposition observed specifically in AD patients. NFTs observe first from coeruleus and entorhinal cortex, and then spread to neocortex, which well explain clinical progression of AD, such as memory problem to dementia. Tau fibrils are the major component of NFT. Before forming tau fibrils, tau binds together, form soluble tau oligomer, and then granular tau oligomer. The soluble tau oligomer associates with synapse loss, and granular tau formation induces neuronal loss. Therefore, tau aggregation inhibitor is expected to halt the clinical progression of AD.

  1. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H.; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of tau bound to microtubules and inhibited axonal transport of tau. To determine whether differential tau clearance is responsible for the increase in phosphomimic tau, we inhibited autophagy in neurons which resulted in a 3-fold accumulation of phosphomimic tau compared with wild type tau, and endogenous tau was unaffected. In autophagy-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, but not in neurons, proteasomal degradation of phosphomutant tau was also reduced compared with wild type tau. Therefore, autophagic and proteasomal pathways are involved in tau degradation, with autophagy appearing to be the primary route for clearing phosphorylated tau in neurons. Defective autophagy might contribute to the accumulaton of tau in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23601672

  2. Reduced number of axonal mitochondria and tau hypophosphorylation in mouse P301L tau knockin neurons.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Pooler, Amy M; Lau, Dawn H W; Mórotz, Gábor M; De Vos, Kurt J; Gilley, Jonathan; Coleman, Michael P; Hanger, Diane P

    2016-01-01

    Expression of the frontotemporal dementia-related tau mutation, P301L, at physiological levels in adult mouse brain (KI-P301L mice) results in overt hypophosphorylation of tau and age-dependent alterations in axonal mitochondrial transport in peripheral nerves. To determine the effects of P301L tau expression in the central nervous system, we examined the kinetics of mitochondrial axonal transport and tau phosphorylation in primary cortical neurons from P301L knock-in (KI-P301L) mice. We observed a significant 50% reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axons of cortical neurons cultured from KI-P301L mice compared to wild-type neurons. Expression of murine P301L tau did not change the speed, direction of travel or likelihood of movement of mitochondria. Notably, the angle that defines the orientation of the mitochondria in the axon, and the volume of individual moving mitochondria, were significantly increased in neurons expressing P301L tau. We found that murine tau phosphorylation in KI-P301L mouse neurons was diminished and the ability of P301L tau to bind to microtubules was also reduced compared to tau in wild-type neurons. The P301L mutation did not influence the ability of murine tau to associate with membranes in cortical neurons or in adult mouse brain. We conclude that P301L tau is associated with mitochondrial changes and causes an early reduction in murine tau phosphorylation in neurons coupled with impaired microtubule binding of tau. These results support the association of mutant tau with detrimental effects on mitochondria and will be of significance for the pathogenesis of tauopathies.

  3. Ante mortem cerebrospinal fluid tau levels correlate with postmortem tau pathology in frontotemporal lobar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David J; Lleó, Alberto; Xie, Sharon X; McMillan, Corey T; Wolk, David A; Lee, Edward B; Van Deerlin, Viviana M; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Grossman, Murray

    2017-08-01

    To test the hypotheses that (1) antemortem cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau levels correlate with postmortem tau pathology in frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and (2) tauopathy patients have higher phosphorylated-tau levels compared to transactivation response element DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) proteinopathy patients while accounting for Alzheimer's disease (AD) copathology. Patients had autopsy-confirmed FTLD with tauopathy (n = 31), TDP-43 proteinopathy (n = 49), or AD (n = 26) with antemortem CSF. CSF tau levels were compared between groups and correlated with digital histology measurement of postmortem tau pathology averaged from three cerebral regions (angular gyrus, mid-frontal cortex, and anterior cingulate gyrus). Multivariate linear regression tested the association of ante mortem CSF tau levels with postmortem tau pathology adjusting for demographics. Multivariate regression found an independent association of ante mortem CSF phosphorylated tau levels with postmortem cerebral tau pathology in FTLD (Beta = 1.3; 95% confidence interval = 0.2-2.4; p < 0.02). After excluding patients with coincident AD-associated tau pathology accompanying sporadic FTLD, we found lower CSF phosphorylated tau levels in the TDP-43 group (median = 7.4pg/ml; interquartile range [IQR] = 6.0, 12.3; n = 26) compared to the tauopathy group (median = 12.5pg/ml; IQR = 10.7, 15.0; n = 23; Z = 2.6; p < 0.01). CSF phosphorylated-tau levels are positively associated with cerebral tau burden in FTLD. In vivo detection of AD copathology in sporadic FTLD patients may help stratify clinical cohorts with pure neuropathology in which low CSF phosphorylated-tau levels may have diagnostic utility to distinguish TDP-43 proteinopathy from tauopathy. Autopsy-confirmed samples are critical for FTLD biomarker development and validation. Ann Neurol 2017;82:247-258. © 2017 American Neurological Association.

  4. Glycan Determinants of Heparin-Tau Interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Huvent, Isabelle; Lippens, Guy; Eliezer, David; Zhang, Anqiang; Li, Quanhong; Tessier, Peter; Linhardt, Robert J; Zhang, Fuming; Wang, Chunyu

    2017-03-14

    Tau aggregates into paired helical filaments within neurons, a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Heparin promotes tau aggregation and recently has been shown to be involved in the cellular uptake of tau aggregates. Although the tau-heparin interaction has been extensively studied, little is known about the glycan determinants of this interaction. Here, we used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and NMR spectroscopy to characterize the interaction between two tau fragments, K18 and K19, and several polysaccharides, including heparin, heparin oligosaccharides, chemically modified heparin, and related glycans. Using a heparin-immobilized chip, SPR revealed that tau K18 and K19 bind heparin with a KD of 0.2 and 70 μM, respectively. In SPR competition experiments, N-desulfation and 2-O-desulfation had no effect on heparin binding to K18, whereas 6-O-desulfation severely reduced binding, suggesting a critical role for 6-O-sulfation in the tau-heparin interaction. The tau-heparin interaction became stronger with longer-chain heparin oligosaccharides. As expected for an electrostatics-driven interaction, a moderate amount of salt (0.3 M NaCl) abolished binding. NMR showed the largest chemical-shift perturbation (CSP) in R2 in tau K18, which was absent in K19, revealing differential binding sites in K18 and K19 to heparin. Dermatan sulfate binding produced minimal CSP, whereas dermatan disulfate, with the additional 6-O-sulfo group, induced much larger CSP. 2-O-desulfated heparin induced much larger CSP in K18 than 6-O-desulfated heparin. Our data demonstrate a crucial role for the 6-O-sulfo group in the tau-heparin interaction, which to our knowledge has not been reported before.

  5. High expression of the taurine transporter TauT in primary cilia of NIH3T3 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Søren T; Voss, Jesper W; Teilmann, Stefan C; Lambert, Ian H

    2005-05-01

    Taurine, present in high concentrations in various mammalian cells, is essential for regulation of cell volume, cellular oxidative status as well as the cellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Cellular taurine content is a balance between active uptake through the saturable, Na(+)-dependent taurine transporter TauT, and passive release via a volume-sensitive leak pathway. Here we demonstrate that: (i) TauT localizes to the primary cilium of growth-arrested NIH3T3 fibroblasts, (ii) long-term exposure to TNF(alpha) or hypertonic sucrose medium, i.e., growth medium supplemented with 100 mM sucrose, increases ciliary TauT expression and (iii) long-term exposure to hypertonic taurine medium, i.e., growth medium supplemented with 100 mM taurine, reduces ciliary TauT expression. These results point to an important role of taurine in the regulation of physiological processes located to the primary cilium.

  6. Combination of keratins and alpha-smooth muscle actin distinguishes secretory coils from ducts of eccrine sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Li, Haihong; Zhang, Xiang; Zeng, Shaopeng; Li, Xuexue; Zhang, Bingna; Chen, Lu; Lin, Changmin; Zhang, Mingjun; Tang, Shijie; Fu, Xiaobing

    2015-04-01

    Eccrine sweat glands are comprised of secretory coils and ducts, which are distinct in morphology and function. To better understand the roles of the two parts in development, homeostasis, wound repair and regeneration of eccrine sweat glands, we must distinguish between them. In this study, the localization of keratins and alpha-SMA in human eccrine sweat glands was examined by immunofluorescence staining. Based on the differential localization of keratins and alpha-SMA in different cell types, four pairs of antibodies (K5/K7, K5/alpha-SMA, K14/K7 and K14/alpha-SMA) were used to differentiate secretory coils from ducts by double-immunofluorescence staining. Immunofluorescence staining showed that myoepithelial cells of secretory coils expressed K5, K14 and alpha-SMA, whereas secretory cells of secretory coils expressed K7, K8, K15, K18 and K19. Ductal cells expressed K5, K8, K14 and K19. Double-staining showed that the secretory coils were K5(+)/K7(+), K5(+)/alpha-SMA(+), K14(+)/K7(+) and K14(+)/alpha-SMA(+), whereas ducts were K5(+)/K7(-), K5(+)/alpha-SMA(-), K14(+)/K7(-) and K14(+)/alpha-SMA(-). In conclusion, by combining use of keratins and alpha-SMA antibodies, secretory coils can be easily differentiated from ducts in morphology.

  7. E(k)∝ k-5 observed at large k for rapidly rotating turbulent flow*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinney, Harry L.; Jung, Sungwhan; Yarbrough, Ray

    2004-11-01

    We have made velocity measurements on a quasi-two-dimensional turbulent flow in a rapidly rotating annulus (Reynolds number 20000, Rossby number 0.03). Earlier measurements demonstrated that in the inverse cascade (low wavenumbers), the energy scaling is given by E(k)∝ k-2 rather than the expected E(k)∝ k-5/3 [1]. Extending the measurements to high wavenumbers (into the forward enstrophy cascade), we find E(k)∝ k-5 rather than the E(k)∝ k-3 that has been found for a non-rotating quasi-two-dimensional flow [2]. Our observed value of -5 for the exponent is the same as a recently predicted bound for the exponent [3]. *Supported by ONR [1] C. N. Baroud et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 114501 (2002). [2] J. Paret and P. Tabeling, Phys. Fluids 10, 3126 (1998). [3] C. V. Tran and J. Bowman, Phys. Rev. E 69, 036303 (2004).

  8. Polarized spectral properties of Tm 3+:K 5Bi(MoO 4) 4 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. Q.; Tang, J. F.; Huang, J. H.; Gong, X. H.; Chen, Y. J.; Lin, Y. F.; Luo, Z. D.; Huang, Y. D.

    2011-11-01

    Trivalent thulium-doped K 5Bi(MoO 4) 4 single crystals were grown by the Czochralski method. Its polarized absorption and fluorescence spectra and fluorescence decay curves were recorded at room temperature. On the basis of the Judd-Ofelt theory, the spectral parameters of the Tm 3+:K 5Bi(MoO 4) 4 crystal were calculated. The cross relaxations between Tm 3+ ions were analyzed. The emission cross sections of the 3F 4 → 3H 6 transition were obtained by the Fuchtbauer-Ladenburg formula and then the gain cross sections around 1.9 μm were calculated. The peak emission cross section and width of emission band around 1.9 μm are comparable to those for Tm 3+:YAG and the tunable range is about 280 nm for the potential ˜1.9 μm laser operation via the 3F 4 → 3H 6 transition.

  9. Common Core Literacy Lesson Plans: Ready-to-Use Resources, K-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Schools nationwide are transitioning to the Common Core--our advice to you: Don't go it alone! Our new book, "Common Core Literacy Lesson Plans: Ready-to-Use Resources, K-5," shows you that teaching the Common Core State Standards in the elementary grades doesn't have to be intimidating! This easy-to-use guide provides model lesson plans for…

  10. K5LaLi2F10:Er3+ crystals. Growth, structure and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominiak-Dzik, G.; Golab, S.; Baluka, M.; Pietraszko, A.; Hermanowicz, K.

    1999-07-01

    Single crystals of K5LaLi2F10:Er3+ and K5LaLi2F10 were synthesized and the structural determination was made by x-ray diffraction analysis. The structure is orthorhombic with space group Pnma. The unit cell parameters are: a = 20.775, b = 7.822 and c = 6.963 Å. The infrared transmission and Raman scattering spectra of oriented single crystals were measured and discussed in terms of factor group analysis and x-ray structure. A vibrational assignment is proposed. Preliminary optical properties of Er3+ ions in K5LaLi2F10 crystals have been investigated using absorption, luminescence and lifetime measurements in the 5-300 K temperature range. The low temperature absorption and luminescence spectra of Er3+ have allowed us to identify the Stark levels of low-lying multiplets. The luminescence observed at 5 K has been attributed to the 4S3/2icons/Journals/Common/to" ALT="to" ALIGN="TOP"/>4I15/2 (18 300 cm-1), 4F9/2icons/Journals/Common/to" ALT="to" ALIGN="TOP"/>4I15/2 (15 000 cm-1), 4S3/2icons/Journals/Common/to" ALT="to" ALIGN="TOP"/>4I13/2 (11800 cm-1) and 4I11/2icons/Journals/Common/to" ALT="to" ALIGN="TOP"/>4I15/2 (10000 cm-1) transitions. The lifetimes of selected excited states were measured at 5 and 300 K temperature. The obtained data gave the first insight into the luminescent properties of Er3+ ions in the fluorine surroundings in K5LaLi2F10 crystals.

  11. Generalized separable parameter space techniques for fitting 1K-5K serial compartment models

    PubMed Central

    Kadrmas, Dan J.; Oktay, M. Bugrahan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Kinetic modeling is widely used to analyze dynamic imaging data, estimating kinetic parameters that quantify functional or physiologic processes in vivo. Typical kinetic models give rise to nonlinear solution equations in multiple dimensions, presenting a complex fitting environment. This work generalizes previously described separable nonlinear least-squares techniques for fitting serial compartment models with up to three tissue compartments and five rate parameters. Methods: The approach maximally separates the linear and nonlinear aspects of the modeling equations, using a formulation modified from previous basis function methods to avoid a potential mathematical degeneracy. A fast and robust algorithm for solving the linear subproblem with full user-defined constraints is also presented. The generalized separable parameter space technique effectively reduces the dimensionality of the nonlinear fitting problem to one dimension for 2K-3K compartment models, and to two dimensions for 4K-5K models. Results: Exhaustive search fits, which guarantee identification of the true global minimum fit, required approximately 10 ms for 2K-3K and 1.1 s for 4K-5K models, respectively. The technique is also amenable to fast gradient-descent iterative fitting algorithms, where the reduced dimensionality offers improved convergence properties. The objective function for the separable parameter space nonlinear subproblem was characterized and found to be generally well-behaved with a well-defined global minimum. Separable parameter space fits with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm required fewer iterations than comparable fits for conventional model formulations, averaging 1 and 7 ms for 2K-3K and 4K-5K models, respectively. Sensitivity to initial conditions was likewise reduced. Conclusions: The separable parameter space techniques described herein generalize previously described techniques to encompass 1K-5K compartment models, enable robust solution of the linear

  12. Generalized separable parameter space techniques for fitting 1K-5K serial compartment models.

    PubMed

    Kadrmas, Dan J; Oktay, M Bugrahan

    2013-07-01

    Kinetic modeling is widely used to analyze dynamic imaging data, estimating kinetic parameters that quantify functional or physiologic processes in vivo. Typical kinetic models give rise to nonlinear solution equations in multiple dimensions, presenting a complex fitting environment. This work generalizes previously described separable nonlinear least-squares techniques for fitting serial compartment models with up to three tissue compartments and five rate parameters. The approach maximally separates the linear and nonlinear aspects of the modeling equations, using a formulation modified from previous basis function methods to avoid a potential mathematical degeneracy. A fast and robust algorithm for solving the linear subproblem with full user-defined constraints is also presented. The generalized separable parameter space technique effectively reduces the dimensionality of the nonlinear fitting problem to one dimension for 2K-3K compartment models, and to two dimensions for 4K-5K models. Exhaustive search fits, which guarantee identification of the true global minimum fit, required approximately 10 ms for 2K-3K and 1.1 s for 4K-5K models, respectively. The technique is also amenable to fast gradient-descent iterative fitting algorithms, where the reduced dimensionality offers improved convergence properties. The objective function for the separable parameter space nonlinear subproblem was characterized and found to be generally well-behaved with a well-defined global minimum. Separable parameter space fits with the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm required fewer iterations than comparable fits for conventional model formulations, averaging 1 and 7 ms for 2K-3K and 4K-5K models, respectively. Sensitivity to initial conditions was likewise reduced. The separable parameter space techniques described herein generalize previously described techniques to encompass 1K-5K compartment models, enable robust solution of the linear subproblem with full user-defined constraints

  13. Common Core Literacy Lesson Plans: Ready-to-Use Resources, K-5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Schools nationwide are transitioning to the Common Core--our advice to you: Don't go it alone! Our new book, "Common Core Literacy Lesson Plans: Ready-to-Use Resources, K-5," shows you that teaching the Common Core State Standards in the elementary grades doesn't have to be intimidating! This easy-to-use guide provides model lesson plans for…

  14. A Dual Pathogenic Mechanism Links Tau Acetylation to Sporadic Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Tseng, Jui-Heng; Wander, Connor M.; Madden, Victoria; Tripathy, Ashutosh; Yuan, Chao-Xing; Cohen, Todd J.

    2017-01-01

    Tau acetylation has recently emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule (MT)-binding region (MTBR), suggesting acetylation could regulate both normal and pathological tau functions. Here, we combined biochemical and cell-based approaches to uncover a dual pathogenic mechanism mediated by tau acetylation. We show that acetylation specifically at residues K280/K281 impairs tau-mediated MT stabilization, and enhances the formation of fibrillar tau aggregates, highlighting both loss and gain of tau function. Full-length acetylation-mimic tau showed increased propensity to undergo seed-dependent aggregation, revealing a potential role for tau acetylation in the propagation of tau pathology. We also demonstrate that methylene blue, a reported tau aggregation inhibitor, modulates tau acetylation, a novel mechanism of action for this class of compounds. Our study identifies a potential “two-hit” mechanism in which tau acetylation disengages tau from MTs and also promotes tau aggregation. Thus, therapeutic approaches to limit tau K280/K281 acetylation could simultaneously restore MT stability and ameliorate tau pathology in AD and related tauopathies. PMID:28287136

  15. The Dynamics and Turnover of Tau Aggregates in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing L.; Buist, Arjan; Soares, Alberto; Callaerts, Kathleen; Calafate, Sara; Stevenaert, Frederik; Daniels, Joshua P.; Zoll, Bryan E.; Crowe, Alex; Brunden, Kurt R.; Moechars, Diederik; Lee, Virginia M. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous tau aggregates, the hallmark lesions of Alzheimer disease (AD), play key roles in neurodegeneration. Activation of protein degradation systems has been proposed to be a potential strategy for removing pathological tau, but it remains unclear how effectively tau aggregates can be degraded by these systems. By applying our previously established cellular model system of AD-like tau aggregate induction using preformed tau fibrils, we demonstrate that tau aggregates induced in cells with regulated expression of full-length mutant tau can be gradually cleared when soluble tau expression is suppressed. This clearance is at least partially mediated by the autophagy-lysosome pathway, although both the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway are deficient in handling large tau aggregates. Importantly, residual tau aggregates left after the clearance phase leads to a rapid reinstatement of robust tau pathology once soluble tau expression is turned on again. Moreover, we succeeded in generating monoclonal cells persistently carrying tau aggregates without obvious cytotoxicity. Live imaging of GFP-tagged tau aggregates showed that tau inclusions are dynamic structures constantly undergoing “fission” and “fusion,” which facilitate stable propagation of tau pathology in dividing cells. These findings provide a greater understanding of cell-to-cell transmission of tau aggregates in dividing cells and possibly neurons. PMID:27129267

  16. Hadronic decays of the tau lepton : {tau}- {yields} ({pi}{pi}{pi})- {nu}{tau} within Resonance Chiral Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2006-01-12

    {tau} decays into hadrons foresee the study of the hadronization of vector and axial-vector QCD currents, yielding relevant information on the dynamics of the resonances entering into the processes. We analyse {tau} {yields} {pi}{pi}{pi}{nu}{tau} decays within the framework of the Resonance Chiral Theory, comparing this theoretical scheme with the experimental data, namely ALEPH spectral function and branching ratio. Hence we get values for the mass and on-shell width of the a 1 (1260) resonance, and provide the structure functions that have been measured by OPAL and CLEO-II.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau and phospho-tau-181 proteins during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Lederer, Wolfgang; Dominguez, Cristina Alomar; Popovscaia, Marina; Putz, Günther; Humpel, Christian

    2016-10-01

    During pregnancy various interactions occur between structural alterations of the maternal brain and placental metabolism. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of tau and phospho-tau-181 protein vary during normal pregnancy and in women with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. We measured cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, tau and phospho-tau-181 protein levels in 90 pregnant women electively assigned for regional anaesthesia during pregnancy or for cesarean section using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations for tau and phospho-tau-181 in 66 women with normal pregnancy were 308.5±117.3pg/mL and 50.5±16.7pg/mL, respectively. Blood pressure, liver function, clotting activity and kidney function were significantly different in eleven women with preeclampsia and HELLP syndrome. The weight of the newly born (p<0.001; HR: 0.998), the weight of the placenta (p=0.018) and concentrations for phospho-tau-181 (p=0.043; HR: 1.211) correlated significantly with the disease. Mean concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid tau and phospho-tau-181 protein during pregnancy were evaluated. Phospho-tau-181 protein concentrations correlated with placental function supporting the hypothesis that altered expression of neuronal factors during pregnancy may affect development of the placenta. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Probing M subdwarf metallicity with an esdK5+esdM5.5 binary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlenko, Ya. V.; Zhang, Z. H.; Gálvez-Ortiz, M. C.; Kushniruk, I. O.; Jones, H. R. A.

    2015-10-01

    Context. We present a spectral analysis of the binary G 224-58 AB, which consists of the coolest M extreme subdwarf (esdM5.5) and a brighter primary (esdK5). This binary may serve as a benchmark for metallicity measurement calibrations and as a test bed for atmospheric and evolutionary models for esdM objects. Aims: We perform the analysis of optical and infrared spectra of both components to determine their parameters. Methods: We determine abundances primarily using high-resolution optical spectra of the primary. Other parameters were determined from the fits of synthetic spectra computed with these abundances to the observed spectra from 0.4 to 2.5 microns for both components. Results: We determine Teff = 4625 ± 100 K, log g = 4.5 ± 0.5 for the A component and Teff = 3200 ± 100 K, log g = 5.0 ± 0.5, for the B component. We obtained abundances of [ Mg / H ] = + - 1.51 ± 0.08, [Ca/H] = - 1.39 ± 0.03, [Ti/H] = - 1.37 ± 0.03 for alpha group elements and [CrH] = - 1.88 ± 0.07, [Mn/H] = - 1.96 ± 0.06, [ Fe / H ] = - 1.92 ± 0.02, [Ni/H] = - 1.81 ± 0.05 and [Ba/H] = - 1.87 ± 0.11 for iron group elements from fits to the spectral lines observed in the optical and infrared spectral regions of the primary. We find consistent abundances with fits to the secondary albeit at lower signal to noise. Conclusions: Abundances of different elements in G 224-58 A and G 224-58 B atmospheres cannot be described by one metallicity parameter. The offset of ˜0.4 dex between the abundances derived from alpha element and iron group elements corresponds with our expectation for metal-deficient stars. We thus clarify that some indices used to date to measure metallicities for establishing esdM stars, based on CaH, MgH, and TiO band system strength ratios in the optical and H2O in the infrared, relate to abundances of alpha-element group rather than to iron peak elements. For metal deficient M dwarfs with [ Fe / H ] < - 1.0, this provides a ready explanation for apparently

  19. Proteopathic tau seeding predicts tauopathy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Brandon B; Furman, Jennifer L; Mahan, Thomas E; Yamasaki, Tritia R; Mirbaha, Hilda; Eades, William C; Belaygorod, Larisa; Cairns, Nigel J; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2014-10-14

    Transcellular propagation of protein aggregates, or proteopathic seeds, may drive the progression of neurodegenerative diseases in a prion-like manner. In tauopathies such as Alzheimer's disease, this model predicts that tau seeds propagate pathology through the brain via cell-cell transfer in neural networks. The critical role of tau seeding activity is untested, however. It is unknown whether seeding anticipates and correlates with subsequent development of pathology as predicted for a causal agent. One major limitation has been the lack of a robust assay to measure proteopathic seeding activity in biological specimens. We engineered an ultrasensitive, specific, and facile FRET-based flow cytometry biosensor assay based on expression of tau or synuclein fusions to CFP and YFP, and confirmed its sensitivity and specificity to tau (∼ 300 fM) and synuclein (∼ 300 pM) fibrils. This assay readily discriminates Alzheimer's disease vs. Huntington's disease and aged control brains. We then carried out a detailed time-course study in P301S tauopathy mice, comparing seeding activity versus histological markers of tau pathology, including MC1, AT8, PG5, and Thioflavin S. We detected robust seeding activity at 1.5 mo, >1 mo before the earliest histopathological stain. Proteopathic tau seeding is thus an early and robust marker of tauopathy, suggesting a proximal role for tau seeds in neurodegeneration.

  20. Proteopathic tau seeding predicts tauopathy in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Brandon B.; Furman, Jennifer L.; Mahan, Thomas E.; Yamasaki, Tritia R.; Mirbaha, Hilda; Eades, William C.; Belaygorod, Larisa; Cairns, Nigel J.; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2014-01-01

    Transcellular propagation of protein aggregates, or proteopathic seeds, may drive the progression of neurodegenerative diseases in a prion-like manner. In tauopathies such as Alzheimer’s disease, this model predicts that tau seeds propagate pathology through the brain via cell–cell transfer in neural networks. The critical role of tau seeding activity is untested, however. It is unknown whether seeding anticipates and correlates with subsequent development of pathology as predicted for a causal agent. One major limitation has been the lack of a robust assay to measure proteopathic seeding activity in biological specimens. We engineered an ultrasensitive, specific, and facile FRET-based flow cytometry biosensor assay based on expression of tau or synuclein fusions to CFP and YFP, and confirmed its sensitivity and specificity to tau (∼300 fM) and synuclein (∼300 pM) fibrils. This assay readily discriminates Alzheimer’s disease vs. Huntington's disease and aged control brains. We then carried out a detailed time-course study in P301S tauopathy mice, comparing seeding activity versus histological markers of tau pathology, including MC1, AT8, PG5, and Thioflavin S. We detected robust seeding activity at 1.5 mo, >1 mo before the earliest histopathological stain. Proteopathic tau seeding is thus an early and robust marker of tauopathy, suggesting a proximal role for tau seeds in neurodegeneration. PMID:25261551

  1. Propagation of Tau Aggregates and Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Michel; Eisenberg, David S; Crowther, R Anthony

    2017-07-25

    A pathway from the natively unfolded microtubule-associated protein Tau to a highly structured amyloid fibril underlies human Tauopathies. This ordered assembly causes disease and represents the gain of toxic function. In recent years, evidence has accumulated to suggest that Tau inclusions form first in a small number of brain cells, from where they propagate to other regions, resulting in neurodegeneration and disease. Propagation of pathology is often called prion-like, which refers to the capacity of an assembled protein to induce the same abnormal conformation in a protein of the same kind, initiating a self-amplifying cascade. In addition, prion-like encompasses the release of protein aggregates from brain cells and their uptake by neighboring cells. In mice, the intracerebral injection of Tau inclusions induces the ordered assembly of monomeric Tau, followed by its spreading to distant brain regions. Conformational differences between Tau aggregates from transgenic mouse brain and in vitro assembled recombinant protein account for the greater seeding potency of brain aggregates. Short fibrils constitute the major species of seed-competent Tau in the brains of transgenic mice. The existence of multiple human Tauopathies with distinct fibril morphologies has led to the suggestion that different molecular conformers (or strains) of aggregated Tau exist.

  2. Tau pathology induces intraneuronal cholesterol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Frauke; Ohm, Thomas G

    2014-09-01

    Epidemiologic and experimental data suggest the involvement of cholesterol metabolism in the development and progression of Alzheimer disease and Niemann-Pick type C disease, but not of frontotemporal dementias. In these 3 neurodegenerative diseases, however, protein tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation into neurofibrillary tangles are observed. To elucidate the relationship between cholesterol and tau, we compared sterol levels of neurons burdened with neurofibrillary tangles with those of their unaffected neighbors using semiquantitative filipin fluorescence microscopy in mice expressing P301L mutant human tau (a well-described model of FTDP-17) and in P301L transgenic mice lacking apolipoprotein E (the major cholesterol transporter in the brain). Cellular unesterified cholesterol was higher in neurons affected by tau pathology irrespective of apolipoprotein E deficiency. This argues for an impact of tau pathology on cellular cholesterol homeostasis. We suggest that there is a bidirectional mode of action: Disturbances in cellular cholesterol metabolism may promote tau pathology, but tau pathology may also alter neuronal cholesterol homeostasis; once it is established, a vicious cycle may promote neurofibrillary tangle formation.

  3. A Search for B+ to tau+ nu

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-06-26

    The authors present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu} using 383 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II B-Factory. A sample of events with one reconstructed semileptonic B decay (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}X) is selected, and in the recoil a search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu} is performed. The {tau} is identified in the following channels: {tau}{sup +} {yields} e{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{nu}{bar {nu}}, {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} {bar {nu}} and {tau}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}}. They measure a branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}) = (0.9 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 0.1(syst.)) x 10{sup -4}. In the absence of a significant signal, we calculate an upper limit at the 90% confidence level of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}) < 1.7 x 10{sup -4}. They calculate the product of the B meson decay constant f{sub B} and |V{sub ub}| to be f{sub B} {center_dot} |V{sub ub}| = (7.2{sub -2.8}{sup +2.0}(stat.) {+-} 0.2(syst.)) x 10{sup -4} GeV.

  4. Intracerebral injection of preformed synthetic tau fibrils initiates widespread tauopathy and neuronal loss in the brains of tau transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Peeraer, Eve; Bottelbergs, Astrid; Van Kolen, Kristof; Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Vasconcelos, Bruno; Mahieu, Michel; Duytschaever, Hilde; Ver Donck, Luc; Torremans, An; Sluydts, Ellen; Van Acker, Nathalie; Kemp, John A; Mercken, Marc; Brunden, Kurt R; Trojanowski, John Q; Dewachter, Ilse; Lee, Virginia M Y; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated fibrillized tau are found in numerous tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that tau pathology can be transmitted from cell-to-cell; however the mechanisms involved in the initiation of tau fibrillization and spreading of disease linked to progression of tau pathology are poorly understood. We show here that intracerebral injections of preformed synthetic tau fibrils into the hippocampus or frontal cortex of young tau transgenic mice expressing mutant human P301L tau induces tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation around the site of injection, as well as a time-dependent propagation of tau pathology to interconnected brain areas distant from the injection site. Furthermore, we show that the tau pathology as a consequence of injection of tau preformed fibrils into the hippocampus induces selective loss of CA1 neurons. Together, our data confirm previous studies on the seeded induction and the spreading of tau pathology in a different tau transgenic mouse model and reveals neuronal loss associated with seeded tau pathology in tau transgenic mouse brain. These results further validate the utility of the tau seeding model in studying disease transmission, and provide a more complete in vivo tauopathy model with associated neurodegeneration which can be used to investigate the mechanisms involved in tau aggregation and spreading, as well as aid in the search for disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Intracerebral injection of preformed synthetic tau fibrils initiates widespread tauopathy and neuronal loss in the brains of tau transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Peeraer, Eve; Bottelbergs, Astrid; Van Kolen, Kristof; Stancu, Ilie-Cosmin; Vasconcelos, Bruno; Mahieu, Michel; Duytschaever, Hilde; Ver Donck, Luc; Torremans, An; Sluydts, Ellen; Van Acker, Nathalie; Kemp, John A.; Mercken, Marc; Brunden, Kurt R.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Dewachter, Ilse; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Moechars, Diederik

    2015-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated fibrillized tau are found in numerous tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that tau pathology can be transmitted from cell-to-cell; however the mechanisms involved in the initiation of tau fibrillization and spreading of disease linked to progression of tau pathology are poorly understood. We show here that intracerebral injections of preformed synthetic tau fibrils into the hippocampus or frontal cortex of young tau transgenic mice expressing mutant human P301L tau induces tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation around the site of injection, as well as a time-dependent propagation of tau pathology to interconnected brain areas distant from the injection site. Furthermore, we show that the tau pathology as a consequence of injection of tau preformed fibrils into the hippocampus induces selective loss of CA1 neurons. Together, our data confirm previous studies on the seeded induction and the spreading of tau pathology in a different tau transgenic mouse model and reveals neuronal loss associated with seeded tau pathology in tau transgenic mouse brain. These results further validate the utility of the tau seeding model in studying disease transmission, and provide a more complete in vivo tauopathy model with associated neurodegeneration which can be used to investigate the mechanisms involved in tau aggregation and spreading, as well as aid in the search for disease modifying treatments for Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. PMID:25220759

  6. Early maturation and distinct tau pathology in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons from patients with MAPT mutations.

    PubMed

    Iovino, Mariangela; Agathou, Sylvia; González-Rueda, Ana; Del Castillo Velasco-Herrera, Martin; Borroni, Barbara; Alberici, Antonella; Lynch, Timothy; O'Dowd, Sean; Geti, Imbisaat; Gaffney, Daniel; Vallier, Ludovic; Paulsen, Ole; Káradóttir, Ragnhildur Thóra; Spillantini, Maria Grazia

    2015-11-01

    Tauopathies, such as Alzheimer's disease, some cases of frontotemporal dementia, corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, are characterized by aggregates of the microtubule-associated protein tau, which are linked to neuronal death and disease development and can be caused by mutations in the MAPT gene. Six tau isoforms are present in the adult human brain and they differ by the presence of 3(3R) or 4(4R) C-terminal repeats. Only the shortest 3R isoform is present in foetal brain. MAPT mutations found in human disease affect tau binding to microtubules or the 3R:4R isoform ratio by altering exon 10 splicing. We have differentiated neurons from induced pluripotent stem cells derived from fibroblasts of controls and patients with N279K and P301L MAPT mutations. Induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons recapitulate developmental tau expression, showing the adult brain tau isoforms after several months in culture. Both N279K and P301L neurons exhibit earlier electrophysiological maturation and altered mitochondrial transport compared to controls. Specifically, the N279K neurons show abnormally premature developmental 4R tau expression, including changes in the 3R:4R isoform ratio and AT100-hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates, while P301L neurons are characterized by contorted processes with varicosity-like structures, some containing both alpha-synuclein and 4R tau. The previously unreported faster maturation of MAPT mutant human neurons, the developmental expression of 4R tau and the morphological alterations may contribute to disease development.

  7. Coefficient alpha and interculture test selection.

    PubMed

    Thurber, Steven; Kishi, Yasuhiro

    2014-04-01

    The internal consistency reliability of a measure can be a focal point in an evaluation of the potential adequacy of an instrument for adaptation to another cultural setting. Cronbach's alpha (α) coefficient is often used as the statistical index for such a determination. However, alpha presumes a tau-equivalent test and may constitute an inaccurate population estimate for multidimensional tests. These notions are expanded and examined with a Japanese version of a questionnaire on nursing attitudes toward suicidal patients, originally constructed in Sweden using the English language. The English measure was reported to have acceptable internal consistency (α) albeit the dimensionality of the questionnaire was not addressed. The Japanese scale was found to lack tau-equivalence. An alternative to alpha, "composite reliability," was computed and found to be below acceptable standards in magnitude and precision. Implications for research application of the Japanese instrument are discussed.

  8. NMR observation of Tau in Xenopus oocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodart, Jean-François; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Amniai, Laziza; Leroy, Arnaud; Landrieu, Isabelle; Rousseau-Lescuyer, Arlette; Vilain, Jean-Pierre; Lippens, Guy

    2008-06-01

    The observation by NMR spectroscopy of microinjected 15N-labelled proteins into Xenopus laevis oocytes might open the way to link structural and cellular biology. We show here that embedding the oocytes into a 20% Ficoll solution maintains their structural integrity over extended periods of time, allowing for the detection of nearly physiological protein concentrations. We use these novel conditions to study the neuronal Tau protein inside the oocytes. Spectral reproducibility and careful comparison of the spectra of Tau before and after cell homogenization is presented. When injecting Tau protein into immature oocytes, we show that both its microtubule association and different phosphorylation events can be detected.

  9. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  10. Tau pathophysiology in neurodegeneration: a tangled issue.

    PubMed

    Spires-Jones, Tara L; Stoothoff, William H; de Calignon, Alix; Jones, Phillip B; Hyman, Bradley T

    2009-03-01

    Neurodegenerative tauopathies are marked by their common pathologic feature of aggregates formed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, which are associated with synapse and neuronal loss. Changes in tau conformation result in both loss of normal function and gain of fibrillogenicity that leads to aggregation. Here, we discuss the pathophysiology of tau and emerging evidence of how changes in this protein might ultimately lead to neuronal death. In particular, based on recent evidence, we propose that a non-apoptotic caspase-associated form of death is occurring in tauopathy.

  11. Acetylation of Tau Inhibits Its Degradation and Contributes to Tauopathy

    PubMed Central

    Min, Sang-Won; Cho, Seo-Hyun; Zhou, Yungui; Schroeder, Sebastian; Haroutunian, Vahram; Seeley, William W.; Huang, Eric J.; Shen, Yong; Masliah, Eliezer; Mukherjee, Chandrani; Meyers, David; Cole, Philip A.; Ott, Melanie; Gan, Li

    2011-01-01

    Summary Neurodegenerative tauopathies characterized by hyperphosphorylated tau include frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Reducing tau levels improves cognitive function in mouse models of AD and FTDP-17, but the mechanisms regulating the turnover of pathogenic tau are unknown. We found that tau is acetylated and that tau acetylation prevents degradation of phosphorylated tau (p-tau). Using two antibodies specific for acetylated tau, we showed that tau acetylation is elevated in patients at early and moderate Braak stages of tauopathy. Histone acetyltransferase p300 was involved in tau acetylation and the class III protein deacetylase SIRT1 in deacetylation. Deleting SIRT1 enhanced levels of acetylated-tau and pathogenic forms of p-tau in vivo, likely by blocking proteasome-mediated degradation. Inhibiting p300 with a small molecule promoted tau deacetylation and eliminated p-tau associated with tauopathy. Modulating tau acetylation could be a new therapeutic strategy to reduce tau-mediated neurodegeneration. PMID:20869593

  12. The role of the VQIVYK peptide in tau protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Perez, Mar; Santa-María, Ismael; Tortosa, Elena; Cuadros, Raquel; Del Valle, Mercedes; Hernández, Felix; Moreno, Francisco J; Avila, Jesús

    2007-11-01

    Although it remains unclear whether they are related to one another, tau aggregation and phosphorylation are the main pathological hallmarks of the neuronal disorders known as tauopathies. The capacity to aggregate is impaired in a variant of the tau 3R isoform that lacks residues 306-311 (nomenclature for the largest CNS tau isoform) and hence, we have taken advantage of this feature to study how phosphorylation and aggregation may be related as well as the role of this six amino acid peptide (VQIVYK). Through these analyses, we found that the phosphorylation of the tau variant was higher than that of the complete tau protein and that not only the deletion of these residues, but also the interaction of these residues, in tau 3R, with thioflavin-S augmented tau phosphorylation by glycogen synthase kinase 3. In addition, the binding of the peptide containing the residues 306-311 to the whole tau protein provoked an increase in tau phosphorylation. This observation could be physiologically relevant as may suggest that tau-tau interactions, through those residues, facilitate tau phosphorylation. In summary, our data indicate that deletion of residues VQIVYK, in tau protein produces an increase in tau phosphorylation, without tau aggregation, because the VQIVYK peptide, that favors aggregation, is missing. On the other hand, when the whole tau protein interacts with thioflavin-S or the peptide VQIVYK, an increase in both aggregation and phosphorylation occurs.

  13. Higgs mediated lepton flavor violating tau decays {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}{gamma} in effective theories

    SciTech Connect

    Aranda, J. I.; Tututi, E. S.; Toscano, J. J.

    2008-07-01

    The size of the branching ratios for the {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}{gamma} decays induced by a lepton flavor violating Higgs interaction H{tau}{mu} is studied in the framework of effective field theories. The best constraint on the H{tau}{mu} vertex, derived from the know measurement on the muon anomalous magnetic moment, is used to impose the upper bounds Br({tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma})<7.5x10{sup -10} and Br({tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma}{gamma})<2.3x10{sup -12}, which are more stringent than current experimental limits on this class of transitions.

