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Sample records for alpha-amidating monooxygenase mrna

  1. Alternative mRNA splicing generates multiple forms of peptidyl-glycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase in rat atrium.

    PubMed Central

    Stoffers, D A; Green, C B; Eipper, B A

    1989-01-01

    Peptidyl-glycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM; EC 1.14.17.3) catalyzes the conversion of a variety of glycine-extended peptides into biologically active alpha-amidated product peptides in a reaction dependent on copper, ascorbate, and molecular oxygen. We have isolated and sequenced cDNAs representing the two major classes of PAM mRNA in the adult rat heart atrium. The two types of cDNA, rPAM-1 and rPAM-2, are identical except for the deletion of a 315-base-pair segment within the protein coding region in rPAM-2, suggesting that rPAM-1 and rPAM-2 arise by alternative splicing. Northern analysis using a cDNA probe derived from within the 315-base-pair region deleted in rPAM-2 visualized the larger of the PAM mRNAs in adult rat atrium and not the smaller, indicating that the presence or absence of this 315-nucleotide segment is a major feature distinguishing the two size forms of PAM mRNA. The 105 amino acid segment that distinguishes the two forms of atrial PAM contains a consensus N-glycosylation site and a paired basic amino acid site of potential importance in endoproteolytic processing. Comparison of the nucleotide sequences of rat, frog, and bovine PAM cDNAs reveals an extremely well conserved segment in the 3' untranslated region. The high degree of conservation in amino acid sequence throughout the catalytic, intragranular, and cytoplasmic domains of rat atrium, bovine pituitary, and frog skin PAM suggests that both the catalytic and noncatalytic domains of the protein subserve important functions. Images PMID:2911604

  2. Effect of cortisol on neurophysin I/oxytocin and peptidyl glycine-alpha-amidating mono-oxygenase mRNA expression in bovine luteal and granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, A; Mlynarczuk, J; Kotwica, J

    2013-01-01

    Cortisol stimulates the synthesis and secretion of oxytocin (OT) from bovine granulosa and luteal cells, but the molecular mechanisms of cortisol action remain unknown. In this study, granulosa cells or luteal cells from days 1-5 and 11-15 of the oestrous cycle were incubated for 4 or 8 h with cortisol (1 x 10(-5), 1 x 10(-7) M). After testing cell viability and hormone secretion (OT, progesterone, estradiol), we studied the effect of cortisol on mRNA expression for precursor of OT (NP-I/OT) and peptidyl glycine-alpha-amidating mono-oxygenase (PGA). The influence of RU 486 (1 x 10(-5) M), a progesterone receptor blocker and inhibitor of the glucocorticosteroid receptor (GR), on the expression for both genes was tested. Cortisol increased the mRNA expression for NP-I/OT and PGA in granulosa cells and stimulated the expression for NP-I/OT mRNA in luteal cells obtained from days 1-5 and days 11-15 of the oestrous cycle. Expression for PGA mRNA was increased only in luteal cells from days 11-15 of the oestrous cycle. In addition, RU 486 blocked the cortisol-stimulated mRNA expression for NP-I/OT and PGA in both types of cells. These data suggest that cortisol affects OT synthesis and secretion in bovine ovarian cells, by acting on the expression of key genes, that may impair ovary

  3. Membrane-associated forms of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase activity in rat pituitary. Tissue specificity.

    PubMed

    May, V; Cullen, E I; Braas, K M; Eipper, B A

    1988-06-05

    Membrane-associated peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) activity was investigated in rat anterior and neurointermediate pituitary tissues and in pituitary AtT-20/D-16v and GH3 cell lines. A substantial fraction of total pituitary PAM activity was found to be membrane-associated. Triton X-100, N-octyl-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and Zwittergent were effective in solubilizing PAM activity from crude pituitary membranes. The distribution of enzyme activity between soluble and membrane-associated forms was tissue-specific. In the anterior pituitary lobe and pituitary cell lines, 40-60% of total PAM activity was membrane-associated while only 10% of the alpha-amidating activity in the neurointermediate lobe was membrane-associated. Soluble and membrane-associated forms of PAM shared nearly identical characteristics with respect to copper and ascorbate requirements, pH optima, and Km values. Upon subcellular fractionation of anterior and neurointermediate pituitary lobe homogenates on Percoll gradients, 12-18% of total PAM activity was found in the rough endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi fractions and 42-60% was localized to secretory granule fractions. For both tissues, membrane-associated PAM activity was enriched in the rough endoplasmic reticulum/Golgi pool, whereas most of the secretory granule-associated enzyme activity was soluble.

  4. Isolation and functional expression of human pancreatic peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Tateishi, K; Arakawa, F; Misumi, Y; Treston, A M; Vos, M; Matsuoka, Y

    1994-11-30

    Pancreastatin (PST) is processed from chromogranin A and the C-terminal amide of the peptide is an absolute requirement for biological activities. Human pancreatic carcinoma cells QGP-1 which produce both chromogranin A and PST were used to isolate cDNAs encoding two forms of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM). The two forms are a full length bifunctional enzyme and a variant lacking the transmembrane domain-coding region. When the cDNAs of these two forms were expressed in COS-7 cells, cells transfected with the predicted soluble form released into the culture medium a very much higher amidating activity which converts human chromogranin A-(273-302) to PST-29. The optimal pH for amidating activity was 5.4 and Cu2+, ascorbate and catalase were required as cofactors for the both forms of PAM. Km values for the membrane-bound and the soluble forms of PAM were 15.7 +/- 3.1 microM and 12.4 +/- 1.6 microM, respectively. These results demonstrate that both forms of PAM can function in the posttranslational processing of chromogranin A to PST in the environment of a secretory vesicle.

  5. Menkes protein contributes to the function of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Steveson, Tami C; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D; Ma, Xin-Ming; Mueller, Gregory P; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2003-01-01

    Menkes protein (ATP7A) is a P-type ATPase involved in copper uptake and homeostasis. Disturbed copper homeostasis occurs in patients with Menkes disease, an X-linked disorder characterized by mental retardation, neurodegeneration, connective tissue disorders, and early childhood death. Mutations in ATP7A result in malfunction of copper-requiring enzymes, such as tyrosinase and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase. The first step of the two-step amidation reaction carried out by peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) also requires copper. We used tissue from wild-type rats and mice and an ATP7A-specific antibody to determine that ATP7A is expressed at high levels in tissues expressing high levels of PAM. ATP7A is largely localized to the trans Golgi network in pituitary endocrine cells. The Atp7a mouse, bearing a mutation in the Atp7a gene, is an excellent model system for examining the consequences of ATP7A malfunction. Despite normal levels of PAM protein, levels of several amidated peptides were reduced in pituitary and brain extracts of Atp7a mice, demonstrating that PAM function is compromised when ATP7A is inactive. Based on these results, we conclude that a reduction in the ability of PAM to produce bioactive end-products involved in neuronal growth and development could contribute to many of the biological effects associated with Menkes disease.

  6. Reversal of physiological deficits caused by diminished levels of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase by dietary copper.

    PubMed

    Bousquet-Moore, D; Ma, X M; Nillni, E A; Czyzyk, T A; Pintar, J E; Eipper, B A; Mains, R E

    2009-04-01

    Amidated peptides are critically involved in many physiological functions. Genetic deletion of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), the only enzyme that can synthesize these peptides, is embryonically lethal. The goal of the present study was the identification of physiological functions impaired by haploinsufficiency of PAM. Regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis and body temperature, functions requiring contributions from multiple amidated peptides, were selected for evaluation. Based on serum T(4) and pituitary TSH-beta mRNA levels, mice heterozygous for PAM (PAM(+/-)) were euthyroid at baseline. Feedback within the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis was impaired in PAM(+/-) mice made hypothyroid using a low iodine/propylthiouracil diet. Despite their normal endocrine response to cold, PAM(+/-) mice were unable to maintain body temperature as well as wild-type littermates when kept in a 4 C environment. When provided with additional dietary copper, PAM(+/-) mice maintained body temperature as well as wild-type mice. Pharmacological activation of vasoconstriction or shivering also allowed PAM(+/-) mice to maintain body temperature. Cold-induced vasoconstriction was deficient in PAM(+/-) mice. This deficit was eliminated in PAM(+/-) mice receiving a diet with supplemental copper. These results suggest that dietary deficiency of copper, coupled with genetic deficits in PAM, could result in physiological deficits in humans.

  7. mRNA differential display in a microbial enrichment culture: simultaneous identification of three cyclohexanone monooxygenases from three species.

    PubMed

    Brzostowicz, Patricia C; Walters, Dana M; Thomas, Stuart M; Nagarajan, Vasantha; Rouvière, Pierre E

    2003-01-01

    mRNA differential display has been used to identify cyclohexanone oxidation genes in a mixed microbial community derived from a wastewater bioreactor. Thirteen DNA fragments randomly amplified from the total RNA of an enrichment subculture exposed to cyclohexanone corresponded to genes predicted to be involved in the degradation of cyclohexanone. Nine of these DNA fragments are part of genes encoding three distinct Baeyer-Villiger cyclohexanone monooxygenases from three different bacterial species present in the enrichment culture. In Arthrobacter sp. strain BP2 and Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi2, the monooxygenase is part of a gene cluster that includes all the genes required for the degradation of cyclohexanone, while in Rhodococcus sp. strain Phi1 the genes surrounding the monooxygenase are not predicted to be involved in this degradation pathway but rather seem to belong to a biosynthetic pathway. Furthermore, in the case of Arthrobacter strain BP2, three other genes flanking the monooxygenase were identified by differential display, demonstrating that the repeated sampling of bacterial operons shown earlier for a pure culture (D. M. Walters, R. Russ, H. Knackmuss, and P. E. Rouvière, Gene 273:305-315, 2001) is also possible for microbial communities. The activity of the three cyclohexanone monooxygenases was confirmed and characterized following their expression in Escherichia coli.

  8. Effect of hyperosmotic conditions on flavin-containing monooxygenase activity, protein and mRNA expression in rat kidney

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Coburn, Cary; Currás-Collazo, Margarita; Guillén, Gabriel; Schlenk, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxigenases (FMOs) are a polymorphic family of drug and pesticide metabolizing enzymes, found in the smooth endoplasmatic reticulum that catalyze the oxidation of soft nucleophilic heteroatom substances to their respective oxides. Previous studies in euryhaline fishes have indicated induction of FMO expression and activity in vivo under hyperosmotic conditions. In this study we evaluated the effect of hypersaline conditions in rat kidney. Male Sprague–Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneal with 3.5 M NaCl at a doses ranging from 0.3 cm3/100 g to 0.6 cm3/100 g in two separate treatments. Three hours after injection, FMO activities and FMO1 protein was examined in the first experiment, and the expression of FMO1 mRNA was measured in the second experiment from kidneys after treatment with NaCl. A positive significant correlation was found between FMO1 protein expression and plasma osmolarity (p < 0.05, r = 0.6193). Methyl-p-tolyl sulfide oxidase showed a statistically significant increase in FMO activity, and a positive correlation was observed between plasma osmolarity and production of FMO1-derived (R)-methyl-p-tolyl sulfoxide (p < 0.05, r = 0.6736). Expression of FMO1 mRNA was also positively correlated with plasma osmolality (p < 0.05, r = 0.8428). Similar to studies in fish, these results suggest that expression and activities of FMOs may be influenced by hyperosmotic conditions in the kidney of rats. PMID:19429252

  9. A mutation in the promoter of the chicken β,β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 gene alters xanthophyll metabolism through a selective effect on its mRNA abundance in the breast muscle.

    PubMed

    Jlali, M; Graulet, B; Chauveau-Duriot, B; Chabault, M; Godet, E; Leroux, S; Praud, C; Le Bihan-Duval, E; Duclos, M J; Berri, C

    2012-12-01

    A polymorphism in the promoter of the β,β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1) gene recently was identified in an experimental cross between 2 chicken lines divergently selected on growth rate and found to be associated with variations in the yellow color of the breast meat. In this study, the effects of the polymorphism on several aspects of carotenoid metabolism were evaluated in chickens sharing the same genetic background except for their genotype at the BCMO1 locus. We confirmed that BCMO1 mRNA abundance varied (P < 0.001) between the 2 homozygous genotypes (GG < AA) and in the pectoralis major muscle. By contrast, BCMO1 mRNA expression was not affected (P > 0.05) by the polymorphism in the duodenum, liver, or sartorius muscle. The breast meat of GG chickens was more (P < 0.001) yellow and richer in lutein (P < 0.01) and zeaxanthin (P < 0.05) compared to that of AA chickens whereas these variables did not differ (P > 0.05) in the other tissues tested. The GG were also characterized by reduced (P < 0.01) plasma lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations than AA without affecting plasma and tissue content of fat-soluble vitamins A and E. As lutein and zeaxanthin are usually not considered as substrates of the BCMO1 enzyme, the impact of BCMO1 polymorphism on the activity of other genes involved in carotenoid transport (SCARB1 and CD36 encoding the scavenger receptor class B type I and the cluster determinant 36, respectively) and metabolism (BCDO2 encoding β,β-carotene 9',10'-dioxygenase 2) was evaluated. The BCMO1 polymorphism did not affect mRNA abundance of BCDO2, SCARB1, or CD36, regardless of tissue considered. Taken together, these results indicated that a genetic variant of BCMO1 specifically changes lutein and zeaxanthin content in the chicken plasma and breast muscle without impairing vitamin A and E metabolism.

  10. The influence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolite-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) on mRNA expression for NP-I/OT and PGA, involved in oxytocin synthesis in bovine granulosa and luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczuk, Jaroslaw; Wrobel, Michal H; Kotwica, Jan

    2009-11-01

    The effect of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) congeners (PCB 77, PCB 126, PCB 153) and their technical mixture-Aroclor (Ar) 1248, as well as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolite-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE; two individual isomers p,p'- and o,p'- or their mixture, 95% and 5%, respectively) at the dose of 10 ng/ml each, on the gene expression of (a) oxytocin (OT) precursor-neurophysin-oxytocin (NP-I/OT) and (b) peptidyl glycine-alpha-amidating mono-oxygenase (PGA), the terminal enzyme in the pathway of OT synthesis, was studied. Granulosa cells from follicles >1cm in diameter, collected on days 19-21 of estrous cycle, and luteal cells from corpora lutea (CL) collected on days 8-12 of the estrous cycle were used. The cells were incubated (6h) with these xenobiotics and the expression of NP-I/OT and PGA genes was determined. All PCBs increased (P<0.05) NP-I/OT gene expression in granulosa cells. Similarly, all PCBs but PCB 126 increased (P<0.05) PGA gene expression in these cells. DDT and DDE increased (P<0.05) gene expression of NP-I/OT in granulosa cells, while gene expression of PGA in these cells was stimulated (P<0.05) by DDE only. The mRNA expression for NP-I/OT and PGA in luteal cells was increased (P<0.05) by PCB 77 and PCB 153. Both DDE isomers and mixture also stimulated (P<0.05) of NP-I/OT mRNA expression, while increase (P<0.05) of PGA mRNA expression was elicited by incubation of these cells with DDE mixture and Ar 1248. Obtained data suggest that PCBs, DDT and DDE can affect the mRNA expression for NP-I/OT and PGA in bovine granulosa and luteal cells.

  11. An improved choline monooxygenase assay

    SciTech Connect

    Lafontaine, P.J.; Hanson, A.D. )

    1991-05-01

    Glycine betaine accumulates in leaves of plants from several angiosperm families in response to drought or salinization. Its synthesis, from the oxidation of choline, is mediated by a two step pathway. In spinach the first enzyme of this pathway is a ferredoxin-dependent choline monooxygenase (CMO). In order to purify this enzyme a sensitive and reliable assay is necessary. Two types of modifications were explored to improve the existing assay. (1) Ferredoxin reduction - one way of providing reduced Fd to CMO is by the addition of isolated spinach thylakoids in the assay mixture. In order to optimize the reduction of Fd two different systems were compared: (a) where only PS is active, by adding DCMU to inhibit electron transport from PS II and DAD as electron donor for PS I; (b) where both PS II and PS I are active. (2) Betaine aldehyde estimation - to simplify this, it is possible to couple the CMO reaction with betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) from E. coli. BADH converts betaine aldehyde to betaine as it is formed in the assay, eliminating the need for a chemical oxidation step.

  12. Expression of recombinant human bifunctional peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase in CHO cells and its use for insulin analogue modification.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Marcin; Wójtowicz-Krawiec, Anna; Mikiewicz, Diana; Kęsik-Brodacka, Małgorzata; Cecuda-Adamczewska, Violetta; Marciniak-Rusek, Alina; Sokołowska, Iwona; Łukasiewicz, Natalia; Gurba, Lidia; Odrowąż-Sypniewski, Michał; Baran, Piotr; Płucienniczak, Grażyna; Płucienniczak, Andrzej; Borowicz, Piotr; Szewczyk, Bogusław

    2016-03-01

    The availability of catalytically active peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) should provide the means to examine its potential use for the chemienzymatic synthesis of bioactive peptides for the purpose of pharmacological studies. Hypoglycemic activity is one of the most important features of insulin derivatives. Insulin glargine amide was found to show a time/effect profile which is distinctly more flat and thus more advantageous than insulin glargine itself. The aim of the study was to obtain recombinant PAM and use it for insulin analogue amidation. We stably expressed a recombinant PAM in CHO dhfr-cells in culture. Recombinant PAM was partially purified by fractional ammonium sulphate precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography. The enzyme was used to modify glycine-extended A22(G)-B31(K)-B32(R) human insulin analogue (GKR). Alpha-amidated insulin was analyzed by HPLC and mass spectrometry. Hypoglycemic activity of amidated and non-amidated insulin was compared. The pharmacodynamic effect was based on glucose concentration measurement in Wistar rats with hyperglycemia induced by streptozotocin. The overall glycemic profile up to 36 h was evaluated after subcutaneous single dosing at a range of 2.5-7.5 U/kg b.w. The experiment on rats confirmed with a statistical significance (P < 0.05) hypoglycemic activity of GKR-NH2 in comparison to a control group receiving 0.9% NaCl. Characteristics for GKR-NH2 profile was a rather fast beginning of action (0.5-2.0 h) and quite prolonged return to initial values. GKR-NH2 is a candidate for a hypoglycemic drug product in diabetes care. In addition, this work also provides a valuable alternative method for preparing any other recombinant bioactive peptides with C-terminal amidation.

  13. Kinetic isotope effects of peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating mono-oxygenase reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, K; Onami, T; Noguchi, M

    1998-01-01

    Many bioactive polypeptides or neuropeptides possess a C-terminal alpha-amide group as a critical determinant for their optimal bioactivities. The amide functions are introduced by the sequential actions of peptidylglycine alpha-hydroxylating mono-oxygenase (PHM; EC 1.14.17.3) and peptidylamidoglycollate lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.2.5) from their glycine-extended precursors. In the present study we examined the kinetic isotope effects of the frog PHM reaction by competitive and non-competitive approaches. In the competitive approach we employed the double-label tracer method with D-Tyr-[U-14C]Val-Gly, D-Tyr-[3,4-3H]Val-[2,2-2H2]-Gly, and D-Tyr-Val-(R,S)[2-3H]Gly as substrates, and we determined the deuterium and tritium effects on Vmax/Km as 1.625+/-0.041 (mean+/-S. D.) and 2.71+/-0.16 (mean+/-S.D.), respectively. The intrinsic deuterium isotope effect (Dk) on the glycine hydroxylation reaction was estimated to be 6.5-10.0 (mean 8.1) by the method of Northrop [Northrop (1975) Biochemistry 14, 2644-2651]. In the non-competitive approach with N,N-dimethyl-1,4-phenylenediamine as a reductant, however, the deuterium effect on Vmax (DV) was approximately unity, although the deuterium effect on Vmax/Km (DV/K) was comparable to that obtained by the competitive approach. These results indicated that DV was completely masked by the presence of one or more steps much slower than the glycine hydroxylation step and that DV/K was diminished from Dk by a large forward commitment to catalysis. The addition of PAL, however, increased the apparent DV from 1.0 to 1.2, implying that the product release step was greatly accelerated by PAL. These results suggest that the product release is rate-limiting in the overall PHM reaction. The large Dk indicated that the glycine hydroxylation catalysed by PHM might proceed in a stepwise mechanism similar to that proposed for the dopamine beta-hydroxylase reaction [Miller and Klinman (1983) Biochemistry 22, 3091-3096]. PMID:9806894

  14. The Origin and Evolution of Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs): An Ancestral Family of Flavin Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Mascotti, Maria Laura; Lapadula, Walter Jesús; Juri Ayub, Maximiliano

    2015-01-01

    The Baeyer—Villiger Monooxygenases (BVMOs) are enzymes belonging to the “Class B” of flavin monooxygenases and are capable of performing exquisite selective oxidations. These enzymes have been studied from a biotechnological perspective, but their physiological substrates and functional roles are widely unknown. Here, we investigated the origin, taxonomic distribution and evolutionary history of the BVMO genes. By using in silico approaches, 98 BVMO encoding genes were detected in the three domains of life: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. We found evidence for the presence of these genes in Metazoa (Hydra vulgaris, Oikopleura dioica and Adineta vaga) and Haptophyta (Emiliania huxleyi) for the first time. Furthermore, a search for other “Class B” monooxygenases (flavoprotein monooxygenases –FMOs – and N-hydroxylating monooxygenases – NMOs) was conducted. These sequences were also found in the three domains of life. Phylogenetic analyses of all “Class B” monooxygenases revealed that NMOs and BVMOs are monophyletic, whereas FMOs form a paraphyletic group. Based on these results, we propose that BVMO genes were already present in the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) and their current taxonomic distribution is the result of differential duplication and loss of paralogous genes. PMID:26161776

  15. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    PubMed

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced.

  16. Tolerance to Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity in the Mouse Model of Autoprotection is Associated with Induction of Flavin-containing Monooxygenase-3 (FMO3) in Hepatocytes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acetaminophen (APAP) pretreatment with a low hepatotoxic dose in mice results in resistance to a second, higher dose of APAP (APAP autoprotection). Recent microarray work by our group showed a drastic induction of liver flavin containing monooxygenase-3 (Fmo3) mRNA expression in...

  17. Structural diversity of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Forsberg, Zarah; Loose, Jennifer Sm; Bissaro, Bastien; Eijsink, Vincent Gh

    2017-01-10

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) catalyze the oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds and represent a promising resource for development of industrial enzyme cocktails for biomass processing. LPMOs show high sequence and modular diversity and are known, so far, to cleave insoluble substrates such as cellulose, chitin and starch, as well as hemicelluloses such as beta-glucan, xyloglucan and xylan. All LPMOs share a catalytic histidine brace motif to bind copper, but differ strongly when it comes to the nature and arrangement of residues on the substrate-binding surface. In recent years, the number of available LPMO structures has increased rapidly, including the first structure of an enzyme-substrate complex. The insights gained from these structures is reviewed below.

  18. Structural basis of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, Marta; Levy, Colin; Heyes, Derren J.; Lafite, Pierre; Outeiro, Tiago F.; Giorgini, Flaviano; Leys, David; Scrutton, Nigel S.

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), an enzyme in the eukaryotic tryptophan catabolic pathway (i.e. kynurenine pathway), leads to amelioration of Huntington’s disease-relevant phenotypes in yeast, fruit fly, and mouse models1–5, as well as a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease3. KMO is a FAD-dependent monooxygenase, and is located in the outer mitochondrial membrane where it converts L-kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine. Perturbations in the levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites have been linked to the pathogenesis of a spectrum of brain disorders6, as well as cancer7,8, and several peripheral inflammatory conditions9. Despite the importance of KMO as a target for neurodegenerative disease, the molecular basis of KMO inhibition by available lead compounds has remained hitherto unknown. Here we report the first crystal structure of KMO, in the free form and in complex with the tight-binding inhibitor UPF 648. UPF 648 binds close to the FAD cofactor and perturbs the local active site structure, preventing productive binding of the substrate kynurenine. Functional assays and targeted mutagenesis revealed that the active site architecture and UPF 648 binding are essentially identical in human KMO, validating the yeast KMO:UPF 648 structure as a template for structure-based drug design. This will inform the search for new KMO inhibitors that are able to cross the blood-brain barrier in targeted therapies against neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, and Parkinson’s diseases. PMID:23575632

  19. A Carbonate-Forming Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Youcai; Dietrich, David; Xu, Wei; Patel, Ashay; Thuss, Justin A. J.; Wang, Jingjing; Yin, Wen-Bing; Qiao, Kangjian; Houk, Kendall N.; Vederas, John C.; Tang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Despite the remarkable versatility displayed by flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) in natural product biosynthesis, one notably missing activity is the oxidative generation of carbonate functional groups. We describe a multifunctional Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase CcsB, which catalyzes the formation of an in-line carbonate in the macrocyclic portion of cytochalasin E. This study expands the repertoire of activities of FMOs and provides a possible synthetic strategy for transformation of ketones into carbonates. PMID:24838010

  20. Substrate radical intermediates in soluble methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aimin; Jin, Yi; Zhang, Jingyan; Brazeau, Brian J; Lipscomb, John D

    2005-12-09

    EPR spin-trapping experiments were carried out using the three-component soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO). Spin-traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), alpha-4-pyridyl-1-oxide N-tert-butylnitrone (POBN), and nitrosobenzene (NOB) were used to investigate the possible formation of substrate radical intermediates during catalysis. In contrast to a previous report, the NADH-coupled oxidations of various substrates did not produce any trapped radical species when DMPO or POBN was present. However, radicals were detected by these traps when only the MMO reductase component and NADH were present. DMPO and POBN were found to be weak inhibitors of the MMO reaction. In contrast, NOB is a strong inhibitor for the MMO-catalyzed nitrobenzene oxidation reaction. When NOB was used as a spin-trap in the complete MMO system with or without substrate, EPR signals from an NOB radical were detected. We propose that a molecule of NOB acts simultaneously as a substrate and a spin-trap for MMO, yielding the long-lived radical and supporting a stepwise mechanism for MMO.

  1. A tale of two methane monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Matthew O.

    2017-01-01

    Methane monooxygenase (MMO) enzymes activate O2 for oxidation of methane. Two distinct MMOs exist in nature, a soluble form that uses a diiron active site (sMMO) and a membrane-bound form with a catalytic copper center (pMMO). Understanding the reaction mechanisms of these enzymes is of fundamental importance to biologists and chemists, and is also relevant to the development of new biocatalysts. The sMMO catalytic cycle has been elucidated in detail, including O2 activation intermediates and the nature of the methane-oxidizing species. By contrast, many aspects of pMMO catalysis remain unclear, most notably the nuclearity and molecular details of the copper active site. Here, we review the current state of knowledge for both enzymes, and consider pMMO O2 activation intermediates suggested by computational and synthetic studies in the context of existing biochemical data. Further work is needed on all fronts, with the ultimate goal of understanding how these two remarkable enzymes catalyze a reaction not readily achieved by any other metalloenzyme or biomimetic compound. PMID:27878395

  2. Pam (Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase) heterozygosity alters brain copper handling with region specificity

    PubMed Central

    Gaier, Eric D; Miller, Megan B; Ralle, Martina; Aryal, Dipendra; Wetsel, William C; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2013-01-01

    Copper (Cu), an essential trace element present throughout the mammalian nervous system, is crucial for normal synaptic function. Neuronal handling of Cu is poorly understood. We studied the localization and expression of Atp7a, the major intracellular Cu transporter in the brain, and its relation to peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), an essential cuproenzyme and regulator of Cu homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells. Based on biochemical fractionation and immunostaining of dissociated neurons, Atp7a was enriched in postsynaptic vesicular fractions. Cu followed a similar pattern, with ~20% of total Cu in synaptosomes. A mouse model heterozygous for the Pam gene (PAM+/−) is selectively Cu deficient in the amygdala. As in cortex and hippocampus, Atp7a and PAM expression overlap in the amygdala, with highest expression in interneurons. Messenger RNA levels of Atox-1 and Atp7a, which deliver Cu to the secretory pathway, were reduced in the amygdala but not the hippocampus in PAM+/− mice, along with GABAB receptor mRNA levels. Consistent with Cu deficiency, dopamine β-monooxygenase function was impaired as evidenced by elevated dopamine metabolites in the amygdala, but not the hippocampus, of PAM+/− mice. These alterations in Cu delivery to the secretory pathway in the PAM+/− amygdala may contribute to the physiological and behavioral deficits observed. PMID:24032518

  3. Towards practical Baeyer-Villiger-monooxygenases: design of cyclohexanone monooxygenase mutants with enhanced oxidative stability.

    PubMed

    Opperman, Diederik J; Reetz, Manfred T

    2010-12-10

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) catalyze the conversion of ketones and cyclic ketones into esters and lactones, respectively. Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB 9871 is known to show an impressive substrate scope as well as exquisite chemo-, regio-, and enantioselectivity in many cases. Large-scale synthetic applications of CHMO are hampered, however, by the instability of the enzyme. Oxidation of cysteine and methionine residues contributes to this instability. Designed mutations of all the methionine and cysteine residues in the CHMO wild type (WT) showed that the amino acids labile towards oxidation are mostly either surface-exposed or located within the active site, whereas the two methionine residues identified for thermostabilization are buried within the folded protein. Combinatorial mutations gave rise to two stabilized mutants with either oxidative or thermal stability, without compromising the activity or stereoselectivity of the enzyme. The most oxidatively stabilized mutant retained nearly 40 % of its activity after incubation with H(2)O(2) (0.2 M), whereas the wild-type enzyme's activity was completely abolished at concentrations as low as 5 mM H(2)O(2). We propose that oxidation-stable mutants might well be a "prerequisite" for thermostabilization, because laboratory-evolved thermostability in CHMO might be masked by a high degree of oxidation instability.

  4. Proposed involvement of a soluble methane monooxygenase homologue in the cyclohexane-dependent growth of a new Brachymonas species.

    PubMed

    Brzostowicz, Patricia C; Walters, Dana M; Jackson, Raymond E; Halsey, Kimberly H; Ni, Hao; Rouvière, Pierre E

    2005-02-01

    High-throughput mRNA differential display (DD) was used to identify genes induced by cyclohexane in Brachymonas petroleovorans CHX, a recently isolated beta-proteobacterium that grows on cyclohexane. Two metabolic gene clusters were identified multiple times in independent reverse transcription polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCR) in the course of this DD experiment. These clusters encode genes believed to be required for cyclohexane metabolism. One gene cluster (8 kb) encodes the subunits of a multicomponent hydroxylase related to the soluble butane of Pseudomonas butanovora and methane monooxygenases (sMMO) of methanotrophs. We propose that this butane monooxygenase homologue carries out the oxidation of cyclohexane into cyclohexanol during growth. A second gene cluster (11 kb) contains almost all the genes required for the oxidation of cyclohexanol to adipic acid. Real-time PCR experiments confirmed that genes from both clusters are induced by cyclohexane. The role of the Baeyer-Villiger cyclohexanone monooxygenase of the second cluster was confirmed by heterologous expression in Escherichia coli.

  5. Hydrocarbon monooxygenase in Mycobacterium: recombinant expression of a member of the ammonia monooxygenase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Nicholas V; Le, Nga B; Ly, Mai A; Ogawa, Hitoha E; McCarl, Victoria; Wilson, Neil L; Holmes, Andrew J

    2012-01-01

    The copper membrane monooxygenases (CuMMOs) are an important group of enzymes in environmental science and biotechnology. Areas of relevance include the development of green chemistry for sustainable exploitation of methane (CH4) reserves, remediation of chlorinated hydrocarbon contamination and monitoring human impact in the biogeochemical cycles of CH4 and nitrogen. Challenges for all these applications are that many aspects of the ecology, physiology and structure–function relationships in the CuMMOs are inadequately understood. Here, we describe genetic and physiological characterization of a novel member of the CuMMO family that has an unusual physiological substrate range (C2–C4 alkanes) and a distinctive bacterial host (Mycobacterium). The Mycobacterial CuMMO genes (designated hmoCAB) were amenable to heterologous expression in M. smegmatis—this is the first example of recombinant expression of a complete and highly active CuMMO enzyme. The apparent specific activity of recombinant cells containing hmoCAB ranged from 2 to 3 nmol min–1 per mg protein on ethane, propane and butane as substrates, and the recombinants could also attack ethene, cis-dichloroethene and 1,2-dichloroethane. No detectable activity of recombinants or wild-type strains was seen with methane. The specific inhibitor allylthiourea strongly inhibited growth of wild-type cells on C2–C4 alkanes, and omission of copper from the medium had a similar effect, confirming the physiological role of the CuMMO for growth on alkanes. The hydrocarbon monooxygenase provides a new model for studying this important enzyme family, and the recombinant expression system will enable biochemical and molecular biological experiments (for example, site-directed mutagenesis) that were previously not possible. PMID:21796219

  6. Two Structures of an N-Hydroxylating Flavoprotein Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Olucha, Jose; Meneely, Kathleen M.; Chilton, Annemarie S.; Lamb, Audrey L.

    2011-01-01

    The ornithine hydroxylase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PvdA) catalyzes the FAD-dependent hydroxylation of the side chain amine of ornithine, which is subsequently formylated to generate the iron-chelating hydroxamates of the siderophore pyoverdin. PvdA belongs to the class B flavoprotein monooxygenases, which catalyze the oxidation of substrates using NADPH as the electron donor and molecular oxygen. Class B enzymes include the well studied flavin-containing monooxygenases and Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases. The first two structures of a class B N-hydroxylating monooxygenase were determined with FAD in oxidized (1.9 Å resolution) and reduced (3.03 Å resolution) states. PvdA has the two expected Rossmann-like dinucleotide-binding domains for FAD and NADPH and also a substrate-binding domain, with the active site at the interface between the three domains. The structures have NADP(H) and (hydroxy)ornithine bound in a solvent-exposed active site, providing structural evidence for substrate and co-substrate specificity and the inability of PvdA to bind FAD tightly. Structural and biochemical evidence indicates that NADP+ remains bound throughout the oxidative half-reaction, which is proposed to shelter the flavin intermediates from solvent and thereby prevent uncoupling of NADPH oxidation from hydroxylated product formation. PMID:21757711

  7. Hydroxylation of methane through component interactions in soluble methane monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydroxylation through methane monooxygenases (MMOs) is a key aspect due to their control of the carbon cycle in the ecology system and recent applications of methane gas in the field of bioenergy and bioremediation. Methanotropic bacteria perform a specific microbial conversion from methane, one of the most stable carbon compounds, to methanol through elaborate mechanisms. MMOs express particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in most strains and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) under copper-limited conditions. The mechanisms of MMO have been widely studied from sMMO belonging to the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. This enzyme has diiron active sites where different types of hydrocarbons are oxidized through orchestrated hydroxylase, regulatory and reductase components for precise control of hydrocarbons, oxygen, protons, and electrons. Recent advances in biophysical studies, including structural and enzymatic achievements for sMMO, have explained component interactions, substrate pathways, and intermediates of sMMO. In this account, oxidation of methane in sMMO is discussed with recent progress that is critical for understanding the microbial applications of C-H activation in one-carbon substrates.

  8. Kinetic mechanism of phenylacetone monooxygenase from Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E; Baas, Bert-Jan; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2008-04-01

    Phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) from Thermobifida fusca is a FAD-containing Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO). To elucidate the mechanism of conversion of phenylacetone by PAMO, we have performed a detailed steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetic analysis. In the catalytic cycle ( k cat = 3.1 s (-1)), rapid binding of NADPH ( K d = 0.7 microM) is followed by a transfer of the 4( R)-hydride from NADPH to the FAD cofactor ( k red = 12 s (-1)). The reduced PAMO is rapidly oxygenated by molecular oxygen ( k ox = 870 mM (-1) s (-1)), yielding a C4a-peroxyflavin. The peroxyflavin enzyme intermediate reacts with phenylacetone to form benzylacetate ( k 1 = 73 s (-1)). This latter kinetic event leads to an enzyme intermediate which we could not unequivocally assign and may represent a Criegee intermediate or a C4a-hydroxyflavin form. The relatively slow decay (4.1 s (-1)) of this intermediate yields fully reoxidized PAMO and limits the turnover rate. NADP (+) release is relatively fast and represents the final step of the catalytic cycle. This study shows that kinetic behavior of PAMO is significantly different when compared with that of sequence-related monooxygenases, e.g., cyclohexanone monooxygenase and liver microsomal flavin-containing monooxygenase. Inspection of the crystal structure of PAMO has revealed that residue R337, which is conserved in other BVMOs, is positioned close to the flavin cofactor. The analyzed R337A and R337K mutant enzymes were still able to form and stabilize the C4a-peroxyflavin intermediate. The mutants were unable to convert either phenylacetone or benzyl methyl sulfide. This demonstrates that R337 is crucially involved in assisting PAMO-mediated Baeyer-Villiger and sulfoxidation reactions.

  9. Identification of a flavin-containing S-oxygenating monooxygenase involved in alliin biosynthesis in garlic.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Naoko; Onuma, Misato; Mizuno, Shinya; Sugino, Yuka; Nakabayashi, Ryo; Imai, Shinsuke; Tsuneyoshi, Tadamitsu; Sumi, Shin-ichiro; Saito, Kazuki

    2015-09-01

    S-Alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides are cysteine-derived secondary metabolites highly accumulated in the genus Allium. Despite pharmaceutical importance, the enzymes that contribute to the biosynthesis of S-alk-(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in Allium plants remain largely unknown. Here, we report the identification of a flavin-containing monooxygenase, AsFMO1, in garlic (Allium sativum), which is responsible for the S-oxygenation reaction in the biosynthesis of S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide (alliin). Recombinant AsFMO1 protein catalyzed the stereoselective S-oxygenation of S-allyl-l-cysteine to nearly exclusively yield (RC SS )-S-allylcysteine sulfoxide, which has identical stereochemistry to the major natural form of alliin in garlic. The S-oxygenation reaction catalyzed by AsFMO1 was dependent on the presence of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), consistent with other known flavin-containing monooxygenases. AsFMO1 preferred S-allyl-l-cysteine to γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine as the S-oxygenation substrate, suggesting that in garlic, the S-oxygenation of alliin biosynthetic intermediates primarily occurs after deglutamylation. The transient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion proteins indicated that AsFMO1 is localized in the cytosol. AsFMO1 mRNA was accumulated in storage leaves of pre-emergent nearly sprouting bulbs, and in various tissues of sprouted bulbs with green foliage leaves. Taken together, our results suggest that AsFMO1 functions as an S-allyl-l-cysteine S-oxygenase, and contributes to the production of alliin both through the conversion of stored γ-glutamyl-S-allyl-l-cysteine to alliin in storage leaves during sprouting and through the de novo biosynthesis of alliin in green foliage leaves.

  10. Characterization and Crystal Structure of a Robust Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Romero, Elvira; Castellanos, J Rubén Gómez; Mattevi, Andrea; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-12-19

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a promising biocatalyst for industrial reactions owing to its broad substrate spectrum and excellent regio-, chemo-, and enantioselectivity. However, the low stability of many Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases is an obstacle for their exploitation in industry. Characterization and crystal structure determination of a robust CHMO from Thermocrispum municipale is reported. The enzyme efficiently converts a variety of aliphatic, aromatic, and cyclic ketones, as well as prochiral sulfides. A compact substrate-binding cavity explains its preference for small rather than bulky substrates. Small-scale conversions with either purified enzyme or whole cells demonstrated the remarkable properties of this newly discovered CHMO. The exceptional solvent tolerance and thermostability make the enzyme very attractive for biotechnology.

  11. Characterization and Crystal Structure of a Robust Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Elvira; Castellanos, J. Rubén Gómez

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a promising biocatalyst for industrial reactions owing to its broad substrate spectrum and excellent regio‐, chemo‐, and enantioselectivity. However, the low stability of many Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases is an obstacle for their exploitation in industry. Characterization and crystal structure determination of a robust CHMO from Thermocrispum municipale is reported. The enzyme efficiently converts a variety of aliphatic, aromatic, and cyclic ketones, as well as prochiral sulfides. A compact substrate‐binding cavity explains its preference for small rather than bulky substrates. Small‐scale conversions with either purified enzyme or whole cells demonstrated the remarkable properties of this newly discovered CHMO. The exceptional solvent tolerance and thermostability make the enzyme very attractive for biotechnology. PMID:27873437

  12. Substrate Specificity and Enantioselectivity of 4-Hydroxyacetophenone Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Kamerbeek, Nanne M.; Olsthoorn, Arjen J. J.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Janssen, Dick B.

    2003-01-01

    The 4-hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase (HAPMO) from Pseudomonas fluorescens ACB catalyzes NADPH- and oxygen-dependent Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 4-hydroxyacetophenone to the corresponding acetate ester. Using the purified enzyme from recombinant Escherichia coli, we found that a broad range of carbonylic compounds that are structurally more or less similar to 4-hydroxyacetophenone are also substrates for this flavin-containing monooxygenase. On the other hand, several carbonyl compounds that are substrates for other Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are not converted by HAPMO. In addition to performing Baeyer-Villiger reactions with aromatic ketones and aldehydes, the enzyme was also able to catalyze sulfoxidation reactions by using aromatic sulfides. Furthermore, several heterocyclic and aliphatic carbonyl compounds were also readily converted by this BVMO. To probe the enantioselectivity of HAPMO, the conversion of bicyclohept-2-en-6-one and two aryl alkyl sulfides was studied. The monooxygenase preferably converted (1R,5S)-bicyclohept-2-en-6-one, with an enantiomeric ratio (E) of 20, thus enabling kinetic resolution to obtain the (1S,5R) enantiomer. Complete conversion of both enantiomers resulted in the accumulation of two regioisomeric lactones with moderate enantiomeric excess (ee) for the two lactones obtained [77% ee for (1S,5R)-2 and 34% ee for (1R,5S)-3]. Using methyl 4-tolyl sulfide and methylphenyl sulfide, we found that HAPMO is efficient and highly selective in the asymmetric formation of the corresponding (S)-sulfoxides (ee > 99%). The biocatalytic properties of HAPMO described here show the potential of this enzyme for biotechnological applications. PMID:12514023

  13. Investigating the coenzyme specificity of phenylacetone monooxygenase from Thermobifida fusca.

    PubMed

    Dudek, Hanna M; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E; Rodríguez, Cristina; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Gotor, Vicente; Fraaije, Marco W

    2010-11-01

    Type I Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) strongly prefer NADPH over NADH as an electron donor. In order to elucidate the molecular basis for this coenzyme specificity, we have performed a site-directed mutagenesis study on phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) from Thermobifida fusca. Using sequence alignments of type I BVMOs and crystal structures of PAMO and cyclohexanone monooxygenase in complex with NADP(+), we identified four residues that could interact with the 2'-phosphate moiety of NADPH in PAMO. The mutagenesis study revealed that the conserved R217 is essential for binding the adenine moiety of the nicotinamide coenzyme while it also contributes to the recognition of the 2'-phosphate moiety of NADPH. The substitution of T218 did not have a strong effect on the coenzyme specificity. The H220N and H220Q mutants exhibited a ~3-fold improvement in the catalytic efficiency with NADH while the catalytic efficiency with NADPH was hardly affected. Mutating K336 did not increase the activity of PAMO with NADH, but it had a significant and beneficial effect on the enantioselectivity of Baeyer-Villiger oxidations and sulfoxidations. In conclusion, our results indicate that the function of NADPH in catalysis cannot be easily replaced by NADH. This finding is in line with the complex catalytic mechanism and the vital role of the coenzyme in BVMOs.

  14. Investigating the coenzyme specificity of phenylacetone monooxygenase from Thermobifida fusca

    PubMed Central

    Dudek, Hanna M.; Torres Pazmiño, Daniel E.; Rodríguez, Cristina; de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Gotor, Vicente

    2010-01-01

    Type I Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) strongly prefer NADPH over NADH as an electron donor. In order to elucidate the molecular basis for this coenzyme specificity, we have performed a site-directed mutagenesis study on phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) from Thermobifida fusca. Using sequence alignments of type I BVMOs and crystal structures of PAMO and cyclohexanone monooxygenase in complex with NADP+, we identified four residues that could interact with the 2′-phosphate moiety of NADPH in PAMO. The mutagenesis study revealed that the conserved R217 is essential for binding the adenine moiety of the nicotinamide coenzyme while it also contributes to the recognition of the 2′-phosphate moiety of NADPH. The substitution of T218 did not have a strong effect on the coenzyme specificity. The H220N and H220Q mutants exhibited a ~3-fold improvement in the catalytic efficiency with NADH while the catalytic efficiency with NADPH was hardly affected. Mutating K336 did not increase the activity of PAMO with NADH, but it had a significant and beneficial effect on the enantioselectivity of Baeyer–Villiger oxidations and sulfoxidations. In conclusion, our results indicate that the function of NADPH in catalysis cannot be easily replaced by NADH. This finding is in line with the complex catalytic mechanism and the vital role of the coenzyme in BVMOs. PMID:20703875

  15. Alkane Oxidation: Methane Monooxygenases, Related Enzymes, and Their Biomimetics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Vincent C-C; Maji, Suman; Chen, Peter P-Y; Lee, Hung Kay; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2017-02-16

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) mediate the facile conversion of methane into methanol in methanotrophic bacteria with high efficiency under ambient conditions. Because the selective oxidation of methane is extremely challenging, there is considerable interest in understanding how these enzymes carry out this difficult chemistry. The impetus of these efforts is to learn from the microbes to develop a biomimetic catalyst to accomplish the same chemical transformation. Here, we review the progress made over the past two to three decades toward delineating the structures and functions of the catalytic sites in two MMOs: soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). sMMO is a water-soluble three-component protein complex consisting of a hydroxylase with a nonheme diiron catalytic site; pMMO is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme with a unique tricopper cluster as the site of hydroxylation. The metal cluster in each of these MMOs harnesses O2 to functionalize the C-H bond using different chemistry. We highlight some of the common basic principles that they share. Finally, the development of functional models of the catalytic sites of MMOs is described. These efforts have culminated in the first successful biomimetic catalyst capable of efficient methane oxidation without overoxidation at room temperature.

  16. Bacterial expression of human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: solubility, activity, purification.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K; Mole, D J; Binnie, M; Homer, N Z M; Zheng, X; Yard, B A; Iredale, J P; Auer, M; Webster, S P

    2014-03-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an enzyme central to the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism. KMO has been implicated as a therapeutic target in several disease states, including Huntington's disease. Recombinant human KMO protein production is challenging due to the presence of transmembrane domains, which localise KMO to the outer mitochondrial membrane and render KMO insoluble in many in vitro expression systems. Efficient bacterial expression of human KMO would accelerate drug development of KMO inhibitors but until now this has not been achieved. Here we report the first successful bacterial (Escherichia coli) expression of active FLAG™-tagged human KMO enzyme expressed in the soluble fraction and progress towards its purification.

  17. The molecular basis of polysaccharide cleavage by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Simmons, Thomas J.; Dupree, Paul; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N.; Hemsworth, Glyn R.; Ciano, Luisa; Johnston, Esther M.; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S.; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Marmuse, Laurence; Fort, Sébastien; Cottaz, Sylvain; Driguez, Hugues; Henrissat, Bernard; Lenfant, Nicolas; Tuna, Floriana; Baldansuren, Amgalanbaatar; Davies, Gideon J.; Leggio, Leila Lo; Walton, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-containing enzymes which oxidatively break down recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose and chitin. Since their discovery LPMOs have become integral factors in the industrial utilization of biomass, especially in the sustainable generation of cellulosic bioethanol. We report here the first structural determination of an LPMO–oligosaccharide complex, yielding detailed insights into the mechanism of action of these enzymes. Using a combination of structure and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we reveal the means by which LPMOs interact with saccharide substrates. We further uncover electronic and structural features of the enzyme active site, showing how LPMOs orchestrate the reaction of oxygen with polysaccharide chains. PMID:26928935

  18. Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases: The Microbial Power Tool for Lignocellulose Degradation.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja Salomon

    2016-11-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are copper-enzymes that catalyze oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds. These enzymes are secreted by many microorganisms to initiate infection and degradation processes. In particular, the concept of fungal degradation of lignocellulose has been revised in the light of this recent finding. LPMOs require a source of electrons for activity, and both enzymatic and plant-derived sources have been identified. Importantly, light-induced electron delivery from light-harvesting pigments can efficiently drive LPMO activity. The possible implications of LPMOs in plant-symbiont and -pathogen interactions are discussed in the context of the very powerful oxidative capacity of these enzymes.

  19. Pharmacological kynurenine 3-monooxygenase enzyme inhibition significantly reduces neuropathic pain in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Rojewska, Ewelina; Piotrowska, Anna; Makuch, Wioletta; Przewlocka, Barbara; Mika, Joanna

    2016-03-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the involvement of the kynurenine pathway in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases, but the role of this system in neuropathic pain requires further extensive research. Therefore, the aim of our study was to examine the role of kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (Kmo), an enzyme that is important in this pathway, in a rat model of neuropathy after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the sciatic nerve. For the first time, we demonstrated that the injury-induced increase in the Kmo mRNA levels in the spinal cord and the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) was reduced by chronic administration of the microglial inhibitor minocycline and that this effect paralleled a decrease in the intensity of neuropathy. Further, minocycline administration alleviated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced upregulation of Kmo mRNA expression in microglial cell cultures. Moreover, we demonstrated that not only indirect inhibition of Kmo using minocycline but also direct inhibition using Kmo inhibitors (Ro61-6048 and JM6) decreased neuropathic pain intensity on the third and the seventh days after CCI. Chronic Ro61-6048 administration diminished the protein levels of IBA-1, IL-6, IL-1beta and NOS2 in the spinal cord and/or the DRG. Both Kmo inhibitors potentiated the analgesic properties of morphine. In summary, our data suggest that in neuropathic pain model, inhibiting Kmo function significantly reduces pain symptoms and enhances the effectiveness of morphine. The results of our studies show that the kynurenine pathway is an important mediator of neuropathic pain pathology and indicate that Kmo represents a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of neuropathy.

  20. Characterization and Application of Xylene Monooxygenase for Multistep Biocatalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bühler, Bruno; Witholt, Bernard; Hauer, Bernhard; Schmid, Andreas

    2002-01-01

    Xylene monooxygenase of Pseudomonas putida mt-2 catalyzes multistep oxidations of one methyl group of toluene and xylenes. Recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the monooxygenase genes xylM and xylA catalyzes the oxygenation of toluene, pseudocumene, the corresponding alcohols, and the corresponding aldehydes, all by a monooxygenation type of reaction (B. Bühler, A. Schmid, B. Hauer, and B. Witholt, J. Biol. Chem. 275:10085-10092, 2000). Using E. coli expressing xylMA, we investigated the kinetics of this one-enzyme three-step biotransformation. We found that unoxidized substrates like toluene and pseudocumene inhibit the second and third oxygenation steps and that the corresponding alcohols inhibit the third oxygenation step. These inhibitions might promote the energetically more favorable alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenations in the wild type. Growth of E. coli was strongly affected by low concentrations of pseudocumene and its products. Toxicity and solubility problems were overcome by the use of a two-liquid-phase system with bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate as the carrier solvent, allowing high overall substrate and product concentrations. In a fed-batch-based two-liquid-phase process with pseudocumene as the substrate, we observed the consecutive accumulation of aldehyde, acid, and alcohol. Our results indicate that, depending on the reaction conditions, product formation could be directed to one specific product. PMID:11823191

  1. Regulated O2 activation in flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Rosanne E; Mayfield, Jeffery A; DuBois, Jennifer L

    2011-08-17

    Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) are involved in important biosynthetic pathways in diverse organisms, including production of the siderophores used for the import and storage of essential iron in serious pathogens. We have shown that the FMO from Aspergillus fumigatus, an ornithine monooxygenase (Af-OMO), is mechanistically similar to its well-studied distant homologues from mammalian liver. The latter are highly promiscuous in their choice of substrates, while Af-OMO is unusually specific. This presents a puzzle: how do Af-OMO and other FMOs of the biosynthetic classes achieve such specificity? We have discovered substantial enhancement in the rate of O(2) activation in Af-OMO in the presence of L-arginine, which acts as a small molecule regulator. Such protein-level regulation could help explain how this and related biosynthetic FMOs manage to couple O(2) activation and substrate hydroxylation to each other and to the appropriate cellular conditions. Given the essentiality of Fe to Af and the avirulence of the Af-OMO gene knock out, inhibitors of Af-OMO are likely to be drug targets against this medically intractable pathogen.

  2. Glyceryl ether monooxygenase resembles aromatic amino acid hydroxylases in metal ion and tetrahydrobiopterin dependence.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Keller, Markus A; Hermetter, Albin; Golderer, Georg; Werner-Felmayer, Gabriele; Werner, Ernst R

    2009-01-01

    Glyceryl ether monooxygenase is a tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent membrane-bound enzyme which catalyses the cleavage of lipid ethers into glycerol and the corresponding aldehyde. Despite many different characterisation and purification attempts, so far no gene and primary sequence have been assigned to this enzyme. The seven other tetrahydrobiopterin-dependent enzymes can be divided in the family of aromatic amino acid hydroxylases - comprising phenylalanine hydroxylase, tyrosine hydroxylase and the two tryptophan hydroxylases - and into the three nitric oxide synthases. We tested the influences of different metal ions and metal ion chelators on glyceryl ether monooxygenase, phenylalanine hydroxylase and nitric oxide synthase activity to elucidate the relationship of glyceryl ether monooxygenase to these two families. 1,10-Phenanthroline, an inhibitor of non-heme iron-dependent enzymes, was able to potently block glyceryl ether monooxygenase as well as phenylalanine hydroxylase, but had no effect on inducible nitric oxide synthase. Two tetrahydrobiopterin analogues, N(5)-methyltetrahydrobiopterin and 4-aminotetrahydrobiopterin, had a similar impact on glyceryl ether monooxygenase activity, as has already been shown for phenylalanine hydroxylase. These observations point to a close analogy of the role of tetrahydrobiopterin in glyceryl ether monooxygenase and in aromatic amino acid hydroxylases and suggest that glyceryl ether monooxygenase may require a non-heme iron for catalysis.

  3. Analysis of the gene cluster encoding toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1

    SciTech Connect

    Bertoni, G.; Martino, M.; Galli, E.; Barbieri, P.

    1998-10-01

    The toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase cloned from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 displays a very broad range of substrates and a very peculiar regioselectivity, because it is able to hydroxylate more than one position on the aromatic ring of several hydrocarbons and phenols. The nucleotide sequence of the gene cluster coding for this enzymatic system has been determined. The sequence analysis revealed the presence of six open reading frames (ORFs) homologous to other genes clustered in operons coding for multicomponent monooxygenases found in benzene- and toluene-degradative pathways cloned from Pseudomonas strains. Significant similarities were also found with multicomponent monooxygenase systems for phenol, methane, alkene, and dimethyl sulfide cloned from different bacterial strains. The knockout of each ORF and complementation with the wild-type allele indicated that all six ORFs are essential for the full activity of the toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase in Escherichia coli. This analysis also shows that despite its activity on both hydrocarbons and phenols, toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase belongs to a toluene multicomponent monooxygenase subfamily rather than to the monooxygenases active on phenols.

  4. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers. PMID:28071716

  5. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases disrupt the cellulose fibers structure.

    PubMed

    Villares, Ana; Moreau, Céline; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Garajova, Sona; Foucat, Loïc; Falourd, Xavier; Saake, Bodo; Berrin, Jean-Guy; Cathala, Bernard

    2017-01-10

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a class of powerful oxidative enzymes that breakdown recalcitrant polysaccharides such as cellulose. Here we investigate the action of LPMOs on cellulose fibers. After enzymatic treatment and dispersion, LPMO-treated fibers show intense fibrillation. Cellulose structure modifications visualized at different scales indicate that LPMO creates nicking points that trigger the disintegration of the cellulose fibrillar structure with rupture of chains and release of elementary nanofibrils. Investigation of LPMO action using solid-state NMR provides direct evidence of modification of accessible and inaccessible surfaces surrounding the crystalline core of the fibrils. The chains breakage likely induces modifications of the cellulose network and weakens fibers cohesion promoting their disruption. Besides the formation of new initiation sites for conventional cellulases, this work provides the first evidence of the direct oxidative action of LPMOs with the mechanical weakening of the cellulose ultrastructure. LPMOs can be viewed as promising biocatalysts for enzymatic modification or degradation of cellulose fibers.

  6. Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase activity in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, G.D.; Schuresko, D.D.

    1981-06-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon mono-oxygenase (AHM), an enzyme of key importance in metabolism of xenobiotic chemicals such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PNA), is present in human lymphocytes. Studies investing the relation of activity of AHM in human lymphocytes to parameters such as disease state, PNA exposure, in vitro mitogen stimulation, etc. have been summarized in this report. Some studies have demonstrated increased AHM activity in lymphocytes from cigarette smokers (compared to nonsmokers), and in lung cancer patients when compared to appropriate control groups. These observations are confused by extreme variability in human lymphocyte AHM activities, such variability arising from factors such as genetic variation in AHM activity, variation in in vitro culture conditions which affect AHM activity, and the problematical relationship of common AHM assays to actual PNA metabolism taking place in lymphocytes. If some of the foregoing problems can be adequately addressed, lymphocyte AHM activity could hold the promise of being a useful biomarker system for human PNA exposure.

  7. The Oxygen Dilemma: A Severe Challenge for the Application of Monooxygenases?

    PubMed Central

    Holtmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Monooxygenases are promising catalysts because they in principle enable the organic chemist to perform highly selective oxyfunctionalisation reactions that are otherwise difficult to achieve. For this, monooxygenases require reducing equivalents, to allow reductive activation of molecular oxygen at the enzymes' active sites. However, these reducing equivalents are often delivered to O2 either directly or via a reduced intermediate (uncoupling), yielding hazardous reactive oxygen species and wasting valuable reducing equivalents. The oxygen dilemma arises from monooxygenases' dependency on O2 and the undesired uncoupling reaction. With this contribution we hope to generate a general awareness of the oxygen dilemma and to discuss its nature and some promising solutions. PMID:27194219

  8. Structure of nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase component B from Mycobacterium thermoresistibile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Edwards, T. E.; Begley, D. W.; Abramov, A.; Thompkins, K. B.; Ferrell, M.; Guo, W. J.; Phan, I.; Olsen, C.; Napuli, A.; Sankaran, B.; Stacy, R.; Van Voorhis, W. C.; Stewart, L. J.; Myler, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis belongs to a large family of soil bacteria which can degrade a remarkably broad range of organic compounds and utilize them as carbon, nitrogen and energy sources. It has been proposed that a variety of mycobacteria can subsist on alternative carbon sources during latency within an infected human host, with the help of enzymes such as nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase (NTA-Mo). NTA-Mo is a member of a class of enzymes which consist of two components: A and B. While component A has monooxygenase activity and is responsible for the oxidation of the substrate, component B consumes cofactor to generate reduced flavin mononucleotide, which is required for component A activity. NTA-MoB from M. thermoresistibile, a rare but infectious close relative of M. tuberculosis which can thrive at elevated temperatures, has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The 1.6 Å resolution crystal structure of component B of NTA-Mo presented here is one of the first crystal structures determined from the organism M. thermo­resistibile. The NTA-MoB crystal structure reveals a homodimer with the characteristic split-barrel motif typical of flavin reductases. Surprisingly, NTA-MoB from M. thermoresistibile contains a C-terminal tail that is highly conserved among myco­bacterial orthologs and resides in the active site of the other protomer. Based on the structure, the C-terminal tail may modulate NTA-MoB activity in mycobacteria by blocking the binding of flavins and NADH. PMID:21904057

  9. Evolving P450pyr Monooxygenase for Regio- and Stereoselective Hydroxylations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Li, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    P450pyr monooxygenase from Sphingomonas sp. HXN-200 catalysed the regio- and stereoselective hydroxylation at a non-activated carbon atom, a useful but challenging reaction in classic chemistry, with unique substrate specificity for a number of alicyclic compounds. New P450pyr mutants were developed by directed evolution with improved catalytic performance, thus significantly extending the application of the P450pyr monooxygenase family in biohydroxylation to prepare useful and valuable chiral alcohols. Directed evolution of P450pyr created new enzymes with improved S-enantioselectivity or R-enantioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl pyrrolidine, enhanced regioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl pyrrolidinone, and increased enantioselectivity for the hydroxylation of N-benzyl piperidinone, respectively. Directed evolution of P450pyr generated also mutants with fully altered regioselectivity (from terminal to subterminal) and newly created excellent S-enantioselectivity for the biohydroxylation of n-octane and propylbenzene, respectively, providing new opportunities for the regio- and enantioselective alkane functionalization. New P450pyr mutants were engineered as the first catalyst for highly selective terminal hydroxylation of n-butanol to 1,4-butanediol. Several novel, accurate, sensitive, simple, and HTS assays based on colorimetric or MS detection for measuring the enantio- and/or regioselectivity of hydroxylation were developed and proven to be practical in directed evolution. The P450pyr X-ray structure was obtained and used to guide the evolution. In silico modelling and substrate docking provided some insight into the influence of several important amino acid mutations of the engineered P450pyr mutants on the altered or enhanced regio- and enantioselectivity as well as new substrate acceptance. The obtained information and knowledge is useful for further engineering of P450pyr for other hydroxylations and oxidations.

  10. Characterization of the peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) from the venom ducts of neogastropods, Conus bullatus and Conus geographus

    PubMed Central

    Ul-Hasan, Sabah; Burgess, Daniel M.; Gajewiak, Joanna; Li, Qing; Hu, Hao; Yandell, Mark; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Bandyopadhyay, Pradip K.