  14. Accumulation of Filamentous Tau in the Cerebral Cortex of Human Tau R406W Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Masaki; Shoji†, Mikio; Kawarai, Toshitaka; Kawarabayashi, Takeshi; Matsubara, Etsuro; Murakami, Tetsuro; Sasaki, Atsushi; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Ikarashi, Yasushi; Kuribara, Hisashi; Ishiguro, Koichi; Hasegawa, Masato; Yen, Shu-Hui; Chishti, M. Azhar; Harigaya, Yasuo; Abe, Koji; Okamoto, Koichi; St. George-Hyslop, Peter; Westaway, David

    2005-01-01

    Missense mutations of the tau gene cause autosomal dominant frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17), an illness characterized by progressive personality changes, dementia, and parkinsonism. There is prominent frontotemporal lobe atrophy of the brain accompanied by abundant tau accumulation with neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal cell loss. Using a hamster prion protein gene expression vector, we generated several independent lines of transgenic (Tg) mice expressing the longest form of the human four-repeat tau with the R406W mutation associated with FTDP-17. The TgTauR406W 21807 line showed tau accumulation beginning in the hippocampus and amygdala at 6 months of age, which subsequently spread to the cortices and subcortical areas. The accumulated tau was phosphorylated, ubiquitinated, conformationally changed, argyrophilic, and sarcosyl-insoluble. Activation of GSK-3β and astrocytic induction of mouse tau were observed. Astrogliosis and microgliosis correlated with prominent tau accumulation. Electron microscopic examination revealed the presence of straight filaments. Behavioral tests showed motor disturbances and progressive acquired memory loss between 10 to 12 months of age. These findings suggested that TgTauR406W mice would be a useful model in the study of frontotemporal dementia and other tauopathies such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD). PMID:15681835

  15. Search for the rare decay B0-->tau+tau- at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Weinstein, A J R; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; MacFarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; Graziani, G; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yeche, Ch; Zito, M; Altenburg, D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Won, E; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Martinez-Vidal, F; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Vazquez, W P; Charles, M J; Mader, W F; Mallik, U; Mohapatra, A K; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Yi, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pacetti, S; Pioppi, M; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Giroux, X; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Petersen, T C; Pierini, M; Plaszczynski, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Forster, Ian J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Cormack, C M; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Edgar, C L; Hodgkinson, M C; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Cote, D; Taras, P; Viaud, B; Nicholson, H; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Jessop, C P; LoSecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissiere, C; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Morganit, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Schröder, H; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Abe, T; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, M; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H; Schott, G

    2006-06-23

    We present the results of a search for the decay B0-->tau+tau- in a data sample of (232+/-3)x10(6) Upsilon(4S)-->BB decays using the BABAR detector. Certain extensions of the standard model predict measurable levels of this otherwise rare decay. We reconstruct fully one neutral B meson and seek evidence for the signal decay in the rest of the event. We find no evidence for signal events and obtain Beta(B0->tau+tau-)<4.1x10(-3) at the 90% confidence level.

  16. Searches for Lepton Flavor Violation in the Decays tau+- ---> e+- gamma and tau+- ---> mu+- gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, Bernard; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /more authors..

    2010-06-11

    Searches for lepton-flavor-violating decays of a {tau} lepton to a lighter mass lepton and a photon have been performed with the entire dataset of (963 {+-} 7) x 10{sup 6} {tau} decays collected by the BABAR detector near the {Upsilon}(4S), {Upsilon}(3S) and {Upsilon}(2S) resonances. The searches yield no evidence of signals and they set upper limits on the branching fractions of {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} e{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 3.3 x 10{sup -8} and {Beta}({tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} {mu}{sup {+-}}{gamma}) < 4.4 x 10{sup -8} at 90% confidence level.

  17. Orbital motions and light curves of young binaries XZ Tau and VY Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, A. V.; Emelyanov, N. V.; Zharova, A. V.; Lamzin, S. A.; Malogolovets, E. V.; Roe, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The results of our speckle interferometric observations of young binaries VY Tau and XZ Tau are presented. For the first time, we found a relative displacement of VY Tau components as well as a preliminary orbit for XZ Tau. It appeared that the orbit is appreciably non-circular and is inclined by i ≲ 47◦ from the plane of the sky. It means that the rotation axis of XZ Tau A and the axis of its jet are significantly non-perpendicular to the orbital plane. We found that the average brightness of XZ Tau had been increasing from the beginning of the last century up to the mid-thirties and then it decreased by Δ B > 2 mag. The maximal brightness has been reached significantly later on the time of periastron passage. The total brightness of XZ Tau's components varied in a non-regular way from 1970 to 1985 when eruptions of hot gas from XZ Tau A presumably had occurred. In the early nineties the variations became regular following which a chaotic variability had renewed. We also report that a flare activity of VY Tau has resumed after 40 yr pause, parameters of the previous and new flares are similar, and the flares are related with the A component.

  18. Survey of Volatiles in the Disks Around GV Tau N and AA Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Erika

    2010-02-01

    We propose to use NIRSPEC to characterize the gas phase volatiles, particularly organic molecules, in circumstellar disks toward Tauri stars GV Tau N and AA Tau. These sources have recently been found to exhibit rich molecular absorption (GV Tau N; Gibb et al. 2007) and emission (AA Tau; Carr et al. 2008) spectra that sample distinct regions of the circumstellar disk. If we are to understand the distribution of materials in disks and place our solar system in context, these systems must be studied in detail. As such, we propose to perform a near-infrared survey of these two sources.

  19. Anti-tau antibody reduces insoluble tau and decreases brain atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Kiran; Jiang, Hong; Mahan, Thomas E; Maloney, Susan E; Wozniak, David F; Diamond, Marc I; Holtzman, David M

    2015-01-01

    Objective We previously found a strong reduction in tau pathology and insoluble tau in P301S tau transgenic mice following intracerebroventricular infusion of the anti-tau antibody HJ8.5. We sought to determine the effects of HJ8.5 in the same model following peripheral administration. Methods The primary objective was to determine if HJ8.5 administered at a dose of 50 mg kg−1 week−1 by intraperitoneal (IP) injection to 6-month-old P301S mice for 3 months would influence phospho-tau (p-tau) accumulation, tau insolubility, and neurodegeneration. Results Treatment with HJ8.5 at 50 mg/kg showed a very strong decrease in detergent-insoluble tau. Importantly, HJ8.5 significantly reduced the loss of cortical and hippocampal tissue volumes compared to control treated mice. HJ8.5 treatment reduced hippocampal CA1 cellular layer staining with the p-tau antibody AT8 and thio-S-positive tau aggregates in piriform cortex and amygdala. Moreover, mice treated with HJ8.5 at 50 mg/kg showed a decrease in motor/sensorimotor deficits compared to vehicle-treated mice. Some effects of HJ8.5, including reduction in brain atrophy, and p-tau immunostaining were also seen with a dose of 10 mg kg−1 week−1. In BV2-microglial cells, we observed significantly higher uptake of P301S tau aggregates in the presence of HJ8.5. HJ8.5 treatment also resulted in a large dose-dependent increase of tau in the plasma. Interpretation Our results indicate that systemically administered anti-tau antibody HJ8.5 significantly decreases insoluble tau, decreases brain atrophy, and improves motor/sensorimotor function in a mouse model of tauopathy. These data further support the idea that anti-tau antibodies should be further assessed as a potential treatment for tauopathies. PMID:25815354

  20. Antibody Therapeutics Targeting Aβ and Tau.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Gilbert; Holtzman, David M

    2017-10-03

    The astonishing findings that active and passive immunization against amyloid-β (Aβ) in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) dramatically decreased amyloid burden led to a rapid initiation of human clinical trials with much enthusiasm. However, methodological issues and adverse effects relating to these clinical trials arose, challenging the effectiveness and safety of these reagents. Efforts are now underway to develop safer immunotherapeutic approaches toward Aβ and the treatment of individuals at risk for AD before or in the earliest stages of cognitive decline with new hopes. Furthermore, several studies have shown tau as a potential immunotherapeutic target for the treatment of tauopathy-related diseases including frontotemporal lobar dementia (FTLD). Both active and passive immunization targeting tau in mouse models of tauopathy effectively decreased tau pathology while improving cognitive performance. These preclinical studies have highlighted tau as an alternative target with much anticipation of clinical trials to be undertaken. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  1. Targeted deletion of Atg5 reveals differential roles of autophagy in keratin K5-expressing epithelia

    SciTech Connect

    Sukseree, Supawadee; Rossiter, Heidemarie; Mildner, Michael; Pammer, Johannes; Buchberger, Maria; Gruber, Florian; Watanapokasin, Ramida; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2013-01-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We generated mice lacking Atg5 and autophagy in keratin K5-positive epithelia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Suppression of autophagy in thymic epithelium was not associated with signs of autoimmunity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy was required for normal terminal differentiation of preputial gland cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Autophagy-deficient cells of the preputial glands degraded nuclear DNA prematurely. -- Abstract: Autophagy contributes to the homeostasis of many tissues, yet its role in epithelia is incompletely understood. A recent report proposed that Atg5-dependent autophagy in thymic epithelial cells is essential for their function in the negative selection of self-reactive T-cells and, thus, for the suppression of tissue inflammation. Here we crossed mice carrying floxed alleles of the Atg5 gene with mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the keratin K5 promoter to suppress autophagy in all K5-positive epithelia. The efficiency of autophagy abrogation was confirmed by immunoanalyses of LC3, which was converted to the autophagy-associated LC3-II form in normal but not Atg5-deficient cells, and of p62, which accumulated in Atg5-deficient cells. Mice carrying the epithelium-specific deletion of Atg5 showed normal weight gain, absence of tissue inflammation, and a normal morphology of the thymic epithelium. By contrast, autophagy-deficient epithelial cells of the preputial gland showed aberrant eosinophilic staining in histology and premature degradation of nuclear DNA during terminal differentiation. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that autophagy is dispensable for the suppression of autoimmunity by thymic epithelial cells but essential for normal differentiation of the preputial gland in mice.

  2. Vitamin K(3) and K(5) are inhibitors of tumor pyruvate kinase M2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Jiang, Zheng; Wang, Beibei; Wang, Yanguang; Hu, Xun

    2012-03-28

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a rate-limiting enzyme of aerobic glycolysis in cancer cells and plays important roles in cancer metabolism and growth. Here we show that vitamin K(3) and K(5) (VK(3) and VK(5)) are relatively specific PKM2 inhibitors. VK(3) and VK(5) showed a significantly stronger potency to inhibit PKM2 than to inhibit PKM1 and PKL, 2 other isoforms of PK dominantly expressed in most adult tissues and liver. This study combined with previous reports supports that VK(3) and VK(5) have potential as adjuvant for cancer chemotherapy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Radiographic Evidence for k-5/3 Scaling of Density Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silver, R. N.; Gore, R.; Greene, J.; Harlow, F.; Whitman, R.

    1996-09-01

    Experiments on the explosively driven compression and reexpansion of metal cylinders are reported. Analysis of radiography data taken with a pulsed x-ray source reveals scale invariant density fluctuations. The marginal density spectra are consistent with a k-8/3 power law, where k is wave number, corresponding to scalar density spectra varying as k-5/3. Remarkably, the same scaling behavior is observed for a variety of metals with widely different mechanical properties. The relation of these results to fully developed turbulence in both incompressible fluids and compressible fluids with large density variations is discussed.

  4. The audiovisual tau effect in infancy.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Takahiro; Shirai, Nobu; Wada, Yuji; Miura, Kayo; Kanazawa, So; Yamaguchi, Masami K

    2010-03-03

    Perceived spatial intervals between successive flashes can be distorted by varying the temporal intervals between them (the "tau effect"). A previous study showed that a tau effect for visual flashes could be induced when they were accompanied by auditory beeps with varied temporal intervals (an audiovisual tau effect). We conducted two experiments to investigate whether the audiovisual tau effect occurs in infancy. Forty-eight infants aged 5-8 months took part in this study. In Experiment 1, infants were familiarized with audiovisual stimuli consisting of three pairs of two flashes and three beeps. The onsets of the first and third pairs of flashes were respectively matched to those of the first and third beeps. The onset of the second pair of flashes was separated from that of the second beep by 150 ms. Following the familiarization phase, infants were exposed to a test stimulus composed of two vertical arrays of three static flashes with different spatial intervals. We hypothesized that if the audiovisual tau effect occurred in infancy then infants would preferentially look at the flash array with spatial intervals that would be expected to be different from the perceived spatial intervals between flashes they were exposed to in the familiarization phase. The results of Experiment 1 supported this hypothesis. In Experiment 2, the first and third beeps were removed from the familiarization stimuli, resulting in the disappearance of the audiovisual tau effect. This indicates that the modulation of temporal intervals among flashes by beeps was essential for the audiovisual tau effect to occur (Experiment 2). These results suggest that the cross-modal processing that underlies the audiovisual tau effect occurs even in early infancy. In particular, the results indicate that audiovisual modulation of temporal intervals emerges by 5-8 months of age.

  5. Ironing out Tau's Role in Parkinsonism

    PubMed Central

    Stankowski, Jeannette N.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease affects more than five million people worldwide, yet no therapeutic has been identified that can slow or halt the progression of this debilitating disease. A new study in tau knockout mice suggests that tau deficiency causes impaired ferroportin-coupled iron export, by retention of the amyloid precursor protein, a neuronal ferroxidase partner, in the endoplasmic reticulum. This leads to parkinsonism through intracellular iron accumulation and degeneration of dopamine neurons (pages X-Y). PMID:22310680

  6. Summary of the Tau 2016 Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lusiani, Alberto

    2017-06-01

    The main topics discussed at the Tau 2016 Workshop are briefly summarized. A large number of reports were given on low-energy QCD studies, on the hadronic g - 2 contribution, and on neutrino Physics. Other reports were given on the τ lepton properties and related topics, on Lepton Flavour Violation and New Physics searches involving tau-lepton production or light New Physics particles.

  7. Deletion of endogenous Tau proteins is not detrimental in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burnouf, Sylvie; Grönke, Sebastian; Augustin, Hrvoje; Dols, Jacqueline; Gorsky, Marianna Karina; Werner, Jennifer; Kerr, Fiona; Alic, Nazif; Martinez, Pedro; Partridge, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Human Tau (hTau) is a highly soluble and natively unfolded protein that binds to microtubules within neurons. Its dysfunction and aggregation into insoluble paired helical filaments is involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), constituting, together with accumulated β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides, a hallmark of the disease. Deciphering both the loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function of hTau proteins is crucial to further understand the mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration in AD. As the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster expresses Tau proteins (dTau) that are homologous to hTau, we aimed to better comprehend dTau functions by generating a specific tau knock-out (KO) fly line using homologous recombination. We observed that the specific removal of endogenous dTau proteins did not lead to overt, macroscopic phenotypes in flies. Indeed, survival, climbing ability and neuronal function were unchanged in tau KO flies. In addition, we did not find any overt positive or negative effect of dTau removal on human Aβ-induced toxicity. Altogether, our results indicate that the absence of dTau proteins has no major functional impact on flies, and suggests that our tau KO strain is a relevant model to further investigate the role of dTau proteins in vivo, thereby giving additional insights into hTau functions. PMID:26976084

  8. The winds from HL Tau

    PubMed Central

    Klaassen, P. D.; Mottram, J. C.; Maud, L. T.; Juhasz, A.

    2016-01-01

    Outflowing motions, whether a wind launched from the disc, a jet launched from the protostar, or the entrained molecular outflow, appear to be a ubiquitous feature of star formation. These outwards motions have a number of root causes, and how they manifest is intricately linked to their environment as well as the process of star formation itself. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) Science Verification data of HL Tau, we investigate the high-velocity molecular gas being removed from the system as a result of the star formation process. We aim to place these motions in context with the optically detected jet, and the disc. With these high-resolution (∼1 arcsec) ALMA observations of CO (J=1−0), we quantify the outwards motions of the molecular gas. We find evidence for a bipolar outwards flow, with an opening angle, as measured in the redshifted lobe, starting off at 90°, and narrowing to 60° further from the disc, likely because of magnetic collimation. Its outwards velocity, corrected for inclination angle is of the order of 2.4 km s−1. PMID:27559304

  9. Tau longitudinal polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} and its role in the search for the charged Higgs boson

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Minoru; Watanabe, Ryoutaro

    2010-08-01

    We study the longitudinal polarization of the tau lepton in B{yields}D{tau}{nu} decay. After discussing possible sensitivities of {tau} decay modes to the {tau} polarization, we examine the effect of charged Higgs boson on the {tau} polarization in B{yields}D{tau}{nu}. We find a relation between the decay rate and the {tau} polarization, and clarify the role of the {tau} polarization measurement in the search for the charged Higgs boson.

  10. Spectroscopy of V471 Tau. I. Review of basic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Bois, B.; Mochnacki, S.W.; Lanning, H.H.

    1988-07-01

    Spectroscopic observations of the eclipsing binary V471 Tau are reported and analyzed. Data obtained mainly in the red band at Mt. Wilson Observatory and KPNO during the period 1975-1983 are compiled in extensive tables and graphs, and the radial velocity of the K dwarf component is determined using a Griffin-mask technique. Results discussed include: (1) distance 44 + or - 6 pc, (consistent with membership in the Hyades), (2) apparent period variation consistent with a third component, (3) emissionlike features affecting the radial-velocity determination, (4) transient features consistent with the presence of flares, and (5) phase-coherent variation in H-alpha (attributed to the action of the white-dwarf Lyman continuum emission on the K dwarf). 70 references.

  11. Exemplary Literacy Teachers: Promoting Success for All Children in Grades K-5. Solving Problems in the Teaching of Literacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, Cathy Collins; Mangieri, John N.

    This book presents instructional techniques and behaviors that result in the most significant achievement gains for preK-5 students, guiding teachers in assessing their strengths and building their skills within six key domains of literacy instruction directly linked to student success. The book is based on a macroanalysis of preK-5 reading…

  12. Is the Sky Really Falling?: An Update on the Status of Social Studies in the K-5 Curriculum in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanFossen, Phillip J.; McGrew, Chris

    2008-01-01

    This study replicates a 2005 study of the status of social studies in the K-5 curriculum in Indiana. The current study reports the results of a comprehensive survey (33 fixed and 2 open-ended) of a stratified (by grade) random sample of K-5 teachers in Indiana (n = 385; response rate = 32%). Results indicated a continued marginalization of social…

  13. Vaccination with Sarkosyl insoluble PHF-tau decrease neurofibrillary tangles formation in aged tau transgenic mouse model: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ando, Kunie; Kabova, Anna; Stygelbout, Virginie; Leroy, Karelle; Heraud, Céline; Frédérick, Christelle; Suain, Valérie; Yilmaz, Zehra; Authelet, Michèle; Dedecker, Robert; Potier, Marie-Claude; Duyckaerts, Charles; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Active immunization using tau phospho-peptides in tauopathy mouse models has been observed to reduce tau pathology, especially when given prior to the onset of pathology. Since tau aggregates in these models and in human tauopathies are composed of full-length tau with many post-translational modifications, and are composed of several tau isoforms in many of them, pathological tau proteins bearing all these post-translational modifications might prove to be optimal tau conformers to use as immunogens, especially in models with advanced tau pathology. To this aim, we immunized aged wild-type and mutant tau mice with preparations containing human paired helical filaments (PHF) emulsified in Alum-adjuvant. This immunization protocol with fibrillar PHF-tau was well tolerated and did not induce an inflammatory reaction in the brain or adverse effect in these aged mice. Mice immunized with four repeated injections developed anti-PHF-tau antibodies with rising titers that labeled human neurofibrillary tangles in situ. Immunized mutant tau mice had a lower density of hippocampal Gallyas-positive neurons. Brain levels of Sarkosyl-insoluble tau were also reduced in immunized mice. These results indicate that an immunization protocol using fibrillar PHF-tau proteins is an efficient and tolerated approach to reduce tau pathology in an aged tauopathy animal model.

  14. Naturally Occurring Autoantibodies against Tau Protein Are Reduced in Parkinson's Disease Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Kronimus, Yannick; Albus, Alexandra; Balzer-Geldsetzer, Monika; Straub, Sarah; Semler, Elisa; Otto, Markus; Klotsche, Jens; Dodel, Richard; Mengel, David

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Altered levels of naturally occurring autoantibodies (nAbs) against disease-associated neuronal proteins have been reported for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Recent histopathologic studies suggest a contribution of both Lewy body- and AD-related pathology to Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD). Therefore, we explored nAbs against alpha-synuclein (αS), tau and β-amyloid (Aβ) in PDD compared to cognitively normal PD patients. Materials and Methods We established three different ELISAs to quantify the nAbs-tau, nAbs-αS, and nAbs-Aβ levels and avidity towards their specific antigen in serum samples of 18 non-demented (PDND) and 18 demented PD patients (PDD), which were taken from an ongoing multi-center cohort study (DEMPARK/LANDSCAPE). Results PDD patients had significantly decreased nAbs-tau serum levels compared to PDND patients (p = 0.007), whereas the serum titers of nAbs-αS and nAbs-Aβ were unchanged. For all three nAbs, no significant differences in avidity were found between PDD and PDND cohorts. However, within both patient groups, nAbs-tau showed lowest avidity to their antigen, followed by nAbs-αS, and nAbs-Aβ. Though, due to a high interassay coefficient of variability and the exclusion of many samples below the limit of detection, conclusions for nAbs-Aβ are only conditionally possible. Conclusion We detected a significantly decreased nAbs-tau serum level in PDD patients, indicating a potential linkage between nAbs-tau serum titer and cognitive deficits in PD. Thus, further investigation in larger samples is justified to confirm our findings. PMID:27802290

  15. The decay. tau. sup minus r arrow K sup minus K sup +. pi. sup minus. nu. sub. tau. and the. nu. sub. tau. mass

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez-Cadenas, J.J. ); Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Pich, A. Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Universidad de Valencia, Burjasot )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper, we present a model based on the effective chiral Lagrangian to describe the decay {tau}{sup {minus}}{r arrow}{ital K}{sup {minus}}{ital K}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}{nu}{sub {tau}}. Using our model we study the possible limits on the {nu}{sub {tau}} mass that can be achieved by a high-statistics, high-precision experiment taking data close to the {tau}-pair production threshold.

  16. Results of magnetic field measurements in young stars DO Tau, DR Tau, and DS Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodin, A. V.; Lamzin, S. A.; Chuntonov, G. A.

    2013-04-01

    The results of longitudinal magnetic field measurements B z in the hot accretion spot in three classical T Tauri stars (CTTS) are reported. In all three stars the magnetic field is detected at a level above 2 σ in the formation region of the narrow component of the He I 5876 Å emission line. In the case of DS Tau the longitudinal field B z in the hot spot was also measured from the narrow emission components of the Na I D lines, implying +0.8 ± 0.3 kG, which is equal to the B z field component measured from the He I 5876 Å line. Our results suggest that the 6-m telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory can be used to study magnetic fields in the hot spots of CTTS with magnitudes down to 13m, making it possible to double the number of stars of this type with measured B z values in the accretion zone.

  17. How it all started: tau and protein phosphatase 2A.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Götz, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    This review is dedicated to Inge Grundke-Iqbal who laid the foundations of the tau field, by isolating tau from the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain, discovering that tau is hyperphosphorylated, and proving a critical role of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and its endogenous inhibitor I2PP2A in this process. This memorial starts with a few personal notes, and then covers how subcellular fractionation helped in isolating tau. We review in detail the role of PP2A and its endogenous inhibitor in tau phosphorylation. We discuss the role that methylation and phosphorylation have in regulating PP2A activity. We add what we have contributed to understanding the role of tau and PP2A in AD using PP2A transgenic and knockout models, and conclude by addressing two underexplored areas in tau research: tau's non-canonical functions and the role distinct tau isoforms have in a physiological context.

  18. Passive Immunization with Phospho-Tau Antibodies Reduces Tau Pathology and Functional Deficits in Two Distinct Mouse Tauopathy Models

    PubMed Central

    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Barten, Donna M.; Vana, Laurel; Devidze, Nino; Yang, Ling; Cadelina, Gregory; Hoque, Nina; DeCarr, Lynn; Keenan, Stefanie; Lin, Alan; Cao, Yang; Snyder, Bradley; Zhang, Bin; Nitla, Magdalena; Hirschfeld, Gregg; Barrezueta, Nestor; Polson, Craig; Wes, Paul; Rangan, Vangipuram S.; Cacace, Angela; Albright, Charles F.; Meredith, Jere; Trojanowski, John Q.; Lee, Virginia M-Y.; Brunden, Kurt R.; Ahlijanian, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer’s disease (AD), an extensive accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles, along with neuronal loss, is evident in distinct brain regions. Staging of tau pathology by postmortem analysis of AD subjects suggests a sequence of initiation and subsequent spread of neurofibrillary tau tangles along defined brain anatomical pathways. Further, the severity of cognitive deficits correlates with the degree and extent of tau pathology. In this study, we demonstrate that phospho-tau (p-tau) antibodies, PHF6 and PHF13, can prevent the induction of tau pathology in primary neuron cultures. The impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation and spread of tau pathology, as well as functional deficits, was subsequently evaluated with these antibodies in two distinct transgenic mouse tauopathy models. The rTg4510 transgenic mouse is characterized by inducible over-expression of P301L mutant tau, and exhibits robust age-dependent brain tau pathology. Systemic treatment with PHF6 and PHF13 from 3 to 6 months of age led to a significant decline in brain and CSF p-tau levels. In a second model, injection of preformed tau fibrils (PFFs) comprised of recombinant tau protein encompassing the microtubule-repeat domains into the cortex and hippocampus of young P301S mutant tau over-expressing mice (PS19) led to robust tau pathology on the ipsilateral side with evidence of spread to distant sites, including the contralateral hippocampus and bilateral entorhinal cortex 4 weeks post-injection. Systemic treatment with PHF13 led to a significant decline in the spread of tau pathology in this model. The reduction in tau species after p-tau antibody treatment was associated with an improvement in novel-object recognition memory test in both models. These studies provide evidence supporting the use of tau immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for AD and other tauopathies. PMID:25933020

  19. Passive immunization with phospho-tau antibodies reduces tau pathology and functional deficits in two distinct mouse tauopathy models.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Barten, Donna M; Vana, Laurel; Devidze, Nino; Yang, Ling; Cadelina, Gregory; Hoque, Nina; DeCarr, Lynn; Keenan, Stefanie; Lin, Alan; Cao, Yang; Snyder, Bradley; Zhang, Bin; Nitla, Magdalena; Hirschfeld, Gregg; Barrezueta, Nestor; Polson, Craig; Wes, Paul; Rangan, Vangipuram S; Cacace, Angela; Albright, Charles F; Meredith, Jere; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Brunden, Kurt R; Ahlijanian, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), an extensive accumulation of extracellular amyloid plaques and intraneuronal tau tangles, along with neuronal loss, is evident in distinct brain regions. Staging of tau pathology by postmortem analysis of AD subjects suggests a sequence of initiation and subsequent spread of neurofibrillary tau tangles along defined brain anatomical pathways. Further, the severity of cognitive deficits correlates with the degree and extent of tau pathology. In this study, we demonstrate that phospho-tau (p-tau) antibodies, PHF6 and PHF13, can prevent the induction of tau pathology in primary neuron cultures. The impact of passive immunotherapy on the formation and spread of tau pathology, as well as functional deficits, was subsequently evaluated with these antibodies in two distinct transgenic mouse tauopathy models. The rTg4510 transgenic mouse is characterized by inducible over-expression of P301L mutant tau, and exhibits robust age-dependent brain tau pathology. Systemic treatment with PHF6 and PHF13 from 3 to 6 months of age led to a significant decline in brain and CSF p-tau levels. In a second model, injection of preformed tau fibrils (PFFs) comprised of recombinant tau protein encompassing the microtubule-repeat domains into the cortex and hippocampus of young P301S mutant tau over-expressing mice (PS19) led to robust tau pathology on the ipsilateral side with evidence of spread to distant sites, including the contralateral hippocampus and bilateral entorhinal cortex 4 weeks post-injection. Systemic treatment with PHF13 led to a significant decline in the spread of tau pathology in this model. The reduction in tau species after p-tau antibody treatment was associated with an improvement in novel-object recognition memory test in both models. These studies provide evidence supporting the use of tau immunotherapy as a potential treatment option for AD and other tauopathies.

  20. Study of the Tau- to Pi- Pi+ Pi- Pi0 Nu/Tau And Tau- to Pi- Pi- Pi+ Eta Nu/Tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, Randall; /Victoria U.

    2007-11-14

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied with the BABAR detector. Preliminary branching fractions on the two modes are presented. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode is found to have a large contribution from the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is studied using the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode and the {tau}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is seen to be the primary source of these decays. A 90% confidence level upper limit is placed on the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay which proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of perfect isospin symmetry.

  1. Horizontal Tau air showers from mountains in deep vally :Traces of Ultrahigh neutrino tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fargion, Daniele

    1999-08-01

    Ultra High Energy (UHE) Tau neutrino may lead to a very peculiar imprint in future underground K m3 detectors in water and ice as well as in air: rarest secondary tau tracks and decay which may exceed the muon ones. Indeed Bremsstrahlung at high energy lead to longer tracks for heavier leptons. Radiation lenght grows nearly with the square of the lepton mass. Indeed electrons are too light and their trace in matter is negligible (decimeters) muon are much better observed, while tau are too short life time and short range to be found. However, because relativistic time expansion, UHE tau traces in matter, above 1017 eV , are relativistically boosted overcoming the corresponding muon tracks, already bounded by bremsstrahlung logaritmic regime. The tau crossing for Kms in water or ice may be confused with common muon tracks; their tau decay may be missunderstood as muonic catastrophic brehmstrallung interactions. To economize UHE tau dicovery, we suggest to look the tau decay in air into the deep valleys montains, like Canyons or deep in escavation mines where horizontal air showers induce fluoresce or Cerenkov lights. The mountain valley width screens from horizontal secondary muons. The valley height increases the solid angle view. The horizontal air Kms-size gap offer a strong discriminator to filter UHE muons against tau. Tens event a year at PeV ( W resonance peak) energies in K m3 excavation gap should be observable . Hunting air shower in the night toward high mountains in Canyons or in a deep excavation may be the best and cheapest way to discover UHE neutrinos , either born by electron antineutrino scattering on electrons at PeV energies, or by direct tau neutrino possibly relic of muonic flavour oscillation even at EeV energies.

  2. Optical variability in the unusual K5 V infrared-excess star HD 98800

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1994-01-01

    The dusty infrared-excess star HD 98800 (K5 V) was observed for several weeks in the spring of 1993 by the Vanderbilt/Tennessee State 0.4 m automatic photoelectric telescope. It was found to be a variable star with an amplitude of 0.07 mag in V and a period of 14.7 days. We show, by comparison with other chromospherically active variable stars and constant stars with good observational histories, that the Rossby number for HD 98800, determined to be 0.30, places it well within the regime of stars whose convective envelopes and rotation rates combine to drive a magnetic dynamo strong enough to generate photometrically observable starspots. The light curve suggests at least two large spots at somewhat different longitudes on HD 98800, one of which could be as large as 16 deg in radius.

  3. Optical variability in the unusual K5 V infrared-excess star HD 98800

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1994-01-01

    The dusty infrared-excess star HD 98800 (K5 V) was observed for several weeks in the spring of 1993 by the Vanderbilt/Tennessee State 0.4 m automatic photoelectric telescope. It was found to be a variable star with an amplitude of 0.07 mag in V and a period of 14.7 days. We show, by comparison with other chromospherically active variable stars and constant stars with good observational histories, that the Rossby number for HD 98800, determined to be 0.30, places it well within the regime of stars whose convective envelopes and rotation rates combine to drive a magnetic dynamo strong enough to generate photometrically observable starspots. The light curve suggests at least two large spots at somewhat different longitudes on HD 98800, one of which could be as large as 16 deg in radius.

  4. Optical variability in the unusual K5 V infrared-excess star HD 98800

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henry, Gregory W.; Hall, Douglas S.

    1994-04-01

    The dusty infrared-excess star HD 98800 (K5 V) was observed for several weeks in the spring of 1993 by the Vanderbilt/Tennessee State 0.4 m automatic photoelectric telescope. It was found to be a variable star with an amplitude of 0.07 mag in V and a period of 14.7 days. We show, by comparison with other chromospherically active variable stars and constant stars with good observational histories, that the Rossby number for HD 98800, determined to be 0.30, places it well within the regime of stars whose convective envelopes and rotation rates combine to drive a magnetic dynamo strong enough to generate photometrically observable starspots. The light curve suggests at least two large spots at somewhat different longitudes on HD 98800, one of which could be as large as 16 deg in radius.

  5. Protoplanetary disk formation and evolution models: DM Tau and GM Aur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueso, R.; Guillot, T.

    2002-09-01

    We study the formation and evolution of protoplanetary disks using an axisymmetric turbulent disk model. We compare model results with observational parameters derived for the DM Tau and GM Aur systems. These are relatively old T Tauri stars with large and massive protoplanetary disks. Early disk formation is studied in the standard scenario of slowly rotating isothermal collapsing spheres and is strongly dependent on the initial angular momentum and the collapse accretion rate. The viscous evolution of the disk is integrated in time using the classical Alpha prescription of turbulence. We follow the temporal evolution of the disks until their characteristics fit the observed characteristics of DM Tau and GM Aur. We therefore obtain the set of model parameters that are able to explain the present state of these disks. We also study the disk evolution under the Beta parameterization of turbulence, recently proposed for sheared flows on protoplanetary disks. Both parameterizations allow explaining the present state of both DM Tau and GM Aur. We infer a value of Alpha between 5x10-3 to 0.02 for DM Tau and one order of magnitude smaller for GM Aur. Values of the Beta parameter are in accordance with theoretical predictions of Beta around 2x10-5 but with a larger dispersion on other model parameters, which make us favor the Alpha parameterization of turbulence. Implications for planetary system development in these systems are presented. In particular, GM Aur is a massive and slowly evolving disk where conditions are very favorable for planetesimal growth. The large value of present disk mass and the relatively small observed accretion rate of this system may also be indicative of the presence of an inner gas giant planet. Acknowledgements: This work has been supported by Programme Nationale de Planetologie. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doctoral fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  6. Amplification of Tau fibrils from minute quantities of seeds.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Virginia; Dinkel, Paul D; Rickman Hager, Emily; Margittai, Martin

    2014-09-16

    The propagation of Tau pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to proceed through templated conversion of Tau protein into fibrils and cell-to-cell transfer of elongation-competent seeds. To investigate the efficiency of Tau conversion, we adapted the protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay used for the conversion of prions. Utilizing heparin as a cofactor and employing repetitive cycles of shearing and growth, synthetic Tau fibrils and Tau fibrils in AD brain extract are progressively amplified. Concurrently, self-nucleation is suppressed. The results highlight breakage-induced replication of Tau fibrils as a potential facilitator of disease spread.

  7. Amplification of Tau Fibrils from Minute Quantities of Seeds

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The propagation of Tau pathology in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is thought to proceed through templated conversion of Tau protein into fibrils and cell-to-cell transfer of elongation-competent seeds. To investigate the efficiency of Tau conversion, we adapted the protein misfolding cyclic amplification assay used for the conversion of prions. Utilizing heparin as a cofactor and employing repetitive cycles of shearing and growth, synthetic Tau fibrils and Tau fibrils in AD brain extract are progressively amplified. Concurrently, self-nucleation is suppressed. The results highlight breakage-induced replication of Tau fibrils as a potential facilitator of disease spread. PMID:25153692

  8. (18)F-AV-1451 and CSF T-tau and P-tau as biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Schöll, Michael; Strandberg, Olof; Smith, Ruben; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Insel, Philip S; Hägerström, Douglas; Ohlsson, Tomas; Zetterberg, Henrik; Jögi, Jonas; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2017-09-01

    To elucidate the relationship between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) total-tau (T-tau) and phosphorylated tau (P-tau) with the tau PET ligand (18)F-AV-1451 in Alzheimer's disease (AD), we examined 30 cognitively healthy elderly (15 with preclinical AD), 14 prodromal AD, and 39 AD dementia patients. CSF T-tau and P-tau were highly correlated (R = 0.92, P < 0.001), but they were only moderately associated with retention of (18)F-AV-1451, and mainly in demented AD patients. (18)F-AV-1451, but not CSF T-tau or P-tau, was strongly associated with atrophy and cognitive impairment. CSF tau was increased in preclinical AD, despite normal (18)F-AV-1451 retention. However, not all dementia AD patients exhibited increased CSF tau, even though (18)F-AV-1451 retention was always increased at this disease stage. We conclude that CSF T-tau and P-tau mainly behave as biomarkers of "disease state", since they appear to be increased in many cases of AD at all disease stages, already before the emergence of tau aggregates. In contrast, (18)F-AV-1451 is a biomarker of "disease stage", since it is increased in clinical stages of the disease, and is associated with brain atrophy and cognitive decline. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  9. Tau pathology spread in PS19 tau transgenic mice following locus coeruleus (LC) injections of synthetic tau fibrils is determined by the LC's afferent and efferent connections.

    PubMed

    Iba, Michiyo; McBride, Jennifer D; Guo, Jing L; Zhang, Bin; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M-Y

    2015-09-01

    Filamentous tau inclusions are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other neurodegenerative tauopathies. An increasing number of studies implicate the cell-to-cell propagation of tau pathology in the progression of tauopathies. We recently showed (Iba et al., J Neurosci 33:1024-1037, 2013) that inoculation of preformed synthetic tau fibrils (tau PFFs) into the hippocampus of young transgenic (Tg) mice (PS19) overexpressing human P301S mutant tau induced robust tau pathology in anatomically connected brain regions including the locus coeruleus (LC). Since Braak and colleagues hypothesized that the LC is the first brain structure to develop tau lesions and since LC has widespread connections throughout the CNS, LC neurons could be the critical initiators of the stereotypical spreading of tau pathology through connectome-dependent transmission of pathological tau in AD. Here, we report that injections of tau PFFs into the LC of PS19 mice induced propagation of tau pathology to major afferents and efferents of the LC. Notably, tau pathology propagated along LC efferent projections was localized not only to axon terminals but also to neuronal perikarya, suggesting transneuronal transfer of templated tau pathology to neurons receiving LC projections. Further, brainstem neurons giving rise to major LC afferents also developed perikaryal tau pathology. Surprisingly, while tangle-bearing neurons degenerated in the LC ipsilateral to the injection site starting 6 months post-injection, no neuron loss was seen in the contralateral LC wherein tangle-bearing neurons gradually cleared tau pathology by 6-12 months post-injection. However, the spreading pattern of tau pathology observed in our LC-injected mice is different from that in AD brains since hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, which are affected in early stages of AD, were largely spared of tau inclusions in our model. Thus, while our study tested critical aspects of the Braak hypothesis of tau pathology spread

  10. Whole Genome Expression Analysis in a Mouse Model of Tauopathy Identifies MECP2 as a Possible Regulator of Tau Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Maphis, Nicole M.; Jiang, Shanya; Binder, Jessica; Wright, Carrie; Gopalan, Banu; Lamb, Bruce T.; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT or tau) correlates with the development of cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related tauopathies. While numerous attempts have been made to model AD-relevant tau pathology in various animal models, there has been very limited success for these models to fully recapitulate the progression of disease as seen in human tauopathies. Here, we performed whole genome gene expression in a genomic mouse model of tauopathy that expressed human MAPT gene under the control of endogenous human MAPT promoter and also were complete knockout for endogenous mouse tau [referred to as ‘hTauMaptKO(Duke)′ mice]. First, whole genome expression analysis revealed 64 genes, which were differentially expressed (32 up-regulated and 32 down-regulated) in the hippocampus of 6-month-old hTauMaptKO(Duke) mice compared to age-matched non-transgenic controls. Genes relevant to neuronal function or neurological disease include up-regulated genes: PKC-alpha (Prkca), MECP2 (Mecp2), STRN4 (Strn4), SLC40a1 (Slc40a1), POLD2 (Pold2), PCSK2 (Pcsk2), and down-regulated genes: KRT12 (Krt12), LASS1 (Cers1), PLAT (Plat), and NRXN1 (Nrxn1). Second, network analysis suggested anatomical structure development, cellular metabolic process, cell death, signal transduction, and stress response were significantly altered biological processes in the hTauMaptKO(Duke) mice as compared to age-matched non-transgenic controls. Further characterization of a sub-group of significantly altered genes revealed elevated phosphorylation of MECP2 (methyl-CpG-binding protein-2), which binds to methylated CpGs and associates with chromatin, in hTauMaptKO(Duke) mice compared to age-matched controls. Third, phoshpho-MECP2 was elevated in autopsy brain samples from human AD compared to healthy controls. Finally, siRNA-mediated knockdown of MECP2 in human tau expressing N2a cells resulted in a

  11. Modulation of tau phosphorylation and intracellular localization by cellular stress.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, S M; Zinnerman, M; Garner, C; Johnson, G V

    2000-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein that is functionally modulated by phosphorylation and hyperphosphorylated in several neurodegenerative diseases. Because phosphorylation regulates both normal and pathological tau functioning, it is of great interest to identify the signalling pathways and enzymes capable of modulating tau phosphorylation in vivo. The present study examined changes in tau phosphorylation and localization in response to osmotic stress, which activates the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs), a family of proline-directed protein kinases shown to phosphorylate tau in vitro and hypothesized to phosphorylate tau in Alzheimer's disease. Immunoblot analysis with phosphorylation-dependent antibodies revealed that osmotic stress increased tau phosphorylation at the non-Ser/Thr-Pro sites Ser-262/356, within the microtubule-binding domain, as well as Ser/Thr-Pro sites outside of tau's microtubule-binding domain. Although all SAPKs examined were activated by osmotic stress, none of the endogenous SAPKs mediated the increase in tau phosphorylation. However, when transfected into SH-SY5Y cells, SAPK3, but not the other SAPKs examined, phosphorylated tau in situ in response to activation by osmotic stress. Osmotic-stress-induced tau phosphorylation correlated with a decrease in the amount of tau associated with the cytoskeleton and an increase in the amount of soluble tau. This stress-induced alteration in tau localization was only partially due to phosphorylation at Ser-262/356 by a staurosporine-sensitive, non-proline-directed, protein kinase. Taken together, these results suggest that osmotic stress activates at least two tau-directed protein kinases, one proline-directed and one non-proline-directed, that SAPK3 can phosphorylate tau on Ser/Thr-Pro residues in situ, and that Ser-262/356 phosphorylation only partially regulates tau localization in the cell. PMID:10620503

  12. Aminothienopyridazines and methylene blue affect Tau fibrillization via cysteine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Crowe, Alex; James, Michael J; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Smith, Amos B; Trojanowski, John Q; Ballatore, Carlo; Brunden, Kurt R

    2013-04-19

    Alzheimer disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the accumulation of intraneuronal fibrils comprised of the protein Tau. Tau is normally a soluble protein that stabilizes microtubules, with splice isoforms that contain either three (3-R) or four (4-R) microtubule binding repeats. The formation of Tau fibrils is thought to result in neuronal damage, and inhibitors of Tau fibrillization may hold promise as therapeutic agents. The process of Tau fibrillization can be replicated in vitro, and a number of small molecules have been identified that inhibit Tau fibril formation. However, little is known about how these molecules affect Tau fibrillization. Here, we examined the mechanism by which the previously described aminothieno pyridazine (ATPZ) series of compounds inhibit Tau fibrillization. Active ATPZs were found to promote the oxidation of the two cysteine residues within 4-R Tau by a redox cycling mechanism, resulting in the formation of a disulfide-containing compact monomer that was refractory to fibrillization. Moreover, the ATPZs facilitated intermolecular disulfide formation between 3-R Tau monomers, leading to dimers that were capable of fibrillization. The ATPZs also caused cysteine oxidation in molecules unrelated to Tau. Interestingly, methylene blue, an inhibitor of Tau fibrillization under evaluation in Alzheimer disease clinical trials, caused a similar oxidation of cysteines in Tau and other molecules. These findings reveal that the ATPZs and methylene blue act by a mechanism that may affect their viability as potential therapeutic agents.