    2014-01-01

    Cone snails, genus Conus, are predatory marine snails that use venom to capture their prey. This venom contains a diverse array of peptide toxins, known as conotoxins, which undergo a diverse set of posttranslational modifications. Amidating enzymes modify peptides and proteins containing a C-terminal glycine residue, resulting in loss of the glycine residue and amidation of the preceding residue. A significant fraction of peptides present in the venom of cone snails contain C-terminal amidated residues, which are important for optimizing biological activity. This study describes the characterization of the amidating enzyme, peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), present in the venom duct of cone snails, Conus bullatus and Conus geographus. PAM is known to carry out two functions, peptidyl α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) and peptidylamido-glycolate lyase (PAL). In some animals, such as Drosophila melanogaster, these two functions are present in separate polypeptides, working as individual enzymes. In other animals, such as mammals and in Aplysia californica, PAM activity resides in a single, bifunctional polypeptide. Using specific oligonucleotide primers and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction we have identified and cloned from the venom duct cDNA library, a cDNA with 49% homology to PAM from A. californica. We have determined that both the PHM and PAL activities are encoded in one mRNA polynucleotide in both C. bullatus and C. geographus. We have directly demonstrated enzymatic activity catalyzing the conversion of dansyl-YVG-COOH to dansyl-YV-NH2 in cloned cDNA expressed in Drosophila S2 cells. PMID:23994590

  11. Metabolic conditions determining the composition and catalytic activity of cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases in Candida tropicalis.

    PubMed Central

    Sanglard, D; Käppeli, O; Fiechter, A

    1984-01-01

    In the microsomal fraction of Candida tropicalis cells, two distinct monooxygenases were detected, depending on the growth conditions. The distinction of the two monooxygenases was evident from: (i) the absorption maxima in the reduced CO difference spectra of the terminal oxidases (cytochromes P-450 and P-448); (ii) the contents of the monooxygenase components (cytochromes P-450/P-448, NADPH-cytochrome c (P-450) reductase, and cytochrome b5) and (iii) the catalytic activity of the complete system (aliphatic hydroxylation and N-demethylation activity). The occurrence of the respective monooxygenases could be related to the carbon source (n-alkanes or glucose). Oxygen limitation led to a significant increase of cytochrome P-450/P-448 content, independent of the carbon source utilized by the cells. An improved method for the isolation of microsomes enabled us to demonstrate the presence of cytochrome P-448 in glucose-grown cells. PMID:6690424

  12. Coupling Oxygen Consumption with Hydrocarbon Oxidation in Bacterial Multicomponent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weixue; Liang, Alexandria D; Lippard, Stephen J

    2015-09-15

    A fundamental goal in catalysis is the coupling of multiple reactions to yield a desired product. Enzymes have evolved elegant approaches to address this grand challenge. A salient example is the biological conversion of methane to methanol catalyzed by soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), a member of the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. sMMO is a dynamic protein complex of three components: a hydroxylase, a reductase, and a regulatory protein. The active site, a carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron center, is buried inside the 251 kDa hydroxylase component. The enzyme processes four substrates: O2, protons, electrons, and methane. To couple O2 activation to methane oxidation, timely control of substrate access to the active site is critical. Recent studies of sMMO, as well as its homologues in the BMM superfamily, have begun to unravel the mechanism. The emerging and unifying picture reveals that each substrate gains access to the active site along a specific pathway through the hydroxylase. Electrons and protons are delivered via a three-amino-acid pore located adjacent to the diiron center; O2 migrates via a series of hydrophobic cavities; and hydrocarbon substrates reach the active site through a channel or linked set of cavities. The gating of these pathways mediates entry of each substrate to the diiron active site in a timed sequence and is coordinated by dynamic interactions with the other component proteins. The result is coupling of dioxygen consumption with hydrocarbon oxidation, avoiding unproductive oxidation of the reductant rather than the desired hydrocarbon. To initiate catalysis, the reductase delivers two electrons to the diiron(III) center by binding over the pore of the hydroxylase. The regulatory component then displaces the reductase, docking onto the same surface of the hydroxylase. Formation of the hydroxylase-regulatory component complex (i) induces conformational changes of pore residues that may bring protons to the

  13. A soluble form of ammonia monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Gilch, Stefan; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2009-09-01

    Ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) of Nitrosomonas europaea is a metalloenzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of ammonia to hydroxylamine. This study shows that AMO resides in the cytoplasm of the bacteria in addition to its location in the membrane and is distributed approximately equally in both subcellular fractions. AMO in both fractions catalyzes the oxidation of ammonia and binds [(14)C]acetylene, a mechanism-based inhibitor which specifically interacts with catalytically active AMO. Soluble AMO was purified 12-fold to electrophoretic homogeneity with a yield of 8%. AMO has a molecular mass of approximately 283 kDa with subunits of ca. 27 kDa (alpha-subunit, AmoA), ca. 42 kDa (beta-subunit, AmoB), and ca. 24 kDa (gamma-subunit, cytochrome c(1)) in an alpha(3)beta(3)gamma(3) sub-unit structure. Different from the beta-subunit of membrane-bound AMO, AmoB of soluble AMO possesses an N-terminal signal sequence. AMO contains Cu (9.4+/-0.6 mol per mol AMO), Fe (3.9+/-0.3 mol per mol AMO), and Zn (0.5 to 2.6 mol per mol AMO). Upon reduction the visible absorption spectrum of AMO reveals absorption bands characteristic of cytochrome c. Electron para-magnetic resonance spectroscopy of air-oxidized AMO at 50 K shows a paramagnetic signal originating from Cu(2+) and at 10 K a paramagnetic signal characteristic of heme-Fe.

  14. Structural basis for pregnenolone biosynthesis by the mitochondrial monooxygenase system

    SciTech Connect

    Strushkevich, Natallia; MacKenzie, Farrell; Cherkesova, Tatyana; Grabovec, Irina; Usanov, Sergey; Park, Hee-Won

    2011-09-06

    In humans, the precursor to all steroid hormones, pregnenolone, is synthesized from cholesterol by an enzyme complex comprising adrenodoxin reductase (AdR), adrenodoxin (Adx), and a cytochrome P450 (P450scc or CYP11A1). This complex not only plays a key role in steroidogenesis, but also has long been a model to study electron transfer, multistep catalysis, and C-C bond cleavage performed by monooxygenases. Detailed mechanistic understanding of these processes has been hindered by a lack of structural information. Here we present the crystal structure of the complex of human Adx and CYP11A1 - the first of a complex between a eukaryotic CYP and its redox partner. The structures with substrate and a series of reaction intermediates allow us to define the mechanism underlying sequential hydroxylations of the cholesterol and suggest the mechanism of C-C bond cleavage. In the complex the [2Fe-2S] cluster of Adx is positioned 17.4 {angstrom} away from the heme iron of CYP11A1. This structure suggests that after an initial protein-protein association driven by electrostatic forces, the complex adopts an optimized geometry between the redox centers. Conservation of the interaction interface suggests that this mechanism is common for all mitochondrial P450s.

  15. Engineering Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase for the Production of Methyl Propanoate.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Hugo L; Romero, Elvira; Fraaije, Marco W

    2017-01-20

    A previous study showed that cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus (AcCHMO) catalyzes the Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of 2-butanone, yielding ethyl acetate and methyl propanoate as products. Methyl propanoate is of industrial interest as a precursor of acrylic plastic. Here, various residues near the substrate and NADP(+) binding sites in AcCHMO were subjected to saturation mutagenesis to enhance both the activity on 2-butanone and the regioselectivity toward methyl propanoate. The resulting libraries were screened using whole cell biotransformations, and headspace gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify improved AcCHMO variants. This revealed that the I491A AcCHMO mutant exhibits a significant improvement over the wild type enzyme in the desired regioselectivity using 2-butanone as a substrate (40% vs 26% methyl propanoate, respectively). Another interesting mutant is the T56S AcCHMO mutant, which exhibits a higher conversion yield (92%) and kcat (0.5 s(-1)) than wild type AcCHMO (52% and 0.3 s(-1), respectively). Interestingly, the uncoupling rate for the T56S AcCHMO mutant is also significantly lower than that for the wild type enzyme. The T56S/I491A double mutant combined the beneficial effects of both mutations leading to higher conversion and improved regioselectivity. This study shows that even for a relatively small aliphatic substrate (2-butanone), catalytic efficiency and regioselectivity can be tuned by structure-inspired enzyme engineering.

  16. Mechanism of Action of a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Eswaramoorthy,S.; Bonanno, J.; Burley, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2006-01-01

    Elimination of nonnutritional and insoluble compounds is a critical task for any living organism. Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) attach an oxygen atom to the insoluble nucleophilic compounds to increase solubility and thereby increase excretion. Here we analyze the functional mechanism of FMO from Schizosaccharomyces pombe using the crystal structures of the wild type and protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes. The structure of the wild-type FMO revealed that the prosthetic group FAD is an integral part of the protein. FMO needs NADPH as a cofactor in addition to the prosthetic group for its catalytic activity. Structures of the protein-cofactor and protein-substrate complexes provide insights into mechanism of action. We propose that FMOs exist in the cell as a complex with a reduced form of the prosthetic group and NADPH cofactor, readying them to act on substrates. The 4{alpha}-hydroperoxyflavin form of the prosthetic group represents a transient intermediate of the monooxygenation process. The oxygenated and reduced forms of the prosthetic group help stabilize interactions with cofactor and substrate alternately to permit continuous enzyme turnover.

  17. Effects of Zinc on Particulate Methane Monooxygenase Activity and Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Sirajuddin, Sarah; Barupala, Dulmini; Helling, Stefan; Marcus, Katrin; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a membrane-bound metalloenzyme that oxidizes methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. Zinc is a known inhibitor of pMMO, but the details of zinc binding and the mechanism of inhibition are not understood. Metal binding and activity assays on membrane-bound pMMO from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) reveal that zinc inhibits pMMO at two sites that are distinct from the copper active site. The 2.6 Å resolution crystal structure of Methylocystis species strain Rockwell pMMO reveals two previously undetected bound lipids, and metal soaking experiments identify likely locations for the two zinc inhibition sites. The first is the crystallographic zinc site in the pmoC subunit, and zinc binding here leads to the ordering of 10 previously unobserved residues. A second zinc site is present on the cytoplasmic side of the pmoC subunit. Parallels between these results and zinc inhibition studies of several respiratory complexes suggest that zinc might inhibit proton transfer in pMMO. PMID:24942740

  18. Diversity and evolution of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Oomycetes.

    PubMed

    Sello, Mopeli Marshal; Jafta, Norventia; Nelson, David R; Chen, Wanping; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Parvez, Mohammad; Kgosiemang, Ipeleng Kopano Rosinah; Monyaki, Richie; Raselemane, Seiso Caiphus; Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Mthakathi, Ntsane Trevor; Sitheni Mashele, Samson; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-07-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins whose role as drug targets against pathogens, as well as in valuable chemical production and bioremediation, has been explored. In this study we performed comprehensive comparative analysis of P450s in 13 newly explored oomycete pathogens. Three hundred and fifty-six P450s were found in oomycetes. These P450s were grouped into 15 P450 families and 84 P450 subfamilies. Among these, nine P450 families and 31 P450 subfamilies were newly found in oomycetes. Research revealed that oomycetes belonging to different orders contain distinct P450 families and subfamilies in their genomes. Evolutionary analysis and sequence homology data revealed P450 family blooms in oomycetes. Tandem arrangement of a large number of P450s belonging to the same family indicated that P450 family blooming is possibly due to its members' duplications. A unique combination of amino acid patterns was observed at EXXR and CXG motifs for the P450 families CYP5014, CYP5015 and CYP5017. A novel P450 fusion protein (CYP5619 family) with an N-terminal P450 domain fused to a heme peroxidase/dioxygenase domain was discovered in Saprolegnia declina. Oomycete P450 patterns suggested host influence in shaping their P450 content. This manuscript serves as reference for future P450 annotations in newly explored oomycetes.

  19. Differential microbial transformation of nitrosamines by an inducible propane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Homme, Carissa L; Sharp, Jonathan O

    2013-07-02

    The toxicity of N-nitrosamines, their presence in drinking and environmental water supplies, and poorly understood recalcitrance collectively necessitate a better understanding of their potential for bioattenuation. Here, we show that the bacterial strain Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 can biotransform N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA), N-nitrosodi-n-propylamine (NDPA), N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR), and possibly N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) in addition to N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Growth of cells on propane as the sole carbon source greatly enhanced degradation rates when contrasted with cells grown on complex organics. Propane-induced rates in order of fastest to slowest were NDMA > NDEA > NDPA > NPYR > NMOR at concentrations <2000 μg/L. Removal rates for linear functional groups scaled inversely with mass and cyclic nitrosamines were more recalcitrant than linear nitrosamines. Controls demonstrated significant NDEA and NDPA losses independent of biomass, suggesting abiotic processes may play a role in attenuation of these two compounds under experimental conditions tested here. In contrast to NDMA, a transition from first to zero order kinetics was not observed for the other nitrosamines included in this study over a concentration range of 20-2000 μg/L. A genetic knockout for the propane monooxygenase enzyme (PrMO) confirmed the role of this enzyme in the biotransformation of NDEA and NPYR. This study furthers our understanding of environmental nitrosamine attenuation by revealing an enzymatic mechanism for the biotransformation of multiple nitrosamines, their relative recalcitrance to transformation, and potential for abiotic loss.

  20. Diversity and evolution of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in Oomycetes

    PubMed Central

    Sello, Mopeli Marshal; Jafta, Norventia; Nelson, David R; Chen, Wanping; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Parvez, Mohammad; Kgosiemang, Ipeleng Kopano Rosinah; Monyaki, Richie; Raselemane, Seiso Caiphus; Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Mthakathi, Ntsane Trevor; Sitheni Mashele, Samson; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are heme-thiolate proteins whose role as drug targets against pathogens, as well as in valuable chemical production and bioremediation, has been explored. In this study we performed comprehensive comparative analysis of P450s in 13 newly explored oomycete pathogens. Three hundred and fifty-six P450s were found in oomycetes. These P450s were grouped into 15 P450 families and 84 P450 subfamilies. Among these, nine P450 families and 31 P450 subfamilies were newly found in oomycetes. Research revealed that oomycetes belonging to different orders contain distinct P450 families and subfamilies in their genomes. Evolutionary analysis and sequence homology data revealed P450 family blooms in oomycetes. Tandem arrangement of a large number of P450s belonging to the same family indicated that P450 family blooming is possibly due to its members’ duplications. A unique combination of amino acid patterns was observed at EXXR and CXG motifs for the P450 families CYP5014, CYP5015 and CYP5017. A novel P450 fusion protein (CYP5619 family) with an N-terminal P450 domain fused to a heme peroxidase/dioxygenase domain was discovered in Saprolegnia declina. Oomycete P450 patterns suggested host influence in shaping their P450 content. This manuscript serves as reference for future P450 annotations in newly explored oomycetes. PMID:26129850

  1. Dioxygen activation in methane monooxygenase: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Gherman, Benjamin F; Baik, Mu-Hyun; Lippard, Stephen J; Friesner, Richard A

    2004-03-10

    Using broken-symmetry unrestricted Density Functional Theory, the mechanism of enzymatic dioxygen activation by the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMOH) is determined to atomic detail. After a thorough examination of mechanistic alternatives, an optimal pathway was identified. The diiron(II) state H(red) reacts with dioxygen to give a ferromagnetically coupled diiron(II,III) H(superoxo) structure, which undergoes intersystem crossing to the antiferromagnetic surface and affords H(peroxo), a symmetric diiron(III) unit with a nonplanar mu-eta(2):eta(2)-O(2)(2)(-) binding mode. Homolytic cleavage of the O-O bond yields the catalytically competent intermediate Q, which has a di (mu-oxo)diiron(IV) core. A carboxylate shift involving Glu243 is essential to the formation of the symmetric H(peroxo) and Q structures. Both thermodynamic and kinetic features agree well with experimental data, and computed spin-exchange coupling constants are in accord with spectroscopic values. Evidence is presented for pH-independent decay of H(red) and H(peroxo). Key electron-transfer steps that occur in the course of generating Q from H(red) are also detailed and interpreted. In contrast to prior theoretical studies, a requisite large model has been employed, electron spins and couplings have been treated in a quantitative manner, potential energy surfaces have been extensively explored, and quantitative total energies have been determined along the reaction pathway.

  2. Exploring the Structural Basis of Substrate Preferences in Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Franceschini, Stefano; van Beek, Hugo L.; Pennetta, Alessandra; Martinoli, Christian; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Steroid monooxygenase (STMO) from Rhodococcus rhodochrous catalyzes the Baeyer-Villiger conversion of progesterone into progesterone acetate using FAD as prosthetic group and NADPH as reducing cofactor. The enzyme shares high sequence similarity with well characterized Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases, including phenylacetone monooxygenase and cyclohexanone monooxygenase. The comparative biochemical and structural analysis of STMO can be particularly insightful with regard to the understanding of the substrate-specificity properties of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases that are emerging as promising tools in biocatalytic applications and as targets for prodrug activation. The crystal structures of STMO in the native, NADP+-bound, and two mutant forms reveal structural details on this microbial steroid-degrading enzyme. The binding of the nicotinamide ring of NADP+ is shifted with respect to the flavin compared with that observed in other monooxygenases of the same class. This finding fully supports the idea that NADP(H) adopts various positions during the catalytic cycle to perform its multiple functions in catalysis. The active site closely resembles that of phenylacetone monooxygenase. This observation led us to discover that STMO is capable of acting also on phenylacetone, which implies an impressive level of substrate promiscuity. The investigation of six mutants that target residues on the surface of the substrate-binding site reveals that enzymatic conversions of both progesterone and phenylacetone are largely insensitive to relatively drastic amino acid changes, with some mutants even displaying enhanced activity on progesterone. These features possibly reflect the fact that these enzymes are continuously evolving to acquire new activities, depending on the emerging availabilities of new compounds in the living environment. PMID:22605340

  3. Phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase and the role of endobiotic metabolism enzymes in xenobiotic biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Steventon, Glyn B; Mitchell, Stephen C

    2009-10-01

    Phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase is the key enzyme in the sulfoxidation of the thioether drug S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine and its thioether metabolites, S-methyl-l-cysteine, N-acetyl-S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine and N-acetyl-S-methyl-l-cysteine in humans, and a number of other mammalian species. The kinetics constants of the sulfoxidation reaction (K(m), V(max) and CL(E)) have been investigated in cytosolic fractions derived from rat and human liver, in cytosolic fractions of HepG2 cells and using both human and mouse cDNA expressed phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase. Differences in K(m), V(max) and CL(E) of S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine have been seen in HepG2 cells and human and mouse cDNA expressed phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase when compared to both rat and human hepatic cytosolic fractions. The association of the genetic polymorphism in the sulfoxidation of S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine is highlighted with particular reference to this biotransformation reaction as being a biomarker of disease susceptibility in Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and motor neurone diseases and in rheumatoid arthritis. The possible underlying molecular genetics of the sulfoxidation polymorphism is also discussed in relation to the known allelic frequencies of phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase. Finally, the new found role phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase plays in xenobiotic metabolism is discussed.

  4. Membrane-associated methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed Central

    Zahn, J A; DiSpirito, A A

    1996-01-01

    An active preparation of the membrane-associated methane monooxygenase (pMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus Bath was isolated by ion-exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography using dodecyl beta-D-maltoside as the detergent. The active preparation consisted of three major polypeptides with molecular masses of 47,000, 27,000, and 25,000 Da. Two of the three polypeptides (those with molecular masses of 47,000 and 27,000 Da) were identified as the polypeptides induced when cells expressing the soluble MMO are switched to culture medium in which the pMMO is expressed. The 27,000-Da polypeptide was identified as the acetylene-binding protein. The active enzyme complex contained 2.5 iron atoms and 14.5 copper atoms per 99,000 Da. The electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of the enzyme showed evidence for a type 2 copper center (g perpendicular = 2.057, g parallel = 2.24, and magnitude of A parallel = 172 G), a weak high-spin iron signal (g = 6.0), and a broad low-field (g = 12.5) signal. Treatment of the pMMO with nitric oxide produced the ferrous-nitric oxide derivative observed in the membrane fraction of cells expressing the pMMO. When duroquinol was used as a reductant, the specific activity of the purified enzyme was 11.1 nmol of propylene oxidized.min-1.mg of protein-1, which accounted for approximately 30% of the cell-free propylene oxidation activity. The activity was stimulated by ferric and cupric metal ions in addition to the cytochrome b-specific inhibitors myxothiazol and 2-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide. PMID:8576034

  5. Discovery and industrial applications of lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Katja S

    2016-02-01

    The recent discovery of copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide mono-oxygenases (LPMOs) has opened up a vast area of research covering several fields of application. The biotech company Novozymes A/S holds patents on the use of these enzymes for the conversion of steam-pre-treated plant residues such as straw to free sugars. These patents predate the correct classification of LPMOs and the striking synergistic effect of fungal LPMOs when combined with canonical cellulases was discovered when fractions of fungal secretomes were evaluated in industrially relevant enzyme performance assays. Today, LPMOs are a central component in the Cellic CTec enzyme products which are used in several large-scale plants for the industrial production of lignocellulosic ethanol. LPMOs are characterized by an N-terminal histidine residue which, together with an internal histidine and a tyrosine residue, co-ordinates a single copper atom in a so-called histidine brace. The mechanism by which oxygen binds to the reduced copper atom has been reported and the general mechanism of copper-oxygen-mediated activation of carbon is being investigated in the light of these discoveries. LPMOs are widespread in both the fungal and the bacterial kingdoms, although the range of action of these enzymes remains to be elucidated. However, based on the high abundance of LPMOs expressed by microbes involved in the decomposition of organic matter, the importance of LPMOs in the natural carbon-cycle is predicted to be significant. In addition, it has been suggested that LPMOs play a role in the pathology of infectious diseases such as cholera and to thus be relevant in the field of medicine.

  6. Suicidal inactivation and labelling of ammonia mono-oxygenase by acetylene.

    PubMed Central

    Hyman, M R; Wood, P M

    1985-01-01

    Acetylene brings about a progressive inactivation of ammonia mono-oxygenase, the ammonia-oxidizing enzyme in Nitrosomonas europaea. High NH4+ ion concentrations were protective. The inactivation followed first-order kinetics, with a rate constant of 1.5 min-1 at saturating concentrations of acetylene. If acetylene was added in the absence of O2, the cells remained active until O2 was re-introduced. A protective effect was also demonstrated with thiourea, a reversible non-competitive inhibitor of ammonia oxidation. Incubation of cells with [14C]acetylene was found to cause labelling of a single membrane polypeptide. This ran on dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis with an Mr value of 28 000. It is concluded that acetylene is a suicide substrate for the mono-oxygenase. The labelling experiment provides the first identification of a constituent polypeptide of ammonia mono-oxygenase. Images Fig. 4. PMID:4004794

  7. Transcriptional Regulation of the Grape Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Gene CYP736B Expression in Response to Xylella fastidiosa Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are a group of versatile redox proteins that mediate the biosynthesis of lignins, terpenes, alkaloids, and a variety of other secondary compounds which act as plant defense agents. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to...

  8. Selective Usage of Transcription Initiation and Polyadenylation Sites in Grape Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Gene CYP736B Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are versatile redox proteins that mediate biosynthesis of lignins, terpenes, alkaloids, and a variety of other secondary compounds as plant defense agents against a range of pathogens and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in the...

  9. Intermediate P* from Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Contains a Diferrous Cluster

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rahul; Meier, Katlyn K.; Münck, Eckard; Lipscomb, John D.

    2013-01-01

    During a single turnover of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, several discrete intermediates are formed. The diiron cluster of MMOH is first reduced to the FeIIFeII state (Hred). O2 binds rapidly at a site away from the cluster to form the FeIIFeII intermediate O, which converts to an FeIIIFeIII-peroxo intermediate P and finally to the FeIVFeIV intermediate Q. Q binds and reacts with methane to yield methanol and water. The rate constants for these steps are increased by a regulatory protein, MMOB. Previously reported transient kinetic studies have suggested that an intermediate P* forms between O and P in which the g = 16 EPR signal characteristic of the reduced diiron cluster of Hred and O is lost. This was interpreted as signaling oxidation of the cluster, but low accumulation of P* prevented further characterization. In this study, three methods to directly detect and trap P* are applied together to allow its spectroscopic and kinetic characterization. First, the MMOB mutant His33Ala is used to specifically slow the decay of P* without affecting its formation rate, leading to its nearly quantitative accumulation. Second, spectra-kinetic data collection is used to provide a sensitive measure of the formation and decay rate constants of intermediates as well as their optical spectra. Finally, the substrate furan is included to react with Q and quench its strong chromophore. The optical spectrum of P* closely mimics those of Hred and O, but it is distinctly different from that of P. The reaction cycle rate constants allowed prediction of the times for maximal accumulation of the intermediates. Mössbauer spectra of rapid freeze quench samples at these times show that the intermediates are formed at almost exactly the predicted levels. The Mössbauer spectra show that the diiron cluster of P*, quite unexpectedly, is in the FeIIFeII state. Thus, the loss of the g = 16 EPR results from a change of

  10. Intermediate P* from soluble methane monooxygenase contains a diferrous cluster.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rahul; Meier, Katlyn K; Münck, Eckard; Lipscomb, John D

    2013-06-25

    During a single turnover of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, several discrete intermediates are formed. The diiron cluster of MMOH is first reduced to the Fe(II)Fe(II) state (H(red)). O₂ binds rapidly at a site away from the cluster to form the Fe(II)Fe(II) intermediate O, which converts to an Fe(III)Fe(III)-peroxo intermediate P and finally to the Fe(IV)Fe(IV) intermediate Q. Q binds and reacts with methane to yield methanol and water. The rate constants for these steps are increased by a regulatory protein, MMOB. Previously reported transient kinetic studies have suggested that an intermediate P* forms between O and P in which the g = 16 EPR signal characteristic of the reduced diiron cluster of H(red) and O is lost. This was interpreted as signaling oxidation of the cluster, but a low level of accumulation of P* prevented further characterization. In this study, three methods for directly detecting and trapping P* are applied together to allow its spectroscopic and kinetic characterization. First, the MMOB mutant His33Ala is used to specifically slow the decay of P* without affecting its formation rate, leading to its nearly quantitative accumulation. Second, spectra-kinetic data collection is used to provide a sensitive measure of the formation and decay rate constants of intermediates as well as their optical spectra. Finally, the substrate furan is included to react with Q and quench its strong chromophore. The optical spectrum of P* closely mimics those of H(red) and O, but it is distinctly different from that of P. The reaction cycle rate constants allowed prediction of the times for maximal accumulation of the intermediates. Mössbauer spectra of rapid freeze-quench samples at these times show that the intermediates are formed at almost exactly the predicted levels. The Mössbauer spectra show that the diiron cluster of P*, quite unexpectedly, is in the Fe(II)Fe(II) state. Thus, the

  11. Flavoprotein monooxygenases for oxidative biocatalysis: recombinant expression in microbial hosts and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ceccoli, Romina D.; Bianchi, Dario A.; Rial, Daniela V.

    2014-01-01

    External flavoprotein monooxygenases comprise a group of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyze the insertion of one atom of molecular oxygen into an organic substrate and the second atom is reduced to water. These enzymes are involved in a great number of metabolic pathways both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Flavoprotein monooxygenases have attracted the attention of researchers for several decades and the advent of recombinant DNA technology caused a great progress in the field. These enzymes are subjected to detailed biochemical and structural characterization and some of them are also regarded as appealing oxidative biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and valuable intermediates toward active pharmaceutical ingredients due to their high chemo-, stereo-, and regioselectivity. Here, we review the most representative reactions catalyzed both in vivo and in vitro by prototype flavoprotein monooxygenases, highlighting the strategies employed to produce them recombinantly, to enhance the yield of soluble proteins, and to improve cofactor regeneration in order to obtain versatile biocatalysts. Although we describe the most outstanding features of flavoprotein monooxygenases, we mainly focus on enzymes that were cloned, expressed and used for biocatalysis during the last years. PMID:24567729

  12. TCE degradation by toluene/benzene monooxygenase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa JI104 and Escherichia coli recombinant

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, Junichi; Kitayama, Atsushi

    1995-12-31

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa JI104 incorporates more than three degradation pathways for aromatic compounds such as benzene, toluene, and xylene. A dioxygenase and two monooxygenases were cloned in Escherichia coli XL1-Blue. The dioxygenase yielding cis-toluene dihydrodiol and one of the monooxygenases producing o-cresol from toluene did not exhibit conspicuous activity in trichloroethylene (TCE) oxygenation, although DNA sequencing proved that the former enzyme was an isozyme of toluene dioxygenase of the known TCE decomposer P.putida F1. The other toluene/benzene monooxygenase that could generate o-, m-, and p-cresol simultaneously from toluene showed TCE oxygenation activity resulting in TCE decomposition in E. coli. The activity was inhibited competitively by toluene, ethylbenzene, and o- and m-xylene: their inhibition constants were greater than those of propylbenzene and p-xylene. When the E. coli recombinant harboring the monooxygenase was induced by isopropyl {beta}-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) and incubated in the absence of toluene, TCE degradation activity decreased during incubation, compared to that with toluene. Toluene probably controlled the lifetime of the enzyme.

  13. Flavoprotein monooxygenases for oxidative biocatalysis: recombinant expression in microbial hosts and applications.

    PubMed

    Ceccoli, Romina D; Bianchi, Dario A; Rial, Daniela V

    2014-01-01

    External flavoprotein monooxygenases comprise a group of flavin-dependent oxidoreductases that catalyze the insertion of one atom of molecular oxygen into an organic substrate and the second atom is reduced to water. These enzymes are involved in a great number of metabolic pathways both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Flavoprotein monooxygenases have attracted the attention of researchers for several decades and the advent of recombinant DNA technology caused a great progress in the field. These enzymes are subjected to detailed biochemical and structural characterization and some of them are also regarded as appealing oxidative biocatalysts for the production of fine chemicals and valuable intermediates toward active pharmaceutical ingredients due to their high chemo-, stereo-, and regioselectivity. Here, we review the most representative reactions catalyzed both in vivo and in vitro by prototype flavoprotein monooxygenases, highlighting the strategies employed to produce them recombinantly, to enhance the yield of soluble proteins, and to improve cofactor regeneration in order to obtain versatile biocatalysts. Although we describe the most outstanding features of flavoprotein monooxygenases, we mainly focus on enzymes that were cloned, expressed and used for biocatalysis during the last years.

  14. Biocatalytic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide using an engineered toluene monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Carlin, DA; Bertolani, SJ; Siegel, JB

    2015-01-01

    Mutants of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase are demonstrated to oxidize ethylene to ethylene oxide in vivo at yields of >99%. The best mutant increases ethylene oxidation activity by >5500-fold relative to the native enzyme. This is the first report of a recombinant enzyme capable of carrying out this industrially significant chemical conversion.

  15. Biocatalytic conversion of ethylene to ethylene oxide using an engineered toluene monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Carlin, D A; Bertolani, S J; Siegel, J B

    2015-02-11

    Mutants of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase are demonstrated to oxidize ethylene to ethylene oxide in vivo at yields of >99%. The best mutant increases ethylene oxidation activity by >5500-fold relative to the native enzyme. This is the first report of a recombinant enzyme capable of carrying out this industrially significant chemical conversion.

  16. Monooxygenase Levels and Knockdown Resistance (kdr) Allele Frequencies in Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles arabiensis in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Githeko, Andrew K; Githure, John I; Mutunga, James; Zhou, Guofa; Yan, Guiyun

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid-treated bed nets and indoor spray are important components of malaria control strategies in Kenya. Information on resistance to pyrethroid insecticides in Anopheles gambiae and An. arabiensis populations is essential to the selection of appropriate insecticides and the management of insecticide resistance. Monooxygenase activity and knockdown resistance (kdr) allele frequency are biochemical and molecular indicators of mosquito resistance to pyrethroids. This study determined baseline information on monooxygenase activity and kdr allele frequency in anopheline mosquitoes in the western region, the Great Rift Valley-central province region, and the coastal region of Kenya. A total of 1990 field-collected individuals, representing 12 An. gambiae and 22 An. arabiensis populations was analyzed. We found significant among-population variation in monooxygenase activity in An. gambiae and An. arabiensis and substantial variability among individuals within populations. Nine out of 12 An. gambiae populations exhibited significantly higher average monooxygenase activity than the susceptible Kisumu reference strain. The kdr alleles (L1014S) were detected in three An. gambiae populations, and one An. arabiensis population in western Kenya, but not in the Rift Valley-central region and the coastal Kenya region. All genotypes with the kdr alleles were heterozygous, and the conservative estimation of kdr allele frequency was below 1% in these four populations. Information on monooxygenase activity and kdr allele frequency reported in this study provided baseline data for monitoring insecticide resistance changes in Kenya during the era when large-scale insecticide-treated bednet and indoor residual spray campaigns were being implemented. PMID:18402140

  17. Polysome immunoprecipitation of phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA from rat liver and cloning of its cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Robson, K J; Chandra, T; MacGillivray, R T; Woo, S L

    1982-01-01

    The mRNA for phenylalanine hydroxylase (phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase, EC 1.14.16.1) has been purified from total rat liver mRNAs, of which it constitutes less than 0.25%, to greater than 10% purity in a single step by specific polysome immunoprecipitation. The purified mRNA was used for synthesis and cloning of its cDNA. Recombinant colonies containing phenylalanine hydroxylase DNA sequences were identified by differential hybridization, hybrid-selected translation, and blot hybridization analysis. The rat cDNA clone was capable of hybridizing with human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA, which will permit the isolation of the corresponding human gene for analysis of phenylketonuria, a hereditary disorder in phenylalanine metabolism that causes permanent mental retardation in humans. Images PMID:6750607

  18. Structural and Catalytic Differences between Two FADH2-Dependent Monooxygenases: 2,4,5-TCP 4-Monooxygenase (TftD) from Burkholderia cepacia AC1100 and 2,4,6-TCP 4-Monooxygenase (TcpA) from Cupriavidus necator JMP134

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Robert P.; Webb, Brian N.; Subramanian, Arun Kumar; Nissen, Mark; Popchock, Andrew; Xun, Luying; Kang, ChulHee

    2012-01-01

    2,4,5-TCP 4-monooxygenase (TftD) and 2,4,6-TCP 4-monooxygenase (TcpA) have been discovered in the biodegradation of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). TcpA and TftD belong to the reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-dependent monooxygenases and both use 2,4,6-TCP as a substrate; however, the two enzymes produce different end products. TftD catalyzes a typical monooxygenase reaction, while TcpA catalyzes a typical monooxygenase reaction followed by a hydrolytic dechlorination. We have previously reported the 3D structure of TftD and confirmed the catalytic residue, His289. Here we have determined the crystal structure of TcpA and investigated the apparent differences in specificity and catalysis between these two closely related monooxygenases through structural comparison. Our computational docking results suggest that Ala293 in TcpA (Ile292 in TftD) is possibly responsible for the differences in substrate specificity between the two monooxygenases. We have also identified that Arg101 in TcpA could provide inductive effects/charge stabilization during hydrolytic dechlorination. The collective information provides a fundamental understanding of the catalytic reaction mechanism and the parameters for substrate specificity. The information may provide guidance for designing bioremediation strategies for polychlorophenols, a major group of environmental pollutants. PMID:22949829

  19. Flavin-containing monooxygenase-3: induction by 3-methylcholanthrene and complex regulation by xenobiotic chemicals in hepatoma cells and mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Celius, Trine; Pansoy, Andrea; Matthews, Jason; Okey, Allan B; Henderson, Marilyn C; Krueger, Sharon K; Williams, David E

    2010-08-15

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases often are thought not to be inducible but we recently demonstrated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-dependent induction of FMO mRNAs in mouse liver by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (Celius et al., Drug Metab Dispos 36:2499, 2008). We now evaluated FMO induction by other AHR ligands and xenobiotic chemicals in vivo and in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells (Hepa-1). In mouse liver, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) induced FMO3 mRNA 8-fold. In Hepa-1 cells, 3MC and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced FMO3 mRNA >30-fold. Induction by 3MC and BaP was AHR dependent but, surprisingly, the potent AHR agonist, TCDD, did not induce FMO3 mRNA in Hepa-1 cells nor did chromatin immunoprecipitation assays detect recruitment of AHR or ARNT to Fmo3 regulatory elements after exposure to 3MC in liver or in Hepa-1 cells. However, in Hepa-1, 3MC and BaP (but not TCDD) caused recruitment of p53 protein to a p53 response element in the 5'-flanking region of the Fmo3 gene. We tested the possibility that FMO3 induction in Hepa-1 cells might be mediated by Nrf2/anti-oxidant response pathways, but agents known to activate Nrf2 or to induce oxidative stress did not affect FMO3 mRNA levels. The protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (which causes "superinduction" of CYP1A1 mRNA in TCDD-treated cells), by itself caused dramatic upregulation (>300-fold) of FMO3 mRNA in Hepa-1 suggesting that cycloheximide prevents synthesis of a labile protein that suppresses FMO3 expression. Although FMO3 mRNA is highly induced by 3MC or TCDD in mouse liver and in Hepa-1 cells, FMO protein levels and FMO catalytic function showed only modest elevation.

  20. Flavin-containing monooxygenase-3: Induction by 3-methylcholanthrene and complex regulation by xenobiotic chemicals in hepatoma cells and mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Celius, Trine; Pansoy, Andrea; Matthews, Jason; Okey, Allan B.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2010-08-15

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases often are thought not to be inducible but we recently demonstrated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)-dependent induction of FMO mRNAs in mouse liver by 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) (Celius et al., Drug Metab Dispos 36:2499, 2008). We now evaluated FMO induction by other AHR ligands and xenobiotic chemicals in vivo and in mouse Hepa1c1c7 hepatoma cells (Hepa-1). In mouse liver, 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) induced FMO3 mRNA 8-fold. In Hepa-1 cells, 3MC and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced FMO3 mRNA > 30-fold. Induction by 3MC and BaP was AHR dependent but, surprisingly, the potent AHR agonist, TCDD, did not induce FMO3 mRNA in Hepa-1 cells nor did chromatin immunoprecipitation assays detect recruitment of AHR or ARNT to Fmo3 regulatory elements after exposure to 3MC in liver or in Hepa-1 cells. However, in Hepa-1, 3MC and BaP (but not TCDD) caused recruitment of p53 protein to a p53 response element in the 5'-flanking region of the Fmo3 gene. We tested the possibility that FMO3 induction in Hepa-1 cells might be mediated by Nrf2/anti-oxidant response pathways, but agents known to activate Nrf2 or to induce oxidative stress did not affect FMO3 mRNA levels. The protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide (which causes 'superinduction' of CYP1A1 mRNA in TCDD-treated cells), by itself caused dramatic upregulation (> 300-fold) of FMO3 mRNA in Hepa-1 suggesting that cycloheximide prevents synthesis of a labile protein that suppresses FMO3 expression. Although FMO3 mRNA is highly induced by 3MC or TCDD in mouse liver and in Hepa-1 cells, FMO protein levels and FMO catalytic function showed only modest elevation.

  1. Diversity of the active methanotrophic community in acidic peatlands as assessed by mRNA and SIP-PLFA analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yin; Dumont, Marc G; McNamara, Niall P; Chamberlain, Paul M; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Murrell, J Colin

    2008-02-01

    The active methanotroph community was investigated for the first time in heather (Calluna)-covered moorlands and Sphagnum/Eriophorum-covered UK peatlands. Direct extraction of mRNA from these soils facilitated detection of expression of methane monooxygenase genes, which revealed that particulate methane monooxygenase and not soluble methane monooxygenase was probably responsible for CH(4) oxidation in situ, because only pmoA transcripts (encoding a subunit of particulate methane monooxygenase) were readily detectable. Differences in methanotroph community structures were observed between the Calluna-covered moorland and Sphagnum/Eriophorum-covered gully habitats. As with many other Sphagnum-covered peatlands, the Sphagnum/Eriophorum-covered gullies were dominated by Methylocystis. Methylocella and Methylocapsa-related species were also present. Methylobacter-related species were found as demonstrated by the use of a pmoA-based diagnostic microarray. In Calluna-covered moorlands, in addition to Methylocella and Methylocystis, a unique group of peat-associated type I methanotrophs (Gammaproteobacteria) and a group of uncultivated type II methanotrophs (Alphaproteobacteria) were also found. The pmoA sequences of the latter were only distantly related to Methylocapsa and also to the RA-14 group of methanotrophs, which are believed to be involved in oxidation of atmospheric concentrations of CH(4). Soil samples were also labelled with (13)CH(4), and subsequent analysis of the (13)C-labelled phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) showed that 16:1 omega 7, 18:1 omega 7 and 18:1 omega 9 were the major labelled PLFAs. The presence of (13)C-labelled 18:1 omega 9, which was not a major PLFA of any extant methanotrophs, indicated the presence of novel methanotrophs in this peatland.

  2. Genetic Variant in Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Alters Lipid Metabolism in Laying Hens in a Diet-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Long, Cheng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Yanan; Wang, Hao; Yue, Hongyuan; Wang, Xiaocui; Wu, Shugeng; Qi, Guanghai

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variant T329S in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) impairs trimethylamine (TMA) metabolism in birds. The TMA metabolism that under complex genetic and dietary regulation, closely linked to cardiovascular disease risk. We determined whether the genetic defects in TMA metabolism may change other metabolic traits in birds, determined whether the genetic effects depend on diets, and to identify genes or gene pathways that underlie the metabolic alteration induced by genetic and diet factors. We used hens genotyped as FMO3 c.984 A>T as well as those with the homozygous normal genotype. For each genotype, hens were provided with either a corn-soybean meal basal diets (SM), which contains lower levels of TMA precursor, or the basal diets supplemented with 21% of rapeseed meal (RM), which contains higher levels of TMA precursor. An integrative analysis of metabolomic and transcriptomic was used to explore the metabolic patterns of FMO3 genetic variant in hens that were fed the two defined diets. In birds that consumed SM diets, the T329S mutation increased levels of plasma TMA and lipids, FMO3 mRNA levels, and the expression of genes involved in long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. In birds that consumed RM diets, the T329S mutation induced fishy odor syndrome, a repression in LXR pathway and a reciprocal change in lipid metabolism. Variations in TMA and lipid metabolism were linked to the genetic variant in FMO3 in a diet-specific manner, which suggest FMO3 functions in TMA metabolism and lipid homeostasis. LXR pathway and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism are two possible mechanisms of FMO3 action in response to dietary TMA precursor. PMID:27877090

  3. Properties of soluble and membrane bound dopamine-beta-monooxygenase from bovine adrenal medulla cross-linked with dimethyl suberimidate.

    PubMed

    Miras-Portugal, M T; Millaruelo, A; Vara, F

    1980-12-10

    Bovine dopamine-beta-monooxygenase from chromaffin granules in its soluble and membrane-bound forms was cross-linked with the bifunctional reagent dimethyl suberimidate, and its structural and kinetic properties were studied. 1. The cross-linking reaction does not affect the activity of soluble dopamine-beta-monooxygenase; it produces a ten percent inactivation in the membrane-bound enzyme, possibly because the linkage to other membrane proteins hinders its activity. 2. The soluble dopamine-beta-monooxygenase reaction mixture was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis, showing appreciable amounts of dimer and tetramer, but only small amounts of trimer. In membrane-bound dopamine-beta-monooxygenase, subjected to the same treatment, appreciable amounts of dimer and higher aggregates were found. 3. The kinetic properties of soluble dopamine-beta-monooxygenase after the crosslinking reaction are the same as those of the native enzyme, with a ping-pong kinetic mechanism and the same real Michaelis constants for tyramine and ascorbate: KmT = 0.36 mM and KmA = 0.32 mM. Membrane-bound dopamine-beta-monooxygenase does not present a ping-pong mechanism before or after cross-linking; its real Michaelis constants are slightly modified by the cross-linking reaction: KmT = 0.4 mM and KMA = 0.4 mM.

  4. tRNA-modifying MiaE protein from Salmonella typhimurium is a nonheme diiron monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Mathevon, Carole; Pierrel, Fabien; Oddou, Jean-Louis; Garcia-Serres, Ricardo; Blondin, Geneviève; Latour, Jean-Marc; Ménage, Stéphane; Gambarelli, Serge; Fontecave, Marc; Atta, Mohamed

    2007-08-14

    MiaE catalyzes the posttranscriptional allylic hydroxylation of 2-methylthio-N-6-isopentenyl adenosine in tRNAs. The Salmonella typhimurium enzyme was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme is a monomer with two iron atoms and displays activity in in vitro assays. The type and properties of the iron center were investigated by using a combination of UV-visible absorption, EPR, HYSCORE, and Mössbauer spectroscopies which demonstrated that the MiaE enzyme contains a nonheme dinuclear iron cluster, similar to that found in the hydroxylase component of methane monooxygenase. This is the first example of an enzyme from this important class of diiron monooxygenases to be involved in the hydroxylation of a biological macromolecule and the second example of a redox metalloenzyme participating in tRNA modification.

  5. Bacterial degradation of styrene involving a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-dependent styrene monooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Hartmans, S; van der Werf, M J; de Bont, J A

    1990-01-01

    By using styrene as the sole source of carbon and energy in concentrations of 10 to 500 microM, 14 strains of aerobic bacteria and two strains of fungi were isolated from various soil and water samples. In cell extracts of 11 of the bacterial isolates, a novel flavin adenine dinucleotide-requiring styrene monooxygenase activity that oxidized styrene to styrene oxide (phenyl oxirane) was detected. In one bacterial strain (S5), styrene metabolism was studied in more detail. In addition to styrene monooxygenase, cell extracts from strain S5 contained styrene oxide isomerase and phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase activities. A pathway for styrene degradation via styrene oxide and phenylacetaldehyde to phenylacetic acid is proposed. PMID:2339888

  6. Biological methane oxidation: regulation, biochemistry, and active site structure of particulate methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, Raquel L; Rosenzweig, Amy C

    2004-01-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is a three-subunit integral membrane enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol. Although pMMO is the predominant methane oxidation catalyst in nature, it has proved difficult to isolate, and most questions regarding its molecular structure, active site composition, chemical mechanism, and genetic regulation remain unanswered. Copper ions are believed to play a key role in both pMMO regulation and catalysis, and there is some evidence that the enzyme contains iron as well. A number of research groups have solubilized and purified or partially purified pMMO. These preparations have been characterized by biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, aspects of methane monooxygenase gene regulation and copper accumulation in methanotrophs have been studied. This review summarizes for the first time the often controversial pMMO literature, focusing on recent progress and highlighting unresolved issues.

  7. The mechanism of methane and dioxygen activation in the catalytic cycle of methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Shteinman, A A

    1995-03-27

    The binuclear structure of the active center of methane monooxygenase plays a determining role in dioxygen activation and in selectivity and specificity of alkane oxidation with this enzyme. A new mechanism is suggested for binding and activation of O2, which involves side-on binding of O2-(2) to iron atoms followed by its conversion to the bis-mu-oxo complex considered as an alternative of ferryl in CH4 activation. This mechanism results in the sequence of the cleavage of the O-O bond of peroxide O/O2-instead of the opposite sequence O2-/O, which takes place in the case of heme monooxygenase cytochrome P-450. Therefore, in this case there is no necessity of the charge relay system [N.B. Gerber and S.G. Sligar, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 114 (1992) 8742] for the transformation of O2 to an active intermediate. The experiment for checking this hypothesis is suggested.

  8. Improved homology model of cyclohexanone monooxygenase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus based on multiple templates.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, Eduardo; Ventura, Oscar N; Eriksson, Leif A; Saenz-Méndez, Patricia

    2014-04-01

    A new homology model of cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus is derived based on multiple templates, and in particular the crystal structure of CHMO from Rhodococcus sp. The derived model was fully evaluated, showing that the quality of the new structure was improved over previous models. Critically, the nicotinamide cofactor is included in the model for the first time. Analysis of several molecular dynamics snapshots of intermediates in the enzymatic mechanism led to a description of key residues for cofactor binding and intermediate stabilization during the reaction, in particular Arg327 and the well known conserved motif (FxGxxxHxxxW) in Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases, in excellent agreement with known experimental and computational data.

  9. Discovery, application and protein engineering of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases for organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Balke, Kathleen; Kadow, Maria; Mallin, Hendrik; Sass, Stefan; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2012-08-21

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are useful enzymes for organic synthesis as they enable the direct and highly regio- and stereoselective oxidation of ketones to esters or lactones simply with molecular oxygen. This contribution covers novel concepts such as searching in protein sequence databases using distinct motifs to discover new Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases as well as high-throughput assays to facilitate protein engineering in order to improve BVMOs with respect to substrate range, enantioselectivity, thermostability and other properties. Recent examples for the application of BVMOs in synthetic organic synthesis illustrate the broad potential of these biocatalysts. Furthermore, methods to facilitate the more efficient use of BVMOs in organic synthesis by applying e.g. improved cofactor regeneration, substrate feed and in situ product removal or immobilization are covered in this perspective.

  10. Factors limiting aliphatic chlorocarbon degradation by Nitrosomonas europaea: Cometabolic inactivation of ammonia monooxygenase and substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Rasche, M.E.; Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    The soil nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea is capable of degrading trichloroethylene (TCE) and other halogenated hydrocarbons. TCE cometabolism by N. europaea resulted in an irreversible loss of TCE biodegradative capacity, ammonia-oxidizing activity, and ammonia-dependent O{sub 2} uptake by the cells. Inactivation was not observed in the presence of allylthiourea, a specific inhibitor of enzyme ammonia monooxygenase, or under anaerobic conditions, indicating that the TCE-mediated inactivation required ammonia monooxygenase activity. When N. europaea cells were incubated with ({sup 14}C)TCE under conditions which allowed turnover of ammonia monooxygenase, a number of cellular proteins were covalently labeled with {sup 14}C. Treatment of cells with allylthiourea or acetylene prior to incubation with ({sup 14}C)TCE prevented incorporation of {sup 14}C into proteins. The ammonia-oxidizing activity of cells inactivated in the presence of TCE could be recovered through a process requiring de novo protein synthesis. In addition to TCE, a series of chlorinated methanes, ethanes, and other ethylenes were screened as substrates for ammonia monooxygenase and for their ability to inactivate the ammonia-oxidizing system of N. europaea. The chlorocarbons would be divided into three classes depending on their biodegradability and inactivating potential: (1) compounds which were not biodegradable by N. europaea and which had no toxic effect on the cells (2) compounds which were cooxidized by N. europaea and had little or no toxic effect on the cells; and (3) compounds which were cooxidized and produced a turnover-dependent inactivation of ammonia oxidation by N. europaea.

  11. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-10-31

    The first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase reveals a different ring orientation of its FMN cofactor compared with other related bacterial luciferase-family enzymes. The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily.

  12. Prospecting Biotechnologically-Relevant Monooxygenases from Cold Sediment Metagenomes: An In Silico Approach.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Matías A; Lozada, Mariana; Rial, Daniela V; Mac Cormack, Walter P; Jansson, Janet K; Sjöling, Sara; Carroll, JoLynn; Dionisi, Hebe M

    2017-04-09

    The goal of this work was to identify sequences encoding monooxygenase biocatalysts with novel features by in silico mining an assembled metagenomic dataset of polar and subpolar marine sediments. The targeted enzyme sequences were Baeyer-Villiger and bacterial cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP153). These enzymes have wide-ranging applications, from the synthesis of steroids, antibiotics, mycotoxins and pheromones to the synthesis of monomers for polymerization and anticancer precursors, due to their extraordinary enantio-, regio-, and chemo- selectivity that are valuable features for organic synthesis. Phylogenetic analyses were used to select the most divergent sequences affiliated to these enzyme families among the 264 putative monooxygenases recovered from the ~14 million protein-coding sequences in the assembled metagenome dataset. Three-dimensional structure modeling and docking analysis suggested features useful in biotechnological applications in five metagenomic sequences, such as wide substrate range, novel substrate specificity or regioselectivity. Further analysis revealed structural features associated with psychrophilic enzymes, such as broader substrate accessibility, larger catalytic pockets or low domain interactions, suggesting that they could be applied in biooxidations at room or low temperatures, saving costs inherent to energy consumption. This work allowed the identification of putative enzyme candidates with promising features from metagenomes, providing a suitable starting point for further developments.

  13. Crystal structure of a phenol-coupling P450 monooxygenase involved in teicoplanin biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhi; Rupasinghe, Sanjeewa G.; Schuler, Mary A.; Nair, Satish K.

    2012-02-08

    The lipoglycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin has proven efficacy against gram-positive pathogens. Teicoplanin is distinguished from the vancomycin-type glycopeptide antibiotics, by the presence of an additional cross-link between the aromatic amino acids 1 and 3 that is catalyzed by the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase Orf6* (CYP165D3). As a goal towards understanding the mechanism of this phenol-coupling reaction, we have characterized recombinant Orf6* and determined its crystal structure to 2.2-{angstrom} resolution. Although the structure of Orf6* reveals the core fold common to other P450 monooxygenases, there are subtle differences in the disposition of secondary structure elements near the active site cavity necessary to accommodate its complex heptapeptide substrate. Specifically, the orientation of the F and G helices in Orf6* results in a more closed active site than found in the vancomycin oxidative enzymes OxyB and OxyC. In addition, Met226 in the I helix replaces the more typical Gly/Ala residue that is positioned above the heme porphyrin ring, where it forms a hydrogen bond with a heme iron-bound water molecule. Sequence comparisons with other phenol-coupling P450 monooxygenases suggest that Met226 plays a role in determining the substrate regiospecificity of Orf6*. These features provide further insights into the mechanism of the cross-linking mechanisms that occur during glycopeptide antibiotics biosynthesis.

  14. Crystallization and initial crystallographic characterization of the Corynebacterium glutamicum nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase component A

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Sujin; Lee, Sujin; Kang, Beom Sik; Lee, Heung-Soo; Oh, Tae-Kwang; Kim, Myung Hee

    2006-11-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum NTA monooxygenase component A protein, which plays the central role in NTA biodegradation, was crystallized. The initial X-ray crystallographic characterization is reported. Safety and environmental concerns have recently dictated the proper disposal of nitrilotriacetate (NTA). Biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase, which is composed of two proteins: component A and component B. The NTA monooxygenase component A protein from Corynebacterium glutamicum was crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method in the presence of ammonium sulfate as the precipitant. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a maximum resolution of 2.5 Å on a synchrotron beamline. The crystal belongs to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.04, b = 98.51, c = 171.61 Å, β = 101.94°. The asymmetric unit consists of four molecules, corresponding to a packing density of 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. The structure was solved by molecular replacement. Structure refinement is in progress.

  15. A novel chimera: the "truncated hemoglobin-antibiotic monooxygenase" from Streptomyces avermitilis.

    PubMed

    Bonamore, Alessandra; Attili, Andrea; Arenghi, Fabio; Catacchio, Bruno; Chiancone, Emilia; Morea, Veronica; Boffi, Alberto

    2007-08-15

    Novel chimeric proteins made of a globin domain fused with a "cofactor free" monooxygenase domain have been identified within the Streptomyces avermitilis and Frankia sp. genomes by means of bioinformatics methods. Structure based sequence alignments show that the globin domains of both proteins can be unambiguously assigned to the truncated hemoglobin family, in view of the striking similarity to the truncated hemoglobins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Thermobifida fusca and Bacillus subtilis. In turn, the non-heme domains belong to a family of small (about 100 aminoacids) homodimeric proteins annotated as antibiotic biosynthesis monooxygenases, despite the lack of a cofactor (e.g., a metal, a flavin or a heme) necessary for oxygen activation. The chimeric protein from S. avermitilis has been cloned, expressed and characterized. The protein is a stable dimer in solution based on analytical ultracentrifugation experiments. The heme ligand binding properties with oxygen and carbonmonoxide resemble those of other Group II truncated hemoglobins. In addition, an oxygen dependent redox activity has been demonstrated towards easily oxidizable substrates such as menadiol and p-aminophenol. These findings suggest novel functional roles of truncated hemoglobins, which might represent a vast class of multipurpose oxygen activating/scavenging proteins whose catalytic action is mediated by the interaction with cofactor free monooxygenases.

  16. Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenases: structure/function, genetic polymorphisms and role in drug metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Williams, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) oxygenates drugs and xenobiotics containing a “soft-nucleophile”, usually nitrogen or sulfur. FMO, like cytochrome P450 (CYP), is a monooxygenase, utilizing the reducing equivalents of NADPH to reduce 1 atom of molecular oxygen to water, while the other atom is used to oxidize the substrate. FMO and CYP also exhibit similar tissue and cellular location, molecular weight, substrate specificity, and exist as multiple enzymes under developmental control. The human FMO functional gene family is much smaller (5 families each with a single member) than CYP. FMO does not require a reductase to transfer electrons from NADPH and the catalytic cycle of the 2 monooxygenases is strikingly different. Another distinction is the lack of induction of FMOs by xenobiotics. In general, CYP is the major contributor to oxidative xenobiotic metabolism. However, FMO activity may be of significance in a number of cases and should not be overlooked. FMO and CYP have overlapping substrate specificities, but often yield distinct metabolites with potentially significant toxicological/pharmacological consequences. The physiological function(s) of FMO are poorly understood. Three of the 5 expressed human FMO genes, FMO1, FMO2 and FMO3, exhibit genetic polymorphisms. The most studied of these is FMO3 (adult human liver) in which mutant alleles contribute to the disease known as trimethylaminuria. The consequences of these FMO genetic polymorphisms in drug metabolism and human health are areas of research requiring further exploration. PMID:15922018

  17. StyA1 and StyA2B from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP: a Multifunctional Styrene Monooxygenase System▿

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Dirk; Kermer, René; Gröning, Janosch A. D.; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; van Berkel, Willem J. H.; Schlömann, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Two-component flavoprotein monooxygenases are emerging biocatalysts that generally consist of a monooxygenase and a reductase component. Here we show that Rhodococcus opacus 1CP encodes a multifunctional enantioselective flavoprotein monooxygenase system composed of a single styrene monooxygenase (SMO) (StyA1) and another styrene monooxygenase fused to an NADH-flavin oxidoreductase (StyA2B). StyA1 and StyA2B convert styrene and chemical analogues to the corresponding epoxides at the expense of FADH2 provided from StyA2B. The StyA1/StyA2B system presents the highest monooxygenase activity in an equimolar ratio of StyA1 and StyA2B, indicating (transient) protein complex formation. StyA1 is also active when FADH2 is supplied by StyB from Pseudomonas sp. VLB120 or PheA2 from Rhodococcus opacus 1CP. However, in both cases the reductase produces an excess of FADH2, resulting in a high waste of NADH. The epoxidation rate of StyA1 heavily depends on the type of reductase. This supports that the FADH2-induced activation of StyA1 requires interprotein communication. We conclude that the StyA1/StyA2B system represents a novel type of multifunctional flavoprotein monooxygenase. Its unique mechanism of cofactor utilization provides new opportunities for biotechnological applications and is highly relevant from a structural and evolutionary point of view. PMID:20675468

  18. The oxygenating constituent of 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase from the CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida: the first crystal structure of a type II Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Isupov, Michail N.; Schröder, Ewald; Gibson, Robert P.; Beecher, Jean; Donadio, Giuliana; Saneei, Vahid; Dcunha, Stephlina A.; McGhie, Emma J.; Sayer, Christopher; Davenport, Colin F.; Lau, Peter C.; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Kadow, Maria; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Bourenkov, Gleb; Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional structures of the native enzyme and the FMN complex of the overexpressed form of the oxygenating component of the type II Baeyer–Villiger 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase have been determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of this dimeric FMN-dependent enzyme, which is encoded on the large CAM plasmid of Pseudomonas putida, has been solved by a combination of multiple anomalous dispersion from a bromine crystal soak and molecular replacement using a bacterial luciferase model. The orientation of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor in the active site of this TIM-barrel fold enzyme differs significantly from that previously observed in enzymes of the bacterial luciferase-like superfamily. The Ala77 residue is in a cis conformation and forms a β-bulge at the C-terminus of β-strand 3, which is a feature observed in many proteins of this superfamily. PMID:26527149

  19. Flavin-Dependent Redox Transfers by the Two-Component Diketocamphane Monooxygenases of Camphor-Grown Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007

    PubMed Central

    Willetts, Andrew; Kelly, David

    2016-01-01

    The progressive titres of key monooxygenases and their requisite native donors of reducing power were used to assess the relative contribution of various camphor plasmid (CAM plasmid)- and chromosome-coded activities to biodegradation of (rac)-camphor at successive stages throughout growth of Pseudomonas putida NCIMB 10007 on the bicylic monoterpenoid. A number of different flavin reductases (FRs) have the potential to supply reduced flavin mononucleotide to both 2,5- and 3,6-diketocamphane monooxygenase, the key isoenzymic two-component monooxygenases that delineate respectively the (+)- and (−)-camphor branches of the convergent degradation pathway. Two different constitutive chromosome-coded ferric reductases able to act as FRs can serve such as role throughout all stages of camphor-dependent growth, whereas Fred, a chromosome-coded inducible FR can only play a potentially significant role in the relatively late stages. Putidaredoxin reductase, an inducible CAM plasmid-coded flavoprotein that serves an established role as a redox intermediate for plasmid-coded cytochrome P450 monooxygenase also has the potential to serve as an important FR for both diketocamphane monooxygenases (DKCMOs) throughout most stages of camphor-dependent growth. PMID:27754389

  20. Structural and Catalytic Characterization of a Fungal Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Ferroni, Felix Martin; Tolmie, Carmien; Smit, Martha Sophia; Opperman, Diederik Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are biocatalysts that convert ketones to esters. Due to their high regio-, stereo- and enantioselectivity and ability to catalyse these reactions under mild conditions, they have gained interest as alternatives to chemical Baeyer-Villiger catalysts. Despite their widespread occurrence within the fungal kingdom, most of the currently characterized BVMOs are from bacterial origin. Here we report the catalytic and structural characterization of BVMOAFL838 from Aspergillus flavus. BVMOAFL838 converts linear and aryl ketones with high regioselectivity. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to show significant substrate inhibition with phenylacetone, which was more pronounced at low pH, enzyme and buffer concentrations. Para substitutions on the phenyl group significantly improved substrate affinity and increased turnover frequencies. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to preferentially oxidize aliphatic ketones and aryl ketones when the phenyl group are separated by at least two carbons from the carbonyl group. The X-ray crystal structure, the first of a fungal BVMO, was determined at 1.9 Å and revealed the typical overall fold seen in type I bacterial BVMOs. The active site Arg and Asp are conserved, with the Arg found in the “in” position. Similar to phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO), a two residue insert relative to cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) forms a bulge within the active site. Approximately half of the “variable” loop is folded into a short α-helix and covers part of the active site entry channel in the non-NADPH bound structure. This study adds to the current efforts to rationalize the substrate scope of BVMOs through comparative catalytic and structural investigation of different BVMOs. PMID:27472055

  1. Gene structure and spatiotemporal expression profile of tomato genes encoding YUCCA-like flavin monooxygenases: the ToFZY gene family.