  13. Aminothienopyridazines and Methylene Blue Affect Tau Fibrillization via Cysteine Oxidation*

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, Alex; James, Michael J.; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Smith, Amos B.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ballatore, Carlo; Brunden, Kurt R.

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease and several other neurodegenerative disorders are characterized by the accumulation of intraneuronal fibrils comprised of the protein Tau. Tau is normally a soluble protein that stabilizes microtubules, with splice isoforms that contain either three (3-R) or four (4-R) microtubule binding repeats. The formation of Tau fibrils is thought to result in neuronal damage, and inhibitors of Tau fibrillization may hold promise as therapeutic agents. The process of Tau fibrillization can be replicated in vitro, and a number of small molecules have been identified that inhibit Tau fibril formation. However, little is known about how these molecules affect Tau fibrillization. Here, we examined the mechanism by which the previously described aminothieno pyridazine (ATPZ) series of compounds inhibit Tau fibrillization. Active ATPZs were found to promote the oxidation of the two cysteine residues within 4-R Tau by a redox cycling mechanism, resulting in the formation of a disulfide-containing compact monomer that was refractory to fibrillization. Moreover, the ATPZs facilitated intermolecular disulfide formation between 3-R Tau monomers, leading to dimers that were capable of fibrillization. The ATPZs also caused cysteine oxidation in molecules unrelated to Tau. Interestingly, methylene blue, an inhibitor of Tau fibrillization under evaluation in Alzheimer disease clinical trials, caused a similar oxidation of cysteines in Tau and other molecules. These findings reveal that the ATPZs and methylene blue act by a mechanism that may affect their viability as potential therapeutic agents. PMID:23443659

  14. Study of the tau- ---> pi- pi- pi+ pi0 pi0 nu/tau and tau- --> 3h- 2h+ nu/tau Decays Using the BaBar Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Sobie, R.; /Victoria U.

    2005-06-21

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -} 2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decays have been studied using the BABAR experiment at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. Preliminary branching fractions are given for the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and to the sub-channels {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -} {pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {omega}(782){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}}. A preliminary upper limit is given on the branching fraction for the {phi}(1020){pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} mode. In addition a preliminary measurement of the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} 3h{sup -}2h{sup +} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay (h = {pi}, K) is presented.

  15. PICALM modulates autophagy activity and tau accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Kevin; Fleming, Angeleen; Imarisio, Sara; Lopez Ramirez, Ana; Mercer, Jacob L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Bento, Carla F.; Puri, Claudia; Zavodszky, Eszter; Siddiqi, Farah; Lavau, Catherine P.; Betton, Maureen; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Wechsler, Daniel S.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have identified several loci associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including proteins involved in endocytic trafficking such as PICALM/CALM (phosphatidylinositol binding clathrin assembly protein). It is unclear how these loci may contribute to AD pathology. Here we show that CALM modulates autophagy and alters clearance of tau, a protein which is a known autophagy substrate and which is causatively linked to AD, both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, altered CALM expression exacerbates tau-mediated toxicity in zebrafish transgenic models. CALM influences autophagy by regulating the endocytosis of SNAREs, such as VAMP2, VAMP3 and VAMP8, which have diverse effects on different stages of the autophagy pathway, from autophagosome formation to autophagosome degradation. This study suggests that the AD genetic risk factor CALM modulates autophagy, and this may affect disease in a number of ways including modulation of tau turnover. PMID:25241929

  16. Riluzole Rescues Glutamate Alterations, Cognitive Deficits, and Tau Pathology Associated with P301L Tau Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hunsberger, Holly C.; Weitzner, Daniel S; Rudy, Carolyn C.; Hickman, James E.; Libell, Eric M.; Speer, Rebecca R.; Gerhardt, Greg A.; Reed, Miranda N.

    2016-01-01

    In the years preceding a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), hyperexcitability of the hippocampus is a commonly observed phenomenon in those at risk for AD. Our previous work suggests a dysregulation in glutamate neurotransmission may mediate this hyperexcitability, and glutamate dysregulation correlates with cognitive deficits in the rTg(TauP301L)4510 mouse model of AD. To determine whether improving glutamate regulation would attenuate cognitive deficits and AD-related pathology, TauP301L mice were treated with riluzole (~ 12.5 mg/kg/day p.o.), an FDA-approved drug for ALS that lowers extracellular glutamate levels. Riluzole-treated TauP301L mice exhibited improved memory performance that was associated with a decrease in glutamate release and an increase in glutamate uptake in the dentate gyrus (DG), cornu ammonis 3(CA3), and cornu ammonis 1(CA1) regions of the hippocampus. Riluzole treatment also attenuated the TauP301L-mediated increase in hippocampal vesicular glutamate transporter (vGLUT1), and the TauP301L-mediated decrease in hippocampal glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) and PSD-95 expression. Riluzole treatment also reduced tau pathology. These findings further elucidate the changes in glutamate regulation associated with tau pathology and open new opportunities for the development of clinically applicable therapeutic approaches to regulate glutamate in vulnerable circuits for those at risk for the development of AD. PMID:26146790

  17. Multicolor immunofluorescence reveals that p63- and/or K5-positive progenitor cells contribute to normal breast epithelium and usual ductal hyperplasia but not to low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia of the breast.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Werner; Stenman, Göran; Schroeder, Tina; Schumacher, Udo; Loening, Thomas; Stahnke, Lisa; Löhnert, Catharina; Siering, Robert Michael; Kuper, Arthur; Samoilova, Vera; Tiemann, Markus; Korsching, Eberhard; Buchwalow, Igor

    2017-03-16

    We contend that knowledge about the cellular composition of normal breast epithelium is a prerequisite for understanding proliferative breast disease. Against this background, we used multicolor immunofluorescence to study normal breast epithelium and two types of intraepithelial proliferative breast lesion for expression of the p63, basal keratin K5, glandular keratin K8/18, SMA, ER-alpha, and Ki67. We studied eight normal breast epithelium samples, 12 cases of usual ductal hyperplasia, and 33 cases of low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia (9 flat epithelial atypia, 14 low-grade ductal carcinoma in situ and 10 cases of lobular neoplasia). Usual ductal hyperplasia showed striking similarity to normal luminal breast epithelium including p63+ and/or K5+ luminal progenitor cells and the full spectrum of luminal progeny cells. In normal breast epithelium and usual ductal hyperplasia, expression of ER-alpha was associated with lack of expression of the proliferation antigen Ki67. In contrast, we found in both types of low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia robust expression of keratin K8/18 and a positive association between ER-alpha and Ki67 expression. However, these lesions were consistently negative for p63 and/or K5. Our observational study supports the view that usual ductal hyperplasia and low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia are different entities rather than part of a spectrum of the same disease. We propose a new operational model of cell differentiation that may serve to better understand correlations between normal breast epithelium and proliferative breast diseases. From our data we conclude that p63+ and/or K5+ progenitor cells contribute to maintenance of normal epithelium and usual ductal hyperplasia, but not to low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia of the breast.

  18. CP violation in semileptonic tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, D.; Castro, G. Lopez; Lozano, L.-T. Lopez

    2005-08-01

    The leading order contribution to the direct CP asymmetry in {tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay rates is evaluated within the standard model. The weak phase required for CP violation is introduced through an interesting mechanism involving second order weak interactions, which is also responsible for tiny violations of the {delta}S={delta}Q rule in K{sub l3} decays. The calculated CP asymmetry turns out to be of order 10{sup -12}, leaving a large window for studying effects of nonstandard sources of CP violation in this observable.

  19. A measurement of the tau lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abreu, P.; Adam, W.; Adye, T.; Agasi, E.; Aleksan, R.; Alekseev, G. D.; Algeri, A.; Allen, P.; Almehed, S.; Alvsvaag, S. J.; Amaldi, U.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Andreazza, A.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.-D.; Apsimon, R. J.; Arnoud, Y.; Å, B.; Augustin, J.-E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barate, R.; Barbiellini, G.; Bardin, D. Y.; Barker, G. J.; Baroncelli, A.; Barring, O.; Barrio, J. A.; Bartl, W.; Bates, M. J.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.-H.; Beeston, C. J.; Begalli, M.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Beltran, P.; Benedic, D.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Bianchi, F.; Bilenky, M. S.; Billoir, P.; Bjarne, J.; Bloch, D.; Blyth, S.; Bocci, V.; Bogolubov, P. N.; Bolognese, T.; Bonesini, M.; Bonivento, W.; Booth, P. S. L.; Borisov, G.; Borner, H.; Bosio, C.; Bostjancic, B.; Bosworth, S.; Botner, O.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bozzo, M.; Braibant, S.; Branchini, P.; Brand, K. D.; Brenner, R. A.; Briand, H.; Bricman, C.; Brown, R. C. A.; Brummer, N.; Brunet, J.-M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Burmeister, H.; Buytaert, J. A. M. A.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camacho Rozas, A. J.; Campion, R.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Cao, F.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Castillo Gimenez, M. V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Cerrito, L.; Chabaud, V.; Chan, A.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chaussard, L.; Chauveau, J.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chevalier, L.; Chliapnikov, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chrin, J. T. M.; Clara, M. P.; Collins, P.; Contreras, J. L.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Couchot, F.; Crawley, H. B.; Crennell, D.; Crosetti, G.; Crozon, M.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Dahl-Jensen, E.; Dalmagne, B.; Dam, M.; Damgaard, G.; Darbo, G.; Daubie, E.; Daum, A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Davenport, M.; David, P.; Davies, J.; da Silva, W.; Defoix, C.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; de Angelis, A.; de Boeck, H.; de Boer, W.; de Clercq, C.; de Fez Laso, M. D. M.; de Groot, N.; de La Vaissiere, C.; de Lotto, B.; de Min, A.; Dijkstra, H.; di Ciaccio, L.; Djama, F.; Dolbeau, J.; Donszelmann, M.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Dufour, Y.; Dupont, F.; Eek, L.-O.; Eerola, P. A.-M.; Ehret, R.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Elliot Peisert, A.; Engel, J.-P.; Ershaidat, N.; Fassouliotis, D.; Feindt, M.; Fenyuk, A.; Fernandez Alonso, M.; Ferrer, A.; Filippas, T. A.; Firestone, A.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Forbes, K. A. J.; Fousset, J.-L.; Francon, S.; Franek, B.; Frenkiel, P.; Fries, D. C.; Frodesen, A. G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Furnival, K.; Furstenau, H.; Fuster, J.; Gamba, D.; Garcia, C.; Garcia, J.; Gaspar, C.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, Ph.; Gazis, E. N.; Gerber, J.-P.; Giacomelli, P.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Golovatyuk, V. M.; Gomez Y Cadenas, J. J.; Goobar, A.; Gopal, G.; Gorski, M.; Gracco, V.; Grant, A.; Grard, F.; Graziani, E.; Grosdidier, G.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Wiesmann, P.; Grossetete, B.; Gumenyuk, S.; Guy, J.; Haedinger, U.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, M.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakansson, A.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hao, W.; Harris, F. J.; Hedberg, V.; Henkes, T.; Hernandez, J. J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T. L.; Hietanen, I.; Higgins, C. O.; Higon, E.; Hilke, H. J.; Hodgson, S. D.; Hofmokl, T.; Holmes, R.; Holmgren, S.-O.; Holthuizen, D.; Honore, P. F.; Hooper, J. E.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huet, K.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Ioannou, P.; Iversen, P.-S.; Jackson, J. N.; Jalocha, P.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Johansson, E. K.; Johnson, D.; Jonker, M.; Jonsson, L.; Juillot, P.; Kalkanis, G.; Kalmus, G.; Kapusta, F.; Karlsson, M.; Karvelas, E.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E. C.; Keranen, R.; Kesteman, J.; Khomenko, B. A.; Khovanski, N. N.; King, B.; Kjaer, N. J.; Klein, H.; Klovning, A.; Kluit, P.; Koch-Mehrin, A.; Koehne, J. H.; Koene, B.; Kokkinias, P.; Koratzinos, M.; Korcyl, K.; Korytov, A. V.; Kostioukhine, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, P. H.; Krolikowski, J.; Kronkvist, I.; Kruener-Marquis, U.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulka, K.; Kurvinen, K.; Lacasta, C.; Lambropoulos, C.; Lamsa, J. W.; Lanceri, L.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.-P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, F.; Leitner, R.; Lemoigne, Y.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Levy, J. M.; Lieb, E.; Liko, D.; Lindgren, J.; Lindner, R.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Loerstad, B.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J. G.; Lopez-Fernandez, A.; Lopez Aguera, M. A.; Los, M.; Loukas, D.; Lozano, J. J.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; Maehlum, G.; Maillard, J.; Maio, A.; Maltezos, A.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.-C.; Markou, A.; Maron, T.; Marti, S.; Mathis, L.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, M.; Mc Cubbin, M.; Mc Nay, R.; Mc Nulty, R.; Meola, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W. T.; Michelotto, M.; Mikulec, I.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Mitselmakher, G. V.; Mjoernmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moeller, R.; Moenig, K.; Monge, M. R.; Morettini, P.; Mueller, H.; Murray, W. J.; Myatt, G.; Navarria, F. L.; Negri, P.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nijjhar, B.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nilsen, P. E. S.; Niss, P.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevski, A. G.; Orava, R.; Ostankov, A.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Pain, R.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Pape, L.; Parodi, F.; Passeri, A.; Pegoraro, M.; Pennanen, J.; Peralta, L.; Pernegger, H.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Pettersen, T. E.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Pingot, O.; Plaszczynski, S.; Podobrin, O.; Pol, M. E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Privitera, P.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Ratoff, P. N.; Read, A. L.; Redaelli, N. G.; Regler, M.; Reid, D.; Renton, P. B.; Resvanis, L. K.; Richard, F.; Richardson, M.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roditi, I.; Romero, A.; Roncagliolo, I.; Ronchese, P.; Ronnqvist, C.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rossi, S.; Rossi, U.; Rosso, E.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Ruckstuhl, W.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Rybin, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sanchez, J.; Sannino, M.; Schael, S.; Schneider, H.; Schulze, B.; Schyns, M. A. E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Segar, A. M.; Seitz, A.; Sekulin, R.; Sessa, M.; Sette, G.; Seufert, R.; Shellard, R. C.; Siccama, I.; Siegrist, P.; Simonetti, S.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A. N.; Skjevling, G.; Smadja, G.; Smith, G. R.; Sosnowski, R.; Souza-Santos, D.; Spassoff, T. S.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Staeck, H.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Straver, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tabarelli, T.; Tchikilev, O.; Theodosiou, G. E.; Tilquin, A.; Timmermans, J.; Timofeev, V. G.; Tkatchev, L. G.; Todorov, T.; Toet, D. Z.; Toker, O.; Tome, B.; Torassa, E.; Tortora, L.; Treille, D.; Trevisan, U.; Trischuk, W.; Tristram, G.; Troncon, C.; Tsirou, A.; Tsyganov, E. N.; Turluer, M.-L.; Tuuva, T.; Tyapkin, I. A.; Tyndel, M.; Tzamarias, S.; Ueberschaer, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Vander Velde, C.; van Apeldoorn, G. W.; van Dam, P.; van der Heijden, M.; van Doninck, W. K.; Vaz, P.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Vilanova, D.; Vincent, P.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopyanov, A. S.; Vollmer, M.; Voulgaris, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Waldner, F.; Wayne, M.; Wehr, A.; Weierstall, M.; Weilhammer, P.; Werner, J.; Wetherell, A. M.; Wickens, J. H.; Wilkinson, G. R.; Williams, W. S. C.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Woschnagg, K.; Yamdagni, N.; Yepes, P.; Zaitsev, A.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zhang, G.; Zimin, N. I.; Zito, M.; Zuberi, R.; Zukanovich Funchal, R.; Zumerle, G.; Zuniga, J.

    1993-03-01

    The tau lepton lifetime is measured using four different methods with the DELPHI detector. Three measurements using one prong decays are combined, accounting for correlations, resulting in ττ=298 +/-7 (stat.)+/-4 (syst.) fs while the decay length distribution of three prong decays gives ππ=298+/-13 (stat)+/-(syst.) fs. The combined result is ττ=298+/-7 fs. The ratio of the Fermi coupling constant from tau decay relative to that from muon decay is found to be 0.985+/-0.013, compatible with lepton universality.

  20. Search for Second-Class Currents in tau- -> omega.pi-.nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2009-04-22

    We report an analysis of {tau}{sup -} decaying into {omega}{pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} with {omega} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} using a data sample containing nearly 320 million {tau} pairs collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B-Factory. We find no evidence for second-class currents and we set an upper limit of 0.69% at 90% confidence level for the fraction of second-class currents in this decay mode.

  1. The Tau Lepton and the Search for New Elementary Particle Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Perl, Martin L.

    1998-11-18

    This Fifth International WEIN Symposium is devoted to physics beyond the standard model. This talk is about tau lepton physics, but I begin with the question: do we know how to find new physics in the world of elementary particles? This question is interwoven with the various tau physics topics. These topics are: searching for unexpected tau decay modes; searching for additional tau decay mechanisms; radiative tau decays; tau decay modes of the W, B, and D; decay of the Z{sup 0} to tau pairs; searching for CP violation in tau decay; the tau neutrino, dreams and odd ideas in tau physics; and tau research facilities in the next decades.

  2. Multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton and electromagnetic calorimeter requirements at Tau-Charm Factory

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1989-08-01

    This is a study of the physics sensitivity to the multiple-neutral-meson decays of the /tau/ lepton at the Tau-Charm Factory. The sensitivity is compared for a moderate and an ultimate electromagnetic calorimeter. With the high luminosity of the Tau- Charm Factory, a very large sample of the decays /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//2/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// and /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus//3/pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau// can be collected with both detectors. However, with the ultimate detector, 2/pi//sup 0/ and 3/pi//sup 0/ can be unambiguously reconstructed with very little background. For the suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//pi//sup 0//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has the sensitivity. The ultimate detector is also sensitive to the more suppressed decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ K/sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau// and the moderate detector may have the sensitivity if the hadronic background is not significantly larger than that predicted by Lund. In the case of the highly suppressed second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// /yields/ /pi//sup /minus///eta//nu//sub /tau//, only the ultimate detector has sensitivity. The sensitivity can be greatly enhanced with a small-angle photon veto. 16 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Tau Phosphorylation by GSK3 in Different Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jesús; León-Espinosa, Gonzalo; García, Esther; García-Escudero, Vega; Hernández, Félix; DeFelipe, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Almost a 20% of the residues of tau protein are phosphorylatable amino acids: serine, threonine, and tyrosine. In this paper we comment on the consequences for tau of being a phosphoprotein. We will focus on serine/threonine phosphorylation. It will be discussed that, depending on the modified residue in tau molecule, phosphorylation could be protective, in processes like hibernation, or toxic like in development of those diseases known as tauopathies, which are characterized by an hyperphosphorylation and aggregation of tau. PMID:22675648

  4. Molecular insights into the reversible formation of tau protein fibrils.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yin; Dinkel, Paul; Yu, Xiang; Margittai, Martin; Zheng, Jie; Nussinov, Ruth; Wei, Guanghong; Ma, Buyong

    2013-05-04

    We computationally and experimentally showed that tau protein fibrils can be formed at high temperature. When cooled, the fibrils dissociate back to monomers. Heparin promotes tau fibril formation and prevents its reversion. Our results revealed the physicochemical mechanism of reversible formation of tau fibrils.

  5. Recent Results From BaBar in Tau Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Lewczuk, Mateusz; /Victoria U.

    2009-06-25

    The BaBar collaboration has accumulated over 400 million {tau}-pairs which can be used to study charged leptonic and hadronic weak currents to unprecedented precision. This note presents results on lepton universality, measurements of |V{sub us}|, and searches for {tau} decays which violate lepton flavour conservation, or {tau} decays that proceed through a suppressed second class current.

  6. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  7. Estimation of Tau and Phosphorylated Tau181 in Serum of Alzheimer’s Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shekhar, Shashank; Kumar, Rahul; Rai, Nitish; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Kusum; Upadhyay, Ashish Datt; Tripathi, Manjari; Dwivedi, Sadanand; Dey, Aparajit B.; Dey, Sharmistha

    2016-01-01

    The elevated level of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Tau and phosphorylated Tau181 (p-Tau181) proteins are well established hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Elevated level of p-Tau181 can differentiate AD from other neurodegenerative disease. However, the expression level of these proteins in serum of AD patient is not well set up. This study sought to evaluate the level of Tau and p-Tau181 in serum of AD, and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients for an alternative approach to establish protein-based markers by convenient way. Blood samples were collected from 39 AD patients, 37 MCI patients and 37 elderly individuals as controls. The levels of Tau and p-Tau181 in the serum of the different groups were measured by label free real time Surface Plasmon Resonance technology by using specific antibodies, and were further confirmed by the conventional western blot method. An appropriate statistical analysis, including Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC), was performed. The concentrations of serum Tau and p-Tau181 were significantly higher (p<0.00001) in AD (Tau; 47.49±9.00ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.161±0.04 ng/μL) compared to MCI (Tau; 39.26±7.78 ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.135±0.02 ng/μL) and were further higher compared to elderly controls (Tau; 34.92±6.58 ng/μL, p-Tau181; 0.122±0.01 ng/ μL). A significant (p<0.0001) downhill correlation was found between Tau as well as p-Tau181 levels with HMSE and MoCA score. This study for the first time reports the concentration of Tau and p-Tau181 in serum of AD and MCI patients. The cutoff values of Tau and p-Tau181 of AD and MCI patients with sensitivity and specificity reveal that serum level of these proteins can be used as a predictive marker for AD and MCI. PMID:27459603

  8. Tau-tubulin kinase 1 enhances prefibrillar tau aggregation and motor neuron degeneration in P301L FTDP-17 tau-mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiqing; Sato, Shinji; Okuyama, Satoshi; Swan, Russell J; Jacobsen, Michael T; Strunk, Elena; Ikezu, Tsuneya

    2010-08-01

    Tau-tubulin kinase-1 (TTBK1) phosphorylates microtubule-associated protein tau at specific serine/threonine residues found in paired helical filaments (PHFs), and its expression is up-regulated in the brain in Alzheimer disease, suggesting its role in tauopathy pathogenesis. To understand the effects of TTBK1 on tauopathy in vivo, we have developed bigenic mice overexpressing full-length TTBK1 and the P301L tau mutant. The bigenic mice show enhanced tau phosphorylation at multiple sites (AT8, 12E8, PHF-1, and pS422), tauC3-immunoreactive tau fragmentation, and accumulation of tau aggregates in cortical and hippocampal neurons at 12-13 mo of age. However, the phosphorylated tau aggregates were predominantly sarkosyl soluble and migrated in the light sucrose density fraction after discontinuous sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation, which suggests that they form small oligomers. The bigenic mice show significant locomotor dysfunction as determined by both rotorod and grip strength tests, as well as enhanced loss of motor neurons in the L4-L5 spinal cord. This neuronal dysfunction and degeneration was associated with increased levels of tau oligomers, cyclin-dependent protein kinase 5 activators p35 and p25, and pY216 phosphorylated glycogen synthase kinase 3-beta. These data suggest that TTBK1 up-regulation enhances tau phosphorylation and oligomerization, whose toxicity results in enhanced neurodegeneration and locomotor dysfunction in a tauopathy animal model.

  9. Tau identification using multivariate techniques in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neil, D. C.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2012-06-01

    Tau leptons play an important role in the physics program of the LHC. They are being used in electroweak measurements, in detector related studies and in searches for new phenomena like the Higgs boson or Supersymmetry. In the detector, tau leptons are reconstructed as collimated jets with low track multiplicity. Due to the background from QCD multijet processes, efficient tau identification techniques with large fake rejection are essential. Since single variable criteria are not enough to efficiently separate them from jets and electrons, modern multivariate techniques are used. In ATLAS, several advanced algorithms are applied to identify taus, including a projective likelihood estimator and boosted decision trees. All multivariate methods applied to the ATLAS simulated data perform better than the baseline cut analysis. Their performance is shown using high energy data collected at the ATLAS experiment. The improvement ranges from a factor of 2 to 5 in rejection for the same efficiency, depending on the selected efficiency operating point and the number of prongs in the tau decay. The strengths and weaknesses of each technique are also discussed.

  10. Proline Conformation in a Functional Tau Fragment.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Puneet; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Huvent, Isabelle; Hanoulle, Xavier; Lopez, Juan; Smet, Caroline; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Landrieu, Isabelle; Lippens, G

    2016-01-16

    The conformational state of distinct prolines can determine the folding of a protein but equally other biological processes when coupled to a conformation-sensitive secondary reaction. For the neuronal tau protein, the importance of proline conformation is underscored by its interaction with different prolyl cis/trans isomerases. The proline conformation would gain even further importance after phosphorylation of the preceding residue by various proline-directed kinases. A number of molecular diseases including Alzheimer's disease and traumatic brain injury were thereby recently qualified as "cistauosis", as they would imply a cis conformation for the pThr231-Pro232 prolyl bond. We here investigate by NMR spectroscopy the conformation of all prolines in a functional Tau fragment, Tau[208-324]. Although we can detect and identify some minor conformers in the cis form, we show that all prolines are for over 90% in the trans conformation. Phosphorylation by CDK2/CycA3, which notably leads to complete modification of the Thr231 residue, does not change this conclusion. Our data hence disagree with the notion that specific prolyl bonds in tau would adopt preferentially the cis conformation.

  11. Coefficient Alpha as an Estimate of Test Reliability under Violation of Two Assumptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zimmerman, Donald W.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Coefficient alpha was examined through computer simulation as an estimate of test reliability under violation of two assumptions. Coefficient alpha underestimated reliability under violation of the assumption of essential tau-equivalence of subtest scores and overestimated it under violation of the assumption of uncorrelated subtest error scores.…

  12. Determination of the Michel parameters and the {tau} neutrino helicity in {tau} decay

    SciTech Connect

    CLEO Collaboration

    1997-11-01

    Using the CLEO II detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring operated at {radical} (s) =10.6GeV, we have determined the Michel parameters {rho}, {xi}, and {delta} in {tau}{sup {minus_plus}}{r_arrow}l{sup {minus_plus}}{nu}{bar {nu}} decay as well as the {tau} neutrino helicity parameter h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} in {tau}{sup {minus_plus}}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup {minus_plus}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu} decay. From a data sample of 3.02{times}10{sup 6} produced {tau} pairs we analyzed events of the topologies e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}(l{sup {plus_minus}}{nu}{bar {nu}})({pi}{sup {minus_plus}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}) and e{sup +}e{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}({pi}{sup {plus_minus}}{pi}{sup 0}{bar {nu}})({pi}{sup {minus_plus}}{pi}{sup 0}{nu}). We obtain {rho}=0.747{rho}=0.747{plus_minus}0.010{plus_minus}0.006, {xi}=1.007{plus_minus}0.040{plus_minus}0.015, {xi}{delta}=0.745{plus_minus}0.026{plus_minus}0.009, and h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}}={minus}0.995{plus_minus}0.010{plus_minus}0.003, where we have used the previously determined sign of h{sub {nu}{sub {tau}}} [ARGUS Collaboration, H. Albrecht {ital et al.}, Z. Phys. C {bold 58}, 61 (1993); Phys. Lett. B {bold 349}, 576 (1995)]. We also present the Michel parameters as determined from the electron and muon samples separately. All results are in agreement with the standard model V{minus}A interaction. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Loss of Axonal Mitochondria Promotes Tau-Mediated Neurodegeneration and Alzheimer's Disease–Related Tau Phosphorylation Via PAR-1

    PubMed Central

    Iijima-Ando, Kanae; Sekiya, Michiko; Suzuki, Emiko; Lu, Bingwei; Iijima, Koichi M.

    2012-01-01

    Abnormal phosphorylation and toxicity of a microtubule-associated protein tau are involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, what pathological conditions trigger tau abnormality in AD is not fully understood. A reduction in the number of mitochondria in the axon has been implicated in AD. In this study, we investigated whether and how loss of axonal mitochondria promotes tau phosphorylation and toxicity in vivo. Using transgenic Drosophila expressing human tau, we found that RNAi–mediated knockdown of milton or Miro, an adaptor protein essential for axonal transport of mitochondria, enhanced human tau-induced neurodegeneration. Tau phosphorylation at an AD–related site Ser262 increased with knockdown of milton or Miro; and partitioning defective-1 (PAR-1), the Drosophila homolog of mammalian microtubule affinity-regulating kinase, mediated this increase of tau phosphorylation. Tau phosphorylation at Ser262 has been reported to promote tau detachment from microtubules, and we found that the levels of microtubule-unbound free tau increased by milton knockdown. Blocking tau phosphorylation at Ser262 site by PAR-1 knockdown or by mutating the Ser262 site to unphosphorylatable alanine suppressed the enhancement of tau-induced neurodegeneration caused by milton knockdown. Furthermore, knockdown of milton or Miro increased the levels of active PAR-1. These results suggest that an increase in tau phosphorylation at Ser262 through PAR-1 contributes to tau-mediated neurodegeneration under a pathological condition in which axonal mitochondria is depleted. Intriguingly, we found that knockdown of milton or Miro alone caused late-onset neurodegeneration in the fly brain, and this neurodegeneration could be suppressed by knockdown of Drosophila tau or PAR-1. Our results suggest that loss of axonal mitochondria may play an important role in tau phosphorylation and toxicity in the pathogenesis of AD. PMID:22952452

  14. Extensive p-tau pathology and SDS-stable p-tau oligomers in Alzheimer’s cortical synapses

    PubMed Central

    Henkins, Kristen M.; Sokolow, Sophie; Miller, Carol A.; Vinters, Harry V.; Poon, Wayne; Cornwell, Lindsey B.; Saing, Tommy; Gylys, Karen Hoppens

    2012-01-01

    Like amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers, tau aggregates are increasingly recognized as potential key toxic intermediates in Alzheimer’s disease and as therapeutic targets. P-tau co-localizes with Aβ in cortical AD synapses and may contribute to synapse dysfunction and loss. Flow cytometry analysis of synaptosomes from AD compared to aged cognitively normal cortex demonstrates increased immunolabeling for three p-tau antibodies (AT8, PHF-1 and pS422), indicating phosphorylation at multiple tau epitopes. Sequential extraction experiments show increased soluble p-tau in AD synapses, but a sizable pool of p-tau requires detergent solubilization, suggesting endosomal/lysosomal localization. P-tau is co-localized with Aβ in individual synaptosomes in dual labeling experiments, and flow cytometry sorting of Aβ-positive synaptosomes from an AD case reveals a marked enrichment of p-tau aggregates. The p-tau enrichment, a 76-fold increase over the initial homogenate, is consistent with sequestration of p-tau in internal synaptic compartments. Western analysis of a series of AD and normal cases shows SDS-stable tau oligomers in the dimer/trimer size range in AD samples. These results indicate that widespread synaptic p-tau pathology accompanies Aβ accumulations in surviving synaptic terminals, particularly in late-stage AD. PMID:22486774

  15. Extensive p-tau pathology and SDS-stable p-tau oligomers in Alzheimer's cortical synapses.

    PubMed

    Henkins, Kristen M; Sokolow, Sophie; Miller, Carol A; Vinters, Harry V; Poon, Wayne W; Cornwell, Lindsey B; Saing, Tommy; Gylys, Karen Hoppens

    2012-11-01

    Like amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers, tau aggregates are increasingly recognized as potential key toxic intermediates in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and as therapeutic targets. P-tau co-localizes with Aβ in cortical AD synapses and may contribute to synapse dysfunction and loss. Flow cytometry analysis of synaptosomes from AD compared with aged cognitively normal cortex demonstrates increased immunolabeling for three p-tau antibodies (AT8, PHF-1 and pS422), indicating phosphorylation at multiple tau epitopes. Sequential extraction experiments show increased soluble p-tau in AD synapses, but a sizable pool of p-tau requires detergent solubilization, suggesting endosomal/lysosomal localization. P-tau is co-localized with Aβ in individual synaptosomes in dual labeling experiments, and flow cytometry sorting of Aβ-positive synaptosomes from an AD case reveals a marked enrichment of p-tau aggregates. The p-tau enrichment, a 76-fold increase over the initial homogenate, is consistent with sequestration of p-tau in internal synaptic compartments. Western analysis of a series of AD and normal cases shows SDS-stable tau oligomers in the dimer/trimer size range in AD samples. These results indicate that widespread synaptic p-tau pathology accompanies Aβ accumulations in surviving synaptic terminals, particularly in late-stage AD.

  16. Escitalopram Ameliorates Forskolin-Induced Tau Hyperphosphorylation in HEK239/tau441 Cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Qing-Guo; Wang, Yan-Juan; Gong, Wei-Gang; Zhou, Qi-Da; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Jun

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of escitalopram (a widely used and highly efficacious antidepressant from the SSRI class) on tau hyperphosphorylation, HEK293/tau441 cells were pretreated with 4 μM of forskolin for 2 h. Then we treated the cells with different doses of escitalopram (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 μM) for 22 h. We measured the phosphorylation level of tau by Western blotting. It was shown that escitalopram could protect tau from hyperphosphorylation induced by pharmacological activation of protein kinase A (PKA) at a dose of 20, 40, and 80 μM in vitro. Interestingly, the same dose of escitalopram could also increase the level of serine-9-phosphorylated GSK-3β (inactive form) and the phosphorylation level of Akt at Ser473 (active form) with no significant change in the level of total GSK-3β and Akt. Unexpectedly, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A receptor (5-HT1A) agonist 8-OH-DPAT did not decrease forskolin-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Our results suggest that escitalopram can ameliorate forskolin-induced tau hyperphosphorylation, which is not through the typical 5-HT1A pathway, and Akt/GSK-3β signaling pathway is involved. These findings may support an effective role of antidepressants in the prevention of dementia associated with depression in patients.

  17. Resolved multifrequency radio observations of GG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, Sean M.; Birnstiel, T.; Rosenfeld, K. A.; Wilner, D. J.; Chandler, Claire J.; Pérez, L. M.; Isella, Andrea; Ricci, L.; Carpenter, J. M.; Calvet, N.; Corder, S. A.; Deller, A. T.; Dullemond, C. P.; Greaves, J. S.; Harris, R. J.; Henning, Th.; Linz, H.; Kwon, W.; Lazio, J.; Mundy, L. G.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We present subarcsecond resolution observations of continuum emission associated with the GG Tau quadruple star system at wavelengths of 1.3, 2.8, 7.3, and 50 mm. These data confirm that the GG Tau A binary is encircled by a circumbinary ring at a radius of 235 AU with a FWHM width of ∼60 AU. We find no clear evidence for a radial gradient in the spectral shape of the ring, suggesting that the particle size distribution is spatially homogeneous on angular scales ≳0.''1. A central point source, likely associated with the primary component (GG Tau Aa), exhibits a composite spectrum from dust and free-free emission. Faint emission at 7.3 mm is observed toward the low-mass star GG Tau Ba, although its origin remains uncertain. Using these measurements of the resolved, multifrequency emission structure of the GG Tau A system, models of the far-infrared to radio spectrum are developed to place constraints on the grain size distribution and dust mass in the circumbinary ring. The non-negligible curvature present in the ring spectrum implies a maximum particle size of 1-10 mm, although we are unable to place strong constraints on the distribution shape. The corresponding dust mass is 30-300 M {sub ⊕}, at a temperature of 20-30 K. We discuss how this significant concentration of relatively large particles in a narrow ring at a large radius might be produced in a local region of higher gas pressures (i.e., a particle 'trap') located near the inner edge of the circumbinary disk.

  18. Caspase-Cleaved Tau Impairs Mitochondrial Dynamics in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Pérez, María José; Vergara-Pulgar, Katiana; Jara, Claudia; Cabezas-Opazo, Fabian; Quintanilla, Rodrigo A

    2017-01-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by the presence of aggregates of tau protein. Tau truncated by caspase-3 (D421) or tau hyperphosphorylated at Ser396/S404 might play a role in the pathogenesis of AD. Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that modify their size and function through mitochondrial dynamics. Recent studies have shown that alterations of mitochondrial dynamics affect synaptic communication. Therefore, we studied the effects of pathological forms of tau on the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. We used primary cortical neurons from tau(-/-) knockout mice and immortalized cortical neurons (CN1.4) that were transfected with plasmids containing green fluorescent protein (GFP) or GFP with different tau forms: full-length (GFP-T4), truncated (GFP-T4C3), pseudophosphorylated (GFP-T42EC), or both truncated and pseudophosphorylated modifications of tau (GFP-T4C3-2EC). Cells expressing truncated tau showed fragmented mitochondria compared to cells that expressed full-length tau. These findings were corroborated using primary neurons from tau(-/-) knockout mice that expressed the truncated and both truncated and pseudophosphorylated forms of tau. Interestingly, mitochondrial fragmentation was accompanied by a significant reduction in levels of optic atrophy protein 1 (Opa1) in cells expressing the truncated form of tau. In addition, treatment with low concentrations of amyloid-beta (Aβ) significantly reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, cell viability, and mitochondrial length in cortical cells and primary neurons from tau(-/-) mice that express truncated tau. These results indicate that the presence of tau pathology impairs mitochondrial dynamics by reducing Opa1 levels, an event that could lead to mitochondrial impairment observed in AD.