    PubMed

    Expósito-Rodríguez, Marino; Borges, Andrés A; Borges-Pérez, Andrés; Pérez, José A

    2011-07-01

    The flavin monooxygenases (FMO) encoded by plant YUCCA genes are thought to catalyze a rate-limiting step in the tryptamine pathway for indole-3-acetic acid biosynthesis. Recent experiments with different plant models have indicate that YUCCA genes play essential roles in growth and development through their contribution to the local pool of free auxin. In this study we have characterized five new genes that encode YUCCA-like FMOs in the tomato genome (ToFZY2 to ToFZY6), including gene structure, conserved motifs and phylogenetic analyses. As a first step towards clarifying the individual functions of ToFZY genes, we have used quantitative real-time RT-PCR to conduct a systematic comparison of the steady-state mRNA levels of 6 ToFZY genes, in 33 samples representing major organs and the entire tomato life cycle. We followed an absolute quantification strategy which allowed us to cross-compare transcript levels among different ToFZY genes in a given spatiotemporal coordinate. Our results indicate that expression of ToFZY genes is temporally and spatially regulated, and that the distinctive expression pattern of each ToFZY gene partially overlaps with other members of the multigenic family. We compare our data with previous results in other plant species and make some predictions about the role of tryptamine pathway in tomato growth and development.

  2. Effects of sponge bleaching on ammonia-oxidizing Archaea: distribution and relative expression of ammonia monooxygenase genes associated with the barrel sponge Xestospongia muta.

    PubMed

    López-Legentil, Susanna; Erwin, Patrick M; Pawlik, Joseph R; Song, Bongkeun

    2010-10-01

    Sponge-mediated nitrification is an important process in the nitrogen cycle, however, nothing is known about how nitrification and symbiotic Archaea may be affected by sponge disease and bleaching events. The giant barrel sponge Xestospongia muta is a prominent species on Caribbean reefs that contains cyanobacterial symbionts, the loss of which results in two types of bleaching: cyclic, a recoverable condition; and fatal, a condition associated with the disease-like sponge orange band (SOB) syndrome and sponge death. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses, clone libraries, and relative mRNA quantification of ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA) were performed using a RNA transcript-based approach to characterize the active ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) community present in bleached, non-bleached, and SOB tissues of cyclically and fatally bleached sponges. We found that non-bleached and cyclically bleached tissues of X. muta harbored a unique Crenarchaeota community closely related to those reported for other sponges. In contrast, bleached tissue from the most degraded sponge contained a Crenarchaeota community that was more similar to those found in sediment and sand. Although there were no significant differences in amoA expression among the different tissues, amoA expression was higher in the most deteriorated tissues. Results suggest that a shift in the Crenarchaeota community precedes an increase in amoA gene expression in fatally bleached sponges, while cyclic bleaching did not alter the AOA community structure and its amoA gene expression.

  3. Interaction of the mechanism-based inactivator acetylene with ammonia monooxygenase of Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Gilch, Stefan; Vogel, Manja; Lorenz, Matthias W; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    The ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) of Nitrosomonas europaea is a metalloenzyme that catalyses the oxidation of ammonia to hydroxylamine. We have identified histidine 191 of AmoA as the binding site for the oxidized mechanism-based inactivator acetylene. Binding of acetylene changed the molecular mass of His-191 from 155.15 to 197.2 Da (+42.05), providing evidence that acetylene was oxidized to ketene (CH2CO; 42.04 Da) which binds specifically to His-191. It must be assumed that His-191 is part of the acetylene-activating site in AMO or at least directly neighbours this site.

  4. Kinetic characterization of the soluble butane monooxygenase from Thauera butanivorans, formerly 'Pseudomonas butanovora'.

    PubMed

    Cooley, Richard B; Dubbels, Bradley L; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A; Bottomley, Peter J; Arp, Daniel J

    2009-06-01

    Soluble butane monooxygenase (sBMO), a three-component di-iron monooxygenase complex expressed by the C(2)-C(9) alkane-utilizing bacterium Thauera butanivorans, was kinetically characterized by measuring substrate specificities for C(1)-C(5) alkanes and product inhibition profiles. sBMO has high sequence homology with soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and shares a similar substrate range, including gaseous and liquid alkanes, aromatics, alkenes and halogenated xenobiotics. Results indicated that butane was the preferred substrate (defined by k(cat) : K(m) ratios). Relative rates of oxidation for C(1)-C(5) alkanes differed minimally, implying that substrate specificity is heavily influenced by differences in substrate K(m) values. The low micromolar K(m) for linear C(2)-C(5) alkanes and the millimolar K(m) for methane demonstrate that sBMO is two to three orders of magnitude more specific for physiologically relevant substrates of T. butanivorans. Methanol, the product of methane oxidation and also a substrate itself, was found to have similar K(m) and k(cat) values to those of methane. This inability to kinetically discriminate between the C(1) alkane and C(1) alcohol is observed as a steady-state concentration of methanol during the two-step oxidation of methane to formaldehyde by sBMO. Unlike methanol, alcohols with chain length C(2)-C(5) do not compete effectively with their respective alkane substrates. Results from product inhibition experiments suggest that the geometry of the active site is optimized for linear molecules four to five carbons in length and is influenced by the regulatory protein component B (butane monooxygenase regulatory component; BMOB). The data suggest that alkane oxidation by sBMO is highly specialized for the turnover of C(3)-C(5) alkanes and the release of their respective alcohol products. Additionally, sBMO is particularly efficient at preventing methane oxidation during growth on linear alkanes > or =C(2,) despite its high

  5. Structure and boosting activity of a starch-degrading lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lo Leggio, Leila; Simmons, Thomas J; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Frandsen, Kristian E H; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Stringer, Mary A; von Freiesleben, Pernille; Tovborg, Morten; Johansen, Katja S; De Maria, Leonardo; Harris, Paul V; Soong, Chee-Leong; Dupree, Paul; Tryfona, Theodora; Lenfant, Nicolas; Henrissat, Bernard; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H

    2015-01-22

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are recently discovered enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. LPMOs are fundamental in the effective utilization of these substrates by bacteria and fungi; moreover, the enzymes have significant industrial importance. We report here the activity, spectroscopy and three-dimensional structure of a starch-active LPMO, a representative of the new CAZy AA13 family. We demonstrate that these enzymes generate aldonic acid-terminated malto-oligosaccharides from retrograded starch and boost significantly the conversion of this recalcitrant substrate to maltose by β-amylase. The detailed structure of the enzyme's active site yields insights into the mechanism of action of this important class of enzymes.

  6. Oxidation of chlorinated olefins by Escherichia coli transformed with dimethyl sulfide monooxygenase genes or cumene dioxygenase genes.

    PubMed

    Takami, Wako; Yoshida, Takako; Nojiri, Hideaki; Yamane, Hisakazu; Omori, Toshio

    1999-04-01

    In the present work, it was shown that the dimethyl sulfide (DMS) monooxygenase and the cumene dioxygenase catalyzed oxidation of various chlorinated ethenes, propenes, and butenes. The specific activities of these oxygenases were determined for C(2) to C(4) chlorinated olefins, and the oxidation rates ranged from 0.19 to 4.18 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the DMS monooxygenase and from 0.19 to 1.29 nmol.min(-1).mg(-1) of dry cells by the cumene dioxygenase. The oxidation products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Most chlorinated olefins were monooxygenated by the DMS monooxygenase to yield chlorinated epoxides. In the case of the cumene dioxygenase, the substrates lacking any chlorine atom on double-bond carbon atoms were dioxygenated, and those with chlorine atoms attaching to double-bond carbon atoms were monooxygenated to yield allyl alcohols.

  7. CYP63A2, a catalytically versatile fungal P450 monooxygenase capable of oxidizing higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, and alkanes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are known to oxidize hydrocarbons albeit with limited substrate specificity across classes of these compounds. Here we report a P450 monooxygenase (CYP63A2) from the model ligninolytic white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that was fo...

  8. Crystal structure of a Baeyer-Villiger flavin-containing monooxygenase from Staphylococcus aureus MRSA strain MU50.

    PubMed

    Hwang, William C; Xu, Qingping; Wu, Bainan; Godzik, Adam

    2014-08-05

    Flavin-containing Monooxygenase (FMO) catalyzed the oxygenation of broad spectrum of substrates. FMO can also serve as biocatalysts in the Baeyer-Villiger reaction in organic synthesis. Here, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of a Baeyer-Villiger Flavin-containing Monooxygenase (BVFMO) from methicillin- and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain MU50. The structure of S. aureus FMO should facilitate further development of BVFMO as biocatalysts. A possible role of S. aureus FMO in methicillin and vancomycin resistance is discussed. Proteins 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. P450monooxygenases (P450ome) of the model white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2012-01-01

    Phanerochaete chrysosporium, the model white rot fungus, has been the focus of research for the past about four decades for understanding the mechanisms and processes of biodegradation of the natural aromatic polymer lignin and a broad range of environmental toxic chemicals. The ability to degrade this vast array of xenobiotic compounds was originally attributed to its lignin-degrading enzyme system (LDS), mainly the extracellular peroxidases. However, subsequent physiological, biochemical, and/or genetic studies by us and others identified the involvement of a peroxidase-independent oxidoreductase system, the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system. The whole genome sequence revealed an extraordinarily large P450 contingent (P450ome) with an estimated 149 P450s in this organism. This review focuses on the current status of understanding on the P450 monooxygenase system of P. chrysosporium in terms of pre-genomic and post-genomic identification, structural and evolutionary analysis, transcriptional regulation, redox partners, and functional characterization for its biodegradative potential. Future research on this catalytically diverse oxidoreductase enzyme system and its major role as a newly emerged player in xenobiotic metabolism/degradation is discussed. PMID:22624627

  10. Investigation of the enzymology and pharmacology of novel substrates and inhibitors of dopamine beta-monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine beta-monooxygenase (DBM) was shown to catalyze the selenoxidation of 2-(phenylseleno)ethylamines, selenium-containing analogues of dopamine, by the normal monooxygenase pathway. The compounds 2-(phenylseleno)-ethylamine (PAESe), 2-(4'-hydroxyphenylseleno)ethylamine (pOH PAESe), and 1-(phenylseleno)-2-propylamine (Me PAESe) were synthesized and fully characterized as DBM substrates. Two other classes of compounds were investigated as potential alternate substrates for DBM. The possibility of stereoselective sulfonylation of 2-(phenylsulfenyl)- ethylamine (PAESO) was considered. A unique class of compounds, 2-(phenylthio)ethanols were designed and synthesized as DBM substrates but were found to be a novel class of potent competitive inhibitors of DBM with respect to tyramine. Preliminary experiments were also performed in an effort to demonstrate that the potent antihypertensive and indirect-acting sympathomimetic activity of 2-(phenylthio)ethylamine (PAES) was a result of DBM-oxygenation of this compound in vivo. The specific reserpine-sensitive uptake of (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine into rat brain synaptosomes was demonstrated as was the synaptosomal conversion of (/sup 3/H)-dopamine to (/sup 3/H)-norepinephrine.

  11. A family of diiron monooxygenases catalyzing amino acid beta-hydroxylation in antibiotic biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Makris, Thomas M; Chakrabarti, Mrinmoy; Münck, Eckard; Lipscomb, John D

    2010-08-31

    The biosynthesis of chloramphenicol requires a beta-hydroxylation tailoring reaction of the precursor L-p-aminophenylalanine (L-PAPA). Here, it is shown that this reaction is catalyzed by the enzyme CmlA from an operon containing the genes for biosynthesis of L-PAPA and the nonribosomal peptide synthetase CmlP. EPR, Mössbauer, and optical spectroscopies reveal that CmlA contains an oxo-bridged dinuclear iron cluster, a metal center not previously associated with nonribosomal peptide synthetase chemistry. Single-turnover kinetic studies indicate that CmlA is functional in the diferrous state and that its substrate is L-PAPA covalently bound to CmlP. Analytical studies show that the product is hydroxylated L-PAPA and that O(2) is the oxygen source, demonstrating a monooxygenase reaction. The gene sequence of CmlA shows that it utilizes a lactamase fold, suggesting that the diiron cluster is in a protein environment not previously known to effect monooxygenase reactions. Notably, CmlA homologs are widely distributed in natural product biosynthetic pathways, including a variety of pharmaceutically important beta-hydroxylated antibiotics and cytostatics.

  12. Stabilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase by a computationally designed disulfide bond spanning only one residue

    PubMed Central

    van Beek, Hugo L.; Wijma, Hein J.; Fromont, Lucie; Janssen, Dick B.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important parameter in biocatalytic applications, and there is a strong need for efficient methods to generate robust enzymes. We investigated whether stabilizing disulfide bonds can be computationally designed based on a model structure. In our approach, unlike in previous disulfide engineering studies, short bonds spanning only a few residues were included. We used cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), a Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB9871 as the target enzyme. This enzyme has been the prototype BVMO for many biocatalytic studies even though it is notoriously labile. After creating a small library of mutant enzymes with introduced cysteine pairs and subsequent screening for improved thermostability, three stabilizing disulfide bonds were identified. The introduced disulfide bonds are all within 12 Å of each other, suggesting this particular region is critical for unfolding. This study shows that stabilizing disulfide bonds do not have to span many residues, as the most stabilizing disulfide bond, L323C–A325C, spans only one residue while it stabilizes the enzyme, as shown by a 6 °C increase in its apparent melting temperature. PMID:24649397

  13. Induced allostery in the directed evolution of an enantioselective Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Sheng; Acevedo, Juan Pablo; Reetz, Manfred T.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular basis of allosteric effects, known to be caused by an effector docking to an enzyme at a site distal from the binding pocket, has been studied recently by applying directed evolution. Here, we utilize laboratory evolution in a different way, namely to induce allostery by introducing appropriate distal mutations that cause domain movements with concomitant reshaping of the binding pocket in the absence of an effector. To test this concept, the thermostable Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenase, phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO), was chosen as the enzyme to be employed in asymmetric Baeyer–Villiger reactions of substrates that are not accepted by the wild type. By using the known X-ray structure of PAMO, a decision was made regarding an appropriate site at which saturation mutagenesis is most likely to generate mutants capable of inducing allostery without any effector compound being present. After screening only 400 transformants, a double mutant was discovered that catalyzes the asymmetric oxidative kinetic resolution of a set of structurally different 2-substituted cyclohexanone derivatives as well as the desymmetrization of three different 4-substituted cyclohexanones, all with high enantioselectivity. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and covariance maps unveiled the origin of increased substrate scope as being due to allostery. Large domain movements occur that expose and reshape the binding pocket. This type of focused library production, aimed at inducing significant allosteric effects, is a viable alternative to traditional approaches to “designed” directed evolution that address the binding site directly. PMID:20133612

  14. Biooxidation of n-butane to 1-butanol by engineered P450 monooxygenase under increased pressure.

    PubMed

    Nebel, Bernd A; Scheps, Daniel; Honda Malca, Sumire; Nestl, Bettina M; Breuer, Michael; Wagner, Hans-Günter; Breitscheidel, Boris; Kratz, Detlef; Hauer, Bernhard

    2014-12-10

    In addition to the traditional 1-butanol production by hydroformylation of gaseous propene and by fermentation of biomass, the cytochrome P450-catalyzed direct terminal oxidation of n-butane into the primary alcohol 1-butanol constitutes an alternative route to provide the high demand of this basic chemical. Moreover the use of n-butane offers an unexploited ubiquitous feed stock available in large quantities. Based on protein engineering of CYP153A from Polaromonas sp. JS666 and the improvement of the native redox system, a highly ω-regioselective (>96%) fusion protein variant (CYP153AP.sp.(G254A)-CPRBM3) for the conversion of n-butane into 1-butanol was developed. Maximum yield of 3.12g/L butanol, of which 2.99g/L comprise for 1-butanol, has been obtained after 20h reaction time. Due to the poor solubility of n-butane in an aqueous system, a high pressure reaction assembly was applied to increase the conversion. After optimization a maximum product content of 4.35g/L 1-butanol from a total amount of 4.53g/L butanol catalyzed by the self-sufficient fusion monooxygenase has been obtained at 15bar pressure. In comparison to the CYP153A wild type the 1-butanol concentration was enhanced fivefold using the engineered monooxygenase whole cell system by using the high-pressure reaction assembly.

  15. Lactone-bound structures of cyclohexanone monooxygenase provide insight into the stereochemistry of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Yachnin, Brahm J; McEvoy, Michelle B; MacCuish, Roderick J D; Morley, Krista L; Lau, Peter C K; Berghuis, Albert M

    2014-12-19

    The Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are microbial enzymes that catalyze the synthetically useful Baeyer-Villiger oxidation reaction. The available BVMO crystal structures all lack a substrate or product bound in a position that would determine the substrate specificity and stereospecificity of the enzyme. Here, we report two crystal structures of cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) with its product, ε-caprolactone, bound: the CHMO(Tight) and CHMO(Loose) structures. The CHMO(Tight) structure represents the enzyme state in which substrate acceptance and stereospecificity is determined, providing a foundation for engineering BVMOs with altered substrate spectra and/or stereospecificity. The CHMO(Loose) structure is the first structure where the product is solvent accessible. This structure represents the enzyme state upon binding and release of the substrate and product. In addition, the role of the invariant Arg329 in chaperoning the substrate/product during the catalytic cycle is highlighted. Overall, these data provide a structural framework for the engineering of BVMOs with altered substrate spectra and/or stereospecificity.

  16. Stabilization of cyclohexanone monooxygenase by a computationally designed disulfide bond spanning only one residue.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Hugo L; Wijma, Hein J; Fromont, Lucie; Janssen, Dick B; Fraaije, Marco W

    2014-01-01

    Enzyme stability is an important parameter in biocatalytic applications, and there is a strong need for efficient methods to generate robust enzymes. We investigated whether stabilizing disulfide bonds can be computationally designed based on a model structure. In our approach, unlike in previous disulfide engineering studies, short bonds spanning only a few residues were included. We used cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB9871 as the target enzyme. This enzyme has been the prototype BVMO for many biocatalytic studies even though it is notoriously labile. After creating a small library of mutant enzymes with introduced cysteine pairs and subsequent screening for improved thermostability, three stabilizing disulfide bonds were identified. The introduced disulfide bonds are all within 12 Å of each other, suggesting this particular region is critical for unfolding. This study shows that stabilizing disulfide bonds do not have to span many residues, as the most stabilizing disulfide bond, L323C-A325C, spans only one residue while it stabilizes the enzyme, as shown by a 6 °C increase in its apparent melting temperature.

  17. The hydrogen peroxide reactivity of peptidylglycine monooxygenase supports a Cu(II)-superoxo catalytic intermediate.

    PubMed

    Bauman, Andrew T; Yukl, Erik T; Alkevich, Katsiaryna; McCormack, Ashley L; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2006-02-17

    We have investigated the reaction of peptidylglycine monooxygenase with hydrogen peroxide to determine whether Cu(II)-peroxo is a likely intermediate. When the oxidized enzyme was reacted with the dansyl-YVG substrate and H(2)O(2), the alpha-hydroxyglycine product was formed. The reaction was catalytic and did not require the presence of additional reductant. When (18)O-labeled H(2)O(2) was reacted with peptidylglycine monooxygenase and substrate anaerobically, oxygen in the product was labeled with (18)O and must therefore be derived from H(2)O(2). However, when the reaction was carried out with H (16)(2)O(2) in the presence of (18)O(2), 60% of the product contained the (18)O label. Therefore, the reaction must proceed via an intermediate that can react directly with dioxygen and thus scramble the label. Under strictly anaerobic conditions (in the presence of glucose and glucose oxidase, where no oxygen was released into the medium from nonenzymatic peroxide decomposition), product formation and peroxide consumption were tightly coupled, and the rate of product formation was identical to that measured under aerobic conditions. Peroxide reactivity was eliminated by a mutation at the Cu(H) center, which should not be involved in the peroxide shunt. Our data lend support to recent proposals that Cu(II)-superoxide is the active species.

  18. Increased monooxygenase activity associated with resistance to permethrin in Pediculus humanus capitis (Anoplura: Pediculidae) from Argentina.

    PubMed

    González Audino, P; Barrios, S; Vassena, C; Mougabure Cueto, G; Zerba, E; Picollo, M I

    2005-05-01

    We studied the profile of permethrin resistance in populations of head lice infesting children 6-12 yr old in schools and their homes in and around Buenos Aires, Argentina. Five permethrin-resistant populations with different levels of resistance were collected: Hogar Loyola (HL), Republica de Turquia (RT), Hogar Mitre (HM), Guardia de Honor (GH), and Ricardo Guiraldes (RG). One susceptible population, Bandera Argentina (BA), also was collected. Their level of resistance was evaluated, and results showed resistance ratios of 13 for HL, 16 for RT, 22 for HM, 61 for GH, and 69 for RG. To elucidate the possible involvement of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase system in conferring permethrin resistance, ethoxycoumarin-O-deethylase (ECOD) activity was measured in abdomens of individual third instars and adults by using a fluorometric assay. The ECOD activity was lower in the susceptible BA population (4.7 ng per louse) than in the resistant ones (13.7 ng per louse for RG, 12.3 ng per louse for GH, 8.6 ng per louse for RT, and 8.2 ng per louse for HL). ECOD activity was significantly correlated with the level of resistance in the field populations (r = 0.97, P = 0.0009), suggesting a role for cytochrome monooxygenase P450 system in permethrin resistance by head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis De Geer.

  19. Untangling the multiple monooxygenases of Mycobacterium chubuense strain NBB4, a versatile hydrocarbon degrader.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Nicholas V; Yau, Sheree; Wilson, Neil L; Nolan, Laura M; Migocki, Margaret D; Ly, Mai-Anh; Crossett, Ben; Holmes, Andrew J

    2011-06-01

    Mycobacterium strain NBB4 was isolated on ethene as part of a bioprospecting study searching for novel monooxygenase (MO) enzymes of interest to biocatalysis and bioremediation. Previous work indicated that strain NBB4 contained an unprecedented diversity of MO genes, and we hypothesized that each MO type would support growth on a distinct hydrocarbon substrate. Here, we attempted to untangle the relationships between MO types and hydrocarbon substrates. Strain NBB4 was shown to grow on C2 -C4 alkenes and C2 -C16 alkanes. Complete gene clusters encoding six different monooxygenases were recovered from a fosmid library, including homologues of ethene MO (etnABCD), propene MO (pmoABCD), propane MO (smoABCD), butane MO (smoXYB1C1Z), cytochrome P450 (CYP153; fdx-cyp-fdr) and alkB (alkB-rubA1-rubA2). Catabolic enzymes involved in ethene assimilation (EtnA, EtnC, EtnD, EtnE) and alkane assimilation (alcohol and aldehyde dehydrogenases) were identified by proteomics, and we showed for the first time that stress response proteins (catalase/peroxidase, chaperonins) were induced by growth on C2 -C5 alkanes and ethene. Surprisingly, none of the identified MO genes could be specifically associated with oxidation of small alkanes, and thus the nature of the gaseous alkane MO in NBB4 remains mysterious.

  20. Characterization of a Novel Rieske-Type Alkane Monooxygenase System in Pusillimonas sp. Strain T7-7

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Wang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The cold-tolerant bacterium Pusillimonas sp. strain T7-7 is able to utilize diesel oils (C5 to C30 alkanes) as a sole carbon and energy source. In the present study, bioinformatics, proteomics, and real-time reverse transcriptase PCR approaches were used to identify the alkane hydroxylation system present in this bacterium. This system is composed of a Rieske-type monooxygenase, a ferredoxin, and an NADH-dependent reductase. The function of the monooxygenase, which consists of one large (46.711 kDa) and one small (15.355 kDa) subunit, was further studied using in vitro biochemical analysis and in vivo heterologous functional complementation tests. The purified large subunit of the monooxygenase was able to oxidize alkanes ranging from pentane (C5) to tetracosane (C24) using NADH as a cofactor, with greatest activity on the C15 substrate. The large subunit also showed activity on several alkane derivatives, including nitromethane and methane sulfonic acid, but it did not act on any aromatic hydrocarbons. The optimal reaction condition of the large subunit is pH 7.5 at 30°C. Fe2+ can enhance the activity of the enzyme evidently. This is the first time that an alkane monooxygenase system belonging to the Rieske non-heme iron oxygenase family has been identified in a bacterium. PMID:23417490

  1. Whole genome co-expression analysis of soybean cytochrome P450 genes identifies nodulation-specific P450 monooxygenases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) catalyze oxidation of various substrates using oxygen and NAD(P)H. Plant P450s are involved in the biosynthesis of primary and secondary metabolites performing diverse biological functions. The recent availability of soybean genome sequence allows us to ident...

  2. Purification and characterization of toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia cepacia G4.

    PubMed

    Newman, L M; Wackett, L P

    1995-10-31

    Recent in vivo studies indicate that ring monooxygenation is a widespread mechanism by which bacteria metabolize aromatic hydrocarbons and obtain carbon and energy. In this study, toluene 2-monooxygenase from Burkholderia (formerly Pseudomonas) cepacia G4 was purified to homogeneity and found to be a three-component enzyme system. The reconstituted enzyme system oxidized toluene to o-cresol and o-cresol to 3-methylcatechol, an important intermediate for growth of the bacterium on toluene. Steady-state kinetic parameters measured for the water-soluble substrate o-cresol were a Km of 0.8 microM and a Vmax of 131 nmol min-1 (mg of hydroxylase protein)-1. The three protein components were (1) a 40 kDa polypeptide containing one FAD and a [2Fe2S] cluster, (2) a 10.4 kDa polypeptide that contained no identifiable metals or organic cofactors, and (3) a 211 kDa alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component containing five to six iron atoms. The 40 kDa flavo-iron-sulfur protein oxidized NADH and transferred electrons to cytochrome c, dyes, and the alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component. It is analogous to other NADH oxidoreductase components found in a wide range of bacterial mono- and dioxygenases. The 10.4 kDa component, added to the other two components and NADH, increased toluene oxidation rates 10-fold. The alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component was indicated to contain the site for toluene binding and hydroxylation by the following observations: (1) tight binding to a toluene affinity column; (2) oxidation of toluene after reduction of the protein with dithionite and adding O2; (3) H2O2-dependent toluene oxidation and catalase activity; and (4) spectroscopic studies of the iron atoms in the component. The alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2 component had no significant absorbance in the visible region. EPR spectroscopy yielded a signal at g = 16 upon addition of > 2 equiv of electrons per 2 Fe atoms. Taken with the quantitation of five to six iron atoms, the data suggest that the alpha 2 beta 2 gamma 2

  3. Status of Resistance of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to Neonicotinoids in Iran and Detoxification by Cytochrome P450-Dependent Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Basij, M; Talebi, K; Ghadamyari, M; Hosseininaveh, V; Salami, S A

    2017-02-01

    Nine Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) populations were collected from different regions of Iran. In all nine populations, only one biotype (B biotype) was detected. Susceptibilities of these populations to imidacloprid and acetamiprid were assayed. The lethal concentration 50 values (LC50) for different populations showed a significant discrepancy in the susceptibility of B. tabaci to imidacloprid (3.76 to 772.06 mg l(-1)) and acetamiprid (4.96 to 865 mg l(-1)). The resistance ratio of the populations ranged from 9.72 to 205.20 for imidacloprid and 6.38 to 174.57 for acetamiprid. The synergistic effects of piperonylbutoxide (PBO) and S,S,S-tributylphosphorotrithioate (DEF) were evaluated for the susceptible (RF) and resistant (JR) populations for the determination of the involvement of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase and carboxylesterase, respectively, in their resistance mechanisms. The results showed that PBO overcame the resistance of the JR population to both imidacloprid and acetamiprid, with synergistic ratios of 72.7 and 106.9, respectively. Carboxylesterase, glutathione S-transferase and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase were studied biochemically, for the purpose of measuring the activity of the metabolizing enzymes in order to determine which enzymes are directly involved in neonicotinoid resistance. There was an increase in the activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase up to 17-fold in the resistant JR population (RR = 205.20). The most plausible activity of cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase correlated with the resistances of imidacloprid and acetamiprid, and this suggests that cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase is the only enzyme system responsible for neonicotinoid resistance in the nine populations of B. tabaci.

  4. Toluene 4-Monooxygenase and its Complex with Effector Protein T4moD

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Fox, Brian G.

    2012-10-16

    Toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) is a multiprotein diiron enzyme complex that catalyzes the regiospecific oxidation of toluene to p-cresol. Catalytic function requires the presence of a small protein, called the effector protein. Effector protein exerts substantial control on the diiron hydroxylase catalytic cycle through protein-protein interactions. High-resolution crystal structures of the stoichometric hydroxylase and effector protein complex described here reveal how protein-protein interactions and reduction of the diiron center produce an active site configuration poised for reaction with O{sub 2}. Further information from crystal structures of mutated isoforms of the hydroxylase and a peroxo adduct is combined with catalytic results to give a fuller picture of the geometry of the enzyme-substrate complex used for the high fidelity oxidation of hydrocarbon substrates.

  5. Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases involved in anthracene metabolism by the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Chigu, Nomathemba Loice; Hirosue, Sinji; Nakamura, Chie; Teramoto, Hiroshi; Ichinose, Hirofumi; Wariishi, Hiroyuki

    2010-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) involved in anthracene metabolism by the white-rot basidiomycete Phanerochaete chrysosporium were identified by comprehensive screening of both catalytic potentials and transcriptomic profiling. Functional screening of P. chrysosporium P450s (PcCYPs) revealed that 14 PcCYP species catalyze stepwise conversion of anthracene to anthraquinone via intermediate formation of anthrone. Moreover, transcriptomic profiling explored using a complementary DNA microarray system demonstrated that 12 PcCYPs are up-regulated in response to exogenous addition of anthracene. Among the up-regulated PcCYPs, five species showed catalytic activity against anthracene. Based upon both catalytic and transcriptional properties, these five species are most likely to play major roles in anthracene metabolic processes in vivo. Thus, the combination of functional screening and a microarray system may provide a novel strategy for obtaining a thorough understanding of the catalytic functions and biological impacts of PcCYPs.

  6. Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 "2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate monooxygenase" is an alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Fukumori, F; Hausinger, R P

    1993-01-01

    The Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134 tfdA gene, encoding the enzyme responsible for the first step in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) biodegradation, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and several enzymatic properties of the partially purified gene product were examined. Although the tfdA-encoded enzyme is typically referred to as 2,4-D monooxygenase, we were unable to observe any reductant-dependent activity. Rather, we demonstrate that this enzyme is a ferrous ion-dependent dioxygenase that uses alpha-ketoglutarate as a cosubstrate. The alpha-ketoglutarate is converted to succinate concomitant with 2,4-D conversion to 2,4-dichlorophenol. By using [1-14C]alpha-ketoglutarate, we established that carbon dioxide is the second product derived from alpha-ketoglutarate. Finally, we verified the proposal that glyoxylate is the second product derived from 2,4-D. PMID:8458850

  7. Structure, dynamics, and function of the monooxygenase P450 BM-3: insights from computer simulations studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccatano, Danilo

    2015-07-01

    The monooxygenase P450 BM-3 is a NADPH-dependent fatty acid hydroxylase enzyme isolated from soil bacterium Bacillus megaterium. As a pivotal member of cytochrome P450 superfamily, it has been intensely studied for the comprehension of structure-dynamics-function relationships in this class of enzymes. In addition, due to its peculiar properties, it is also a promising enzyme for biochemical and biomedical applications. However, despite the efforts, the full understanding of the enzyme structure and dynamics is not yet achieved. Computational studies, particularly molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, have importantly contributed to this endeavor by providing new insights at an atomic level regarding the correlations between structure, dynamics, and function of the protein. This topical review summarizes computational studies based on MD simulations of the cytochrome P450 BM-3 and gives an outlook on future directions.

  8. Xenon and halogenated alkanes track putative substrate binding cavities in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Whittington, D A; Rosenzweig, A C; Frederick, C A; Lippard, S J

    2001-03-27

    To investigate the role of protein cavities in facilitating movement of the substrates, methane and dioxygen, in the soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH), we determined the X-ray structures of MMOH from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) cocrystallized with dibromomethane or iodoethane, or by using crystals pressurized with xenon gas. The halogenated alkanes bind in two cavities within the alpha-subunit that extend from one surface of the protein to the buried dinuclear iron active site. Two additional binding sites were located in the beta-subunit. Pressurization of two crystal forms of MMOH with xenon resulted in the identification of six binding sites located exclusively in the alpha-subunit. These results indicate that hydrophobic species bind preferentially in preexisting cavities in MMOH and support the hypothesis that such cavities may play a functional role in sequestering and enhancing the availability of the physiological substrates for reaction at the active site.

  9. Dynamics of Alkane Hydroxylation at the Non-Heme Diiron Center in Methane Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Guallar, Victor; Gherman, Benjamin F.; Lippard, Stephen J.; Friesner, Richard A.

    2002-03-12

    Semiclassical molecular dynamics simulations have been combined with quantum chemistry calculations to provide detailed modeling of the methane and ethane hydroxylation reactions catalyzed by the hydroxylase enzymes of the soluble methane monooxygenase system. The experimental distribution of enantiomeric alcohols in the reaction of ethanes made chiral by the use of hydrogen isotopes is quantitatively reproduced and explained. The reaction dynamics involve a mixture of concerted and bound radical trajectories, and we characterize each of these reactive channels in detail. Diffusion of the bound radical intermediate at the active site core determines the global rate constant. The results also provide a qualitative rationale for the lack of ring-opened products derived from certain radical clock substrate probes and for the relative rate constants and kinetic isotope effects exhibited by a variety of substrates.

  10. Crystal Structure of Dicamba Monooxygenase: A Rieske Nonheme Oxygenase that Catalyzes Oxidative Demethylation

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Razvan; Jiang, Wen Zhi; Weeks, Donald P.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2009-08-28

    Dicamba (3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid) is a widely used herbicide that is efficiently degraded by soil microbes. These microbes use a novel Rieske nonheme oxygenase, dicamba monooxygenase (DMO), to catalyze the oxidative demethylation of dicamba to 3,6-dichlorosalicylic acid (DCSA) and formaldehyde. We have determined the crystal structures of DMO in the free state, bound to its substrate dicamba, and bound to the product DCSA at 2.10-1.75 {angstrom} resolution. The structures show that the DMO active site uses a combination of extensive hydrogen bonding and steric interactions to correctly orient chlorinated, ortho-substituted benzoic-acid-like substrates for catalysis. Unlike other Rieske aromatic oxygenases, DMO oxygenates the exocyclic methyl group, rather than the aromatic ring, of its substrate. This first crystal structure of a Rieske demethylase shows that the Rieske oxygenase structural scaffold can be co-opted to perform varied types of reactions on xenobiotic substrates.

  11. Single-domain flavoenzymes trigger lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases for oxidative degradation of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Garajova, Sona; Mathieu, Yann; Beccia, Maria Rosa; Bennati-Granier, Chloé; Biaso, Frédéric; Fanuel, Mathieu; Ropartz, David; Guigliarelli, Bruno; Record, Eric; Rogniaux, Hélène; Henrissat, Bernard; Berrin, Jean-Guy

    2016-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of plant biomass has been recently revolutionized by the discovery of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) that carry out oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides. These very powerful enzymes are abundant in fungal saprotrophs. LPMOs require activation by electrons that can be provided by cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs), but as some fungi lack CDH-encoding genes, other recycling enzymes must exist. We investigated the ability of AA3_2 flavoenzymes secreted under lignocellulolytic conditions to trigger oxidative cellulose degradation by AA9 LPMOs. Among the flavoenzymes tested, we show that glucose dehydrogenase and aryl-alcohol quinone oxidoreductases are catalytically efficient electron donors for LPMOs. These single-domain flavoenzymes display redox potentials compatible with electron transfer between partners. Our findings extend the array of enzymes which regulate the oxidative degradation of cellulose by lignocellulolytic fungi. PMID:27312718

  12. Alkyl Formate Ester Synthesis by a Fungal Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Ferroni, Felix Martin; Tolmie, Carmien; Smit, Martha Sophia; Opperman, Diederik Johannes

    2017-03-16

    We investigated Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO)-mediated synthesis of alkyl formate esters, which are important flavor and fragrance products. A recombinant fungal BVMO from Aspergillus flavus was found to transform a selection of aliphatic aldehydes into alkyl formates with high regioselectivity. Near complete conversion of 10 mm octanal was achieved within 8 h with a regiomeric excess of ∼80 %. Substrate concentration was found to affect specific activity and regioselectivity of the BVMO, as well as the rate of product autohydrolysis to the primary alcohol. More than 80 % conversion of 50 mm octanal was reached after 72 h (TTN nearly 20 000). Biotransformation on a 200 mL scale under unoptimized conditions gave a space-time yield (STY) of 4.2 g L(-1)  d(-1) (3.4 g L(-1)  d(-1) extracted product).

  13. The Contribution of Non-catalytic Carbohydrate Binding Modules to the Activity of Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases*

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Lucy I.; Labourel, Aurore; Walton, Paul H.; Davies, Gideon J.; Gilbert, Harry J.

    2016-01-01

    Lignocellulosic biomass is a sustainable industrial substrate. Copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) contribute to the degradation of lignocellulose and increase the efficiency of biofuel production. LPMOs can contain non-catalytic carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), but their role in the activity of these enzymes is poorly understood. Here we explored the importance of CBMs in LPMO function. The family 2a CBMs of two monooxygenases, CfLPMO10 and TbLPMO10 from Cellulomonas fimi and Thermobispora bispora, respectively, were deleted and/or replaced with CBMs from other proteins. The data showed that the CBMs could potentiate and, surprisingly, inhibit LPMO activity, and that these effects were both enzyme-specific and substrate-specific. Removing the natural CBM or introducing CtCBM3a, from the Clostridium thermocellum cellulosome scaffoldin CipA, almost abolished the catalytic activity of the LPMOs against the cellulosic substrates. The deleterious effect of CBM removal likely reflects the importance of prolonged presentation of the enzyme on the surface of the substrate for efficient catalytic activity, as only LPMOs appended to CBMs bound tightly to cellulose. The negative impact of CtCBM3a is in sharp contrast with the capacity of this binding module to potentiate the activity of a range of glycoside hydrolases including cellulases. The deletion of the endogenous CBM from CfLPMO10 or the introduction of a family 10 CBM from Cellvibrio japonicus LPMO10B into TbLPMO10 influenced the quantity of non-oxidized products generated, demonstrating that CBMs can modulate the mode of action of LPMOs. This study demonstrates that engineered LPMO-CBM hybrids can display enhanced industrially relevant oxygenations. PMID:26801613

  14. Inactivation of Toluene 2-Monooxygenase in Burkholderia cepacia G4 by Alkynes

    PubMed Central

    Yeager, Chris M.; Bottomley, Peter J.; Arp, Daniel J.; Hyman, Michael R.

    1999-01-01

    High concentrations of acetylene (10 to 50% [vol/vol] gas phase) were required to inhibit the growth of Burkholderia cepacia G4 on toluene, while 1% (vol/vol) (gas phase) propyne or 1-butyne completely inhibited growth. Low concentrations of longer-chain alkynes (C5 to C10) were also effective inhibitors of toluene-dependent growth, and 2- and 3-alkynes were more potent inhibitors than their 1-alkyne counterparts. Exposure of toluene-grown B. cepacia G4 to alkynes resulted in the irreversible loss of toluene- and o-cresol-dependent O2 uptake activities, while acetate- and 3-methylcatechol-dependent O2 uptake activities were unaffected. Toluene-dependent O2 uptake decreased upon the addition of 1-butyne in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The loss of activity followed first-order kinetics, with apparent rate constants ranging from 0.25 min−1 to 2.45 min−1. Increasing concentrations of toluene afforded protection from the inhibitory effects of 1-butyne. Furthermore, oxygen, supplied as H2O2, was required for inhibition by 1-butyne. These results suggest that alkynes are specific, mechanism-based inactivators of toluene 2-monooxygenase in B. cepacia G4, although the simplest alkyne, acetylene, was relatively ineffective compared to longer alkynes. Alkene analogs of acetylene and propyne—ethylene and propylene—were not inactivators of toluene 2-monooxygenase activity in B. cepacia G4 but were oxidized to their respective epoxides, with apparent Ks and Vmax values of 39.7 μM and 112.3 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 for ethylene and 32.3 μM and 89.2 nmol min−1 mg of protein−1 for propylene. PMID:9925593

  15. Structure and Ligand Binding Properties of the Epoxidase Component of Styrene Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Kantz, Auric; Beaton, Michelle; Gassner, George T.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-07-23

    Styrene monooxygenase (SMO) is a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase that transforms styrene to styrene oxide in the first step of the styrene catabolic and detoxification pathway of Pseudomonas putida S12. The crystal structure of the N-terminally histidine-tagged epoxidase component of this system, NSMOA, determined to 2.3 {angstrom} resolution, indicates the enzyme exists as a homodimer in which each monomer forms two distinct domains. The overall architecture is most similar to that of p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase (PHBH), although there are some significant differences in secondary structure. Structural comparisons suggest that a large cavity open to the surface forms the FAD binding site. At the base of this pocket is another cavity that likely represents the styrene binding site. Flavin binding and redox equilibria are tightly coupled such that reduced FAD binds apo NSMOA {approx}8000 times more tightly than the oxidized coenzyme. Equilibrium fluorescence and isothermal titration calorimetry data using benzene as a substrate analogue indicate that the oxidized flavin and substrate analogue binding equilibria of NSMOA are linked such that the binding affinity of each is increased by 60-fold when the enzyme is saturated with the other. A much weaker {approx}2-fold positive cooperative interaction is observed for the linked binding equilibria of benzene and reduced FAD. The low affinity of the substrate analogue for the reduced FAD complex of NSMOA is consistent with a preferred reaction order in which flavin reduction and reaction with oxygen precede the binding of styrene, identifying the apoenzyme structure as the key catalytic resting state of NSMOA poised to bind reduced FAD and initiate the oxygen reaction.

  16. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem

    PubMed Central

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance. PMID:26459905

  17. The Biochemical Mechanism of Auxin Biosynthesis by an Arabidopsis YUCCA Flavin-containing Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xinhua; Mashiguchi, Kiyoshi; Chen, Qingguo; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Yuji; Ojha, Sunil; DuBois, Jennifer; Ballou, David; Zhao, Yunde

    2013-01-01

    Auxin regulates every aspect of plant growth and development. Previous genetic studies demonstrated that YUCCA (YUC) flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) catalyze a rate-limiting step in auxin biosynthesis and that YUCs are essential for many developmental processes. We proposed that YUCs convert indole-3-pyruvate (IPA) to indole-3-acetate (IAA). However, the exact biochemical mechanism of YUCs has remained elusive. Here we present the biochemical characterization of recombinant Arabidopsis YUC6. Expressed in and purified from Escherichia coli, YUC6 contains FAD as a cofactor, which has peaks at 448 nm and 376 nm in the UV-visible spectrum. We show that YUC6 uses NADPH and oxygen to convert IPA to IAA. The first step of the YUC6-catalyzed reaction is the reduction of the FAD cofactor to FADH− by NADPH. Subsequently, FADH− reacts with oxygen to form a flavin-C4a-(hydro)peroxy intermediate, which we show has a maximum absorbance at 381 nm in its UV-visible spectrum. The final chemical step is the reaction of the C4a-intermediate with IPA to produce IAA. Although the sequences of the YUC enzymes are related to those of the mammalian FMOs, which oxygenate nucleophilic substrates, YUC6 oxygenates an electrophilic substrate (IPA). Nevertheless, both classes of enzymes form quasi-stable C4a-(hydro)peroxyl FAD intermediates. The YUC6 intermediate has a half-life of ∼20 s whereas that of some FMOs is >30 min. This work reveals the catalytic mechanism of the first known plant flavin monooxygenase and provides a foundation for further investigating how YUC activities are regulated in plants. PMID:23188833

  18. Kinetic Mechanism of the Dechlorinating Flavin-dependent Monooxygenase HadA.

    PubMed

    Pimviriyakul, Panu; Thotsaporn, Kittisak; Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2017-03-24

    The accumulation of chlorophenols (CPs) in the environment, due to their wide use as agrochemicals, has become a serious environmental problem. These organic halides can be degraded by aerobic microorganisms, where the initial steps of various biodegradation pathways include an oxidative dechlorinating process in which chloride is replaced by a hydroxyl substituent. Harnessing these dechlorinating processes could provide an opportunity for environmental remediation, but detailed catalytic mechanisms for these enzymes are not yet known. To close this gap, we now report transient kinetics and product analysis of the dechlorinating flavin-dependent monooxygenase, HadA, from the aerobic organism Ralstonia pickettii DTP0602, identifying several mechanistic properties that differ from other enzymes in the same class. We first overexpressed and purified HadA to homogeneity. Analyses of the products from single and multiple turnover reactions demonstrated that HadA prefers 4-CP and 2-CP over CPs with multiple substituents. Stopped-flow and rapid-quench flow experiments of HadA with 4-CP show the involvement of specific intermediates (C4a-hydroperoxy-FAD and C4a-hydroxy-FAD) in the reaction, define rate constants and the order of substrate binding, and demonstrate that the hydroxylation step occurs prior to chloride elimination. The data also identify the non-productive and productive paths of the HadA reactions and demonstrate that product formation is the rate-limiting step. This is the first elucidation of the kinetic mechanism of a two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase that can catalyze oxidative dechlorination of various CPs, and as such it will serve as the basis for future investigation of enzyme variants that will be useful for applications in detoxifying chemicals hazardous to human health.

  19. Crystal Structure of Albaflavenone Monooxygenase Containing a Moonlighting Terpene Synthase Active Site*

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bin; Lei, Li; Vassylyev, Dmitry G.; Lin, Xin; Cane, David E.; Kelly, Steven L.; Yuan, Hang; Lamb, David C.; Waterman, Michael R.

    2009-01-01

    Albaflavenone synthase (CYP170A1) is a monooxygenase catalyzing the final two steps in the biosynthesis of this antibiotic in the soil bacterium, Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). Interestingly, CYP170A1 shows no stereo selection forming equal amounts of two albaflavenol epimers, each of which is oxidized in turn to albaflavenone. To explore the structural basis of the reaction mechanism, we have studied the crystal structures of both ligand-free CYP170A1 (2.6 Å) and complex of endogenous substrate (epi-isozizaene) with CYP170A1 (3.3 Å). The structure of the complex suggests that the proximal epi-isozizaene molecules may bind to the heme iron in two orientations. In addition, much to our surprise, we have found that albaflavenone synthase also has a second, completely distinct catalytic activity corresponding to the synthesis of farnesene isomers from farnesyl diphosphate. Within the cytochrome P450 α-helical domain both the primary sequence and x-ray structure indicate the presence of a novel terpene synthase active site that is moonlighting on the P450 structure. This includes signature sequences for divalent cation binding and an α-helical barrel. This barrel is unusual because it consists of only four helices rather than six found in all other terpene synthases. Mutagenesis establishes that this barrel is essential for the terpene synthase activity of CYP170A1 but not for the monooxygenase activity. This is the first bifunctional P450 discovered to have another active site moonlighting on it and the first time a terpene synthase active site is found moonlighting on another protein. PMID:19858213

  20. Homology modeling and protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121: in silico insights.

    PubMed

    Jain, Chakresh Kumar; Gupta, Money; Prasad, Yamuna; Wadhwa, Gulshan; Sharma, Sanjeev Kumar

    2014-07-01

    The degradation of hydrocarbons plays an important role in the eco-balancing of petroleum products, pesticides and other toxic products in the environment. The degradation of hydrocarbons by microbes such as Geobacillus thermodenitrificans, Burkhulderia, Gordonia sp. and Acinetobacter sp. has been studied intensively in the literature. The present study focused on the in silico protein engineering of alkane monooxygenase (ladA)-a protein involved in the alkane degradation pathway. We demonstrated the improvement in substrate binding energy with engineered ladA in Burkholderia thailandensis MSMB121. We identified an ortholog of ladA monooxygenase found in B. thailandensis MSMB121, and showed it to be an enzyme involved in an alkane degradation pathway studied extensively in Geobacillus thermodenitrificans. Homology modeling of the three-dimensional structure of ladA was performed with a crystal structure (protein databank ID: 3B9N) as a template in MODELLER 9v11, and further validated using PROCHECK, VERIFY-3D and WHATIF tools. Specific amino acids were substituted in the region corresponding to amino acids 305-370 of ladA protein, resulting in an enhancement of binding energy in different alkane chain molecules as compared to wild protein structures in the docking experiments. The substrate binding energy with the protein was calculated using Vina (Implemented in VEGAZZ). Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the dynamics of different alkane chain molecules inside the binding pockets of wild and mutated ladA. Here, we hypothesize an improvement in binding energies and accessibility of substrates towards engineered ladA enzyme, which could be further facilitated for wet laboratory-based experiments for validation of the alkane degradation pathway in this organism.

  1. The Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase Enzymatic Activity for the Biosynthesis of Aromatic Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Notomista, Eugenio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Di Cristo, Carlo; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Izzo, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Monocyclic phenols and catechols are important antioxidant compounds for the food and pharmaceutic industries; their production through biotransformation of low-added value starting compounds is of major biotechnological interest. The toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) that is able to hydroxylate a wide array of aromatic compounds and has already proven to be a versatile biochemical tool to produce mono- and dihydroxylated derivatives of aromatic compounds. The molecular determinants of its regioselectivity and substrate specificity have been thoroughly investigated, and a computational strategy has been developed which allows designing mutants able to hydroxylate non-natural substrates of this enzyme to obtain high-added value compounds of commercial interest. In this work, we have investigated the use of recombinant ToMO, expressed in cells of Escherichia coli strain JM109, for the biotransformation of non-natural substrates of this enzyme such as 2-phenoxyethanol, phthalan and 2-indanol to produce six hydroxylated derivatives. The hydroxylated products obtained were identified, isolated and their antioxidant potential was assessed both in vitro, using the DPPH assay, and on the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2. Incubation of H9c2 cells with the hydroxylated compounds obtained from ToMO-catalyzed biotransformation induced a differential protective effect towards a mild oxidative stress induced by the presence of sodium arsenite. The results obtained confirm once again the versatility of the ToMO system for oxyfunctionalization reactions of biotechnological importance. Moreover, the hydroxylated derivatives obtained possess an interesting antioxidant potential that encourages the use of the enzyme for further functionalization reactions and their possible use as scaffolds to design novel bioactive molecules. PMID:25915063

  2. The Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase Enzymatic Activity for the Biosynthesis of Aromatic Antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Donadio, Giuliana; Sarcinelli, Carmen; Pizzo, Elio; Notomista, Eugenio; Pezzella, Alessandro; Di Cristo, Carlo; De Lise, Federica; Di Donato, Alberto; Izzo, Viviana

    2015-01-01

    Monocyclic phenols and catechols are important antioxidant compounds for the food and pharmaceutic industries; their production through biotransformation of low-added value starting compounds is of major biotechnological interest. The toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas sp. OX1 is a bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) that is able to hydroxylate a wide array of aromatic compounds and has already proven to be a versatile biochemical tool to produce mono- and dihydroxylated derivatives of aromatic compounds. The molecular determinants of its regioselectivity and substrate specificity have been thoroughly investigated, and a computational strategy has been developed which allows designing mutants able to hydroxylate non-natural substrates of this enzyme to obtain high-added value compounds of commercial interest. In this work, we have investigated the use of recombinant ToMO, expressed in cells of Escherichia coli strain JM109, for the biotransformation of non-natural substrates of this enzyme such as 2-phenoxyethanol, phthalan and 2-indanol to produce six hydroxylated derivatives. The hydroxylated products obtained were identified, isolated and their antioxidant potential was assessed both in vitro, using the DPPH assay, and on the rat cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2. Incubation of H9c2 cells with the hydroxylated compounds obtained from ToMO-catalyzed biotransformation induced a differential protective effect towards a mild oxidative stress induced by the presence of sodium arsenite. The results obtained confirm once again the versatility of the ToMO system for oxyfunctionalization reactions of biotechnological importance. Moreover, the hydroxylated derivatives obtained possess an interesting antioxidant potential that encourages the use of the enzyme for further functionalization reactions and their possible use as scaffolds to design novel bioactive molecules.

  3. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases as a detoxification mechanism in insects: new insights from the arctiids (lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Sehlmeyer, Sven; Wang, Linzhu; Langel, Dorothee; Heckel, David G; Mohagheghi, Hoda; Petschenka, Georg; Ober, Dietrich

    2010-05-03

    Insects experience a wide array of chemical pressures from plant allelochemicals and pesticides and have developed several effective counterstrategies to cope with such toxins. Among these, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are crucial in plant-insect interactions. Flavin-dependent monooxygenases (FMOs) seem not to play a central role in xenobiotic detoxification in insects, in contrast to mammals. However, the previously identified senecionine N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae (Lepidoptera) indicates that FMOs have been recruited during the adaptation of this insect to plants that accumulate toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids. Identification of related FMO-like sequences of various arctiids and other Lepidoptera and their combination with expressed sequence tag (EST) data and sequences emerging from the Bombyx mori genome project show that FMOs in Lepidoptera form a gene family with three members (FMO1 to FMO3). Phylogenetic analyses suggest that FMO3 is only distantly related to lepidopteran FMO1 and FMO2 that originated from a more recent gene duplication event. Within the FMO1 gene cluster, an additional gene duplication early in the arctiid lineage provided the basis for the evolution of the highly specific biochemical, physiological, and behavioral adaptations of these butterflies to pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-producing plants. The genes encoding pyrrolizidine-alkaloid-N-oxygenizing enzymes (PNOs) are transcribed in the fat body and the head of the larvae. An N-terminal signal peptide mediates the transport of the soluble proteins into the hemolymph where PNOs efficiently convert pro-toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids into their non-toxic N-oxide derivatives. Heterologous expression of a PNO of the generalist arctiid Grammia geneura produced an N-oxygenizing enzyme that shows noticeably expanded substrate specificity compared with the related enzyme of the specialist Tyria jacobaeae. The data about the evolution of FMOs within lepidopteran insects and the

  4. Escherichia coli Overexpressing a Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens Becomes Resistant to Imipenem.

    PubMed

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Castrignanò, Silvia; Catucci, Gianluca; Medana, Claudio; Terlizzi, Maria Elena; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Gilardi, Gianfranco; Sadeghi, Sheila J

    2015-10-12

    Antimicrobial resistance is a global issue currently resulting in the deaths of hundreds of thousands of people a year worldwide. Data present in the literature illustrate the emergence of many bacterial species that display resistance to known antibiotics; Acinetobacter spp. are a good example of this. We report here that Acinetobacter radioresistens has a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (Ar-BVMO) with 100% amino acid sequence identity to the ethionamide monooxygenase of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Acinetobacter baumannii. Both enzymes are only distantly phylogenetically related to other canonical bacterial BVMO proteins. Ar-BVMO not only is capable of oxidizing two anticancer drugs metabolized by human FMO3, danusertib and tozasertib, but also can oxidize other synthetic drugs, such as imipenem. The latter is a member of the carbapenems, a clinically important antibiotic family used in the treatment of MDR bacterial infections. Susceptibility tests performed by the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method demonstrate that imipenem-sensitive Escherichia coli BL21 cells overexpressing Ar-BVMO become resistant to this antibiotic. An agar disk diffusion assay proved that when imipenem reacts with Ar-BVMO, it loses its antibiotic property. Moreover, an NADPH consumption assay with the purified Ar-BVMO demonstrates that this antibiotic is indeed a substrate, and its product is identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to be a Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation product of the carbonyl moiety of the β-lactam ring. This is the first report of an antibiotic-inactivating BVMO enzyme that, while mediating its usual BV oxidation, also operates by an unprecedented mechanism of carbapenem resistance.

  5. Eukaryotic formylglycine-generating enzyme catalyses a monooxygenase type of reaction.

    PubMed

    Peng, Jianhe; Alam, Sarfaraz; Radhakrishnan, Karthikeyan; Mariappan, Malaiyalam; Rudolph, Markus Georg; May, Caroline; Dierks, Thomas; von Figura, Kurt; Schmidt, Bernhard

    2015-09-01

    C α-formylglycine (FGly) is the catalytic residue of sulfatases in eukaryotes. It is generated by a unique post-translational modification catalysed by the FGly-generating enzyme (FGE) in the endoplasmic reticulum. FGE oxidizes a cysteine residue within the conserved CxPxR sequence motif of nascent sulfatase polypeptides to FGly. Here we show that this oxidation is strictly dependent on molecular oxygen (O2) and consumes 1 mol O2 per mol FGly formed. For maximal activity FGE requires an O2 concentration of 9% (105 μM). Sustained FGE activity further requires the presence of a thiol-based reductant such as DTT. FGly is also formed in the absence of DTT, but its formation ceases rapidly. Thus inactivated FGE accumulates in which the cysteine pair Cys336/Cys341 in the catalytic site is oxidized to form disulfide bridges between either Cys336 and Cys341 or Cys341 and the CxPxR cysteine of the sulfatase. These results strongly suggest that the Cys336/Cys341 pair is directly involved in the O2 -dependent conversion of the CxPxR cysteine to FGly. The available data characterize eukaryotic FGE as a monooxygenase, in which Cys336/Cys341 disulfide bridge formation donates the electrons required to reduce one oxygen atom of O2 to water while the other oxygen atom oxidizes the CxPxR cysteine to FGly. Regeneration of a reduced Cys336/Cys341 pair is accomplished in vivo by a yet unknown reductant of the endoplasmic reticulum or in vitro by DTT. Remarkably, this monooxygenase reaction utilizes O2 without involvement of any activating cofactor.

  6. Enzymatic formation of apo-carotenoids from the xanthophyll carotenoids lutein, zeaxanthin and b-cryptoxanthin by ferret carotene-9, 10-monooxygenase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Xanthophyll carotenoids, such as lutein, zeaxanthin and b-cryptoxanthin, may provide potential health benefits against chronic and degenerative diseases. Investigating pathways of xanthophyll metabolism are important to understanding their biological functions. Carotene-15,150-monooxygenase (CMO1) h...

  7. mRNA stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J

    1995-01-01

    This review concerns how cytoplasmic mRNA half-lives are regulated and how mRNA decay rates influence gene expression. mRNA stability influences gene expression in virtually all organisms, from bacteria to mammals, and the abundance of a particular mRNA can fluctuate manyfold following a change in the mRNA half-life, without any change in transcription. The processes that regulate mRNA half-lives can, in turn, affect how cells grow, differentiate, and respond to their environment. Three major questions are addressed. Which sequences in mRNAs determine their half-lives? Which enzymes degrade mRNAs? Which (trans-acting) factors regulate mRNA stability, and how do they function? The following specific topics are discussed: techniques for measuring eukaryotic mRNA stability and for calculating decay constants, mRNA decay pathways, mRNases, proteins that bind to sequences shared among many mRNAs [like poly(A)- and AU-rich-binding proteins] and proteins that bind to specific mRNAs (like the c-myc coding-region determinant-binding protein), how environmental factors like hormones and growth factors affect mRNA stability, and how translation and mRNA stability are linked. Some perspectives and predictions for future research directions are summarized at the end. PMID:7565413

  8. A comparison of the substrate and electron-donor specificities of the methane mono-oxygenases from three strains of methane-oxidizing bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Stirling, D I; Colby, J; Dalton, H

    1979-01-01

    1. Methane mono-oxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium has the same broad substrate specificity as the analogous enzyme from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath); the enzyme from Methylomonas methanica is more specific. 2. Contrary to previous reports, NAD(P)H and not ascorbate is the required electron donor for the enzyme from Methylosinus trichosporium. 3. It is concluded that these three bacteria contain similar methane mono-oxygenases. PMID:106847

  9. Transcriptional regulation of the grape cytochrome P450 monooxygenase gene CYP736B expression in response to Xylella fastidiosa infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP) mediate synthesis and metabolism of many physiologically important primary and secondary compounds that are related to plant defense against a range of pathogenic microbes and insects. To determine if cytochrome P450 monooxygenases are involved in defense response to Xylella fastidiosa (Xf) infection, we investigated expression and regulatory mechanisms of the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene in both disease resistant and susceptible grapevines. Results Cloning of genomic DNA and cDNA revealed that the CYP736B gene was composed of two exons and one intron with GT as a donor site and AG as an acceptor site. CYP736B transcript was up-regulated in PD-resistant plants and down-regulated in PD-susceptible plants 6 weeks after Xf inoculation. However, CYP736B expression was very low in stem tissues at all evaluated time points. 5'RACE and 3'RACE sequence analyses revealed that there were three candidate transcription start sites (TSS) in the upstream region and three candidate polyadenylation (PolyA) sites in the downstream region of CYP736B. Usage frequencies of each transcription initiation site and each polyadenylation site varied depending on plant genotype, developmental stage, tissue, and treatment. These results demonstrate that expression of CYP736B is regulated developmentally and in response to Xf infection at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. Multiple transcription start and polyadenylation sites contribute to regulation of CYP736B expression. Conclusions This report provides evidence that the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase CYP736B gene is involved in defense response at a specific stage of Xf infection in grapevines; multiple transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites exist for CYP736B in grapevine; and coordinative and selective use of transcription initiation and polyadenylation sites play an important role in regulation of CYP736B expression during growth

  10. Role of hepatic monooxygenases in generating estrogenic metabolites from methoxychlor and from its identified contaminants.

    PubMed

    Bulger, W H; Feil, V J; Kupfer, D

    1985-01-01

    Previous investigations demonstrated that methoxychlor [1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane] contains estrogenic contaminants and that methoxychlor per se is not an estrogen but is a proestrogen being metabolized in vivo into estrogenic products. The present study examined structurally identified methoxychlor contaminants as to their estrogenic or proestrogenic properties. Also, the estrogenic activity of demethylated metabolites of methoxychlor and of one contaminant was determined. To examine these properties, we utilized an assay developed by us that monitors whether a given compound, incubated with isolated rat uteri, can diminish the uterine cytosolic estrogen receptor and elevate the nuclear estrogen receptor and whether metabolic intervention by hepatic microsomal monooxygenase(s) is required by the respective compound for this cellular redistribution of the receptor. Of the 15 compounds examined which constitute with methoxychlor 99.5% of total technical grade methoxychlor, two compounds, 1,1-dichloro-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethene (mono-OH-MDDE) and 1,1,1-trichloro-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-(4-methoxyphenyl)ethane (mono-OH-methoxychlor), were active per se and two compounds, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-methoxyphenyl)ethene (MDDE) and methoxychlor, required metabolic transformation for estrogenic activity to be manifested. Subsequently, it was shown that the mono- and bis-OH metabolites of MDDE and of methoxychlor were active estrogens and that the order of activity, either by the above procedure or in terms of relative binding affinity to rat uterine cytosolic receptor, was as follows: bis-OH-MDDE much greater than bis-OH-methoxychlor greater than mono-OH-MDDE greater than mono-OH-methoxychlor. Following the in vitro observations, the activity of MDDE and bis-OH-MDDE was determined in vivo in immature rats. It appears that both compounds are estrogenic, yielding marked elevation in ornithine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.17) levels and moderate

  11. Pseudomonad Cyclopentadecanone Monooxygenase Displaying an Uncommon Spectrum of Baeyer-Villiger Oxidations of Cyclic Ketones†

    PubMed Central

    Iwaki, Hiroaki; Wang, Shaozhao; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Nagahashi, Ayako; Lertvorachon, Jittiwud; Yang, Jianzhong; Konishi, Yasuo; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Lau, Peter C. K.

    2006-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are biocatalysts that offer the prospect of high chemo-, regio-, and enantioselectivity in the organic synthesis of lactones or esters from a variety of ketones. In this study, we have cloned, sequenced, and overexpressed in Escherichia coli a new BVMO, cyclopentadecanone monooxygenase (CpdB or CPDMO), originally derived from Pseudomonas sp. strain HI-70. The 601-residue primary structure of CpdB revealed only 29% to 50% sequence identity to those of known BVMOs. A new sequence motif, characterized by a cluster of charged residues, was identified in a subset of BVMO sequences that contain an N-terminal extension of ∼60 to 147 amino acids. The 64-kDa CPDMO enzyme was purified to apparent homogeneity, providing a specific activity of 3.94 μmol/min/mg protein and a 20% yield. CPDMO is monomeric and NADPH dependent and contains ∼1 mol flavin adenine dinucleotide per mole of protein. A deletion mutant suggested the importance of the N-terminal 54 amino acids to CPDMO activity. In addition, a Ser261Ala substitution in a Rossmann fold motif resulted in an improved stability and increased affinity of the enzyme towards NADPH compared to the wild-type enzyme (Km = 8 μM versus Km = 24 μM). Substrate profiling indicated that CPDMO is unusual among known BVMOs in being able to accommodate and oxidize both large and small ring substrates that include C11 to C15 ketones, methyl-substituted C5 and C6 ketones, and bicyclic ketones, such as decalone and β-tetralone. CPDMO has the highest affinity (Km = 5.8 μM) and the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km ratio of 7.2 × 105 M−1 s−1) toward cyclopentadecanone, hence the Cpd designation. A number of whole-cell biotransformations were carried out, and as a result, CPDMO was found to have an excellent enantioselectivity (E > 200) as well as 99% S-selectivity toward 2-methylcyclohexanone for the production of 7-methyl-2-oxepanone, a potentially valuable chiral building block. Although

  12. Regioselective Versatility of Monooxygenase Reactions Catalyzed by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4: Examples with Single Substrates.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio A; Deo, Anand K; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes have broad and overlapping substrate specificity and catalyze a variety of monooxygenase reactions, including aliphatic and aromatic hydroxylations, N-hydroxylations, oxygenations of heteroatoms (N, S, P and I), alkene and arene epoxidations, dehalogenations, dehydrogenations and N-, O- and S-dealkylations. Individual CYP enzymes typically catalyze the oxidative metabolism of a common substrate in a regioselective and stereoselective manner. In addition, different CYP enzymes often utilize different monooxygenase reactions when oxidizing a common substrate. This review examines various oxidative reactions catalyzed by a CYP enzyme acting on a single substrate. In the first example, 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), a halogenated aromatic environmental contaminant, was oxidatively biotransformed by human CYP2B6. Nine different metabolites of BDE-47 were produced by CYP2B6 via monooxygenase reactions that included aromatic hydroxylation, with and without an NIH-shift, dealkylation and debromination. In the second example, lithocholic acid (3α-hydroxy-5β-cholan-24-oic acid), an endogenous bile acid, served as a substrate for human CYP3A4 and yielded five different metabolites via aliphatic hydroxylation and dehydrogenation reactions.

  13. Identification and treatment of heme depletion attributed to overexpression of a lineage of evolved P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Michener, Joshua K; Nielsen, Jens; Smolke, Christina D

    2012-11-20

    Recent advances in metabolic engineering have demonstrated that microbial biosynthesis can provide a viable alternative to chemical synthesis for the production of bulk and fine chemicals. Introduction of a new biosynthetic pathway typically requires the expression of multiple heterologous enzymes in the production host, which can impose stress on the host cell and, thereby, limit performance of the pathway. Unfortunately, analysis and treatment of the host stress response can be difficult, because there are many sources of stress that may interact in complex ways. We use a systems biological approach to analyze the stress imposed by expressing different enzyme variants from a lineage of soluble P450 monooxygenases, previously evolved for heterologous activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our analysis identifies patterns of stress imposed on the host by heterologous enzyme overexpression that are consistent across the evolutionary lineage, ultimately implicating heme depletion as the major stress. We show that the monooxygenase evolution, starting from conditions of either high or low stress, caused the cellular stress to converge to a common level. Overexpression of rate-limiting enzymes in the endogenous heme biosynthetic pathway alleviates the stress imposed by expression of the P450 monooxygenases and increases the enzymatic activity of the final evolved P450 by an additional 2.3-fold. Heme overexpression also increases the total activity of an endogenous cytosolic heme-containing catalase but not a heterologous P450 that is membrane-associated. This work demonstrates the utility of combining systems and synthetic biology to analyze and optimize heterologous enzyme expression.

  14. Total degradation of pentachloroethane by an engineered Alcaligenes strain expressing a modified camphor monooxygenase and a hybrid dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Ryo; Yoshihira, Kunichika; Ngadiman; Futagami, Taiki; Goto, Masatoshi; Furukawa, Kensuke

    2004-06-01

    We engineered biphenyl-degrading Alcaligenes sp. strain KF711 for total degradation of pentachloroethane (PCA), which expresses a modified camphor monooxygenase and a hybrid dioxygenase consisting of TodC1 (a large subunit of toluene dioxygenase of Pseudomonas putida F1) and BphA2-BphA3-pbhA4 (a small subunit, ferredoxin and ferredoxin reductase of biphenyl dioxygenase, respectively, in strain KF707). Modified camphor monooxygenase genes (camCAB) were supplied as a plasmid and the todC1 gene was integrated within the chromosomal bph gene cluster by a single crossover recombination. The resultant strain KF711S-3cam dechlorinated PCA to trichloroethene by the action of the modified camphor monooxygenase under anaerobic conditions. The same strain subsequently degraded trichloroethene formed oxidatively by the action of the Tol-Bph hybrid dioxygenase under aerobic conditions. Thus sequential anaerobic and aerobic treatments of the KF711S-3cam resting cells resulted in efficient and total degradation of PCA.

  15. Nutrigenetics of carotenoid metabolism in the chicken: a polymorphism at the β,β-carotene 15,15'-mono-oxygenase 1 (BCMO1) locus affects the response to dietary β-carotene.

    PubMed

    Jlali, Maamer; Graulet, Benoit; Chauveau-Duriot, Béatrice; Godet, Estelle; Praud, Christophe; Nunes, Carlos Simões; Le Bihan-Duval, Elisabeth; Berri, Cécile; Duclos, Michel J

    2014-06-28

    The enzyme β,β-carotene-15,15'-mono-oxygenase 1 (BCMO1) is responsible for the symmetrical cleavage of β-carotene into retinal. We identified a polymorphism in the promoter of the BCMO1 gene, inducing differences in BCMO1 mRNA levels (high in adenines (AA) and low in guanines (GG)) and colour in chicken breast muscle. The present study was designed to test whether this polymorphism could affect the response to dietary β-carotene. Dietary β-carotene supplementation did not change the effects of the genotypes on breast muscle properties: BCMO1 mRNA levels were lower and xanthophyll contents higher in GG than in AA chickens. Lower vitamin E levels in the plasma and duodenum, plasma cholesterol levels and body weight were also observed in GG than in AA chickens. In both genotypes, dietary β-carotene increased vitamin A storage in the liver; however, it reduced numerous parameters such as SCARB1 (scavenger receptor class B type I) in the duodenum, BCMO1 in the liver, vitamin E levels in the plasma and tissues, xanthophyll contents in the pectoralis major muscle and carcass adiposity. However, several diet × genotype interactions were observed. In the GG genotype, dietary β-carotene increased ISX (intestine-specific homeobox) and decreased BCMO1 mRNA levels in the duodenum, decreased xanthophyll concentrations in the duodenum, liver and plasma, and decreased colour index and HDL-cholesterol concentration in the plasma. Retinol accumulation following dietary β-carotene supplementation was observed in the duodenum of AA chickens only. Therefore, the negative feedback control on β-carotene conversion through ISX appears as functional in the duodenum of GG but not of AA chickens. This could result in a higher availability of β-carotene in the duodenum of GG chickens, reducing the uptake of xanthophylls, liposoluble vitamins and cholesterol.

  16. Sequencing and characterization of mixed function monooxygenase genes CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 of Mink (Mustela vison) to facilitate study of dioxin-like compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaowei; Moore, Jeremy N.; Newsted, John L.; Hecker, Markus Zwiernik, Matthew J.; Jones, Paul D.; Bursian, Steven J.

    2009-02-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to understand aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediated toxicity in mink, cDNAs encoding for CYP1A1 and the CYP1A2 mixed function monooxygenases were cloned and characterized. In addition, the effects of selected dibenzofurans on the expression of these genes and the presence of their respective proteins (P4501A) were investigated, and then correlated with the catalytic activities of these proteins as measured by ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase (EROD) and methoxyresorufin O-deethylase (MROD) activities. The predicted protein sequences for CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 comprise 517 and 512 amino acid residues, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis of the mink CYP1As with protein sequences of other mammals revealed high sequence homology with sea otter, seals and the dog, with amino acid identities ranging from 89 to 95% for CYP1A1 and 81 to 93% for CYP1A2. Since exposure to both 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzofuran (TCDF) and 2,3,4,7,8-Pentachlorodibenzofuran (PeCDF) resulted in dose-dependent increases of CYP1A1 mRNA, CYP1A2 mRNA and CYP1A protein levels an underlying AhR-mediated mechanism is suggested. The up-regulation of CYP1A mRNA in liver was more consistent to the sum adipose TEQ concentration than to the liver TEQ concentration in minks treated with TCDF or PeCDF. The result suggested that the hepatic-sequestered fraction of PeCDF was biologically inactive to the induction of CYP1A1 and CYP1A2.

  17. Identification of selectivity determinants in CYP monooxygenases by modelling and systematic analysis of sequence and structure.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alexander; Pleiss, Jurgen

    2012-02-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) form a large, ubiquitous enzyme family and are of great interest in red and white biotechnology. To investigate the effect of protein structure on selectivity, the binding of substrate molecules near to the active site was modelled by molecular dynamics simulations. From a comprehensive and systematic comparison of more than 6300 CYP sequences and 31 structures using the Cytochrome P450 Engineering Database (CYPED), residues were identified which are predicted to point close to the heme centre and thus restrict accessibility for substrates. As a result, sequence-structure-function relationships are described that can be used to predict selectivity-determining positions from CYP sequences and structures. Based on this analysis, a minimal library consisting of bacterial CYP102A1 (P450(BM3)) and 24 variants was constructed. All variants were functionally expressed in E. coli, and the library was screened with four terpene substrates. Only 3 variants showed no activity towards all 4 terpenes, while 11 variants demonstrated either a strong shift or improved regio- or stereoselectivity during oxidation of at least one substrate as compared to CYP102A1 wild type. The minimal library also contains variants that show interesting side products which are not generated by the wild type enzyme. By two additional rounds of molecular modelling, diversification, and screening, the selectivity of one of these variants for a new product was optimised with a minimal screening effort. We propose this as a generic approach for other CYP substrates.

  18. Suppressed expression of choline monooxygenase in sugar beet on the accumulation of glycine betaine.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Nana; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kitou, Kunihide; Sahashi, Kosuke; Tamagake, Hideto; Tanaka, Yoshito; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-11-01

    Glycine betaine (GB) is an important osmoprotectant and synthesized by two-step oxidation of choline. Choline monooxygenase (CMO) catalyzes the first step of the pathway and is believed to be a rate limiting step for GB synthesis. Recent studies have shown the importance of choline-precursor supply for GB synthesis. In order to investigate the role of CMO for GB accumulation in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), transgenic plants carrying the antisense BvCMO gene were developed. The antisense BvCMO plants showed the decreased activity of GB synthesis from choline compared to wild-type (WT) plants which is well related to the suppressed level of BvCMO protein. However, GB contents were similar between transgenic and WT plants with the exception of young leaves and storage roots. Transgenic plants showed enhanced susceptibility to salt stress than WT plants. These results suggest the importance of choline-precursor-supply for GB accumulation, and young leaves and storage root are sensitive sites for GB accumulation.

  19. Electron transfer reactions in the alkene mono-oxygenase complex from Nocardia corallina B-276.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, S C; Cammack, R; Dalton, H

    1999-01-01

    Nocardia corallina B-276 possesses a multi-component enzyme, alkene mono-oxygenase (AMO), that catalyses the stereoselective epoxygenation of alkenes. The reductase component of this system has been shown by EPR and fluorescence spectroscopy to contain two prosthetic groups, an FAD centre and a [2Fe-2S] cluster. The role of these centres in the epoxygenation reaction was determined by midpoint potential measurements and electron transfer kinetics. The order of potentials of the prosthetic groups of the reductase were FAD/FAD.=-216 mV, [2Fe-2S]/[2Fe-2S].=-160 mV and FAD./FAD.=-134 mV. Combined, these data implied that the reductase component supplied the energy required for the epoxygenation reaction and allowed a prediction of the mechanism of electron transfer within the AMO complex. The FAD moiety was reduced by bound NADH in a two-electron reaction. The electrons were then transported to the [2Fe-2S] centre one at a time, which in turn reduced the di-iron centre of the epoxygenase. Reduction of the di-iron centre is required for oxygen binding and substrate oxidation. PMID:10085230

  20. Crystal Structures of Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase Reveal Complex Domain Movements and a Sliding Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, I.; Yachnin, B; Wang, S; Grosse, S; Bergeron, H; Imura, A; Iwaki, H; Hasegawa, Y; Lau, P; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a flavoprotein that carries out the archetypical Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a variety of cyclic ketones into lactones. Using NADPH and O{sub 2} as cosubstrates, the enzyme inserts one atom of oxygen into the substrate in a complex catalytic mechanism that involves the formation of a flavin-peroxide and Criegee intermediate. We present here the atomic structures of CHMO from an environmental Rhodococcus strain bound with FAD and NADP+ in two distinct states, to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.2 {angstrom}. The two conformations reveal domain shifts around multiple linkers and loop movements, involving conserved arginine 329 and tryptophan 492, which effect a translation of the nicotinamide resulting in a sliding cofactor. Consequently, the cofactor is ideally situated and subsequently repositioned during the catalytic cycle to first reduce the flavin and later stabilize formation of the Criegee intermediate. Concurrent movements of a loop adjacent to the active site demonstrate how this protein can effect large changes in the size and shape of the substrate binding pocket to accommodate a diverse range of substrates. Finally, the previously identified BVMO signature sequence is highlighted for its role in coordinating domain movements. Taken together, these structures provide mechanistic insights into CHMO-catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  1. Kinetic and spectroscopic characterization of the putative monooxygenase domain of human MICAL-1.

    PubMed

    Zucchini, Daniela; Caprini, Gianluca; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Vanoni, Maria A

    2011-11-01

    MICALs form a conserved multidomain protein family essential for cytoskeletal rearrangements. To complement structural information available, we produced the FAD-containing monooxygenase-like domain of human MICAL-1 (MICAL-MO) in forms differing for the presence and location of a His-tag, which only influences the protein yields. The K(m) for NADPH of the NADPH oxidase reaction is sensitive to ionic strength and type of ions. The apparent k(cat) (pH 7) is limited by enzyme reduction by NADPH, which occurs without detectable intermediates, as established by anaerobic rapid reaction experiments. The sensitivity to ionic strength and type of ions and the pH dependence of the steady-state kinetic parameters extend MICAL-MO similarity with enzymes of the p-hydroxybenzoate hydroxylase class at the functional level. The reaction is also sensitive to solvent viscosity, providing a tool to monitor the conformational changes predicted to occur during turnover. Finally, it was confirmed that MICAL-MO promotes actin depolymerization, and it was shown that F-actin, but not G-actin, stimulates NADPH oxidation by increasing k(cat) and k(cat)/K(NADPH) (≈5 and ≈200-fold, respectively) with an apparent K(m) for actin of 4.7μM, under conditions that stabilize F-actin. The time-course of NADPH oxidation shows substrate recycling, indicating the possible reversibility of MICAL effect.

  2. Prediction and analysis of the modular structure of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) form a vast and diverse family of highly variable sequences. They catalyze a wide variety of oxidative reactions and are therefore of great relevance in drug development and biotechnological applications. Despite their differences in sequence and substrate specificity, the structures of CYPs are highly similar. Although being in research focus for years, factors mediating selectivity and activity remain vague. Description This systematic comparison of CYPs based on the Cytochrome P450 Engineering Database (CYPED) involved sequence and structure analysis of more than 8000 sequences. 31 structures have been applied to generate a reliable structure-based HMM profile in order to predict structurally conserved regions. Therefore, it was possible to automatically transfer these modules on CYP sequences without any secondary structure information, to analyze substrate interacting residues and to compare interaction sites with redox partners. Conclusions Functionally relevant structural sites of CYPs were predicted. Regions involved in substrate binding were analyzed in all sequences among the CYPED. For all CYPs that require a reductase, two reductase interaction sites were identified and classified according to their length. The newly gained insights promise an improvement of engineered enzyme properties for potential biotechnological application. The annotated sequences are accessible on the current version of the CYPED. The prediction tool can be applied to any CYP sequence via the web interface at http://www.cyped.uni-stuttgart.de/cgi-bin/strpred/dosecpred.pl. PMID:20950472

  3. Oxidation of ultrafast radical clock substrate probes by the soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Valentine, A M; LeTadic-Biadatti, M H; Toy, P H; Newcomb, M; Lippard, S J

    1999-04-16

    Radical clock substrate probes were used to assess the viability of a discrete substrate radical species in the mechanism of hydrocarbon oxidation by the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). New substituted cyclopropane probes were used with very fast ring-opening rate constants and other desirable attributes, such as the ability to discriminate between radical and cationic intermediates. Oxidation of these substrates by a reconstituted sMMO system resulted in no rearranged products, allowing an upper limit of 150 fs to be placed on the lifetime of a putative radical species. This limit strongly suggests that there is no such substrate radical intermediate. The two enantiomers of trans-1-methyl-2-phenyl-cyclopropane were prepared, and the regioselectivity of their oxidation to the corresponding cyclopropylmethanol and cyclopropylphenol products was determined. The results are consistent with selective orientation of the two enantiomeric substrates in the hydrophobic cavity at the active site of sMMO, specific models for which were examined by molecular modeling.

  4. Crystal structures of cyclohexanone monooxygenase reveal complex domain movements and a sliding cofactor.

    PubMed

    Mirza, I Ahmad; Yachnin, Brahm J; Wang, Shaozhao; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Imura, Akihiro; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Lau, Peter C K; Berghuis, Albert M

    2009-07-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a flavoprotein that carries out the archetypical Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a variety of cyclic ketones into lactones. Using NADPH and O(2) as cosubstrates, the enzyme inserts one atom of oxygen into the substrate in a complex catalytic mechanism that involves the formation of a flavin-peroxide and Criegee intermediate. We present here the atomic structures of CHMO from an environmental Rhodococcus strain bound with FAD and NADP(+) in two distinct states, to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.2 A. The two conformations reveal domain shifts around multiple linkers and loop movements, involving conserved arginine 329 and tryptophan 492, which effect a translation of the nicotinamide resulting in a sliding cofactor. Consequently, the cofactor is ideally situated and subsequently repositioned during the catalytic cycle to first reduce the flavin and later stabilize formation of the Criegee intermediate. Concurrent movements of a loop adjacent to the active site demonstrate how this protein can effect large changes in the size and shape of the substrate binding pocket to accommodate a diverse range of substrates. Finally, the previously identified BVMO signature sequence is highlighted for its role in coordinating domain movements. Taken together, these structures provide mechanistic insights into CHMO-catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  5. Switching the Regioselectivity of a Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase toward (+)-trans-Dihydrocarvone by Rational Protein Design.

    PubMed

    Balke, Kathleen; Schmidt, Sandy; Genz, Maika; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2016-01-15

    The regioselectivity of the Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase-catalyzed oxidation is governed mostly by electronic effects leading to the migration of the higher substituted residue. However, in some cases, substrate binding occurs in a way that the less substituted residue lies in an antiperiplanar orientation to the peroxy bond in the Criegee intermediate yielding in the formation of the "abnormal" lactone product. We are the first to demonstrate a complete switch in the regioselectivity of the BVMO from Arthrobacter sp. (CHMOArthro) as exemplified for (+)-trans-dihydrocarvone by redesigning the active site of the enzyme. In the designed triple mutant, the substrate binds in an inverted orientation leading to a ratio of 99:1 in favor of the normal lactone instead of exclusive formation of the abnormal lactone in case of the wild type enzyme. In order to validate our computational study, the beneficial mutations were successfully transferred to the CHMO from Acinetobacter sp. (CHMOAcineto), again yielding in a complete switch of regioselectivity.

  6. Modulation of MICAL Monooxygenase Activity by its Calponin Homology Domain: Structural and Mechanistic Insights

    PubMed Central

    Alqassim, Saif S.; Urquiza, Mauricio; Borgnia, Eitan; Nagib, Marc; Amzel, L. Mario; Bianchet, Mario A.

    2016-01-01

    MICALs (Molecule Interacting with CasL) are conserved multidomain enzymes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization in nerve development, endocytosis, and apoptosis. In these enzymes, a type-2 calponin homology (CH) domain always follows an N-terminal monooxygenase (MO) domain. Although the CH domain is required for MICAL-1 cellular localization and actin-associated function, its contribution to the modulation of MICAL activity towards actin remains unclear. Here, we present the structure of a fragment of MICAL-1 containing the MO and the CH domains—determined by X-ray crystallography and small angle scattering—as well as kinetics experiments designed to probe the contribution of the CH domain to the actin-modification activity. Our results suggest that the CH domain, which is loosely connected to the MO domain by a flexible linker and is far away from the catalytic site, couples F-actin to the enhancement of redox activity of MICALMO-CH by a cooperative mechanism involving a trans interaction between adjacently bound molecules. Binding cooperativity is also observed in other proteins regulating actin assembly/disassembly dynamics, such as ADF/Cofilins. PMID:26935886

  7. Monooxygenase-mediated 1,2-dichloroethane degradation by Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Hage, J.C.; Hartmans, S.

    1999-06-01

    A bacterial strain, designated Pseudomonas sp. strain DCA1, was isolated from a 1,2-dichloroethane (DCA)-degrading biofilm. Strain DCA1 utilizes DCA as the sole carbon and energy source and does not require additional organic nutrients, such as vitamins, for optimal growth. The affinity of strain DCA1 for DCA is very high, with a K{sub m} value below the detection limit of 0.5 {micro}M. Instead of a hydrolytic dehalogenation, as in other DCA utilizers, the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1 is an oxidation reaction. Oxygen and NAD(P)H are required for this initial step. Propene was converted to 1,2-epoxypropane by DCA-grown cells and competitively inhibited DCA degradation. The authors concluded that a monooxygenase is responsible for the first step in DCA degradation in strain DCA1. Oxidation of DCA probably results in the formation of the unstable intermediate 1,2-dichloroethanol, which spontaneously releases chloride, yielding chloroacetaldehyde. The DCA degradation pathway is strain DCA1 proceeds from chloroacetaldehyde via chloroacetic acid and presumably glycolic acid, which is similar to degradation routes observed in other DCA-utilizing bacteria.

  8. C. elegans flavin-containing monooxygenase-4 is essential for osmoregulation in hypotonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hirani, Nisha; Westenberg, Marcel; Seed, Paul T.; Petalcorin, Mark I. R.; Dolphin, Colin T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Studies in Caenorhabditis elegans have revealed osmoregulatory systems engaged when worms experience hypertonic conditions, but less is known about measures employed when faced with hypotonic stress. Inactivation of fmo-4, which encodes flavin-containing monooxygenase-4, results in dramatic hypoosmotic hypersensitivity; worms are unable to prevent overwhelming water influx and swell rapidly, finally rupturing due to high internal hydrostatic pressure. fmo-4 is expressed prominently in hypodermis, duct and pore cells but is excluded from the excretory cell. Thus, FMO-4 plays a crucial osmoregulatory role by promoting clearance of excess water that enters during hypotonicity, perhaps by synthesizing an osmolyte that acts to establish an osmotic gradient from excretory cell to duct and pore cells. C. elegans FMO-4 contains a C-terminal extension conserved in all nematode FMO-4s. The coincidently numbered human FMO4 also contains an extended C-terminus with features similar to those of FMO-4. Although these shared sequence characteristics suggest potential orthology, human FMO4 was unable to rescue the fmo-4 osmoregulatory defect. Intriguingly, however, mammalian FMO4 is expressed predominantly in the kidney – an appropriate site if it too is, or once was, involved in osmoregulation. PMID:27010030

  9. Lead discovery for human kynurenine 3-monooxygenase by high-throughput RapidFire mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Denise M; Gee, Michelle; Haslam, Carl; Leavens, Bill; Christodoulou, Erica; Hissey, Paul; Hardwicke, Philip; Argyrou, Argyrides; Webster, Scott P; Mole, Damian J; Wilson, Kris; Binnie, Margaret; Yard, Beverley A; Dean, Tony; Liddle, John; Uings, Iain; Hutchinson, Jonathan P

    2014-04-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a therapeutically important target on the eukaryotic tryptophan catabolic pathway, where it converts L-kynurenine (Kyn) to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK). We have cloned and expressed the human form of this membrane protein as a full-length GST-fusion in a recombinant baculovirus expression system. An enriched membrane preparation was used for a directed screen of approximately 78,000 compounds using a RapidFire mass spectrometry (RF-MS) assay. The RapidFire platform provides an automated solid-phase extraction system that gives a throughput of approximately 7 s per well to the mass spectrometer, where direct measurement of both the substrate and product allowed substrate conversion to be determined. The RF-MS methodology is insensitive to assay interference, other than where compounds have the same nominal mass as Kyn or 3-HK and produce the same mass transition on fragmentation. These instances could be identified by comparison with the product-only data. The screen ran with excellent performance (average Z' value 0.8) and provided several tractable hit series for further investigation.

  10. Flavin containing monooxygenase 3 exerts broad effects on glucose and lipid metabolism and atherosclerosis[S

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Diana M.; Wang, Zeneng; Lee, Richard; Meng, Yonghong; Che, Nam; Charugundla, Sarada; Qi, Hannah; Wu, Judy; Pan, Calvin; Brown, J. Mark; Vallim, Thomas; Bennett, Brian J.; Graham, Mark; Hazen, Stanley L.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2015-01-01

    We performed silencing and overexpression studies of flavin containing monooxygenase (FMO) 3 in hyperlipidemic mouse models to examine its effects on trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) levels and atherosclerosis. Knockdown of hepatic FMO3 in LDL receptor knockout mice using an antisense oligonucleotide resulted in decreased circulating TMAO levels and atherosclerosis. Surprisingly, we also observed significant decreases in hepatic lipids and in levels of plasma lipids, ketone bodies, glucose, and insulin. FMO3 overexpression in transgenic mice, on the other hand, increased hepatic and plasma lipids. Global gene expression analyses suggested that these effects of FMO3 on lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis may be mediated through the PPARα and Kruppel-like factor 15 pathways. In vivo and in vitro results were consistent with the concept that the effects were mediated directly by FMO3 rather than trimethylamine/TMAO; in particular, overexpression of FMO3 in the human hepatoma cell line, Hep3B, resulted in significantly increased glucose secretion and lipogenesis. Our results indicate a major role for FMO3 in modulating glucose and lipid homeostasis in vivo, and they suggest that pharmacologic inhibition of FMO3 to reduce TMAO levels would be confounded by metabolic interactions. PMID:25378658

  11. Kynurenine–3–monooxygenase inhibition prevents multiple organ failure in rodent models of acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mole, Damian J; Webster, Scott P; Uings, Iain; Zheng, Xiaozhong; Binnie, Margaret; Wilson, Kris; Hutchinson, Jonathan P; Mirguet, Olivier; Walker, Ann; Beaufils, Benjamin; Ancellin, Nicolas; Trottet, Lionel; Bénéton, Véronique; Mowat, Christopher G; Wilkinson, Martin; Rowland, Paul; Haslam, Carl; McBride, Andrew; Homer, Natalie ZM; Baily, James E; Sharp, Matthew GF; Garden, O James; Hughes, Jeremy; Howie, Sarah EM; Holmes, Duncan S; Liddle, John; Iredale, John P

    2015-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis (AP) is a common and devastating inflammatory condition of the pancreas that is considered to be a paradigm of sterile inflammation leading to systemic multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and death1,2 Acute mortality from AP-MODS exceeds 20%3 and for those who survive the initial episode, their lifespan is typically shorter than the general population4. There are no specific therapies available that protect individuals against AP-MODS. Here, we show that kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO), a key enzyme of tryptophan metabolism5, is central to the pathogenesis of AP-MODS. We created a mouse strain deficient for Kmo with a robust biochemical phenotype that protected against extrapancreatic tissue injury to lung, kidney and liver in experimental AP-MODS. A medicinal chemistry strategy based on modifications of the kynurenine substrate led to the discovery of GSK180 as a potent and specific inhibitor of KMO. The binding mode of the inhibitor in the active site was confirmed by X-ray co-crystallography at 3.2 Å resolution. Treatment with GSK180 resulted in rapid changes in levels of kynurenine pathway metabolites in vivo and afforded therapeutic protection against AP-MODS in a rat model of AP. Our findings establish KMO inhibition as a novel therapeutic strategy in the treatment of AP-MODS and open up a new area for drug discovery in critical illness. PMID:26752518

  12. Emerging Roles of Flavin Monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) in Cholesterol Metabolism and Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Schugar, Rebecca C.; Brown, J. Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review Atherosclerosis and associated cardiovascular disease (CVD) still remain the largest cause of mortality worldwide. Several recent studies have discovered that metabolism of common nutrients by gut microbes can produce a proatherogenic metabolite called trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). The goal of this review is to discuss emerging evidence that the hepatic enzyme that generates TMAO, flavin monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), plays a regulatory role in maintaining whole body cholesterol balance and atherosclerosis development. Recent Findings Several independent studies have recently uncovered a link between either FMO3 itself or its enzymatic product TMAO with atherosclerosis and hepatic insulin resistance. These recent studies show that inhibition of FMO3 stimulates macrophage reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) and protects against atherosclerosis in mice. Summary A growing body of work demonstrates that nutrients present in high fat foods (phosphatidylcholine, choline, and L-carnitine) can be metabolized by the gut microbial enzymes to generate trimethylamine (TMA), which is then further metabolized by the host enzyme FMO3 to produce proatherogenic TMAO. Here we discuss emerging evidence that the TMAO producing enzyme FMO3 is centrally involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis by regulating cholesterol metabolism and insulin resistance, and how these new insights provide exciting new avenues for CVD therapies. PMID:26218418

  13. Soluble methane monooxygenase component B gene probe for identification of methanotrophs that rapidly degrade trichloroethylene.

    PubMed Central

    Tsien, H C; Hanson, R S

    1992-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms, Western blot (immunoblot) analysis, and fluorescence-labelled signature probes were used for the characterization of methanotrophic bacteria as well as for the identification of methanotrophs which contained the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) gene and were able to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE). The gene encoding a soluble MMO component B protein from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was cloned. It contained a 2.2-kb EcoRI fragment. With this cloned component B gene as probe, methanotroph types I, II, and X and environmental and bioreactor samples were screened for the presence of the gene encoding soluble MMO. Fragments produced by digestion of DNA with rare cutting restriction endonucleases were separated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and transferred to Zeta-Probe membrane (Bio-Rad) for Southern blot analysis. Samples were also analyzed for the presence of soluble MMO by Western blot analysis and the ability to degrade TCE. The physiological groups of methanotrophs in each sample were determined by hybridizing cells with fluorescence-labelled signature probes. Among twelve pure or mixed cultures, DNA fragments of seven methanotrophs hybridized with the soluble MMO B gene probe. When grown in media with limited copper, all of these bacteria degraded TCE. All of them are type II methanotrophs. The soluble MMO component B gene of the type X methanotroph, Methylococcus capsulatus Bath, did not hybridize to the M. trichosporium OB3b soluble MMO component B gene probe, although M. capsulatus Bath also produces a soluble MMO. Images PMID:1349468

  14. Characterization of maize cytochrome P450 monooxygenases induced in response to safeners and bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Persans, M W; Wang, J; Schuler, M A

    2001-02-01

    Plants use a diverse array of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in their biosynthetic and detoxification pathways. To determine the extent to which various maize P450s are induced in response to chemical inducers, such as naphthalic anhydride (NA), triasulfuron (T), phenobarbital, and bacterial pathogens (Erwinia stuartii, Acidovorax avenae), we have analyzed the response patterns of seven P450 transcripts after treatment of seedlings with these inducers. Each of these P450 transcripts has distinct developmental, tissue-specific, and chemical cues regulating their expression even when they encode P450s within the same biosynthetic pathway. Most notably, the CYP71C1 and CYP71C3 transcripts, encoding P450s in the DIMBOA biosynthetic pathway, are induced to the same level in response to wounding and NA treatment of younger seedlings and differentially in response to NA/T treatment of younger seedlings and NA and NA/T treatment of older seedlings. NA and T induce expression of both CYP92A1 and CYP72A5 transcripts in older seedling shoots, whereas phenobarbital induces CYP92A1 expression in older seedling shoots and highly induces CYP72A5 expression in young and older seedling roots. Expressed sequence tag (EST) 6c06b11 transcripts, encoding an undefined P450 activity, are highly induced in seedling shoots infected with bacterial pathogens.

  15. Characterization of Maize Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Induced in Response to Safeners and Bacterial Pathogens1

    PubMed Central

    Persans, Michael W.; Wang, Jian; Schuler, Mary A.

    2001-01-01

    Plants use a diverse array of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in their biosynthetic and detoxification pathways. To determine the extent to which various maize P450s are induced in response to chemical inducers, such as naphthalic anhydride (NA), triasulfuron (T), phenobarbital, and bacterial pathogens (Erwinia stuartii, Acidovorax avenae), we have analyzed the response patterns of seven P450 transcripts after treatment of seedlings with these inducers. Each of these P450 transcripts has distinct developmental, tissue-specific, and chemical cues regulating their expression even when they encode P450s within the same biosynthetic pathway. Most notably, the CYP71C1 and CYP71C3 transcripts, encoding P450s in the DIMBOA biosynthetic pathway, are induced to the same level in response to wounding and NA treatment of younger seedlings and differentially in response to NA/T treatment of younger seedlings and NA and NA/T treatment of older seedlings. NA and T induce expression of both CYP92A1 and CYP72A5 transcripts in older seedling shoots, whereas phenobarbital induces CYP92A1 expression in older seedling shoots and highly induces CYP72A5 expression in young and older seedling roots. Expressed sequence tag (EST) 6c06b11 transcripts, encoding an undefined P450 activity, are highly induced in seedling shoots infected with bacterial pathogens. PMID:11161067

  16. Phenylalanine monooxygenase and the sulfur oxygenation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine in mice.

    PubMed

    Vandenbossche, Evita; Lucas, Christopher; Mistry, Lata; Garfield, Emma; Mitchell, Stephen C; Steventon, Glyn B

    2016-01-01

    1. The extent of sulfoxidation of the drug, S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine, has been shown to vary between individuals, with this phenomenon being mooted as a biomarker for certain disease states and susceptibilities. Studies in vitro have indicated that the enzyme responsible for this reaction was phenylalanine monooxygenase but to date no in vivo evidence exists to support this assumption. Using the mouse models of mild hyperphenylalaninamia (enu1 PAH variant) and classical phenylketonuria (enu2 PAH variant), the sulfur oxygenation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine has been investigated. 2. Compared to the wild type (wt/wt) mice, both the heterozygous dominant (wt/enu1 and wt/enu2) mice and the homozygous recessive (enu1/enu1 and enu2/enu2) mice were shown to have significantly increased Cmax, AUC(0-180 min) and AUC(0-∞ min) values (15 - to 20-fold higher). These results were primarily attributable to the significantly reduced clearance of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (13 - to 22-fold lower). 3. Only the wild type mice produced measurable quantities of the parent S-oxide metabolites. Those mice possessing one or more allelic variant showed no evidence of blood SCMC (R/S) S-oxides. These observations support the proposition that differences in phenylalanine hydroxylase activity underlie the variation in S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine sulfoxidation and that no other enzyme is able to undertake this reaction.

  17. Reaction Mechanism of the Bicopper Enzyme Peptidylglycine α-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase*

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Enrique; Rommel, Judith B.; Kästner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase is a noninteracting bicopper enzyme that stereospecifically hydroxylates the terminal glycine of small peptides for its later amidation. Neuroendocrine messengers, such as oxytocin, rely on the biological activity of this enzyme. Each catalytic turnover requires one oxygen molecule, two protons from the solvent, and two electrons. Despite this enzyme having been widely studied, a consensus on the reaction mechanism has not yet been found. Experiments and theoretical studies favor a pro-S abstraction of a hydrogen atom followed by the rebinding of an OH group. However, several hydrogen-abstracting species have been postulated; because two protons are consumed during the reaction, several protonation states are available. An electron transfer between the copper atoms could play a crucial role for the catalysis as well. This leads to six possible abstracting species. In this study, we compare them on equal footing. We perform quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, considering the glycine hydrogen abstraction. Our results suggest that the most likely mechanism is a protonation of the abstracting species before the hydrogen abstraction and another protonation as well as a reduction before OH rebinding. PMID:24668808

  18. Microsomal monooxygenase as a multienzyme system: the role of P450-P450 interactions

    PubMed Central

    Davydov, Dmitri R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There is increasing evidence of physical interactions (association) among cytochromes P450 in the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum. Functional consequences of these interactions are often underestimated. Areas covered This article provides a comprehensive overview of available experimental material regarding P450-P450 interactions. Special emphasis is given to the interactions between different P450 species and to the functional consequences of homo- and heterooligomerization. Expert opinion Recent advances provide conclusive evidence for a substantial degree of P450 oligomerization in membranes. Interactions between different P450 species resulting in the formation of mixed oligomers with altered activity and substrate specificity have been demonstrated clearly. There are important indications that oligomerization of cytochromes P450 impedes electron flow to a fraction of the P450 population, which render some P450 species non-functional. Functional consequences of P450-P450 interactions make the integrated properties of the microsomal monooxygenase remarkably different from a simple summation of the properties of the individual P450 species. This complexity compromises the predictive power of the current in vitro models of drug metabolism and warrants an urgent need for development of new model systems that consider the interactions of multiple P450 species. PMID:21395496

  19. Localization of genes encoding three distinct flavin-containing monooxygenases to human chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    Shephard, E.A.; Fox, M.F.; Povey, S. ); Dolphin, C.T.; Phillips, I.R.; Smith, R. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to map the gene encoding human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) form II (N. Lomri, Q. Gu, and J. R. Cashman, 1992, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 89: 1685--1689) to chromosome 1. They propose the designation FMO3 for this gene as it is the third FMO gene to be mapped. The two other human FMO genes identified to date, FMO1 and FMO2, are also located on chromosome 1 (C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. Povey, C. N. A. Palmer, D. M. Ziegler, R. Ayesh, R. L. Smith, and 1. R. Phillips, 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 12379--12385; C. Dolphin, E. A. Shephard, S. F. Povey, R. L. Smith, and I. R. Phillips, 1992, Biochem. J. 286: 261--267). The localization of FMO1, FMO2, and FMO3 has been refined to the long arm of chromosome 1. Analysis of human metaphase chromosomes by in situ hybridization confirmed the mapping of FMO1 and localized this gene more precisely to 1 q23-q25. 28 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Safety assessment of dicamba mono-oxygenases that confer dicamba tolerance to various crops.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cunxi; Glenn, Kevin C; Kessenich, Colton; Bell, Erin; Burzio, Luis A; Koch, Michael S; Li, Bin; Silvanovich, Andre

    2016-11-01

    Dicamba tolerant (DT) soybean, cotton and maize were developed through constitutive expression of dicamba mono-oxygenase (DMO) in chloroplasts. DMO expressed in three DT crops exhibit 91.6-97.1% amino acid sequence identity to wild type DMO. All DMO forms maintain the characteristics of Rieske oxygenases that have a history of safe use. Additionally, they are all functionally similar in vivo since the three DT crops are all tolerant to dicamba treatment. None of these DMO sequences were found to have similarity to any known allergens or toxins. Herein, to further understand the safety of these DMO variants, a weight of evidence approach was employed. Each purified DMO protein was found to be completely deactivated in vitro by heating at temperatures 55 °C and above, and all were completely digested within 30 s or 5 min by pepsin and pancreatin, respectively. Mice orally dosed with each of these DMO proteins showed no adverse effects as evidenced by analysis of body weight gain, food consumption and clinical observations. Therefore, the weight of evidence from all these protein safety studies support the conclusion that the various forms of DMO proteins introduced into DT soybean, cotton and maize are safe for food and feed consumption, and the small amino acid sequence differences outside the active site of DMO do not raise any additional safety concerns.

  1. Reconstitution of {beta}-carotene hydroxylase activity of thermostable CYP175A1 monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Momoi, Kyoko; Hofmann, Ute; Schmid, Rolf D.; Urlacher, Vlada B. . E-mail: itbvkha@po.uni-stuttgart.de

    2006-01-06

    CYP175A1 is a thermostable P450 Monooxygenase from Thermus thermophilus HB27, demonstrating in vivo activity towards {beta}-carotene. Activity of CYP175A1 was reconstituted in vitro using artificial electron transport proteins. First results were obtained in the mixture with a crude Escherichia coli cell extract at 37 {sup o}C. In this system, {beta}-carotene was hydroxylated to {beta}-cryptoxanthin. The result indicated the presence of electron transport enzymes among the E. coli proteins, which are suitable for CYP175A1. However, upon in vitro reconstitution of CYP175A1 activity with purified recombinant flavodoxin and flavodoxin reductase from E. coli, only very low {beta}-cryptoxanthin production was observed. Remarkably, with another artificial electron transport system, putidaredoxin and putidaredoxin reductase from Pseudomonas putida, purified CYP175A1 enzyme hydroxylated {beta}-carotene at 3- and also 3'-positions, resulting in {beta}-cryptoxanthin and zeaxanthin. Under the optimal reaction conditions, the turnover rate of the enzyme reached 0.23 nmol {beta}-cryptoxanthin produced per nmol P450 per min.

  2. Production of four Neurospora crassa lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases in Pichia pastoris monitored by a fluorimetric assay

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recent studies demonstrate that enzymes from the glycosyl hydrolase family 61 (GH61) show lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (PMO) activity. Together with cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) an enzymatic system capable of oxidative cellulose cleavage is formed, which increases the efficiency of cellulases and put PMOs at focus of biofuel research. Large amounts of purified PMOs, which are difficult to obtain from the native fungal producers, are needed to study their reaction kinetics, structure and industrial application. In addition, a fast and robust enzymatic assay is necessary to monitor enzyme production and purification. Results Four pmo genes from Neurospora crassa were expressed in P. pastoris under control of the AOX1 promoter. High yields were obtained for the glycosylated gene products PMO-01867, PMO-02916 and PMO-08760 (>300 mg L-1), whereas the yield of non-glycosylated PMO-03328 was moderate (~45 mg L-1). The production and purification of all four enzymes was specifically followed by a newly developed, fast assay based on a side reaction of PMO: the production of H2O2 in the presence of reductants. While ascorbate is a suitable reductant for homogeneous PMO preparations, fermentation samples require the specific electron donor CDH. Conclusions P. pastoris is a high performing expression host for N. crassa PMOs. The pmo genes under control of the native signal sequence are correctly processed and active. The novel CDH-based enzyme assay allows fast determination of PMO activity in fermentation samples and is robust against interfering matrix components. PMID:23102010

  3. Mechanisms of reduced flavin transfer in the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Sucharitakul, Jeerus; Tinikul, Ruchanok; Chaiyen, Pimchai

    2014-08-01

    Two-component flavin-dependent enzymes are abundant in nature and are involved in a wide variety of biological reactions. These enzymes consist of a reductase which generates a reduced flavin and a monooxygenase that utilizes the reduced flavin as a substrate for monooxygenation. As reduced flavin is unstable and can be oxidized by oxygen, these enzymes must have a means to efficiently coordinate the transfer of the reduced flavin such that auto-oxidation can be minimized. Various types of experiments and methodologies have been used to probe the mode of reduced flavin transfer. Results from many systems have indicated that the transfer can be achieved by free diffusion and that the presence of one component has no influence on the kinetics of the other component. Contradicting results indicating that the transfer of the reduced flavin may be achieved via protein-protein mediation also exist. Regardless of the mode of reduced flavin transfer, these enzymes have a means to control their overall kinetics such that the reaction rate is slow when the demand for oxygenation is not high.

  4. Oxygenation of Organoboronic Acids by a Nonheme Iron(II) Complex: Mimicking Boronic Acid Monooxygenase Activity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayanti; Paine, Tapan Kanti

    2015-10-19

    Phenolic compounds are important intermediates in the bacterial biodegradation of aromatic compounds in the soil. An Arthrobacter sp. strain has been shown to exhibit boronic acid monooxygenase activity through the conversion of different substituted phenylboronic acids to the corresponding phenols using dioxygen. While a number of methods have been reported to cleave the C-B bonds of organoboronic acids, there is no report on biomimetic iron complex exhibiting this activity using dioxygen as the oxidant. In that direction, we have investigated the reactivity of a nucleophilic iron-oxygen oxidant, generated upon oxidative decarboxylation of an iron(II)-benzilate complex [(Tp(Ph2))Fe(II)(benzilate)] (Tp(Ph2) = hydrotris(3,5-diphenyl-pyrazol-1-yl)borate), toward organoboronic acids. The oxidant converts different aryl/alkylboronic acids to the corresponding oxygenated products with the incorporation of one oxygen atom from dioxygen. This method represents an efficient protocol for the oxygenation of boronic acids with dioxygen as the terminal oxidant.

  5. Structural and Functional Characterization of a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase with Broad Substrate Specificity*

    PubMed Central

    Borisova, Anna S.; Isaksen, Trine; Dimarogona, Maria; Kognole, Abhishek A.; Mathiesen, Geir; Várnai, Anikó; Røhr, Åsmund K.; Payne, Christina M.; Sørlie, Morten; Sandgren, Mats; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.

    2015-01-01

    The recently discovered lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) carry out oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides and are of major importance for efficient processing of biomass. NcLPMO9C from Neurospora crassa acts both on cellulose and on non-cellulose β-glucans, including cellodextrins and xyloglucan. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of NcLPMO9C revealed an extended, highly polar substrate-binding surface well suited to interact with a variety of sugar substrates. The ability of NcLPMO9C to act on soluble substrates was exploited to study enzyme-substrate interactions. EPR studies demonstrated that the Cu2+ center environment is altered upon substrate binding, whereas isothermal titration calorimetry studies revealed binding affinities in the low micromolar range for polymeric substrates that are due in part to the presence of a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM1). Importantly, the novel structure of NcLPMO9C enabled a comparative study, revealing that the oxidative regioselectivity of LPMO9s (C1, C4, or both) correlates with distinct structural features of the copper coordination sphere. In strictly C1-oxidizing LPMO9s, access to the solvent-facing axial coordination position is restricted by a conserved tyrosine residue, whereas access to this same position seems unrestricted in C4-oxidizing LPMO9s. LPMO9s known to produce a mixture of C1- and C4-oxidized products show an intermediate situation. PMID:26178376

  6. Flavin-containing monooxygenase S-oxygenation of a series of thioureas and thiones

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; Krueger, Sharon K.; Stevens, J. Fred; Kedzie, Karen; Fang, Wenkui K.; Heidelbaugh, Todd; Nguyen, Phong; Chow, Ken; Garst, Michael; Gil, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2014-07-15

    Mammalian flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) is active towards many drugs with a heteroatom having the properties of a soft nucleophile. Thiocarbamides and thiones are S-oxygenated to the sulfenic acid which can either react with glutathione and initiate a redox-cycle or be oxygenated a second time to the unstable sulfinic acid. In this study, we utilized LC–MS/MS to demonstrate that the oxygenation by hFMO of the thioureas under test terminated at the sulfenic acid. With thiones, hFMO catalyzed the second reaction and the sulfinic acid rapidly lost sulfite to form the corresponding imidazole. Thioureas are often pulmonary toxicants in mammals and, as previously reported by our laboratory, are excellent substrates for hFMO2. This isoform is expressed at high levels in the lung of most mammals, including non-human primates. Genotyping to date indicates that individuals of African (up to 49%) or Hispanic (2–7%) ancestry have at least one allele for functional hFMO2 in lung, but not Caucasians nor Asians. In this study the major metabolite formed by hFMO2 with thioureas from Allergan, Inc. was the sulfenic acid that reacted with glutathione. The majority of thiones were poor substrates for hFMO3, the major form in adult human liver. However, hFMO1, the major isoform expressed in infant and neonatal liver and adult kidney and intestine, readily S-oxygenated thiones under test, with K{sub m}s ranging from 7 to 160 μM and turnover numbers of 30–40 min{sup −1}. The product formed was identified by LC–MS/MS as the imidazole. The activities of the mouse and human FMO1 and FMO3 orthologs were in good agreement with the exception of some thiones for which activity was much greater with hFMO1 than mFMO1.

  7. A small lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase from Streptomyces griseus targeting α- and β-chitin.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Yuko S; Kudo, Madoka; Loose, Jennifer S M; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Totani, Kazuhide; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2015-03-01

    The lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have received considerable attention subsequent to their discovery because of their ability to boost the enzymatic conversion of recalcitrant polysaccharides. In the present study, we describe the enzymatic properties of SgLPMO10F, a small (15 kDa) auxilliary activity (AA) family 10 LPMO from Streptomyces griseus belonging to a clade of the phylogenetic tree without any characterized representative. The protein was expressed using a Brevibacillus-based expression system that had not been used previously for LPMO expression and that also ensures correct processing of the N-terminus crucial for LPMO activity. The enzyme was active towards both α- and β-chitin and showed stronger binding and a greater release of soluble oxidized products for the latter allomorph. In chitinase synergy assays, however, SgLPMO10F worked slightly better for α-chitin, increasing chitin solubilization yields by up to 30-fold and 20-fold for α- and β-chitin, respectively. Synergy experiments with various chitinases showed that the addition of SgLPMO10F leads to a substantial increase in the (GlcNAc)2 :GlcNAc product ratio, in reactions with α-chitin only. This underpins the structural differences between the substrates and also shows that, on α-chitin, SgLPMO10F affects the binding mode and/or degree of processivity of the chitinases tested. Variation in the only exposed aromatic residue in the substrate-binding surface of LPMO10s has previously been linked to preferential binding for α-chitin (exposed Trp) or β-chitin (exposed Tyr). Mutation of this residue, Tyr56, in SgLPMO10F to Trp had no detectable effect on substrate-binding preferences but, in synergy experiments, the mutant appeared to be more efficient on α-chitin.

  8. Bioinspired copper(I) complexes that exhibit monooxygenase and catechol dioxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Aline; Metzinger, Ramona; Limberg, Christian

    2015-01-12

    New tripodal ligand L2 featuring three different pyridyl/imidazolyl-based N-donor units at a bridgehead C atom, from which one of the imidazolyl units is separated by a phenylene linker, was synthesized and investigated with regards to copper(I) complexation. The resulting complex [(L2)Cu]OTf (2(OTf)), the known complex [(L1)Cu]OTf (1(OTf); L1 differs from L2 in that it lacks the phenylene spacer) and [(L3)Cu]OTf (3(OTf)), prepared from a known chiral, tripodal, N-donor ligand featuring pyridyl, pyrazolyl, and imidazolyl donors, were tested as catalysts for the oxidation of sodium 2,4-di-tert-butylphenolate (NaDTBP) with O2. Indeed, they mediated NaDTBP oxidation to give mainly the corresponding catecholate and quinone (Q). None of the complexes 1(OTf), 2(OTf), and 3(OTf) is superior to the others, as yields were comparable and, if the presence of protons is guaranteed by concomitant addition of the phenol DTBP, the oxidation can also be performed catalytically. For all complexes stoichiometric oxidations under certain conditions (concentrated solutions, high NaDTBP content) were found to also generate products typical for metal-mediated intradiol cleavage of the catecholate with O2. As shown representatively for 1(OTf) this dioxygenation sets in at a later stage of the reaction. Initially a copper species responsible for the monooxygenation must form from 1(OTf)/NaDTBP/O2, and only thereafter is the copper species responsible for dioxygenation formed and consumes Q as substrate. Hence, under these circumstances complexes 1(OTf)-3(OTf) show both monooxygenase and catechol dioxygenase activity.

  9. Evaluating cytochrome P450 in birds by monooxygenases and immunohistochemistry: possible nonlethal assessment by skin immunohistochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melancon, M.J.; Kutay, A.L.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Stegeman, John J.

    2000-01-01

    Six month old Lesser Scaup and nestling Tree Swallows were injected intraperitoneally with beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) or vehicle. Nestling Tree Swallows were also collected from five sites with differing levels of contaminants. Liver samples were taken and stored at -80C until microsome preparation and monooxygenase (MO) assay. Skin and heart samples were placed in buffered formalin until immunohistochemical (IMHC) analysis for cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A). Scaup treated with BNF at 20 or 100 mg/kg body weight showed approximately 20- to 65-fold increases in four MOs. Responses of two of the four MOs were as high at 20 mg/kg as at 100mg/kg. There was no IMHC response in the vehicle-injected ducks, while in skin the IMHC response was the same for both dose levels of BNF and in heart there was response in two of four samples at 20 mg/kg and in all five samples at 100mg/kg. Tree Swallows injected with BNF at 100, but not at 20 mg/kg showed significant increases (ca.5-fold) in two MO activities. There was no IMHC response in control swallows. In skin and heart there were IMHC responses in one of five swallows at 20 mg/kg and four of five swallows at 100mg/kg. There was poor correlation between individual skin IMHC responses and MO activities and PCB concentrations in 47 field-collected Tree Swallow samples, but 14 of the 16 skin samples with positive IMHC responses were from the location with the highest MO activities and PCB concentrations. Although present data do not allow construction of significant dose response curves, the responses in skin make it well worth continuing study on this potential nonlethal technique for biomonitoring contaminant exposure of birds.

  10. Two Novel Flavin-Containing Monooxygenases Involved in Biosynthesis of Aliphatic Glucosinolates

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Wenwen; Li, Jing; Yu, Qingyue; Cang, Wei; Xu, Rui; Wang, Yang; Ji, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glucosinolates, a class of secondary metabolites from cruciferous plants, are derived from amino acids and have diverse biological activities, such as in biotic defense, depending on their side chain modification. The first structural modification step in the synthesis of aliphatic (methionine-derived) glucosinolates—S-oxygenation of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates—was found to be catalyzed by five flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), FMOGS-OX1-5. Here, we report two additional FMOGS-OX enzymes, FMOGS-OX6, and FMOGS-OX7, encoded by At1g12130 and At1g12160, respectively. The overexpression of both FMOGS-OX6 and FMOGS-OX7 decreased the ratio of methylthioalkyl glucosinolates to the sum of methylthioalkyl and methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates, suggesting that the introduction of the two genes converted methylthioalkyl glucosinolates into methylsulfinylalkyl glucosinolates. Analysis of expression pattern revealed that the spatial expression of the two genes is quite similar and partially overlapped with the other FMOGS-OX genes, which are primarily expressed in vascular tissue. We further analyzed the responsive expression pattern of all the seven FMOGS-OX genes to exogenous treatment with abscisic acid, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), jasmonic acid (JA), salicylic acid, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and low and high temperatures. Although these genes showed same tendency toward the changing stimulus, the sensitivity of each gene was quite different. The variety in spatial expression among the FMOGS-OX genes while responding to environmental stimulus indicated a complex and finely tuned regulation of glucosinolates modifications. Identification of these two novel FMOGS-OX enzymes will enhance the understanding of glucosinolates modifications and the importance of evolution of these duplicated genes. PMID:27621741

  11. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C; Wright, Aaron T; Yeager, Chris; Hyman, Michael R

    2016-04-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2 (-)) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4 (+)-dependent O2 uptake by N. europaea by 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, andde novoprotein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-tandem time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analyses also confirmed that the fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was AmoA.

  12. Electron paramagnetic studies of the copper and iron containing soluble ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Gilch, Stefan; Meyer, Ortwin; Schmidt, Ingo

    2010-08-01

    Soluble ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) from Nitrosomonas europaea was purified to homogeneity and metals in the active sites of the enzyme (Cu, Fe) were analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. EPR spectra were obtained for a type 2 Cu(II) site with g(parallel) = 2.24, A(parallel) = 18.4 mT and g(perpendicular) = 2.057 as well as for heme and non heme iron present in purified soluble AMO from N. europaea. A second type 2 Cu(II) EPR signal with g(parallel) = 2.29, A(parallel) = 16.1 mT and g(perpendicular) = 2.03 appeared in the spectrum of the ferricyanide oxidized enzyme and was attributed to oxidation of cuprous sites. Comparison of EPR-detectable Cu(2+) with total copper determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) suggests that there are six paramagnetic Cu(2+) and three diamagnetic Cu(1+) per heterotrimeric soluble AMO (two paramagnetic and one diamagnetic Cu per alphabetagamma-protomer). A trigonal EPR signal at g = 6.01, caused by a high-spin iron, indicative for cytochrome bound iron, and a rhombic signal at g = 4.31, characteristic of specifically bound Fe(3+) was detectable. The binding of nitric oxide in the presence of reductant resulted in a ferrous S = 3/2 signal, characteristic of a ferrous nitrosyl complex. Inactivation of soluble AMO with acetylene did neither diminish the ferrous signal nor the intensity of the Cu(2+)-EPR signal.

  13. Characterization of alternate reductant binding and electron transfer in the dopamine. beta. -monooxygenase reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, L.C.; Klinman, J.P.

    1987-08-25

    The steady-state limiting kinetic parameters V/sub max/, V/K/sub DA/, and V/K/sub O/sub 2//, together with deuterium isotope effects on these parameters, have been determined for the dopamine ..beta..-monooxygenase (D..beta..M) reaction in the presence of structurally distinct reductants. The results show the one-electron reductant ferrocyanide to be nearly as kinetically competent as the presumed in vivo reductant ascrobate. Further, a reductant system of ferricyanide plus substrate dopamine yields steady-state kinetic parameters and isotope effects very similar to those measured solely in the presence of ferrocyanide, indicating a role for catecholamine in the rapid recycling of oxidized ferrocyanide. Use of substrate dopamine as the sole reductant is found to lead to a highly unusual kinetic independence of oxygen concentration, as well as significantly reduced values of V/sub max/ and V/K/sub DA/, and the authors conclude that dopamine reduces enzymic copper in a rate-limiting step that is 40-fold slower than with ascorbate. The near-identical kinetic parameters measured in the presence of either ascorbate or ferrocyanide, together with markedly reduced rates with dopamine, are interpreted in terms of a binding site for reductant that is physically distinct from the substrate binding site. This view is supported by molecular modeling, which reveals ascorbate and ferrocyanide to possess an unexpected similarity in potential sites for interaction with enzymic residues. With regard to electron flux, identical values of V/K/sub O/sub 2// have been measured with (2,2-/sup 2/H/sub 2/)dopamine as substrate both in the presence and in the absence of added ascorbate. This key result unambiguously rules out an entry of electrons to enzyme forms leading from the enzyme-dopamine complex to enzyme-bound product and, hence, reaction mechanisms involving a reductive activation of the putative Cu(II)-OOH prior to substrate hydroxylation.