  19. Trans-cellular propagation of Tau aggregation by fibrillar species.

    PubMed

    Kfoury, Najla; Holmes, Brandon B; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M; Diamond, Marc I

    2012-06-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule associated protein Tau is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. In Alzheimer disease, Tau pathology spreads progressively throughout the brain, possibly along existing neural networks. However, it is still unclear how the propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. Intriguingly, in animal models, vaccine-based therapies have reduced Tau and synuclein pathology by uncertain mechanisms, given that these proteins are intracellular. We have previously speculated that trans-cellular propagation of misfolding could be mediated by a process similar to prion pathogenesis, in which fibrillar Tau aggregates spread pathology from cell to cell. However, there has been little evidence to demonstrate true trans-cellular propagation of Tau misfolding, in which Tau aggregates from one cell directly contact Tau protein in the recipient cell to trigger further aggregation. Here we have observed that intracellular Tau fibrils are directly released into the medium and then taken up by co-cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates induce fibrillization of intracellular Tau in these naive recipient cells via direct protein-protein contact that we demonstrate using FRET. Tau aggregation can be amplified across several generations of cells. An anti-Tau monoclonal antibody blocks Tau aggregate propagation by trapping fibrils in the extracellular space and preventing their uptake. Thus, propagation of Tau protein misfolding among cells can be mediated by release and subsequent uptake of fibrils that directly contact native protein in recipient cells. These results support the model of aggregate propagation by templated conformational change and suggest a mechanism for vaccine-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases.

  20. Trans-cellular Propagation of Tau Aggregation by Fibrillar Species*

    PubMed Central

    Kfoury, Najla; Holmes, Brandon B.; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    Aggregation of the microtubule associated protein Tau is associated with several neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer disease and frontotemporal dementia. In Alzheimer disease, Tau pathology spreads progressively throughout the brain, possibly along existing neural networks. However, it is still unclear how the propagation of Tau misfolding occurs. Intriguingly, in animal models, vaccine-based therapies have reduced Tau and synuclein pathology by uncertain mechanisms, given that these proteins are intracellular. We have previously speculated that trans-cellular propagation of misfolding could be mediated by a process similar to prion pathogenesis, in which fibrillar Tau aggregates spread pathology from cell to cell. However, there has been little evidence to demonstrate true trans-cellular propagation of Tau misfolding, in which Tau aggregates from one cell directly contact Tau protein in the recipient cell to trigger further aggregation. Here we have observed that intracellular Tau fibrils are directly released into the medium and then taken up by co-cultured cells. Internalized Tau aggregates induce fibrillization of intracellular Tau in these naive recipient cells via direct protein-protein contact that we demonstrate using FRET. Tau aggregation can be amplified across several generations of cells. An anti-Tau monoclonal antibody blocks Tau aggregate propagation by trapping fibrils in the extracellular space and preventing their uptake. Thus, propagation of Tau protein misfolding among cells can be mediated by release and subsequent uptake of fibrils that directly contact native protein in recipient cells. These results support the model of aggregate propagation by templated conformational change and suggest a mechanism for vaccine-based therapies in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:22461630

  1. Search for a low-mass higgs boson in Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau(+)tau(-) at BABAR.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prencipe, E; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Tico, J Garra; Grauges, E; Martinelli, M; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Lynch, G; Osipenkov, I L; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Asgeirsson, D J; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Randle-Conde, A; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Atmacan, H; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Vitug, G M; Yasin, Z; Sharma, V; Campagnari, C; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Martinez, A J; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wang, L; Winstrom, L O; Cheng, C H; Doll, D A; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Ongmongkolkul, P; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Hirschauer, J F; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Wagner, S R; Ayad, R; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Karbach, T M; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Kobel, M J; Nogowski, R; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Bernard, D; Latour, E; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Playfer, S; Watson, J E; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Fioravanti, E; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Munerato, M; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Santoro, V; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Contri, R; Guido, E; Lo Vetere, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Adametz, A; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bernlochner, F U; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Lueck, T; Volk, A; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Derkach, D; da Costa, J Firmino; Grosdidier, G; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Malaescu, B; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Clarke, C K; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Sigamani, M; Cowan, G; Paramesvaran, S; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Gradl, W; Hafner, A; Alwyn, K E; Bailey, D; Barlow, R J; Jackson, G; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Salvati, E; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Henderson, S W; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Schram, M; Biassoni, P; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Stracka, S; Cremaldi, L; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sonnek, P; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Simard, M; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Onorato, G; Sciacca, C; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Wang, W F; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Castelli, G; Gagliardi, N; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Ben-Haim, E; Bonneaud, G R; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Marchiori, G; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Sitt, S; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Lopes Pegna, D; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Anulli, F; Baracchini, E; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Gioi, L Li; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Esteve, L; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Benitez, J F; Cenci, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Sevilla, M Franco; Gabareen, A M; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Lindquist, B; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Neal, H; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; West, C A; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Bellis, M; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Miyashita, T S; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Soffer, A; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Wray, B C; Drummond, B W; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Bianchi, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Choi, H H F; Hamano, K; King, G J; Kowalewski, R; Lewczuk, M J; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Gershon, T J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Puccio, E M T; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Vuosalo, C O; Wu, S L

    2009-10-30

    We search for a light Higgs boson A0 in the radiative decay Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0), A(0)-->tau+tau-, tau+-->e+nu(e)nu(tau), or tau+-->mu+nu(mu)nu(tau). The data sample contains 122x10(6) Upsilon(3S) events recorded with the BABAR detector. We find no evidence for a narrow structure in the studied tau+tau- invariant mass region of 4.03tau+tau-)<10.10 GeV/c2. We exclude at the 90% confidence level (C.L.) a low-mass Higgs boson decaying to tau+tau- with a product branching fraction B(Upsilon(3S)-->gammaA(0))xB(A(0)-->tau+tau-)>(1.5-16)x10(-5) across the m(tau+tau-) range. We also set a 90% C.L. upper limit on the tau+tau- decay of the eta(b) at B(eta(b)-->tau+tau-)<8%.

  2. An unexpected oxidation: NaK5Cl2(S2O6)2 revisited

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, William T. A.; Plater, M. John

    2017-01-01

    The title compound, NaK5Cl2(S2O6)2 [systematic name: sodium penta­potassium dichloride bis­(di­thio­nate)], arose as an unexpected product from an organic synthesis that used di­thio­nite (S2O4 2−) ions as a reducing agent to destroy excess permanganate ions. Compared to the previous study [Stanley (1953 ▸). Acta Cryst. 6, 187–196], the present tetra­gonal structure exhibits a root 2a × root 2a × c super-cell due to subtle changes in the orientations of the di­thio­nate anions. The structure can be visualized as a three-dimensional framework of [001] columns of alternating trans-NaO4Cl2 and KO4Cl2 octa­hedra cross-linked by the di­thio­nate ions with the inter­stices occupied by KO6Cl2 polyhedra to generate a densely packed three-dimensional framework. The asymmetric unit comprises two sodium ions (site symmetries 4 and -4, four potassium ions (site symmetries = -4, 4, 1 and 1), three chloride ions (site symmetries = 4, 4 and 2) and two half-di­thio­nate ions (all atoms on general positions). Both di­thio­nate ions are completed by crystallographic inversion symmetry. The crystal chosen for data collection was found to be rotationally twinned by 180° about the [100] axis in reciprocal space with a 0.6298 (13):0.3702 (13) domain ratio. PMID:28217339

  3. Observation of CO2 in Comet C/2012 K5 LINEAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKay, Adam; Kelley, Michael; DiSanti, Michael; Chanover, Nancy

    2012-12-01

    The study of cometary composition is important to understanding the formation and evolution of our solar system. Comets have undergone very little thermal evolution in their lifetimes, which results in their near pristine composition. The nucleus of a comet is very rarely detected directly. Instead, we observe the coma that surrounds the nucleus. Physical and chemical processes in the coma affect its composition, and therefore coma composition is not a direct representation of nuclear composition. An important trend is the observed variation of coma composition with heliocentric distance, most likely influenced by the volatility of the main surface ices, H2O, CO2, and CO. Infrared studies of these molecules are complicated by telluric features, so often daughter molecules of these species such as OH are observed instead. A potentially effective tracer for these primary ices is atomic oxygen in the coma. However, the relationship between these ices and atomic oxygen is only understood at a qualitative level. We propose to use Spitzer observations in IRAC's 4.5 micron band pass to observe the CO2 v3 band at 4.26 microns in comet C/2012 K5 LINEAR. These observations will be coordinated with observations of atomic oxygen obtained at Apache Point Observatory and observations of H2O at Keck. These near simultaneous observations of H2O, CO2, and atomic oxygen in a cometary coma will increase our understanding of the link between these primary ices and atomic oxygen. With a complete understanding of the relationship between atomic oxygen and the primary ices on the nucleus, observations of atomic oxygen can serve as a powerful proxy for the production of these primary volatiles and aid our understanding of the variation in coma composition as a function of heliocentric distance, and therefore the composition of the nucleus and how our solar system was formed.

  4. Survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5 Under Simulated Martian Surface Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David J.; Schuerger, Andrew C.; Davidson, Mark M.; Pacala, Stephen W.; Bakermans, Corien; Onstott, Tullis C.

    2009-03-01

    Spacecraft launched to Mars can retain viable terrestrial microorganisms on board that may survive the interplanetary transit. Such biota might compromise the search for life beyond Earth if capable of propagating on Mars. The current study explored the survivability of Psychrobacter cryohalolentis K5, a psychrotolerant microorganism obtained from a Siberian permafrost cryopeg, under simulated martian surface conditions of high ultraviolet irradiation, high desiccation, low temperature, and low atmospheric pressure. First, a desiccation experiment compared the survival of P. cryohalolentis cells embedded, or not embedded, within a medium/salt matrix (MSM) maintained at 25°C for 24 h within a laminar flow hood. Results indicate that the presence of the MSM enhanced survival of the bacterial cells by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. Second, tests were conducted in a Mars Simulation Chamber to determine the UV tolerance of the microorganism. No viable vegetative cells of P. cryohalolentis were detected after 8 h of exposure to Mars-normal conditions of 4.55 W/m2 UVC irradiation (200-280 nm), -12.5°C, 7.1 mbar, and a Mars gas mix composed of CO2 (95.3%), N2 (2.7%), Ar (1.6%), O2 (0.2%), and H2O (0.03%). Third, an experiment was conducted within the Mars chamber in which total atmospheric opacities were simulated at τ = 0.1 (dust-free CO2 atmosphere at 7.1 mbar), 0.5 (normal clear sky with 0.4 = dust opacity and 0.1 = CO2-only opacity), and 3.5 (global dust storm) to determine the survivability of P. cryohalolentis to partially shielded UVC radiation. The survivability of the bacterium increased with the level of UVC attenuation, though population levels still declined several orders of magnitude compared to UVC-absent controls over an 8 h exposure period.

  5. Review of recent results on the /tau/ lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, K.K.

    1988-04-01

    This is a review of the recent results on the /tau/ lepton. The results include precise measurements of the lifetime, measurements of the decay /tau//sup /minus// ..-->.. ..pi../sup /minus//2..pi../sup 0/..nu../sub /tau// with much improved precision, limits on decay modes containing /eta/ mesons, including the second-class-current decay /tau//sup /minus// ..-->.. ..pi../sup /minus///eta/..nu../sub /tau//, and limits on exotic decay modes. The implications of these results on the discrepancy in the one-charged-particle decay modes are discussed. 43 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Tau Lepton Physics: Proceedings of the Second Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, K. K.

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * International Advisory Committee and Local Organization Committee * Forward * Workshop Agenda * New Measurements of the τ Lepton Mass * Status of the Tau Lepton — View from the PDG * TAUOLA Monte Carlo for τ Decays. A Question of Systematic Errors * A Review of the τ Lifetime * A Recent CLEO II Measurement of the Branching Ratio Be(τ → eνν) * Tau Leptonic Branching Ratios with the L3 Detector * Measurements of BR( {τ \\to ev\\bar v } ) and BR( {τ \\to μ v\\bar v } ) Using the OPAL Detector at LEP * Status of Lepton Universality * QCD Predictions for the Tau Hadronic Width and Determination of α_s(M_τ ^{2}) * τ → π(K)ν and τ → ρν (OPAL Results) * Measurement of the Decay τ- → ρ-ντ * A Measurement of the Branching Fraction B(τ± → h±π0ντ) * One-Prong Tau Decays with Multiple π0's * Analysis of the Hadronic Final State in τ- → π-π-π+ντ * Observation of the Decay τ± → 3h±2π0ντ * Measurement of the Spectral Functions and Determination of the Strong Coupling Constant * 3-Prong τ Decays * CLEO-II Results on τ Decays to η * Strange Decays of the Tau Lepton * Tau Decay Puzzles and Possible Light Gluinos * Beyond the Standard Model in Tau Decays * A Measurement of the Tau Lepton Lifetime * Tau Lifetime Measurement Using the OPAL Detector at LEP * A Precise Measurement of the τ Lepton Lifetime * DELPHI τ Lifetime Measurements * L3 Tau Lifetime Measurement from 1991 Data * The Tau Branching Ratios * Are We Moving Toward a Balanced τ Budget? * Bell's Inequality and τ-Physics at LEP * Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the τ Lepton * Tests for CP Violation in τ Decays * CP Violation and τ Weak Dipole Moment * Search for CP Violation in Z → τ+τ- * Test of Electroweak Interactions at TRISTAN * Test of Electroweak Interactions at LEP * Measurement of τ Polarization at LEP * Tau Physics at p\\bar p Colliders * New Measurements of the Tau and Tau Neutrino Masses from

  7. Discodermolide interferes with the binding of tau protein to microtubules.

    PubMed

    Kar, Santwana; Florence, Gordon J; Paterson, Ian; Amos, Linda A

    2003-03-27

    We investigated whether discodermolide, a novel antimitotic agent, affects the binding to microtubules of tau protein repeat motifs. Like taxol, the new drug reduces the proportion of tau that pellets with microtubules. Despite their differing structures, discodermolide, taxol and tau repeats all bind to a site on beta-tubulin that lies within the microtubule lumen and is crucial in controlling microtubule assembly. Low concentrations of tau still bind strongly to the outer surfaces of preformed microtubules when the acidic C-terminal regions of at least six tubulin dimers are available for interaction with each tau molecule; otherwise binding is very weak.

  8. Biochemical studies in Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) patients: change in CSF levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide and phospho-tau.

    PubMed

    Ray, Balmiki; Reyes, Patricio F; Lahiri, Debomoy K

    2011-04-01

    Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) is one of the causes of dementia of the elderly characterized by impaired mental function, gait difficulties and urinary incontinence. Previously, it was proposed that some of the NPH patients may develop Alzheimer's disease (AD) like pathology. Aim of this study was to compare levels of different CSF biomarkers, including total secreted β-amyloid precursor protein (sAPP), sAPP-alpha form (sAPPα), amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptide, total-tau protein and hyperphosphorylated-tau protein in subjects from NPH and Non-NPH Control (NNC). CSF was collected from 23 NPH patients and 13 Non-NPH controls by lumber puncture. Western blot analysis was performed to measure levels of sAPP-total. ELISA was used separately to determine levels of sAPPα, Aβ peptide, total-tau and phospho-tau proteins. We found a significant decrease in levels of total secreted APP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) in the CSF sample of NPH patients vs. NNC. We did not observe any change in levels of total-tau or phospho-tau in NPH vs. NNC subjects. Notably, phospho-tau level was significantly increased in the NPH patients, who were suffering from the disease for more than one year, vs. NNC. Among five biomarkers studied, decreased sAPP, sAPPα and Aβ (1-42) levels in CSF can be molecular markers to distinguish NPH cases from NNC. Disease severity can also be assessed by increased levels of CSF phospho-tau protein and the ratio of phospho-tau to Aβ (1-42), which might be a useful tool for predicting conversion of NPH individuals to other neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD).

  9. Curcumin Suppresses Soluble Tau Dimers and Corrects Molecular Chaperone, Synaptic, and Behavioral Deficits in Aged Human Tau Transgenic Mice*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qiu-Lan; Zuo, Xiaohong; Yang, Fusheng; Ubeda, Oliver J.; Gant, Dana J.; Alaverdyan, Mher; Teng, Edmond; Hu, Shuxin; Chen, Ping-Ping; Maiti, Panchanan; Teter, Bruce; Cole, Greg M.; Frautschy, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying Tau-related synaptic and cognitive deficits and the interrelationships between Tau species, their clearance pathways, and synaptic impairments remain poorly understood. To gain insight into these mechanisms, we examined these interrelationships in aged non-mutant genomic human Tau mice, with established Tau pathology and neuron loss. We also examined how these interrelationships changed with an intervention by feeding mice either a control diet or one containing the brain permeable beta-amyloid and Tau aggregate binding molecule curcumin. Transgene-dependent elevations in soluble and insoluble phospho-Tau monomer and soluble Tau dimers accompanied deficits in behavior, hippocampal excitatory synaptic markers, and molecular chaperones (heat shock proteins (HSPs)) involved in Tau degradation and microtubule stability. In human Tau mice but not control mice, HSP70, HSP70/HSP72, and HSP90 were reduced in membrane-enriched fractions but not in cytosolic fractions. The synaptic proteins PSD95 and NR2B were reduced in dendritic fields and redistributed into perikarya, corresponding to changes observed by immunoblot. Curcumin selectively suppressed levels of soluble Tau dimers, but not of insoluble and monomeric phospho-Tau, while correcting behavioral, synaptic, and HSP deficits. Treatment increased PSD95 co-immunoprecipitating with NR2B and, independent of transgene, increased HSPs implicated in Tau clearance. It elevated HSP90 and HSC70 without increasing HSP mRNAs; that is, without induction of the heat shock response. Instead curcumin differentially impacted HSP90 client kinases, reducing Fyn without reducing Akt. In summary, curcumin reduced soluble Tau and elevated HSPs involved in Tau clearance, showing that even after tangles have formed, Tau-dependent behavioral and synaptic deficits can be corrected. PMID:23264626

  10. Electrochemical detection of anti-tau antibodies binding to tau protein and inhibition of GSK-3β-catalyzed phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Esteves-Villanueva, Jose O; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2016-03-01

    Tau protein hyperphosphorylation triggers tau aggregation and its toxicity, leading to neuronal death and cell-to-cell toxicity. Hence, inhibition of protein kinases is a viable tool toward reduction of tau toxicity. By targeting various epitopes of Tau441 protein immobilized on Au surface, the protein kinase inhibition by anti-tau antibodies was measured by surface electrochemistry. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to measure the charge transfer resistance (Rct) of nonphosphorylated tau-Au film (nTau-Au) and compared with the phosphorylated tau-Au film (pTau-Au). The pTau-Au films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), which indicated high phosphorus content. The Rct factor was used as the measure of inhibition efficacies by anti-tau antibodies (D8, A10, P262, and Tau46) in addition to antibody formulation intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG). The Rct factor for pTau-Au in the absence of antibodies was 0.25 ± 0.08, indicating a dramatic decrease in Rct on phosphorylation. The Rct factors for Tau46 and A10 were 0.57 ± 0.22 and 0.65 ± 0.26, respectively, indicating phosphorylation inhibition. All antibodies exhibited similar binding to nTau-Au. The proposed electrochemical assay may be used for detection of other posttranslational modifications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The disk around the brown dwarf KPNO Tau 3

    SciTech Connect

    Broekhoven-Fiene, Hannah; Matthews, Brenda; Di Francesco, James; Duchêne, Gaspard; Scholz, Aleks; Chrysostomou, Antonio; Jayawardhana, Ray

    2014-07-10

    We present submillimeter observations of the young brown dwarfs KPNO Tau 1, KPNO Tau 3, and KPNO Tau 6 at 450 μm and 850 μm taken with the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. KPNO Tau 3 and KPNO Tau 6 have been previously identified as Class II objects hosting accretion disks, whereas KPNO Tau 1 has been identified as a Class III object and shows no evidence of circumsubstellar material. Our 3σ detection of cold dust around KPNO Tau 3 implies a total disk mass of (4.0 ± 1.1) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} (assuming a gas to dust ratio of 100:1). We place tight constraints on any disks around KPNO Tau 1 or KPNO Tau 6 of <2.1 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} and <2.7 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉}, respectively. Modeling the spectral energy distribution of KPNO Tau 3 and its disk suggests the disk properties (geometry, dust mass, and grain size distribution) are consistent with observations of other brown dwarf disks and low-mass T-Tauri stars. In particular, the disk-to-host mass ratio for KPNO Tau 3 is congruent with the scenario that at least some brown dwarfs form via the same mechanism as low-mass stars.

  12. Tau mis-splicing in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Ah; Ahn, Sang Il; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2016-08-01

    Tau proteins, which stabilize the structure and regulate the dynamics of microtubules, also play important roles in axonal transport and signal transduction. Tau proteins are missorted, aggregated, and found as tau inclusions under many pathological conditions associated with neurodegenerative disorders, which are collectively known as tauopathies. In the adult human brain, tau protein can be expressed in six isoforms due to alternative splicing. The aberrant splicing of tau pre-mRNA has been consistently identified in a variety of tauopathies but is not restricted to these types of disorders as it is also present in patients with non-tau proteinopathies and RNAopathies. Tau mis-splicing results in isoform-specific impairments in normal physiological function and enhanced recruitment of excessive tau isoforms into the pathological process. A variety of factors are involved in the complex set of mechanisms underlying tau mis-splicing, but variation in the cis-element, methylation of the MAPT gene, genetic polymorphisms, the quantity and activity of spliceosomal proteins, and the patency of other RNA-binding proteins, are related to aberrant splicing. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate therapeutic strategies aimed at correcting the tau mis-splicing process in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between tau mis-splicing and neurodegenerative disorders will aid in the development of efficient therapeutic strategies for patients with a tauopathy or other, related neurodegenerative disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 405-413].

  13. Tau mis-splicing in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sun Ah; Ahn, Sang Il; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2016-01-01

    Tau proteins, which stabilize the structure and regulate the dynamics of microtubules, also play important roles in axonal transport and signal transduction. Tau proteins are missorted, aggregated, and found as tau inclusions under many pathological conditions associated with neurodegenerative disorders, which are collectively known as tauopathies. In the adult human brain, tau protein can be expressed in six isoforms due to alternative splicing. The aberrant splicing of tau pre-mRNA has been consistently identified in a variety of tauopathies but is not restricted to these types of disorders as it is also present in patients with non-tau proteinopathies and RNAopathies. Tau mis-splicing results in isoform-specific impairments in normal physiological function and enhanced recruitment of excessive tau isoforms into the pathological process. A variety of factors are involved in the complex set of mechanisms underlying tau mis-splicing, but variation in the cis-element, methylation of the MAPT gene, genetic polymorphisms, the quantity and activity of spliceosomal proteins, and the patency of other RNA-binding proteins, are related to aberrant splicing. Currently, there is a lack of appropriate therapeutic strategies aimed at correcting the tau mis-splicing process in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, a more comprehensive understanding of the relationship between tau mis-splicing and neurodegenerative disorders will aid in the development of efficient therapeutic strategies for patients with a tauopathy or other, related neurodegenerative disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(8): 405-413] PMID:27222125

  14. Effects of 3-repeat tau on taxol mobility through microtubules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyunjoo; Fygenson, Deborah; Kim, Mahn Won

    2005-03-01

    Both the anti-cancer drug taxol and the microtubule-associated protein tau suppress dynamics of microtubules (MT). We have observed taxol mobility with full-length 3-repeat tau, one of six tau isoforms, using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) on MTs and compare with earlier results on recombinant full-length adult 4-repeat tau. Taxol mobility becomes highly sensitive to taxol concentration in the presence of 3-repeat tau (up to 1:1 molar ratio) as it does in the presence of 4-repeat tau, but is 2 to 3 times faster at low taxol concentrations. Fitting to a mean-field binding reaction model [J.L. Ross et.al, PNAS 101:12910-5 (2004)] suggests that the presence of 3-repeat tau enhances taxol movement through pores in the MT walls.

  15. Dimer model for Tau proteins bound in microtubule bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Natalie; Kluber, Alexander; Hayre, N. Robert; Singh, Rajiv; Cox, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    The microtubule associated protein tau is important in nucleating and maintaining microtubule spacing and structure in neuronal axons. Modification of tau is implicated as a later stage process in Alzheimer's disease, but little is known about the structure of tau in microtubule bundles. We present preliminary work on a proposed model for tau dimers in microtubule bundles (dimers are the minimal units since there is one microtubule binding domain per tau). First, a model of tau monomer was created and its characteristics explored using implicit solvent molecular dynamics simulation. Multiple simulations yield a partially collapsed form with separate positively/negatively charged clumps, but which are a factor of two smaller than required by observed microtubule spacing. We argue that this will elongate in dimer form to lower electrostatic energy at a cost of entropic ``spring'' energy. We will present preliminary results on steered molecular dynamics runs on tau dimers to estimate the actual force constant. Supported by US NSF Grant DMR 1207624.

  16. Total-tau and phospho-tau(181Thr) in cerebrospinal fluid of neurologically intact population increase with age.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, J; Psujek, M; Bartosik-Psujek, H

    2009-01-01

    Tau protein is a microtubule-associated molecule playing a crucial role in maintenance of neuronal integrity and in many neurodegenerative processes; its pathology has become a hallmark feature at the tissue level. The aim of the study was to estimate total tau and phospho-tau (Thr181) concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid of healthy population. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were taken from 129 subjects (age 18-77 years) without known neurologic or psychiatric condition. Both total-tau and phospho-tau levels showed significant correlation with age, which was more pronounced in older population.

  17. Characterization of tau oligomeric seeds in progressive supranuclear palsy.

    PubMed

    Gerson, Julia E; Sengupta, Urmi; Lasagna-Reeves, Cristian A; Guerrero-Muñoz, Marcos J; Troncoso, Juan; Kayed, Rakez

    2014-06-14

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative tauopathy which is primarily defined by the deposition of tau into globose-type neurofibrillary tangles (NFT). Tau in its native form has important functions for microtubule dynamics. Tau undergoes alternative splicing in exons 2, 3, and 10 which results in six different isoforms. Products of splicing on exon 10 are the most prone to mutations. Three repeat (3R) and four repeat (4R) tau, like other disease-associated amyloids, can form oligomers which may then go on to further aggregate and form fibrils. Recent studies from our laboratory and others have provided evidence that tau oligomers, not NFTs, are the most toxic species in neurodegenerative tauopathies and seed the pathological spread of tau. Analysis of PSP brain sections revealed globose-type NFTs, as well as both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated tau oligomers. Analysis of PSP brains via Western blot and ELISA revealed the presence of increased levels of tau oligomers compared to age-matched control brains. Oligomers were immunoprecipitated from PSP brain and were capable of seeding the oligomerization of both 3R and 4R tau isoforms. This is the first time tau oligomers have been characterized in PSP. These results indicate that tau oligomers are an important component of PSP pathology, along with NFTs. The ability of PSP brain-derived tau oligomers to seed 3R and 4R tau suggests that these oligomers represent the pathological species responsible for disease propagation and the presence of oligomers in a pure neurodegenerative tauopathy implies a common neuropathological process for tau seen in diseases with other amyloid proteins.

  18. Final report on the key comparison CCPR-K5: Spectral diffuse reflectance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadal, Maria; Eckerle, Kenneth L.; Early, Edward A.; Ohno, Yoshi

    2013-01-01

    The CCPR K5 key comparison on spectral diffuse reflectance was carried out in the framework of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement, by 13 national metrology institutes (MMIs) as participants. The participants were CSIR-NML (South Africa), HUT (Finland), IFA-CSIC (Spain), KRISS (Republic of Korea), MSL (New Zealand), NIM (China), NIST (United States of America), NMIJ (Japan), NPL (United Kingdom), NRC (Canada), OMH (Hungary), PTB (Germany) and VNIIOFI (Russia Federation). NIST (USA) piloted the comparison. The aim of this comparison was to check the agreement of measurement of the spectral diffuse reflectance among participants, using the measurement geometry of d/0 or 0/d in the wavelength range of 360 nm to 820 nm at 20 nm increment. The comparison was a star type comparison with the samples provided by the pilot laboratory and with the measurement sequence: Pilot-Participant-Pilot. Spectralon and matte white ceramic tiles were used as the transfer standards. Each participant received three of each type of sample and at least one sample of each type was measured three times on three separate days, and the other two samples were measured once. The report presents the description of the measurement facilities, procedures and uncertainties of all the participants as well as the results of the comparison. Measurement results from the participants and their associated uncertainties were analyzed in accordance with the Guidelines for CCPR Key Comparison Report Preparation, using weighted mean with cut-off. For the calculation of the Key Comparison Reference Value (KCRV), as agreed by the participants, the data of both samples were used for the 460 nm to 820 nm region and only the data of the Spectralon samples were used in the spectral region of 360 nm to 440 nm. The unilateral degrees of equivalence (DoE) calculated for each participant are mostly consistent within the uncertainty (k = 2) of the DoE. This international comparison of spectral diffuse reflectance

  19. CSF tau and tau/Aβ42 predict cognitive decline in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changqin; Cholerton, Brenna; Shi, Min; Ginghina, Carmen; Cain, Kevin C.; Auinger, Peggy; Zhang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A substantial proportion of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) have concomitant cognitive dysfunction. Identification of biomarker profiles that predict which PD patients have a greater likelihood for progression of cognitive symptoms is pressingly needed for future treatment and prevention approaches. Methods Subjects were drawn from the Deprenyl and Tocopherol Antioxidative Therapy of Parkinsonism (DATATOP) study, a large clinical trial that enrolled initially untreated PD patients. For the current study, Phase One encompassed trial baseline until just prior to levodopa administration (n=403), and Phase Two spanned the initiation of levodopa treatment until the end of cognitive follow-up (n=305). Correlations and linear mixed models were performed to determine cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between baseline amyloid β1-42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and measures of memory and executive function. Analyses also considered APOE genotype and tremor- vs. rigidity-dominant phenotype. Results No association was found between baseline CSF biomarkers and cognitive test performance during Phase One. However, once levodopa treatment was initiated, higher p-tau and p-tau/Aβ42 predicted subsequent decline on cognitive tasks involving both memory and executive functions. The interactions between biomarkers and cognition decline did not appear to be influenced by levodopa dosage, APOE genotype or motor phenotype. Conclusions The current study has, for the first time, demonstrated the possible involvement of tau species, whose gene (MAPT) has been consistently linked to the risk of PD by genome-wide association studies, in the progression of cognitive symptoms in PD. PMID:25596881

  20. Trans-splicing correction of tau isoform imbalance in a mouse model of tau mis-splicing.

    PubMed

    Avale, María Elena; Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Gallo, Jean-Marc

    2013-07-01

    Abnormal metabolism of the tau protein is central to the pathogenesis of a number of dementias, including Alzheimer's disease. Aberrant alternative splicing of exon 10 in the tau pre-mRNA resulting in an imbalance of tau isoforms is one of the molecular causes of the inherited tauopathy, FTDP-17. We showed previously in heterologous systems that exon 10 inclusion in tau mRNA could be modulated by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing (SMaRT). Here, we evaluated the potential of trans-splicing RNA reprogramming to correct tau mis-splicing in differentiated neurons in a mouse model of tau mis-splicing, the htau transgenic mouse line, expressing the human MAPT gene in a null mouse Mapt background. Trans-splicing molecules designed to increase exon 10 inclusion were delivered to neurons using lentiviral vectors. We demonstrate reprogramming of tau transcripts at the RNA level after transduction of cultured neurons or after direct delivery and long-term expression of viral vectors into the brain of htau mice in vivo. Tau RNA trans-splicing resulted in an increase in exon 10 inclusion in the mature tau mRNA. Importantly, we also show that the trans-spliced product is translated into a full-length chimeric tau protein. These results validate the potential of SMaRT to correct tau mis-splicing and provide a framework for its therapeutic application to neurodegenerative conditions linked to aberrant RNA processing.

  1. Differential induction and spread of tau pathology in young PS19 tau transgenic mice following intracerebral injections of pathological tau from Alzheimer’s disease or corticobasal degeneration brains

    PubMed Central

    Boluda, Susana; Iba, Michiyo; Zhang, Bin; Raible, Kevin M.; Lee, Virginia M-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    Filamentous tau pathologies are hallmark lesions of several neurodegenerative tauopathies including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) which show cell type-specific and topographically distinct tau inclusions. Growing evidence supports templated transmission of tauopathies through functionally interconnected neuroanatomical pathways suggesting that different self-propagating strains of pathological tau could account for the diverse manifestations of neurodegenerative tauopathies. Here, we describe the rapid and distinct cell type-specific spread of pathological tau following intracerebral injections of CBD or AD brain extracts enriched in pathological tau (designated CBD-Tau and AD-Tau, respectively) in young human mutant P301S tau transgenic (Tg) mice (line PS19) ~6–9 months before they show onset of mutant tau transgene-induced tau pathology. At 1 month post-injection of CBD-Tau, tau inclusions developed predominantly in oligodendrocytes of the fimbria and white matter near the injection sites with infrequent intraneuronal tau aggregates. In contrast, injections of AD-Tau in young PS19 mice induced tau pathology predominantly in neuronal perikarya with little or no oligodendrocyte involvement 1 month post-injection. With longer post-injection survival intervals of up to 6 months, CBD-Tau- and AD-Tau-induced tau pathology spread to different brain regions distant from the injection sites while maintaining the cell type-specific pattern noted above. Finally, CA3 neuron loss was detected 3 months post-injection of AD-Tau but not CBD-Tau. Thus, AD-Tau and CBD-Tau represent specific pathological tau strains that spread differentially and may underlie distinct clinical and pathological features of these two tauopathies. Hence, these strains could become targets to develop disease-modifying therapies for CBD and AD. PMID:25534024

  2. EFFECT OF DUST ON Ly{alpha} PHOTON TRANSFER IN AN OPTICALLY THICK HALO

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Yang; Shu Chiwang; Roy, Ishani; Fang Lizhi

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the effects of dust on Ly{alpha} photons emergent from an optically thick medium by solving the integro-differential equation of radiative transfer of resonant photons. To solve the differential equations numerically, we use the weighted essentially non-oscillatory method. Although the effects of dust on radiative transfer are well known, the resonant scattering of Ly{alpha} photons makes the problem non-trivial. For instance, if the medium has an optical depth of dust absorption and scattering of {tau}{sub a} >> 1, {tau} >> 1, and {tau} >> {tau}{sub a}, the effective absorption optical depth in a random walk scenario would be equal to {radical}({tau}{sub a}({tau}{sub a}+{tau})). We show, however, that for a resonant scattering at frequency {nu}{sub 0}, the effective absorption optical depth would be even larger than {tau}({nu}{sub 0}). If the cross section of dust scattering and absorption is frequency-independent, the double-peaked structure of the frequency profile given by the resonant scattering is basically dust-independent. That is, dust causes neither narrowing nor widening of the width of the double-peaked profile. One more result is that the timescales of the Ly{alpha} photon transfer in an optically thick halo are also basically independent of the dust scattering, even when the scattering is anisotropic. This is because those timescales are mainly determined by the transfer in the frequency space, while dust scattering, either isotropic or anisotropic, does not affect the behavior of the transfer in the frequency space when the cross section of scattering is wavelength-independent. This result does not support the speculation that dust will lead to the smoothing of the brightness distribution of a Ly{alpha} photon source with an optically thick halo.

  3. V409 Tau as Another AA Tau: Photometric Observations of Stellar Occultations by the Circumstellar Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Pepper, Joshua; Stassun, Keivan G.; Siverd, Robert J.; Cargile, Phillip; Weintraub, David A.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Gaudi, B. Scott; Mamajek, Eric E.; Sanchez, N. Nicole

    2015-07-01

    AA Tau is a well studied young stellar object (YSO) that presents many of the photometric characteristics of a Classical T Tauri star (CTTS), including short-timescale stochastic variability attributed to spots and/or accretion as well as long-duration dimming events attributed to occultations by vertical features (e.g., warps) in its circumstellar disk. We present new photometric observations of AA Tau from the Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope North (KELT-North) which reveal a deep, extended dimming event in 2011, which we show supports the interpretation by Bouvier et al. of an occultation by a high-density feature in the circumstellar disk located \\gt 8 AU from the star. We also present KELT-North observations of V409 Tau, a relatively unstudied YSO also in Taurus-Auriga, showing short timescale erratic variability, along with two separate long and deep dimming events, one from 2009 January through late 2010 October, and the other from 2012 March until at least 2013 September. We interpret both dimming events to have lasted more than 600 days, each with a depth of ˜1.4 mag. From a spectral energy distribution analysis, we propose that V409 Tau is most likely surrounded by a circumstellar disk viewed nearly edge-on, and using Keplerian timescale arguments we interpret the deep dimmings of V409 Tau as occultations from one or more features within this disk ≳10 AU from the star. In both AA Tau and V409 Tau, the usual CTTS short-timescale variations associated with accretion processes close to the stars continue during the occultations, further supporting the distant occulting material interpretation. Like AA Tau, V409 Tau serves as a laboratory for studying the detailed structure of the protoplanetary environments of T Tauri disks, specifically disk structures that may be signposts of planet formation at many AU out in the disk. We also provide a table of all currently known disk-occulting young stars as a convenient reference for future work on such

  4. The Copernicus ultraviolet spectral atlas Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogerson, J. B., Jr.; Upson, W. L., II

    1977-01-01

    An ultraviolet spectral atlas was presented for the B0 V star, Tau Scorpii. It was scanned from 949 to 1560 A by the Princeton spectrometer aboard the Copernicus satellite. From 949 to 1420 A the observations have a nominal resolution of 0.05 A. At the longer wavelengths, the resolution was 0.1 A. The atlas was presented in both tables and graphs.

  5. TAU as Tao. [interstellar spacecraft performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, P. T.; Reid, M. S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of building and launching a truly deep-space spacecraft mission that will penetrate near interstellar space to a depth of one thousand astronomical units (TAU) within a flight time of 50 years. Particular attention is given to the mission profile and to its communications system, power system, and propulsion system. Results of experimental studies indicate that, with advanced technology, reasonable trip times can be achieved and adequate science information can be brought to earth.

  6. Maternal entrainment of tau mutant hamsters.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, N; Davis, F C

    1992-01-01

    Maternal entrainment of the circadian wheel-running activity rhythm was examined in Syrian hamsters heterozygous for a single gene mutation (tau) that affects the free-running period of circadian rhythms. Heterozygous tau pups were born to and raised by wild-type mothers under constant dim light. The pups' wheel-running activity was recorded after weaning on postnatal day 18 or 24. Pups weaned on day 18 had an average free-running period of 21.70 hr, demonstrating that the tau phenotype was fully expressed at this age. Using the activity onset of the postnatal free-running rhythms as a phase reference, we estimated the phase relationships between the pups and their mothers on days 18 and 24. In contrast to results with wild-type pups, the activity rhythms of tau pups were not in phase with the rhythms of their wild-type mothers; that is, activity onsets of mothers and pups did not coincide. The pups did, however, show synchrony among themselves, indicating that they had been exposed to a synchronizing signal sometime during development. It is likely that this synchronizing signal was provided by the mothers, since pups from different litters showed phase relationships similar to those of their mothers. Thus the mothers provided a signal that was sufficient to cause entrainment, despite the 2-hr difference in free-running period between the mothers and pups. Although the pups' activity rhythms appeared to have been entrained by the mothers, they were clearly free-running by postnatal day 18. The mechanism for entrainment is lost during the course of development, despite continued interaction between the mothers and pups.

  7. Prompt {nu}{sub {tau}} fluxes in present and future {tau} neutrino experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Garcia, M.C.; Gomez-Cadenas, J.J.

    1997-02-01

    We use a nonperturbative QCD approach, the quark-gluon string model, to compute the {tau}-neutrino fluxes produced by fixed target pA collisions (where A is a target material) for incident protons of energies ranging from 120 to 800 GeV. The purpose of this calculation is to estimate {ital in a consistent way} the prompt background for the {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}{sub e}){leftrightarrow}{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation search in the on-going {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}{sub e}){leftrightarrow}{nu}{sub {tau}} oscillation search experiments CHORUS and NOMAD, as well as the expected prompt background in future experiments, such as COSMOS at Fermilab and a possible second-generation {nu}{sub {mu}}({nu}{sub e}){leftrightarrow}{nu}{sub {tau}} search experiment at the CERN SPS. In addition, we compute the number of {nu}{sub {tau}} interactions expected by the experiment E872 at Fermilab. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Searching for tau neutrinos with Cherenkov telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, D.; Bernardini, E.; Kappes, A.

    2015-02-01

    Cherenkov telescopes have the capability of detecting high energy tau neutrinos in the energy range of 1-1000 PeV by searching for very inclined showers. If a tau lepton, produced by a tau neutrino, escapes from the Earth or a mountain, it will decay and initiate a shower in the air which can be detected by an air shower fluorescence or Cherenkov telescope. In this paper, we present detailed Monte Carlo simulations of corresponding event rates for the VERITAS and two proposed Cherenkov Telescope Array sites: Meteor Crater and Yavapai Ranch, which use representative AGN neutrino flux models and take into account topographic conditions of the detector sites. The calculated neutrino sensitivities depend on the observation time and the shape of the energy spectrum, but in some cases are comparable or even better than corresponding neutrino sensitivities of the IceCube detector. For VERITAS and the considered Cherenkov Telescope Array sites the expected neutrino sensitivities are up to factor 3 higher than for the MAGIC site because of the presence of surrounding mountains.

  9. Hyperphosphorylation results in tau dysfunction in DNA folding and protection.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yang; He, Hai-Jin; Zhou, Jun; Miao, Jun-Ye; Lu, Jing; He, Ying-Ge; Pan, Rong; Wei, Yan; Liu, Ying; He, Rong-Qiao

    2013-01-01

    Hyperphosphorylation of tau occurs in preclinical and clinical stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and hyperphosphorylated tau is the main constituent of the paired helical filaments in the brains of mild cognitive impairment and AD patients. While most of the work described so far focused on the relationship between hyperphosphorylation of tau and microtubule disassembly as well as axonal transport impairments, both phenomena ultimately leading to cell death, little work has been done to study the correlation between tau hyperphosphorylation and DNA damage. As we showed in this study, tau hyperphosphorylation and DNA damage co-occurred under formaldehyde treatment in N2a cells, indicating that phosphorylated tau (p-Tau) induced by formaldehyde may be involved in DNA impairment. After phosphorylation, the effect of tau in preventing DNA from thermal denaturation was diminished, its ability to accelerate DNA renaturation was lost, and its function in protecting DNA from reactive oxygen species (ROS) attack was impaired. Thus, p-Tau is not only associated with the disassembly of the microtubule system, but also plays a crucial role in DNA impairment. Hyperphosphorylation-mediated dysfunction of tau protein in prevention of DNA structure from damage under the attack of ROS may provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying tauopathies.

  10. Dopamine D2 Receptor antagonism suppresses tau aggregation and neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Allyson V.; Wheeler, Jeanna M.; Guthrie, Chris R.; Liachko, Nicole F.; Kraemer, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia, are diseases characterized by the formation of pathological tau protein aggregates in the brain and progressive neurodegeneration. Presently no effective disease modifying treatments exist for tauopathies. Methods To identify drugs targeting tau neurotoxicity, we have used a C. elegans model of tauopathy to screen a drug library containing 1120 compounds approved for human use for the ability to suppress tau-induced behavioral effects. Results One compound, the typical antipsychotic azaperone, improved the motility of tau transgenic worms, reduced levels of insoluble tau, and was protective against neurodegeneration. We found that azaperone reduces insoluble tau in a human cell culture model of tau aggregation, and that other antipsychotic drugs (flupenthixol, perphenazine, and zotepine) also ameliorate the effects of tau expression in both models. Conclusions Reduction of dopamine signaling through the dopamine D2 receptor with the use of gene knockouts in C. elegans or RNAi knockdown in human cell culture have similar protective effects against tau toxicity. These results suggest dopamine D2 receptor antagonism holds promise as a potential neuroprotective strategy for targeting tau aggregation and neurotoxicity. PMID:23140663

  11. CSF tau levels influence cortical plasticity in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    PubMed

    Koch, Giacomo; Esposito, Zaira; Kusayanagi, Hajime; Monteleone, Fabrizia; Codecá, Claudia; Di Lorenzo, Francesco; Caltagirone, Carlo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Martorana, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative process characterized by progressive neuronal degeneration, reduced levels of neurotransmitters, and altered forms of synaptic plasticity. In animal models of AD, amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins are supposed to interfere with synaptic transmission. In the current study, we investigated the correlation between motor cortical plasticity, measured with 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), and the levels of Aβ₁₋₄₂, total tau (t-Tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-Tau) detected in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of AD patients. We found that the overall rTMS after effects were milder in AD patients in comparison with controls. In AD patients the amount of rTMS-induced inhibition correlated with CSF t-Tau, but not with Aβ₁₋₄₂ CSF levels. Surprisingly, higher CSF t-Tau levels were associated to a stronger inhibition of the motor evoked potentials, implying that the expected effects of the 1 Hz rTMS protocol were more evident in patients with more pathological t-Tau CSF levels. These data could be interpreted as the consequence of CSF t-Tau mediated abnormal excitatory activity and could suggest that CSF t-Tau may impact mechanisms of cortical plasticity.

  12. Highly accurate tau-leaping methods with random corrections.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yucheng; Li, Tiejun

    2009-03-28

    We aim to construct higher order tau-leaping methods for numerically simulating stochastic chemical kinetic systems in this paper. By adding a random correction to the primitive tau-leaping scheme in each time step, we greatly improve the accuracy of the tau-leaping approximations. This gain in accuracy actually comes from the reduction in the local truncation error of the scheme in the order of tau, the marching time step size. While the local truncation error of the primitive tau-leaping method is O(tau(2)) for all moments, our Poisson random correction tau-leaping method, in which the correction term is a Poisson random variable, can reduce the local truncation error for the mean to O(tau(3)), and both Gaussian random correction tau-leaping methods, in which the correction term is a Gaussian random variable, can reduce the local truncation error for both the mean and covariance to O(tau(3)). Numerical results demonstrate that these novel methods more accurately capture crucial properties such as the mean and variance than existing methods for simulating chemical reaction systems. This work constitutes a first step to construct high order numerical methods for simulating jump processes. With further refinement and appropriately modified step-size selection procedures, the random correction methods should provide a viable way of simulating chemical reaction systems accurately and efficiently.

  13. Can numerical modeling help understand the fate of tau protein in the axon terminal?

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, I A; Kuznetsov, A V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the fate of tau protein in the axon terminal. We developed a comprehensive model of tau transport that accounts for transport of cytosolic tau by diffusion, diffusion transport of microtubule (MT)-bound tau along the MT lattice, active motor-driven transport of MT-bound tau via slow axonal transport mechanism, and degradation of tau in the axon due to tau's finite half-life. We investigated the effect of different assumptions concerning the fate of tau in the terminal on steady-state transport of tau in the axon. In particular, we studied two possible scenarios: (i) tau is destroyed in the terminal and (ii) there is no tau destruction in the terminal, and to avoid tau accumulation we postulated zero flux of tau at the terminal. We found that the tau concentration and percentage of MT-bound tau are not very sensitive to the assumption concerning the fate of tau in the terminal, but the tau's flux and average velocity of tau transport are very sensitive to this assumption. This suggests that measuring the velocity of tau transport and comparing it with the results of mathematical modeling for different assumptions concerning tau's fate in the terminal can provide information concerning what happens to tau in the terminal.

  14. The Relationship between Teacher Training, Intervention Strategies, and Students' Academic Achievement in the Classroom with K-5 ADHD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary intent of this study was to explore the effect between teachers' training, intervention strategies, and the academic achievement of K-5 ADHD students. The study design employed a mixed research design. The quantitative method focused on collecting data from certified regular and special-education teachers. Additionally, effects were…

  15. Moving the School and Dancing Education: Case Study Research of K-5 Students' Experiences in a Dance Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Alison E.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation chronicles the qualitative case study of a dance artist-in-residence at a diverse and inclusive K-5 school in an urban district, integrating science, social studies, physical education, music, and visual arts school curriculum and culminating in two public performances. This study focused on how students made meaning through this…

  16. Moving the School and Dancing Education: Case Study Research of K-5 Students' Experiences in a Dance Residency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Alison E.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation chronicles the qualitative case study of a dance artist-in-residence at a diverse and inclusive K-5 school in an urban district, integrating science, social studies, physical education, music, and visual arts school curriculum and culminating in two public performances. This study focused on how students made meaning through this…

  17. The Relationship between Teacher Training, Intervention Strategies, and Students' Academic Achievement in the Classroom with K-5 ADHD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Nancy A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary intent of this study was to explore the effect between teachers' training, intervention strategies, and the academic achievement of K-5 ADHD students. The study design employed a mixed research design. The quantitative method focused on collecting data from certified regular and special-education teachers. Additionally, effects were…

  18. Exploring the World of Animals: Linking Fiction to Nonfiction. Literature Bridges to Science Series. Grades K-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Phyllis J.

    This teacher resource book, designed to encourage student interest and build learning across the curriculum in grades K-5, is based on the theme of animals. Resource lists and activities in the book focus on the following sections: (1) animals as pets; (2) animals on the farm; (3) animals in the woods; and (4) animals in the wild. Each section…

  19. Exploring the World of Animals: Linking Fiction to Nonfiction. Literature Bridges to Science Series. Grades K-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Phyllis J.

    This teacher resource book, designed to encourage student interest and build learning across the curriculum in grades K-5, is based on the theme of animals. Resource lists and activities in the book focus on the following sections: (1) animals as pets; (2) animals on the farm; (3) animals in the woods; and (4) animals in the wild. Each section…

  20. Effects of Vitamin K3 and K5 on Daunorubicin-resistant Human T Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Nakaoka, Eri; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Anticancer efficacy of vitamin K derivatives on multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been scarcely investigated. The effects of vitamins K3 and K5 on proliferation of human leukemia MOLT-4 cells and on daunorubicin-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells were estimated by a WST assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, followed by flow cytometry. Vitamins K3 and K5 significantly inhibited proliferation of leukemic cells at 10 and 100 μM (p<0.05), and these effects were almost equally observed in both MOLT-4 and MOLT/DNR drug-resistant cells. Vitamin K3 induced cell apoptosis at 10 and 100 μM in both MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cells (p<0.05). Vitamin K5 also increased apoptotic cells, while rather inducing necrotic cell death. Vitamins K3 and K5 suppress MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cell-proliferation partially through induction of apoptosis, and these vitamin derivatives can overcome drug resistance due to P-glycoprotein expression. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  1. The Development and Validation of the Instructional Practices Log in Science: A Measure of K-5 Science Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Elizabeth L.; Carrier, Sarah J.; Minogue, James; Porter, Stephen R.; McEachin, Andrew; Walkowiak, Temple A.; Zulli, Rebecca A.

    2017-01-01

    The Instructional Practices Log in Science (IPL-S) is a daily teacher log developed for K-5 teachers to self-report their science instruction. The items on the IPL-S are grouped into scales measuring five dimensions of science instruction: "Low-level Sense-making," "High-level Sense-making," "Communication,"…

  2. The Positive Impact of World Language Study on Special Needs K-5 Children: A Mixed Methodology Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Wiley, Patricia; Miller, Roy V.

    2010-01-01

    The present research study was conducted to explore how structured Spanish instruction (30 minutes, twice a week, for a semester) impacts the level of class participation and on-task behavior and the reading fluency rate of a group of self-contained, special needs, elementary school children (grades K-5). Data for this mixed methodology study were…

  3. Examining the Internal Structure of the easyCBM Reading Measures, Grades K-5. Technical Report #1302

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alonzo, Julie; Park, Bitnara Jasmine; Tindal, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    In this technical report, we describe a study examining the internal structures of the easyCBM reading measures, Grades K-5. Data were gathered from a convenience sample of 114 Kindergarten students, 43 first graders, 82 second graders, 100 third graders, 109 fourth graders, and 71 fifth graders attending schools in Oregon, Georgia, South…

  4. Interactions between Aβ and Mutated Tau Lead to Polymorphism and Induce Aggregation of Aβ-Mutated Tau Oligomeric Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Raz, Yoav; Miller, Yifat

    2013-01-01

    One of the main hallmarks of the fronto-temporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) is the accumulation of neurofibrillary tangles in the brain as an outcome of the aggregation of mutated tau protein. This process occurs due to a number of genetic mutations in the MAPT gene. One of these mutations is the ∆K280 mutation in the tau R2 repeat domain, which promotes the aggregation vis-à-vis that for the wild-type tau. Experimental studies have shown that in Alzheimer’s disease Aβ peptide forms aggregates both with itself and with wild-type tau. By analogy, in FTDP-17, it is likely that there are interactions between Aβ and mutated tau, but the molecular mechanisms underlying such interactions remain to be elucidated. Thus, to investigate the interactions between Aβ and mutated tau, we constructed fourteen ∆K280 mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligomeric complexes. In seven of the mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligoemric complexes the mutated tau oligomers exhibited hydrophobic interactions in their core domain, and in the other seven mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligoemric complexes the mutated tau oligomers exhibited salt-bridge interactions in their core domain. We considered two types of interactions between mutated tau oligomers and Aβ oligomers: interactions of one monomer of the Aβ oligomer with one monomer of the mutated tau oligomer to form a single-layer conformation, and interactions of the entire Aβ oligomer with the entire mutated tau oligomer to form a double-layer conformation. We also considered parallel arrangements of Aβ trimers alternating with mutated tau trimers in a single-layer conformation. Our results demonstrate that in the interactions of Aβ and mutated tau oligomers, polymorphic mutated tau-Aβ17-42 oligomeric complexes were observed, with a slight preference for the double-layer conformation. Aβ trimers alternating with mutated tau trimers constituted a structurally stable confined β-structure, albeit one that was

  5. The CDF-II tau physics program triggers, tau ID and preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    C. Pagliarone et al.

    2003-11-03

    The study of processes containing {tau} leptons in the final state will play an important role at Tevatron Run II. Such final states will be relevant both for electroweak studies and measurements as well as in searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. The present paper discusses the physics opportunities and challenges related to the implementation of new set of triggers able to select events containing tau candidates in the final state. They illustrate, in particular, the physics capabilities for a variety of new physics scenarios such as supersymmetry (SUSY), SUSY with Rp-parity violation, with Bilinear parity violation or models with the violation of lepton flavor. Finally, they present the first Run II results obtained using some of the described tau triggers.

  6. Tau flavored dark matter and its impact on tau Yukawa coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Wei; Guo, Huai-Ke; Li, Hao-Lin

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we perform a systematic study of the tau flavored dark matter (DM) model by introducing two kinds of mediators (a scalar doublet and a charged scalar singlet). The electromagnetic properties of the DM, as well as their implications in DM direct detections, are analyzed in detail. The model turns out contributing a significant radiative correction to the tau lepton mass, in addition to loosing the tension between the measured DM relic density and constraints of DM direct detections. The loop corrections can be Script O(10%) of the total tau mass. Signal rates of the Higgs measurements from the LHC in the h→τ τ and h→ γ γ channels, relative to the Standard Model expectations, can be explained in this model.

  7. Search for tau- ---> 4pi- 3pi+ (pi0) nu/tau Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ter-Antonian, R.; Kass, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Hast, C.; /SLAC

    2005-06-21

    A search for the decay of the {tau} lepton to seven charged pions and at most one {pi}{sup 0} was performed using the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} collider. The analysis uses data recorded on and near the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance between 1999 and 2003, a total of 124.3 fb{sup -1}. They observe 7 events with an expected background of 11.9 {+-} 2.2 events and calculate a preliminary upper limit of BR({tau}{sup -} {yields} 4{pi}{sup -} 3{pi}{sup +}({pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}}) < 2.7 x 10{sup -7} at 90% CL. This is a significant improvement over the previous limit established by the CLEO Collaboration.

  8. Both total and phosphorylated tau are increased in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sjogren, M; Davidsson, P; Tullberg, M; Minthon, L; Wallin, A; Wikkelso, C; Granerus, A; Vanderstichele, H; Vanmechelen, E; Blennow, K

    2001-01-01

    BACKROUND—Pathological tau protein concentrations in CSF are found in both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), but studies on brain tissue have suggested that the tau pathology in AD differs from that in FTD and that the difference may be related to the degree of phosphorylation. As CSF tau protein is increased after stroke, tau may also be implicated in the pathophysiology of vascular dementia, of which subcortical arteriosclerotic encephalopathy (SAE) is a putative subtype.
OBJECTIVES—To investigate the nature of tau protein in CSF and the involvement of total CSF tau and phosphorylated CSF tau (phosphotau) in various types of dementia.
METHODS—Using ELISAs for total tau and tau phosphorylated at Thr181 (phosphotau), the CSF concentrations of total tau and phosphotau were determined in patients with probable and possible AD (n=41 and 19, respectively), FTD (n=18), SAE (n=17), and Parkinson's disease (PD; n=15) and in age matched controls (n=17). All the antibodies stained the lower molecular weight bands, whereas only the antibodies that recognise phosphorylated tau stained the higher molecular bands.
RESULTS—Both CSF tau and CSF phosphotau were increased in probable AD compared with FTD (p<0.001), SAE (p<0.001), PD (p<0.001), and controls (p<0.001). CSF phosphotau was increased in possible AD compared with FTD (p<0.001) and SAE (p<0.001). CSF tau and CSF phosphotau were positively correlated in all the groups. Molecular weight forms of tau ranging from 25 kDa to 80 kDa were found in the CSF
CONCLUSION—Both phosphorylated and unphosphorylated tau isoforms were present in the CSF, and tau protein appeared in both truncated and full length forms. The results suggest that the CSF concentrations of tau and phosphotau are increased in about two thirds of patients with probable AD and in half of those with possible AD but are normal in FTD, SAE, and PD compared with normal aging. Values in the normal range do not exclude AD

  9. A Search for B+ --> tau + nu tau Recoiling Against B- --> D0 l- nu-bar l X

    SciTech Connect

    Sekula, Stephen J

    2003-03-24

    We present a search for the decay B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} in 88.9 x 10{sup 6} {Upsilon}(4S) decays recorded with the BABAR detector at the SLAC B-Factory. A sample of semi-exclusive, semi-leptonic B decays (B{sup -} {yields} D{sup 0}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}X), where X is either a photon, {pi}{sup 0}, or nothing, is used to identify the daughter particles that are associated with the other B meson in each event. These particles are searched for evidence of a one-prong leptonic B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay. For this data sample we set a preliminary upper limit on the branching fraction of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 4.9 x 10{sup -4} at the 90% confidence level. This result is then combined with a statistically independent BABAR search for B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}} to give a combined preliminary limit of {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {tau}{sup +}{nu}{sub {tau}}) < 4.1 x 10{sup -4}.

  10. AAV-mediated expression of anti-tau scFvs decreases tau accumulation in a mouse model of tauopathy.

    PubMed

    Ising, Christina; Gallardo, Gilbert; Leyns, Cheryl E G; Wong, Connie H; Stewart, Floy; Koscal, Lauren J; Roh, Joseph; Robinson, Grace O; Remolina Serrano, Javier; Holtzman, David M

    2017-05-01

    Tauopathies are characterized by the progressive accumulation of hyperphosphorylated, aggregated forms of tau. Our laboratory has previously demonstrated that passive immunization with an anti-tau antibody, HJ8.5, decreased accumulation of pathological tau in a human P301S tau-expressing transgenic (P301S-tg) mouse model of frontotemporal dementia/tauopathy. To investigate whether the Fc domain of HJ8.5 is required for the therapeutic effect, we engineered single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) derived from HJ8.5 with variable linker lengths, all specific to human tau. Based on different binding properties, we selected two anti-tau scFvs and tested their efficacy in vivo by adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer to the brain of P301S-tg mice. The scFvs significantly reduced levels of hyperphosphorylated, aggregated tau in brain tissue of P301S-tg mice, associated with a decrease in detergent-soluble tau species. Interestingly, these mice showed substantial levels of scFvs in the cerebrospinal fluid without significant effects on total extracellular tau levels. Therefore, our study provides a novel strategy for anti-tau immunotherapeutics that potentially limits a detrimental proinflammatory response. © 2017 Ising et al.

  11. Anti-tau antibodies that block tau aggregate seeding in vitro markedly decrease pathology and improve cognition in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yanamandra, Kiran; Kfoury, Najla; Jiang, Hong; Mahan, Thomas E.; Ma, Shengmei; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Tau aggregation occurs in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and many other disorders collectively termed tauopathies. Trans-cellular propagation of tau pathology, mediated by extracellular tau aggregates, may underlie pathogenesis of these conditions. P301S tau transgenic mice express mutant human tau protein, and develop progressive tau pathology. Using a cell-based biosensor assay, we screened anti-tau monoclonal antibodies for their ability to block seeding activity present in P301S brain lysates. We infused 3 effective antibodies or controls into the lateral ventricle of P301S mice for 3 months. The antibodies markedly reduced hyperphosphorylated, aggregated, and insoluble tau. They also blocked development of tau seeding activity detected in brain lysates using the biosensor assay, reduced microglial activation, and improved cognitive deficits. These data imply a central role for extracellular tau aggregates in the development of pathology. They also suggest immunotherapy specifically designed to block trans-cellular aggregate propagation will be a productive treatment strategy. PMID:24075978

  12. Anti-tau antibodies that block tau aggregate seeding in vitro markedly decrease pathology and improve cognition in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yanamandra, Kiran; Kfoury, Najla; Jiang, Hong; Mahan, Thomas E; Ma, Shengmei; Maloney, Susan E; Wozniak, David F; Diamond, Marc I; Holtzman, David M

    2013-10-16

    Tau aggregation occurs in neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease and many other disorders collectively termed tauopathies. trans-cellular propagation of tau pathology, mediated by extracellular tau aggregates, may underlie pathogenesis of these conditions. P301S tau transgenic mice express mutant human tau protein and develop progressive tau pathology. Using a cell-based biosensor assay, we screened anti-tau monoclonal antibodies for their ability to block seeding activity present in P301S brain lysates. We infused three effective antibodies or controls into the lateral ventricle of P301S mice for 3 months. The antibodies markedly reduced hyperphosphorylated, aggregated, and insoluble tau. They also blocked development of tau seeding activity detected in brain lysates using the biosensor assay, reduced microglial activation, and improved cognitive deficits. These data imply a central role for extracellular tau aggregates in the development of pathology. They also suggest that immunotherapy specifically designed to block trans-cellular aggregate propagation will be a productive treatment strategy.

  13. Alpha Blockers

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions such as high blood pressure and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Find out more about this class of medication. ... these conditions: High blood pressure Enlarged prostate (benign prostatic hyperplasia) Though alpha blockers are commonly used to treat ...

  14. Alpha Thalassemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... an apparently normal individual has a child with hemoglobin H disease or alpha thalassemia minor. It can ... gene on one chromosome 25% 25% 25% 25% hemoglobin H disease there is a 25% chance with ...

  15. Resonance Effective Theory Approach to {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{nu}{tau} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2004-12-02

    The decays {tau} {yields} 3{pi}{nu}{tau} are analyzed in the framework of the resonance effective theory of QCD, We derive the effective chiral Lagrangian relevant for the evaluation of the hadronic axial-vector current, taking into account the constraints imposed by QCD on the high energy asymptotic behaviour. Then we fit the unknown parameters to the spectral function and branching ratio measured by ALEPH, showing that the theory is in good agreement with experimental data. A detailed description of the work sketched here can be found.

  16. Tau protein is essential for stress-induced brain pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Sofia; Vaz-Silva, João; Pinto, Vitor; Dalla, Christina; Kokras, Nikolaos; Bedenk, Benedikt; Mack, Natalie; Czisch, Michael; Almeida, Osborne F. X.; Sousa, Nuno; Sotiropoulos, Ioannis

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to chronic stress is frequently accompanied by cognitive and affective disorders in association with neurostructural adaptations. Chronic stress was previously shown to trigger Alzheimer’s-like neuropathology, which is characterized by Tau hyperphosphorylation and missorting into dendritic spines followed by memory deficits. Here, we demonstrate that stress-driven hippocampal deficits in wild-type mice are accompanied by synaptic missorting of Tau and enhanced Fyn/GluN2B-driven synaptic signaling. In contrast, mice lacking Tau [Tau knockout (Tau-KO) mice] do not exhibit stress-induced pathological behaviors and atrophy of hippocampal dendrites or deficits of hippocampal connectivity. These findings implicate Tau as an essential mediator of the adverse effects of stress on brain structure and function. PMID:27274066

  17. CP violation in Semi-Leptonic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, David

    2007-06-19

    We study CP violation in semi-leptonic {tau} decays and we determine the conditions necessary to be able to define a observable CP asymmetry. We apply these conditions in both models, the standard model for the electroweak interactions and its supersymmetric extensions. In the first case, the leading order contribution to the direct CP asymmetry in {tau}{+-} {yields} K{+-}{pi}0{nu}{tau} decay rates is evaluated. In the second case,we compute the SUSY effective hamiltonian that describes the |{delta}S| = 1 semileptonic decays of tau leptons. We show that SUSY contributions may enhance the CP asymmetry of {tau} {yields} K{pi}{nu}{tau} decays by several orders of magnitude compared to the standard model expectations.

  18. Tau as a therapeutic target in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, Diana S.; Ward, Sarah M.; Lancia, Jody K.; Patterson, Kristina R.

    2013-01-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated protein thought to help modulate the stability of neuronal microtubules. In tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease and several frontotemporal dementias, tau is abnormally modified and misfolded resulting in its disassociation from microtubules and the generation of pathological lesions characteristic for each disease. A recent surge in the population of people with neurodegenerative tauopathies has highlighted the immense need for disease-modifying therapies for these conditions, and new attention has focused on tau as a potential target for intervention. In the current work we summarize evidence linking tau to disease pathogenesis and review recent therapeutic approaches aimed at ameliorating tau dysfunction. The primary therapeutic tactics considered include kinase inhibitors and phosphatase activators, immunotherapies, small molecule inhibitors of protein aggregation, and microtubule-stabilizing agents. Although the evidence for tau-based treatments is encouraging, additional work is undoubtedly needed to optimize each treatment strategy for the successful development of safe and effective therapeutics. PMID:22790092

  19. PET Imaging of Tau Deposition in the Aging Human Brain

    DOE PAGES

    Schöll, Michael; Lockhart, Samuel N.; Schonhaut, Daniel R.; ...

    2016-03-02

    Tau pathology is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but also occurs in normal cognitive aging. In this study, using the tau PET agent 18F-AV-1451, we examined retention patterns in cognitively normal older people in relation to young controls and AD patients. Age and β-amyloid (measured using PiB PET) were differentially associated with tau tracer retention in healthy aging. Older age was related to increased tracer retention in regions of the medial temporal lobe, which predicted worse episodic memory performance. PET detection of tau in other isocortical regions required the presence of cortical β-amyloid and was associated with decline inmore » global cognition. Furthermore, patterns of tracer retention corresponded well with Braak staging of neurofibrillary tau pathology. In conclusion, the present study defined patterns of tau tracer retention in normal aging in relation to age, cognition, and β-amyloid deposition.« less

  20. PET Imaging of Tau Deposition in the Aging Human Brain

    SciTech Connect

    Schöll, Michael; Lockhart, Samuel N.; Schonhaut, Daniel R.; O’Neil, James P.; Janabi, Mustafa; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Baker, Suzanne L.; Vogel, Jacob W.; Faria, Jamie; Schwimmer, Henry D.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Jagust, William J.

    2016-03-02

    Tau pathology is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but also occurs in normal cognitive aging. In this study, using the tau PET agent 18F-AV-1451, we examined retention patterns in cognitively normal older people in relation to young controls and AD patients. Age and β-amyloid (measured using PiB PET) were differentially associated with tau tracer retention in healthy aging. Older age was related to increased tracer retention in regions of the medial temporal lobe, which predicted worse episodic memory performance. PET detection of tau in other isocortical regions required the presence of cortical β-amyloid and was associated with decline in global cognition. Furthermore, patterns of tracer retention corresponded well with Braak staging of neurofibrillary tau pathology. In conclusion, the present study defined patterns of tau tracer retention in normal aging in relation to age, cognition, and β-amyloid deposition.

  1. Search for the rare leptonic decay B--->tau-nutau.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Gaillard, J-M; Hicheur, A; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Palano, A; Pompili, A; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Borgland, A W; Breon, A B; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Gritsan, A V; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadel, R W; Kadyk, J; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Shelkov, V G; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Fritsch, M; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Chevalier, N; Cottingham, W N; Kelly, M P; Latham, T E; Wilson, F F; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Thiessen, D; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, A E; Blinov, V E; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Ivanchenko, V N; Kravchenko, E A; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yushkov, A N; Best, D; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Buchanan, C; Hartfiel, B L; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Del Re, D; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Macfarlane, D B; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, Sh; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Dahmes, B; Levy, S L; Long, O; Lu, A; Mazur, M A; Richman, J D; Verkerke, W; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Heusch, C A; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schmitz, R E; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Yang, S; Jayatilleke, S; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Abe, T; Blanc, F; Bloom, P; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Rankin, P; Smith, J G; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Chen, A; Harton, J L; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Zeng, Q L; Altenburg, D; Brandt, T; Brose, J; Dickopp, M; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Lacker, H M; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R; Nogowski, R; Otto, S; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Spaan, B; Sundermann, J E; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Brochard, F; Grenier, P; Schrenk, S; Thiebaux, Ch; Vasileiadis, G; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Lavin, D; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Azzolini, V; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Piemontese, L; Sarti, A; Treadwell, E; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Patteri, P; Piccolo, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Crosetti, G; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Bailey, S; Brandenburg, G; Morii, M; Won, E; Dubitzky, R S; Langenegger, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Gaillard, J R; Morton, G W; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Taylor, G P; Charles, M J; Grenier, G J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Lamsa, J; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Yi, J; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Laplace, S; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Petersen, T C; Plaszczynski, S; Schune, M H; Tantot, L; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Simani, M C; Wright, D M; Bevan, A J; Chavez, C A; Coleman, J P; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Parry, R J; Payne, D J; Sloane, R J; Touramanis, C; Back, J J; Cormack, C M; Harrison, P F; Di Lodovico, F; Mohanty, G B; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flack, R L; Flaecher, H U; Green, M G; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Winter, M A; Brown, D; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Hodgkinson, M C; Lafferty, G D; Lyon, A J; Williams, J C; Farbin, A; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Kovalskyi, D; Lae, C K; Lillard, V; Roberts, D A; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Flood, K T; Hertzbach, S S; Kofler, R; Koptchev, V B; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S; Cowan, R; Sciolla, G; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Mangeol, D J J; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Taras, P; Nicholson, H; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Wilden, L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Gabriel, T A; Allmendinger, T; Brau, B; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Potter, C T; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Torrence, E; Colecchia, F; Dorigo, A; Galeazzi, F; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Tiozzo, G; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Briand, H; Chauveau, J; David, P; de la Vaissière, Ch; Del Buono, L; Hamon, O; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malcles, J; Ocariz, J; Pivk, M; Roos, L; T'jampens, S; Therin, G; Manfredi, P F; Re, V; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Guo, Q H; Panetta, J; Anulli, F; Biasini, M; Peruzzi, I M; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bondioli, M; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Martinez-Vidal, F; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rama, M; Rizzo, G; Sandrelli, F; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Paick, K; Wagoner, D E; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Miftakov, V; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Tehrani, F Safai; Voena, C; Christ, S; Wagner, G; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Geddes, N I; Gopal, G P; Olaiya, E O; Aleksan, R; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Giraud, P-F; de Monchenault, G Hamel; Kozanecki, W; Langer, M; Legendre, M; London, G W; Mayer, B; Schott, G; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Yumiceva, F X; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Buchmueller, O L; Claus, R; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; De Nardo, G; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Elsen, E E; Fan, S; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Hadig, T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hryn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'Grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Petrak, S; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Simi, G; Snyder, A; Soha, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Va'vra, J; Wagner, S R; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Meyer, T I; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Ernst, J A; Saeed, M A; Saleem, M; Wappler, F R; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Kim, H; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Bona, M; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Borean, C; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Poropat, P; Vitale, L; Vuagnin, G; Panvini, R S; Banerjee, Sw; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Jackson, P D; Kowalewski, R; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Band, H R; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Graham, M; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Prepost, R; Rubin, A E; Sekula, S J; Tan, P; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J H; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Greene, M G; Neal, H

    2005-07-22

    We present a search for the decay B(-)--> tau(-)nu(tau) in a sample of 88.9 x 10(6) BB pairs recorded with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center B factory. One of the two B mesons from the Gamma(4S) is reconstructed in a hadronic or a semileptonic final state, and the decay products of the other B in the event are analyzed for consistency with a B(-) --> tau(-)nu(tau) decay. We find no evidence of a signal and set an upper limit on the branching fraction of B(B(-) --> tau(-) nu(tau)) < 4.2 x 10(-4) at the 90% confidence level.

  2. Human protein tau represses DNA replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Wang, Xing Sheng; Qu, M H; Liu, Ying; He, Rong Qiao

    2005-11-30

    Here, in the experiments of both PCR and real-time PCR, a repression of DNA amplification was observed in the presence of protein tau. Furthermore, a strong repression appeared when an in vitro DNA replication assay was performed at the physiological temperature (37 degrees C). The incorporation of dNTP was markedly decreased to approximately 12% of control by the presence of tau23 and to approximately 15% by tau40. In the competitive experiments, the PCR product could be restored when the competitor DNA was added, indicating that the association of tau with the template gave rise to the repression. However, tau did not repress the yield of RNA in transcription, suggesting that tau was replaced or ejected from the template by the elongating T7 RNA polymerase.

  3. PET Imaging of Tau Deposition in the Aging Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Schonhaut, Daniel R.; O’Neil, James P.; Janabi, Mustafa; Ossenkoppele, Rik; Baker, Suzanne L.; Vogel, Jacob W.; Faria, Jamie; Schwimmer, Henry D.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Jagust, William J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Tau pathology is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) but also occurs in normal cognitive aging. Using the tau PET agent 18F-AV-1451, we examined retention patterns in cognitively normal older people in relation to young controls and AD patients. Age and β-amyloid (measured using PiB PET) were differentially associated with tau tracer retention in healthy aging. Older age was related to increased tracer retention in regions of the medial temporal lobe, which predicted worse episodic memory performance. PET detection of tau in other isocortical regions required the presence of cortical β-amyloid, and was associated with decline in global cognition. Furthermore, patterns of tracer retention corresponded well with Braak staging of neurofibrillary tau pathology. The present study defined patterns of tau tracer retention in normal aging in relation to age, cognition, and β-amyloid deposition. PMID:26938442

  4. Alzheimer-related decrease in CYFIP2 links amyloid production to tau hyperphosphorylation and memory loss

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Sachin Suresh; Mizuno, Keiko; Ghosh, Anshua; Aziz, Wajeeha; Troakes, Claire; Daoud, Jason; Golash, Vidushi; Noble, Wendy; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Characteristic features of Alzheimer’s disease are memory loss, plaques resulting from abnormal processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP), and presence of neurofibrillary tangles and dystrophic neurites containing hyperphosphorylated tau. Currently, it is not known what links these abnormalities together. Cytoplasmic FMR1 interacting protein 2 (CYFIP2) has been suggested to regulate mRNA translation at synapses and this may include local synthesis of APP and alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II, a kinase that can phosphorylate tau. Further, CYFIP2 is part of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein-family verprolin-homologous protein complex, which has been implicated in actin polymerization at synapses, a process thought to be required for memory formation. Our previous studies on p25 dysregulation put forward the hypothesis that CYFIP2 expression is reduced in Alzheimer’s disease and that this contributes to memory impairment, abnormal APP processing and tau hyperphosphorylation. Here, we tested this hypothesis. First, in post-mortem tissue CYFIP2 expression was reduced by ∼50% in severe Alzheimer’s hippocampus and superior temporal gyrus when normalized to expression of a neuronal or synaptic marker protein. Interestingly, there was also a trend for decreased expression in mild Alzheimer’s disease hippocampus. Second, CYFIP2 expression was reduced in old but not in young Tg2576 mice, a model of familial Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, we tested the direct impact of reduced CYFIP2 expression in heterozygous null mutant mice. We found that in hippocampus this reduced expression causes an increase in APP and β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) protein, but not mRNA expression, and elevates production of amyloid-β42. Reduced CYFIP2 expression also increases alpha-calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II protein expression, and this is associated with hyperphosphorylation of tau at serine-214. The reduced expression also

  5. Modification of Tau by 8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate (8-Nitro-cGMP): EFFECTS OF NITRIC OXIDE-LINKED CHEMICAL MODIFICATION ON TAU AGGREGATION.

    PubMed

    Yoshitake, Jun; Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Sumioka, Akio; Yoshikawa, Misato; Matsushita, Kenji; Akaike, Takaaki; Takashima, Akihiko

    2016-10-21

    Neurofibrillar tangles caused by intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau inclusion and extracellular amyloid β peptide deposition are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Tau contains one or two cysteine residues in three or four repeats of the microtubule binding region following alternative splicing of exon 10, and formation of intermolecular cysteine disulfide bonds accelerates tau aggregation. 8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) acts as a novel second messenger of nitric oxide (NO) by covalently binding cGMP to cysteine residues by electrophilic properties, a process termed protein S-guanylation. Here we studied S-guanylation of tau and its effects on tau aggregation. 8-Nitro-cGMP exposure induced S-guanylation of tau both in vitro and in tau-overexpressed HEK293T cells. S-guanylated tau inhibited heparin-induced tau aggregation in a thioflavin T assay. Atomic force microscopy observations indicated that S-guanylated tau could not form tau granules and fibrils. Further biochemical analyses showed that S-guanylated tau was inhibited at the step of tau oligomer formation. In P301L tau-expressing Neuro2A cells, 8-nitro-cGMP treatment significantly reduced the amount of sarcosyl-insoluble tau. NO-linked chemical modification on cysteine residues of tau could block tau aggregation, and therefore, increasing 8-nitro-cGMP levels in the brain could become a potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Presynaptic localization of GluK5 in rod photoreceptors suggests a novel function of high affinity glutamate receptors in the mammalian retina

    PubMed Central

    Frotscher, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Kainate receptors mediate glutamatergic signaling through both pre- and presynaptic receptors. Here, we studied the expression of the high affinity kainate receptor GluK5 in the mouse retina. Double-immunofluoresence labeling and electron microscopic analysis revealed a presynaptic localization of GluK5 in the outer plexiform layer. Unexpectedly, we found GluK5 almost exclusively localized to the presynaptic ribbon of photoreceptor terminals. Moreover, in GluK5-deficient mutant mice the structural integrity of synaptic ribbons was severely altered pointing to a novel function of GluK5 in organizing synaptic ribbons in the presynaptic terminals of rod photoreceptors. PMID:28235022

  7. Global Conformation of Tau Protein Mapped by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gorantla, Nalini Vijay; Khandelwal, Puneet; Poddar, Pankaj; Chinnathambi, Subashchandrabose

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive neuronal loss in the brain. Its two major hallmarks are extracellular senile plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), formed by aggregation of amyloid β-42 (Aβ-42) and Tau protein respectively. Aβ-42 is a transmembrane protein, which is produced after the sequential action of β- and γ-secretases, thus obtained peptide is released extracellularly and gets deposited on the neuron forming senile plaques. NFTs are composed of microtubule-associated protein-Tau (MAPT). Tau protein's major function is to stabilize the microtubule that provides a track on which the cargo proteins are shuttled and the stabilized microtubule also maintains shape and integrity of the neuronal cell. Tau protein is subjected to various modifications such as phosphorylation, ubiquitination, glycation, acetylation, truncation, glycosylation, deamination, and oxidation; these modifications ultimately lead to its aggregation. Phosphorylation is the major modification and is extensively studied with respect to Tau protein. Tau protein, however, undergoes certain level of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, which regulates its affinity for microtubule and ultimately leading to microtubule assembly and disassembly. Our main aim was to study the native state of longest isoform of Tau (hTau40WT-4R2N) and its shortest isoform, (hTau23WT-3R0N), at various temperatures such as 10, 25, and 37 °C. Raman spectroscopic results suggested that the proportion of random coils or unordered structure depends on the temperature of the protein environment. Upon increase in the temperature from 10 to 37 °C, the proportion of random coils or unordered structures increased in the case of hTau40WT. However, we did not find a significant effect of temperature on the structure of hTau23WT. This current approach enables one to analyze the global conformation of soluble Tau in solution.

  8. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Sarah N.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R.; Darling, April

    2015-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  9. Connecting the Dots Between Tau Dysfunction and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Frost, Bess; Götz, Jürgen; Feany, Mel B.