  14. Ascorbate depletion as a consequence of product recycling during dopamine. beta. -monooxygenase catalyzed selenoxidation

    SciTech Connect

    May, S.W.; Herman, H.H.; Roberts, S.F.; Ciccarello, M.C.

    1987-03-24

    The competence of dopamine ..beta..-monooxygenase (DBM) to process selenide substrates was investigated, in anticipation that the expected selenoxide products would exhibit unique reactivity and redox properties. The prototypical selenide phenyl 2-aminoethyl selenide (PAESe) was synthesized and shown to be a substrate for DBM with the characteristic e/O/sub 2/ ratio of 2:1 for monooxygenation. The kinetic parameters for oxygenation of PAESe were found to be similar to those for the DBM-catalyzed sulfoxidation of the cognate sulfide phenyl 2-aminoethyl sulfide, and selenoxidation was stimulated by fumarate in a manner similar to other well-characterized DBM monooxygenation reactions. Identification of phenyl 2-aminoethyl selenoxide (PAESeO) as the enzymatic product was accomplished by the demonstration of coincident elution of authentic PAESeO with the enzymatic product in three significantly different HPLC systems. PAESeO was found to oxidize ascorbic acid with the concomitant and stoichiometric reduction of PAESeO back to the selenide, PAESe. As a consequence of this nonenzymatic reaction, ascorbate-supported DBM turnover was prematurely terminated under standard assay conditions due to depletion of reduced ascorbate. The kinetics of the redox reaction between PAESeO and ascorbate were investigated with a spectrophotometric assay of ascorbate at 300 nm, and a second-order rate constant of 3.4 M/sup -1/ s/sup -1/ was determined at pH 5.0, 25/sup 0/C. Spectrophotometric assay of cytochrome c (cyt c) reduction at 550 nm during the oxidation of ascorbate by PAESeO demonstrated that no cyt c trappable semidehydroascorbate was produced in this nonenzymatic reaction.

  15. Fungal Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases: Their Distribution, Structure, Functions, Family Expansion, and Evolutionary Origin

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanping; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Jefcoate, Colin; Kim, Sun-Chang; Chen, Fusheng; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) monooxygenase superfamily contributes a broad array of biological functions in living organisms. In fungi, CYPs play diverse and pivotal roles in versatile metabolism and fungal adaptation to specific ecological niches. In this report, CYPomes in the 47 genomes of fungi belong to the phyla Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota have been studied. The comparison of fungal CYPomes suggests that generally fungi possess abundant CYPs belonging to a variety of families with the two global families CYP51 and CYP61, indicating individuation of CYPomes during the evolution of fungi. Fungal CYPs show highly conserved characteristic motifs, but very low overall sequence similarities. The characteristic motifs of fungal CYPs are distinguishable from those of CYPs in animals, plants, and especially archaea and bacteria. The four representative motifs contribute to the general function of CYPs. Fungal CYP51s and CYP61s can be used as the models for the substrate recognition sites analysis. The CYP proteins are clustered into 15 clades and the phylogenetic analyses suggest that the wide variety of fungal CYPs has mainly arisen from gene duplication. Two large duplication events might have been associated with the booming of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. In addition, horizontal gene transfer also contributes to the diversification of fungal CYPs. Finally, a possible evolutionary scenario for fungal CYPs along with fungal divergences is proposed. Our results provide the fundamental information for a better understanding of CYP distribution, structure and function, and new insights into the evolutionary events of fungal CYPs along with the evolution of fungi. PMID:24966179

  16. Proteomic and targeted qPCR analyses of subsurface microbial communities for presence of methane monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Andrzej J. Paszczynski; Ravindra Paidisetti; Andrew K. Johnson; Ronald L. Crawford; Frederick S. Colwell; Tonia Green; Mark Delwiche; Hope Lee; Deborah Newby; Eoin L. Brodie; Mark Conrad

    2011-11-01

    The Test Area North (TAN) site at the Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, ID, USA, sits over a trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminant plume in the Snake River Plain fractured basalt aquifer. Past observations have provided evidence that TCE at TAN is being transformed by biological natural attenuation that may be primarily due to co-metabolism in aerobic portions of the plume by methanotrophs. TCE co-metabolism by methanotrophs is the result of the broad substrate specificity of microbial methane monooxygenase which permits non-specific oxidation of TCE in addition to the primary substrate, methane. Arrays of experimental approaches have been utilized to understand the biogeochemical processes driving intrinsic TCE co-metabolism at TAN. In this study, aerobic methanotrophs were enumerated by qPCR using primers targeting conserved regions of the genes pmoA and mmoX encoding subunits of the particulate MMO (pMMO) and soluble MMO (sMMO) enzymes, respectively, as well as the gene mxa encoding the downstream enzyme methanol dehydrogenase. Identification of proteins in planktonic and biofilm samples from TAN was determined using reverse phase ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with a quadrupole-time-of-flight (QToF) mass spectrometer to separate and sequence peptides from trypsin digests of the protein extracts. Detection of MMO in unenriched water samples from TAN provides direct evidence of intrinsic methane oxidation and TCE co-metabolic potential of the indigenous microbial population. Mass spectrometry is also well suited for distinguishing which form of MMO is expressed in situ either soluble or particulate. Using this method, pMMO proteins were found to be abundant in samples collected from wells within and adjacent to the TCE plume at TAN.

  17. Gating effects of component B on oxygen activation by the methane monooxygenase hydroxylase component.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Nesheim, J C; Lee, S K; Lipscomb, J D

    1995-10-20

    Component B (MMOB) of the soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) system accelerates the initial velocity of methane oxidation by up to 150-fold by an unknown mechanism. The active site of MMO contains a diferric, hydroxo-bridged diiron cluster located on the hydroxylase component (MMOH). This cluster is reduced by the NAD(P)H-coupled reductase component to the diferrous state, which then reacts with O2 to yield two reaction cycle intermediates sequentially termed compounds P and Q. The rate of compound P formation is shown here to be independent of O2 concentration, suggesting that an MMOH-O2 complex (compound O) is (congruent to irreversibly) formed before compound P. Compound Q is capable of reacting with hydrocarbons to yield the MMOH-product complex, compound T. It is shown here that MMOB accelerates catalysis by increasing congruent to 1000-fold the rate of O2 association and reaction with diferrous MMOH leading to compound P. Modeling of the single turnover reaction in the presence of substoichiometric MMOB suggests that MMOB also accelerates the compound P to Q conversion by congruent to 40-fold. Due to this O2-gating effect of MMOB, either compound Q or T becomes the dominant species during turnover, depending upon the substrate concentration and type. Because these are the species that either react with substrate (Q) or release product (T), their buildup maximizes the turnover rate. This is the first direct role in catalysis to be recognized for MMOB and represents a novel method for oxygenase regulation.

  18. Component interactions in the soluble methane monooxygenase system from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath).

    PubMed

    Gassner, G T; Lippard, S J

    1999-09-28

    The soluble methane monooxygenase system of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) includes three protein components: a 251-kDa non-heme dinuclear iron hydroxylase (MMOH), a 39-kDa iron-sulfur- and FAD-containing reductase (MMOR), and a 16-kDa regulatory protein (MMOB). The thermodynamic stability and kinetics of formation of complexes between oxidized MMOH and MMOB or MMOR were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy at temperatures ranging from 3.3 to 45 degrees C. The results, in conjunction with data from equilibrium analytical ultracentrifugation studies of MMOR and MMOB, indicate that free MMOR and MMOB exist as monomers in solution and bind MMOH with 2:1 stoichiometry. The role of component interactions in the catalytic mechanism of sMMO was investigated through simultaneous measurement of oxidase and hydroxylase activities as a function of varied protein component concentrations during steady-state turnover. The partitioning of oxidase and hydroxylase activities of sMMO is highly dependent on both the MMOR concentration and the nature of the organic substrate. In particular, NADH oxidation is significantly uncoupled from methane hydroxylation at MMOR concentrations exceeding 20% of the hydroxylase concentration but remains tightly coupled to propylene epoxidation at MMOR concentrations ranging up to the MMOH concentration. The steady-state kinetic data were fit to numerical simulations of models that include both the oxidase activities of free MMOR and of MMOH/MMOR complexes and the hydroxylase activity of MMOH/MMOB complexes. The data were well described by a model in which MMOR and MMOB bind noncompetitively at distinct interacting sites on the hydroxylase. MMOB manifests its regulatory effects by differentially accelerating intermolecular electron transfer from MMOR to MMOH containing bound substrate and product in a manner consistent with its activating and inhibitory effects on the hydroxylase.

  19. Inactivation of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) by acetylene.

    PubMed

    Pham, Minh D; Lin, Ya-Ping; Van Vuong, Quan; Nagababu, Penumaka; Chang, Brian T-A; Ng, Kok Yaoh; Chen, Chein-Hung; Han, Chau-Chung; Chen, Chung-Hsuan; Li, Mai Suan; Yu, Steve S-F; Chan, Sunney I

    2015-12-01

    Acetylene (HCCH) has a long history as a mechanism-based enzyme inhibitor and is considered an active-site probe of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Here, we report how HCCH inactivates pMMO in Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) by using high-resolution mass spectrometry and computational simulation. High-resolution MALDI-TOF MS of intact pMMO complexes has allowed us to confirm that the enzyme oxidizes HCCH to the ketene (C2H2O) intermediate, which then forms an acetylation adduct with the transmembrane PmoC subunit. LC-MS/MS analysis of the peptides derived from in-gel proteolytic digestion of the protein subunit identifies K196 of PmoC as the site of acetylation. No evidence is obtained for chemical modification of the PmoA or PmoB subunit. The inactivation of pMMO by a single adduct in the transmembrane PmoC domain is intriguing given the complexity of the structural fold of this large membrane-protein complex as well as the complicated roles played by the various metal cofactors in the enzyme catalysis. Computational studies suggest that the entry of hydrophobic substrates to, and migration of products from, the catalytic site of pMMO are controlled tightly within the transmembrane domain. Support of these conclusions is provided by parallel experiments with two related alkynes: propyne (CH3CCH) and trifluoropropyne (CF3CCH). Finally, we discuss the implication of these findings to the location of the catalytic site in pMMO.

  20. Plant activation of aromatic amines mediated by cytochromes P450 and flavin-containing monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Chiapella, C; Radovan, R D; Moreno, J A; Casares, L; Barbé, J; Llagostera, M

    2000-10-31

    To know the mechanisms involved in the activation of promutagenic aromatic amines mediated by plants, we used Persea americana S117 system (S117) for the activation of 2-aminofluorene (2-AF) and m-phenylenediamine (m-PDA) in Ames assays. In these assays, the effect of the diphenylene iodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs), of the 1-aminobenzotriazole (1-ABT), an inhibitor of cytochromes P450 (cyt-P450s) and of the methimazole, a high-affinity substrate for FMOs, was studied. The efficacy of both inhibitors and of the methimazole was verified to find that they did partially inhibit the mutagenesis of both aromatic amines, activated with rat liver S9. Similarly, both inhibitors and methimazole did produce a significant decrease in 2-AF and m-PDA mutagenesis, when the activation system was S117, indicating that, similar to what occurs in mammalian systems, plant FMOs and cyt-P450s can metabolize aromatic amines to mutagenic product(s). However, the affinity of both FMOs and cyt-P450s of plant for 2-AF and m-PDA was different. Data obtained indicate that the activities of plant FMOs must be the main enzymatic system of m-PDA activation while, in 2-AF activation, plant cyt-P450s have the most relevant activities. In addition, peroxidases of the S117 system must contribute to 2-AF activation and some isoforms of FMOs and/or cyt-P450s of the S117 system, uninhibited by the inhibitors used, must be the responsible for a partial activation of m-PDA.

  1. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.; Yeager, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Nitrosomonas europaea is an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2−) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4+-dependent O2 uptake by N. europaea by 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, and de novo protein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–tandem time of flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analyses also confirmed that the fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was AmoA. PMID:26826234

  2. Occurrence of a barbiturate-inducible catalytically self-sufficient 119,000 dalton cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase in bacilli.

    PubMed

    Fulco, A J; Ruettinger, R T

    1987-05-04

    In a recent publication (Narhi, L.O. and Fulco, A.J.[1986] J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7160-7169) we described the characterization of a catalytically self-sufficient 119,000 Dalton cytochrome P-450 fatty acid monooxygenase (P-450BM-3) induced by barbiturates in Bacillus megaterium ATCC 14581. We have now examined cell-free preparations from 12 distinct strains of B. megaterium and from one or two strains each of B. alvei, B. brevis, B. cereus, B. licheniformis, B. macerans, B. pumilis and B. subtilis for the presence of this inducible enzyme. Using Western blot analyses in combination with assays for fatty acid hydroxylase activity and cytochrome P-450, we were able to show that 11 of the 12 B. megaterium strains contained not only a strongly pentobarbital-inducible fatty acid monooxygenase identical to or polymorphic with P-450BM-3 but also significant levels of two smaller P-450 cytochromes that were the same as or similar to cytochromes P-450BM-1 and P-450BM-2 originally found in ATCC 14581. Unlike the 119,000 Dalton P-450, however, the two smaller P-450s were generally easily detectable in cultures grown to stationary phase in the absence of barbiturates and, with some exceptions, were not strongly induced by pentobarbital. None of the non-megaterium species of Bacillus tested exhibited significant levels of either fatty acid monooxygenase activity or cytochrome P-450. The one strain of B. megaterium that lacked inducible P-450BM-3 was also negative for BM-1 and BM-2. However, this strain (ATCC 13368) did contain a small but significant level of another P-450 cytochrome that others have identified as the oxygenase component of a steroid 15-beta-hydroxylase system. Our evidence suggests that the BM series of P-450 cytochromes is encoded by chromosomal (rather than by plasmid) DNA.

  3. The effect of disulfide bond introduction and related Cys/Ser mutations on the stability of a cyclohexanone monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Sandy; Genz, Maika; Balke, Kathleen; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2015-11-20

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMO) belong to the class B of flavin-dependent monooxygenases (type I BVMOs) and catalyze the oxidation of (cyclic) ketones into esters and lactones. The prototype BVMO is the cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Acinetobacter sp. NCIMB 9871. This enzyme shows an impressive substrate scope with a high chemo-, regio- and/or enantioselectivity. BVMO reactions are often difficult, if not impossible to achieve by chemical approaches and this makes these enzymes thus highly desired candidates for industrial applications. Unfortunately, the industrial use is hampered by several factors related to the lack of stability of these biocatalysts. Thus, the aim of this study was to improve the CHMO's long-term stability, one of the most relevant parameter for biocatalytic processes, and additionally its stability against oxidation. We used an easy computational method for the prediction of stabilizing disulfide bonds in the CHMO-scaffold. The three most promising predicted disulfide pairs were created and biochemically characterized. The most oxidatively stable variant (Y411C-A463C) retained nearly 60% activity after incubation with 25 mM H2O2 whereas the wild type retained only 16%. In addition, one extra disulfide pair (T415C-A463C) was created and tested for increased stability. The melting temperature (Tm) of this variant was increased by 5°C with simultaneous improved long-term stability. After verification by ABD-F labeling that this mutant does not form a disulfide bond, single and double Cys/Ser mutants were prepared and investigated. Subsequent analysis revealed that the T415C single point variant is the most stable variant with a 30-fold increased long-term stability (33% residual activity after 24h incubation at 25°C) showcasing a great achievement for practical applications.

  4. Independent recruitment of a flavin-dependent monooxygenase for safe accumulation of sequestered pyrrolizidine alkaloids in grasshoppers and moths.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linzhu; Beuerle, Till; Timbilla, James; Ober, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Several insect lineages have developed diverse strategies to sequester toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids from food-plants for their own defense. Here, we show that in two highly divergent insect taxa, the hemimetabolous grasshoppers and the holometabolous butterflies, an almost identical strategy evolved independently for safe accumulation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids. This strategy involves a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase that transfers the pyrrolizidine alkaloids to their respective N-oxide, enabling the insects to avoid high concentrations of toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the hemolymph. We have identified a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase, which is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase, of the grasshopper Zonocerus variegatus. After heterologous expression in E. coli, this enzyme shows high specificity for pyrrolizidine alkaloids of various structural types and for the tropane alkaloid atropine as substrates, a property that has been described previously for a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase of the arctiid moth Grammia geneura. Phylogenetic analyses of insect flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences suggest that independent gene duplication events preceded the establishment of this specific enzyme in the lineages of the grasshoppers and of arctiid moths. Two further flavin-dependent monooxygenase sequences have been identified from Z. variegatus sharing amino acid identities of approximately 78% to the pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxygenase. After heterologous expression, both enzymes are also able to catalyze the N-oxygenation of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, albeit with a 400-fold lower specific activity. With respect to the high sequence identity between the three Z. variegatus sequences this ability to N-oxygenize pyrrolizidine alkaloids is interpreted as a relict of a former bifunctional ancestor gene of which one of the gene copies optimized this activity for the specific adaptation to pyrrolizidine alkaloid containing food plants.

  5. Competition between Metals for Binding to Methanobactin Enables Expression of Soluble Methane Monooxygenase in the Presence of Copper

    PubMed Central

    Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Ul-Haque, Muhammad Farhan; Baral, Bipin S.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that copper is a key factor regulating expression of the two forms of methane monooxygenase found in proteobacterial methanotrophs. Of these forms, the cytoplasmic, or soluble, methane monooxygenase (sMMO) is expressed only at low copper concentrations. The membrane-bound, or particulate, methane monooxygenase (pMMO) is constitutively expressed with respect to copper, and such expression increases with increasing copper. Recent findings have shown that copper uptake is mediated by a modified polypeptide, or chalkophore, termed methanobactin. Although methanobactin has high specificity for copper, it can bind other metals, e.g., gold. Here we show that in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, sMMO is expressed and active in the presence of copper if gold is also simultaneously present. Such expression appears to be due to gold binding to methanobactin produced by M. trichosporium OB3b, thereby limiting copper uptake. Such expression and activity, however, was significantly reduced if methanobactin preloaded with copper was also added. Further, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) of transcripts of genes encoding polypeptides of both forms of MMO and SDS-PAGE results indicate that both sMMO and pMMO can be expressed when copper and gold are present, as gold effectively competes with copper for binding to methanobactin. Such findings suggest that under certain geochemical conditions, both forms of MMO may be expressed and active in situ. Finally, these findings also suggest strategies whereby field sites can be manipulated to enhance sMMO expression, i.e., through the addition of a metal that can compete with copper for binding to methanobactin. PMID:25416758

  6. Inactivation of tyrosine 3-monooxygenase by acetone precipitation and its restoration by incubation with a sulfhydryl agent and iron.

    PubMed

    Okuno, S; Fujisawa, H

    1981-04-14

    The acetone precipitation of a partially purified tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (L-tyrosine, tetrahydropteridine: oxygen oxidoreductase (3-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.16.2) resulted in the complete loss of enzymatic activity. The enzymatic activity was restored by incubation with iron and dithiothreitol. The restoration of the activity was a pH-, temperature- and time-dependent reaction. Since cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, manganese, cadmium, magnesium calcium and barium ions were all ineffective in restoring activity, iron ion appeared to be specifically required in the restoration of the enzyme activity. Dithiothreitol could be partially replaced in the restoration step by glutathione, 2-mercaptoethanol or cysteine.

  7. Comparison of the peptide map and functional properties of monooxygenases induced by 3-methylcholanthrene and. beta. -naphthoflavone

    SciTech Connect

    Chasovnikova, O.B.; Mishin, V.M.; Tsyrlov, I.B.

    1987-02-20

    The similarity of the catalytic, spectral, electrophoretic, and immunochemical properties of microsomal cytochromes P-448 (molecular weight 56,000), synthesized de novo after administration of 3-methylcholanthrene and ..beta..-naphthoflavone to rats, was demonstrated. The identity of the peptide maps of the microsomal and isolated cytochrome P-448 is evidence of adequacy of the method of limited proteolysis for establishing the homogeneity and comparing the structure of the microsomal hemoproteins. The data obtained substantiate the approach for the study of the similarity and differences in the structure and enzymatic activity of various forms of monooxygenases without their preliminary isolation from the microsomal membrane.

  8. H2-driven biotransformation of n-octane to 1-octanol by a recombinant Pseudomonas putida strain co-synthesizing an O2-tolerant hydrogenase and a P450 monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lonsdale, Thomas H; Lauterbach, Lars; Honda Malca, Sumire; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Lenz, Oliver

    2015-11-21

    An in vivo biotransformation system is presented that affords the hydroxylation of n-octane to 1-octanol on the basis of NADH-dependent CYP153A monooxygenase and NAD(+)-reducing hydrogenase heterologously synthesized in a bacterial host. The hydrogenase sustains H2-driven NADH cofactor regeneration even in the presence of O2, the co-substrate of monooxygenase.

  9. Disorders in barrier protein mRNA expression and placenta secretory activity under the influence of polychlorinated biphenyls in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowska, A; Mlynarczuk, J; Kotwica, J

    2017-02-01

    Pregnancy disorders are often correlated with the presence of organic pollutants in the tissues of living bodies. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects (over 24 and 48 hours) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) 153, 126, and 77 at doses of 1, 10, and 100 ng/mL on barrier function and secretory activity in cow placentome sections collected during the second trimester of pregnancy. None of the PCBs affected the viability of the sections (P > 0.05). Polychlorinated biphenyl 153 decreased (P < 0.05) connexin 26 (Cx 26) mRNA expression, and all three PCBs reduced (P < 0.05) Cx 43 mRNA expression. Cx 32 mRNA expression showed a downward trend (P > 0.05) under the influence of PCBs 126 and 77. Moreover, PCBs 153 and 126 increased keratin 8 (KRT8) mRNA expression, whereas all PCBs decreased (P < 0.05) placenta specific protein 1 (PLAC-1) mRNA expression without changing (P > 0.05) hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) mRNA expression. Concomitantly, PCBs 153 and 126 stimulated (P < 0.05) cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) mRNA expression, all PCBs increased (P < 0.05) prostaglandin E2 synthase (PGES) mRNA expression, and PCBs 126 and 77 increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) secretion. All three PCBs decreased (P < 0.05) prostaglandin F2α synthase (PGFS) mRNA expression and prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α) secretion. In addition, all three PCBs increased (P < 0.05) neurophysin I/oxytocin (NP-I/OT) mRNA expression and OT secretion but did not affect peptidyl-glycine-α-amidating monooxygenase (PGA) mRNA expression (P > 0.05). Moreover, the PCBs increased (P < 0.05) estradiol (E2) secretion, whereas progesterone (P4) secretion remained unchanged (P > 0.05). These changes could affect trophoblast invasion and uterine contractility and thus impact the course of gestation and/or fetal development in the cow.

  10. Cytoplasmic mRNA turnover and ageing

    PubMed Central

    Borbolis, Fivos; Syntichaki, Popi

    2015-01-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover that determines the lifetime of cytoplasmic mRNAs is a means to control gene expression under both normal and stress conditions, whereas its impact on ageing and age-related disorders has just become evident. Gene expression control is achieved at the level of the mRNA clearance as well as mRNA stability and accessibility to other molecules. All these processes are regulated by cis-acting motifs and trans-acting factors that determine the rates of translation and degradation of transcripts. Specific messenger RNA granules that harbor the mRNA decay machinery or various factors, involved in translational repression and transient storage of mRNAs, are also part of the mRNA fate regulation. Their assembly and function can be modulated to promote stress resistance to adverse conditions and over time affect the ageing process and the lifespan of the organism. Here, we provide insights into the complex relationships of ageing modulators and mRNA turnover mechanisms. PMID:26432921

  11. Crystallographic Analysis of Active Site Contributions to Regiospecificity in the Diiron Enzyme Toluene 4-Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Lucas J.; Acheson, Justin F.; McCoy, Jason G.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Fox, Brian G.

    2014-10-02

    Crystal structures of toluene 4-monooxygenase hydroxylase in complex with reaction products and effector protein reveal active site interactions leading to regiospecificity. Complexes with phenolic products yield an asymmetric {mu}-phenoxo-bridged diiron center and a shift of diiron ligand E231 into a hydrogen bonding position with conserved T201. In contrast, complexes with inhibitors p-NH{sub 2}-benzoate and p-Br-benzoate showed a {mu}-1,1 coordination of carboxylate oxygen between the iron atoms and only a partial shift in the position of E231. Among active site residues, F176 trapped the aromatic ring of products against a surface of the active site cavity formed by G103, E104 and A107, while F196 positioned the aromatic ring against this surface via a {pi}-stacking interaction. The proximity of G103 and F176 to the para substituent of the substrate aromatic ring and the structure of G103L T4moHD suggest how changes in regiospecificity arise from mutations at G103. Although effector protein binding produced significant shifts in the positions of residues along the outer portion of the active site (T201, N202, and Q228) and in some iron ligands (E231 and E197), surprisingly minor shifts (<1 {angstrom}) were produced in F176, F196, and other interior residues of the active site. Likewise, products bound to the diiron center in either the presence or absence of effector protein did not significantly shift the position of the interior residues, suggesting that positioning of the cognate substrates will not be strongly influenced by effector protein binding. Thus, changes in product distributions in the absence of the effector protein are proposed to arise from differences in rates of chemical steps of the reaction relative to motion of substrates within the active site channel of the uncomplexed, less efficient enzyme, while structural changes in diiron ligand geometry associated with cycling between diferrous and diferric states are discussed for their potential

  12. Structure and Mechanism of Styrene Monooxygenase Reductase: New Insight into the FAD–Transfer Reaction†

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Eliot; Kantz, Auric; Gassner, George T.; Sazinsky, Matthew H.

    2013-01-01

    The two–component flavoprotein styrene monooxygenase (SMO) from Pseudomonas putida S12 catalyzes the NADH– and FAD–dependent epoxidation of styrene to styrene oxide. In this study we investigate the mechanism of flavin reduction and transfer from the reductase (SMOB) to epoxidase (NSMOA) component and report our findings in light of the 2.2–Å crystal structure of SMOB. Upon rapidly mixing with NADH, SMOB forms an NADH→FADox charge–transfer intermediate and catalyzes a hydride–transfer reaction from NADH to FAD, with a rate constant of 49.1 ± 1.4 s−1, in a step that is coupled to the rapid dissociation of NAD+. Electrochemical and equilibrium–binding studies indicate that NSMOA binds FADhq ~13–times more tightly than SMOB, which supports a vectoral transfer of FADhq from the reductase to the epoxidase. After binding to NSMOA, FADhq rapidly reacts with molecular oxygen to form a stable C(4a)–hydroperoxide intermediate. The half–life of apoSMOB generated in the FAD–transfer reaction is increased ~21–fold, supporting the model of a protein–protein interaction between apoSMOB and NSMOA with the peroxide intermediate. The mechanisms of FAD–dissociation and transport from SMOB to NSMOA were probed by monitoring the competitive reduction of cytochrome c in the presence and absence of pyridine nucleotides. Based on these studies, we propose a model in which reduced FAD binds to SMOB in equilibrium between an unreactive, sequestered state (S–state) and more reactive, transfer state (T–state). Dissociation of NAD+ after the hydride transfer–reaction transiently populates the T–state, promoting the transfer of FADhq to NSMOA. The binding of pyridine nucleotides to SMOB–FADhq shifts the FADhq–binding equilibrium from the T–state to the S–state. Additionally, the 2.2–Å crystal structure of SMOB–FADox reported in this work is discussed in light of the pyridine nucleotide–gated flavin–transfer and electron

  13. Activity-Based Protein Profiling of Ammonia Monooxygenase in Nitrosomonas europaea

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Kristen; Sadler, Natalie C.; Wright, Aaron T.; Yeager, Chris; Hyman, Michael R.; Löffler, F. E.

    2016-01-29

    Nitrosomonas europaeais an aerobic nitrifying bacterium that oxidizes ammonia (NH3) to nitrite (NO2) through the sequential activities of ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase (HAO). Many alkynes are mechanism-based inactivators of AMO, and here we describe an activity-based protein profiling method for this enzyme using 1,7-octadiyne (17OD) as a probe. Inactivation of NH4+-dependent O2uptake byN. europaeaby 17OD was time- and concentration-dependent. The effects of 17OD were specific for ammonia-oxidizing activity, andde novoprotein synthesis was required to reestablish this activity after cells were exposed to 17OD. Cells were reacted with Alexa Fluor 647 azide using a copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) (click) reaction, solubilized, and analyzed by SDS-PAGE and infrared (IR) scanning. A fluorescent 28-kDa polypeptide was observed for cells previously exposed to 17OD but not for cells treated with either allylthiourea or acetylene prior to exposure to 17OD or for cells not previously exposed to 17OD. The fluorescent polypeptide was membrane associated and aggregated when heated with β-mercaptoethanol and SDS. The fluorescent polypeptide was also detected in cells pretreated with other diynes, but not in cells pretreated with structural homologs containing a single ethynyl functional group. The membrane fraction from 17OD-treated cells was conjugated with biotin-azide and solubilized in SDS. Streptavidin affinity-purified polypeptides were on-bead trypsin-digested, and amino acid sequences of the peptide fragments were determined by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis. Peptide fragments from AmoA were the predominant peptides detected in 17OD-treated samples. In-gel digestion and matrix

  14. Differential Reactivity between Two Copper Sites in Peptidylglycine r-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    E Chufan; S Prigge; X Siebert; B Eipper; R Mains; L Amzel

    2011-12-31

    Peptidylglycine {alpha}-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) catalyzes the stereospecific hydroxylation of the C{alpha} of C-terminal glycine-extended peptides and proteins, the first step in the activation of many peptide hormones, growth factors, and neurotransmitters. The crystal structure of the enzyme revealed two nonequivalent Cu sites (Cu{sub M} and Cu{sub H}) separated by {approx}11 {angstrom}. In the resting state of the enzyme, Cu{sub M} is coordinated in a distorted tetrahedral geometry by one methionine, two histidines, and a water molecule. The coordination site of the water molecule is the position where external ligands bind. The Cu{sub H} has a planar T-shaped geometry with three histidines residues and a vacant position that could potentially be occupied by a fourth ligand. Although the catalytic mechanism of PHM and the role of the metals are still being debated, Cu{sub M} is identified as the metal involved in catalysis, while Cu{sub H} is associated with electron transfer. To further probe the role of the metals, we studied how small molecules such as nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}), azide (N{sub 3}{sup -}), and carbon monoxide (CO) interact with the PHM copper ions. The crystal structure of an oxidized nitrite-soaked PHMcc, obtained by soaking for 20 h in mother liquor supplemented with 300 mM NaNO{sub 2}, shows that nitrite anion coordinates Cu{sub M} in an asymmetric bidentate fashion. Surprisingly, nitrite does not bind Cu{sub H}, despite the high concentration used in the experiments (nitrite/protein > 1000). Similarly, azide and carbon monoxide coordinate Cu{sub M} but not Cu{sub H} in the PHMcc crystal structures obtained by cocrystallization with 40 mM NaN{sub 3} and by soaking CO under 3 atm of pressure for 30 min. This lack of reactivity at the Cu{sub H} is also observed in the reduced form of the enzyme: CO binds Cu{sub M} but not Cu{sub H} in the structure of PHMcc obtained by exposure of a crystal to 3 atm CO for 15 min in the presence of 5

  15. Key amino acid residues in the regulation of soluble methane monooxygenase catalysis by component B.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, Brian J; Lipscomb, John D

    2003-05-20

    The regulatory component MMOB of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) has been hypothesized to control access of substrates into the active site of the hydroxylase component (MMOH) through formation of a size specific channel or region of increased structural flexibility tuned to methane and O(2). Accordingly, a decrease in the size of four MMOB residues (N107G/S109A/S110A/T111A, the Quad mutant) was shown to accelerate the reaction of substrates larger than methane with the reactive MMOH intermediate Q [Wallar, B. J., and Lipscomb, J. D. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 2220-2233]. Here, this hypothesis is tested by construction of single and double mutations involving the residues of the Quad mutant. It is shown that mutations of residues that extend into the core structure of MMOB alter many aspects of the MMOH catalyzed reaction but do not mimic the effects of the Quad mutant. In contrast, the MMOB residues that are thought to form part of the interface in the MMOH-MMOB complex increase active site accessibility as observed for the Quad mutant. In particular, the mutant T111A mimics most of the effects of the Quad mutant; thus, Thr111 is proposed to most directly control access. Unexpectedly, mutation of Thr111 to the larger Tyr greatly increases the rate constant for the reaction of larger substrates such as ethane, furan, and nitrobenzene with Q while decreasing the rate constant for the reaction with methane. Other steps in the cycle are dramatically slowed, the regiospecificity for nitrobenzene oxidation is altered, and 10-fold more T111Y than wild-type MMOB is required to maximize the rate of turnover. Thus, T111Y appears to make a more extensive change in local interface structure that allows hydrocarbons at least as large as ethane to bind and react with Q similarly. As a result, the bond cleavage rates for methane, ethane, and their deuterated analogues are shown for the first time to correlate with bond strength in accord with a mechanism in which C-H bond

  16. Kinetics and activation thermodynamics of methane monooxygenase compound Q formation and reaction with substrates.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, B J; Lipscomb, J D

    2000-11-07

    The transient kinetics of formation and decay of the reaction cycle intermediates of the Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b methane monooxygenase (MMO) catalytic cycle are studied as a function of temperature and substrate type and deuteration. Kinetic evidence is presented for the existence of three intermediates termed compounds O, P, and P forming after the addition of O(2) to diferrous MMO hydroxylase (H(r)) and before the formation of the reactive intermediate compound Q. The Arrhenius plots for these reactions are linear and independent of substrate concentration and type, showing that substrate does not participate directly in the oxygen activation phase of the catalytic cycle. Analysis of the transient kinetic data revealed only small changes relative to the weak optical spectrum of H(r) for any of these intermediates. In contrast, large changes in the 430 nm spectral region are associated with the formation of Q. The decay reaction of Q exhibits an apparent first-order concentration dependence for all substrates tested, and the observed rate constant depends on the substrate type. The kinetics of the decay reaction of Q yield a nonlinear Arrhenius plot when methane is the substrate, and the rates in both segments of the plot increase linearly with methane concentration. Together these observations suggest that at least two reactions with a methane concentration dependence, and perhaps two methane molecules, are involved in the decay process. When CD(4) is used as the substrate, a large isotope effect and a linear Arrhenius plot are observed. Analogous plots for all other MMO substrates tested (e.g., ethane) are linear, and no isotope effect for deuterated analogues is observed. This demonstrates that a step other than C-H bond breaking is rate limiting for alternative MMO substrates. A two step Q decay mechanism is proposed that provides an explanation for the lack of an isotope effect for alternative MMO substrates and the fact that rate of oxidation of

  17. Mechanistic studies of cyclohexanone monooxygenase: chemical properties of intermediates involved in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, D; Ballou, D P; Massey, V

    2001-09-18

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO), a bacterial flavoenzyme, carries out an oxygen insertion reaction on cyclohexanone to form a seven-membered cyclic product, epsilon-caprolactone. The reaction catalyzed involves the four-electron reduction of O2 at the expense of a two-electron oxidation of NADPH and a two-electron oxidation of cyclohexanone to form epsilon-caprolactone. Previous studies suggested the participation of either a flavin C4a-hydroperoxide or a flavin C4a-peroxide intermediate during the enzymatic catalysis [Ryerson, C. C., Ballou, D. P., and Walsh, C. (1982) Biochemistry 21, 2644-2655]. However, there was no kinetic or spectral evidence to distinguish between these two possibilities. In the present work we used double-mixing stopped-flow techniques to show that the C4a-flavin-oxygen adduct, which is formed rapidly from the reaction of oxygen with reduced enzyme in the presence of NADP, can exist in two states. When the reaction is carried out at pH 7.2, the first intermediate is a flavin C4a-peroxide with maximum absorbance at 366 nm; this intermediate becomes protonated at about 3 s(-1) to form what is believed to be the flavin C4a-hydroperoxide with maximum absorbance at 383 nm. These two intermediates can be interconverted by altering the pH, with a pK(a) of 8.4. Thus, at pH 9.0 the flavin C4a-peroxide persists mainly in the deprotonated form. Further kinetic studies also demonstrated that only the flavin C4a-peroxide intermediate could oxygenate the substrate, cyclohexanone. The requirement in catalysis of the deprotonated flavin C4a-peroxide, a nucleophile, is consistent with a Baeyer-Villiger rearrangement mechanism for the enzymatic oxygenation of cyclohexanone. In the course of these studies, the Kd for cyclohexanone to the C4a-peroxyflavin form of CHMO was determined to be approximately 1 microM. The rate-determining step in catalysis was shown to be the release of NADP from the oxidized enzyme.

  18. Oxidative Metabolism of Seleno-L-Methionine to L-Methionine Selenoxide by Flavin- Containing Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Renee J.; Glocke, Steven C.; Sicuri, Anna Rita; Ripp, Sharon L.; Elfarra, Adnan A

    2008-01-01

    The roles of flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) in the oxidation of seleno-L-methionine (SeMet) to L-methionine selenoxide (MetSeO) were investigated using cDNA-expressed human FMOs, purified rat liver FMOs, and rat liver microsomes. MetSeO and the N-2,4-dinitrophenyl-derivatives of SeMet and MetSeO were synthesized and characterized by 1H-NMR and ESI/MS. These reference compounds were then used to develop a sensitive HPLC assay to monitor SeMet oxidation to MetSeO. Formation of MetSeO in rat liver microsomes was time-, protein concentration-, SeMet concentration-, and NADPH-dependent. The microsomal activity exhibited a SeMet Km value (mean ±S.D.; n=4) of 0.91 ± 0.29 mM and a Vmax value of 44 ± 8.0 nmol MetSeO/mg protein/min. Inclusion of 1-benzylimidazole, superoxide dismutase or deferoxamine caused no inhibition of the rat liver microsomal activity. Because these results suggested the involvement of FMOs in the oxidation of SeMet in rat liver microsomes, formation of MetSeO was also examined using cDNA-expressed human and purified rat FMOs. The results showed that both rat and human FMO1 and FMO3 but not FMO5 can catalyze the reaction. The SeMet kinetic constants were obtained with purified rat liver FMO3 (Km = 0.11 mM, Vmax = 280 nmol/mg protein/min) and rat liver FMO1 (Km = 7.8 mM, Vmax = 1200 nmol/mg protein/min). Because SeMet has anti-cancer, chemopreventive, and toxic properties, the kinetic results suggest FMO3 is likely to play a role in the biological activities of SeMet at low exposure conditions. PMID:17173378

  19. Methane monooxygenase component B mutants alter the kinetics of steps throughout the catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Wallar, B J; Lipscomb, J D

    2001-02-20

    Component interactions play important roles in the regulation of catalysis by methane monooxygenase (MMO). The binding of component B (MMOB) to the hydroxylase component (MMOH) has been shown in previous studies to cause structural changes in MMOH that result in altered thermodynamic and kinetic properties during the reduction and oxygen binding steps of the catalytic cycle. Here, specific amino acid residues of MMOB that play important roles in the interconversion of several intermediates of the MMO cycle have been identified. Both of the histidine residues in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b MMOB (H5 and H33) were chemically modified by diethylpyrocarbonate (DEPC). Although the DEPC--MMOB species exhibited only minor changes relative to unmodified MMOB in steady-state MMO turnover, large decreases in the formation rate constants of the reaction cycle intermediates, compound P and compound Q, were observed. The site specific mutants H5A, H33A, and H5A/H33A were made and characterized. H5A and wild type MMOB elicited similar steady-state and transient kinetics, although the mutant caused a slightly lower rate constant for Q formation. Conversely, H33A exhibited a >50-fold decrease in the P formation rate constant, which resulted in slower formation of Q. The kinetics of the double mutant (H5A/H33A) were similar to those of H33A, suggesting that the highly conserved residue, H33, has the most significant effect on the efficient progress of the cycle. Ongoing NMR investigations of residues perturbed by formation of the MMOH-MMOB complex suggested construction of the MMOB N107G/S109A/S110A/T111A quadruple mutant. This mutant was found to elicit a nearly 2-fold increase in specific activity for steady-state MMO turnover of large substrates such as furan and nitrobenzene but caused no similar increase for the physiological substrate, methane. While the quadruple mutant did not have a significant effect on P and Q formation, it caused an almost 3-fold increase in the

  20. Roles of the methane monooxygenase reductase component in the regulation of catalysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Nesheim, J C; Paulsen, K E; Stankovich, M T; Lipscomb, J D

    1997-04-29

    The reductase component (MMOR) of the soluble methane monooxygenase isolated from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b catalyzes transfer of 2e- from NADH to the hydroxylase component (MMOH) where oxygen activation and substrate oxidation occur. It is shown here that MMOR can also exert regulatory effects on catalysis by binding to MMOH or to the binary complex of MMOH and component B (MMOB), another regulatory protein. MMOR alters the oxidation-reduction potentials of the dinuclear iron cluster at the active site of MMOH. Although little change is observed in the potential for the first electron transfer to the cluster (E(1)0' = 76 mV), the E(2)0' potential value for the second electron transfer is increased from 21 to 125 mV. This shift provides a larger driving force for electron transfer from MMOR and favors transfer of two rather than one electron as required by catalysis. Similar positive shifts in potential are observed even in the presence of MMOB which has been shown to cause a 132 mV negative shift in the midpoint potential of MMOH in the absence of MMOR. MMOR is also shown to decrease the rate of reaction between the fully reduced MMOH-MMOB and O2 approximately 20-fold at 4 degrees C. However, the time course of the key catalytic cycle intermediate that can react with substates, compound Q, is unaffected. This implies a compensating faster decay of one or more of the intermediates that occur between diferrous MMOH and compound Q in the reaction cycle, thereby limiting potential nonproductive autodecay of these intermediates. Accordingly, an increase in single turnover product yield is observed in the presence of MMOR. Interestingly, MMOR can cause the redox potential increases, changes in rates, and the increase in product yield when present at only 10% of the concentration of MMOH active sites. Substrate binding is shown to induce negligible changes in the redox potentials. Two alternative regulatory schemes are presented based on (i) thermodynamic coupling

  1. Isolation and initial characterization of a novel type of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase activity from a marine microorganism.

    PubMed

    Willetts, Andrew; Joint, Ian; Gilbert, Jack A; Trimble, William; Mühling, Martin

    2012-07-01

    A novel type of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) has been found in a marine strain of Stenotrophomonas maltophila strain PML168 that was isolated from a temperate intertidal zone. The enzyme is able to use NADH as the source of reducing power necessary to accept the atom of diatomic oxygen not incorporated into the oxyfunctionalized substrate. Growth studies have establish that the enzyme is inducible, appears to serve a catabolic role, and is specifically induced by one or more unidentified components of seawater as well as various anthropogenic xenobiotic compounds. A blast search of the primary sequence of the enzyme, recovered from the genomic sequence of the isolate, has placed this atypical BVMO in the context of the several hundred known members of the flavoprotein monooxygenase superfamily. A particular feature of this BVMO lies in its truncated C-terminal domain, which results in a relatively small protein (357 amino acids; 38.4 kDa). In addition, metagenomic screening has been conducted on DNA recovered from an extensive range of marine environmental samples to gauge the relative abundance and distribution of similar enzymes within the global marine microbial community. Although low, abundance was detected in samples from many marine provinces, confirming the potential for biodiscovery in marine microorganisms.

  2. The substrate-bound crystal structure of a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase exhibits a Criegee-like conformation.

    PubMed

    Yachnin, Brahm J; Sprules, Tara; McEvoy, Michelle B; Lau, Peter C K; Berghuis, Albert M

    2012-05-09

    The Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are a family of bacterial flavoproteins that catalyze the synthetically useful Baeyer-Villiger oxidation reaction. This involves the conversion of ketones into esters or cyclic ketones into lactones by introducing an oxygen atom adjacent to the carbonyl group. The BVMOs offer exquisite regio- and enantiospecificity while acting on a wide range of substrates. They use only NADPH and oxygen as cosubstrates, and produce only NADP(+) and water as byproducts, making them environmentally attractive for industrial purposes. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a BVMO, cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Rhodococcus sp. HI-31 in complex with its substrate, cyclohexanone, as well as NADP(+) and FAD, to 2.4 Å resolution. This structure shows a drastic rotation of the NADP(+) cofactor in comparison to previously reported NADP(+)-bound structures, as the nicotinamide moiety is no longer positioned above the flavin ring. Instead, the substrate, cyclohexanone, is found at this location, in an appropriate position for the formation of the Criegee intermediate. The rotation of NADP(+) permits the substrate to gain access to the reactive flavin peroxyanion intermediate while preventing it from diffusing out of the active site. The structure thus reveals the conformation of the enzyme during the key catalytic step. CHMO is proposed to undergo a series of conformational changes to gradually move the substrate from the solvent, via binding in a solvent excluded pocket that dictates the enzyme's chemospecificity, to a location above the flavin-peroxide adduct where catalysis occurs.

  3. The Substrate-Bound Crystal Structure of a Baeyer–Villiger Monooxygenase Exhibits a Criegee-like Conformation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are a family of bacterial flavoproteins that catalyze the synthetically useful Baeyer–Villiger oxidation reaction. This involves the conversion of ketones into esters or cyclic ketones into lactones by introducing an oxygen atom adjacent to the carbonyl group. The BVMOs offer exquisite regio- and enantiospecificity while acting on a wide range of substrates. They use only NADPH and oxygen as cosubstrates, and produce only NADP+ and water as byproducts, making them environmentally attractive for industrial purposes. Here, we report the first crystal structure of a BVMO, cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) from Rhodococcus sp. HI-31 in complex with its substrate, cyclohexanone, as well as NADP+ and FAD, to 2.4 Å resolution. This structure shows a drastic rotation of the NADP+ cofactor in comparison to previously reported NADP+-bound structures, as the nicotinamide moiety is no longer positioned above the flavin ring. Instead, the substrate, cyclohexanone, is found at this location, in an appropriate position for the formation of the Criegee intermediate. The rotation of NADP+ permits the substrate to gain access to the reactive flavin peroxyanion intermediate while preventing it from diffusing out of the active site. The structure thus reveals the conformation of the enzyme during the key catalytic step. CHMO is proposed to undergo a series of conformational changes to gradually move the substrate from the solvent, via binding in a solvent excluded pocket that dictates the enzyme’s chemospecificity, to a location above the flavin–peroxide adduct where catalysis occurs. PMID:22506764

  4. Cloning, Expression, Characterization, and Biocatalytic Investigation of the 4-Hydroxyacetophenone Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas putida JD1▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rehdorf, Jessica; Zimmer, Christian L.; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.

    2009-01-01

    While the number of available recombinant Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) has grown significantly over the last few years, there is still the demand for other BVMOs to expand the biocatalytic diversity. Most BVMOs that have been described are dedicated to convert efficiently cyclohexanone and related cyclic aliphatic ketones. To cover a broader range of substrate types and enantio- and/or regioselectivities, new BVMOs have to be discovered. The gene encoding a BVMO identified in Pseudomonas putida JD1 converting aromatic ketones (HAPMO; 4-hydroxyacetophenone monooxygenase) was amplified from genomic DNA using SiteFinding-PCR, cloned, and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, four other open reading frames could be identified clustered around this HAPMO. It has been suggested that these proteins, including the HAPMO, might be involved in the degradation of 4-hydroxyacetophenone. Substrate specificity studies revealed that a large variety of other arylaliphatic ketones are also converted via Baeyer-Villiger oxidation into the corresponding esters, with preferences for para-substitutions at the aromatic ring. In addition, oxidation of aldehydes and some heteroaromatic compounds was observed. Cycloketones and open-chain ketones were not or poorly accepted, respectively. It was also found that this enzyme oxidizes aromatic ketones such as 3-phenyl-2-butanone with excellent enantioselectivity (E ≫100). PMID:19251889

  5. Continuous testing system for Baeyer-Villiger biooxidation using recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase encapsulated in polyelectrolyte complex capsules.

    PubMed

    Bučko, Marek; Schenkmayerová, Andrea; Gemeiner, Peter; Vikartovská, Alica; Mihovilovič, Marko D; Lacík, Igor

    2011-08-10

    An original strategy for universal laboratory testing of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases based on continuous packed-bed minireactor connected with flow calorimeter and integrated with bubble-free oxygenation is reported. Model enantioselective Baeyer-Villiger biooxidations of rac-bicyclo[3.2.0]hept-2-en-6-one to corresponding lactones (1R,5S)-3-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one and (1S,5R)-2-oxabicyclo-[3.3.0]oct-6-en-3-one as important chiral synthons for the synthesis of bioactive compounds were performed in the minireactor equipped with a column packed with encapsulated recombinant cells Escherichia coli overexpressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase. The cells were encapsulated in polyelectrolyte complex capsules formed by reaction of oppositely charged polymers utilizing highly reproducible and controlled encapsulation process. Encapsulated cells tested in minireactor exhibited high operational stability with 4 complete substrate conversions to products and 6 conversions above 80% within 14 repeated consecutive biooxidation tests. Moreover, encapsulated cells showed high enzyme stability during 91 days of storage with substrate conversions above 80% up to 60 days of storage. Furthermore, usable thermometric signal of Baeyer-Villiger biooxidation obtained by flow calorimetry using encapsulated cells was utilized for preparatory kinetic study in order to guarantee sub-inhibitory initial substrate concentration for biooxidation tests.

  6. Directed evolution of phenylacetone monooxygenase as an active catalyst for the Baeyer-Villiger conversion of cyclohexanone to caprolactone.

    PubMed

    Parra, Loreto P; Acevedo, Juan P; Reetz, Manfred T

    2015-07-01

    Phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) is an exceptionally robust Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase, which makes it ideal for potential industrial applications. However, its substrate scope is limited, unreactive cyclohexanone being a prominent example. Such a limitation is unfortunate, because this particular transformation in an ecologically viable manner would be highly desirable, the lactone and the respective lactam being of considerable interest as monomers in polymer science. We have applied directed evolution in search of an active mutant for this valuable C-C activating reaction. Using iterative saturation mutagenesis (ISM), several active mutants were evolved, with only a minimal trade-off in terms of stability. The best mutants allow for quantitative conversion of 2 mM cyclohexanone within 1 h reaction time. In order to circumvent the NADP(+) regeneration problem, whole E. coli resting cells were successfully applied. Molecular dynamics simulations and induced fit docking throw light on the origin of enhanced PAMO activity. The PAMO mutants constitute ideal starting points for future directed evolution optimization necessary for an industrial process.

  7. Monooxygenase activity and contaminant burdens of pipping heron embryos in Virginia, the Great Lakes and San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Custer, T.W.; Hothem, R.L.; King, K.A.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Spann, J.W.

    1991-01-01

    Black-crowned night-heron (Nvcticorax nvcticorax) pipping embryos were studied from undisturbed (Chincoteague National Wildl ife Refuge, VA) and industrialized (Cat Island, Green Bay WI, and Bair and W. Marin Islands, San Francisco Bay, CA) locations. Hepatic aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) , ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, (EROD), benzyloxyROD (BROD), pentoxyROD (PROD) and ethoxycoumarinOD (ECOD) activities and burdens of organochlorines (embryo + yolk sac - liver) were quantified. AHH, BROD, ECOD and EROD were induced up to 100-fold (P<.O5) in embryos from Cat Island compared to the other sites. Greatest burdens of total PCBs and p,p?DDE were detected in Cat Island embryos. Monooxygenase activities (AHH, BROD, ECOD and EROD) and PCB concentrations were significantly correlated (r=O.50 to 0.72). These and other data indicate that monooxygenases may be rapid and inexpensive biomarkers of exposure to some PCB congeners. Current efforts include determination of PCB congeners and other contaminants in these embryos, additional characterization of the induced P-450 isozymes, and expanding the study to include heron embryos and nestlings at other estuaries.

  8. Factors affecting the relative importance of amine oxidases and monooxygenases in the in vivo metabolism of xenobiotic amines in humans.

    PubMed

    Strolin Benedetti, M; Tipton, K F; Whomsley, R; Baltes, E

    2007-01-01

    The monooxygenases and the amine oxidases (AOs) are the major enzyme systems involved in vivo in the oxidative metabolism of xenobiotic amines in humans. With the exception of the inhibition of the metabolism of tyramine ingested by subjects taking inhibitors of MAO-A or of both MAO-A and -B, which has been extensively investigated, the involvement of the monoamine oxidases in xenobiotic amine metabolism (drugs in particular) has been largely neglected. Furthermore, with the exception of amlodipine, there have been essentially no studies on the metabolism of drug amines by amine oxidases such as SSAOs and PAOs in humans. In contrast, monooxygenases (CYP isoenzymes, and to a lesser extent, FMOs) have been extensively investigated in terms of their involvement in xenobiotic metabolism. It is possible that the contribution of AOs to the overall metabolism of xenobiotic amines in humans has been underestimated, or erroneously estimated, as most investigations of drug metabolism have been performed using in vitro test systems optimized for CYP activity, such as liver microsomes, and most investigations of drug metabolism in vivo in humans have identified only the final, stable metabolites.

  9. Interactions between the HIV-1 Unspliced mRNA and Host mRNA Decay Machineries

    PubMed Central

    Toro-Ascuy, Daniela; Rojas-Araya, Bárbara; Valiente-Echeverría, Fernando; Soto-Rifo, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) unspliced transcript is used both as mRNA for the synthesis of structural proteins and as the packaged genome. Given the presence of retained introns and instability AU-rich sequences, this viral transcript is normally retained and degraded in the nucleus of host cells unless the viral protein REV is present. As such, the stability of the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA must be particularly controlled in the nucleus and the cytoplasm in order to ensure proper levels of this viral mRNA for translation and viral particle formation. During its journey, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA assembles into highly specific messenger ribonucleoproteins (mRNPs) containing many different host proteins, amongst which are well-known regulators of cytoplasmic mRNA decay pathways such as up-frameshift suppressor 1 homolog (UPF1), Staufen double-stranded RNA binding protein 1/2 (STAU1/2), or components of miRNA-induced silencing complex (miRISC) and processing bodies (PBs). More recently, the HIV-1 unspliced mRNA was shown to contain N6-methyladenosine (m6A), allowing the recruitment of YTH N6-methyladenosine RNA binding protein 2 (YTHDF2), an m6A reader host protein involved in mRNA decay. Interestingly, these host proteins involved in mRNA decay were shown to play positive roles in viral gene expression and viral particle assembly, suggesting that HIV-1 interacts with mRNA decay components to successfully accomplish viral replication. This review summarizes the state of the art in terms of the interactions between HIV-1 unspliced mRNA and components of different host mRNA decay machineries. PMID:27886048

  10. EXPRESSION OF BRANCHIAL FLAVIN-CONTAINING MONOOXYGENASE IS DIRECTLY CORRELATED WITH SALINITY-INDUCED ALDICARB TOXICITY IN THE EURYHALINE FISH (ORYZIAS LATIPES). (R826109)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Earlier studies in our laboratory have demonstrated a reduction of flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) activity when salt-water adapted euryhaline fish were transferred to water of less salinity. Since FMOs have been shown to be responsible for the bioact...

  11. Cloning, sequencing, and analysis of a gene cluster from Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600 encoding nitrilotriacetate monooxygenase and NADH:flavin mononucleotide oxidoreductase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Y; Mortimer, M W; Fisher, T S; Kahn, M L; Brockman, F J; Xun, L

    1997-01-01

    Nitrilotriacetate (NTA) is an important chelating agent in detergents and has also been used extensively in processing radionuclides. In Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC 29600, biodegradation of NTA is initiated by NTA monooxygenase that oxidizes NTA to iminodiacetate and glyoxylate. The NTA monooxygenase activity requires two component proteins, component A and component B, but the function of each component is unclear. We have cloned and sequenced a gene cluster encoding components A and B (nmoA and nmoB) and two additional open reading frames, nmoR and nmoT, downstream of nmoA. Based on sequence similarities, nmoR and nmoT probably encode a regulatory protein and a transposase, respectively. The NmoA sequence was similar to a monooxygenase that uses reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) as reductant; NmoB was similar to an NADH:flavin mononucleotide (FMN) oxidoreductase. On the basis of this information, we tested the function of each component. Purified component B was shown to be an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase, and its activity could be separated from that of component A. When the Photobacterium fischeri NADH:FMN oxidoreductase was substituted for component B in the complete reaction, NTA was oxidized, showing that the substrate specificity of the reaction resides in component A. Component A is therefore an NTA monooxygenase that uses FMNH2 and O2 to oxidize NTA, and component B is an NADH:FMN oxidoreductase that provides FMNH2 for NTA oxidation. PMID:9023192

  12. Self-amplifying mRNA vaccines.

    PubMed

    Brito, Luis A; Kommareddy, Sushma; Maione, Domenico; Uematsu, Yasushi; Giovani, Cinzia; Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Otten, Gillis R; Yu, Dong; Mandl, Christian W; Mason, Peter W; Dormitzer, Philip R; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Geall, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    This chapter provides a brief introduction to nucleic acid-based vaccines and recent research in developing self-amplifying mRNA vaccines. These vaccines promise the flexibility of plasmid DNA vaccines with enhanced immunogenicity and safety. The key to realizing the full potential of these vaccines is efficient delivery of nucleic acid to the cytoplasm of a cell, where it can amplify and express the encoded antigenic protein. The hydrophilicity and strong net negative charge of RNA impedes cellular uptake. To overcome this limitation, electrostatic complexation with cationic lipids or polymers and physical delivery using electroporation or ballistic particles to improve cellular uptake has been evaluated. This chapter highlights the rapid progress made in using nonviral delivery systems for RNA-based vaccines. Initial preclinical testing of self-amplifying mRNA vaccines has shown nonviral delivery to be capable of producing potent and robust innate and adaptive immune responses in small animals and nonhuman primates. Historically, the prospect of developing mRNA vaccines was uncertain due to concerns of mRNA instability and the feasibility of large-scale manufacturing. Today, these issues are no longer perceived as barriers in the widespread implementation of the technology. Currently, nonamplifying mRNA vaccines are under investigation in human clinical trials and can be produced at a sufficient quantity and quality to meet regulatory requirements. If the encouraging preclinical data with self-amplifying mRNA vaccines are matched by equivalently positive immunogenicity, potency, and tolerability in human trials, this platform could establish nucleic acid vaccines as a versatile new tool for human immunization.

  13. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation.

    PubMed

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-08-04

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5' end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies.

  14. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Poker, Gilad; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2015-01-01

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, elongation, and termination rates along the mRNA strand on the steady-state protein translation rate. We show that the sensitivity of mRNA translation is equal to the sensitivity of the maximal eigenvalue of a symmetric, nonnegative, tridiagonal, and irreducible matrix. This leads to new analytical results as well as efficient numerical schemes that are applicable for large-scale models. Our results show that in the usual endogenous case, when initiation is more rate-limiting than elongation, the sensitivity of the translation rate to small mutations rapidly increases towards the 5′ end of the ORF. When the initiation rate is high, as may be the case for highly expressed and/or heterologous optimized genes, the maximal sensitivity is with respect to the elongation rates at the middle of the mRNA strand. We also show that the maximal possible effect of a small increase/decrease in any of the rates along the mRNA is an increase/decrease of the same magnitude in the translation rate. These results are in agreement with previous molecular evolutionary and synthetic biology experimental studies. PMID:26238363

  15. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases: a crystallographer’s view on a new class of biomass-degrading enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a new class of microbial copper enzymes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant polysaccharides. They have only been discovered and characterized in the last 5–10 years and have stimulated strong interest both in biotechnology and in bioinorganic chemistry. In biotechnology, the hope is that these enzymes will finally help to make enzymatic biomass conversion, especially of lignocellulosic plant waste, economically attractive. Here, the role of LPMOs is likely to be in attacking bonds that are not accessible to other enzymes. LPMOs have attracted enormous interest since their discovery. The emphasis in this review is on the past and present contribution of crystallographic studies as a guide to functional understanding, with a final look towards the future. PMID:27840684

  16. Transcript Analysis of Multiple Copies of amo (Encoding Ammonia Monooxygenase) and hao (Encoding Hydroxylamine Oxidoreductase) in Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Hommes, Norman G.; Sayavedra-Soto, Luis A.; Arp, Daniel J.

    2001-01-01

    The genes encoding ammonia monooxygenase (amoCAB), hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (hao), and the c-type cytochrome c-554 (hcy) are present in multiple copies in the genome of Nitrosomonas europaea. The upstream regions of the two copies of amoC, the three copies of hao, and one copy of hcy were cloned and sequenced. Primer extension reactions were done to identify transcription start sites for these genes, as well as for amoA. Putative ς70 promoter sequences were found associated with all but one of the mapped transcription start sites. Primer extensions were done with amoC primers using RNA harvested from cells incubated with and without ammonium. The experiments suggested that N. europaea cells may be able to use different promoters in the presence and absence of ammonium. PMID:11208810

  17. Copper-dioxygen complex mediated C-H bond oxygenation: relevance for particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO).

    PubMed

    Himes, Richard A; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2009-02-01

    Particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), an integral membrane protein found in methanotrophic bacteria, catalyzes the oxidation of methane to methanol. Expression and greater activity of the enzyme in the presence of copper ion suggest that pMMO is a cuprous metalloenzyme. Recent advances - especially the first crystal structures of pMMO - have energized the field, but the nature of the active site(s) and the mechanism of methane oxidation remain poorly understood-yet hotly contested. Herein the authors briefly review the current understanding of the pMMO metal sites and discuss advances in small molecule Cu-O(2) chemistry that may contribute to an understanding of copper-ion mediated hydrocarbon oxidation chemistry.

  18. Simultaneous biocatalyst production and Baeyer-Villiger oxidation for bioconversion of cyclohexanone by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Yong-Cheol; Lee, Dae-Hee; Park, Kyungmoon; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2005-01-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) catalyzing Baeyer-Villiger oxidation converts cyclic ketones into optically pure lactones, which have been used as building blocks in organic synthesis. A recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pMM4 expressing CHMO originated from Acinetobacter sp. NCIB 9871 was used to produce epsilon-caprolactone through a simultaneous biocatalyst production and Baeyer-Villiger oxidation (SPO) process. A fed-batch process was designed to obtain high cell density for improving production of epsilon-caprolactone. The fed-batch SPO process gave the best results, 10.2 g/L of epsilon-caprolactone and 0.34 g/(L.h) of productivity, corresponding to a 10.5- and 3.4-fold enhancement compared with those of the batch SPO, respectively.

  19. Enhanced production of ε-caprolactone by coexpression of bacterial hemoglobin gene in recombinant Escherichia coli expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2014-12-28

    Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in a microbial system expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) can be influenced by not only the efficient regeneration of NADPH but also a sufficient supply of oxygen. In this study, the bacterial hemoglobin gene from Vitreoscilla stercoraria (vhb) was introduced into the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing CHMO to investigate the effects of an oxygen-carrying protein on microbial BV oxidation of cyclohexanone. Coexpression of Vhb allowed the recombinant E. coli strain to produce a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 15.7 g/l in a fed-batch BV oxidation of cyclohexanone, which corresponded to a 43% improvement compared with the control strain expressing CHMO only under the same conditions.

  20. Oxidative cleavage and hydrolytic boosting of cellulose in soybean spent flakes by Trichoderma reesei Cel61A lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brian C; Agger, Jane Wittrup; Wichmann, Jesper; Meyer, Anne S

    2017-03-01

    The auxiliary activity family 9 (AA9) copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase (LPMO) from Trichoderma reesei (EG4; TrCel61A) was investigated for its ability to oxidize the complex polysaccharides from soybean. The substrate specificity of the enzyme was assessed against a variety of substrates, including both soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry, and soy spent flake pretreated with sodium hydroxide. Products from enzymatic treatments were analyzed using mass spectrometry and high performance anion exchange chromatography. We demonstrate that TrCel61A is capable of oxidizing cellulose from both pretreated soy spent flake and phosphoric acid swollen cellulose, oxidizing at both the C1 and C4 positions. In addition, we show that the oxidative activity of TrCel61A displays a synergistic effect capable of boosting endoglucanase activity, and thereby substrate depolymerization of soy cellulose, by 27%.

  1. Oxidation of trichloroethylene, 1,1-dichloroethylene, and chloroform by toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1

    SciTech Connect

    Chauhan, S.; Wood, T.K.; Barbieri, P.

    1998-08-01

    Toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1, which oxidizes toluene and o-xylene, was examined for its ability to degrade the environmental pollutants trichloroethylene (TCE), 1,1-dichloroethylene (1,1-DCE), cis-1,2-DCE, trans-1,2-DCE, chloroform, dichloromethane, phenol, 2,4-dichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trichlorophenol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,3,5,6-tetrachlorophenol, and 2,3,4,5,6-pentachlorophenol. Escherichia coli JM109 that expressed ToMO from genes on plasmid pBZ1260 under control of the lac promoter degraded TCE, 1,1-DCE, and chloroform at initial rates of 3.1, 3.6, and 1.6 nmol, respectively. Stoichiometric amounts of chloride release were seen, indicating mineralization. Thus, the substrate range of ToMO is extended to include aliphatic chlorinated compounds.

  2. Identification of the Lomofungin Biosynthesis Gene Cluster and Associated Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase Gene in Streptomyces lomondensis S015

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxiao; Sheng, Chaolan; Wang, Wei; Hu, Hongbo; Peng, Huasong; Zhang, Xuehong

    2015-01-01

    Streptomyces lomondensis S015 synthesizes the broad-spectrum phenazine antibiotic lomofungin. Whole genome sequencing of this strain revealed a genomic locus consisting of 23 open reading frames that includes the core phenazine biosynthesis gene cluster lphzGFEDCB. lomo10, encoding a putative flavin-dependent monooxygenase, was also identified in this locus. Inactivation of lomo10 by in-frame partial deletion resulted in the biosynthesis of a new phenazine metabolite, 1-carbomethoxy-6-formyl-4,9-dihydroxy-phenazine, along with the absence of lomofungin. This result suggests that lomo10 is responsible for the hydroxylation of lomofungin at its C-7 position. This is the first description of a phenazine hydroxylation gene in Streptomyces, and the results of this study lay the foundation for further investigation of phenazine metabolite biosynthesis in Streptomyces. PMID:26305803

  3. Localization of human flavin-containing monooxygenase genes FMO2 and FMO5 to chromosome 1q

    SciTech Connect

    McCombie, R.R.; Shephard, E.A.; Dolphin, C.T.

    1996-06-15

    The human flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene family comprises at least five distinct members (FMO1 to FMO5) that code for enzymes responsible for the oxidation of a wide variety of soft nucleophilic substrates, including drugs and environmental pollutants. Three of these genes (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO4) have previously been localized to human chromosome 1q, raising the possibility that the entire gene family is clustered in this chromosomal region. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction of DNA isolated from a panel of human-rodent somatic cell hybrids demonstrates that the two remaining identified members of the FMO gene family, FMO2 and FMO5, also are located on chromosome 1q. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Effects of the neem tree compounds azadirachtin, salannin, nimbin, and 6-desacetylnimbin on ecdysone 20-monooxygenase activity.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, M J; Smith, S L; Johnson, S; Morgan, E D

    1997-01-01

    The effects of azadirachtin, salannin, nimbin, and 6-desacetylnimbin on ecdysone 20-monooxygenase (E-20-M) activity were examined in three insect species. Homogenates of wandering stage third instar larvae of Drosophila melanogaster, or abdomens from adult female Aedes aegypti, or fat body or midgut from fifth instar larvae of Manduca sexta were incubated with radiolabeled ecdysone and increasing concentrations (from 1 x 10(-8) to 1 x 10(-3) M) of the four compounds isolated from seed kernels of the neem tree, Azadirachta indica. All four neem tree compounds were found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent fashion, the E-20-M activity in three insect species. The concentration of these compounds required to elicit a 50% inhibition of this steroid hydroxylase activity in the three insect species examined ranged from approximately 2 x 10(-5) to 1 x 10(-3).

  5. A chicory cytochrome P450 mono-oxygenase CYP71AV8 for the oxidation of (+)-valencene.

    PubMed

    Cankar, Katarina; van Houwelingen, Adèle; Bosch, Dirk; Sonke, Theo; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2011-01-03

    Chicory (Cichorium intybus L.), which is known to have a variety of terpene-hydroxylating activities, was screened for a P450 mono-oxygenase to convert (+)-valencene to (+)-nootkatone. A novel P450 cDNA was identified in a chicory root EST library. Co-expression of the enzyme with a valencene synthase in yeast, led to formation of trans-nootkatol, cis-nootkatol and (+)-nootkatone. The novel enzyme was also found to catalyse a three step conversion of germacrene A to germacra-1(10),4,11(13)-trien-12-oic acid, indicating its involvement in chicory sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis. Likewise, amorpha-4,11-diene was converted to artemisinic acid. Surprisingly, the chicory P450 has a different regio-specificity on (+)-valencene compared to germacrene A and amorpha-4,11-diene.

  6. Identification of the Monooxygenase Gene Clusters Responsible for the Regioselective Oxidation of Phenol to Hydroquinone in Mycobacteria▿

    PubMed Central

    Furuya, Toshiki; Hirose, Satomi; Osanai, Hisashi; Semba, Hisashi; Kino, Kuniki

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium goodii strain 12523 is an actinomycete that is able to oxidize phenol regioselectively at the para position to produce hydroquinone. In this study, we investigated the genes responsible for this unique regioselective oxidation. On the basis of the fact that the oxidation activity of M. goodii strain 12523 toward phenol is induced in the presence of acetone, we first identified acetone-induced proteins in this microorganism by two-dimensional electrophoretic analysis. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of one of these acetone-induced proteins shares 100% identity with that of the protein encoded by the open reading frame Msmeg_1971 in Mycobacterium smegmatis strain mc2155, whose genome sequence has been determined. Since Msmeg_1971, Msmeg_1972, Msmeg_1973, and Msmeg_1974 constitute a putative binuclear iron monooxygenase gene cluster, we cloned this gene cluster of M. smegmatis strain mc2155 and its homologous gene cluster found in M. goodii strain 12523. Sequence analysis of these binuclear iron monooxygenase gene clusters revealed the presence of four genes designated mimABCD, which encode an oxygenase large subunit, a reductase, an oxygenase small subunit, and a coupling protein, respectively. When the mimA gene (Msmeg_1971) of M. smegmatis strain mc2155, which was also found to be able to oxidize phenol to hydroquinone, was deleted, this mutant lost the oxidation ability. This ability was restored by introduction of the mimA gene of M. smegmatis strain mc2155 or of M. goodii strain 12523 into this mutant. Interestingly, we found that these gene clusters also play essential roles in propane and acetone metabolism in these mycobacteria. PMID:21183637

  7. Mechanism of the 6-Hydroxy-3-succinoyl-pyridine 3-Monooxygenase Flavoprotein from Pseudomonas putida S16*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hao; Hausinger, Robert P.; Tang, Hong-Zhi; Xu, Ping

    2014-01-01

    6-Hydroxy-3-succinoyl-pyridine (HSP) 3-monooxygenase (HspB), a flavoprotein essential to the pyrrolidine pathway of nicotine degradation, catalyzes pyridine-ring β-hydroxylation, resulting in carbon-carbon cleavage and production of 2,5-dihydroxypyridine. Here, we generated His6-tagged HspB in Escherichia coli, characterized the properties of the recombinant enzyme, and investigated its mechanism of catalysis. In contrast to conclusions reported previously, the second product of the HspB reaction was shown to be succinate, with isotope labeling experiments providing direct evidence that the newly introduced oxygen atom of succinate is derived from H2O. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that HspB is the most closely related to two p-nitrophenol 4-monooxygenases, and the experimental results exhibit that p-nitrophenol is a substrate of HspB. The reduction of HspB (with maxima at 375 and 460 nm, and a shoulder at 485 nm) by NADH was followed by stopped-flow spectroscopy, and the rate constant for reduction was shown to be stimulated by HSP. Reduced HspB reacts with oxygen to form a C(4a)-(hydro)peroxyflavin intermediate with an absorbance maximum at ∼400 nm within the first few milliseconds before converting to the oxidized flavoenzyme species. The formed C(4a)-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate reacts with HSP to form an intermediate that hydrolyzes to the products 2,5-dihydroxypyridine and succinate. The investigation on the catalytic mechanism of a flavoprotein pyridine-ring β-position hydroxylase provides useful information for the biosynthesis of pyridine derivatives. PMID:25172510

  8. Development of a plant viral-vector-based gene expression assay for the screening of yeast cytochrome p450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Kathleen; Nguyen, Long V; Khan, Faizah; Pogue, Gregory P; Vojdani, Fakhrieh; Panda, Sanjay; Pinot, Franck; Oriedo, Vincent B; Rasochova, Lada; Subramanian, Mani; Miller, Barbara; White, Earl L

    2003-02-01

    Development of a gene discovery tool for heterologously expressed cytochrome P450 monooxygenases has been inherently difficult. The activity assays are labor-intensive and not amenable to parallel screening. Additionally, biochemical confirmation requires coexpression of a homologous P450 reductase or complementary heterologous activity. Plant virus gene expression systems have been utilized for a diverse group of organisms. In this study we describe a method using an RNA vector expression system to phenotypically screen for cytochrome P450-dependent fatty acid omega-hydroxylase activity. Yarrowia lipolytica CYP52 gene family members involved in n-alkane assimilation were amplified from genomic DNA, cloned into a plant virus gene expression vector, and used as a model system for determining heterologous expression. Plants infected with virus vectors expressing the yeast CYP52 genes (YlALK1-YlALK7) showed a distinct necrotic lesion phenotype on inoculated plant leaves. No phenotype was detected on negative control constructs. YlALK3-, YlALK5-, and YlALK7-inoculated plants all catalyzed the terminal hydroxylation of lauric acid as confirmed using thin-layer and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry methods. The plant-based cytochrome P450 phenotypic screen was tested on an n-alkane-induced Yarrowia lipolytica plant virus expression library. A subset of 1,025 random library clones, including YlALK1-YlALK7 constructs, were tested on plants. All YlALK gene constructs scored positive in the randomized screen. Following nucleotide sequencing of the clones that scored positive using a phenotypic screen, approximately 5% were deemed appropriate for further biochemical analysis. This report illustrates the utility of a plant-based system for expression of heterologous cytochrome P450 monooxygenases and for the assignment of gene function.

  9. Spectroscopic and computational insight into the activation of O2 by the mononuclear Cu center in polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Kjaergaard, Christian H; Qayyum, Munzarin F; Wong, Shaun D; Xu, Feng; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Walton, Daniel J; Young, Nigel A; Davies, Gideon J; Walton, Paul H; Johansen, Katja Salomon; Hodgson, Keith O; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I

    2014-06-17

    Strategies for O2 activation by copper enzymes were recently expanded to include mononuclear Cu sites, with the discovery of the copper-dependent polysaccharide monooxygenases, also classified as auxiliary-activity enzymes 9-11 (AA9-11). These enzymes are finding considerable use in industrial biofuel production. Crystal structures of polysaccharide monooxygenases have emerged, but experimental studies are yet to determine the solution structure of the Cu site and how this relates to reactivity. From X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopies, we observed a change from four-coordinate Cu(II) to three-coordinate Cu(I) of the active site in solution, where three protein-derived nitrogen ligands coordinate the Cu in both redox states, and a labile hydroxide ligand is lost upon reduction. The spectroscopic data allowed for density functional theory calculations of an enzyme active site model, where the optimized Cu(I) and (II) structures were consistent with the experimental data. The O2 reactivity of the Cu(I) site was probed by EPR and stopped-flow absorption spectroscopies, and a rapid one-electron reduction of O2 and regeneration of the resting Cu(II) enzyme were observed. This reactivity was evaluated computationally, and by calibration to Cu-superoxide model complexes, formation of an end-on Cu-AA9-superoxide species was found to be thermodynamically favored. We discuss how this thermodynamically difficult one-electron reduction of O2 is enabled by the unique protein structure where two nitrogen ligands from His1 dictate formation of a T-shaped Cu(I) site, which provides an open coordination position for strong O2 binding with very little reorganization energy.

  10. Methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 affects gene expression and methane monooxygenase activity in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Farhan Ul-Haque, Muhammad; Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Vorobev, Alexey; Baral, Bipin S; DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2015-04-01

    Methanotrophs can express a cytoplasmic (soluble) methane monooxygenase (sMMO) or membrane-bound (particulate) methane monooxygenase (pMMO). Expression of these MMOs is strongly regulated by the availability of copper. Many methanotrophs have been found to synthesize a novel compound, methanobactin (Mb), that is responsible for the uptake of copper, and methanobactin produced by Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b plays a key role in controlling expression of MMO genes in this strain. As all known forms of methanobactin are structurally similar, it was hypothesized that methanobactin from one methanotroph may alter gene expression in another. When Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b was grown in the presence of 1 μM CuCl2, expression of mmoX, encoding a subunit of the hydroxylase component of sMMO, was very low. mmoX expression increased, however, when methanobactin from Methylocystis sp. strain SB2 (SB2-Mb) was added, as did whole-cell sMMO activity, but there was no significant change in the amount of copper associated with M. trichosporium OB3b. If M. trichosporium OB3b was grown in the absence of CuCl2, the mmoX expression level was high but decreased by several orders of magnitude if copper prebound to SB2-Mb (Cu-SB2-Mb) was added, and biomass-associated copper was increased. Exposure of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b to SB2-Mb had no effect on expression of mbnA, encoding the polypeptide precursor of methanobactin in either the presence or absence of CuCl2. mbnA expression, however, was reduced when Cu-SB2-Mb was added in both the absence and presence of CuCl2. These data suggest that methanobactin acts as a general signaling molecule in methanotrophs and that methanobactin "piracy" may be commonplace.

  11. Catalytic activity of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa toward cinnamic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Furuya, Toshiki; Kino, Kuniki

    2014-02-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylases (HPAHs) of the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase family are attractive enzymes that possess the catalytic potential to synthesize valuable ortho-diphenol compounds from simple monophenol compounds. In this study, we investigated the catalytic activity of HPAH from Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO1 toward cinnamic acid derivatives. We prepared Escherichia coli cells expressing the hpaB gene encoding the monooxygenase component and the hpaC gene encoding the oxidoreductase component. E. coli cells expressing HpaBC exhibited no or very low oxidation activity toward cinnamic acid, o-coumaric acid, and m-coumaric acid, whereas they rapidly oxidized p-coumaric acid to caffeic acid. Interestingly, after p-coumaric acid was almost completely consumed, the resulting caffeic acid was further oxidized to 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamic acid. In addition, HpaBC exhibited oxidation activity toward 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)propanoic acid, ferulic acid, and coniferaldehyde to produce the corresponding ortho-diphenols. We also investigated a flask-scale production of caffeic acid from p-coumaric acid as the model reaction for HpaBC-catalyzed syntheses of hydroxycinnamic acids. Since the initial concentrations of the substrate p-coumaric acid higher than 40 mM markedly inhibited its HpaBC-catalyzed oxidation, the reaction was carried out by repeatedly adding 20 mM of this substrate to the reaction mixture. Furthermore, by using the HpaBC whole-cell catalyst in the presence of glycerol, our experimental setup achieved the high-yield production of caffeic acid, i.e., 56.6 mM (10.2 g/L) within 24 h. These catalytic activities of HpaBC will provide an easy and environment-friendly synthetic approach to hydroxycinnamic acids.

  12. Mechanism of Cytoplasmic mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a fundamental process in gene expression that depends upon the abundance and accessibility of the mRNA transcript as well as the activity of many protein and RNA-protein complexes. Here we focus on the intricate mechanics of mRNA translation in the cytoplasm of higher plants. This chapter includes an inventory of the plant translational apparatus and a detailed review of the translational processes of initiation, elongation, and termination. The majority of mechanistic studies of cytoplasmic translation have been carried out in yeast and mammalian systems. The factors and mechanisms of translation are for the most part conserved across eukaryotes; however, some distinctions are known to exist in plants. A comprehensive understanding of the complex translational apparatus and its regulation in plants is warranted, as the modulation of protein production is critical to development, environmental plasticity and biomass yield in diverse ecosystems and agricultural settings. PMID:26019692

  13. Staufen-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Eonyoung; Maquat, Lynne E.

    2013-01-01

    Staufen1 (STAU1)-mediated mRNA decay (SMD) is an mRNA degradation process in mammalian cells that is mediated by the binding of STAU1 to a STAU1-binding site (SBS) within the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of target mRNAs. During SMD, STAU1, a double-stranded (ds) RNA-binding protein, recognizes dsRNA structures formed either by intramolecular base-pairing of 3'UTR sequences or by intermolecular base-pairing of 3'UTR sequences with a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) via partially complementary Alu elements. Recently, STAU2, a paralog of STAU1, has also been reported to mediate SMD. Both STAU1 and STAU2 interact directly with the ATP-dependent RNA helicase UPF1, a key SMD factor, enhancing its helicase activity to promote effective SMD. Moreover, STAU1 and STAU2 form homodimeric and heterodimeric interactions via domain-swapping. Since both SMD and the mechanistically related nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) employ UPF1, SMD and NMD are competitive pathways. Competition contributes to cellular differentiation processes, such as myogenesis and adipogenesis, placing SMD at the heart of various physiologically important mechanisms. PMID:23681777

  14. Identification of a novel Baeyer‐Villiger monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens: close relationship to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prodrug activator EtaA

    PubMed Central

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Sadeghi, Sheila J.; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Summary This work demonstrates that Acinetobacter radioresistens strain S13 during the growth on medium supplemented with long‐chain alkanes as the sole energy source expresses almA gene coding for a Baeyer‐Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) involved in alkanes subterminal oxidation. Phylogenetic analysis placed the sequence of this novel BVMO in the same clade of the prodrug activator ethionamide monooxygenase (EtaA) and it bears only a distant relation to the other known class I BVMO proteins. In silico analysis of the 3D model of the S13 BVMO generated by homology modelling also supports the similarities with EtaA by binding ethionamide to the active site. In vitro experiments carried out with the purified enzyme confirm that this novel BVMO is indeed capable of typical Baeyer‐Villiger reactions as well as oxidation of the prodrug ethionamide. PMID:22862894

  15. Identification of a novel Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase from Acinetobacter radioresistens: close relationship to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis prodrug activator EtaA.

    PubMed

    Minerdi, Daniela; Zgrablic, Ivan; Sadeghi, Sheila J; Gilardi, Gianfranco

    2012-11-01

    This work demonstrates that Acinetobacter radioresistens strain S13 during the growth on medium supplemented with long-chain alkanes as the sole energy source expresses almA gene coding for a Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) involved in alkanes subterminal oxidation. Phylogenetic analysis placed the sequence of this novel BVMO in the same clade of the prodrug activator ethionamide monooxygenase (EtaA) and it bears only a distant relation to the other known class I BVMO proteins. In silico analysis of the 3D model of the S13 BVMO generated by homology modelling also supports the similarities with EtaA by binding ethionamide to the active site. In vitro experiments carried out with the purified enzyme confirm that this novel BVMO is indeed capable of typical Baeyer-Villiger reactions as well as oxidation of the prodrug ethionamide.

  16. Identification of reference housekeeping-genes for mRNA expression studies in patients with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parmita; Chawla, Himika; Saha, Soma; Tandon, Nikhil; Goswami, Ravinder

    2016-06-01

    Selection of appropriate housekeeping-genes as reference is important in mRNA expression-related experiments. It is more important in diabetes since hyperglycemia per se can influence expression of housekeeping-genes. RNA expression of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase, β-actin and 18S-ribosomal-RNA, Hypoxanthine-phosphoribosyl-transferase (HPRT), Tyrosine-3-monooxygenase/tryptophan (YHWAZ), β2-microglobin (β2M), TATA-binding-protein (TBP), and Ubiquitin C and cytochrome1 (CYC1) assessed in circulating-lymphocytes-(PBMC) of patients with type-1-diabetes and healthy controls. The stability ('M' value <1.02) and number of housekeeping-genes required for normalization in qRT-PCR were determined by 'ge-norm software.' Vitamin-D-receptor (VDR) was used as a target gene. All the nine genes tested had sufficient 'M' value in diabetes and healthy controls. However, housekeeping-genes indicated a relatively higher stability of expression in healthy controls in comparison to diabetes. Use of single housekeeping-genes brought gross variation in the calculation of VDR-mRNA copies. The ge-norm software suggested geometric mean of five housekeeping-genes for ideal normalization in diabetes (CYC1, β-actin, YHWAZ, HPRT, and β2M) and only three in controls (CYC1, β-actin, and TBP). HbA1c did not correlate with expression of any of the nine housekeeping-genes. Thus, geometric mean of CYC1, β-actin, YHWAZ, HPRT, and β2M needs to be used for ideal normalization of mRNA in type-1-diabetes. Similar studies are required in other population.

  17. Characterization of 4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-Hydroxylase (HpaB) of Escherichia coli as a Reduced Flavin Adenine Dinucleotide-Utilizing Monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Xun, Luying; Sandvik, Erik R.

    2000-01-01

    4-Hydroxyphenylacetate 3-hydroxylase (HpaB and HpaC) of Escherichia coli W has been reported as a two-component flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase that attacks a broad spectrum of phenolic compounds. However, the function of each component in catalysis is unclear. The large component (HpaB) was demonstrated here to be a reduced FAD (FADH2)-utilizing monooxygenase. When an E. coli flavin reductase (Fre) having no apparent homology with HpaC was used to generate FADH2 in vitro, HpaB was able to use FADH2 and O2 for the oxidation of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate. HpaB also used chemically produced FADH2 for 4-hydroxyphenylacetate oxidation, further demonstrating that HpaB is an FADH2-utilizing monooxygenase. FADH2 generated by Fre was rapidly oxidized by O2 to form H2O2 in the absence of HpaB. When HpaB was included in the reaction mixture without 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, HpaB bound FADH2 and transitorily protected it from rapid autoxidation by O2. When 4-hydroxyphenylacetate was also present, HpaB effectively competed with O2 for FADH2 utilization, leading to 4-hydroxyphenylacetate oxidation. With sufficient amounts of HpaB in the reaction mixture, FADH2 produced by Fre was mainly used by HpaB for the oxidation of 4-hydroxyphenylacetate. At low HpaB concentrations, most FADH2 was autoxidized by O2, causing uncoupling. However, the coupling of the two enzymes' activities was increased by lowering FAD concentrations in the reaction mixture. A database search revealed that HpaB had sequence similarities to several proteins and gene products involved in biosynthesis and biodegradation in both bacteria and archaea. This is the first report of an FADH2-utilizing monooxygenase that uses FADH2 as a substrate rather than as a cofactor. PMID:10653707

  18. Comparative Analysis of the Conventional and Novel pmo (Particulate Methane Monooxygenase) Operons from Methylocystis Strain SC2

    PubMed Central

    Ricke, Peter; Erkel, Christoph; Kube, Michael; Reinhardt, Richard; Liesack, Werner

    2004-01-01

    In addition to the conventional pmoA gene (pmoA1) encoding the active site polypeptide of particulate methane monooxygenase, a novel pmoA gene copy (pmoA2) is widely distributed among type II methanotrophs (methane-oxidizing bacteria [MOB]) (M. Tchawa Yimga, P. F. Dunfield, P. Ricke, J. Heyer, and W. Liesack, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 69:5593-5602, 2003). Here we report that the pmoA1 and pmoA2 gene copies in the type II MOB Methylocystis strain SC2 are each part of a complete pmoCAB gene cluster (pmoCAB1, pmoCAB2). A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library of strain SC2 genomic DNA was constructed, and BAC clones carrying either pmoCAB1 or pmoCAB2 were identified. Comparative sequence analysis showed that these two gene clusters exhibit low levels of identity at both the DNA level (67.4 to 70.9%) and the derived protein level (59.3 to 65.6%). In contrast, the secondary structures predicted for PmoCAB1 and PmoCAB2, as well as the derived transmembrane-spanning regions, are nearly identical. This suggests that PmoCAB2 is, like PmoCAB1, a highly hydrophobic, membrane-associated protein. A total of 190 of the 203 amino acid residues representing a highly conserved consensus sequence of the currently known PmoCAB1 and AmoCAB sequence types could be identified in PmoCAB2. The amoCAB gene cluster encodes ammonia monooxygenase and is evolutionarily related to pmoCAB. Analysis of a set of amino acid residues that allowed differentiation between conventional PmoA and AmoA provided further support for the hypothesis that pmoCAB2 encodes a functional equivalent of PmoCAB1. In experiments in which we used 5′ rapid amplification of cDNA ends we identified transcriptional start sites 320 and 177 bp upstream of pmoC1 and pmoC2, respectively. Immediately upstream of the transcriptional start sites of both pmoCAB1 and pmoCAB2, sequence motifs similar to Escherichia coli σ70 promoters were identified. PMID:15128567

  19. Evidence for Involvement of Copper Ions and Redox State in Regulation of Butane Monooxygenase in Pseudomonas butanovora▿

    PubMed Central

    Doughty, D. M.; Kurth, E. G.; Sayavedra-Soto, L. A.; Arp, D. J.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2008-01-01

    Pseudomonas butanovora possesses an alcohol-inducible alkane monooxygenase, butane monooxygenase (BMO), that initiates growth on C2-C9 alkanes. A lacZ transcriptional reporter strain, P. butanovora bmoX::lacZ, in which the BMO promoter controls the expression of β-galactosidase activity, was used to show that 1-butanol induced the BMO promoter in the presence or absence of O2 when lactate-grown, BMO-repressed cells were washed free of lactate and incubated in NH4Cl-KNa phosphate buffer. In contrast, when lactate-grown cells of the reporter strain were incubated in phosphate buffer containing the mineral salts of standard growth medium, 1-butanol-dependent induction was significantly repressed at low O2 (1 to 2% [vol/vol]) and totally repressed under anoxic conditions. The repressive effect of the mineral salts was traced to its copper content. In cells exposed to 1% (vol/vol) O2, CuSO4 (0.5 μM) repressed 1-butanol-dependent induction of β-galactosidase activity. Under oxic conditions (20% O2 [vol/vol]), significantly higher concentrations of CuSO4 (2 μM) were required for almost complete repression of induction in lactate-grown cells. A combination of the Cu2+ reducing agent Na ascorbate (100 μM) and CuSO4 (0.5 μM) repressed the induction of β-galactosidase activity under oxic conditions to the same extent that 0.5 μM CuSO4 alone repressed it under anoxic conditions. Under oxic conditions, 2 μM CuSO4 repressed induction of the BMO promoter less effectively in butyrate-grown cells of the bmoX::lacZ strain and of an R8-bmoX::lacZ mutant reporter strain with a putative BMO regulator, BmoR, inactivated. Under anoxic conditions, CuSO4 repression remained highly effective, regardless of the growth substrate, in both BmoR-positive and -negative reporter strains. PMID:18281403

  20. Cloning and expression of three ladA-type alkane monooxygenase genes from an extremely thermophilic alkane-degrading bacterium Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23.

    PubMed

    Boonmak, Chanita; Takahashi, Yasunori; Morikawa, Masaaki

    2014-05-01

    An extremely thermophilic bacterium, Geobacillus thermoleovorans B23, is capable of degrading a broad range of alkanes (with carbon chain lengths ranging between C11 and C32) at 70 °C. Whole-genome sequence analysis revealed that unlike most alkane-degrading bacteria, strain B23 does not possess an alkB-type alkane monooxygenase gene. Instead, it possesses a cluster of three ladA-type genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, on its chromosome, whose protein products share significant amino acid sequence identities, 49.8, 34.4, and 22.7 %, respectively, with that of ladA alkane monooxygenase gene found on a plasmid of Geobacillus thermodetrificans NG 80-2. Each of the three genes, ladAαB23, ladAβB23, and ladB B23, was heterologously expressed individually in an alkB1 deletion mutant strain, Pseudomonas fluorescens KOB2Δ1. It was found that all three genes were functional in P. fluorescens KOB2Δ1, and partially restored alkane degradation activity. In this study, we suggest that G. thermoleovorans B23 utilizes multiple LadA-type alkane monooxygenases for the degradation of a broad range of alkanes.

  1. An Unprecedented NADPH Domain Conformation in Lysine Monooxygenase NbtG Provides Insights into Uncoupling of Oxygen Consumption from Substrate Hydroxylation*

    PubMed Central

    Binda, Claudia; Robinson, Reeder M.; Martin del Campo, Julia S.; Keul, Nicholas D.; Rodriguez, Pedro J.; Robinson, Howard H.; Mattevi, Andrea; Sobrado, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    N-Hydroxylating monooxygenases are involved in the biosynthesis of iron-chelating hydroxamate-containing siderophores that play a role in microbial virulence. These flavoenzymes catalyze the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of amines such as those found on the side chains of lysine and ornithine. In this work we report the biochemical and structural characterization of Nocardia farcinica Lys monooxygenase (NbtG), which has similar biochemical properties to mycobacterial homologs. NbtG is also active on d-Lys, although it binds l-Lys with a higher affinity. Differently from the ornithine monooxygenases PvdA, SidA, and KtzI, NbtG can use both NADH and NADPH and is highly uncoupled, producing more superoxide and hydrogen peroxide than hydroxylated Lys. The crystal structure of NbtG solved at 2.4 Å resolution revealed an unexpected protein conformation with a 30° rotation of the NAD(P)H domain with respect to the flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) domain that precludes binding of the nicotinamide cofactor. This “occluded” structure may explain the biochemical properties of NbtG, specifically with regard to the substantial uncoupling and limited stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. Biological implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25802330

  2. An Unprecedented NADPH Domain Conformation in Lysine Monooxygenase NbtG Provides Insights into Uncoupling of Oxygen Consumption from Substrate Hydroxylation

    DOE PAGES

    Binda, Claudia; Robinson, Reeder M.; Martin del Campo, Julia S.; ...

    2015-03-23

    N-hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are involved in the biosynthesis of iron-chelating hydroxamate-containing siderophores that play a role in microbial virulence. These flavoenzymes catalyze the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of amines, such as those found on the side chains of lysine and ornithine. In this work we report the biochemical and structural characterization of Nocardia farcinica Lys monooxygenase (NbtG), which has similar biochemical properties to mycobacterial homologs. NbtG is also active on D-Lys although it binds L-Lys with a higher affinity. Differently from the ornithine monooxygenases PvdA, SidA and KtzI, NbtG can use both NADH and NADPH and is highly uncoupled, producingmore » more superoxide and hydrogen peroxide than hydroxylated Lys. The crystal structure of NbtG solved at 2.4 Å resolution revealed an unexpected protein conformation with a 30° rotation of the NAD(P)H domain with respect to the FAD domain that precludes binding of the nicotinamide cofactor. This “occluded” structure may explain the biochemical properties of NbtG, specifically with regard to the substantial uncoupling and limited stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. We discuss the biological implications of these findings.« less

  3. An Unprecedented NADPH Domain Conformation in Lysine Monooxygenase NbtG Provides Insights into Uncoupling of Oxygen Consumption from Substrate Hydroxylation

    SciTech Connect

    Binda, Claudia; Robinson, Reeder M.; Martin del Campo, Julia S.; Keul, Nicholas D.; Rodriguez, Pedro J.; Robinson, Howard H.; Mattevi, Andrea; Sobrado, Pablo

    2015-03-23

    N-hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are involved in the biosynthesis of iron-chelating hydroxamate-containing siderophores that play a role in microbial virulence. These flavoenzymes catalyze the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of amines, such as those found on the side chains of lysine and ornithine. In this work we report the biochemical and structural characterization of Nocardia farcinica Lys monooxygenase (NbtG), which has similar biochemical properties to mycobacterial homologs. NbtG is also active on D-Lys although it binds L-Lys with a higher affinity. Differently from the ornithine monooxygenases PvdA, SidA and KtzI, NbtG can use both NADH and NADPH and is highly uncoupled, producing more superoxide and hydrogen peroxide than hydroxylated Lys. The crystal structure of NbtG solved at 2.4 Å resolution revealed an unexpected protein conformation with a 30° rotation of the NAD(P)H domain with respect to the FAD domain that precludes binding of the nicotinamide cofactor. This “occluded” structure may explain the biochemical properties of NbtG, specifically with regard to the substantial uncoupling and limited stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. We discuss the biological implications of these findings.

  4. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W.; Namba, Shigetou

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum. PMID:27385817

  5. Overexpression of human kynurenine-3-monooxygenase protects against 3-hydroxykynurenine-mediated apoptosis through bidirectional nonlinear feedback

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, K; Auer, M; Binnie, M; Zheng, X; Pham, N T; Iredale, J P; Webster, S P; Mole, D J

    2016-01-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is a critical regulator of inflammation. The preferred KMO substrate, kynurenine, is converted to 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), and this product exhibits cytotoxicity through mechanisms that culminate in apoptosis. Here, we report that overexpression of human KMO with orthotopic localisation to mitochondria creates a metabolic environment during which the cell exhibits increased tolerance for exogenous 3HK-mediated cellular injury. Using the selective KMO inhibitor Ro61-8048, we show that KMO enzyme function is essential for cellular protection. Pan-caspase inhibition with Z-VAD-FMK confirmed apoptosis as the mode of cell death. By defining expression of pathway components upstream and downstream of KMO, we observed alterations in other key kynurenine pathway components, particularly tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase upregulation, through bidirectional nonlinear feedback. KMO overexpression also increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). These changes in gene expression are functionally relevant, because siRNA knockdown of the pathway components kynureninase and quinolinate phosphoribosyl transferase caused cells to revert to a state of susceptibility to 3HK-mediated apoptosis. In summary, KMO overexpression, and importantly KMO activity, have metabolic repercussions that fundamentally affect resistance to cell stress. PMID:27077813

  6. Phylogenetic Diversity of Archaea and the Archaeal Ammonia Monooxygenase Gene in Uranium Mining-Impacted Locations in Bulgaria

    PubMed Central

    Radeva, Galina; Kenarova, Anelia; Bachvarova, Velina; Popov, Ivan; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Uranium mining and milling activities adversely affect the microbial populations of impacted sites. The negative effects of uranium on soil bacteria and fungi are well studied, but little is known about the effects of radionuclides and heavy metals on archaea. The composition and diversity of archaeal communities inhabiting the waste pile of the Sliven uranium mine and the soil of the Buhovo uranium mine were investigated using 16S rRNA gene retrieval. A total of 355 archaeal clones were selected, and their 16S rDNA inserts were analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) discriminating 14 different RFLP types. All evaluated archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences belong to the 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster of Crenarchaeota. The composition of the archaeal community is distinct for each site of interest and dependent on environmental characteristics, including pollution levels. Since the members of 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster have been implicated in the nitrogen cycle, the archaeal communities from these sites were probed for the presence of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA). Our data indicate that amoA gene sequences are distributed in a similar manner as in Crenarchaeota, suggesting that archaeal nitrification processes in uranium mining-impacted locations are under the control of the same key factors controlling archaeal diversity. PMID:24711725

  7. Oxidative biodegradation of 4-chlorophenol by using recombinant monooxygenase cloned and overexpressed from Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6.

    PubMed

    Kang, Christina; Yang, Jun Won; Cho, Wooyoun; Kwak, Seonyeong; Park, Sungyoon; Lim, Yejee; Choe, Jae Wan; Kim, Han S

    2017-03-16

    In this study, cphC-I and cphB, encoding a putative two-component flavin-diffusible monooxygenase (TC-FDM) complex, were cloned from Arthrobacter chlorophenolicus A6. The corresponding enzymes were overexpressed to assess the feasibility of their utilization for the oxidative decomposition of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). Soluble CphC-I was produced at a high level (∼50%), and subsequently purified. Since CphB was expressed in an insoluble form, a flavin reductase, Fre, cloned from Escherichia coli was used as an alternative reductase. CphC-I utilized cofactor FADH2, which was reduced by Fre for the hydroxylation of 4-CP. This recombinant enzyme complex exhibited a higher specific activity for the oxidation of 4-CP (45.34U/mg-protein) than that exhibited by CphC-I contained in cells (0.18U/mg-protein). The Michaelis-Menten kinetic parameters were determined as: vmax=223.3μM·min(-1), KM=249.4μM, and kcat/KM=0.052min(-1)·μM(-1). These results could be useful for the development of a new biochemical remediation technique based on enzymatic agents catalyzing the degradation of phenolic contaminants.

  8. Local Auxin Biosynthesis Mediated by a YUCCA Flavin Monooxygenase Regulates Haustorium Development in the Parasitic Plant Phtheirospermum japonicum.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Juliane K; Wakatake, Takanori; Yoshida, Satoko; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Wafula, Eric; dePamphilis, Claude W; Namba, Shigetou; Shirasu, Ken

    2016-08-01

    Parasitic plants in the Orobanchaceae cause serious agricultural problems worldwide. Parasitic plants develop a multicellular infectious organ called a haustorium after recognition of host-released signals. To understand the molecular events associated with host signal perception and haustorium development, we identified differentially regulated genes expressed during early haustorium development in the facultative parasite Phtheirospermum japonicum using a de novo assembled transcriptome and a customized microarray. Among the genes that were upregulated during early haustorium development, we identified YUC3, which encodes a functional YUCCA (YUC) flavin monooxygenase involved in auxin biosynthesis. YUC3 was specifically expressed in the epidermal cells around the host contact site at an early time point in haustorium formation. The spatio-temporal expression patterns of YUC3 coincided with those of the auxin response marker DR5, suggesting generation of auxin response maxima at the haustorium apex. Roots transformed with YUC3 knockdown constructs formed haustoria less frequently than nontransgenic roots. Moreover, ectopic expression of YUC3 at the root epidermal cells induced the formation of haustorium-like structures in transgenic P. japonicum roots. Our results suggest that expression of the auxin biosynthesis gene YUC3 at the epidermal cells near the contact site plays a pivotal role in haustorium formation in the root parasitic plant P. japonicum.

  9. Sparteine monooxygenase in brain and liver: Identified by the dopamine uptake blocker ( sup 3 H)GBR-12935

    SciTech Connect

    Kalow, W.; Tyndale, R.F.; Niznik, H.B.; Inaba, T. )

    1990-02-26

    P450IID6 (human sparteine monooxygenase) metabolizes many drugs including neuroleptics, antidepressants, and beta-blockers. The P450IID6 exists in human, bovine, rat and canine brains, but in very low quantities causing methodological difficulties in its assessment. Work with ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935; 1-(2-(diphenylmethoxy) ethyl)-4-(3-phenyl propyl) piperazine has shown that it binds a neuronal/hepatic protein with high affinity ({approximately}7nM) and a rank order of inhibitory potency suggesting that the binding protein is cytochrome P450IID6. The binding was used to predict that d-amphetamine and methamphetamine would interact with P450IID6. Inhibition studies indicated that these compounds were competitive inhibitors of P450IID6. Haloperidol (HAL) and it's metabolite hydroxy-haloperidol (RHAL) are both competitive inhibitors of P450IID6 activity and were found to inhibit ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935 binding. K{sub i} values of twelve compounds (known to interact with the DA transporter or P450IID6) for ({sup 3}H)GRB-12935 binding and P450IID6 activity. The techniques are now available for measurements of cytochrome P450IID6 in healthy and diseased brain/liver tissue using radio-receptor binding assay techniques with ({sup 3}H)GBR-12935.

  10. Molecular evolutionary dynamics of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases across kingdoms: Special focus on mycobacterial P450s

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Mohammad; Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Mthakathi, Ntsane Trevor; Kgosiemang, Ipeleng Kopano Rosinah; Bamal, Hans Denis; Pagadala, Nataraj Sekhar; Xie, Ting; Yang, Haoran; Chen, Hengye; Theron, Chrispian William; Monyaki, Richie; Raselemane, Seiso Caiphus; Salewe, Vuyani; Mongale, Bogadi Lorato; Matowane, Retshedisitswe Godfrey; Abdalla, Sara Mohamed Hasaan; Booi, Wool Isaac; van Wyk, Mari; Olivier, Dedré; Boucher, Charlotte E.; Nelson, David R.; Tuszynski, Jack A.; Blackburn, Jonathan Michael; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Mashele, Samson Sitheni; Chen, Wanping; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2016-01-01

    Since the initial identification of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs/P450s), great progress has been made in understanding their structure-function relationship, diversity and application in producing compounds beneficial to humans. However, the molecular evolution of P450s in terms of their dynamics both at protein and DNA levels and functional conservation across kingdoms still needs investigation. In this study, we analyzed 17 598 P450s belonging to 113 P450 families (bacteria −42; fungi −19; plant −28; animal −22; plant and animal −1 and common P450 family −1) and found highly conserved and rapidly evolving P450 families. Results suggested that bacterial P450s, particularly P450s belonging to mycobacteria, are highly conserved both at protein and DNA levels. Mycobacteria possess the highest P450 diversity percentage compared to other microbes and have a high coverage of P450s (≥1%) in their genomes, as found in fungi and plants. Phylogenetic and functional analyses revealed the functional conservation of P450s despite belonging to different biological kingdoms, suggesting the adherence of P450s to their innate function such as their involvement in either generation or oxidation of steroids and structurally related molecules, fatty acids and terpenoids. This study’s results offer new understanding of the dynamic structural nature of P450s. PMID:27616185

  11. Suitability of recombinant Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida strains for selective biotransformation of m-nitrotoluene by xylene monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Daniel; Witholt, Bernard; Schmid, Andreas

    2005-11-01

    Escherichia coli JM101(pSPZ3), containing xylene monooxygenase (XMO) from Pseudomonas putida mt-2, catalyzes specific oxidations and reductions of m-nitrotoluene and derivatives thereof. In addition to reactions catalyzed by XMO, we focused on biotransformations by native enzymes of the E. coli host and their effect on overall biocatalyst performance. While m-nitrotoluene was consecutively oxygenated to m-nitrobenzyl alcohol, m-nitrobenzaldehyde, and m-nitrobenzoic acid by XMO, the oxidation was counteracted by an alcohol dehydrogenase(s) from the E. coli host, which reduced m-nitrobenzaldehyde to m-nitrobenzyl alcohol. Furthermore, the enzymatic background of the host reduced the nitro groups of the reactants resulting in the formation of aromatic amines, which were shown to effectively inhibit XMO in a reversible fashion. Host-intrinsic oxidoreductases and their reaction products had a major effect on the activity of XMO during biocatalysis of m-nitrotoluene. P. putida DOT-T1E and P. putida PpS81 were compared to E. coli JM101 as alternative hosts for XMO. These promising strains contained an additional dehydrogenase that oxidized m-nitrobenzaldehyde to the corresponding acid but catalyzed the formation of XMO-inhibiting aromatic amines at a significantly lower level than E. coli JM101.

  12. Intermediate Q from soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylates the mechanistic substrate probe norcarane: evidence for a stepwise reaction.

    PubMed

    Brazeau, B J; Austin, R N; Tarr, C; Groves, J T; Lipscomb, J D

    2001-12-05

    Norcarane is a valuable mechanistic probe for enzyme-catalyzed hydrocarbon oxidation reactions because different products or product distributions result from concerted, radical, and cation based reactions. Soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b catalyzes the oxidation of norcarane to afford 3-hydroxymethylcyclohexene and 3-cycloheptenol, compounds characteristic of radical and cationic intermediates, respectively, in addition to 2- and 3-norcaranols. Past single turnover transient kinetic studies have identified several optically distinct intermediates from the catalytic cycle of the hydroxylase component of sMMO. Thus, the reaction between norcarane and key reaction intermediates can be directly monitored. The presence of norcarane increases the rate of decay of only one intermediate, the high-valent bis-mu-oxo Fe(IV)(2) cluster-containing species compound Q, showing that it is responsible for the majority of the oxidation chemistry. The observation of products from both radical and cationic intermediates from norcarane oxidation catalyzed by sMMO is consistent with a mechanism in which an initial substrate radical intermediate is formed by hydrogen atom abstraction. This intermediate then undergoes either oxygen rebound, intramolecular rearrangement followed by oxygen rebound, or loss of a second electron to yield a cationic intermediate to which OH(-) is transferred. The estimated lower limit of 20 ps for the lifetime of the putative radical intermediate is in accord with values determined from previous studies of sterically hindered sMMO probes.

  13. Isolation of Homogeneous Polysaccharide Monooxygenases from Fungal Sources and Investigation of Their Synergism with Cellulases when Acting on Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Bulakhov, A G; Gusakov, A V; Chekushina, A V; Satrutdinov, A D; Koshelev, A V; Matys, V Yu; Sinitsyn, A P

    2016-05-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO) discovered several years ago are enzymes classified as oxidoreductases. In nature, they participate in microbial degradation of cellulose together with cellulases that belong to the hydrolytic type of enzymes (class of hydrolases). Three PMO from ascomycetes - Thielavia terrestris, Trichoderma reesei, and Myceliophthora thermophila - were isolated and purified to homogeneous state using various types of chromatography. The first two enzymes are recombinant proteins heterologously expressed by the Penicillium verruculosum fungus, while the third is a native PMO secreted by M. thermophila. When acting on microcrystalline cellulose, all these PMOs displayed synergism with the cellulase complex of the P. verruculosum fungus. Replacing 10% of cellulases (by protein concentration) with PMO in the presence of 6.25 mM gallic acid or 2.5 µM of cellobiose dehydrogenase from M. thermophila, used as electron donors for PMO, resulted in the 17-31% increase in the yield of reducing sugars after 24-48 h of the enzymatic reaction.

  14. Xenobiotics in gametes of Lake Michigan lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) induce hepatic monooxygenase activity in their offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, R.L.; Lech, J.J.

    1984-12-01

    Eggs spawned from Lake Michigan lake trout contain a number of xenobiotic compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). To assess whether this contamination is sufficient to induce hepatic cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenase (MO) activity during early development, the hepatic MO systems of laboratory-cultured offspring of Lake Michigan, Green Bay, and Marquette Hatchery lake trout were compared. Additionally, the induction of hepatic cytochrome P-450 systems in developing lake trout by the commercial PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254 (A1254), was characterized. During late embryonic development and at the swim-up stage, the hepatic MO systems of the feral lake trout offspring appeared induced, based on levels of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH) activity that were 3.5- to 8.6-fold higher than the hatchery control levels. Furthermore, at the swim-up stage the feral trout offspring resembled A1254-treated hatchery fry with regard to the degree of inhibition of hepatic AHH activity by alpha-naphthoflavone, and the presence of an inducible Mr . 58,000 polypeptide in hepatic microsomes. The levels of aminopyrine N-demethylase activity, which was relatively unresponsive to inducers, were moderately lower in the Lake Michigan and Green Bay swim-up fry compared to the hatchery control levels. After 7 months of posthatching laboratory culture, when residues of xenobiotics present at fertilization were greatly diluted by growth, the hepatic MO systems of the Lake Michigan and hatchery trout offspring appeared essentially indistinguishable with regard to a number of parameters.

  15. Coenzyme Q Biosynthesis: Evidence for a Substrate Access Channel in the FAD-Dependent Monooxygenase Coq6

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Alexandre; Leroux, Vincent; Smadja, Myriam; Gonzalez, Lucie; Lombard, Murielle; Pierrel, Fabien; Mellot-Draznieks, Caroline; Fontecave, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Coq6 is an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q, a polyisoprenylated benzoquinone lipid essential to the function of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this putative flavin-dependent monooxygenase is proposed to hydroxylate the benzene ring of coenzyme Q (ubiquinone) precursor at position C5. We show here through biochemical studies that Coq6 is a flavoprotein using FAD as a cofactor. Homology models of the Coq6-FAD complex are constructed and studied through molecular dynamics and substrate docking calculations of 3-hexaprenyl-4-hydroxyphenol (4-HP6), a bulky hydrophobic model substrate. We identify a putative access channel for Coq6 in a wild type model and propose in silico mutations positioned at its entrance capable of partially (G248R and L382E single mutations) or completely (a G248R-L382E double-mutation) blocking access to the channel for the substrate. Further in vivo assays support the computational predictions, thus explaining the decreased activities or inactivation of the mutated enzymes. This work provides the first detailed structural information of an important and highly conserved enzyme of ubiquinone biosynthesis. PMID:26808124

  16. Conformational analysis of putative regulatory subunit D of the toluene/o-xylene-monooxygenase complex from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1

    PubMed Central

    Scognamiglio, Roberta; Notomista, Eugenio; Barbieri, Paola; Pucci, Piero; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Tramontano, Anna; Di Donato, Alberto

    2001-01-01

    A gene cluster isolated from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 genomic DNA and containing six ORFs codes for toluene/o-xylene-monooxygenase. The putative regulatory D subunit was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Its protein sequence was verified by mass spectrometry mapping and found to be identical to the sequence predicted on the basis of the DNA sequence. The surface topology of subunit D in solution was probed by limited proteolysis carried out under strictly controlled conditions using several proteases as proteolytic probes. The same experiments were carried out on the homologous P2 component of the multicomponent phenol hydroxylase from Pseudomonas putida CF600. The proteolytic fragments released from both proteins in their native state were analyzed by electrospray mass spectrometry, and the preferential cleavage sites were assessed. The results indicated that despite the relatively high similarity between the sequences of the two proteins, some differences in the distribution of preferential proteolytic cleavages were detected, and a much higher conformational flexibility of subunit D was inferred. Moreover, automatic modeling of subunit D was attempted, based on the known three-dimensional structure of P2. Our results indicate that, at least in this case, standard modeling procedures based on automatic alignment on the structure of P2 fail to produce a model consistent with limited proteolysis experimental data. Thus, it is our opinion that reliable techniques such as limited proteolysis can be employed to test three-dimensional models and highlight problems in automatic model building. PMID:11344317

  17. Monooxygenase activity of black-crowned night-heron (BCNH) nestlings in Virginia, the Great Lakes and San Francisco Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rattner, B.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Custer, T.W.; Hothem, R.L.; King, K.A.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Spann, J.W.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate cytochrome P-450 related parameters as biomarkers of pollutant exposure, rates of arylhydrocarbon hydroxylase (AHH), ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD), benzyloxyROD (BROD), pentoxyROD (PROD) and ethoxycoumarinOD (ECOD) were studied in 10-day-old BCNHs (Nycticorax nycticorax). Nestlings were collected from Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, VA ('controls') and from polluted sites including. Cat Island, Green Bay, WI, and Bair and West Marin Islands, San Francisco Bay, CA. Livers were frozen (-70.C) for monooxygenase assays and SDS-PAGE. Microsomal AHH and BROD activities were greater (P2 standard deviations from the control mean (induced up to 3-fold). EROD, PROD and ECOD did not differ among sites. Absence of an EROD response with AHH and BROD induction in BCNHs is different than responses in other species. The association of pollutant burdens with P-450 parameters is being studied. These biomarkers may serve as a rapid screen of exposure in a national contaminant biomonitoring program and other assessment activities.

  18. Phylogenetic diversity of archaea and the archaeal ammonia monooxygenase gene in uranium mining-impacted locations in Bulgaria.

    PubMed

    Radeva, Galina; Kenarova, Anelia; Bachvarova, Velina; Flemming, Katrin; Popov, Ivan; Vassilev, Dimitar; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja

    2014-01-01

    Uranium mining and milling activities adversely affect the microbial populations of impacted sites. The negative effects of uranium on soil bacteria and fungi are well studied, but little is known about the effects of radionuclides and heavy metals on archaea. The composition and diversity of archaeal communities inhabiting the waste pile of the Sliven uranium mine and the soil of the Buhovo uranium mine were investigated using 16S rRNA gene retrieval. A total of 355 archaeal clones were selected, and their 16S rDNA inserts were analysed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) discriminating 14 different RFLP types. All evaluated archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences belong to the 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster of Crenarchaeota. The composition of the archaeal community is distinct for each site of interest and dependent on environmental characteristics, including pollution levels. Since the members of 1.1b/Nitrososphaera cluster have been implicated in the nitrogen cycle, the archaeal communities from these sites were probed for the presence of the ammonia monooxygenase gene (amoA). Our data indicate that amoA gene sequences are distributed in a similar manner as in Crenarchaeota, suggesting that archaeal nitrification processes in uranium mining-impacted locations are under the control of the same key factors controlling archaeal diversity.

  19. The Cercospora nicotianae gene encoding dual O-methyltransferase and FAD-dependent monooxygenase domains mediates cercosporin toxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dekkers, Katherine L; You, Bang-Jau; Gowda, Vivek S; Liao, Hui-Ling; Lee, Miin-Huey; Bau, Huey-Jiunn; Ueng, Peter P; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2007-05-01

    Cercosporin, a photo-activated, non-host-selective phytotoxin produced by many species of the plant pathogenic fungus Cercospora, causes peroxidation of plant cell membranes by generating reactive oxygen species and is an important virulence determinant. Here we report a new gene, CTB3 that is involved in cercosporin biosynthesis in Cercospora nicotianae. CTB3 is adjacent to a previously identified CTB1 encoding a polyketide synthase which is also required for cercosporin production. CTB3 contains a putative O-methyltransferase domain in the N-terminus and a putative flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase domain in the C-terminus. The N-terminal amino acid sequence also is similar to that of the transcription enhancer AFLS (formerly AFLJ) involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis. Expression of CTB3 was differentially regulated by light, medium, nitrogen and carbon sources and pH. Disruption of the N- or C-terminus of CTB3 yielded mutants that failed to accumulate the CTB3 transcript and cercosporin. The Deltactb3 disruptants produced a yellow pigment that is not toxic to tobacco suspension cells. Production of cercosporin in a Deltactb3 null mutant was fully restored when transformed with a functional CTB3 clone or when paired with a Deltactb1-null mutant (defective in polyketide synthase) by cross feeding of the biosynthetic intermediates. Pathogenicity assays using detached tobacco leaves revealed that the Deltactb3 disruptants drastically reduced lesion formation.

  20. The Regulatory Domain of Squalene Monooxygenase Contains a Re-entrant Loop and Senses Cholesterol via a Conformational Change*

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Vicky; Chua, Ngee Kiat; Stevenson, Julian; Brown, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    Squalene monooxygenase (SM) is an important control point in cholesterol synthesis beyond 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Although it is known to associate with the endoplasmic reticulum, its topology has not been determined. We have elucidated the membrane topology of the sterol-responsive domain of SM comprising the first 100 amino acids fused to GFP (SM N100-GFP) by determining the accessibility of 16 introduced cysteines to the cysteine-reactive, membrane-impermeable reagent PEG-maleimide. We have identified a region integrally associated with the endoplasmic reticulum membrane that is likely to interact with cholesterol or respond to cholesterol-induced membrane effects. By comparing cysteine accessibility with and without cholesterol treatment, we further present evidence to suggest that cholesterol induces a conformational change in SM N100-GFP. This change is likely to lead to its targeted degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system because degradation is blunted by treatment with the chemical chaperone glycerol, which retains SM N100-GFP in its native conformation. Furthermore, degradation can be disrupted by insertion of two N-terminal myc tags, implicating the N terminus in this process. Together, this information provides new molecular insights into the regulation of this critical control point in cholesterol synthesis. PMID:26434806

  1. Identification of dimethylamine monooxygenase in marine bacteria reveals a metabolic bottleneck in the methylated amine degradation pathway.

    PubMed

    Lidbury, Ian; Mausz, Michaela A; Scanlan, David J; Chen, Yin

    2017-03-17

    Methylated amines (MAs) are ubiquitous in the marine environment and their subsequent flux into the atmosphere can result in the formation of aerosols and ultimately cloud condensation nuclei. Therefore, these compounds have a potentially important role in climate regulation. Using Ruegeria pomeroyi as a model, we identified the genes encoding dimethylamine (DMA) monooxygenase (dmmABC) and demonstrate that this enzyme degrades DMA to monomethylamine (MMA). Although only dmmABC are required for enzyme activity in recombinant Escherichia coli, we found that an additional gene, dmmD, was required for the growth of R. pomeroyi on MAs. The dmmDABC genes are absent from the genomes of multiple marine bacteria, including all representatives of the cosmopolitan SAR11 clade. Consequently, the abundance of dmmDABC in marine metagenomes was substantially lower than the genes required for other metabolic steps of the MA degradation pathway. Thus, there is a genetic and potential metabolic bottleneck in the marine MA degradation pathway. Our data provide an explanation for the observation that DMA-derived secondary organic aerosols (SOAs) are among the most abundant SOAs detected in fine marine particles over the North and Tropical Atlantic Ocean.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 17 March 2017; doi:10.1038/ismej.2017.31.

  2. A novel flavin-containing monooxygenase from Methylophaga sp strain SK1 and its indigo synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hack Sun; Kim, Jin Kwon; Cho, Eun Hee; Kim, Yong Chul; Kim, Jae Il; Kim, Si Wouk

    2003-07-11

    We cloned a gene from Methylophaga sp. strain SK1. This gene was responsible for producing, the blue pigment, indigo. The complete open reading frame was 1371 bp long, which encodes a protein of 456 amino acids. The molecular mass of the encoded protein was 105 kDa, consisting of homodimer of 54 kDa with an isoelectric point of 5.14. The deduced amino acid sequence from the gene showed approximately 30% identities with flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) of human (FMO1-FMO5), Arabidopsis, and yeast. It contained three characteristic sequence motifs of FMOs: FAD binding domain, FMO-identifying sequence motif, and NADPH binding domain. In addition, the biochemical properties such as substrate specificities and absorption spectra were similar to the eukaryotic FMO families. Thus, we assigned the enzyme to be a bacterial FMO. The recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the bacterial FMO produced up to 160 mg of indigo per liter in the tryptophan medium after 12h cultivation. This suggests that the recombinant strain has a potential to be applied in microbial indigo production.

  3. Differences in metabolism of the marine biotoxin okadaic acid by human and rat cytochrome P450 monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Kolrep, Franziska; Hessel, Stefanie; These, Anja; Ehlers, Anke; Rein, Kathleen; Lampen, Alfonso

    2016-08-01

    The ingestion of seafood contaminated with the marine biotoxin okadaic acid (OA) can lead to diarrhetic shellfish poisoning with symptoms like nausea, vomiting and abdominal cramps. Both rat and the human hepatic cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP) metabolize OA. However, liver cell toxicity of metabolized OA is mainly unclear. The aim of our study was to detect the cellular effects in HepG2 cells exposed to OA in the presence of recombinant CYP enzymes of both rat and human for the investigation of species differences. The results should be set in correlation with a CYP-specific metabolite pattern. Comparative metabolite profiles of OA after incubation in rat and human recombinant CYP enzymes were established by using LC-MS/MS technique. Results demonstrated that metabolism of OA to oxygenated metabolites correlates with detoxification which was mainly catalyzed by human CYP3A4 and CYP3A5. Detoxification by rat Cyp3a1 was lower compared to human CYP3A enzymes and activation of OA by Cyp3a2 was observed, coincident with minor overall conversion capacity of OA. By contrast human and rat CYP1A2 seem to activate OA into cytotoxic intermediates. In conclusion, different mechanisms of OA metabolism may occur in the liver. At low OA doses, the human liver is likely well protected against cytotoxic OA, but for high shellfish consumers a potential risk cannot be excluded.