    2014-01-01

    Tauopathies are devastating and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative diseases, which are histopathologically defined by insoluble filamentous deposits of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein within neurons and glia. Identifying the causes of abnormal tau phosphorylation and subsequent aggregation has been the focus of much research, and is currently a major target for the development of therapeutic interventions for tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease. Recently much has been learned about the sequence of events that lead from tau dysfunction to neuronal death. This review focuses on the cascade of events that are catalyzed by pathological tau, and highlights current and potential therapeutic strategies to target this pathway. PMID:25172552

  10. Lysosomal Dysfunction Promotes Cleavage and Neurotoxicity of Tau In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Katherine A.; Loewen, Carin A.; Mulkearns, Erin; Tyynelä, Jaana; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Feany, Mel B.

    2010-01-01

    Expansion of the lysosomal system, including cathepsin D upregulation, is an early and prominent finding in Alzheimer's disease brain. Cell culture studies, however, have provided differing perspectives on the lysosomal connection to Alzheimer's disease, including both protective and detrimental influences. We sought to clarify and molecularly define the connection in vivo in a genetically tractable model organism. Cathepsin D is upregulated with age in a Drosophila model of Alzheimer's disease and related tauopathies. Genetic analysis reveals that cathepsin D plays a neuroprotective role because genetic ablation of cathepsin D markedly potentiates tau-induced neurotoxicity. Further, generation of a C-terminally truncated form of tau found in Alzheimer's disease patients is significantly increased in the absence of cathepsin D. We show that truncated tau has markedly increased neurotoxicity, while solubility of truncated tau is decreased. Importantly, the toxicity of truncated tau is not affected by removal of cathepsin D, providing genetic evidence that modulation of neurotoxicity by cathepsin D is mediated through C-terminal cleavage of tau. We demonstrate that removing cathepsin D in adult postmitotic neurons leads to aberrant lysosomal expansion and caspase activation in vivo, suggesting a mechanism for C-terminal truncation of tau. We also demonstrate that both cathepsin D knockout mice and cathepsin D–deficient sheep show abnormal C-terminal truncation of tau and accompanying caspase activation. Thus, caspase cleavage of tau may be a molecular mechanism through which lysosomal dysfunction and neurodegeneration are causally linked in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:20664788

  11. Hyperphosphorylated Tau is Elevated in Alzheimer's Disease with Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Patrick S.; Kirkwood, Caitlin M.; Gray, Megan C.; Fish, Kenneth N.; Ikonomovic, Milos D.; Hamilton, Ronald L.; Kofler, Julia K.; Klunk, William E.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Sweet, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Psychosis occurs in 40–60% of Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects, is heritable, and indicates amore rapidly progressive disease phenotype. Neuroimaging and postmortem evidence support an exaggerated prefrontal cortical synaptic deficit in AD with psychosis. Microtubule-associated protein tau is a key mediator of amyloid-β-induced synaptotoxicity in AD, and differential mechanisms of progressive intraneuronal phospho-tau accumulation and interneuronal spread of tau aggregates have recently been described. We hypothesized that psychosis in AD would be associated with greater intraneuronal concentration of phospho-tau and greater spread of tau aggregates in prefrontal cortex. We therefore evaluated prefrontal cortex phospho-tau in a cohort of 45 AD cases with and without psychosis. Intraneuronal phospho-tau concentration was higher in subjects with psychosis, while a measure of phospho-tau spread, volume fraction, was not. Across groups both measures were associated with lower scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination and Digit Span Backwards test. These novel findings indicate that tau phosphorylation may be accelerated in AD with psychosis, indicating a more dynamic, exaggerated pathology in AD with psychosis. PMID:24270207

  12. NMR Meets Tau: Insights into Its Function and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Lippens, Guy; Landrieu, Isabelle; Smet, Caroline; Huvent, Isabelle; Gandhi, Neha S.; Gigant, Benoît; Despres, Clément; Qi, Haoling; Lopez, Juan

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we focus on what we have learned from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) studies on the neuronal microtubule-associated protein Tau. We consider both the mechanistic details of Tau: the tubulin relationship and its aggregation process. Phosphorylation of Tau is intimately linked to both aspects. NMR spectroscopy has depicted accurate phosphorylation patterns by different kinases, and its non-destructive character has allowed functional assays with the same samples. Finally, we will discuss other post-translational modifications of Tau and its interaction with other cellular factors in relationship to its (dys)function. PMID:27338491

  13. Updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-23

    We present an updated measurement of the tau lifetime at SLD. 4316 {tau}-pair events, selected from a 150k Z{sup 0} data sample, are analyzed using three techniques: decay length, impact parameter, and impact parameter difference methods. The measurement benefits from the small and stable interaction region at the SLC and the precision CCD pixel vertex detector of the SLD. The combined result is: {tau}{sub {tau}} = 288.1 {+-} 6.1(stat) {+-} 3.3(syst) fs.

  14. Aluminum induces tau aggregation in vitro but not in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mizoroki, Tatsuya; Meshitsuka, Shunsuke; Maeda, Sumihiro; Murayama, Miyuki; Sahara, Naruhiko; Takashima, Akihiko

    2007-07-01

    Etiological studies suggest that aluminum (Al) intake might increase an individual's risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). Biochemical analysis data on the effects of Al, however, are inconsistent. Hence, the pathological involvement of Al in AD remains unclear. If Al is involved in AD, then it is reasonable to hypothesize that Al might be involved in the formation of either amyloid plaques or neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). Here, we investigated whether Al might be involved in NFT formation by using an in vitro tau aggregation paradigm, a tau-overexpressing neuronal cell line (N2a), and a tau-overexpressing mouse model. Although Al induced tau aggregation in a heparin-induced tau assembly assay, these aggregates were neither thioflavin T positive nor did they resemble tau fibrils seen in human AD brains. With cell lysates from stable cell lines overexpressing tau, the accumulation of SDS-insoluble tau increased when the lysates were treated with at least 100 muM Al-maltolate. Yet Al-maltolate caused illness or death in transgenic mice overexpressing human tau and in non-transgenic littermates well before the Al concentration in the brain reached 100 muM. These results indicate that Al has no direct link to AD pathology.

  15. Evaluation of chromatic cues for trapping Bactrocera tau.

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Ma, Huabo; Niu, Liming; Han, Dongyin; Zhang, Fangping; Chen, Junyu; Fu, Yueguan

    2017-01-01

    Trapping technology based on chromatic cues is an important strategy in controlling Tephritidae (fruit flies). The objectives of this present study were to evaluate the preference of Bactrocera tau for different chromatic cues, and to explore an easy method to print and reproduce coloured paper. Chromatic cues significantly affected the preference of adult B. tau. Wavelengths in the 515-604 nm range were the suitable wavelengths for trapping B. tau. Different-day-old B. tau had different colour preferences. Virtual wavelengths of 595 nm (yellow) and 568 nm (yellowish green) were the optimum wavelengths for trapping 5-7-day-old B. tau and 30-32-day-old B. tau respectively. The trap type and height significantly influenced B. tau attraction efficiency. The number of B. tau on coloured traps hung perpendicular to plant rows was not significantly higher than the number on traps hung parallel to plant rows. The quantisation of colour on the basis of Bruton's wavelength to RGB function can serve as an alternative method for printing and reproducing coloured paper, but a corrected equation should be established between the theoretical wavelength and actual wavelength of coloured paper. Results show that a compound paper coloured yellow (595 nm) and yellowish green (568 nm) installed at 60 and 90 cm above the ground shows the maximum effect for trapping B. tau. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Robust Coefficients Alpha and Omega and Confidence Intervals with Outlying Observations and Missing Data Methods and Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cronbach's coefficient alpha is a widely used reliability measure in social, behavioral, and education sciences. It is reported in nearly every study that involves measuring a construct through multiple items. With non-tau-equivalent items, McDonald's omega has been used as a popular alternative to alpha in the literature. Traditional estimation…

  17. Robust Coefficients Alpha and Omega and Confidence Intervals with Outlying Observations and Missing Data: Methods and Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cronbach's coefficient alpha is a widely used reliability measure in social, behavioral, and education sciences. It is reported in nearly every study that involves measuring a construct through multiple items. With non-tau-equivalent items, McDonald's omega has been used as a popular alternative to alpha in the literature. Traditional estimation…

  18. Robust Coefficients Alpha and Omega and Confidence Intervals with Outlying Observations and Missing Data: Methods and Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2016-01-01

    Cronbach's coefficient alpha is a widely used reliability measure in social, behavioral, and education sciences. It is reported in nearly every study that involves measuring a construct through multiple items. With non-tau-equivalent items, McDonald's omega has been used as a popular alternative to alpha in the literature. Traditional estimation…

  19. Bovine somatotropin attenuates phorbol ester-induced prostaglandin F2alpha production in bovine endometrial cells.

    PubMed

    Badinga, L; Guzeloglu, A; Thatcher, W W

    2002-03-01

    The recent observation that bovine somatotropin (bST) treatment at a timed insemination improves pregnancy rates in lactating dairy cows raises the possibility that growth hormone (GH) may modulate the endocrine and biochemical cross talk between the conceptus and maternal uterus at the time of pregnancy establishment in cattle. The objective of this study was to characterize the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which exogenous GH affects phorbol ester-induced prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) production in cultured bovine endometrial (BEND) cells. Serum-deprived BEND cells were incubated with or without recombinant bovine GH (rbGH), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, recombinant bovine interferon (rbIFN)-tau or a combination of rbGH + rbIFN-tau for 3 h and then treated with phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate (PDBu) for an additional 6 h. Exogenous PDBu increased PGF2alpha secretion and steady-state levels of COX-2 mRNA within 3 h. Priming of BEND cells with rbGH reduced PGF2alpha response to PDBu, whereas cotreatment with IGF-I amplified PDBu induction of PGF2alpha. Preincubation of cell monolayers with rbIFN-tau suppressed PGF2alpha and COX-2 mRNA responses to PDBu. Inhibitory effects of rbGH and rbIFN-tau on PDBu-induced PGF2alpha production were additive. Results provide the first direct evidence that supplemental bST may interact with conceptus-secreted IFN-tau to modulate PGF2alpha secretion at the critical time of maternal recognition of pregnancy.

  20. Stabilization of Microtubule-Unbound Tau via Tau Phosphorylation at Ser262/356 by Par-1/MARK Contributes to Augmentation of AD-Related Phosphorylation and Aβ42-Induced Tau Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Kanae; Maruko-Otake, Akiko; Ohtake, Yosuke; Hayashishita, Motoki; Sekiya, Michiko; Iijima, Koichi M.

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal accumulation of the microtubule-interacting protein tau is associated with neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). β-amyloid (Aβ) lies upstream of abnormal tau behavior, including detachment from microtubules, phosphorylation at several disease-specific sites, and self-aggregation into toxic tau species in AD brains. To prevent the cascade of events leading to neurodegeneration in AD, it is essential to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the initial events of tau mismetabolism. Currently, however, these mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, using transgenic Drosophila co-expressing human tau and Aβ, we found that tau phosphorylation at AD-related Ser262/356 stabilized microtubule-unbound tau in the early phase of tau mismetabolism, leading to neurodegeneration. Aβ increased the level of tau detached from microtubules, independent of the phosphorylation status at GSK3-targeted SP/TP sites. Such mislocalized tau proteins, especially the less phosphorylated species, were stabilized by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via PAR-1/MARK. Levels of Ser262 phosphorylation were increased by Aβ42, and blocking this stabilization of tau suppressed Aβ42-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity and an increase in the levels of tau phosphorylation at the SP/TP site Thr231, suggesting that this process may be involved in AD pathogenesis. In contrast to PAR-1/MARK, blocking tau phosphorylation at SP/TP sites by knockdown of Sgg/GSK3 did not reduce tau levels, suppress tau mislocalization to the cytosol, or diminish Aβ-mediated augmentation of tau toxicity. These results suggest that stabilization of microtubule-unbound tau by phosphorylation at Ser262/356 via the PAR-1/MARK may act in the initial steps of tau mismetabolism in AD pathogenesis, and that such tau species may represent a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27023670

  1. Discoveries of tau, abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau and others of neurofibrillary degeneration: a personal historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge

    2006-01-01

    Alzheimer disease was described by Alois Alzheimer in 1907, but it was not until approximately 60-70 years later that any new significant developments were reported on the pathology of this disease. The discoveries that laid down the foundation for the exciting research that has been carried out during the last approximately 20 years and that have significantly enhanced our understanding of the disease are the ultrastructure of neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic (senile) plaques, the clinical-pathological correlation of these lesions to the presence of dementia, and the bulk isolation and protein composition of paired helical filaments and plaque amyloid. We discovered tau as the major protein subunit of paired helical filaments/neurofibrillary tangles, the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of this protein in this lesion and in Alzheimer brain cytosol and the gain of toxic function by the cytosolic abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau in Alzheimer brain. Here we present a personal historical account of the work in our laboratories that led, in 1986, to the discoveries of tau and its abnormal hyperphosphorylation in paired helical filaments and Alzheimer brain cytosol. This article also describes several major findings which subsequently resulted from the abnormal hyperphosphorylation of tau and in a large part account for the current understanding of the role of this lesion in Alzheimer disease and other tauopathies.

  2. Constraining new interactions with leptonic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.; Silva, J.P.

    1995-10-01

    The recent measurements of the Michel parameters in {tau} decays enable, for the first time, a thorough analysis of the leptonic sector. In general, in models beyond the standard model, these parameters will be altered through changes in the {ital W} and {ital Z} couplings, and/or through interactions mediated by new gauge bosons. We perform a complete, model-independent analysis of the constraints imposed by the present data on such boson-mediated interactions, and point out the existence of useful relations among the couplings.

  3. A measurement of the tau mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, H.; Ehrlichmann, H.; Hamacher, T.; Hofmann, R. P.; Kirchhoff, T.; Nau, A.; Nowak, S.; Schröder, H.; Schulz, H. D.; Walter, M.; Wurth, R.; Appuhn, R. D.; Hast, C.; Kolanoski, H.; Lange, A.; Lindner, A.; Mankel, R.; Schieber, M.; Siegmund, T.; Spaan, B.; Thurn, H.; Töpfer, D.; Walther, A.; Wegener, D.; Paulini, M.; Reim, K.; Wegener, H.; Mundt, R.; Oest, T.; Reiner, R.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Funk, W.; Stiewe, J.; Werner, S.; Ehret, K.; Hofmann, W.; Hüpper, A.; Khan, S.; Knöpfle, K. T.; Spengler, J.; Britton, D. I.; Charlesworth, C. E. K.; Edwards, K. W.; Hyatt, E. R. F.; Kapitza, H.; Krieger, P.; Patel, P. M.; Prentice, J. D.; Saull, P. R. B.; Tzamariudaki, K.; van de Water, R. G.; Yoon, T.-S.; Reβing, D.; Schmidtler, M.; Schneider, M.; Schubert, K. R.; Strahl, K.; Waldi, R.; Weseler, S.; Kernel, G.; Križan, P.; Križnič, E.; Podobnik, T.; Živko, T.; Cronström, H. I.; Jönsson, L.; Balagura, V.; Belyaev, I.; Danilov, M.; Droutskoy, A.; Golutvin, A.; Gorelov, I.; Kostina, G.; Lubimov, V.; Murat, P.; Pakhlov, P.; Ratnikov, F.; Semenov, S.; Shibaev, V.; Soloshenko, V.; Tichomirov, I.; Zaitsev, Yu.; Argus Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Using the ARGUS detector at the DORIS II storage ring, a new measurement of the mass of the τ lepton has been obtained. An analysis of the tau pseudomass spectrum for decays of the type τ- → π-π-π+ντ finds mτ = 1776.3±2.4±1.4 MeV/ c2. This result also leads to an improvement of the upper limit on the ντ mass to mντ < 31 MeV/ c2 at the 95% confidence level.

  4. NEW LIMITS FOR NEUTRINOLESS TAU DECAYS

    SciTech Connect

    Jessop, Colin P.

    2003-05-01

    Neutrinoless 3-prong tau lepton decays into a charged lepton and either two all channels the numbers of events found are compatible with background an update of a previous study and the addition of six decay channels. In charged particles or one neutral meson have been searched for using 4.79 fb{sup -1} estimates and branching fraction upper limits are set for 28 different decay modes. These limits are either more stringent than those set previously or of data collected with the CLEO II detector at CESR. This analysis represents represent the first attempt to find these decays.

  5. Phosphorylation of Tau at S422 is enhanced by Abeta in TauPS2APP triple transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Grueninger, Fiona; Bohrmann, Bernd; Czech, Christian; Ballard, Theresa Maria; Frey, Johann R; Weidensteiner, Claudia; von Kienlin, Markus; Ozmen, Laurence

    2010-02-01

    Amyloid beta peptides and microtubule-associated protein Tau are misfolded and form aggregates in brains of Alzheimer's disease patients. To examine their specific roles in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and their relevance in neurodegenerative processes, we have created TauPS2APP triple transgenic mice that express human mutated Amyloid Precursor Protein, presenilin 2 and Tau. We present a cross-sectional analysis of these mice at 4, 8, 12 and 16 months of age. By comparing with single transgenic Tau mice, we demonstrate that accumulation of Abeta in TauPS2APP triple transgenic mice impacts on Tau pathology by increasing the phosphorylation of Tau at serine 422, as determined by a novel immunodetection method that is able to reliably measure phospho-Tau species in transgenic mouse brains. The TauPS2APP triple transgenic mouse model will be very useful for studying the effect of new therapeutic paradigms on amyloid deposition and downstream neurofibrillary tangle development.

  6. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ruben; Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-09-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with (18)F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer's disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited (18)F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was (18)F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β ((18)F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that (18)F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein.

  7. 18F-AV-1451 tau PET imaging correlates strongly with tau neuropathology in MAPT mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Puschmann, Andreas; Schöll, Michael; Ohlsson, Tomas; van Swieten, John; Honer, Michael; Englund, Elisabet

    2016-01-01

    Tau positron emission tomography ligands provide the novel possibility to image tau pathology in vivo. However, little is known about how in vivo brain uptake of tau positron emission tomography ligands relates to tau aggregates observed post-mortem. We performed tau positron emission tomography imaging with 18F-AV-1451 in three patients harbouring a p.R406W mutation in the MAPT gene, encoding tau. This mutation results in 3- and 4-repeat tau aggregates similar to those in Alzheimer’s disease, and many of the mutation carriers initially suffer from memory impairment and temporal lobe atrophy. Two patients with short disease duration and isolated memory impairment exhibited 18F-AV-1451 uptake mainly in the hippocampus and adjacent temporal lobe regions, correlating with glucose hypometabolism in corresponding regions. One patient died after 26 years of disease duration with dementia and behavioural deficits. Pre-mortem, there was 18F-AV-1451 uptake in the temporal and frontal lobes, as well as in the basal ganglia, which strongly correlated with the regional extent and amount of tau pathology in post-mortem brain sections. Amyloid-β (18F-flutemetamol) positron emission tomography scans were negative in all cases, as were stainings of brain sections for amyloid. This provides strong evidence that 18F-AV-1451 positron emission tomography can be used to accurately quantify in vivo the regional distribution of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. PMID:27357347

  8. INVESTIGATING PLANET FORMATION IN CIRCUMSTELLAR DISKS: CARMA OBSERVATIONS OF RY Tau AND DG Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Isella, Andrea; Carpenter, John M.; Sargent, Anneila I.

    2010-05-10

    We present CARMA observations of the thermal dust emission from the circumstellar disks around the young stars RY Tau and DG Tau at wavelengths of 1.3 mm and 2.8 mm. The angular resolution of the maps is as high as 0.''15, or 20 AU at the distance of the Taurus cloud, which is a factor of 2 higher than has been achieved to date at these wavelengths. The unprecedented detail of the resulting disk images enables us to address three important questions related to the formation of planets. (1) What is the radial distribution of the circumstellar dust? (2) Does the dust emission show any indication of gaps that might signify the presence of (proto-)planets? (3) Do the dust properties depend on the orbital radius? We find that modeling the disk surface density in terms of either a classical power law or the similarity solution for viscous disk evolution reproduces the observations well. Both models constrain the surface density between 15 and 50 AU to within 30% for a given dust opacity. Outside this range, the densities inferred from the two models differ by almost an order of magnitude. The 1.3 mm image from RY Tau shows two peaks separated by 0.''2 with a decline in the dust emission toward the stellar position, which is significant at about 2{sigma}-4{sigma}. For both RY Tau and DG Tau, the dust emission at radii larger than 15 AU displays no significant deviation from an unperturbed viscous disk model. In particular, no radial gaps in the dust distribution are detected. Under reasonable assumptions, we exclude the presence of planets more massive than 5 M{sub J} orbiting either star at distances between about 10 and 60 AU, unless such a planet is so young that there has been insufficient time to open a gap in the disk surface density. The radial variation of the dust opacity slope, {beta}, was investigated by comparing the 1.3 mm and 2.8 mm observations. We find mean values of {beta} of 0.5 and 0.7 for DG Tau and RY Tau, respectively. Variations in {beta} are

  9. Mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous, gene-edited Tau differs from that of over-expressed human wild-type and P301L mutant Tau

    PubMed Central

    Di Xia; Gutmann, Julia M.; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia termed FTLD-Tau are characterized by a massive, yet incompletely characterized and understood redistribution of Tau. To establish a framework for understanding this pathology, we used the genome-editing tool TALEN and generated Tau-mEOS2 knock-in mice to determine the mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous Tau in hippocampal cultures. We analysed Tau in axons, dendrites and spines at three stages of maturation using live-cell imaging, photo-conversion and FRAP assays. Tau-mEOS2 cultures were compared with those over-expressing EGFP-tagged forms of human wild-type (hWT-Tau) and P301L mutant Tau (hP301L-Tau), modelling Tau accumulation in AD and FTLD-Tau, respectively. In developing neurons, Tau-mEOS2 followed a proximo-distal gradient in axons and a subcellular distribution similar to that of endogenous Tau in neurons obtained from wild-type mice, which were abolished, when either hWT-Tau or hP301L-Tau was over-expressed. For the three conditions, FRAP analysis revealed a similar mobility in dendrites compared with axons; however, Tau-mEOS2 was less mobile than hWT-Tau and hP301L-Tau and the mobile fraction was smaller, possibly reflecting less efficient microtubule binding of Tau when over-expressed. Together, our study presents Tau-mEOS2 mice as a novel tool for the study of Tau in a physiological and a pathological context. PMID:27378256

  10. K5/K14-positive cells contribute to salivary gland-like breast tumors with myoepithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Boecker, Werner; Stenman, Goeran; Loening, Thomas; Andersson, Mattias K; Bankfalvi, Agnes; von Holstein, Sarah; Heegaard, Steffen; Lange, Alina; Berg, Tobias; Samoilova, Vera; Tiemann, Katharina; Buchwalow, Igor

    2013-08-01

    Salivary gland-like tumors of the breast show a great variety of architectural patterns and cellular differentiations such as glandular, myoepithelial, squamous, and even mesenchymal phenotypes. However, currently little is known about the evolution and cellular differentiation of these tumors. For that reason, we performed an in situ triple immunofluorescence lineage/differentiation tracing (isTILT) and qRT-PCR study of basal (K5/K14), glandular (K7/K8/18), and epidermal-specific squamous (K10) keratins, p63, and smooth muscle actin (SMA; myoepithelial marker) with the aim to construct and trace different cell lineages and define their cellular hierarchy in tumors with myoepithelial differentiation. isTILT analysis of a series of 28 breast, salivary, and lacrimal gland tumors, including pleomorphic adenomas (n=8), epithelial-myoepithelial tumors (n=9), and adenoid cystic carcinomas (n=11) revealed that all tumor types contained K5/K14-positive progenitor cells in varying frequencies from a few percent up to 15%. These K5/K14-positive tumor cells were found to differentiate to glandular- (K8/18-positive) and myoepithelial-lineage (SMA-positive)-specific cells and were also shown to generate various heterologeous cell differentiations such as squamous and mesenchymal progenies. p63 was co-expressed with K5/K14 in basal-like progenitor cells, myoepithelial, and squamous cells but not in glandular cells. Our results show that the corresponding counterpart tumors of breast and salivary/lacrimal glands have identical cellular compositions. Taken together, our isTILT and RNA-expression data indicate that look-alike tumors of the breast represent a special subgroup of basal-type tumors with benign or usually low malignant potential.

  11. Dynamic Competing Histone H4 K5K8 Acetylation and Butyrylation Are Hallmarks of Highly Active Gene Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Goudarzi, Afsaneh; Zhang, Di; Huang, He; Barral, Sophie; Kwon, Oh Kwang; Qi, Shankang; Tang, Zhanyun; Buchou, Thierry; Vitte, Anne-Laure; He, Tieming; Cheng, Zhongyi; Montellier, Emilie; Gaucher, Jonathan; Curtet, Sandrine; Debernardi, Alexandra; Charbonnier, Guillaume; Puthier, Denis; Petosa, Carlo; Panne, Daniel; Rousseaux, Sophie; Roeder, Robert G.; Zhao, Yingming; Khochbin, Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recently discovered histone lysine acylation marks increase the functional diversity of nucleosomes well beyond acetylation. Here, we focus on histone butyrylation in the context of sperm cell differentiation. Specifically, we investigate the butyrylation of histone H4 lysine 5 and 8 at gene promoters where acetylation guides the binding of Brdt, a bromodomain-containing protein, thereby mediating stage-specific gene expression programs and post-meiotic chromatin reorganization. Genome-wide mapping data show that highly active Brdt-bound gene promoters systematically harbor competing histone acetylation and butyrylation marks at H4 K5 and H4 K8. Despite acting as a direct stimulator of transcription, histone butyrylation competes with acetylation, especially at H4 K5, to prevent Brdt binding. Additionally, H4 K5K8 butyrylation also marks retarded histone removal during late spermatogenesis. Hence, alternating H4 acetylation and butyrylation, while sustaining direct gene activation and dynamic bromodomain binding, could impact the final male epigenome features. PMID:27105113

  12. Final report of COOMET.T-K5: realizations of the ITS-90 at 1084.62 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergiyenko, R. P.; Matveyev, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    At the meeting of the Technical Committee 1.10 of COOMET in 2007 it was decided to undertake a regional comparison between the VNIIM (Russian Federation) and the NSC IM (Ukraine) for realization of the ITS-90 at the freezing point of copper in the field of non-contact thermometry. The VNIIM participated in the key comparisons CCT-K5. As a consequence, the VNIIM therefore acts as the linking institute for this comparison, registered in the KCDB as COOMET.T-K5, to disseminate metrological equivalence to the NSC IM standards (Ukraine). The protocol of the comparison covers two separate comparisons: a comparison of fixed-point cells (Stage 1), and a comparison of lamp calibrations (Stage 2) at 1084.62 °C. The results of the Stage 2 comparison are used in this report for linkage with the CCT-K5. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  13. Proceedings, High-Precision $\\alpha_s$ Measurements from LHC to FCC-ee

    SciTech Connect

    d'Enterria, David; Skands, Peter Z.

    2015-01-01

    This document provides a writeup of all contributions to the workshop on "High precision measurements of $\\alpha_s$: From LHC to FCC-ee" held at CERN, Oct. 12--13, 2015. The workshop explored in depth the latest developments on the determination of the QCD coupling $\\alpha_s$ from 15 methods where high precision measurements are (or will be) available. Those include low-energy observables: (i) lattice QCD, (ii) pion decay factor, (iii) quarkonia and (iv) $\\tau$ decays, (v) soft parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, as well as high-energy observables: (vi) global fits of parton distribution functions, (vii) hard parton-to-hadron fragmentation functions, (viii) jets in $e^\\pm$p DIS and $\\gamma$-p photoproduction, (ix) photon structure function in $\\gamma$-$\\gamma$, (x) event shapes and (xi) jet cross sections in $e^+e^-$ collisions, (xii) W boson and (xiii) Z boson decays, and (xiv) jets and (xv) top-quark cross sections in proton-(anti)proton collisions. The current status of the theoretical and experimental uncertainties associated to each extraction method, the improvements expected from LHC data in the coming years, and future perspectives achievable in $e^+e^-$ collisions at the Future Circular Collider (FCC-ee) with $\\cal{O}$(1--100 ab$^{-1}$) integrated luminosities yielding 10$^{12}$ Z bosons and jets, and 10$^{8}$ W bosons and $\\tau$ leptons, are thoroughly reviewed. The current uncertainty of the (preliminary) 2015 strong coupling world-average value, $\\alpha_s(m_Z)$ = 0.1177 $\\pm$ 0.0013, is about 1\\%. Some participants believed this may be reduced by a factor of three in the near future by including novel high-precision observables, although this opinion was not universally shared. At the FCC-ee facility, a factor of ten reduction in the $\\alpha_s$ uncertainty should be possible, mostly thanks to the huge Z and W data samples available.

  14. Studies of tau- to h- h- h+ nu and tau- to K- pi0 nu Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Nugent, I.M.; /Victoria U.

    2007-10-24

    We present preliminary inclusive branching fraction measurements of {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu} (h = {pi} or K) and {tau}{sup -} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu} decay modes using a sample of {tau}-pair events collected by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. The branching fractions of {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{nu}, and {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}K{sup +}{nu} are measured with higher precision than previously published results and the inclusive branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup -}K{sup +}{nu} is measured for the first time. In addition, the first measurement of the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{phi}{nu} and the measurement of the branching fraction {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{phi}{nu} are determined by means of a binned maximum likelihood fit to the K{sup +}K{sup -} invariant mass distribution. These branching fractions are extracted by means of a migration matrix that accounts for the cross contamination between the {tau}{sup -} {yields} h{sup -}h{sup -}h{sup +}{nu} modes. The preliminary {tau}{sup -} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}{nu} branching fraction and invariant mass distributions are also presented in this paper.

  15. Tau-Induced Ca(2+)/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase-IV Activation Aggravates Nuclear Tau Hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu-Ping; Ye, Jin-Wang; Wang, Xiong; Zhu, Li-Ping; Hu, Qing-Hua; Wang, Qun; Ke, Dan; Tian, Qing; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2017-06-23

    Hyperphosphorylated tau is the major protein component of neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism underlying tau hyperphosphorylation is not fully understood. Here, we demonstrated that exogenously expressed wild-type human tau40 was detectable in the phosphorylated form at multiple AD-associated sites in cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions from HEK293 cells. Among these sites, tau phosphorylated at Thr205 and Ser214 was almost exclusively found in the nuclear fraction at the conditions used in the present study. With the intracellular tau accumulation, the Ca(2+) concentration was significantly increased in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions. Further studies using site-specific mutagenesis and pharmacological treatment demonstrated that phosphorylation of tau at Thr205 increased nuclear Ca(2+) concentration with a simultaneous increase in the phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) at Ser196. On the other hand, phosphorylation of tau at Ser214 did not significantly change the nuclear Ca(2+)/CaMKIV signaling. Finally, expressing calmodulin-binding protein-4 that disrupts formation of the Ca(2+)/calmodulin complex abolished the okadaic acid-induced tau hyperphosphorylation in the nuclear fraction. We conclude that the intracellular accumulation of phosphorylated tau, as detected in the brains of AD patients, can trigger nuclear Ca(2+)/CaMKIV signaling, which in turn aggravates tau hyperphosphorylation. Our findings provide new insights for tauopathies: hyperphosphorylation of intracellular tau and an increased Ca(2+) concentration may induce a self-perpetuating harmful loop to promote neurodegeneration.

  16. Tau and neurodegenerative disease: the story so far.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2016-01-01

    In 1975, tau protein was isolated as a microtubule-associated factor from the porcine brain. In the previous year, a paired helical filament (PHF) protein had been identified in neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer disease (AD), but it was not until 1986 that the PHF protein and tau were discovered to be one and the same. In the AD brain, tau was found to be abnormally hyperphosphorylated, and it inhibited rather than promoted in vitro microtubule assembly. Almost 80 disease-causing exonic missense and intronic silent mutations in the tau gene have been found in familial cases of frontotemporal dementia but, to date, no such mutation has been found in AD. The first phase I clinical trial of an active tau immunization vaccine in patients with AD was recently completed. Assays for tau levels in cerebrospinal fluid and plasma are now available, and tau radiotracers for PET are under development. In this article, we provide an overview of the pivotal discoveries in the tau research field over the past 40 years. We also review the current status of the field, including disease mechanisms and therapeutic approaches.

  17. Widespread tau seeding activity at early Braak stages.

    PubMed

    Furman, Jennifer L; Vaquer-Alicea, Jaime; White, Charles L; Cairns, Nigel J; Nelson, Peter T; Diamond, Marc I

    2017-01-01

    Transcellular propagation of tau aggregates may underlie the progression of pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies. Braak staging (B1, B2, B3) is based on phospho-tau accumulation within connected brain regions: entorhinal cortex (B1); hippocampus/limbic system (B2); and frontal and parietal lobes (B3). We previously developed a specific and sensitive assay that uses flow cytometry to quantify tissue seeding activity based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in cells that stably express tau reporter proteins. In a tauopathy mouse model, we have detected seeding activity far in advance of histopathological changes. It remains unknown whether individuals with AD also develop seeding activity prior to accumulation of phospho-tau. We measured tau seeding activity across four brain regions (hippocampus, frontal lobe, parietal lobe, and cerebellum) in 104 fresh-frozen human AD brain samples from all Braak stages. We observed widespread seeding activity, notably in regions predicted to be free of phospho-tau deposition, and in detergent-insoluble fractions that lacked tau detectable by ELISA. Seeding activity correlated positively with Braak stage and negatively with MMSE. Our results are consistent with early transcellular propagation of tau seeds that triggers subsequent development of neuropathology. The FRET-based seeding assay may also complement standard neuropathological classification of tauopathies.

  18. Dimethyl sulfoxide induces both direct and indirect tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Julien, Carl; Marcouiller, François; Bretteville, Alexis; El Khoury, Noura B; Baillargeon, Joanie; Hébert, Sébastien S; Planel, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is widely used as a solvent or vehicle for biological studies, and for treatment of specific disorders, including traumatic brain injury and several forms of amyloidosis. As Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains are characterized by deposits of β-amyloid peptides, it has been suggested that DMSO could be used as a treatment for this devastating disease. AD brains are also characterized by aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but the effect of DMSO on tau phosphorylation is unknown. We thus investigated the impact of DMSO on tau phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. One hour following intraperitoneal administration of 1 or 2 ml/kg DMSO in mice, no change was observed in tau phosphorylation. However, at 4 ml/kg, tau was hyperphosphorylated at AT8 (Ser(202)/Thr(205)), PHF-1 (Ser(396)/Ser(404)) and AT180 (Thr(231)) epitopes. At this dose, we also noticed that the animals were hypothermic. When the mice were maintained normothermic, the effect of 4 ml/kg DMSO on tau hyperphosphorylation was prevented. On the other hand, in SH-SY5Y cells, 0.1% DMSO induced tau hyperphosphorylation at AT8 and AT180 phosphoepitopes in normothermic conditions. Globally, these findings demonstrate that DMSO can induce tau hyperphosphorylation indirectly via hypothermia in vivo, and directly in vitro. These data should caution researchers working with DMSO as it can induce artifactual results both in vivo and in vitro.

  19. Caspase-2 cleavage of tau reversibly impairs memory.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaohui; Kotilinek, Linda A; Smith, Benjamin; Hlynialuk, Chris; Zahs, Kathleen; Ramsden, Martin; Cleary, James; Ashe, Karen H

    2016-11-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other tauopathies, the tau protein forms fibrils, which are believed to be neurotoxic. However, fibrillar tau has been dissociated from neuron death and network dysfunction, suggesting the involvement of nonfibrillar species. Here we describe a novel pathological process in which caspase-2 cleavage of tau at Asp314 impairs cognitive and synaptic function in animal and cellular models of tauopathies by promoting the missorting of tau to dendritic spines. The truncation product, Δtau314, resists fibrillation and is present at higher levels in brains from cognitively impaired mice and humans with AD. The expression of tau mutants that resisted caspase-2 cleavage prevented tau from infiltrating spines, dislocating glutamate receptors and impairing synaptic function in cultured neurons, and it prevented memory deficits and neurodegeneration in mice. Decreasing the levels of caspase-2 restored long-term memory in mice that had existing deficits. Our results suggest an overall treatment strategy for re-establishing synaptic function and restoring memory in patients with AD by preventing tau from accumulating in dendritic spines.

  20. Morin attenuates tau hyperphosphorylation by inhibiting GSK3β

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Eun Ji; Park, Hee Ra; Kim, Mi Eun; Piao, Shunfu; Lee, Eunjin; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Chung, Hae Young; Ha, Nam-Chul; Mattson, Mark P.; Lee, Jaewon

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the major form of age-related dementia and is characterized by progressive cognitive impairment, the accumulation of extracellular amyloid β-peptide (Aβ), and intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates in affected brain regions. Tau hyperphosphorylation and accumulation in neurofibrillary tangles is strongly correlated with cognitive deficits, and is apparently a critical event in the dementia process because mutations in tau can cause a tangle-only form of dementia called frontotemporal lobe dementia. Among kinases that phosphorylate tau, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) is strongly implicated in AD pathogenesis. In the present study, we established an ELISA to screen for agents that inhibit GSK3β activity and found that the flavonoid morin effectively inhibited GSK3β activity and blocked GSK3β-induced tau phosphorylation in vitro. In addition, morin attenuated Aβ-induced tau phosphorylation and protected human neuroblastoma cells against Aβ cytotoxicity. Furthermore, treatment of 3×Tg-AD mice with morin resulted in reductions in tau hyperphosphorylation and paired helical filament-like immunoreactivity in hippocampal neurons. Morin is a novel inhibitor of GSK3β that can reduce tau pathology in vivo and may have potential as a therapeutic agent in tauopathies. PMID:21782947

  1. Dimethyl Sulfoxide Induces Both Direct and Indirect Tau Hyperphosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Julien, Carl; Marcouiller, François; Bretteville, Alexis; El Khoury, Noura B.; Baillargeon, Joanie; Hébert, Sébastien S.; Planel, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is widely used as a solvent or vehicle for biological studies, and for treatment of specific disorders, including traumatic brain injury and several forms of amyloidosis. As Alzheimer’s disease (AD) brains are characterized by deposits of β-amyloid peptides, it has been suggested that DMSO could be used as a treatment for this devastating disease. AD brains are also characterized by aggregates of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but the effect of DMSO on tau phosphorylation is unknown. We thus investigated the impact of DMSO on tau phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. One hour following intraperitoneal administration of 1 or 2 ml/kg DMSO in mice, no change was observed in tau phosphorylation. However, at 4 ml/kg, tau was hyperphosphorylated at AT8 (Ser202/Thr205), PHF-1 (Ser396/Ser404) and AT180 (Thr231) epitopes. At this dose, we also noticed that the animals were hypothermic. When the mice were maintained normothermic, the effect of 4 ml/kg DMSO on tau hyperphosphorylation was prevented. On the other hand, in SH-SY5Y cells, 0.1% DMSO induced tau hyperphosphorylation at AT8 and AT180 phosphoepitopes in normothermic conditions. Globally, these findings demonstrate that DMSO can induce tau hyperphosphorylation indirectly via hypothermia in vivo, and directly in vitro. These data should caution researchers working with DMSO as it can induce artifactual results both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:22768202

  2. Methylglyoxal induces tau hyperphosphorylation via promoting AGEs formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Hong; Xie, Jia-Zhao; Jiang, Xia; Lv, Bing-Ling; Cheng, Xiang-Shu; Du, Lai-Ling; Zhang, Jia-Yu; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Zhou, Xin-Wen

    2012-12-01

    The hyperphosphorylated tau is a major protein component of neurofibrillary tangle, which is one of hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). While the level of methylglyoxal (MG) is significantly increased in the AD brains, the role of MG in tau phosphorylation is still not reported. Here, we found that MG could induce tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple AD-related sites in neuroblastoma 2a cells under maintaining normal cell viability. MG treatment increased the level of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and the receptor of AGEs (RAGE). Glycogen synthesis kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and p38 MAPK were activated, whereas the level and activity of JNK, Erk1/2, cdk5, and PP2A were not altered after MG treatment. Simultaneous inhibition of GSK-3β or p38 attenuated the MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Aminoguanidine, a blocker of AGEs formation, could effectively reverse the MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. These data suggest that MG induces AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation through AGEs formation involving RAGE up-regulation and GSK-3β activation and p38 activation is also partially involved in MG-induced tau hyperphosphorylation. Thus, targeting MG may be a promising therapeutic strategy to prevent AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation.

  3. Importance of precision measurements in the tau sector

    SciTech Connect

    Pich, A.

    1996-01-01

    {tau} decays provide a powerful tool to test the structure of the weak currents and the universality of their couplings to the {ital W} boson. The constraints implied by present data and the possible improvements at the {tau}cF are analyzed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Structural evaluations of tau protein conformation: methodologies and approaches.