  4. Quantum mechanical calculations suggest that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases use a copper-oxyl, oxygen-rebound mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seonah; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Sandgren, Mats; Paton, Robert S; Beckham, Gregg T

    2014-01-07

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) exhibit a mononuclear copper-containing active site and use dioxygen and a reducing agent to oxidatively cleave glycosidic linkages in polysaccharides. LPMOs represent a unique paradigm in carbohydrate turnover and exhibit synergy with hydrolytic enzymes in biomass depolymerization. To date, several features of copper binding to LPMOs have been elucidated, but the identity of the reactive oxygen species and the key steps in the oxidative mechanism have not been elucidated. Here, density functional theory calculations are used with an enzyme active site model to identify the reactive oxygen species and compare two hypothesized reaction pathways in LPMOs for hydrogen abstraction and polysaccharide hydroxylation; namely, a mechanism that employs a η(1)-superoxo intermediate, which abstracts a substrate hydrogen and a hydroperoxo species is responsible for substrate hydroxylation, and a mechanism wherein a copper-oxyl radical abstracts a hydrogen and subsequently hydroxylates the substrate via an oxygen-rebound mechanism. The results predict that oxygen binds end-on (η(1)) to copper, and that a copper-oxyl-mediated, oxygen-rebound mechanism is energetically preferred. The N-terminal histidine methylation is also examined, which is thought to modify the structure and reactivity of the enzyme. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this posttranslational modification has only a minor effect on the LPMO active site structure or reactivity for the examined steps. Overall, this study suggests the steps in the LPMO mechanism for oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds.

  5. Kinetic and spectroscopic characterization of intermediates and component interactions in reactions of methane monooxygenase from methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, K.E.; Valentine, A.M.; Salifoglou, A.; Lippard, S.J.; Wang, D.; Huynh, B.H.; Edmondson, D.E.

    1995-10-18

    We describe mechanistic studies of the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) enzyme system from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Interactions among the three sMMO components, the hydroxylase (H), reductase (R), and protein B (B), were investigated by monitoring conversion of nitrobenzene to nitrophenol under both single turnover and catalytic conditions. During catalytic turnover, hydroxylation occurs to afford 3-nitrophenol (43%) and 4-nitrophenol (57%), whereas hydroxylation takes place exclusively (> 95%) to give 4-nitrophenol under single turnover conditions in the absence of reductase. Protein B exerts a strong influence on single turnover reactions of nitrobenzene, with optimal rate constants and yields obtained by using 1.5-2 equiv of protein R per equivalent of hydroxylase. The temperature dependence of these kinetic values was determined. Changes in dioxygen concentration and pH, as well as exchange of solvent accessible protons with D{sub 2}O, did not significantly affect the rate constants for either of these processes, the implications of which for the kinetic mechanism are discussed. From the present and related evidence, structures for H{sub peroxo} and Q are proposed. 54 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. Two Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases Catalyze Early Hydroxylation Steps in the Potato Steroid Glycoalkaloid Biosynthetic Pathway1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nakayasu, Masaru; Ohyama, Kiyoshi; Saito, Kazuki

    2016-01-01

    α-Solanine and α-chaconine, steroidal glycoalkaloids (SGAs) found in potato (Solanum tuberosum), are among the best-known secondary metabolites in food crops. At low concentrations in potato tubers, SGAs are distasteful; however, at high concentrations, SGAs are harmful to humans and animals. Here, we show that POTATO GLYCOALKALOID BIOSYNTHESIS1 (PGA1) and PGA2, two genes that encode cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP72A208 and CYP72A188), are involved in the SGA biosynthetic pathway, respectively. The knockdown plants of either PGA1 or PGA2 contained very little SGA, yet vegetative growth and tuber production were not affected. Analyzing metabolites that accumulated in the plants and produced by in vitro enzyme assays revealed that PGA1 and PGA2 catalyzed the 26- and 22-hydroxylation steps, respectively, in the SGA biosynthetic pathway. The PGA-knockdown plants had two unique phenotypic characteristics: The plants were sterile and tubers of these knockdown plants did not sprout during storage. Functional analyses of PGA1 and PGA2 have provided clues for controlling both potato glycoalkaloid biosynthesis and tuber sprouting, two traits that can significantly impact potato breeding and the industry. PMID:27307258

  7. Tertiary amines related to brompheniramine: preferred conformations for N-oxygenation by the hog liver flavin-containing monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Cashman, J R; Celestial, J R; Leach, A; Newdoll, J; Park, S B

    1993-08-01

    The metabolism of racemic, (D)- and (L)-brompheniramine, a widely used antihistamine, was studied with microsomes and with highly purified flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) from hog liver. In addition, a number of other similar tertiary amines were evaluated as substrates for FMO activity from hog liver and the kinetic constants obtained were compared with brompheniramine. Although some N-demethylation was observed, the major metabolite of brompheniramine and the other tertiary amines examined in hog liver microsomes was the metabolite containing an aliphatic nitrogen N-oxide. Brompheniramine was extensively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. N-Oxygenation of brompheniramine in both microsomes and with highly purified FMO from hog liver was enantioselective. The Km for N-oxygenation of (D)-brompheniramine was markedly lower than the Km for (L)-brompheniramine. (E)- and (Z)-zimeldine are less conformationally flexible model compounds of brompheniramine, and these compounds were also examined and were found to be stereoselectively N-oxygenated by the highly purified FMO from hog liver. The similarities and differences in Km and Vmax values were evaluated in terms of possible conformations of the substrates determined by SYBYL molecular mechanics calculations. Distance map data indicated that FMO preferentially accommodated selected conformations of tertiary amines. Thus, (D)-brompheniramine and (Z)-zimeldine presumably have the aliphatic tertiary amine nitrogen atom and aromatic ring center at a defined distance and geometry and were more efficiently N-oxygenated than their respective isomers.

  8. Quantum mechanical calculations suggest that lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases use a copper-oxyl, oxygen-rebound mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seonah; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Sandgren, Mats; Paton, Robert S.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2014-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) exhibit a mononuclear copper-containing active site and use dioxygen and a reducing agent to oxidatively cleave glycosidic linkages in polysaccharides. LPMOs represent a unique paradigm in carbohydrate turnover and exhibit synergy with hydrolytic enzymes in biomass depolymerization. To date, several features of copper binding to LPMOs have been elucidated, but the identity of the reactive oxygen species and the key steps in the oxidative mechanism have not been elucidated. Here, density functional theory calculations are used with an enzyme active site model to identify the reactive oxygen species and compare two hypothesized reaction pathways in LPMOs for hydrogen abstraction and polysaccharide hydroxylation; namely, a mechanism that employs a η1-superoxo intermediate, which abstracts a substrate hydrogen and a hydroperoxo species is responsible for substrate hydroxylation, and a mechanism wherein a copper-oxyl radical abstracts a hydrogen and subsequently hydroxylates the substrate via an oxygen-rebound mechanism. The results predict that oxygen binds end-on (η1) to copper, and that a copper-oxyl–mediated, oxygen-rebound mechanism is energetically preferred. The N-terminal histidine methylation is also examined, which is thought to modify the structure and reactivity of the enzyme. Density functional theory calculations suggest that this posttranslational modification has only a minor effect on the LPMO active site structure or reactivity for the examined steps. Overall, this study suggests the steps in the LPMO mechanism for oxidative cleavage of glycosidic bonds. PMID:24344312

  9. Stopped-flow Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of nitromethane oxidation by the diiron(IV) intermediate of methane monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Muthusamy, Mylrajan; Ambundo, Edna A; George, Simon J; Lippard, Stephen J; Thorneley, Roger N F

    2003-09-17

    The hydroxylase component (MMOH) of soluble methane monooxygenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) was reduced to the diiron(II) form and then allowed to react with dioxygen to generate the diiron(IV) intermediate Q in the first phase of a double-mixing stopped-flow experiment. CD3NO2 was then introduced in the second phase of the experiment, which was carried out in D2O at 25 degrees C. The kinetics of the reaction of the substrate with Q were monitored by stopped-flow Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, observing the disappearance of the asymmetric NO2 bending vibration at 1548 cm-1. The data were fit to a single-exponential function, which yielded a kobs of 0.45 +/- 0.07 s-1. This result is in quantitative agreement with a kobs of 0.39 +/- 0.01 s-1 obtained by observing the disappearance of Q by double-mixing stopped-flow optical spectroscopy at its absorption maximum of 420 nm. These results provide for the first time direct monitoring of the hydroxylation of a methane-derived substrate in the MMOH reaction pathway and demonstrate that Q decay occurs concomitantly with substrate consumption.

  10. Identification of structural determinants of NAD(P)H selectivity and lysine binding in lysine N(6)-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Heba; Robinson, Reeder; Rodriguez, Pedro; Adly, Camelia; El-Sohaimy, Sohby; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-09-15

    l-lysine (l-Lys) N(6)-monooxygenase (NbtG), from Nocardia farcinica, is a flavin-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of l-Lys in the presence of oxygen and NAD(P)H in the biosynthetic pathway of the siderophore nocobactin. NbtG displays only a 3-fold preference for NADPH over NADH, different from well-characterized related enzymes, which are highly selective for NADPH. The structure of NbtG with bound NAD(P)(+) or l-Lys is currently not available. Herein, we present a mutagenesis study targeting M239, R301, and E216. These amino acids are conserved and located in either the NAD(P)H binding domain or the l-Lys binding pocket. M239R resulted in high production of hydrogen peroxide and little hydroxylation with no change in coenzyme selectivity. R301A caused a 300-fold decrease on kcat/Km value with NADPH but no change with NADH. E216Q increased the Km value for l-Lys by 30-fold with very little change on the kcat value or in the binding of NAD(P)H. These results suggest that R301 plays a major role in NADPH selectivity by interacting with the 2'-phosphate of the adenine-ribose moiety of NADPH, while E216 plays a role in l-Lys binding.

  11. Inhibition of the Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase Siderophore A (SidA) Blocks Siderophore Biosynthesis and Aspergillus fumigatus Growth.

    PubMed

    Martín Del Campo, Julia S; Vogelaar, Nancy; Tolani, Karishma; Kizjakina, Karina; Harich, Kim; Sobrado, Pablo

    2016-11-18

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen and the most common causative agent of fatal invasive mycoses. The flavin-dependent monooxygenase siderophore A (SidA) catalyzes the oxygen and NADPH dependent hydroxylation of l-ornithine (l-Orn) to N(5)-l-hydroxyornithine in the biosynthetic pathway of hydroxamate-containing siderophores in A. fumigatus. Deletion of the gene that codes for SidA has shown that it is essential in establishing infection in mice models. Here, a fluorescence polarization high-throughput assay was used to screen a 2320 compound library for inhibitors of SidA. Celastrol, a natural quinone methide, was identified as a noncompetitive inhibitor of SidA with a MIC value of 2 μM. Docking experiments suggest that celastrol binds across the NADPH and l-Orn pocket. Celastrol prevents A. fumigatus growth in blood agar. The addition of purified ferric-siderophore abolished the inhibitory effect of celastrol. Thus, celastrol inhibits A. fumigatus growth by blocking siderophore biosynthesis through SidA inhibiton.

  12. Mutation of the Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Enzyme Cytochrome P450 83A1 Monooxygenase Increases Camalexin Accumulation and Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Simu; Bartnikas, Lisa M; Volko, Sigrid M; Ausubel, Frederick M; Tang, Dingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1), which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mutant analysis showed that this enhanced resistance requires NPR1, EDS1, and PAD4, but not SID2 or EDS5. In cyp83a1-3 mutants, the expression of genes related to camalexin synthesis increased upon G. cichoracearum infection. Significantly, the cyp83a1-3 mutant also accumulated higher levels of camalexin. Decreasing camalexin levels by mutation of the camalexin synthetase gene PAD3 or the camalexin synthesis regulator AtWRKY33 compromised the powdery mildew resistance in these mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of PAD3 increased camalexin levels and enhanced resistance to G. cichoracearum. Taken together, our data indicate that accumulation of higher levels of camalexin contributes to increased resistance to powdery mildew.

  13. Messenger RNA (mRNA) nanoparticle tumour vaccination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phua, Kyle K. L.; Nair, Smita K.; Leong, Kam W.

    2014-06-01

    Use of mRNA-based vaccines for tumour immunotherapy has gained increasing attention in recent years. A growing number of studies applying nanomedicine concepts to mRNA tumour vaccination show that the mRNA delivered in nanoparticle format can generate a more robust immune response. Advances in the past decade have deepened our understanding of gene delivery barriers, mRNA's biological stability and immunological properties, and support the notion for engineering innovations tailored towards a more efficient mRNA nanoparticle vaccine delivery system. In this review we will first examine the suitability of mRNA for engineering manipulations, followed by discussion of a model framework that highlights the barriers to a robust anti-tumour immunity mediated by mRNA encapsulated in nanoparticles. Finally, by consolidating existing literature on mRNA nanoparticle tumour vaccination within the context of this framework, we aim to identify bottlenecks that can be addressed by future nanoengineering research.

  14. Sequences controlling histone H4 mRNA abundance.

    PubMed Central

    Capasso, O; Bleecker, G C; Heintz, N

    1987-01-01

    The post-transcriptional regulation of histone mRNA abundance is manifest both by accumulation of histone mRNA during the S phase, and by the rapid degradation of mature histone mRNA following the inhibition of DNA synthesis. We have constructed a comprehensive series of substitution mutants within a human H4 histone gene, introduced them into the mouse L cell genome, and analyzed their effects on the post-transcriptional control of the H4 mRNA. Our results demonstrate that most of the H4 mRNA is dispensable for proper regulation of histone mRNA abundance. However, recognition of the 3' terminus of the mature H4 mRNA is critically important for regulating its cytoplasmic half-life. Thus, this region of the mRNA functions both in the nucleus as a signal for proper processing of the mRNA terminus, and in the cytoplasm as an essential element in the control of mRNA stability. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3608993

  15. The Two-Component Monooxygenase MeaXY Initiates the Downstream Pathway of Chloroacetanilide Herbicide Catabolism in Sphingomonads.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Minggen; Meng, Qiang; Yang, Youjian; Chu, Cuiwei; Chen, Qing; Li, Yi; Cheng, Dan; Hong, Qing; Yan, Xin; He, Jian

    2017-04-01

    Due to the extensive use of chloroacetanilide herbicides over the past 60 years, bacteria have evolved catabolic pathways to mineralize these compounds. In the upstream catabolic pathway, chloroacetanilide herbicides are transformed into the two common metabolites 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) and 2,6-diethylaniline (DEA) through N-dealkylation and amide hydrolysis. The pathway downstream of MEA is initiated by the hydroxylation of aromatic rings, followed by its conversion to a substrate for ring cleavage after several steps. Most of the key genes in the pathway have been identified. However, the genes involved in the initial hydroxylation step of MEA are still unknown. As a special aniline derivative, MEA cannot be transformed by the aniline dioxygenases that have been characterized. Sphingobium baderi DE-13 can completely degrade MEA and use it as a sole carbon source for growth. In this work, an MEA degradation-deficient mutant of S. baderi DE-13 was isolated. MEA catabolism genes were predicted through comparative genomic analysis. The results of genetic complementation and heterologous expression demonstrated that the products of meaX and meaY are responsible for the initial step of MEA degradation in S. baderi DE-13. MeaXY is a two-component flavoprotein monooxygenase system that catalyzes the hydroxylation of MEA and DEA using NADH and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as cofactors. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analysis confirmed that MeaXY hydroxylates MEA and DEA at the para-position. Transcription of meaX was enhanced remarkably upon induction of MEA or DEA in S. baderi DE-13. Additionally, meaX and meaY were highly conserved among other MEA-degrading sphingomonads. This study fills a gap in our knowledge of the biochemical pathway that carries out mineralization of chloroacetanilide herbicides in sphingomonads.IMPORTANCE Much attention has been paid to the environmental fate of chloroacetanilide herbicides used for the past 60 years. Microbial degradation

  16. Rational Reprogramming of the R2 Subunit of Escherichia coli Ribonucleotide Reductase into a Self-Hydroxylating Monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, J.; Voegtli, W.C.; Khidekel, N.; Moënne-Loccoz, P.; Krebs, C.; Ley, B.A.; Huynh, B.H.; Loehr, T.M.; Rosenzweig, A.C.; Bollinger, Jr., J.M.

    2010-03-05

    The outcome of O{sub 2} activation at the diiron(II) cluster in the R2 subunit of Escherichia coli (class I) ribonucleotide reductase has been rationally altered from the normal tyrosyl radical (Y122) production to self-hydroxylation of a phenylalanine side-chain by two amino acid substitutions that leave intact the (histidine){sub 2}-(carboxylate){sub 4} ligand set characteristic of the diiron-carboxylate family. Iron ligand Asp (D) 84 was replaced with Glu (E), the amino acid found in the cognate position of the structurally similar diiron-carboxylate protein, methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH). We previously showed that this substitution allows accumulation of a {mu}-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) intermediate, which does not accumulate in the wild-type (wt) protein and is probably a structural homologue of intermediate P (H{sub peroxo}) in O{sub 2} activation by MMOH. In addition, the near-surface residue Trp (W) 48 was replaced with Phe (F), blocking transfer of the 'extra' electron that occurs in wt R2 during formation of the formally Fe(III)Fe(IV) cluster X. Decay of the {mu}-1,2-peroxodiiron(III) complex in R2-W48F/D84E gives an initial brown product, which contains very little Y122 and which converts very slowly (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7 h) upon incubation at 0 C to an intensely purple final product. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the purple product indicates that F208 has undergone {epsilon}-hydroxylation and the resulting phenol has shifted significantly to become a ligand to Fe2 of the diiron cluster. Resonance Raman (RR) spectra of the purple product generated with {sup 16}O{sub 2} or {sub 18}O{sub 2} show appropriate isotopic sensitivity in bands assigned to O-phenyl and Fe-O-phenyl vibrational modes, confirming that the oxygen of the Fe(III)-phenolate species is derived from O{sub 2}. Chemical analysis, experiments involving interception of the hydroxylating intermediate with exogenous reductant, and Moessbauer and EXAFS characterization of the brown

  17. Structural and Functional Analysis of a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Important for Efficient Utilization of Chitin in Cellvibrio japonicus.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Zarah; Nelson, Cassandra E; Dalhus, Bjørn; Mekasha, Sophanit; Loose, Jennifer S M; Crouch, Lucy I; Røhr, Åsmund K; Gardner, Jeffrey G; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2016-04-01

    Cellvibrio japonicusis a Gram-negative soil bacterium that is primarily known for its ability to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides through utilization of an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Several putative chitin-degrading enzymes are also found among these carbohydrate-active enzymes, such as chitinases, chitobiases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). In this study, we have characterized the chitin-active LPMO,CjLPMO10A, a tri-modular enzyme containing a catalytic family AA10 LPMO module, a family 5 chitin-binding module, and a C-terminal unclassified module of unknown function. Characterization of the latter module revealed tight and specific binding to chitin, thereby unraveling a new family of chitin-binding modules (classified as CBM73). X-ray crystallographic elucidation of theCjLPMO10A catalytic module revealed that the active site of the enzyme combines structural features previously only observed in either cellulose or chitin-active LPMO10s. Analysis of the copper-binding site by EPR showed a signal signature more similar to those observed for cellulose-cleaving LPMOs. The full-length LPMO shows no activity toward cellulose but is able to bind and cleave both α- and β-chitin. Removal of the chitin-binding modules reduced LPMO activity toward α-chitin compared with the full-length enzyme. Interestingly, the full-length enzyme and the individual catalytic LPMO module boosted the activity of an endochitinase equally well, also yielding similar amounts of oxidized products. Finally, gene deletion studies show thatCjLPMO10A is needed byC. japonicusto obtain efficient growth on both purified chitin and crab shell particles.

  18. Biochemical evidence for the tyrosine involvement in cationic intermediate stabilization in mouse β-carotene 15, 15'-monooxygenase

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase (BCMO1) catalyzes the crucial first step in vitamin A biosynthesis in animals. We wished to explore the possibility that a carbocation intermediate is formed during the cleavage reaction of BCMO1, as is seen for many isoprenoid biosynthesis enzymes, and to determine which residues in the substrate binding cleft are necessary for catalytic and substrate binding activity. To test this hypothesis, we replaced substrate cleft aromatic and acidic residues by site-directed mutagenesis. Enzymatic activity was measured in vitro using His-tag purified proteins and in vivo in a β-carotene-accumulating E. coli system. Results Our assays show that mutation of either Y235 or Y326 to leucine (no cation-π stabilization) significantly impairs the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Moreover, mutation of Y326 to glutamine (predicted to destabilize a putative carbocation) almost eliminates activity (9.3% of wt activity). However, replacement of these same tyrosines with phenylalanine or tryptophan does not significantly impair activity, indicating that aromaticity at these residues is crucial. Mutations of two other aromatic residues in the binding cleft of BCMO1, F51 and W454, to either another aromatic residue or to leucine do not influence the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Our ab initio model of BCMO1 with β-carotene mounted supports a mechanism involving cation-π stabilization by Y235 and Y326. Conclusions Our data are consistent with the formation of a substrate carbocation intermediate and cation-π stabilization of this intermediate by two aromatic residues in the substrate-binding cleft of BCMO1. PMID:20003456

  19. Possible Peroxo State of the Dicopper Site of Particulate Methane Monooxygenase from Combined Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Calculations.

    PubMed

    Itoyama, Shuhei; Doitomi, Kazuki; Kamachi, Takashi; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2016-03-21

    Enzymatic methane hydroxylation is proposed to efficiently occur at the dinuclear copper site of particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), which is an integral membrane metalloenzyme in methanotrophic bacteria. The resting state and a possible peroxo state of the dicopper active site of pMMO are discussed by using combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics calculations on the basis of reported X-ray crystal structures of the resting state of pMMO by Rosenzweig and co-workers. The dicopper site has a unique structure, in which one copper is coordinated by two histidine imidazoles and another is chelated by a histidine imidazole and primary amine of an N-terminal histidine. The resting state of the dicopper site is assignable to the mixed-valent Cu(I)Cu(II) state from a computed Cu-Cu distance of 2.62 Å from calculations at the B3LYP-D/TZVP level of theory. A μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxo-Cu(II)2 structure similar to those of hemocyanin and tyrosinase is reasonably obtained by using the resting state structure and dioxygen. Computed Cu-Cu and O-O distances are 3.63 and 1.46 Å, respectively, in the open-shell singlet state. Structural features of the dicopper peroxo species of pMMO are compared with those of hemocyanin and tyrosinase and synthetic dicopper model compounds. Optical features of the μ-η(2):η(2)-peroxo-Cu(II)2 state are calculated and analyzed with TD-DFT calculations.

  20. Purification and characterization of a two-component monooxygenase that hydroxylates nitrilotriacetate from "Chelatobacter" strain ATCC 29600.

    PubMed Central

    Uetz, T; Schneider, R; Snozzi, M; Egli, T

    1992-01-01

    An assay based on the consumption of nitrilotriacetate (NTA) was developed to measure the activity of NTA monooxygenase (NTA-Mo) in cell extracts of "Chelatobacter" strain ATCC 29600 and to purify a functional, NTA-hydroxylating enzyme complex. The complex consisted of two components that easily dissociated during purification and upon dilution. Both components were purified to more than 95% homogeneity, and it was possible to reconstitute the functional, NTA-hydroxylating enzyme complex from pure component A (cA) and component B (cB). cB exhibited NTA-stimulated NADH oxidation but was unable to hydroxylate NTA. It had a native molecular mass of 88 kDa and contained flavin mononucleotide (FMN). cA had a native molecular mass of 99 kDa. No catalytic activity has yet been shown for cA alone. Under unfavorable conditions, NADH oxidation was partly or completely uncoupled from hydroxylation, resulting in the formation of H2O2. Optimum hydroxylating activity was found to be dependent on the molar ratio of the two components, the absolute concentration of the enzyme complex, and the presence of FMN. Uncoupling of the reaction was favored in the presence of high salt concentrations and in the presence of flavin adenine dinucleotide. The NTA-Mo complex was sensitive to sulfhydryl reagents, but inhibition was reversible by addition of excess dithiothreitol. The Km values for Mg(2+)-NTA, FMN, and NADH were determined as 0.5 mM, 1.3 microM, and 0.35 mM, respectively. Of 26 tested compounds, NTA was the only substrate for NTA-Mo. Images PMID:1735711

  1. Stereospecificity and physiology of co-oxidative production of chemicals by methanotrophic bacteria. [Methane monooxygenase:a2

    SciTech Connect

    Kelley, R.L.; Hoefer, D.E.; Conrad, J.R.; Srivastava, V.J.; Akin, C.

    1991-01-01

    Methanotrophic bacteria can use methane as a sole source of carbon and energy. The enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane in these organisms, methane monooxygenase, is also able to biotransform a number of substrates into industrially important chemicals. One such example is the oxidation of propylene to propylene oxide. Several strains of mesophilic and thermophilic methanotrophs have been tested for their ability to produce propylene oxide with formate, methanol, and methane as the co-oxidative substrates. Cultures in the late stationary phase were found to be more productive than exponentially growing cultures. Methane did not inhibit propylene epoxidation on low-density cultures; in fact, the yields of propylene oxide were greater when both methane and propylene were present than when only propylene was present. In higher-density cultures, however, methane did appear to inhibit oxidation of propylene. The effects of several culture parameters such as pH, temperature, and concentration of micronutrients on propylene oxide production ad steroespecificity were determined. Propylene oxide production was proportional to the amount of cell loading up to 14 g/L. Unwashed cells produced more propylene oxide than washed cells. The long- and short-term inhibitory effects of propylene oxide on the methanotrophic strains were also investigated. A tolerance of up to 1 M propylene oxide was observed, and the maximum inhibitory effect was seen within 30 minute. The steroespecificity for propylene oxide production and oxidation of 3-methylcyclohexene was determined for several strains. Methylosinus trichosporium (OB3b), particularly a cell-free extract of this strain, had the greatest steroespecificity. 13 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Oxidation reactions performed by soluble methane monooxygenase hydroxylase intermediates H(peroxo) and Q proceed by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Lippard, Stephen J

    2010-09-14

    Soluble methane monooxygenase is a bacterial enzyme that converts methane to methanol at a carboxylate-bridged diiron center with exquisite control. Because the oxidizing power required for this transformation is demanding, it is not surprising that the enzyme is also capable of hydroxylating and epoxidizing a broad range of hydrocarbon substrates in addition to methane. In this work we took advantage of this promiscuity of the enzyme to gain insight into the mechanisms of action of H(peroxo) and Q, two oxidants that are generated sequentially during the reaction of reduced protein with O(2). Using double-mixing stopped-flow spectroscopy, we investigated the reactions of the two intermediate species with a panel of substrates of varying C-H bond strength. Three classes of substrates were identified according to the rate-determining step in the reaction. We show for the first time that an inverse trend exists between the rate constant of reaction with H(peroxo) and the C-H bond strength of the hydrocarbon examined for those substrates in which C-H bond activation is rate-determining. Deuterium kinetic isotope effects revealed that reactions performed by Q, but probably not H(peroxo), involve extensive quantum mechanical tunneling. This difference sheds light on the observation that H(peroxo) is not a sufficiently potent oxidant to hydroxylate methane, whereas Q can perform this reaction in a facile manner. In addition, the reaction of H(peroxo) with acetonitrile appears to proceed by a distinct mechanism in which a cyanomethide anionic intermediate is generated, bolstering the argument that H(peroxo) is an electrophilic oxidant that operates via two-electron transfer chemistry.

  3. Cooperation between MEF2 and PPARγ in human intestinal β,β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiaoming; Tsai, Shu-Whei; Yan, Bingfang; Rubin, Lewis P

    2006-01-01

    Background Vitamin A and its derivatives, the retinoids, are essential for normal embryonic development and maintenance of cell differentiation. β, β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 (BCMO1) catalyzes the central cleavage of β-carotene to all-trans retinal and is the key enzyme in the intestinal metabolism of carotenes to vitamin A. However, human and various rodent species show markedly different efficiencies in intestinal BCMO1-mediated carotene to retinoid conversion. The aim of this study is to identify potentially human-specific regulatory control mechanisms of BCMO1 gene expression. Results We identified and functionally characterized the human BCMO1 promoter sequence and determined the transcriptional regulation of the BCMO1 gene in a BCMO1 expressing human intestinal cell line, TC-7. Several functional transcription factor-binding sites were identified in the human promoter that are absent in the mouse BCMO1 promoter. We demonstrate that the proximal promoter sequence, nt -190 to +35, confers basal transcriptional activity of the human BCMO1 gene. Site-directed mutagenesis of the myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) binding elements resulted in decreased basal promoter activity. Mutation of both promoter elements abrogated the expression of intestinal cell BCMO1. Electrophoretic mobility shift and supershift assays and transcription factor co-expression in TC-7 cells showed MEF2C and PPARγ bind to their respective DNA elements and synergistically transactivate BCMO1 expression. Conclusion We demonstrate that human intestinal cell BCMO1 expression is dependent on the functional cooperation between PPARγ and MEF2 isoforms. The findings suggest that the interaction between MEF2 and PPAR factors may provide a molecular basis for interspecies differences in the transcriptional regulation of the BCMO1 gene. PMID:16504037

  4. Expression and purification of the recombinant subunits of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase and reconstitution of the active complex.

    PubMed

    Cafaro, Valeria; Scognamiglio, Roberta; Viggiani, Ambra; Izzo, Viviana; Passaro, Irene; Notomista, Eugenio; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Amoresano, Angela; Casbarra, Annarita; Pucci, Piero; Di Donato, Alberto

    2002-11-01

    This paper describes the cloning of the genes coding for each component of the complex of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1, their expression, purification and characterization. Moreover, the reconstitution of the active complex from the recombinant subunits has been obtained, and the functional role of each component in the electron transfer from the electron donor to molecular oxygen has been determined. The coexpression of subunits B, E and A leads to the formation of a subcomplex, named H, with a quaternary structure (BEA)2, endowed with hydroxylase activity. Tomo F component is an NADH oxidoreductase. The purified enzyme contains about 1 mol of FAD, 2 mol of iron, and 2 mol of acid labile sulfide per mol of protein, as expected for the presence of one [2Fe-2S] cluster, and exhibits a typical flavodoxin absorption spectrum. Interestingly, the sequence of the protein does not correspond to that previously predicted on the basis of DNA sequence. We have shown that this depends on minor errors in the gene sequence that we have corrected. C component is a Rieske-type ferredoxin, whose iron and acid labile sulfide content is in agreement with the presence of one [2Fe-2S] cluster. The cluster is very sensitive to oxygen damage. Mixtures of the subcomplex H and of the subunits F, C and D are able to oxidize p-cresol into 4-methylcathecol, thus demonstrating the full functionality of the recombinant subunits as purified. Finally, experimental evidence is reported which strongly support a model for the electron transfer. Subunit F is the first member of an electron transport chain which transfers electrons from NADH to C, which tunnels them to H subcomplex, and eventually to molecular oxygen.

  5. TESTING THE SPECIFICITY OF PRIMERS TO ENVIRONMENTAL AMMONIA MONOOXYGENASE (AMOA) GENES IN GROUNDWATER TREATED WITH UREA TO PROMOTE CALCITE PRECIPITATION

    SciTech Connect

    Stephanie Freeman; David Reed; Yoshiko Fujita

    2006-12-01

    The diversity of bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes in DNA isolated from microorganisms in groundwater was characterized by amplification of amoA DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and sequencing. The amoA gene is characteristic of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The DNA extracts were acquired from an experiment where dilute molasses and urea were sequentially introduced into a well in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (ESRPA) in Idaho to examine whether such amendments could stimulate enhanced ureolytic activity. The hydrolysis of urea into ammonium and carbonate serves as the basis for a potential remediation technique for trace metals and radionuclide contaminants that co-precipitate in calcite. The ammonium ion resulting from ureolysis can promote the growth of AOB. The goal of this work was to investigate the effectiveness of primers designed for quantitative PCR of environmental amoA genes and to evaluate the effect of the molasses and urea amendments upon the population diversity of groundwater AOB. PCR primers designed to target a portion of the amoA gene were used to amplify amoA gene sequences in the groundwater DNA extracts. Following PCR, amplified gene products were cloned and the clones were characterized by RFLP, a DNA restriction technique that can distinguish different DNA sequences, to gauge the initial diversity. Clones exhibiting unique RFLP patterns were subjected to DNA sequencing. Initial sequencing results suggest that the primers were successful at specific detection of amoA sequences and the RFLP analyses indicated that the diversity of detected amoA sequences in the ESRPA decreased with the additions of molasses and urea.

  6. 4-Toluene sulfonate methyl-monooxygenase from Comamonas testosteroni T-2: purification and some properties of the oxygenase component.

    PubMed Central

    Locher, H H; Leisinger, T; Cook, A M

    1991-01-01

    Comamonas testosteroni T-2 synthesizes an inducible enzyme system that oxygenates 4-toluene sulfontate (TS) to 4-sulfobenzyl alcohol when grown in TS-salts medium. We purified this TS methyl-monooxygenase system (TSMOS) and found it to consist of two components. A monomeric, iron-sulfur flavoprotein (component B), which has been shown to act as a reductase in the 4-sulfobenzoate dioxygenase system of this organism (H. H. Locher, T. Leisinger, and A. M. Cook, Biochem. J. 274:833-842, 1991), carried electrons from NADH to component M, an oxygenase. This oxygenase had the UV-visible spectral characteristics of an iron-sulfur protein. Mrs of about 152,000 for the native oxygenase and of 43,000 under denaturing conditions indicated a homotri- or homotetrameric enzyme, whose N-terminal amino acids and amino acid composition were determined. The activity of the purified enzyme was enhanced about fivefold by the addition of Fe2+. In the presence of O2 and NADH, components B and M together catalyzed the stoichiometric transformation of TS or p-toluate to the corresponding alcohol. The reaction was confirmed as oxygenation of the methyl group by observation of an oxygen atom from 18O2 in carboxybenzyl alcohol. The substrate range of TSMOS included carboxylated analogs of TS (p- and m-toluates and 4-ethylbenzoate), whereas p-xylene, toluene, and p-cresol were not substrates. TSMOS also catalyzed demethylation; 4-methoxybenzoate was transformed to 4-hydroxybenzoate and formaldehyde. Images PMID:2050632

  7. Phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase and the S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine by human cytosolic fractions.

    PubMed

    Boonyapiwat, Boontarika; Forbes, Ben; Mitchell, Stephen; Steventon, Glyn B

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to reaction phenotype the identity of the cytosolic enzyme responsible for the S-oxidation of S-carboxymethyl-L-cysteine (SCMC) in female human hepatic cytosolic fractions. The identity of this enzyme in the female Wistar rat hepatic cytosolic fraction was found to be phenylalanine 4-monooxygenase (PAH). In pooled female human hepatic cytosolic fractions the calculated K(m) and V(max) for substrate (SCMC) activated PAH was 16.22 +/- 11.31 mM and 0.87 +/- 0.41 nmoles x min(-1) mg(-1). The experimental data modelled to the Michaelis-Menten equation with noncompetitive substrate inhibition. When the cytosolic fractions were activated with lysophophatidylcholine the V(max) increased to 52.31 +/- 11.72 nmoles x min(-1) mg(-1) but the K(m) remained unchanged at 16.53 +/- 2.32 mM. A linear correlation was seen in the production of Tyr and SCMC R/S S-oxide in 20 individual female hepatic cytosolic fractions for both substrate and lysophosphatidylcholine activated PAH (r(s) > 0.96). Inhibitor studies found that the specific chemical and antibody inhibitors of PAH reduced the production of Tyr and SCMC R/S S-oxide in these in vitro PAH assays. An investigation of the mechanism of interaction of SCMC with PAH indicated that the drug was a competitive inhibitor of the aromatic C-oxidation of Phe with a calculated K(i) of 17.23 +/- 4.15 mM. The requirement of BH4 as cofactor and the lack of effect of the specific tyrosine hydroxylase, tryptophan hydroxylase and nitric oxide synthase inhibitors on the S-oxidation of SCMC all indicate that PAH was the enzyme responsible for this biotransformation reaction in human hepatic cytosolic fractions.

  8. The in vitro metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by polychlorinated and polybrominated biphenyl induced rat hepatic microsomal monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Haake, J M; Merrill, J C; Safe, S

    1985-09-01

    The metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by halogenated biphenyl-induced rat hepatic microsomal monooxygenases was determined using a high pressure liquid chromatographic assay system. Incubation of benzo[a]pyrene with microsomes from rats pretreated with phenobarbitone or phenobarbitone-type inducers (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',4,4',6,6'-hexachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',5,5'-tetrachlorobiphenyl, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexabromobiphenyl, and 2,2',5,5'-tetrabromobiphenyl) resulted in increased overall metabolism of the hydrocarbon (less than fourfold) into phenolic, quinone, and diol metabolites, with the most striking increase observed in the formation of 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dihydroxybenzo[a]pyrene. In contrast, the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by microsomes from rats induced with 3-methylcholanthrene or 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl resulted in a greater than 10-fold increase in overall benzo[a]pyrene metabolism, with the largest increases observed in the formation of the trans-7,8- and -9,10-dihydrodiol metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene. However, in comparison to control and phenobarbitone-induced microsomes, the oxidative conversion of benzo[a]pyrene by microsomes induced with 3-methylcholanthrene and 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl into the 6,12-quinone was substantially inhibited. Previous reports have shown that the commercial halogenated biphenyl mixtures, fireMaster BP-6, and Aroclor 1254 are mixed-type inducers and that microsomes from rats pretreated with these mixtures markedly enhance the overall metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene. Not surprisingly, the metabolism of benzo[a]pyrene by microsomes from rats pretreated with the mixed-type inducers, 2,3,3',4,4'-penta-,2,3,3',4,4',5-hexa-, and 2',3,3',4,4',5-hexa- chlorobiphenyl was also increased and the metabolic profile was similar to that observed with fireMaster BP-6 and Aroclor 1254 induced microsomes.

  9. Developmental expression and regulation of flavin-containing monooxygenase by the unfolded protein response in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Kupsco, Allison; Schlenk, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) play a key role in xenobiotic metabolism, are regulated by environmental conditions, and are differentially regulated during mammalian development. Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) are a common model organism for toxicological studies. The goal of the current research was to characterize developmental expression and regulation of FMOs in Japanese medaka embryos to better understand the role of FMOs in this model species. Five putative medaka fmos were characterized from the medaka genome through the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database by protein motifs and alignments, then identified as fmo4, fmo5A, fmo5B, fmo5C and fmo5D for the current study. Fmo gene expression was analyzed at 1dpf, 3dpf, 6dpf and 9dpf and distinct developmental patterns of expression were observed. Fmo4 and fmo5D increased 3-fold during mid organogenesis (6dpf), while fmo5B and fmo5C decreased significantly in early organogenesis (3dpf) and fmo5A was unaltered. Promoter analysis was performed for transcription factor binding sites and indicated regulation by developmental factors and a role for the unfolded protein response in fmo modulation. Fmo regulation by the UPR was assessed with treatments of 1μg/ml, 2μg/ml, and 4μg/ml Tunicamycin (Tm), and 2mM and 4mM dithiothreitol (DTT), well-known inducers of endoplasmic reticulum stress, for 24h from 5-6dpf. High concentrations to Tm induced fmo4 and fmo5A up to two-fold, while DTT significantly decreased expression of fmo5A, fmo5B, and fmo5C. Results suggest that medaka fmos are variably regulated by the UPR during organogenesis with variable developmental expression, and suggesting potential stage-dependent activation or detoxification of xenobiotics.

  10. Effect of repeated ether anesthesias on the mono-oxygenase system of rat liver S-9 fraction.

    PubMed

    Paolini, M; Bauer, C; Corsi, C; Tonelli, F; Hrelia, P; Bronzetti, G; Forti, G C

    1984-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ether anesthesia in rats, before i.p. injections to induce the mono-oxygenase enzyme system, on biochemical properties of liver S9 fractions. Aminopyrine N-demethylase and rho-nitroanisole O-demethylase activity levels, their stability, and lipid peroxidation were determined in S9 fractions after etherization (about 1 min in ether vapor chamber daily for 3 consecutive days, before i.p. injections of Na-phenobarbital and beta-naphthoflavone) and compared with controls receiving the same injections without etherization. The activities were slightly (but not significatively) enhanced after this treatment, but stability was markedly and significatively greater after 1 h of incubation in the conditions of the liver microsomal assay (+ 14.8% and + 74.7%, respectively); lipid peroxidation was strongly and significatively depressed (-76.0%). Etherization sufficient to kill the animals on the 4th day resulted in equally active but less stable S9 fraction enzymes. Dimethylnitrosamine (as a standard premutagen) was assayed with the D7 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using S9 fractions obtained from both anesthetized and nonanesthetized rats. According to biochemical data, results obtained with S9 from partially anesthetized rats were comparable with the conventional ones (S9 from nonanesthetized rats). On the contrary, the use of more prolonged ether anesthesia, including one on the day the animals are killed, gives S9 fraction significantly less effective. We conclude that if brief etherizations are used, for i.p. injections only, the S9 fractions obtained are entirely satisfactory and the procedures involved in production are simplified; the additional animal treatment (etherization) must be specified.

  11. Soluble Methane Monooxygenase Production and Trichloroethylene Degradation by a Type I Methanotroph, Methylomonas methanica 68-1

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Sung-Cheol; Bowman, John P.; Sayler, Gary S.

    1993-01-01

    A methanotroph (strain 68-1), originally isolated from a trichloroethylene (TCE)-contaminated aquifer, was identified as the type I methanotroph Methylomonas methanica on the basis of intracytoplasmic membrane ultrastructure, phospholipid fatty acid profile, and 16S rRNA signature probe hybridization. Strain 68-1 was found to oxidize naphthalene and TCE via a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) and thus becomes the first type I methanotroph known to be able to produce this enzyme. The specific whole-cell sMMO activity of 68-1, as measured by the naphthalene oxidation assay and by TCE biodegradation, was comparatively higher than sMMO activity levels in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b grown in the same copper-free conditions. The maximal naphthalene oxidation rates of Methylomonas methanica 68-1 and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were 551 ± 27 and 321 ± 16 nmol h-1 mg of protein -1, respectively. The maximal TCE degradation rates of Methylomonas methanica 68-1 and Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b were 2,325 ± 260 and 995 ± 160 nmol h-1 mg of protein-1, respectively. The substrate affinity of 68-1 sMMO to naphthalene (Km, 70 ± 4 μM) and TCE (Km, 225 ± 13 μM), however, was comparatively lower than that of the sMMO of OB3b, which had affinities of 40 ± 3 and 126 ± 8 μM, respectively. Genomic DNA slot and Southern blot analyses with an sMMO gene probe from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b showed that the sMMO genes of 68-1 have little genetic homology to those of OB3b. This result may indicate the evolutionary diversification of the sMMOs. Images PMID:16348920

  12. Adaptor Protein-1 Complex Affects the Endocytic Trafficking and Function of Peptidylglycine α-Amidating Monooxygenase, a Luminal Cuproenzyme.

    PubMed

    Bonnemaison, Mathilde L; Bäck, Nils; Duffy, Megan E; Ralle, Martina; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2015-08-28

    The adaptor protein-1 complex (AP-1), which transports cargo between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes, plays a role in the trafficking of Atp7a, a copper-transporting P-type ATPase, and peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), a copper-dependent membrane enzyme. Lack of any of the four AP-1 subunits impairs function, and patients with MEDNIK syndrome, a rare genetic disorder caused by lack of expression of the σ1A subunit, exhibit clinical and biochemical signs of impaired copper homeostasis. To explore the role of AP-1 in copper homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells, we used corticotrope tumor cells in which AP-1 function was diminished by reducing expression of its μ1A subunit. Copper levels were unchanged when AP-1 function was impaired, but cellular levels of Atp7a declined slightly. The ability of PAM to function was assessed by monitoring 18-kDa fragment-NH2 production from proopiomelanocortin. Reduced AP-1 function made 18-kDa fragment amidation more sensitive to inhibition by bathocuproine disulfonate, a cell-impermeant Cu(I) chelator. The endocytic trafficking of PAM was altered, and PAM-1 accumulated on the cell surface when AP-1 levels were reduced. Reduced AP-1 function increased the Atp7a presence in early/recycling endosomes but did not alter the ability of copper to stimulate its appearance on the plasma membrane. Co-immunoprecipitation of a small fraction of PAM and Atp7a supports the suggestion that copper can be transferred directly from Atp7a to PAM, a process that can occur only when both proteins are present in the same subcellular compartment. Altered luminal cuproenzyme function may contribute to deficits observed when the AP-1 function is compromised.

  13. Heterogeneity in the Histidine-brace Copper Coordination Sphere in Auxiliary Activity Family 10 (AA10) Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenases.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Amanda K; Wilson, Michael T; Hough, Michael A; Svistunenko, Dimitri A; Hemsworth, Glyn R; Walton, Paul H; Vijgenboom, Erik; Worrall, Jonathan A R

    2016-06-10

    Copper-dependent lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are enzymes that oxidatively deconstruct polysaccharides. The active site copper in LPMOs is coordinated by a histidine-brace. This utilizes the amino group and side chain of the N-terminal His residue with the side chain of a second His residue to create a T-shaped arrangement of nitrogen ligands. We report a structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic appraisal of copper binding to the histidine-brace in an auxiliary activity family 10 (AA10) LPMO from Streptomyces lividans (SliLPMO10E). Unexpectedly, we discovered the existence of two apo-SliLPMO10E species in solution that can each bind copper at a single site with distinct kinetic and thermodynamic (exothermic and endothermic) properties. The experimental EPR spectrum of copper-bound SliLPMO10E requires the simulation of two different line shapes, implying two different copper-bound species, indicative of three and two nitrogen ligands coordinating the copper. Amino group coordination was probed through the creation of an N-terminal extension variant (SliLPMO10E-Ext). The kinetics and thermodynamics of copper binding to SliLPMO10E-Ext are in accord with copper binding to one of the apo-forms in the wild-type protein, suggesting that amino group coordination is absent in the two-nitrogen coordinate form of SliLPMO10E. Copper binding to SliLPMO10B was also investigated, and again it revealed the presence of two apo-forms with kinetics and stoichiometry of copper binding identical to that of SliLPMO10E. Our findings highlight that heterogeneity exists in the active site copper coordination sphere of LPMOs that may have implications for the mechanism of loading copper in the cell.

  14. Structural and Functional Analysis of a Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase Important for Efficient Utilization of Chitin in Cellvibrio japonicus*

    PubMed Central

    Forsberg, Zarah; Nelson, Cassandra E.; Dalhus, Bjørn; Mekasha, Sophanit; Loose, Jennifer S. M.; Crouch, Lucy I.; Røhr, Åsmund K.; Gardner, Jeffrey G.; Eijsink, Vincent G. H.; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Cellvibrio japonicus is a Gram-negative soil bacterium that is primarily known for its ability to degrade plant cell wall polysaccharides through utilization of an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate-active enzymes. Several putative chitin-degrading enzymes are also found among these carbohydrate-active enzymes, such as chitinases, chitobiases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). In this study, we have characterized the chitin-active LPMO, CjLPMO10A, a tri-modular enzyme containing a catalytic family AA10 LPMO module, a family 5 chitin-binding module, and a C-terminal unclassified module of unknown function. Characterization of the latter module revealed tight and specific binding to chitin, thereby unraveling a new family of chitin-binding modules (classified as CBM73). X-ray crystallographic elucidation of the CjLPMO10A catalytic module revealed that the active site of the enzyme combines structural features previously only observed in either cellulose or chitin-active LPMO10s. Analysis of the copper-binding site by EPR showed a signal signature more similar to those observed for cellulose-cleaving LPMOs. The full-length LPMO shows no activity toward cellulose but is able to bind and cleave both α- and β-chitin. Removal of the chitin-binding modules reduced LPMO activity toward α-chitin compared with the full-length enzyme. Interestingly, the full-length enzyme and the individual catalytic LPMO module boosted the activity of an endochitinase equally well, also yielding similar amounts of oxidized products. Finally, gene deletion studies show that CjLPMO10A is needed by C. japonicus to obtain efficient growth on both purified chitin and crab shell particles. PMID:26858252

  15. Arg279 is the key regulator of coenzyme selectivity in the flavin-dependent ornithine monooxygenase SidA.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Reeder; Franceschini, Stefano; Fedkenheuer, Michael; Rodriguez, Pedro J; Ellerbrock, Jacob; Romero, Elvira; Echandi, Maria Paulina; Martin Del Campo, Julia S; Sobrado, Pablo

    2014-04-01

    Siderophore A (SidA) is a flavin-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes the NAD(P)H- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of ornithine in the biosynthesis of siderophores in Aspergillus fumigatus and is essential for virulence. SidA can utilize both NADPH or NADH for activity; however, the enzyme is selective for NADPH. Structural analysis shows that R279 interacts with the 2'-phosphate of NADPH. To probe the role of electrostatic interactions in coenzyme selectivity, R279 was mutated to both an alanine and a glutamate. The mutant proteins were active but highly uncoupled, oxidizing NADPH and producing hydrogen peroxide instead of hydroxylated ornithine. For wtSidA, the catalytic efficiency was 6-fold higher with NADPH as compared to NADH. For the R279A mutant the catalytic efficiency was the same with both coenyzmes, while for the R279E mutant the catalytic efficiency was 5-fold higher with NADH. The effects are mainly due to an increase in the KD values, as no major changes on the kcat or flavin reduction values were observed. Thus, the absence of a positive charge leads to no coenzyme selectivity while introduction of a negative charge leads to preference for NADH. Flavin fluorescence studies suggest altered interaction between the flavin and NADP⁺ in the mutant enzymes. The effects are caused by different binding modes of the coenzyme upon removal of the positive charge at position 279, as no major conformational changes were observed in the structure for R279A. The results indicate that the positive charge at position 279 is critical for tight binding of NADPH and efficient hydroxylation.

  16. Links between mRNA splicing, mRNA quality control, and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Fasken, Milo B.; Corbett, Anita H.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the impairment of RNA binding proteins that play key roles in the post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression has been linked to numerous neurological diseases. These RNA binding proteins perform critical mRNA processing steps in the nucleus, including splicing, polyadenylation, and export. In many cases, these RNA binding proteins are ubiquitously expressed raising key questions about why only brain function is impaired. Recently, mutations in the ZC3H14 gene, encoding an evolutionarily conserved, polyadenosine RNA binding protein, have been linked to a nonsyndromic form of autosomal recessive intellectual disability. Thus far, research on ZC3H14 and its Nab2 orthologs in budding yeast and Drosophila reveals that ZC3H14/Nab2 is important for mRNA processing and neuronal patterning. Two recent studies now provide evidence that ZC3H14/Nab2 may function in the quality control of mRNA splicing and export and could help to explain the molecular defects that cause neuronal dysfunction and lead to an inherited form of intellectual disability. These studies on ZC3H14/Nab2 reveal new clues to the puzzle of why loss of the ubiquitously expressed ZC3H14 protein specifically affects neurons. PMID:27868086

  17. An electrophoretic study of the thermal- and reductant-dependent aggregation of the 27 kDa component of ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Hyman, M R; Arp, D J

    1993-07-01

    Standard protocols for sample preparation for sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) typically involve the combined use of heat and a reductant to fully disrupt protein-protein interactions and allow for constant ratios of SDS-binding to individual polypeptides. However, 14C-labeled forms of the membrane-bound, active-site-containing 27 kDa polypeptide of ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea undergo an aggregation reaction when cells or membranes are heated in the presence of SDS-PAGE sample buffer. The aggregate produced after heating at 100 degrees C is a soluble complex which fails to enter the stacking gel in discontinuous SDS-PAGE gels. The extent of the aggregation reaction is dependent on the temperature of sample preparation, and the reaction exhibits first-order kinetics at 65 degrees C and 100 degrees C (rates constants = 0.07 and 0.35 min-1, respectively). The rate of the aggregation reaction is further dependent on the concentration of reductant used in the sample buffer. However, the concentration of SDS does not significantly affect the rate of aggregation. The aggregated form of the 27 kDA polypeptide can be isolated by gel-permeation chromatography in the presence of SDS. The aggregated protein can also be returned to the monomeric state by incubation at high pH in the presence of SDS. The aggregation reaction also occurs with 14C2H2-labeled polypeptides in other species of autotrophic nitrifiers and a methanotrophic bacterium which expresses the particulate form of methane monooxygenase. We conclude that strongly hydrophobic amino acid sequences present in ammonia monooxygenase are responsible for the aggregation phenomenon.

  18. Amine oxidases and monooxygenases in the in vivo metabolism of xenobiotic amines in humans: has the involvement of amine oxidases been neglected?

    PubMed

    Strolin Benedetti, Margherita; Tipton, Keith F; Whomsley, Rhys

    2007-10-01

    In this review, the major enzyme systems involved in vivo in the oxidative metabolism of xenobiotic amines in humans are discussed, i.e. the monooxygenases [cytochrome P450 system (CYPs) and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs)] and the amine oxidases (AOs). Concerning the metabolism of xenobiotic amines (drugs in particular) by monoamine oxidases (MAOs), this aspect has been largely neglected in the past. An exception is the extensive investigation carried out on the inhibition of the metabolism of tyramine, when tyramine-containing food is ingested by subjects taking inhibitors of MAO A or of both MAO A and B. Moreover, investigations in humans on the metabolism of drug amines on the market by AOs, such as semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidases (SSAOs) and polyamine oxidases (PAOs), are practically nonexistent, with the exception of amlodipine. In contrast to MAOs, monooxygenases (CYP isoenzymes more than FMOs) have been extensively investigated concerning their involvement in the metabolism of xenobiotics. It is possible that the contribution of AOs to the overall metabolism of xenobiotic amines in humans is underestimated or erroneously estimated, as most investigations of drug metabolism are performed using in vitro test systems optimized for CYP activity, such as liver microsomes, and most investigations of drug metabolism in vivo in humans carry out only the identification of the final, stable metabolites. However, for some drugs on the market, the involvement of MAOs in their in vivo metabolism in humans has been demonstrated recently, among these drugs citalopram, sertraline and the triptans are examples that can be mentioned.

  19. Gene overexpression, purification, and identification of a desulfurization enzyme from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 as a sulfide/sulfoxide monooxygenase.

    PubMed Central

    Lei, B; Tu, S C

    1996-01-01

    The oxidation of dibenzothiophene to dibenzothiophene sulfone has been linked to the enzyme encoded by the sox/dszC gene from Rhodococcus sp. strain IGTS8 (S. A. Denome, C. Oldfield, L. J. Nash, and K. D. Young, J. Bacteriol. 176:6707-6717, 1994; C. S. Piddington, B. R. Kovacevich, and J. Rambosek, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 61:468-475, 1995). However, this enzyme has not been characterized, and the type of its catalytic activity remains unclassified. In this work, the sox/dszC gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, a procedure for the purification of the expressed enzyme was developed, and the properties of and the reactions catalyzed by the purified enzyme were characterized. This enzyme binds one flavin mononucleotide (Kd, 7 micrometers) or reduced flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) (Kd < 10(-8) M) per 90,200-Da homodimer, and FMNH2 is an essential cosubstrate for its activity. Patterns of product formation were examined under different FMNH2 availabilities, and results indicate that this enzyme catalyzes a stepwise conversion of dibenzothiophene to the corresponding sulfoxide and subsequently to the sulfone. On the basis of isotope labeling patterns with H2(18)O and 18O2, dibenzothiophene sulfoxide and sulfone obtained their oxygen atom(s) from molecular oxygen rather than water in their formation from dibenzothiophene. The enzyme also utilizes benzyl sulfide and benzyl sulfoxide as substrates. Hence, it is identified as a sulfide/sulfoxide monooxygenase. This monooxygenase is similar to the microsomal flavin-containing monooxygenase but is unique among microbial flavomonooxygenases in its ability to catalyze two consecutive monooxygenation reactions. PMID:8824615

  20. Evidence for Substrate Pre-organization in the Peptidylglycine α-Amidating Monooxygenase (PAM) Reaction Describing the Contribution of Ground State Structure to Hydrogen Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    McIntyre, Neil R.; Lowe, Edward W.; Belof, Jonathan L.; Ivkovic, Milena; Shafer, Jacob; Space, Brian; Merkler, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) is a bifunctional enzyme which catalyzes the post-translational modification of inactive C-terminal glycine-extended peptide precursors to the corresponding bioactive α-amidated peptide hormone. This conversion involves two sequential reactions both of which are catalyzed by the separate catalytic domains of PAM. The first step, the copper-, ascorbate-, and O2-dependent stereospecific hydroxylation at the α-carbon of the C-terminal glycine, is catalyzed by peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM). The second step, the zinc-dependent dealkylation of the carbinolamide intermediate, is catalyzed by peptidylglycine amidoglycolate lyase. Quantum mechanical tunneling dominates PHM–dependant Cα-H bond activation. This study probes the substrate structure dependence of this chemistry using a set of N-acylglycine substrates of varying hydrophobicity. Primary deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIEs), molecular mechanical docking, alchemical free energy perturbation, and equilibrium molecular dynamics were used to study the role played by ground-state substrate structure on PHM catalysis. Our data show that all N-acylglycines bind sequentially to PHM in an equilibrium-ordered fashion. The primary deuterium KIE displays a linear decrease with respect acyl chain length for straight-chain N-acylglycine substrates. Docking orientation of these substrates displayed increased dissociation energy proportional to hydrophobic pocket interaction. The decrease in KIE with hydrophobicity was attributed to a pre-organization event which decreased reorganization energy by decreasing the conformational sampling associated with ground state substrate binding. This is the first example of pre-organization in the family of non-coupled copper monooxygenases. PMID:21043511

  1. Camphor revisited: involvement of a unique monooxygenase in metabolism of 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid by Pseudomonas putida.

    PubMed Central

    Ougham, H J; Taylor, D G; Trudgill, P W

    1983-01-01

    Previously, Pseudomonas putida was shown to degrade (+)-camphor, and cleavage of the first ring of the bicyclic structure involved two monooxygenases (a hydroxylase and a ring oxygen-inserting enzyme), a dehydrogenase, and spontaneous cleavage of an unstable oxygenation product (lactone). Cleavage of the second ring was not demonstrated but was assumed also to occur by ring oxygen insertion, since the predicted oxygenation product was extracted from whole-cell incubation systems. Our investigation established that metabolism of the first ring cleavage intermediate, 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid, occurred through the sequential action of two inducible enzymes, a coenzyme A ester synthetase and an oxygenase. The oxygenase was purified to homogeneity and had a molecular weight of 106,000. This enzyme carried a single molecule of flavin adenine dinucleotide and consisted of two identical subunits. Iron was not present at a significant level. The oxygenase was specific for NADPH as the electron donor and absolutely specific for the coenzyme A ester of 2-oxo-delta 3-4,5,5-trimethylcyclopentenylacetic acid as the substrate. The reaction stoichiometry was compatible with this enzyme being a monooxygenase, and a mass spectral analysis of the methyl ester of the product confirmed the insertion of a single oxygen atom. The enzyme appeared to be analogous to, although distinct from. 2,5-diketocamphane 1,2-monooxygenase in catalyzing a "biological Baeyer-Villiger" reaction with the formation of a lactone. Structural analogy suggested that this lactone, like the first, was also unstable and susceptible to spontaneous ring opening, although this was not experimentally established. Images PMID:6848481

  2. Recombinant expression of Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase (ToMO) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 in the marine Antarctic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125.

    PubMed

    Siani, Loredana; Papa, Rosanna; Di Donato, Alberto; Sannia, Giovanni

    2006-11-10

    The psychrophilic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas haloplanktis TAC125, isolated from Antarctic seawater, was used as recipient for a biodegradative gene of the mesophilic Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1. tou cluster, coding for Toluene o-Xylene Monooxygenase (ToMO), was successfully cloned and expressed into a "cold expression" vector. Apparent catalytic parameters of the recombinant microorganisms on three different substrates were determined and compared with those exhibited by Escherichia coli recombinant cells expressing ToMO. Production of a catalytically efficient TAC/tou microorganism supports the possibility of developing specific degradative capabilities for the bioremediation of chemically contaminated marine environments and of industrial effluents characterised by low temperatures.

  3. First molecular modeling report on novel arylpyrimidine kynurenine monooxygenase inhibitors through multi-QSAR analysis against Huntington's disease: A proposal to chemists!

    PubMed

    Amin, Sk Abdul; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Jha, Tarun; Gayen, Shovanlal

    2016-12-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by mutation of huntingtin protein (mHtt) leading to neuronal cell death. The mHtt induced toxicity can be rescued by inhibiting the kynurenine monooxygenase (KMO) enzyme. Therefore, KMO is a promising drug target to address the neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's diseases. Fiftysix arylpyrimidine KMO inhibitors are structurally explored through regression and classification based multi-QSAR modeling, pharmacophore mapping and molecular docking approaches. Moreover, ten new compounds are proposed and validated through the modeling that may be effective in accelerating Huntington's disease drug discovery efforts.