    PubMed

    Zabik, Nicole L; Imhof, Matthew M; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2017-06-01

    Protein-misfolding diseases are based on a common principle of aggregation initiated by intra- and inter-molecular contacts. The structural and conformational changes induced by biochemical transformations such as post-translational modifications (PTMs), often lead to protein unfolding and misfolding. Thus, these order-to-disorder or disorder-to-order transitions may regulate cellular function. Tau, a neuronal protein, regulates microtubule (MT) structure and overall cellular integrity. However, misfolded tau modified by PTMs results in MT destabilization, toxic tau aggregate formation, and ultimately cell death, leading to neurodegeneration. Currently, the lack of structural information surrounding tau severely limits understanding of neurodegeneration. This minireview focuses on the current methodologies and approaches aimed at probing tau conformation and the role of conformation in various aspects of tau biochemistry. The recent applications of nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry, Förster resonance electron transfer, and molecular dynamics simulations toward structural analysis of conformational landscapes of tau will be described. The strategies developed for structural evaluation of tau may significantly improve our understanding of misfolding diseases.

  5. Identification of nuclear. tau. isoforms in human neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Loomis, P.A.; Howard, T.H.; Castleberry, R.P.; Binder, L.I. )

    1990-11-01

    The {tau} proteins have been reported only in association with microtubules and with ribosomes in situ, in the normal central nervous system. In addition, {tau} has been shown to be an integral component of paired helical filaments, the principal constituent of the neurofibrillary tangles found in brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease and of most aged individuals with Down syndrome (trisomy 21). The authors report here the localization of the well-characterized Tau-1 monoclonal antibody to the nucleolar organizer regions of the acrocentric chromosomes and to their interphase counterpart, the fibrillar component of the nucleolus, in human neuroblastoma cells. Similar localization to the nucleolar organizer regions was also observed in other human cell lines and in one monkey kidney cell line but was not seen in non-primate species. Immunochemically, they further demonstrated the existence of the entire {tau} molecule in the isolated nuclei of neuroblastoma cells. Nuclear {tau} proteins, like the {tau} proteins of the paired helical filaments, cannot be extracted in standard SDS-containing electrophoresis sample buffer but require pretreatment with formic acid prior to immunoblot analysis. This work indicates that {tau} may function in processes not directly associated with microtubules and that highly insoluble complexes of {tau} may also play a role in normal cellular physiology.

  6. Angiotensin II receptor blocker inhibits tumour necrosis factor-alpha-induced cell damage in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Toru; Takao, Toshihiro; Horino, Taro; Matsumoto, Reiko; Inoue, Kousuke; Morita, Tatsuhito; Hashimoto, Kozo

    2008-06-01

    We investigated the effect of angiotensin II (AII) type 1 (AT1) and angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor blockers on tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha)-induced cell damage in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cells (RPTEC). The lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (NAG) release into the medium after TNF-alpha treatment in RPTEC were determined using modified commercial procedures. In addition, the levels of caspase 3/7 activity in RPTEC were measured after TNF-alpha treatment with AlphaTau1 or AT2 receptor blockers. Finally we investigated the change of p22phox protein levels after TNF-alpha with AlphaTau1 or AT2 receptor blockers in RPTEC. Tumour necrosis factor alpha (10(-8) mol/L) significantly increased LDH and NAG release into the medium from RPTEC. AlphaTau1 receptor blockers, olmesartan and valsartan (10(-9)-10(-6) mol/L) showed a significant reduction on TNF-alpha-induced LDH and NAG release in RPTEC. AT2 receptor blocker, PD123319 (10(-7)-10(-5) mol/L) also decreased TNF-alpha-induced LDH and NAG release in RPTEC. Blockade of both AlphaTau1 and AT2 receptor indicated additional reduction on TNF-alpha-induced LDH and NAG release. TNF-alpha (10(-8) mol/L) treatment showed small but significant increases of caspase 3/7 activity in RPTEC, and AT1 and AT2 receptor blockers (10(-8) mol/L) comparably decreased TNF-alpha-induced caspase 3/7 activity. Significant increases of p22phox protein levels were observed in TNF-alpha-treated group in RPTEC. However, only AlphaTau1 (10(-8) mol/L) but not AT2 (10(-5) mol/L) receptor blocker significantly decreased TNF-alpha-induced p22phox protein levels. The present study demonstrates that TNF-alpha induces renal tubular cell damage in RPTEC and AT1/AT2 receptor blockers showed cytoprotective effects probably via at least partly different mechanism.

  7. Alpha fetoprotein

    MedlinePlus

    ... the liver Liver cancer Malignant teratoma Recovery from hepatitis Problems during pregnancy Alternative Names Fetal alpha globulin; AFP Images Blood ... JL, et al, eds. Obstetrics: Normal and Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 11. Read More ... cancer - hepatocellular carcinoma Malignant teratoma of the ...

  8. An autoradiographic evaluation of AV-1451 Tau PET in dementia.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Val J; Curran, Geoffry; Fang, Ping; Liesinger, Amanda M; Josephs, Keith A; Parisi, Joseph E; Kantarci, Kejal; Boeve, Bradley F; Pandey, Mukesh K; Bruinsma, Tyler; Knopman, David S; Jones, David T; Petrucelli, Leonard; Cook, Casey N; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford R; Murray, Melissa E

    2016-06-13

    It is essential to determine the specificity of AV-1451 PET for tau in brain imaging by using pathological comparisons. We performed autoradiography in autopsy-confirmed Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative disorders to evaluate the specificity of AV-1451 binding for tau aggregates. Tissue samples were selected that had a variety of dementia-related neuropathologies including Alzheimer disease, primary age-related tauopathy, tangle predominant dementia, non-Alzheimer disease tauopathies, frontotemporal dementia, parkinsonism, Lewy body disease and multiple system atrophy (n = 38). Brain tissue sections were stained for tau, TAR DNA-binding protein-43, and α-synuclein and compared to AV-1451 autoradiography on adjacent sections. AV-1451 preferentially localized to neurofibrillary tangles, with less binding to areas enriched in neuritic pathology and less mature tau. The strength of AV-1451 binding with respect to tau isoforms in various neurodegenerative disorders was: 3R + 4R tau (e.g., AD) > 3R tau (e.g., Pick disease) or 4R tau. Only minimal binding of AV-1451 to TAR DNA-binding protein-43 positive regions was detected. No binding of AV-1451 to α-synuclein was detected. "Off-target" binding was seen in vessels, iron-associated regions, substantia nigra, calcifications in the choroid plexus, and leptomeningeal melanin. Reduced AV-1451 binding in neuritic pathology compared to neurofibrillary tangles suggests that the maturity of tau pathology may affect AV-1451 binding and suggests complexity in AV-1451 binding. Poor association of AV-1451 with tauopathies that have preferential accumulation of either 4R tau or 3R tau suggests limited clinical utility in detecting these pathologies. In contrast, for disorders associated with 3R + 4R tau, such as Alzheimer disease, AV-1451 binds tau avidly but does not completely reflect the early stage tau progression suggested by Braak neurofibrillary tangle staging. AV-1451 binding to TAR DNA

  9. Period Change and Evolutionary Status of SW Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devlen, Ahmet; Acar, Mert

    2017-03-01

    In this work, the relation between the period change and evolutionary status of SW Tau, a Type II Cepheid variable, is examined. An (O-C) analysis of the times of maxima of SW Tau has been undertaken to determine this relation. SW Tau has the characteristic light curve shape of BL Her type stars. By taking into consideration SW Tau’s well-defined period decrease, obtained from the photometric observations, its position on the HR diagram in accordance with evolutionary models, and its chemical composition, we demonstrate that SW Tau is a Cepheid crossing the instability strip for the fourth time. SW Tau could be interpreted as being an early AGB star on the blueward evolutionary phase during shell helium burning.

  10. Tau co-organizes dynamic microtubule and actin networks

    PubMed Central

    Elie, Auréliane; Prezel, Elea; Guérin, Christophe; Denarier, Eric; Ramirez-Rios, Sacnicte; Serre, Laurence; Andrieux, Annie; Fourest-Lieuvin, Anne; Blanchoin, Laurent; Arnal, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The crosstalk between microtubules and actin is essential for cellular functions. However, mechanisms underlying the microtubule-actin organization by cross-linkers remain largely unexplored. Here, we report that tau, a neuronal microtubule-associated protein, binds to microtubules and actin simultaneously, promoting in vitro co-organization and coupled growth of both networks. By developing an original assay to visualize concomitant microtubule and actin assembly, we show that tau can induce guided polymerization of actin filaments along microtubule tracks and growth of single microtubules along actin filament bundles. Importantly, tau mediates microtubule-actin co-alignment without changing polymer growth properties. Mutagenesis studies further reveal that at least two of the four tau repeated motifs, primarily identified as tubulin-binding sites, are required to connect microtubules and actin. Tau thus represents a molecular linker between microtubule and actin networks, enabling a coordination of the two cytoskeletons that might be essential in various neuronal contexts. PMID:25944224

  11. Anticipating arrival: is the tau margin a specious theory?

    PubMed

    Wann, J P

    1996-08-01

    A critical review is presented of previous studies that have examined the use of the tau margin (tau m) in the temporal judgment of arrival in natural contexts. This body of evidence is frequently cited as providing strong support for the use of Tau m for interceptive timing. Critical flaws are demonstrated in either the analysis or interpretation of many of these studies. It is suggested that temporal control in a number of these experiments could have been effected using a relative distance estimate (zeta ratio). Results are also presented and discussed that conflict with the tau m control hypothesis. It is concluded that although the tau m hypothesis provides an appealing account of interceptive timing, its broad acceptance is unwarranted on the evidence available.

  12. MAGIC gamma-ray telescopes hunting for tau neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góra, D.; Bernardini, E.; Manganaro, M.; López, M.

    2017-01-01

    The MAGIC telescopes, located at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (2200 a.s.l.) in the Canary Island of La Palma, can perform observations pointing directly the sea. This permits to search for signatures of air showers induced by tau neutrinos in the PeV-EeV energy range arising from the ocean. We have studied the MAGIC response to such events, employing Monte Carlo simulations of upward-going tau neutrino showers. The analysis of the simulated shower images shows that air showers induced by tau neutrinos can be discriminated from the background of very inclined hadronic showers. We have calculated the point source acceptance and the expected event rates, assuming an incoming tau neutrino flux consistent with IceCube measurements and for a sample of generic neutrino fluxes from photo-hadronic interactions in AGNs. Finally, we report our first results from the tau neutrino search with the MAGIC telescopes.

  13. Mechanisms of tau and Aβ-induced excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Pallo, Susanne P; DiMaio, John; Cook, Alexis; Nilsson, Bradley; Johnson, Gail V W

    2016-03-01

    Excitotoxicity was originally postulated to be a late stage side effect of Alzheimer׳s disease (AD)-related neurodegeneration, however more recent studies indicate that it may occur early in AD and contribute to the neurodegenerative process. Tau and amyloid beta (Aβ), the main components of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and amyloid plaques, have been implicated in cooperatively and independently facilitating excitotoxicity. Our study investigated the roles of tau and Aβ in AD-related excitotoxicity. In vivo studies showed that tau knockout (tau(-/-)) mice were significantly protected from seizures and hippocampal superoxide production induced with the glutamate analog, kainic acid (KA). We hypothesized that tau accomplished this by facilitating KA-induced Ca(2+) influx into neurons, however lentiviral tau knockdown failed to ameliorate KA-induced Ca(2+) influx into primary rat cortical neurons. We further investigated if tau cooperated with Aβ to facilitate KA-induced Ca(2+) influx. While Aβ biphasically modulated the KA-induced Cacyt(2+) responses, tau knockdown continued to have no effect. Therefore, tau facilitates KA-induced seizures and superoxide production in a manner that does not involve facilitation of Ca(2+) influx through KA receptors (KAR). On the other hand, acute pretreatment with Aβ (10 min) enhanced KA-induced Ca(2+) influx, while chronic Aβ (24 h) significantly reduced it, regardless of tau knockdown. Given previously published connections between Aβ, group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and KAR regulation, we hypothesized that Aβ modulates KAR via a G-protein coupled receptor pathway mediated by group 1 mGluRs. We found that Aβ did not activate group 1 mGluRs and inhibition of these receptors did not reverse Aβ modulation of KA-induced Ca(2+) influx. Therefore, Aβ biphasically regulates KAR via a mechanism that does not involve group 1mGluR activation.

  14. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445-6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ.

  15. 14-3-3ζ Mediates Tau Aggregation in Human Neuroblastoma M17 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Paudel, Hemant K.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein tau is the major component of paired helical filaments (PHFs) associated with the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau in the normal brain binds and stabilizes microtubules. Tau isolated from PHFs is hyperphosphorylated, which prevents it from binding to microtubules. Tau phosphorylation has been suggested to be involved in the development of NFT pathology in the AD brain. Recently, we showed that 14-3-3ζ is bound to tau in the PHFs and when incubated in vitro with 14-3-3ζ, tau formed amorphous aggregates, single-stranded straight filaments, double stranded ribbon-like filaments and PHF-like filaments that displayed close resemblance with corresponding ultrastructures of AD brain. Surprisingly however, phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated tau aggregated in a similar manner, indicating that tau phosphorylation does not affect in vitro tau aggregation (Qureshi et al (2013) Biochemistry 52, 6445–6455). In this study, we have examined the role of tau phosphorylation in tau aggregation in cellular level. We have found that in human M17 neuroblastoma cells, tau phosphorylation by GSK3β or PKA does not cause tau aggregation, but promotes 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation by destabilizing microtubules. Microtubule disrupting drugs also promoted 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation without changing tau phosphorylation in M17 cell. In vitro, when incubated with 14-3-3ζ and microtubules, nonphosphorylated tau bound to microtubules and did not aggregate. Phosphorylated tau on the other hand did not bind to microtubules and aggregated. Our data indicate that microtubule-bound tau is resistant to 14-3-3ζ-induced tau aggregation and suggest that tau phosphorylation promotes tau aggregation in the brain by detaching tau from microtubules and thus making it accessible to 14-3-3ζ. PMID:27548710

  16. Measurement of the Semileptonic B-bar->D{sup (*)}{tau}{nu}-bar{sub {tau}} Decays at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes Pegna, David

    2010-02-10

    Semileptonic B meson decays into final states containing the tau lepton are of interesting as they provide information on the Standard Model as well as a window on new physics effects. We present results on B-bar->D{sup (*)}taunu-bar{sub tau} decays where the second B in the event is fully reconstructed.

  17. O-GlcNAc modification of tau directly inhibits its aggregation without perturbing the conformational properties of tau monomers.

    PubMed

    Yuzwa, Scott A; Cheung, Adrienne H; Okon, Mark; McIntosh, Lawrence P; Vocadlo, David J

    2014-04-17

    The aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau into paired helical filaments to form neurofibrillary tangles constitutes one of the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Tau is post-translationally modified by the addition of N-acetyl-D-glucosamine O-linked to several serine and threonine residues (O-GlcNAc). Previously, increased O-GlcNAcylation of tau has been shown to block the accumulation of tau aggregates within a tauopathy mouse model. Here we show that O-GlcNAc modification of full-length human tau impairs the rate and extent of its heparin-induced aggregation without perturbing its activity toward microtubule polymerization. O-GlcNAcylation, however, does not impact the "global-fold" of tau as measured by a Förster resonance energy transfer assay. Similarly, nuclear magnetic resonance studies demonstrated that O-GlcNAcylation only minimally perturbs the local structural and dynamic features of a tau fragment (residues 353-408) spanning the last microtubule binding repeat to the major GlcNAc-acceptor Ser400. These data indicate that the inhibitory effects of O-GlcNAc on tau aggregation may result from enhanced monomer solubility or the destabilization of fibrils or soluble aggregates, rather than by altering the conformational properties of the monomeric protein. This work further underscores the potential of targeting the O-GlcNAc pathway for potential Alzheimer's disease therapeutics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Tau-Targeted Immunization Impedes Progression of Neurofibrillary Histopathology in Aged P301L Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Mian; Ittner, Arne; Ke, Yazi D.; Götz, Jürgen; Ittner, Lars M.

    2011-01-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains, the microtubule-associated protein tau and amyloid-β (Aβ) deposit as intracellular neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and extracellular plaques, respectively. Tau deposits are furthermore found in a significant number of frontotemporal dementia cases. These diseases are characterized by progressive neurodegeneration, the loss of intellectual capabilities and behavioral changes. Unfortunately, the currently available therapies are limited to symptomatic relief. While active immunization against Aβ has shown efficacy in both various AD mouse models and patients with AD, immunization against pathogenic tau has only recently been shown to prevent pathology in young tau transgenic mice. However, if translated to humans, diagnosis and treatment would be routinely done when symptoms are overt, meaning that the histopathological changes have already progressed. Therefore, we used active immunization to target pathogenic tau in 4, 8, and 18 months-old P301L tau transgenic pR5 mice that have an onset of NFT pathology at 6 months of age. In all age groups, NFT pathology was significantly reduced in treated compared to control pR5 mice. Similarly, phosphorylation of tau at pathological sites was reduced. In addition, increased astrocytosis was found in the oldest treated group. Taken together, our data suggests that tau-targeted immunization slows the progression of NFT pathology in mice, with practical implications for human patients. PMID:22174735

  19. VMD approach to {tau}{sup -}{yields}({omega},{phi}){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Falcon, D. A. Lopez; Castro, G. Lopez

    1997-03-15

    We give a description of {tau}{sup -}{yields}({omega},{phi}){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decays in the approach of the vector-meson dominance (VMD) model and compare our results with the conserved vector current (CVC) predictions and experimental data.

  20. Porcine MAP3K5 analysis: molecular cloning, characterization, tissue expression pattern, and copy number variations associated with residual feed intake.

    PubMed

    Pu, L; Zhang, L C; Zhang, J S; Song, X; Wang, L G; Liang, J; Zhang, Y B; Liu, X; Yan, H; Zhang, T; Yue, J W; Li, N; Wu, Q Q; Wang, L X

    2016-08-12

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 5 (MAP3K5) is essential for apoptosis, proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses, and is a candidate marker for residual feed intake (RFI) in pig. We cloned the full-length cDNA sequence of porcine MAP3K5 by rapid-amplification of cDNA ends. The 5451-bp gene contains a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) (718 bp), a coding region (3738 bp), and a 3'-UTR (995 bp), and encodes a peptide of 1245 amino acids, which shares 97, 99, 97, 93, 91, and 84% sequence identity with cattle, sheep, human, mouse, chicken, and zebrafish MAP3K5, respectively. The deduced MAP3K5 protein sequence contains two conserved domains: a DUF4071 domain and a protein kinase domain. Phylogenetic analysis showed that porcine MAP3K5 forms a separate branch to vicugna and camel MAP3K5. Tissue expression analysis using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) revealed that MAP3K5 was expressed in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, muscle, fat, pancrea, ileum, and stomach tissues. Copy number variation was detected for porcine MAP3K5 and validated by qRT-PCR. Furthermore, a significant increase in average copy number was detected in the low RFI group when compared to the high RFI group in a Duroc pig population. These results provide useful information regarding the influence of MAP3K5 on RFI in pigs.

  1. b-{tau} unification and neutrino masses in SU(5) extensions of the MSSM with radiative electroweak breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Dedes, A.; Tamvakis, K.

    1997-08-01

    We make a complete analysis of the Yukawa coupling unification in SU(5) extensions of the MSSM in the framework of the radiative symmetry-breaking scenario. Both logarithmic and finite threshold corrections of sparticles have been included in the determination of the gauge and Yukawa couplings at M{sub Z}. The effect of the heavy masses of each model in the renormalization group equations is also included. We find that in the minimal SU(5) model b-{tau} Yukawa unification can be achieved for too large a value of {alpha}{sub s}. On the other hand, the {ital Peccei-Quinn} version of the {ital missing doublet} model, with the effect of the right-handed neutrino also included, exhibits b-{tau} unification in excellent agreement with all low energy experimental data. Unification of all Yukawa couplings is also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Apolipoprotein E genotyping and cerebrospinal fluid tau protein: implications for the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Arai, H; Higuchi, S; Sasaki, H

    1997-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotyping was conducted in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 91) as well as in other dementing disorders including Parkinson's disease (PD, n = 73), autopsy-confirmed diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD, n = 16), progressive supranuclear palsy (n = 13), vascular dementia (n = 55), alcoholic dementia (n =25) and normal control subjects (n = 77). ApoE epsilon 4 allele frequency was significantly higher in AD (33.5%, p < 0.001), DLBD (40.6%, p < 0.001) and demented PD (29.4%, p < 0.05) compared to that in normal controls (11.7%). The association of the ApoE epsilon 4 allele with AD was more pronounced in early-onset AD (46.4%) than in late-onset AD (27.8%). 46% of the AD individuals developed AD without association to ApoE epsilon 4, and epsilon 4 homozygotes were found not only in AD, but also in many of other dementing disorders. These results suggest that ApoE genotyping cannot provide certainty about the presence of absence of AD, and that it should be used as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests for AD. On the other hand, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau levels were significantly elevated (p < 0.0001) in AD (78.0 +/- 44.2 pg/ml) compared to those in normal controls (10.6 +/- 8.6 pg/ml). The specificity and the sensitivity of distinguishing AD from normal controls was 95.0 and 91.2%, respectively. Elevated CSF-tau levels were also detected in some patients with acute neurological diseases including meningoencephalitis, Creutzfeld-Jacob disease, normal pressure hydrocephalus and vitamin B12 deficiency encephalopathy. Increased CSF-tau levels in AD were found regardless of the age at onset, clinical stage, ApoE genotype, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin genotype, and presenilin-1 genotype. The CSF-tau levels continued to be abnormal during the progression of AD. These results suggest that CSF-tau serves as an unequivocal and reliable biological marker to aid in the clinical diagnosis of AD.

  3. Tau, phospho-tau, and S-100B in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin; Withut, Esther; Pohl, Daniela; Lange, Peter; Ciesielcyk, Barbara; Diem, Ricarda; Gärtner, Jutta; Otto, Markus

    2005-10-01

    Axonal injury and glial activation are an early neuropathologic event in adults with multiple sclerosis. To investigate whether markers of axonal injury and glial activation are already elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with multiple sclerosis, we studied the cerebrospinal fluid of 25 children with multiple sclerosis and 67 controls for the presence of tau, phospho-tau, and S-100B proteins using specific enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assays. In general, tau, phospho-tau, and S-100B protein levels did not differ significantly between groups. However, in a subgroup of nine children with multiple sclerosis, all of whom had prominent clinical symptoms at the time of lumbar puncture and radiologic disease activity, tau protein levels were significantly elevated when compared with other controls. These data indicate that axonal injury is not restricted to adult multiple sclerosis but can already occur in children with multiple sclerosis.

  4. Hadron structure in {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez Dumm, D.; Roig, P.; Pich, A.; Portoles, J.

    2010-02-01

    We analyze the hadronization structure of both vector and axial-vector currents leading to {tau}{yields}KK{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}}decays. At leading order in the 1/N{sub C} expansion, and considering only the contribution of the lightest resonances, we work out, within the framework of the resonance chiral Lagrangian, the structure of the local vertices involved in those processes. The couplings in the resonance theory are constrained by imposing the asymptotic behavior of vector and axial-vector spectral functions ruled by QCD. In this way we predict the hadron spectra and conclude that, contrary to previous assertions, the vector contribution dominates by far over the axial-vector one in all KK{pi} charge channels.

  5. H4K5 histone acetylation of BRG1 is associated with heroin administration rather than addiction

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Limin; Hong, Qingxiao; Chen, Xiaoying; Xu, Xuting; Liu, Huifen; Zhou, Wenhua; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-01-01

    Diacetylmorphine hydrochloride (heroin) addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disorder that is a heavy public health burden worldwide. Brm/SWI2-related gene-1 (BRG1) is a tumor suppressor gene that can influence embryogenesis and the development of the cerebellum. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of histone H4 lysine 5 (H4K5) modifications on the BRG1 gene in brain tissue of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of heroin-addicted rats. A total of 21 male Sprague Dawley rats were raised in a standard manner and underwent heroin self-administration training. Rats were randomly divided into three equal groups: Group A, self-administered delivery of heroin; group B, yoked delivery of heroin; and group C, yoked delivery of saline. The VTA was harvested and subjected to chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis. Gene expression was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We calculated the recovery rate, which indicated the percentage of the total input BRG1 recovered by ChIP. Our results showed that BRG1 was less associated with H4K5 histone modification in the group of rats that underwent heroin self-administration than in the other two groups (A vs. B, P=0.031; A vs. C, P=0.067). The recovery fold changes of the self-administration group and the passive-administration group were significantly different from those of the group with yoked saline (A vs. C, P=0.013; B vs. C, P=0.009; A vs. B, P=0.731). The results of the current study demonstrated that H4K5 histone acetylation of BRG1 in the VTA may be associated with heroin administration, but not addiction. PMID:27588112

  6. H4K5 histone acetylation of BRG1 is associated with heroin administration rather than addiction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Limin; Hong, Qingxiao; Chen, Xiaoying; Xu, Xuting; Liu, Huifen; Zhou, Wenhua; Duan, Shiwei

    2016-09-01

    Diacetylmorphine hydrochloride (heroin) addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disorder that is a heavy public health burden worldwide. Brm/SWI2-related gene-1 (BRG1) is a tumor suppressor gene that can influence embryogenesis and the development of the cerebellum. The current study aimed to investigate the effect of histone H4 lysine 5 (H4K5) modifications on the BRG1 gene in brain tissue of the ventral tegmental area (VTA) of heroin-addicted rats. A total of 21 male Sprague Dawley rats were raised in a standard manner and underwent heroin self-administration training. Rats were randomly divided into three equal groups: Group A, self-administered delivery of heroin; group B, yoked delivery of heroin; and group C, yoked delivery of saline. The VTA was harvested and subjected to chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis. Gene expression was evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We calculated the recovery rate, which indicated the percentage of the total input BRG1 recovered by ChIP. Our results showed that BRG1 was less associated with H4K5 histone modification in the group of rats that underwent heroin self-administration than in the other two groups (A vs. B, P=0.031; A vs. C, P=0.067). The recovery fold changes of the self-administration group and the passive-administration group were significantly different from those of the group with yoked saline (A vs. C, P=0.013; B vs. C, P=0.009; A vs. B, P=0.731). The results of the current study demonstrated that H4K5 histone acetylation of BRG1 in the VTA may be associated with heroin administration, but not addiction.

  7. Histone deacetylase 6 inhibition improves memory and reduces total tau levels in a mouse model of tau deposition

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Tau pathology is associated with a number of age-related neurodegenerative disorders. Few treatments have been demonstrated to diminish the impact of tau pathology in mouse models and none are yet effective in humans. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an enzyme that removes acetyl groups from cytoplasmic proteins, rather than nuclear histones. Its substrates include tubulin, heat shock protein 90 and cortactin. Tubastatin A is a selective inhibitor of HDAC6. Modification of tau pathology by specific inhibition of HDAC6 presents a potential therapeutic approach in tauopathy. Methods We treated rTg4510 mouse models of tau deposition and non-transgenic mice with tubastatin (25 mg/kg) or saline (0.9%) from 5 to 7 months of age. Cognitive behavior analysis, histology and biochemical analysis were applied to access the effect of tubastatin on memory, tau pathology and neurodegeneration (hippocampal volume). Results We present data showing that tubastatin restored memory function in rTg4510 mice and reversed a hyperactivity phenotype. We further found that tubastatin reduced the levels of total tau, both histologically and by western analysis. Reduction in total tau levels was positively correlated with memory improvement in these mice. However, there was no impact on phosphorylated forms of tau, either by histology or western analysis, nor was there an impact on silver positive inclusions histologically. Conclusion Potential mechanisms by which HDAC6 inhibitors might benefit the rTg4510 mouse include stabilization of microtubules secondary to increased tubulin acetylation, increased degradation of tau secondary to increased acetylation of HSP90 or both. These data support the use of HDAC6 inhibitors as potential therapeutic agents against tau pathology. PMID:24576665

  8. TBI-Induced Formation of Toxic Tau and Its Biochemical Similarities to Tau in AD Brains

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s disease or fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. DOH01-STEM5-2016-00108 (Arancio, PI) 0.96 cal mo DOH...Multiple proteins implicated in neurodegenerative diseases accumulate in axons after brain trauma in humans. Exp Neurol, 2007. 208(2): p. 185-92. 8...and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) lead to similar biochemical changes in tau that increase its toxicity and contribute to cognitive and

  9. Overexpression of Wild-Type Murine Tau Results in Progressive Tauopathy and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Stephanie J.; Crook, Richard J.P.; DeTure, Michael; Randle, Suzanne J.; Innes, Amy E.; Yu, Xin Z.; Lin, Wen-Lang; Dugger, Brittany N.; McBride, Melinda; Hutton, Mike; Dickson, Dennis W.; McGowan, Eileen

    2009-01-01

    Here, we describe the generation and characterization of a novel tau transgenic mouse model (mTau) that overexpresses wild-type murine tau protein by twofold compared with endogenous levels. Transgenic tau expression was driven by a BAC transgene containing the entire wild-type mouse tau locus, including the endogenous promoter and the regulatory elements associated with the tau gene. The mTau model therefore differs from other tau models in that regulation of the genomic mouse transgene mimics that of the endogenous gene, including normal exon splicing regulation. Biochemical data from the mTau mice demonstrated that modest elevation of mouse tau leads to tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple pathologically relevant epitopes and accumulation of sarkosyl-insoluble tau. The mTau mice show a progressive increase in hyperphosphorylated tau pathology with age up to 15 to 18 months, which is accompanied by gliosis and vacuolization. In contrast, older mice show a decrease in tau pathology levels, which may represent hippocampal neuronal loss occurring in this wild-type model. Collectively, these results describe a novel model of tauopathy that develops pathological changes reminiscent of early stage Alzheimer’s disease and other related neurodegenerative diseases, achieved without overexpression of a mutant human tau transgene. This model will provide an important tool for understanding the early events leading to the development of tau pathology and a model for analysis of potential therapeutic targets for sporadic tauopathies. PMID:19717642

  10. The Dynamics and Turnover of Tau Aggregates in Cultured Cells: INSIGHTS INTO THERAPIES FOR TAUOPATHIES.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jing L; Buist, Arjan; Soares, Alberto; Callaerts, Kathleen; Calafate, Sara; Stevenaert, Frederik; Daniels, Joshua P; Zoll, Bryan E; Crowe, Alex; Brunden, Kurt R; Moechars, Diederik; Lee, Virginia M Y

    2016-06-17

    Filamentous tau aggregates, the hallmark lesions of Alzheimer disease (AD), play key roles in neurodegeneration. Activation of protein degradation systems has been proposed to be a potential strategy for removing pathological tau, but it remains unclear how effectively tau aggregates can be degraded by these systems. By applying our previously established cellular model system of AD-like tau aggregate induction using preformed tau fibrils, we demonstrate that tau aggregates induced in cells with regulated expression of full-length mutant tau can be gradually cleared when soluble tau expression is suppressed. This clearance is at least partially mediated by the autophagy-lysosome pathway, although both the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the autophagy-lysosome pathway are deficient in handling large tau aggregates. Importantly, residual tau aggregates left after the clearance phase leads to a rapid reinstatement of robust tau pathology once soluble tau expression is turned on again. Moreover, we succeeded in generating monoclonal cells persistently carrying tau aggregates without obvious cytotoxicity. Live imaging of GFP-tagged tau aggregates showed that tau inclusions are dynamic structures constantly undergoing "fission" and "fusion," which facilitate stable propagation of tau pathology in dividing cells. These findings provide a greater understanding of cell-to-cell transmission of tau aggregates in dividing cells and possibly neurons. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Loss of Tau results in defects in photoreceptor development and progressive neuronal degeneration in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Bolkan, Bonnie J; Kretzschmar, Doris

    2014-12-01

    Accumulations of Tau, a microtubule-associated protein (MAP), into neurofibrillary tangles is a hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and other tauopathies. However, the mechanisms leading to this pathology are still unclear: the aggregates themselves could be toxic or the sequestration of Tau into tangles might prevent Tau from fulfilling its normal functions, thereby inducing a loss of function defect. Surprisingly, the consequences of losing normal Tau expression in vivo are still not well understood, in part due to the fact that Tau knockout mice show only subtle phenotypes, presumably due to the fact that mammals express several MAPs with partially overlapping functions. In contrast, flies express fewer MAP, with Tau being the only member of the Tau/MAP2/MAP4 family. Therefore, we used Drosophila to address the physiological consequences caused by the loss of Tau. Reducing the levels of fly Tau (dTau) ubiquitously resulted in developmental lethality, whereas deleting Tau specifically in neurons or the eye caused progressive neurodegeneration. Similarly, chromosomal mutations affecting dTau also caused progressive degeneration in both the eye and brain. Although photoreceptor cells initially developed normally in dTau knockdown animals, they subsequently degenerated during late pupal stages whereas weaker dTau alleles caused an age-dependent defect in rhabdomere structure. Expression of wild type human Tau partially rescued the neurodegenerative phenotype caused by the loss of endogenous dTau, suggesting that the functions of Tau proteins are functionally conserved from flies to humans. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Deep photospheric flows in Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A.; Karp, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    From analysis of weak, unblended, ultraviolet lines observed in Tau Scorpii by Copernicus, the same line widths and the same slightly blue-depressed wings as found in the upper photospheric lines of the visual region are found. In addition, a radial-velocity discrepancy of about 6 km/s between weak and strong lines in the 1000-1300-A region is found. These results are in quantitative agreement with one another and with the results of the visual region. They imply that a flow of material is present even in the deep photosphere of this star. However, one cannot yet specify the geometry of the flow (outward-radial versus temperature-weighted convection columns). At the least, this flow alters the expected radiation-driven flow solution close to the photosphere. At the most, it could provide the heating of a chromosphere or a corona just outside the photosphere, as required by the imperfect flow model.

  13. Deep photospheric flows in Tau Scorpii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, M. A.; Karp, A. H.

    1979-01-01

    From analysis of weak, unblended, ultraviolet lines observed in Tau Scorpii by Copernicus, the same line widths and the same slightly blue-depressed wings as found in the upper photospheric lines of the visual region are found. In addition, a radial-velocity discrepancy of about 6 km/s between weak and strong lines in the 1000-1300-A region is found. These results are in quantitative agreement with one another and with the results of the visual region. They imply that a flow of material is present even in the deep photosphere of this star. However, one cannot yet specify the geometry of the flow (outward-radial versus temperature-weighted convection columns). At the least, this flow alters the expected radiation-driven flow solution close to the photosphere. At the most, it could provide the heating of a chromosphere or a corona just outside the photosphere, as required by the imperfect flow model.

  14. CP Violation in Tau to K* Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkinson, Mark; /Manchester U.

    2006-03-10

    A sample of {tau}{sup {+-}} {yields} K*{sup {+-}} decays with K*{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} and K{sub S}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, using 123.4 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BaBar detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, is used to search for a direct CP violation effect in the charged Higgs sector. No evidence of CP violation is found and the imaginary part of the charged Higgs coupling, {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}), in the Multi-Higgs-Doublet-Model is found to be at -0.284 < {l_brace}Im{r_brace}({Lambda}) < 0.200 at 90% Confidence Level. In addition the installation of the kk2f Monte Carlo generator into the BaBar software framework is described.

  15. Regulatable transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer disease: onset, reversibility and spreading of Tau pathology.

    PubMed

    Hochgräfe, Katja; Sydow, Astrid; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2013-09-01

    Accumulation of amyloidogenic proteins such as Tau is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer disease and fronto-temporal dementias. To link Tau pathology to cognitive impairments and defects in synaptic plasticity, we created four inducible Tau transgenic mouse models with expression of pro- and anti-aggregant variants of either full-length human Tau (hTau40/ΔK280 and hTau40/ΔK280/PP) or the truncated Tau repeat domain (Tau(RD)/ΔK280 and Tau(RD)/ΔK280/PP). Here we review the histopathological features caused by pro-aggregant Tau, and correlate them with behavioral deficits and impairments in synaptic transmission. Both pro-aggregant Tau variants cause Alzheimer-like features, including synapse loss, mis-localization of Tau into the somatodendritic compartment, conformational changes and hyperphosphorylation. However, there is a clear difference in the extent of Tau aggregation and neurotoxicity. While pro-aggregant full-length hTau40/ΔK280 leads to a 'pre-tangle' pathology, the repeat domain Tau(RD)/ΔK280 causes massive formation of neurofibrillary tangles and neuronal loss in the hippocampus. However, both Tau variants cause co-aggregation of human and mouse Tau and similar functional impairments. Thus, earlier Tau pathological stages and not necessarily neurofibrillary tangles are critical for the development of cognitive malfunctions. Most importantly, memory and synapses recover after switching off expression of pro-aggregant Tau. The rescue of functional impairments correlates with the rescue of most Tau pathological changes and most strikingly the recovery of synapses. This implies that tauopathies as such are reversible, provided that amyloidogenic Tau is removed. Therefore, our Tau transgenic mice may serve as model systems for in vivo validation of therapeutic strategies and drug candidates with regard to cognition and synaptic function. © 2013 The Authors Journal compilation © 2013 FEBS.

  16. First measurement of sigma (p anti-p ---> Z) . Br (Z ---> tau tau) at s**(1/2) = 1.96- TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Arnoud, Y.; Askew, A.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2004-12-01

    The authors present a measurement of the cross section for Z production times the branching fraction to {tau} leptons, {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}), in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the channel in which one {tau} decays into {mu}{nu}{sub {mu}}{nu}{sub {tau}}, and the other into hadrons + {nu}{sub {tau}} or e{nu}{sub e}{nu}{sub {tau}}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 226 pb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The final sample contains 2008 candidate events with an estimated background of 55%. From this they obtain {sigma} {center_dot} Br(Z {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) = 237 {+-} 15(stat) {+-} 18(sys) {+-} 15(lum) pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  17. Activation of human alpha1 and alpha2 homomeric glycine receptors by taurine and GABA.

    PubMed

    De Saint Jan, D; David-Watine, B; Korn, H; Bregestovski, P

    2001-09-15

    1. Two ligand binding alpha subunits, alpha1 and alpha2, of the human (H) glycine receptor (GlyR) are involved at inhibitory synapses in the adult and neonatal spinal cord, respectively. The ability of homomeric alphaH1 and alphaH2 GlyRs to be activated by glycine, taurine and GABA was studied in Xenopus oocytes or in the human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cell line. 2. In outside-out patches from HEK cells, glycine, taurine and GABA activated both GlyRs with the same main unitary conductance, i.e. 85 +/- 3 pS (n = 6) for alphaH1, and 95 +/- 5 pS (n = 4) for alphaH2. 3. The sensitivity of both alphaH1 and alphaH2 GlyRs to glycine was highly variable. In Xenopus oocytes the EC50 for glycine (EC50gly) was between 25 and 280 microM for alphaH1 (n = 44) and between 46 and 541 microM for alphaH2 (n = 52). For both receptors, the highest EC50gly values were found on cells with low maximal glycine responses. 4. The actions of taurine and GABA were dependent on the EC50gly: (i) their EC50 values were linearly correlated to EC50gly, with EC50tau approximately 10 EC50gly and EC50GABA approximately 500-800 EC50gly; (ii) they could act either as full or weak agonists depending on the EC50gly. 5. The Hill coefficient (n(H)) of glycine remained stable regardless of the EC50gly whereas n(H) for taurine decreased with increasing EC50tau. 6. The degree of desensitization, evaluated by fast application of saturating concentrations of agonist on outside-out patches from Xenopus oocytes, was similar for glycine and taurine on both GlyRs and did not exceed 50 %. 7. Our data concerning the variations of EC50gly and the subsequent behaviour of taurine and GABA could be qualitatively described by the simple del Castillo-Katz scheme, assuming that the agonist gating constant varies whereas the binding constants are stable. However, the stability of the Hill coefficient for glycine was not explained by this model, suggesting that other mechanisms are involved in the modulation of EC50.

  18. Measurement of the tau- to eta pi-pi+pi-nu tau Branching Fraction and a Search for a Second-Class Current in the tau- to eta'(958)pi-nu tau Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, David Nathan; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /Frascati /Genoa U. /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /Pisa U. /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DSM, DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2008-03-24

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BABAR detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f{sub 1}(1285){pi}{sup -} {nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error on the branching fractions is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  19. Early Axonopathy Preceding Neurofibrillary Tangles in Mutant Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, Karelle; Bretteville, Alexis; Schindowski, Katharina; Gilissen, Emmanuel; Authelet, Michèle; De Decker, Robert; Yilmaz, Zehra; Buée, Luc; Brion, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases characterized by brain and spinal cord involvement often show widespread accumulations of tau aggregates. We have generated a transgenic mouse line (Tg30tau) expressing in the forebrain and the spinal cord a human tau protein bearing two pathogenic mutations (P301S and G272V). These mice developed age-dependent brain and hippocampal atrophy, central and peripheral axonopathy, progressive motor impairment with neurogenic muscle atrophy, and neurofibrillary tangles and had decreased survival. Axonal spheroids and axonal atrophy developed early before neurofibrillary tangles. Neurofibrillary inclusions developed in neurons at 3 months and were of two types, suggestive of a selective vulnerability of neurons to form different types of fibrillary aggregates. A first type of tau-positive neurofibrillary tangles, more abundant in the forebrain, were composed of ribbon-like 19-nm-wide filaments and twisted paired helical filaments. A second type of tau and neurofilament-positive neurofibrillary tangles, more abundant in the spinal cord and the brainstem, were composed of 10-nm-wide neurofilaments and straight 19-nm filaments. Unbiased stereological analysis indicated that total number of pyramidal neurons and density of neurons in the lumbar spinal cord were not reduced up to 12 months in Tg30tau mice. This Tg30tau model thus provides evidence that axonopathy precedes tangle formation and that both lesions can be dissociated from overt neuronal loss in selected brain areas but not from neuronal dysfunction. PMID:17690183

  20. Endogenous Aβ causes cell death via early tau hyperphosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Amadoro, G; Corsetti, V; Ciotti, M T; Florenzano, F; Capsoni, S; Amato, G; Calissano, P

    2011-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by Aβ overproduction and tau hyperphosphorylation. We report that an early, transient and site-specific AD-like tau hyperphosphorylation at Ser262 and Thr231 epitopes is temporally and causally related with an activation of the endogenous amyloidogenic pathway that we previously reported in hippocampal neurons undergoing cell death upon NGF withdrawal [Matrone, C., Ciotti, M.T., Mercanti, D., Marolda, R., Calissano, P., 2008b. NGF and BDNF signaling control amyloidogenic route and Ab production in hippocampal neurons. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 105, 13138-13143]. Such tau hyperphosphorylation, as well as apoptotic death, is (i) blocked by 4G8 and 6E10 Aβ antibodies or by specific β and/or γ-secretases inhibitors; (ii) temporally precedes tau cleavage mediated by a delayed (6-12h after NGF withdrawal) activation of caspase-3 and calpain-I; (iii) under control of Akt-GSK3β-mediated signaling. Finally, we show that such site-specific tau hyperphosphorylation causes tau detachment from microtubules and an impairment of mitochondrial trafficking. These results depict, for the first time, a rapid interplay between endogenous Aβ and tau post-translational modifications which act co-ordinately to compromise neuronal functions in the same neuronal system, under physiological conditions as seen in AD brain. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. PHOSPHORYLATED TAU: TOXIC, PROTECTIVE, OR NONE OF THE ABOVE

    PubMed Central

    Castellani, Rudy J.; Nunomura, Akihiko; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Perry, George; Smith, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Identification of phosphorylated tau as the major protein component of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) led to the concept that phosphorylated tau was inherently toxic and, as such, intimately involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. While superficially logical, this construct ignores a number of key findings in AD, including i) that NFTs are encountered in viable neurons until late stage disease; ii) that NFTs persist within the neuronal cytoplasm for decades; iii) that NFTs are encountered, sometimes in significant numbers, in cognitively intact elderly; and iv) that neurons with NFTs contain normal content and structure of microtubules. Experimental data in transgenic animal models has further demonstrated that NFTs accumulate in neurons in spite of tau suppression and behavior normalization. These data call into question the inherent toxicity of phosphorylated tau, seemingly leaving the only viable hypothesis of the ad hoc “toxic intermediate” phosphorylated tau concept. However, since we also know that phosphorylated tau sequesters redox active heavy metals and protects against oxidative stress, here we suggest that phosphorylated tau serves a protective role against cellular toxicity. PMID:18688087

  2. Lepton flavor violating {tau} and B decays and heavy neutrinos

    SciTech Connect

    He Xiaogang

    2004-12-01

    We study lepton flavor violating (LFV) {tau} and B decays in models with heavy neutrinos to constrain the mixing matrix parameters U{sub {tau}}{sub N}. We find that the best current constraints when the heavy neutrinos are purely left handed come from LFV radiative {tau} decay modes. To obtain competitive constraints in LFV B decay, it is necessary to probe b{yields}X{sub s}{tau}{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}} at the 10{sup -7} level. When the heavy neutrinos have both left- and right-handed couplings, the mixing parameters can be constrained by studying LFV B decay modes and LFV {tau} decay into three charged leptons. We find that the branching ratios B({tau}{sup {+-}}{yields}l{sub 1}{sup {+-}}l{sub 2}{sup {+-}}l{sub 3}{sup {+-}}), B(B{sub s}{yields}{tau}{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}}) and B(b{yields}X{sub s}l{sub 1}{sup {+-}}l{sub 2}{sup {+-}}) need to be probed at the 10{sup -8} level in order to constrain the mixing parameters beyond what is known from unitarity.

  3. Measurement of the Tau- to F1(1285) Pi- Nu/Tau Branching Fraction And a Search for Second-Class Currents in Tau to Eta-Prime(958) Pi- Nu/Tau

    SciTech Connect

    Alwyn, K.E.; /Manchester U.

    2011-12-01

    The {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}+{pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} decay with the {eta} {yields} {gamma}{gamma} mode is studied using 384 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the BaBar detector. The branching fraction is measured to be (1.60 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.11) x 10{sup -4}. It is found that {tau}{sup -} {yields} f1(1285){pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} {yields} {eta}{pi}{sup -}{pi}+{pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} is the dominant decay mode with a branching fraction of (1.11 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.05) x 10{sup -4}. The first error is statistical and the second systematic. In addition, a 90% confidence level upper limit on the branching fraction of the {tau}{sup -} {yields} {eta}{prime}(958){pi}{sup -}{nu}{tau} decay is measured to be 7.2 x 10{sup -6}. This last decay proceeds through a second-class current and is expected to be forbidden in the limit of isospin symmetry.

  4. Measuring the Higgs Boson's Parity Using tau -> rho nu

    SciTech Connect

    Bower, Gary

    2002-08-08

    We present a very promising method for a measurement of the Higgs boson parity using the H/A {yields} {tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{bar {nu}}{sub {tau}}{rho}{sup -}{nu}{sub {tau}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} {bar {nu}}{sub {tau}} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} {nu}{sub {tau}} decay chain. The method is both model independent and independent of the Higgs production mechanism. Angular distributions of the {tau} decay products which are sensitive to the Higgs boson parity are defined and are found to be measurable using typical properties of a future detector for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider. The prospects for the measurement of the parity of a Higgs boson with a mass of 120 GeV are quantified for the case of e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions of 500 GeV center of mass energy with an integrated luminosity of 500fb{sup -1}. The Standard Model Higgsstrahlung production process is used as an example.

  5. Effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on human Tau fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yingying; Teng, Ningning; Li, Sen

    2016-09-01

    Tau fibrillation is reported to be involved in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, in which the natural environment is very crowded in the cells. Understanding the role of crowding environments in regulating Tau fibrillation is of great importance for elucidating the etiology of these diseases. In this experiment, the effects of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte reagents in the crowding environment on Tau fibrillation were studied by thioflavin T binding, SDS-PAGE and TEM assays. Ficoll 70 and Dextran 70 of different concentrations were used as macromolecular crowding reagents inside the cells and showed a strong enhancing effect on the fibrillation of normal and hyperphosphorylated Tau. The enhancing effect of Dextran is stronger than that of Ficoll 70 at the same concentration. In addition, the cellular osmolyte sucrose was found to protect Tau against fibrillation, and inhibit the enhancing effect of macromolecular crowding on Tau fibrillation. A possible model for the fibrillation process of Tau and the effect of macromolecular crowding and osmolyte on this process was proposed based on these experimental results. The information obtained from our study can enhance the understanding of how proteins aggregate and avoid aggregation in crowded physiological environments and might lead to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease in vivo.

  6. Mechanisms of Tau and Aβ-induced Excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Pallo, Susanne P.; DiMaio, John; Cook, Alexis; Nilsson, Bradley; Johnson, Gail V.W.

    2016-01-01

    Excitotoxicity was originally postulated to be a late stage side effect of Alzheimer’s disease (AD)-related neurodegeneration, however more recent studies indicate that it may occur early in AD and contribute to the neurodegenerative process. Tau and amyloid beta (Aβ), the main components of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) and amyloid plaques, have been implicated in cooperatively and independently facilitating excitotoxicity. Our study investigated the roles of tau and Aβ in AD-related excitotoxicity. In vivo studies showed that tau knockout (tau−/−) mice were significantly protected from seizures and hippocampal superoxide production induced with the glutamate analog, kainic acid (KA). We hypothesized that tau accomplished this by facilitating KA-induced Ca2+ influx into neurons, however lentiviral tau knockdown failed to ameliorate KA-induced Ca2+ influx into primary rat cortical neurons. We further investigated if tau cooperated with Aβ to facilitate KA-induced Ca2+ influx. While Aβ biphasically modulated the KA-induced Ca2+cyt responses, tau knockdown continued to have no effect. Therefore, tau facilitates KA-induced seizures and superoxide production in a manner that does not involve facilitation of Ca2+ influx through KA receptors (KAR). On the other hand, acute pretreatment with Aβ (10 minutes) enhanced KA-induced Ca2+ influx, while chronic Aβ (24 hours) significantly reduced it, regardless of tau knockdown. Given previously published connections between Aβ, group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), and KAR regulation, we hypothesized that Aβ modulates KAR via a G-protein coupled receptor pathway mediated by group 1 mGluRs. We found that Aβ did not activate group 1 mGluRs and inhibition of these receptors did not reverse Aβ modulation of KA-induced Ca2+ influx. Therefore, Aβ biphasically regulates KAR via a mechanism that does not involve group 1 mGluR activation. PMID:26731336

  7. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Gabor G; Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J; Crary, John F; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M; Ironside, James W; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R; Munoz, David G; Murray, Melissa E; Nelson, Peter T; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G; Bieniek, Kevin F; Bigio, Eileen H; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J; Mann, David M; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C; Vinters, Harry V; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B; White, Charles L; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M; Yamada, Masahito; Dickson, Dennis W

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  8. Aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG): harmonized evaluation strategy

    PubMed Central

    Ferrer, Isidro; Grinberg, Lea T.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Attems, Johannes; Budka, Herbert; Cairns, Nigel J.; Crary, John F.; Duyckaerts, Charles; Ghetti, Bernardino; Halliday, Glenda M.; Ironside, James W.; Love, Seth; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Munoz, David G.; Murray, Melissa E.; Nelson, Peter T.; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Trojanowski, John Q.; Ansorge, Olaf; Arzberger, Thomas; Baborie, Atik; Beach, Thomas G.; Bieniek, Kevin F.; Bigio, Eileen H.; Bodi, Istvan; Dugger, Brittany N.; Feany, Mel; Gelpi, Ellen; Gentleman, Stephen M.; Giaccone, Giorgio; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Heale, Richard; Hof, Patrick R.; Hofer, Monika; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Jellinger, Kurt; Jicha, Gregory A.; Ince, Paul; Kofler, Julia; Kövari, Enikö; Kril, Jillian J.; Mann, David M.; Matej, Radoslav; McKee, Ann C.; McLean, Catriona; Milenkovic, Ivan; Montine, Thomas J.; Murayama, Shigeo; Lee, Edward B.; Rahimi, Jasmin; Rodriguez, Roberta D.; Rozemüller, Annemieke; Schneider, Julie A.; Schultz, Christian; Seeley, William; Seilhean, Danielle; Smith, Colin; Tagliavini, Fabrizio; Takao, Masaki; Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Toledo, Jon B.; Tolnay, Markus; Troncoso, Juan C.; Vinters, Harry V.; Weis, Serge; Wharton, Stephen B.; White, Charles L.; Wisniewski, Thomas; Woulfe, John M.; Yamada, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of abnormally phosphorylated tau protein in astrocytes is a frequent, but poorly characterized feature of the aging brain. Its etiology is uncertain, but its presence is sufficiently ubiquitous to merit further characterization and classification, which may stimulate clinicopathological studies and research into its pathobiology. This paper aims to harmonize evaluation and nomenclature of aging-related tau astrogliopathy (ARTAG), a term that refers to a morphological spectrum of astroglial pathology detected by tau immunohistochemistry, especially with phosphorylation-dependent and 4R isoform-specific antibodies. ARTAG occurs mainly, but not exclusively, in individuals over 60 years of age. Tau-immunoreactive astrocytes in ARTAG include thorn-shaped astrocytes at the glia limitans and in white matter, as well as solitary or clustered astrocytes with perinuclear cytoplasmic tau immunoreactivity that extends into the astroglial processes as fine fibrillar or granular immunopositivity, typically in gray matter. Various forms of ARTAG may coexist in the same brain and might reflect different pathogenic processes. Based on morphology and anatomical distribution, ARTAG can be distinguished from primary tauopathies, but may be concurrent with primary tauopathies or other disorders. We recommend four steps for evaluation of ARTAG: (1) identification of five types based on the location of either morphologies of tau astrogliopathy: subpial, subependymal, perivascular, white matter, gray matter; (2) documentation of the regional involvement: medial temporal lobe, lobar (frontal, parietal, occipital, lateral temporal), subcortical, brainstem; (3) documentation of the severity of tau astrogliopathy; and (4) description of subregional involvement. Some types of ARTAG may underlie neurological symptoms; however, the clinical significance of ARTAG is currently uncertain and awaits further studies. The goal of this proposal is to raise awareness of

  9. Search for lepton flavor violating decays tau+/--->l+/-omega.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Bona, M; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Prudent, X; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Garra Tico, J; Grauges, E; Lopez, L; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Eigen, G; Stugu, B; Sun, L; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Shafer, J; Cahn, R N; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lopes Pegna, D; Lynch, G; Orimoto, T J; Osipenkov, I L; Ronan, M T; Tackmann, K; Tanabe, T; Wenzel, W A; Del Amo Sanchez, P; Hawkes, C M; Soni, N; Watson, A T; Koch, H; Schroeder, T; Walker, D; Asgeirsson, D J; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Barrett, M; Khan, A; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Buzykaev, A R; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Todyshev, K Yu; Bondioli, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Martin, E C; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Gary, J W; Liu, F; Long, O; Shen, B C; Vitug, G M; Zhang, L; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Wilson, M G; Winstrom, L O; Chen, E; Cheng, C H; Echenard, B; Fang, F; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Mishra, K; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nagel, M; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Ayad, R; Gabareen, A M; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Merkel, J; Petzold, A; Spaan, B; Wacker, K; Klose, V; Kobel, M J; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Latour, E; Lombardo, V; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Watson, J E; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cecchi, A; Cibinetto, G; Franchini, P; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Santoro, V; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bard, D J; Dauncey, P D; Nash, J A; Panduro Vazquez, W; Tibbetts, M; Behera, P K; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gao, Y Y; Gritsan, A V; Guo, Z J; Lae, C K; Denig, A G; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Béquilleux, J; D'Orazio, A; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Lepeltier, V; Le Diberder, F; Lutz, A M; Pruvot, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Serrano, J; Sordini, V; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Bingham, I; Burke, J P; Chavez, C A; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; George, K A; Di Lodovico, F; Sacco, R; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Paramesvaran, S; Salvatore, F; Wren, A C; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Lafferty, G D; West, T J; Yi, J I; Anderson, J; Chen, C; Jawahery, A; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Tuggle, J M; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Salvati, E; Saremi, S; Cowan, R; Dujmic, D; Fisher, P H; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Zhao, M; McLachlin, S E; Patel, P M; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; De Nardo, G; Fabozzi, F; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M A; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Knoepfel, K J; Losecco, J M; Benelli, G; Corwin, L A; Honscheid, K; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Morris, J P; Rahimi, A M; Regensburger, J J; Sekula, S J; Wong, Q K; Blount, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Kolb, J A; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Gagliardi, N; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Ben-Haim, E; Briand, H; Calderini, G; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Perez, A; Prendki, J; Gladney, L; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Manoni, E; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Cervelli, A; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J J; Biesiada, J; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Baracchini, E; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Jackson, P D; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Renga, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Hartmann, T; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; Castelli, G; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Roethel, W; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Escalier, M; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Chen, X R; Liu, H; Park, W; Purohit, M V; White, R M; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Dingfelder, J C; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Grenier, P; Hast, C; Innes, W R; Kaminski, J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; Nelson, S; O'Grady, C P; Ofte, I; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Pulliam, T; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; Wagner, A P; Weaver, M; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Wulsin, H W; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Ziegler, V; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Miyashita, T S; Petersen, B A; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Zain, S B; Spanier, S M; Wogsland, B J; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Ruland, A M; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Pelliccioni, M; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Lopez-March, N; Martinez-Vidal, F; Milanes, D A; Oyanguren, A; Albert, J; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Harrison, P F; Ilic, J; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Dasu, S; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Kutter, P E; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Wu, S L; Neal, H

    2008-02-22

    A search for lepton flavor violating decays of a tau to a lighter-mass charged lepton and an omega vector meson is performed using 384.1 fb(-1) of e(+)e(-) annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center PEP-II storage ring. No signal is found, and the upper limits on the branching ratios are determined to be B(tau(+/-)-->e;{+/-}omega)<1.1 x10 (-7) and B(tau(+/-)-->micro(+/-)omega)<1.0 x 10(-7) at 90% confidence level.

  10. Prospects for observations of high-energy cosmic tau neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athar, H.; Parente, G.; Zas, E.

    2000-11-01

    We study the prospects for the observation of high-energy cosmic tau neutrinos (E >=106 GeV) originating from proton acceleration in the cores of active galactic nuclei. We consider the possibility that vacuum flavor neutrino oscillations induce a tau to muon neutrino flux ratio greatly exceeding the rather small value expected from intrinsic production. The criteria and event rates for under water or ice light Čerenkov neutrino telescopes are given by considering the possible detection of downgoing high-energy cosmic tau neutrinos through characteristic double shower events.

  11. Heavy-neutrino effects on tau-lepton decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilaftsis, A.

    1994-11-01

    Minimal extensions of the Standard Model that are motivated by grand unified theories or superstring models with an E(6) symmetry can naturally predict heavy neutrinos of a Dirac or Majorana nature. Such heavy neutral leptons violate the decoupling theorem at the one-loop electroweak order and hence offer a unique chance for possible lepton-flavor decays of the tau lepton, e.g. tau to eee or tau to (mu)(mu)(mu), to be seen in LEP experiments. We analyze such decays in models with three and four generations.

  12. Short Fibrils Constitute the Major Species of Seed-Competent Tau in the Brains of Mice Transgenic for Human P301S Tau

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Samuel J.; Kerridge, Caroline; Cooper, Jane; Cavallini, Annalisa; Falcon, Benjamin; Cella, Claire V.; Landi, Alessia; Szekeres, Philip G.; Murray, Tracey K.; Ahmed, Zeshan; Goedert, Michel; Hutton, Michael; O'Neill, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    The interneuronal propagation of aggregated tau is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human tauopathies. It requires the uptake of seed-competent tau into cells, seeding of soluble tau in recipient neurons and release of seeded tau into the extracellular space to complete the cycle. At present, it is not known which tau species are seed-competent. Here, we have dissected the molecular characteristics of seed-competent tau species from the TgP301S tau mouse model using various biochemical techniques and assessed their seeding ability in cell and animal models. We found that sucrose gradient fractions from brain lysates seeded cellular tau aggregation only when large (>10 mer) aggregated, hyperphosphorylated (AT8- and AT100-positive) and nitrated tau was present. In contrast, there was no detectable seeding by fractions containing small, oligomeric (<6 mer) tau. Immunodepletion of the large aggregated AT8-positive tau strongly reduced seeding; moreover, fractions containing these species initiated the formation and spreading of filamentous tau pathology in vivo, whereas fractions containing tau monomers and small oligomeric assemblies did not. By electron microscopy, seed-competent sucrose gradient fractions contained aggregated tau species ranging from ring-like structures to small filaments. Together, these findings indicate that a range of filamentous tau aggregates are the major species that underlie the spreading of tau pathology in the P301S transgenic model. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The spread of tau pathology from neuron to neuron is postulated to account for, or at least to contribute to, the overall propagation of tau pathology during the development of human tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. It is therefore important to characterize the native tau species responsible for this process of seeding and pathology spreading. Here, we use several biochemical techniques to dissect the molecular characteristics of native tau protein

  13. Short Fibrils Constitute the Major Species of Seed-Competent Tau in the Brains of Mice Transgenic for Human P301S Tau.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Samuel J; Kerridge, Caroline; Cooper, Jane; Cavallini, Annalisa; Falcon, Benjamin; Cella, Claire V; Landi, Alessia; Szekeres, Philip G; Murray, Tracey K; Ahmed, Zeshan; Goedert, Michel; Hutton, Michael; O'Neill, Michael J; Bose, Suchira

    2016-01-20

    The interneuronal propagation of aggregated tau is believed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human tauopathies. It requires the uptake of seed-competent tau into cells, seeding of soluble tau in recipient neurons and release of seeded tau into the extracellular space to complete the cycle. At present, it is not known which tau species are seed-competent. Here, we have dissected the molecular characteristics of seed-competent tau species from the TgP301S tau mouse model using various biochemical techniques and assessed their seeding ability in cell and animal models. We found that sucrose gradient fractions from brain lysates seeded cellular tau aggregation only when large (>10 mer) aggregated, hyperphosphorylated (AT8- and AT100-positive) and nitrated tau was present. In contrast, there was no detectable seeding by fractions containing small, oligomeric (<6 mer) tau. Immunodepletion of the large aggregated AT8-positive tau strongly reduced seeding; moreover, fractions containing these species initiated the formation and spreading of filamentous tau pathology in vivo, whereas fractions containing tau monomers and small oligomeric assemblies did not. By electron microscopy, seed-competent sucrose gradient fractions contained aggregated tau species ranging from ring-like structures to small filaments. Together, these findings indicate that a range of filamentous tau aggregates are the major species that underlie the spreading of tau pathology in the P301S transgenic model. Significance statement: The spread of tau pathology from neuron to neuron is postulated to account for, or at least to contribute to, the overall propagation of tau pathology during the development of human tauopathies including Alzheimer's disease. It is therefore important to characterize the native tau species responsible for this process of seeding and pathology spreading. Here, we use several biochemical techniques to dissect the molecular characteristics of native tau protein

  14. The release and trans-synaptic transmission of Tau via exosomes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yipeng; Balaji, Varun; Kaniyappan, Senthilvelrajan; Krüger, Lars; Irsen, Stephan; Tepper, Katharina; Chandupatla, RamReddy; Maetzler, Walter; Schneider, Anja; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria

    2017-01-13

    Tau pathology in AD spreads in a hierarchical pattern, whereby it first appears in the entorhinal cortex, then spreads to the hippocampus and later to the surrounding areas. Based on this sequential appearance, AD can be classified into six stages ("Braak stages"). The mechanisms and agents underlying the progression of Tau pathology are a matter of debate. Emerging evidence indicates that the propagation of Tau pathology may be due to the transmission of Tau protein, but the underlying pathways and Tau species are not well understood. In this study we investigated the question of Tau spreading via small extracellular vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes from different sources were analyzed by biochemical methods and electron microscopy (EM) and cryo-EM. Microfluidic devices that allow the culture of cell populations in different compartments were used to investigate the spreading of Tau. We show that Tau protein is released by cultured primary neurons or by N2a cells overexpressing different Tau constructs via exosomes. Neuron-derived exosomal Tau is hypo-phosphorylated, compared with cytosolic Tau. Depolarization of neurons promotes release of Tau-containing exosomes, highlighting the importance of neuronal activity. Using microfluidic devices we show that exosomes mediate trans-neuronal transfer of Tau depending on synaptic connectivity. Tau spreading is achieved by direct transmission of exosomes between neurons. In organotypic hippocampal slices, Tau-containing exosomes in conditioned medium are taken up by neurons and microglia, not astrocytes. In N2a cells, Tau assemblies are released via exosomes. They can induce inclusions of other Tau molecules in N2a cells expressing mutant human Tau. We also studied exosomes from cerebrospinal fluid in AD and control subjects containing monomeric and oligomeric Tau. Split-luciferase complementation reveals that exosomes from CSF can promote Tau aggregation in cultured cells. Our study demonstrates that exosomes contribute

  15. Loss of medial septum cholinergic neurons in THY-Tau22 mouse model: what links with tau pathology?

    PubMed

    Belarbi, K; Burnouf, S; Fernandez-Gomez, F-J; Desmercières, J; Troquier, L; Brouillette, J; Tsambou, L; Grosjean, M-E; Caillierez, R; Demeyer, D; Hamdane, M; Schindowski, K; Blum, D; Buée, L

    2011-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder histologically defined by the cerebral accumulation of amyloid deposits and neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Loss of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons is another hallmark of the disease thought to contribute to the cognitive dysfunctions. To this date, the mechanisms underlying cholinergic neurons degeneration remain uncertain. The present study aimed to investigate the relationship between neurofibrillary degeneration and cholinergic defects in AD using THY-Tau22 transgenic mouse model exhibiting a major hippocampal AD-like tau pathology and hyperphosphorylated tau species in the septohippocampal pathway. Here, we report that at a time THY-Tau22 mice display strong reference memory alterations, the retrograde transport of fluorogold through the septohippocampal pathway is altered. This impairment is associated with a significant reduction in the number of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-immunopositive cholinergic neurons in the medial septum. Analysis of nerve growth factor (NGF) levels supports an accumulation of the mature neurotrophin in the hippocampus of THY-Tau22 mice, consistent with a decrease of its uptake or retrograde transport by cholinergic terminals. Finally, our data strongly support that tau pathology could be instrumental in the cholinergic neuronal loss observed in AD.

  16. Presynaptic C-terminal truncated tau is released from cortical synapses in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sokolow, Sophie; Henkins, Kristen M.; Bilousova, Tina; Gonzalez, Bianca; Vinters, Harry V.; Miller, Carol A.; Cornwell, Lindsey; Poon, Wayne W.; Gylys, Karen H.

    2015-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau has primarily been associated with axonal location and function; however, recent work shows tau release from neurons and suggests an important role for tau in synaptic plasticity. In our study, we measured synaptic levels of total tau using synaptosomes prepared from cryopreserved human postmortem Alzheimer's disease (AD) and control samples. Flow cytometry data show that a majority of synaptic terminals are highly immunolabeled with the total tau antibody (HT7) in both AD and control samples. Immunoblots of synaptosomal fractions reveal increases in a 20 kDa tau fragment and in tau dimers in AD synapses, and terminal-specific antibodies show that in many synaptosome samples tau lacks a C-terminus. Flow cytometry experiments to quantify the extent of C-terminal truncation reveal that only 15-25% of synaptosomes are positive for intact C-terminal tau. Potassium-induced depolarization demonstrates release of tau and tau fragments from presynaptic terminals, with increased release from AD compared to control samples. This study indicates that tau is normally highly localized to synaptic terminals in cortex where it is well-positioned to affect synaptic plasticity. Tau cleavage may facilitate tau aggregation as well as tau secretion and propagation of tau pathology from the presynaptic compartment in AD. PMID:25393609

  17. Starvation and inhibition of lysosomal function increased tau secretion by primary cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Nguyen-Vi; Plouffe, Vanessa; Rémillard-Labrosse, Gaudeline; Planel, Emmanuel; Leclerc, Nicole

    2014-07-17

    Recent studies have demonstrated that human tau can be secreted by neurons and non-neuronal cells, an event linked to the propagation of tau pathology in the brain. In the present study, we confirmed that under physiological conditions, one tau-positive band was detected in the culture medium with an anti-tau antibody recognizing total tau and the Tau-1 antibody directed against unphosphorylated tau. We then examined whether tau secretion was modified upon insults. Tau secretion was increased by starvation [Earle's Balanced Salt Solution (EBSS)], inhibition of lysosomal function (leupeptin) and when both of these conditions were superimposed, this combined treatment having the most important effects on tau secretion. Interestingly, the pattern of tau secretion was distinct from that of control neurons when neurons were treated either with EBSS alone or EBSS + leupeptin. In these conditions, three tau-positive bands were detected in the culture medium. Two of these three bands were immunoreactive to Tau-1 antibody revealing that at least two tau species were released upon these treatments. Collectively, our results indicate that insults such as nutrient deprivation and lysosomal dysfunction observed in neurodegenerative diseases could result in an increase of tau secretion and propagation of tau pathology in the brain.

  18. Conformation Determines the Seeding Potencies of Native and Recombinant Tau Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Falcon, Benjamin; Cavallini, Annalisa; Angers, Rachel; Glover, Sarah; Murray, Tracey K.; Barnham, Luanda; Jackson, Samuel; O'Neill, Michael J.; Isaacs, Adrian M.; Hutton, Michael L.; Szekeres, Philip G.; Goedert, Michel; Bose, Suchira

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Tau inclusions are a pathological hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, collectively known as the tauopathies. They include Alzheimer disease, tangle-only dementia, Pick disease, argyrophilic grain disease, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration. Tau pathology appears to spread through intercellular propagation, requiring the formation of assembled “prion-like” species. Several cell and animal models have been described that recapitulate aspects of this phenomenon. However, the molecular characteristics of seed-competent Tau remain unclear. Here, we have used a cell model to understand the relationships between Tau structure/phosphorylation and seeding by aggregated Tau species from the brains of mice transgenic for human mutant P301S Tau and full-length aggregated recombinant P301S Tau. Deletion of motifs 275VQIINK280 and 306VQIVYK311 abolished the seeding activity of recombinant full-length Tau, suggesting that its aggregation was necessary for seeding. We describe conformational differences between native and synthetic Tau aggregates that may account for the higher seeding activity of native assembled Tau. When added to aggregated Tau seeds from the brains of mice transgenic for P301S Tau, soluble recombinant Tau aggregated and acquired the molecular properties of aggregated Tau from transgenic mouse brain. We show that seeding is conferred by aggregated Tau that enters cells through macropinocytosis and seeds the assembly of endogenous Tau into filaments. PMID:25406315

  19. Effects of Cell Cycle Inhibitors on Tau Phosphorylation in N2aTau3R Cells

    PubMed Central

    Townsend, Kirk; Davies, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are one of the pathologic hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). They are composed of paired helical filaments (PHF) containing hyperphosphorylated forms of tau. Hyperphosphorylation of certain tau sites favors its dissociation from the microtubules (MT), interfering with axonal transport and compromising the function and viability of neurons. Reappearance of cell cycle proteins have been reported in neurons exhibiting tau aggregation, suggesting that an aberrant cell cycle occurs before neurons die. Cell cycle suppression in neurons is crucial to survival, thus prevention of progression through the cell cycle may offer a therapeutic approach. Using a neuroblastoma cell line overexpressing 3-repeat (3R) tau, we investigated the effects of cell cycle inhibitors on tau phosphorylation. G2/M phase inhibitors did not alter phosphorylation of tau at Ser-202 and Ser-396/404 at the lower doses, but did at higher doses. Ser-202 and Ser-396/404 are phosphorylation sites of early and late neurofibrillary tangles, respectively, in AD. Cisplatin, a G1 phase inhibitor, did not phosphorylate tau. Cyclophosphamide and phosphoramide mustard, DNA cross-linking agents, decreased tau phosphorylation at Ser-396/404 site, but increased phosphorylation at Ser-202. These studies demonstrate that the G2/M blockers have a dose-dependent effect on tau phosphorylation. This seems to be a consequence of both the disruption of MT-organization and MT-dynamics when doses are higher, but only a disruption of MT-dynamics with lower doses. These results are also in agreement with the lack of phosphorylation seen for cisplatin, another inhibitor that produces disruption of the MT-dynamics. PMID:18278567

  20. Chronic noise exposure causes persistence of tau hyperphosphorylation and formation of NFT tau in the rat hippocampus and prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bo; Zhu, Lixing; She, Xiaojun; Wu, Mingquan; Ma, Qiang; Wang, Tianhui; Zhang, Na; Xu, Chuanxiang; Chen, Xuewei; An, Gaihong; Liu, Hongtao

    2012-12-01

    The non-auditory effects of noise exposure on the central nervous system have been established both epidemiologically and experimentally. Chronic noise exposure (CNE) has been associated with tau hyperphosphorylation and Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathological changes. However, experimental evidence for these associations remains limited. The aim of the current study was to explore the effects of CNE [100 dB sound pressure level (SPL) white noise, 4 h/d×14 d] on tau phosphorylation in the rat hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Forty-eight male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to two groups: a noise-exposed group and a control group. The levels of radioimmunoprecipitation assay (RIPA)-soluble and RIPA-insoluble phosphorylated tau at Ser202, Ser396, Ser404, and Ser422 in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex were measured at different time points (days 0, 3, 7, and 14) after the end of the last noise exposure. Exposure to white noise for 14 consecutive days significantly increased the levels of tau phosphorylation at Ser202, Ser396, Ser404, and Ser422, the sites typically phosphorylated in AD brains, in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Tau hyperphosphorylation persisted for 7 to 14 d after the cessation of noise exposure. These alterations were also concomitant with the generation of pathological neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) tau 3, 7 and 14 d after the end of the stimulus. Furthermore, lasting increases in proteins involved in hyperphosphorylation, namely glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), were found to occur in close correspondence with increase in tau hyperphosphorylation. The results of this study show that CNE leads to long-lasting increases in non-NFT hyperphosphorylated tau and delayed formation of misfolded NFT tau in the hippocampus and the prefrontal cortex. Our results also provide evidence for the involvement of GSK3β and PP2A in these processes.

  1. Search for CP Violation in the Decay tau- \\to pi- K^0_S (>= 0 pi0) nu_tau

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Martinelli, M.; Milanes, D.A.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /Pisa U. /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2012-02-16

    We report a search for CP violation in the decay {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -}K{sub S}{sup 0}({>=} 0{pi}{sup 0}){nu}{sub {tau}} using a dataset of 437 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 476 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The CP-violating decay-rate asymmetry is determined to be (-0.45 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.11)%, approximately three standard deviations from the Standard Model prediction of (0.33 {+-} 0.01)%.

  2. NAP alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (IsoNAP).

    PubMed

    Gozes, Illana; Schirer, Yulie; Idan-Feldman, Anat; David, Merav; Furman-Assaf, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    We set out to identify NAP (davunetide) analogs, providing neuroprotection and reducing tau pathology, specifically addressing protection against protein misfolding. NAP (NAPVSIPQ, intranasal formulation AL-108) is a drug candidate that (1) had a statistically significant impact on two measures, namely digit span and delayed-match-to-sample, tests of verbal recall and visual working memory, respectively, in patient population of mild cognitive impairment [preceding Alzheimer's disease (AD)] and (2) protected functional activities of daily living in schizophrenia patients. Previous preclinical studies have shown that stabilization of NAP by replacement of all L-amino acids by D-amino acids resulted in an active peptide, D-NAP. Other NAP mimetics are now explored. A new NAP analog was designed that included replacement of the proline residues by alpha-aminoisobutyric acid to enhance β-sheet breaker characteristics, thereby reducing protein misfolding. Three lines of investigations were chosen: (1) protection against the AD-associated amyloid β (1-42), Aβ1-42, peptide toxicity in cell cultures; (2) inhibition of AD-associated tau aggregation in vitro; and (3) cognitive protection in a mouse model of deficiencies of the NAP parent protein, activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP), exhibiting tau pathology and neurodegeneration. NAP alpha-aminoisobutyric acid (IsoNAP) protected neurons against AD-associated Aβ1-42-toxicity, inhibited the aggregation of the tau-derived peptide VQIVYK (important for the aggregation of tau into paired helical filaments, which form the tangles found in AD and related disorders), and protected cognitive functions in a model of ADNP deficiency. With AD being the major tauopathy, novel NAP derivatives that reduce tauopathy and provide neuroprotection as well as cognitive protection are of scientific and clinical interest.

  3. Study of High-multiplicity 3-prong and 5-prong Tau Decays at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Lees, J.P

    2012-06-01

    We present measurements of the branching fractions of 3-prong and 5-prong {tau} decay modes using a sample of 430 million {tau} lepton pairs, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb{sup -1}, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric energy e{sup +}e{sup -} storage rings. The {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {eta}{nu}{sub {tau}}, {tau}{sup -} {yields} (3{pi}){sup -} {yields} {omega}{nu}{sub {tau}} and {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} f{sub 1}(1285){nu}{sub {tau}} branching fractions are presented as well as a new limit on the branching fraction of the isospin-forbidden, second-class current {tau}{sup -} {yields} {pi}{sup -} {eta}{prime}(958){nu}{sub {tau}} decay. We find no evidence for charged kaons in these decay modes and place the first upper limits on their branching fractions.

  4. Measurement of the absolute branching fraction of Ds+ --> tau+ nutau decay.

    PubMed

    Ecklund, K M; Love, W; Savinov, V; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez, J; Ge, J Y; Miller, D H; Shipsey, I P J; Xin, B; Adams, G S; Anderson, M; Cummings, J P; Danko, I; Hu, D; Moziak, B; Napolitano, J; He, Q; Insler, J; Muramatsu, H; Park, C S; Thorndike, E H; Yang, F; Artuso, M; Blusk, S; Khalil, S; Li, J; Mountain, R; Nisar, S; Randrianarivony, K; Sultana, N; Skwarnicki, T; Stone, S; Wang, J C; Zhang, L M; Bonvicini, G; Cinabro, D; Dubrovin, M; Lincoln, A; Rademacker, J; Asner, D M; Edwards, K W; Naik, P; Reed, J; Briere, R A; Ferguson, T; Tatishvili, G; Vogel, H; Watkins, M E; Rosner, J L; Alexander, J P; Cassel, D G; Duboscq, J E; Ehrlich, R; Fields, L; Gibbons, L; Gray, R; Gray, S W; Hartill, D L; Heltsley, B K; Hertz, D; Jones, C D; Kandaswamy, J; Kreinick, D L; Kuznetsov, V E; Mahlke-Krüger, H; Mohapatra, D; Onyisi, P U E; Patterson, J R; Peterson, D; Riley, D; Ryd, A; Sadoff, A J; Shi, X; Stroiney, S; Sun, W M; Wilksen, T; Athar, S B; Patel, R; Yelton, J; Rubin, P; Eisenstein, B I; Karliner, I; Mehrabyan, S; Lowrey, N; Selen, M; White, E J; Wiss, J; Mitchell, R E; Shepherd, M R; Besson, D; Pedlar, T K; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Gao, K Y; Hietala, J; Kubota, Y; Klein, T; Lang, B W; Poling, R; Scott, A W; Zweber, P; Dobbs, S; Metreveli, Z; Seth, K K; Tomaradze, A; Libby, J; Powell, A; Wilkinson, G

    2008-04-25

    Using a sample of tagged D(s)(+) decays collected near the D(s)(*+/-)D(s)(-/+) peak production energy in e(+)e(-) collisions with the CLEO-c detector, we study the leptonic decay D(s)(+)-->tau(+)nu(tau) via the decay channel tau(+)-->e(+)nu(e)nu(tau). We measure B(D(s)(+)-->tau(+)nu(tau))=(6.17+/-0.71+/-0.34)%, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. Combining this result with our measurements of D(s)(+)-->mu(+)nu(mu) and D(s)(+)-->tau(+)nu(tau) (via tau(+)-->pi(+)nu(tau)), we determine f(D(s))=(274+/-10+/-5) MeV.

  5. Lost after translation: missorting of Tau protein and consequences for Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Zempel, Hans; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2014-12-01

    Tau is a microtubule-associated-protein that is sorted into neuronal axons in physiological conditions. In Alzheimer disease (AD) and other tauopathies, Tau sorting mechanisms fail and Tau becomes missorted into the somatodendritic compartment. In AD, aberrant amyloid-β (Aβ) production might trigger Tau missorting. The physiological axonal sorting of Tau depends on the developmental stage of the neuron, the phosphorylation state of Tau and the microtubule cytoskeleton. Disease-associated missorting of Tau is connected to increased phosphorylation and aggregation of Tau, and impaired microtubule interactions. Disease-causing mechanisms involve impaired transport, aberrant kinase activation, non-physiological interactions of Tau, and prion-like spreading. In this review we focus on the physiological and pathological (mis)sorting of Tau, the underlying mechanisms, and effects in disease.

  6. Structure and mechanism of action of tau aggregation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Cisek, Katryna; Cooper, Grace L.; Huseby, Carol J.; Kuret, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of phenothiazines as tau protein aggregation inhibitors, many additional small molecule inhibitors of diverse chemotype have been discovered and characterized in biological model systems. Although direct inhibition of tau aggregation has shown