  4. Functional Integration of mRNA Translational Control Programs

    PubMed Central

    MacNicol, Melanie C.; Cragle, Chad E.; Arumugam, Karthik; Fosso, Bruno; Pesole, Graziano; MacNicol, Angus M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated mRNA translation plays a key role in control of cell cycle progression in a variety of physiological and pathological processes, including in the self-renewal and survival of stem cells and cancer stem cells. While targeting mRNA translation presents an attractive strategy for control of aberrant cell cycle progression, mRNA translation is an underdeveloped therapeutic target. Regulated mRNAs are typically controlled through interaction with multiple RNA binding proteins (RBPs) but the mechanisms by which the functions of distinct RBPs bound to a common target mRNA are coordinated are poorly understood. The challenge now is to gain insight into these mechanisms of coordination and to identify the molecular mediators that integrate multiple, often conflicting, inputs. A first step includes the identification of altered mRNA ribonucleoprotein complex components that assemble on mRNAs bound by multiple, distinct RBPs compared to those recruited by individual RBPs. This review builds upon our knowledge of combinatorial control of mRNA translation during the maturation of oocytes from Xenopus laevis, to address molecular strategies that may mediate RBP diplomacy and conflict resolution for coordinated control of mRNA translational output. Continued study of regulated ribonucleoprotein complex dynamics promises valuable new insights into mRNA translational control and may suggest novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of disease. PMID:26197342

  5. Genome-Wide Annotation and Comparative Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Basidiomycete Biotrophic Plant Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Qhanya, Lehlohonolo Benedict; Matowane, Godfrey; Chen, Wanping; Sun, Yuxin; Letsimo, Elizabeth Mpholoseng; Parvez, Mohammad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Mashele, Samson Sitheni; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are an exceptional source of diverse and novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), heme-thiolate proteins, with catalytic versatility. Agaricomycotina saprophytes have yielded most of the available information on basidiomycete P450s. This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes. The present study demonstrated the presence of unique P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens that could possibly have originated from the adaptation of these species to different ecological niches (host influence). Systematic analysis of P450s in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens belonging to three different orders, Agaricomycotina (Armillaria mellea), Pucciniomycotina (Melampsora laricis-populina, M. lini, Mixia osmundae and Puccinia graminis) and Ustilaginomycotina (Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum and Tilletiaria anomala), revealed the presence of numerous putative P450s ranging from 267 (A. mellea) to 14 (M. osmundae). Analysis of P450 families revealed the presence of 41 new P450 families and 27 new P450 subfamilies in these biotrophic plant pathogens. Order-level comparison of P450 families between biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 family patterns in these organisms, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order. Further comparison of P450 families with basidiomycete non-pathogens confirmed that biotrophic plant pathogens harbour the unique P450 families in their genomes. The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. The present study revealed that expansion of these P450 families is due to paralogous evolution of member P450s. The presence of unique P450 families in these organisms serves as evidence of how a host

  6. Diversity of flavin-binding monooxygenase genes (almA) in marine bacteria capable of degradation long-chain alkanes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanpeng; Shao, Zongze

    2012-06-01

    Many bacteria have been reported as degraders of long-chain (LC) n-alkanes, but the mechanism is poorly understood. Flavin-binding monooxygenase (AlmA) was recently found to be involved in LC-alkane degradation in bacteria of the Acinetobacter and Alcanivorax genera. However, the diversity of this gene and the role it plays in other bacteria remains unclear. In this study, we surveyed the diversity of almA in marine bacteria and in bacteria found in oil-enrichment communities. To identify the presence of this gene, a pair of degenerate PCR primers were was designed based on conserved motifs of the almA gene sequences in public databases. Using this approach, we identified diverse almA genes in the hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria and in bacterial communities from the surface seawater of the Xiamen coastal area, the South China Sea, the Indian Ocean, and the Atlantic Ocean. As a result, almA was positively detected in 35 isolates belonging to four genera, and a total of 39 different almA sequences were obtained. Five isolates were confirmed to harbor two to three almA genes. From the Xiamen coastal area and the Atlantic Ocean oil-enrichment communities, a total of 60 different almA sequences were obtained. These sequences mainly formed two clusters in the phylogenetic tree, named Class I and Class II, and these shared 45-56% identity at the amino acid level. Class I contained 11 sequences from bacteria represented by the Salinisphaera and Parvibaculum genera. Class II was larger and more diverse, and it was composed of 88 sequences from Proteobacteria, Gram-negative bacteria, and the enriched bacterial communities. These communities were represented by the Alcanivorax and Marinobacter genera, which are the two most popular genera hosting the almA gene. AlmA was also detected across a wide geographical range, as determined by the origin of the bacterial host. Our results demonstrate the diversity of almA and confirm its high rate of occurrence in hydrocarbon

  7. Stopped-Flow Studies of the Reduction of the Copper Centers Suggest a Bifurcated Electron Transfer Pathway in Peptidylglycine Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Shefali; Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Lu, Yi; Blackburn, Ninian J

    2016-04-05

    Peptidylglycine monooxygenase (PHM) is a dicopper enzyme that plays a vital role in the amidation of glycine-extended pro-peptides. One of the crucial aspects of its chemistry is the transfer of two electrons from an electron-storing and -transferring site (CuH) to the oxygen binding site and catalytic center (CuM) over a distance of 11 Å during one catalytic turnover event. Here we present our studies of the first electron transfer (ET) step (reductive phase) in wild-type (WT) PHM as well as its variants. Stopped flow was used to record the reduction kinetic traces using the chromophoric agent N,N-dimethyl-p-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (DMPD) as the reductant. The reduction was found to be biphasic in the WT PHM with an initial fast phase (17.2 s(-1)) followed by a much slower phase (0.46 s(-1)). We were able to ascribe the fast and slow phase to the CuH and CuM sites, respectively, by making use of the H242A and H107AH108A mutants that contain only the CuH site and CuM site, respectively. In the absence of substrate, the redox potentials determined by cyclic voltammetry were 270 mV (CuH site) and -15 mV (CuM site), but binding of substrate (Ac-YVG) was found to alter both potentials so that they converged to a common value of 83 mV. Substrate binding also accelerated the slow reductive phase by ~10-fold, an effect that could be explained at least partially by the equalization of the reduction potential of the copper centers. Studies of H108A showed that the ET to the CuM site is blocked, highlighting the role of the H108 ligand as a component of the reductive ET pathway. Strikingly, the rate of reduction of the H172A variant was unaffected despite the rate of catalysis being 3 orders of magnitude slower than that of the WT PHM. These studies strongly indicate that the reductive phase and catalytic phase ET pathways are different and suggest a bifurcated ET pathway in PHM. We propose that H172 and Y79 form part of an alternate pathway for the catalytic phase

  8. The HHM Motif at the CuH-site of Peptidylglycine Monooxygenase is a pH-Dependent Conformational Switch†

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Chelsey D.; Mayfield, Mary; Blackburn, Ninian J.

    2013-01-01

    Peptidylglycine monooxygenase is a copper-containing enzyme which catalyzes the amidation of neuropeptide hormones, the first step of which is the conversion of a glycine-extended pro-peptide to its α-hydroxyglcine intermediate. The enzyme contains two mononuclear Cu centers termed CuM (ligated to imidazole nitrogens of H242, H244 and the thioether S of M314) and CuH (ligated to imidazole nitrogens of H107, H108 and H172) with a Cu-Cu separation of 11 Å. During catalysis, the M site binds oxygen and substrate and the H site donates the second electron required for hydroxylation. The WT enzyme shows maximum catalytic activity at pH 5.8, and undergoes loss of activity at lower pHs due to a protonation event with a pKA of 4.6. Low pH also causes a unique structural transition in which a new S ligand coordinates to copper with an identical pKA, manifest by a large increase in Cu-S intensity in the XAS. In previous work (Bauman, A. T., Broers, B. A., Kline, C. D., and Blackburn, N. J. (2011) Biochemistry 50, 10819–10828) we tentitively assigned the new Cu-S interaction to binding of M109 to the H-site (part of an HHM conserved motif common to all but one member of the family). Here we follow up on these findings via studies on the catalytic activity, pH-activity profiles, and spectroscopic (EPR, XAS and FTIR) properties of a number of H-site variants, including H107A, H108A, H172A and M109I. Our results establish that M109 is indeed the coordinating ligand, and confirm the prediction that the low pH structural transition with associated loss of activity is abrogated when the M109 thioether is absent. The histidine mutants show more complex behavior, but the almost complete lack of activity in all three variants coupled with only minor differences in their spectroscopic properties suggests that unique structural elements at H are critical for functionality. The data suggest a more general utility for the HHM motif as a copper- and pH-dependent conformational switch

  9. The lumenal loop M672-P707 of the Menkes protein (ATP7A) transfers copper to peptidylglycine monooxygenase

    SciTech Connect

    Otoikhian, Adenike; Barry, Amanda N.; Mayfield, Mary; Nilges, Mark; Huang, Yiping; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Blackburn, Ninian

    2012-05-14

    Copper transfer to cuproproteins located in vesicular compartments of the secretory pathway depends on activity of the copper translocating ATPase (ATP7A or ATP7B) but the mechanism of transfer is largely unexplored. Copper-ATPase ATP7A is unique in having a sequence rich in histidine and methionine residues located on the lumenal side of the membrane. The corresponding fragment binds Cu(I) when expressed as a chimera with a scaffold protein, and mutations or deletions of His and/or Met residues in its sequence inhibit dephosphorylation of the ATPase, a catalytic step associated with copper release. Here we present evidence for a potential role of this lumenal region of ATP7A in copper transfer to cuproenzymes. Both Cu(II) and Cu(I) forms were investigated since the form in which copper is transferred to acceptor proteins is currently unknown. Analysis of Cu(II) using EPR demonstrated that at Cu:P ratios below 1:1, 15N-substituted protein had Cu(II) bound by 4 His residues, but this coordination changed as the Cu(II) to protein ratio increased towards 2:1. XAS confirmed this coordination via analysis of the intensity of outer-shell scattering from imidazole residues. The Cu(II) complexes could be reduced to their Cu(I) counterparts by ascorbate, but here again, as shown by EXAFS and XANES spectroscopy, the coordination was dependent on copper loading. At low copper Cu(I) was bound by a mixed ligand set of His + Met while at higher ratios His coordination predominated. The copper-loaded loop was able to transfer either Cu(II) or Cu(I) to peptidylglycine monooxygenase in the presence of chelating resin, generating catalytically active enzyme in a process that appeared to involve direct interaction between the two partners. The variation of coordination with copper loading suggests copper-dependent conformational change which in turn could act as a signal for regulating copper release by the ATPase pump.

  10. Systematic Identification and Evolutionary Analysis of Catalytically Versatile Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Families Enriched in Model Basidiomycete Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Shale, Karabo; Pagadala, Nataraj Sekhar; Tuszynski, Jack

    2014-01-01

    Genome sequencing of basidiomycetes, a group of fungi capable of degrading/mineralizing plant material, revealed the presence of numerous cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) in their genomes, with some exceptions. Considering the large repertoire of P450s found in fungi, it is difficult to identify P450s that play an important role in fungal metabolism and the adaptation of fungi to diverse ecological niches. In this study, we followed Sir Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection to identify such P450s in model basidiomycete fungi showing a preference for different types of plant components degradation. Any P450 family comprising a large number of member P450s compared to other P450 families indicates its natural selection over other P450 families by its important role in fungal physiology. Genome-wide comparative P450 analysis in the basidiomycete species, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Phanerochaete carnosa, Agaricus bisporus, Postia placenta, Ganoderma sp. and Serpula lacrymans, revealed enrichment of 11 P450 families (out of 68 P450 families), CYP63, CYP512, CYP5035, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5141, CYP5144, CYP5146, CYP5150, CYP5348 and CYP5359. Phylogenetic analysis of the P450 family showed species-specific alignment of P450s across the P450 families with the exception of P450s of Phanerochaete chrysosporium and Phanerochaete carnosa, suggesting paralogous evolution of P450s in model basidiomycetes. P450 gene-structure analysis revealed high conservation in the size of exons and the location of introns. P450s with the same gene structure were found tandemly arranged in the genomes of selected fungi. This clearly suggests that extensive gene duplications, particularly tandem gene duplications, led to the enrichment of selective P450 families in basidiomycetes. Functional analysis and gene expression profiling data suggest that members of the P450 families are catalytically versatile and possibly involved in fungal colonization of plant material. To our

  11. Genome-Wide Annotation and Comparative Analysis of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Basidiomycete Biotrophic Plant Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yuxin; Letsimo, Elizabeth Mpholoseng; Parvez, Mohammad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Mashele, Samson Sitheni; Syed, Khajamohiddin

    2015-01-01

    Fungi are an exceptional source of diverse and novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s), heme-thiolate proteins, with catalytic versatility. Agaricomycotina saprophytes have yielded most of the available information on basidiomycete P450s. This resulted in observing similar P450 family types in basidiomycetes with few differences in P450 families among Agaricomycotina saprophytes. The present study demonstrated the presence of unique P450 family patterns in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens that could possibly have originated from the adaptation of these species to different ecological niches (host influence). Systematic analysis of P450s in basidiomycete biotrophic plant pathogens belonging to three different orders, Agaricomycotina (Armillaria mellea), Pucciniomycotina (Melampsora laricis-populina, M. lini, Mixia osmundae and Puccinia graminis) and Ustilaginomycotina (Ustilago maydis, Sporisorium reilianum and Tilletiaria anomala), revealed the presence of numerous putative P450s ranging from 267 (A. mellea) to 14 (M. osmundae). Analysis of P450 families revealed the presence of 41 new P450 families and 27 new P450 subfamilies in these biotrophic plant pathogens. Order-level comparison of P450 families between biotrophic plant pathogens revealed the presence of unique P450 family patterns in these organisms, possibly reflecting the characteristics of their order. Further comparison of P450 families with basidiomycete non-pathogens confirmed that biotrophic plant pathogens harbour the unique P450 families in their genomes. The CYP63, CYP5037, CYP5136, CYP5137 and CYP5341 P450 families were expanded in A. mellea when compared to other Agaricomycotina saprophytes and the CYP5221 and CYP5233 P450 families in P. graminis and M. laricis-populina. The present study revealed that expansion of these P450 families is due to paralogous evolution of member P450s. The presence of unique P450 families in these organisms serves as evidence of how a host

  12. Probing dimensionality beyond the linear sequence of mRNA.

    PubMed

    Del Campo, Cristian; Ignatova, Zoya

    2016-05-01

    mRNA is a nexus entity between DNA and translating ribosomes. Recent developments in deep sequencing technologies coupled with structural probing have revealed new insights beyond the classic role of mRNA and place it more centrally as a direct effector of a variety of processes, including translation, cellular localization, and mRNA degradation. Here, we highlight emerging approaches to probe mRNA secondary structure on a global transcriptome-wide level and compare their potential and resolution. Combined approaches deliver a richer and more complex picture. While our understanding on the effect of secondary structure for various cellular processes is quite advanced, the next challenge is to unravel more complex mRNA architectures and tertiary interactions.

  13. Strong and weak plasma response to dietary carotenoids identified by cluster analysis and linked to beta-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1 single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Thomas T Y; Edwards, Alison J; Clevidence, Beverly A

    2013-08-01

    The mechanisms as well the genetics underlying the bioavailability and metabolism of carotenoids in humans remain unclear. To begin to address these questions, we used cluster analysis to examine individual temporal responses of plasma carotenoids from a controlled-diet study of subjects who consumed carotenoid-rich beverages. Treatments, given daily for 3 weeks, were watermelon juice at two levels (20-mg lycopene, 2.5-mg β-carotene, n=23 and 40-mg lycopene, 5-mg β-carotene, n=12) and tomato juice (18-mg lycopene, 0.6-mg β-carotene, n=10). Cluster analysis revealed distinct groups of subjects differing in the temporal response of plasma carotenoids and provided the basis for classifying subjects as strong responders or weak responders for β-carotene, lycopene, phytoene and phytofluene. Individuals who were strong or weak responders for one carotenoid were not necessarily strong or weak responders for another carotenoid. Furthermore, individual responsiveness was associated with genetic variants of the carotenoid metabolizing enzyme β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1. These results support the concept that individuals absorb or metabolize carotenoids differently across time and suggest that bioavailability of carotenoids may involve specific genetic variants of β-carotene 15,15'-monooxygenase 1.

  14. Discrimination of the prochiral hydrogens at the C-2 position of n-alkanes by the methane/ammonia monooxygenase family proteins.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Akimitsu; Miyoshi, Teppei; Motokura, Ken; Baba, Toshihide

    2015-08-14

    The selectivity of ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea (AMO-Ne) for the oxidation of C4-C8n-alkanes to the corresponding alcohol isomers was examined to show the ability of AMO-Ne to recognize the n-alkane orientation within the catalytic site. AMO-Ne in whole cells produces 1- and 2-alcohols from C4-C8n-alkanes, and the regioselectivity is dependent on the length of the carbon chain. 2-Alcohols produced from C4-C7n-alkanes were predominantly either the R- or S-enantiomers, while 2-octanol produced from n-octane was racemic. These results indicate that AMO-Ne can discriminate between the prochiral hydrogens at the C-2 position, with the degree of discrimination varying according to the n-alkane. Compared to the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and that of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, AMO-Ne showed a distinct ability to discriminate between the orientation of n-butane and n-pentane in the catalytic site.

  15. The purification, crystallization and preliminary structural characterization of FAD-dependent monooxygenase PhzS, a phenazine-modifying enzyme from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Gohain, Neelakshi; Thomashow, Linda S.; Mavrodi, Dmitri V.; Blankenfeldt, Wulf

    2006-10-01

    PhzS, an FAD-dependent monooxygenase that catalyzes a reaction involved in the biosynthesis of the virulence factor pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa, was cloned, overexpressed and crystallized. Data collection from native and seleno-l-methionine-labelled crystals is reported. The blue chloroform-soluble bacterial metabolite pyocyanin (1-hydroxy-5-methyl-phenazine) contributes to the survival and virulence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen of humans and animals. Little is known about the two enzymes, designated PhzM and PhzS, that function in the synthesis of pyocyanin from phenazine-1-carboxylic acid. In this study, the FAD-dependent monooxygenase PhzS was purified and crystallized from lithium sulfate/ammonium sulfate/sodium citrate pH 5.5. Native crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 144.2, b = 96.2, c = 71.7 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 110.5°. They contain two monomers of PhzS in the asymmetric unit and diffract to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Seleno-l-methionine-labelled PhzS also crystallizes in space group C2, but the unit-cell parameters change to a = 70.6, b = 76.2, c = 80.2 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 110.5° and the diffraction limit is 2.7 Å.

  16. In vitro conversion of ß-carotene to retinal in bovine rumen fluid by a recombinant ß-carotene- 15, 15'-monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    García-López, Esperanza; González-Gallardo, Adriana; Antaramián, Anaid; González-Dávalos, María Laura; Shimada, Armando; Varela-Echavarria, Alfredo; Mora, Ofelia

    2012-04-01

    Pasture-fed cattle yield carcasses with yellow fat; consumers often reject the resulting meat products because they assume they come from old and/or culled animals. Recombinant bacteria expressing beta-carotene 15, 15'-monooxygenase, introduced into the rumen of the animal, might help to reduce the coloration since this enzyme converts carotene to retinal, thereby eliminating the source of yellowness. The goal of this work was to evaluate the effect of a recombinant beta-carotene 15, 15'-monooxygenase (BCMO1) from Gallus gallus, expressed in Escherichia coli. The genetically modified microbe was introduced into ruminal fluid, and carotene conversion to retinal was measured. Under optimum conditions the enzyme produced 6.8 nmol of retinal per 1 mg of protein in 1 hour at 37 °C. The data on in vitro digestibility in ruminal fluid showed no differences in beta-carotene breakdown or in retinal production (p > 0.1) between E. coli with pBAD vector alone and E. coli with pBAD/BCMO1. The pBAD/BCMO1 plasmid was stable in E. coli for 750 generations. These results indicate that the protein did not break beta-carotene into retinal in ruminal fluid, perhaps due to its location in the periplasmic space in E. coli. Future research must consider strategies to release the enzyme into the rumen environment.

  17. Effects of Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) on different fish species: liver cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase activities and FTIR spectra.

    PubMed

    Henczová, Mária; Deér, Aranka Kiss; Filla, Adrienn; Komlósi, Viktória; Mink, János

    2008-07-01

    The effects of Cu(2+)-sulfate and Pb(2+)-acetate on carp (Cyprinus carpio L.), silver carp (Hypopthalmichtys molitrix V.) and wels (Silurus glanis L.) were studied. The liver microsomal Cyt P450 content, the EROD, ECOD and APND monooxygenase activities were measured. In vivo treatment with 1 mg L(-1) Cu(2+) significantly elevated the activities of these enzymes and Cyt P450 content in silver carp livers. The high-dose Cu(2+) treatment (10 mg L(-1)) on silver carp caused two-fold higher induction in the P450 dependent monooxygenase isoensymes than in wels. Although the 2 mg kg(-1) treatment with Pb(2+) in carp elevated significantly the P450 content, the EROD isoenzyme activities were significantly decreased after 1 day, showing the destructive effect of metal ion on the enzyme system. In vitro, Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) decreased the Cyt P450 content in the carp liver microsomes and the absorption peak shifted to higher wavelength. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to detect the damaging effects of the heavy metals. According to the inhibitory potency to Cu(2+), the most sensitive isoenzyme was the EROD in wels, the least was the silver carp's isoenzyme. The investigated fish P450 isoenzymes showed, that the Cu(2+) was a stronger inhibitor than Pb(2+).

  18. The soluble methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Its ability to oxygenate n-alkanes, n-alkenes, ethers, and alicyclic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Colby, J; Stirling, D I; Dalton, H

    1977-08-01

    1. Methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) catalyses the oxidation of various substituted methane derivatives including methanol. 2. It is a very non-specific oxygenase and, in some of its catalytic properties, apparently resembles the analogous enzyme from Methylomonas methanica but differs from those found in Methylosinus trichosporium and Methylomonas albus. 3. CO is oxidized to CO2. 4. C1-C8 n-alkanes are hydroxylated, yielding mixtures of the corresponding 1- and 2-alcohols; no 3- or 4-alcohols are formed. 5. Terminal alkenes yield the corresponding 1,2-epoxides. cis- or trans-but-2-ene are each oxidized to a mixture of 2,3-epoxybutane and but-2-en-1-ol with retention of the cis or trans configuration in both products; 2-butanone is also formed from cis-but-2-ene only. 6. Dimethyl ether is oxidized. Diethyl ether undergoes sub-terminal oxidation, yielding ethanol and ethanal in equimolar amounts. 7. Methane mono-oxygenase also hydroxylates cyclic alkanes and aromatic compounds. However, styrene yields only styrene epoxide and pyridine yields only pyridine N-oxide. 8. Of those compounds tested, only NADPH can replace NADH as electron donor.

  19. The soluble methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath). Its ability to oxygenate n-alkanes, n-alkenes, ethers, and alicyclic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Colby, J; Stirling, D I; Dalton, H

    1977-01-01

    1. Methane mono-oxygenase of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) catalyses the oxidation of various substituted methane derivatives including methanol. 2. It is a very non-specific oxygenase and, in some of its catalytic properties, apparently resembles the analogous enzyme from Methylomonas methanica but differs from those found in Methylosinus trichosporium and Methylomonas albus. 3. CO is oxidized to CO2. 4. C1-C8 n-alkanes are hydroxylated, yielding mixtures of the corresponding 1- and 2-alcohols; no 3- or 4-alcohols are formed. 5. Terminal alkenes yield the corresponding 1,2-epoxides. cis- or trans-but-2-ene are each oxidized to a mixture of 2,3-epoxybutane and but-2-en-1-ol with retention of the cis or trans configuration in both products; 2-butanone is also formed from cis-but-2-ene only. 6. Dimethyl ether is oxidized. Diethyl ether undergoes sub-terminal oxidation, yielding ethanol and ethanal in equimolar amounts. 7. Methane mono-oxygenase also hydroxylates cyclic alkanes and aromatic compounds. However, styrene yields only styrene epoxide and pyridine yields only pyridine N-oxide. 8. Of those compounds tested, only NADPH can replace NADH as electron donor. PMID:411486

  20. Dual role of the carboxyl-terminal region of pig liver L-kynurenine 3-monooxygenase: mitochondrial-targeting signal and enzymatic activity.

    PubMed

    Hirai, Kumiko; Kuroyanagi, Hidehito; Tatebayashi, Yoshitaka; Hayashi, Yoshitaka; Hirabayashi-Takahashi, Kanako; Saito, Kuniaki; Haga, Seiich; Uemura, Tomihiko; Izumi, Susumu

    2010-12-01

    l-kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO) is an NAD(P)H-dependent flavin monooxygenase that catalyses the hydroxylation of l-kynurenine to 3-hydroxykynurenine, and is localized as an oligomer in the mitochondrial outer membrane. In the human brain, KMO may play an important role in the formation of two neurotoxins, 3-hydroxykynurenine and quinolinic acid, both of which provoke severe neurodegenerative diseases. In mosquitos, it plays a role in the formation both of eye pigment and of an exflagellation-inducing factor (xanthurenic acid). Here, we present evidence that the C-terminal region of pig liver KMO plays a dual role. First, it is required for the enzymatic activity. Second, it functions as a mitochondrial targeting signal as seen in monoamine oxidase B (MAO B) or outer membrane cytochrome b(5). The first role was shown by the comparison of the enzymatic activity of two mutants (C-terminally FLAG-tagged KMO and carboxyl-terminal truncation form, KMOΔC50) with that of the wild-type enzyme expressed in COS-7 cells. The second role was demonstrated with fluorescence microscopy by the comparison of the intracellular localization of the wild-type, three carboxyl-terminal truncated forms (ΔC20, ΔC30 and ΔC50), C-terminally FLAG-tagged wild-type and a mutant KMO, where two arginine residues, Arg461-Arg462, were replaced with Ser residues.

  1. Purification and characterization of a Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14 involved in three different monocyclic monoterpene degradation pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Werf, M J

    2000-01-01

    A Baeyer-Villiger mono-oxygenase (BVMO), catalysing the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent oxidation of the monocyclic monoterpene ketones 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone, was purified to homogeneity from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14. Monocyclic monoterpene ketone mono-oxygenase (MMKMO) is a monomeric enzyme of molecular mass 60 kDa. It contains 1 mol of FAD/monomer as the prosthetic group. The N-terminal amino acid sequence showed homology with many other NADPH-dependent and FAD-containing (Type 1) BVMOs. Maximal enzyme activity was measured at pH 9 and 35 degrees C. MMKMO has a broad substrate specificity, catalysing the lactonization of a large number of monocyclic monoterpene ketones and substituted cyclohexanones. The natural substrates 1-hydroxy-2-oxolimonene, dihydrocarvone and menthone were converted stoichiometrically into 3-isopropenyl-6-oxoheptanoate (the spontaneous rearrangement product of the lactone formed by MMKMO), 4-isopropenyl-7-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone and 7-isopropyl-4-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone respectively. The MMKMO-catalysed conversion of iso-dihydrocarvone showed an opposite regioselectivity to that of dihydrocarvone; in this case, 6-isopropenyl-3-methyl-2-oxo-oxepanone was formed as the product. MMKMO converted all enantiomers of the natural substrates with almost equal efficiency. MMKMO is involved in the conversion of the monocyclic monoterpene ketone intermediates formed in the degradation pathways of all stereoisomers of three different monocyclic monoterpenes, i.e. limonene, (dihydro)carveol and menthol. PMID:10769172

  2. Identification of novel toluene monooxygenase genes in a hydrocarbon-polluted sediment using sequence- and function-based screening of metagenomic libraries.

    PubMed

    Bouhajja, E; McGuire, M; Liles, M R; Bataille, G; Agathos, S N; George, I F

    2017-01-01

    The microbial potential for toluene degradation within sediments from a tar oil-contaminated site in Flingern, Germany, was assessed using a metagenomic approach. High molecular weight environmental DNA from contaminated sediments was extracted, purified, and cloned into fosmid and BAC vectors and transformed into Escherichia coli. The fosmid library was screened by hybridization with a PCR amplicon of the α-subunit of the toluene 4-monooxygenase gene to identify genes and pathways encoding toluene degradation. Fourteen clones were recovered from the fosmid library, among which 13 were highly divergent from known tmoA genes and several had the closest relatives among Acinetobacter species. The BAC library was transferred to the heterologous hosts Cupriavidus metallidurans (phylum Proteobacteria) and Edaphobacter aggregans (phylum Acidobacteria). The resulting libraries were screened for expression of toluene degradation in the non-degradative hosts. From expression in C. metallidurans, three novel toluene monooxygenase-encoding operons were identified that were located on IncP1 plasmids. The E. aggregans-hosted BAC library led to the isolation of a cloned genetic locus putatively derived from an Acidobacteria taxon that contained genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation. These data suggest the important role of plasmids in the spread of toluene degradative capacity and indicate putative novel tmoA genes present in this hydrocarbon-polluted environment.

  3. Effects of DNA replication on mRNA noise.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Joseph R; Cole, John A; Fei, Jingyi; Ha, Taekjip; Luthey-Schulten, Zaida A

    2015-12-29

    There are several sources of fluctuations in gene expression. Here we study the effects of time-dependent DNA replication, itself a tightly controlled process, on noise in mRNA levels. Stochastic simulations of constitutive and regulated gene expression are used to analyze the time-averaged mean and variation in each case. The simulations demonstrate that to capture mRNA distributions correctly, chromosome replication must be realistically modeled. Slow relaxation of mRNA from the low copy number steady state before gene replication to the high steady state after replication is set by the transcript's half-life and contributes significantly to the shape of the mRNA distribution. Consequently both the intrinsic kinetics and the gene location play an important role in accounting for the mRNA average and variance. Exact analytic expressions for moments of the mRNA distributions that depend on the DNA copy number, gene location, cell doubling time, and the rates of transcription and degradation are derived for the case of constitutive expression and subsequently extended to provide approximate corrections for regulated expression and RNA polymerase variability. Comparisons of the simulated models and analytical expressions to experimentally measured mRNA distributions show that they better capture the physics of the system than previous theories.

  4. Linking gene regulation to mRNA production and export.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Susana; Hurt, Ed

    2011-06-01

    Regulation of gene expression can occur at many different levels. One important step in the gene expression process is the transport of mRNA from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. In recent years, studies have described how nuclear mRNA export depends on the steps preceding and following transport through nuclear pore complexes. These include gene activation, transcription, mRNA processing and mRNP assembly and disassembly. In this review, we summarise recent insights into the links between these steps in the gene expression cascade.

  5. Does the detoxification of penicillin side-chain precursors depend on microsomal monooxygenase and glutathione S-transferase in Penicillium chrysogenum?

    PubMed

    Emri, Tamás; Oláh, Brigitta; Sámi, László; Pócsi, István

    2003-01-01

    The glutathione (GSH) S-conjugation of 1,2-epoxy-3-(4'-nitrophenoxy)propane was catalysed predominantly by microsomal glutathione S-transferase (mGST) in Penicillium chrysogenum. The specific mGST activity unlike the cytosolic GST (cGST) activity increased substantially when the penicillin side-chain precursor phenoxyacetic acid (POA) was included in the culture medium. Therefore, a microsomal monooxygenase (causing possible release of epoxide intermediates) and mGST-dependent detoxification pathway may exist for the side-chain precursors as an alternative to microsomal activation to acyl-CoA and subsequent transfer to beta-lactam molecules. The P. chrysogenum pahA and Aspergillus nidulans phacA gene products, which are cytochrome p450 monooxygenases and are able to hydroxylate phenylacetic acid (PA) at position 2 on the aromatic ring, are unlikely to release toxic epoxide intermediates but epoxidation of PA and POA due to the action of other microsomal monooxygenases cannot be excluded. The GSH-dependent detoxification of POA was provoked by a well-controlled transient lowering of pH (down to 5.0) at the beginning of the production phase in a fed-batch fermentation system. Both the specific GST and gammaGT activities were increased but the intracellular GSH concentrations remained unaltered unless the pH of the feed was transiently lowered below 5.0. At pH 4.6, the GSH pool was depleted rapidly but no antibiotic production was observed. Although sucrose was taken up effectively by the cells, cell death and autolysis were progressing. Therefore, the industrial exploitation of the GSH-dependent detoxification of penicillin side-chain precursors to reduce intracellular GSH-levels in order to avoid the GSH inhibition of the beta-lactam biosynthetic enzymes seems to be rather unlikely. P. chrysogenum mGST and cGST were separated using GSH-Sepharose 6B affinity chromatography. The purified cGST possessed a homodimer (alpha(2)) tertiary structure with M(r) (, alpha

  6. Translation initiation of the HIV-1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Ohlmann, Théophile; Mengardi, Chloé; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Translation initiation of the full-length mRNA of the human immunodeficiency virus can occur via several different mechanisms to maintain production of viral structural proteins throughout the replication cycle. HIV-1 viral protein synthesis can occur by the use of both a cap-dependant and IRES-driven mechanism depending on the physiological conditions of the cell and the status of the ongoing infection. For both of these mechanisms there is a need for several viral and cellular co-factors for optimal translation of the viral mRNA. In this review we will describe the mechanism used by the full-length mRNA to initiate translation highlighting the role of co-factors within this process. A particular emphasis will be given to the role of the DDX3 RNA helicase in HIV-1 mRNA translation initiation. PMID:26779410

  7. Translation initiation of the HIV-1 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Ohlmann, Théophile; Mengardi, Chloé; López-Lastra, Marcelo

    2014-09-01

    Translation initiation of the full-length mRNA of the human immunodeficiency virus can occur via several different mechanisms to maintain production of viral structural proteins throughout the replication cycle. HIV-1 viral protein synthesis can occur by the use of both a cap-dependant and IRES-driven mechanism depending on the physiological conditions of the cell and the status of the ongoing infection. For both of these mechanisms there is a need for several viral and cellular co-factors for optimal translation of the viral mRNA. In this review we will describe the mechanism used by the full-length mRNA to initiate translation highlighting the role of co-factors within this process. A particular emphasis will be given to the role of the DDX3 RNA helicase in HIV-1 mRNA translation initiation.

  8. Signaling Pathways That Control mRNA Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Roopa; Denmon, Andria P.

    2013-01-01

    Cells regulate their genomes mainly at the level of transcription and at the level of mRNA decay. While regulation at the level of transcription is clearly important, the regulation of mRNA turnover by signaling networks is essential for a rapid response to external stimuli. Signaling pathways result in posttranslational modification of RNA binding proteins by phosphorylation, ubiquitination, methylation, acetylation etc. These modifications are important for rapid remodeling of dynamic ribonucleoprotein complexes and triggering mRNA decay. Understanding how these posttranslational modifications alter gene expression is therefore a fundamental question in biology. In this review we highlight recent findings on how signaling pathways and cell cycle checkpoints involving phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and arginine methylation affect mRNA turnover. PMID:23602935

  9. Multiple crosstalks between mRNA biogenesis and SUMO.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Jérôme O; Geoffroy, Marie-Claude; Palancade, Benoit

    2013-10-01

    mRNA metabolism involves the orchestration of multiple nuclear events, including transcription, processing (e.g., capping, splicing, polyadenylation), and quality control. This leads to the accurate formation of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) that are finally exported to the cytoplasm for translation. The production of defined sets of mRNAs in given environmental or physiological situations relies on multiple regulatory mechanisms that target the mRNA biogenesis machineries. Among other regulations, post-translational modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO, whose prominence in several cellular processes has been largely demonstrated, also plays a key role in mRNA biogenesis. Analysis of the multiple available SUMO proteomes and functional validations of an increasing number of sumoylated targets have revealed the key contribution of SUMO-dependent regulation in nuclear mRNA metabolism. While sumoylation of transcriptional activators and repressors is so far best documented, SUMO contribution to other stages of mRNA biogenesis is also emerging. Modification of mRNA metabolism factors by SUMO determine their subnuclear targeting and biological activity, notably by regulating their molecular interactions with nucleic acids or protein partners. In particular, sumoylation of DNA-bound transcriptional regulators interfere with their association to target sequences or chromatin modifiers. In addition, the recent identification of enzymes of the SUMO pathway within specialized mRNA biogenesis machineries may provide a further level of regulation to their specificity. These multiple crosstalks between mRNA metabolism and SUMO appear therefore as important players in cellular regulatory networks.

  10. Model of ribosome translation and mRNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2013-05-01

    A ribosome is an enzyme that catalyzes translation of the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. Besides translation through the single-stranded mRNA, the ribosome is also able to translate through the duplex region of mRNA via unwinding the duplex. Here, based on our proposed ribosome translation model, we study analytically the dynamics of Escherichia coli ribosome translation through the duplex region of mRNA, and compare with the available single molecule experimental data. It is shown that the ribosome uses only one active mechanism (mechanical unwinding), rather than two active mechanisms (open-state stabilization and mechanical unwinding), as proposed before, to unwind the duplex. The reduced rate of translation through the duplex region is due to the occurrence of futile transitions, which are induced by the energy barrier from the duplex unwinding to the forward translocation along the single-stranded mRNA. Moreover, we also present predicted results of the average translation rate versus the external force acting on the ribosome translating through the duplex region and through the single-stranded region of mRNA, which can be easily tested by future experiments.

  11. Structural and functional characterization of a small chitin-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase domain of a multi-modular chitinase from Jonesia denitrificans.

    PubMed

    Mekasha, Sophanit; Forsberg, Zarah; Dalhus, Bjørn; Bacik, John-Paul; Choudhary, Swati; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Eijsink, Vincent G H

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) boost enzymatic depolymerization of recalcitrant polysaccharides, such as chitin and cellulose. We have studied a chitin-active LPMO domain (JdLPMO10A) that is considerably smaller (15.5 kDa) than all structurally characterized LPMOs so far and that is part of a modular protein containing a GH18 chitinase. The 1.55 Å resolution structure revealed deletions of interacting loops that protrude from the core β-sandwich scaffold in larger LPMO10s. Despite these deletions, the enzyme is active on alpha- and beta-chitin, and the chitin-binding surface previously described for larger LPMOs is fully conserved. JdLPMO10A may represent a minimal scaffold needed to catalyse the powerful LPMO reaction.

  12. Toluene-4-monooxygenase, a three-component enzyme system that catalyzes the oxidation of toluene to p-cresol in Pseudomonas mendocina KR1.

    PubMed Central

    Whited, G M; Gibson, D T

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas mendocina KR1 grows on toluene as a sole carbon and energy source. A multicomponent oxygenase was partially purified from toluene-grown cells and separated into three protein components. The reconstituted enzyme system, in the presence of NADH and Fe2+, oxidized toluene to p-cresol as the first detectable product. Experiments with p-deutero-toluene led to the isolation of p-cresol which retained 68% of the deuterium initially present in the parent molecule. When the reconstituted enzyme system was incubated with toluene in the presence of 18O2, the oxygen in p-cresol was shown to be derived from molecular oxygen. The results demonstrate that P. mendocina KR1 initiates degradation of toluene by a multicomponent enzyme system which has been designated toluene-4-monooxygenase. PMID:2019563

  13. Unliganded and substrate bound structures of the cellooligosaccharide active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase LsAA9A at low pH.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Kristian E H; Poulsen, Jens-Christian N; Tandrup, Tobias; Lo Leggio, Leila

    2017-03-24

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) have been found to be key components in microbial (bacterial and fungal) degradation of biomass. They are copper metalloenzymes that degrade polysaccharides oxidatively and act in synergy with glycoside hydrolases. Recently crystallographic studies carried out at pH 5.5 of the LPMO from Lentinus similis belonging to the fungal LPMO family AA9 have provided the first atomic resolution view of substrate-LPMO interactions. The LsAA9A structure presented here determined at pH 3.5 shows significant disorder of the active site in the absence of substrate ligand. Furthermore some differences are also observed in regards to substrate (cellohexaose) binding, although the major interaction with the N-terminal histidine remains unchanged.

  14. Biocatalytic Conversion of Avermectin to 4"-Oxo-Avermectin: Characterization of Biocatalytically Active Bacterial Strains and of Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase Enzymes and Their Genes

    PubMed Central

    Jungmann, Volker; Molnár, István; Hammer, Philip E.; Hill, D. Steven; Zirkle, Ross; Buckel, Thomas G.; Buckel, Dagmar; Ligon, James M.; Pachlatko, J. Paul

    2005-01-01

    4"-Oxo-avermectin is a key intermediate in the manufacture of the agriculturally important insecticide emamectin benzoate from the natural product avermectin. Seventeen biocatalytically active Streptomyces strains with the ability to oxidize avermectin to 4"-oxo-avermectin in a regioselective manner have been discovered in a screen of 3,334 microorganisms. The enzymes responsible for this oxidation reaction in these biocatalytically active strains were found to be cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) and were termed Ema1 to Ema17. The genes for Ema1 to Ema17 have been cloned, sequenced, and compared to reveal a new subfamily of CYPs. Ema1 to Ema16 have been overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified as His-tagged recombinant proteins, and their basic enzyme kinetic parameters have been determined. PMID:16269732

  15. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, Jane G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 Å. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 Å. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  17. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a monooxygenase from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) involved in the biosynthesis of the polyketide actinorhodin.

    PubMed

    Kendrew, S G; Federici, L; Savino, C; Miele, A; Marsh, E N; Vallone, B

    2000-04-01

    The aromatic monooxygenase ActVA-Orf6 from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) that catalyses an unusual oxidation on the actinorhodin biosynthetic pathway has been crystallized. The crystals diffract to 1.73 A and belong to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 46.95, b = 59.29, c = 71.67 A. Solvent-content (44%) and self-rotation function calculations predict the presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit. Structure determination should provide further insight into the enzyme mechanism and aid in the design of biosynthetic pathways to produce new polyketide natural products with novel functionality.

  18. Effect of environmental pollutants on oxytocin synthesis and secretion from corpus luteum and on contractions of uterus from pregnant cows.

    PubMed

    Mlynarczuk, Jaroslaw; Wrobel, Michal H; Kotwica, Jan

    2010-09-15

    Chloro-organic compounds are persistent environmental pollutants and affect many reproductive processes. Oxytocin (OT) synthesized in luteal cells is a local regulator of ovarian activity and uterine contractions. Therefore the effect of xenobiotics on the OT prohormone synthesis, secretion of OT and progesterone (P4) from luteal cells and on myometrial contractions during early pregnancy in cows was investigated. Luteal cells and myometrial strips from a cow at early pregnancy were treated with polychlorinated biphenyl 77 (PCB 77), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) (1 or 10 ng/ml). The mRNA expression of neurophysin-I/oxytocin (NP-I/OT) and peptidyl-glycine-alpha-amidating mono-oxygenase (PGA) and concentration of OT and P4 were determined by RT-PCR and EIA, respectively. Moreover, the effect of xenobiotics given with P4 (12 ng/ml) on the basal and OT (10(-7)M) stimulated contractions of myometrial strips was studied. Xenobiotics increased (P<0.05) OT secretion but DDE only stimulated P4 secretion. The ratio of P4 to OT in culture medium was decreased by all xenobiotics during 9-12 weeks of pregnancy. All xenobiotics, except HCH, increased (P<0.05) mRNA expression of NP-I/OT during all stages of pregnancy and all treatments decreased (P<0.05) expression of mRNA for PGA during 9-12 weeks of pregnancy. Myometrial strips were relaxed (P<0.01) after pre-incubation with P4, while each of the xenobiotics jointly with P4 increased (P<0.01) myometrial contractions. In conclusion, the xenobiotics used increased both expression of mRNA for genes involved in OT synthesis and secretion of OT from luteal cells. This decreases the ratio of P4 to OT and presumably, in this manner, the chloro-organic compounds can influence uterine contractions and enhance risk of abortions in pregnant females.

  19. Effect of environmental pollutants on oxytocin synthesis and secretion from corpus luteum and on contractions of uterus from pregnant cows

    SciTech Connect

    Mlynarczuk, Jaroslaw; Wrobel, Michal H.; Kotwica, Jan

    2010-09-15

    Chloro-organic compounds are persistent environmental pollutants and affect many reproductive processes. Oxytocin (OT) synthesized in luteal cells is a local regulator of ovarian activity and uterine contractions. Therefore the effect of xenobiotics on the OT prohormone synthesis, secretion of OT and progesterone (P4) from luteal cells and on myometrial contractions during early pregnancy in cows was investigated. Luteal cells and myometrial strips from a cow at early pregnancy were treated with polychlorinated biphenyl 77 (PCB 77), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH) (1 or 10 ng/ml). The mRNA expression of neurophysin-I/oxytocin (NP-I/OT) and peptidyl-glycine-{alpha}-amidating mono-oxygenase (PGA) and concentration of OT and P4 were determined by RT-PCR and EIA, respectively. Moreover, the effect of xenobiotics given with P4 (12 ng/ml) on the basal and OT (10{sup -7} M) stimulated contractions of myometrial strips was studied. Xenobiotics increased (P < 0.05) OT secretion but DDE only stimulated P4 secretion. The ratio of P4 to OT in culture medium was decreased by all xenobiotics during 9-12 weeks of pregnancy. All xenobiotics, except HCH, increased (P < 0.05) mRNA expression of NP-I/OT during all stages of pregnancy and all treatments decreased (P < 0.05) expression of mRNA for PGA during 9-12 weeks of pregnancy. Myometrial strips were relaxed (P < 0.01) after pre-incubation with P4, while each of the xenobiotics jointly with P4 increased (P < 0.01) myometrial contractions. In conclusion, the xenobiotics used increased both expression of mRNA for genes involved in OT synthesis and secretion of OT from luteal cells. This decreases the ratio of P4 to OT and presumably, in this manner, the chloro-organic compounds can influence uterine contractions and enhance risk of abortions in pregnant females.

  20. The divergent AmoC3 subunit of ammonia monooxygenase functions as part of a stress response system in Nitrosomonas europaea.

    PubMed

    Berube, Paul M; Stahl, David A

    2012-07-01

    The ammonia monooxygenase of chemolithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) catalyzes the first step in ammonia oxidation by converting ammonia to hydroxylamine. The monooxygenase of Nitrosomonas europaea is encoded by two nearly identical operon copies (amoCAB(1,2)). Several AOB, including N. europaea, also possess a divergent monocistronic copy of amoC (amoC(3)) of unknown function. Previous work suggested a possible functional role for amoC(3) as part of the σ(E) stress response regulon during the recovery of N. europaea from extended ammonia starvation, thus indicating its importance during the exit of cells from starvation. We here used global transcription analysis to show that expression of amoC(3) is part of a general poststarvation cellular response system in N. europaea. We also found that amoC(3) is required for an efficient response to some stress conditions, as deleting this gene impaired growth at elevated temperatures and recovery following starvation under high oxygen tensions. Deletion of the σ(32) global stress response regulator demonstrated that the heat shock regulon plays a significant role in mediating the recovery of N. europaea from starvation. These findings provide the first described phenotype associated with the divergent AmoC(3) subunit which appears to function as a stress-responsive subunit capable of maintaining ammonia oxidation activity under stress conditions. While this study was limited to starvation and heat shock, it is possible that the AmoC(3) subunit may be responsive to other membrane stressors (e.g., solvent or osmotic shocks) that are prevalent in the environments of AOB.

  1. Mannitol Stress Directs Flavonoid Metabolism toward Synthesis of Flavones via Differential Regulation of Two Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenases in Coleus forskohlii

    PubMed Central

    Awasthi, Praveen; Gupta, Ajai Prakash; Bedi, Yashbir S.; Vishwakarma, Ram A.; Gandhi, Sumit G.

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYP450s) are known to play important roles in biosynthesis of all secondary metabolites, including flavonoids. Despite this, few CYP450s have been functionally characterized in model plants and roles of fewer CYP450s are known in non-model, medicinal, and aromatic plants. Our study in Coleus forskohlii indicates that flavone synthase (CYP93B) and flavonoid 3′ monooxygenase (CYP706C) are key enzymes positioned at a metabolic junction, to execute the biosynthesis of different sub-classes of flavonoids (flavones, flavonol, anthocynanin, isoflavones etc.) from a common precursor. Such branch points are favored targets for artificially modulating the metabolic flux toward specific metabolites, through genetic manipulation or use of elicitors that differentially impact the expression of branch point genes. Genkwanin, the only flavone reported from C. forskohlii, is known to possess anti-inflammatory activity. It is biosynthesized from the general flavonoid precursor: naringenin. Two differentially expressed cytochrome P450 genes (CfCYP93B, CfCYP706C), exhibiting maximum expression in leaf tissues, were isolated from C. forskohlii. Mannitol treatment resulted in increased expression of CfCYP93B and decrease in expression of CfCYP706C. Metabolite quantification data showed that genkwanin content increased and anthocyanin levels decreased in response to mannitol treatment. Alignment, phylogenetic analysis, modeling, and molecular docking analysis of protein sequences suggested that CfCYP93B may be involved in conversion of naringenin to flavones (possibly genkwanin via apigenin), while CfCYP706C may act on common precursors of flavonoid metabolism and channel the substrate toward production of flavonols or anthocynanins. Decrease in expression of CfCYP706C and increase in accumulation of genkwanin suggested that mannitol treatment may possibly lead to accumulation of genkwanin via suppression of a competitive branch of flavonoids in C

  2. Evaluating cytochrome p450 in lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) by monooxygenase activity and immunohistochemistry: Possible nonlethal assessment by skin immunohistochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melancon, M.J.; Kutay, A.L.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Stegeman, John J.

    2006-01-01

    Six-month-old lesser scaup (Aythya affinis) and nestling tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) were injected intraperitoneally with beta-naphthoflavone (BNF) in corn oil or in vehicle alone. Liver samples were taken and stored at -80 degrees C until microsome preparation and monooxygenase assay. Skin samples were placed in buffered formalin for subsequent immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis for cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A). Lesser scaup treated with BNF at 20 or 100 mg/kg body weight showed approximately 6- to 18-fold increases in four monooxygenases (benzyloxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, methoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, and pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase). No IHC response was observed for CYP1A in the skin of vehicle-injected ducks, whereas in the skin from BNF-treated ducks, the positive IHC response was of similar magnitude for both dose levels of BNF. Tree swallows injected with BNF at 100 mg/kg, but not at. 20 mg/kg, showed significant increases (approximately fivefold) in hepatic microsomal O-dealkylase activities. Cytochrome P4501A was undetectable by IHC response in skin from corn oil-treated swallows, but positive IHC responses were observed in the skin of one of five swallows at 20 mg/kg and four of five swallows at 100 mg/kg. Although these data do not allow construction of significant dose-response curves, the IHC responses for CYP1A in skin support the possible use of this nonlethal approach for biomonitoring contaminant exposure of birds. In addition, the CYP1A signal observed at the bases of emerging feathers suggest that these might provide less invasive sampling sites for IHC analysis of CYP1A.

  3. Integrated one-pot enrichment and immobilization of styrene monooxygenase (StyA) using SEPABEAD EC-EA and EC-Q1A anion-exchange carriers.

    PubMed

    Ruinatscha, Reto; Karande, Rohan; Buehler, Katja; Schmid, Andreas

    2011-07-18

    A straightforward one-pot procedure combining enrichment and immobilization of recombinantely expressed FADH₂ dependent styrene monooxygenase (StyA) directly from Escherichia coli cell extracts was investigated. Sepabeads EC-EA and EC-Q1A anion-exchange carriers were employed to non-covalently adsorb StyA from the cell extracts depending on basic parameters such as varying initial protein concentrations and pH. The protein fraction of the cell extract contained around 25% StyA. At low initial protein concentrations (2.5 mg mL⁻¹) and pH 6, the enzyme could be enriched up to 52.4% on Sepabeads EC-EA and up to 46.0% on Sepabeads EC-Q1A, accounting for an almost complete StyA adsorption from the cell extracts. Higher initial protein concentrations were necessary to exploit the high loading capacity of the beads. At 20 mg mL⁻¹, up to 37.6% of the theoretical bead loading capacity could be utilized for StyA binding using Sepabeads EC-EA, and 34.0% using Sepabeads EC-Q1A. For both carriers, protein leakage under reaction conditions could be reduced to less than 2%. During assays, the FADH₂ cofactor necessary for StyA activity was supplied by the NADH-FAD reductase component styrene monooxygenase B (StyB). StyA immobilized on Sepabeads EC-Q1A displayed twice as high styrene epoxidation rates (0.2 U mg(StyA)⁻¹) as compared to Sepabeads EC-EA. This activity could be increased to 0.7 U mg(StyA)⁻¹ by co-immobilizing StyB on Sepabeads EC-Q1A, which corresponds to 33% of the soluble StyA activity.

  4. The Divergent AmoC3 Subunit of Ammonia Monooxygenase Functions as Part of a Stress Response System in Nitrosomonas europaea

    PubMed Central

    Berube, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    The ammonia monooxygenase of chemolithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) catalyzes the first step in ammonia oxidation by converting ammonia to hydroxylamine. The monooxygenase of Nitrosomonas europaea is encoded by two nearly identical operon copies (amoCAB1,2). Several AOB, including N. europaea, also possess a divergent monocistronic copy of amoC (amoC3) of unknown function. Previous work suggested a possible functional role for amoC3 as part of the σE stress response regulon during the recovery of N. europaea from extended ammonia starvation, thus indicating its importance during the exit of cells from starvation. We here used global transcription analysis to show that expression of amoC3 is part of a general poststarvation cellular response system in N. europaea. We also found that amoC3 is required for an efficient response to some stress conditions, as deleting this gene impaired growth at elevated temperatures and recovery following starvation under high oxygen tensions. Deletion of the σ32 global stress response regulator demonstrated that the heat shock regulon plays a significant role in mediating the recovery of N. europaea from starvation. These findings provide the first described phenotype associated with the divergent AmoC3 subunit which appears to function as a stress-responsive subunit capable of maintaining ammonia oxidation activity under stress conditions. While this study was limited to starvation and heat shock, it is possible that the AmoC3 subunit may be responsive to other membrane stressors (e.g., solvent or osmotic shocks) that are prevalent in the environments of AOB. PMID:22544266

  5. Molecular Dynamics Analysis Reveals Structural Insights into Mechanism of Nicotine N-Demethylation Catalyzed by Tobacco Cytochrome P450 Mono-Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Yang, Shuo; An, Baiyi; Wang, Shichen; Yin, Yuejia; Lu, Yang; Xu, Ying; Hao, Dongyun

    2011-01-01

    CYP82E4, a cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, has nicotine N-demethylase (NND) activity, which mediates the bioconversion of nicotine into nornicotine in senescing tobacco leaves. Nornicotine is a precursor of the carcinogen, tobacco-specific nitrosamine. CYP82E3 is an ortholog of CYP82E4 with 95% sequence identity, but it lacks NND activity. A recent site-directed mutagenesis study revealed that a single amino acid substitution, i.e., cysteine to tryptophan at the 330 position in the middle of protein, restores the NND activity of CYP82E3 entirely. However, the same amino acid change caused the loss of the NND activity of CYP82E4. To determine the mechanism of the functional turnover of the two molecules, four 3D structures, i.e., the two molecules and their corresponding cys–trp mutants were modeled. The resulting structures exhibited that the mutation site is far from the active site, which suggests that no direct interaction occurs between the two sites. Simulation studies in different biological scenarios revealed that the mutation introduces a conformation drift with the largest change at the F-G loop. The dynamics trajectories analysis using principal component analysis and covariance analysis suggests that the single amino acid change causes the opening and closing of the transfer channels of the substrates, products, and water by altering the motion of the F-G and B-C loops. The motion of helix I is also correlated with the motion of both the F-G loop and the B-C loop and; the single amino acid mutation resulted in the curvature of helix I. These results suggest that the single amino acid mutation outside the active site region may have indirectly mediated the flexibility of the F-G and B-C loops through helix I, causing a functional turnover of the P450 monooxygenase. PMID:21858078

  6. Tuning the specificity of the recombinant multicomponent toluene o-xylene monooxygenase from Pseudomonas sp. strain OX1 for the biosynthesis of tyrosol from 2-phenylethanol.

    PubMed

    Notomista, Eugenio; Scognamiglio, Roberta; Troncone, Luca; Donadio, Giuliana; Pezzella, Alessandro; Di Donato, Alberto; Izzo, Viviana

    2011-08-01

    Biocatalysis is today a standard technology for the industrial production of several chemicals, and the number of biotransformation processes running on a commercial scale is constantly increasing. Among biocatalysts, bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs), a diverse group of nonheme diiron enzymes that activate dioxygen, are of primary interest due to their ability to catalyze a variety of complex oxidations, including reactions of mono- and dihydroxylation of phenolic compounds. In recent years, both directed evolution and rational design have been successfully used to identify the molecular determinants responsible for BMM regioselectivity and to improve their activity toward natural and nonnatural substrates. Toluene o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) is a BMM isolated from Pseudomonas sp. strain OX1 which hydroxylates a wide spectrum of aromatic compounds. In this work we investigate the use of recombinant ToMO for the biosynthesis in recombinant cells of Escherichia coli strain JM109 of 4-hydroxyphenylethanol (tyrosol), an antioxidant present in olive oil, from 2-phenylethanol, a cheap and commercially available substrate. We initially found that wild-type ToMO is unable to convert 2-phenylethanol to tyrosol. This was explained by using a computational model which analyzed the interactions between ToMO active-site residues and the substrate. We found that residue F176 is the major steric hindrance for the correct positioning of the reaction intermediate leading to tyrosol production into the active site of the enzyme. Several mutants were designed and prepared, and we found that the combination of different mutations at position F176 with mutation E103G allows ToMO to convert up to 50% of 2-phenylethanol into tyrosol in 2 h.

  7. Constitutive Expression of the Cytochrome P450 EthABCD Monooxygenase System Enables Degradation of Synthetic Dialkyl Ethers in Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Judith; Purswani, Jessica; Breuer, Uta; Pozo, Clementina; Harms, Hauke; Müller, Roland H.

    2013-01-01

    In Rhodococcus ruber IFP 2001, Rhodococcus zopfii IFP 2005, and Gordonia sp. strain IFP 2009, the cytochrome P450 monooxygenase EthABCD catalyzes hydroxylation of methoxy and ethoxy residues in the fuel oxygenates methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), and tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME). The expression of the IS3-type transposase-flanked eth genes is ETBE dependent and controlled by the regulator EthR (C. Malandain et al., FEMS Microbiol. Ecol. 72:289–296, 2010). In contrast, we demonstrated by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) that the betaproteobacterium Aquincola tertiaricarbonis L108, which possesses the ethABCD genes but lacks ethR, constitutively expresses the P450 system at high levels even when growing on nonether substrates, such as glucose. The mutant strain A. tertiaricarbonis L10, which is unable to degrade dialkyl ethers, resulted from a transposition event mediated by a rolling-circle IS91-type element flanking the eth gene cluster in the wild-type strain L108. The constitutive expression of Eth monooxygenase is likely initiated by the housekeeping sigma factor σ70, as indicated by the presence in strain L108 of characteristic −10 and −35 binding sites upstream of ethA which are lacking in strain IFP 2001. This enables efficient degradation of diethyl ether, diisopropyl ether, MTBE, ETBE, TAME, and tert-amyl ethyl ether (TAEE) without any lag phase in strain L108. However, ethers with larger residues, n-hexyl methyl ether, tetrahydrofuran, and alkyl aryl ethers, were not attacked by the Eth system at significant rates in resting-cell experiments, indicating that the residue in the ether molecule which is not hydroxylated also contributes to the determination of substrate specificity. PMID:23354715

  8. Improved NADPH Regeneration for Fungal Cytochrome P450 Monooxygenase by Co-Expressing Bacterial Glucose Dehydrogenase in Resting-Cell Biotransformation of Recombinant Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyunwoo; Durairaj, Pradeepraj; Lee, Dowoo; Ahsan, Md Murshidul; Yun, Hyungdon

    2016-12-28

    Fungal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes catalyze versatile monooxygenase reactions and play a major role in fungal adaptations owing to their essential roles in the production avoid metabolites critical for pathogenesis, detoxification of xenobiotics, and exploitation avoid substrates. Although fungal CYP-dependent biotransformation for the selective oxidation avoid organic compounds in yeast system is advantageous, it often suffers from a shortage avoid intracellular NADPH. In this study, we aimed to investigate the use of bacterial glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) for the intracellular electron regeneration of fungal CYP monooxygenase in a yeast reconstituted system. The benzoate hydroxylase FoCYP53A19 and its homologous redox partner FoCPR from Fusarium oxysporum were co-expressed with the BsGDH from Bacillus subtilis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterologous expression and biotransformations. We attempted to optimize several bottlenecks concerning the efficiency of fungal CYP-mediated whole-cell-biotransformation to enhance the conversion. The catalytic performance of the intracellular NADPH regeneration system facilitated the hydroxylation of benzoic acid to 4-hydroxybenzoic acid with high conversion in the resting-cell reaction. The FoCYP53A19+FoCPR+BsGDH reconstituted system produced 0.47 mM 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (94% conversion) in the resting-cell biotransformations performed in 50 mM phosphate buffer (pH 6.0) containing 0.5 mM benzoic acid and 0.25% glucose for 24 h at 30°C. The "coupled-enzyme" system can certainly improve the overall performance of NADPH-dependent whole-cell biotransformations in a yeast system.

  9. Cavity residue leucine 95 and channel residues glutamine 204, aspartic acid 211, and phenylalanine 269 of toluene o-xylene monooxygenase influence catalysis.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Cansu; Sönmez, Burcu; Vardar, Nurcan; Yanık-Yıldırım, K Cansu; Vardar-Schara, Gönül

    2016-09-01

    Structural analysis of toluene-o-xylene monooxygenase (ToMO) hydroxylase revealed the presence of three hydrophobic cavities, a channel, and a pore leading from the protein surface to the active site. Here, saturation mutagenesis was used to investigate the catalytic roles of alpha-subunit (TouA) second cavity residue L95 and TouA channel residues Q204, D211, and F269. By testing the substrates toluene, phenol, nitrobenzene, and/or naphthalene, these positions were found to influence the catalytic activity of ToMO. Several regiospecific variants were identified from TouA positions Q204, F269, and L95. For example, TouA variant Q204H had the regiospecificity of nitrobenzene changed significantly from 30 to 61 % p-nitrophenol. Interestingly, a combination of mutations at Q204H and A106V altered the regiospecificity of nitrobenzene back to 27 % p-nitrophenol. TouA variants F269Y, F269P, Q204E, and L95D improved the meta-hydroxylating capability of nitrobenzene by producing 87, 85, 82, and 77 % m-nitrophenol, respectively. For naphthalene oxidation, TouA variants F269V, Q204A, Q204S/S222N, and F269T had the regiospecificity changed from 16 to 9, 10, 23, and 25 % 2-naphthol, respectively. Here, two additional TouA residues, S222 and A106, were also identified that may have important roles in catalysis. Most of the isolated variants from D211 remained active, whereas having a hydrophobic residue at this position appeared to diminish the catalytic activity toward naphthalene. The mutational effects on the ToMO regiospecificity described here suggest that it is possible to further fine tune and engineer the reactivity of multicomponent diiron monooxygenases toward different substrates at positions that are relatively distant from the active site.

  10. Nuclear Retention of mRNA in Mammalian Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Bahar Halpern, Keren; Caspi, Inbal; Lemze, Doron; Levy, Maayan; Landen, Shanie; Elinav, Eran; Ulitsky, Igor; Itzkovitz, Shalev

    2015-01-01

    Summary mRNA is thought to predominantly reside in the cytoplasm, where it is translated and eventually degraded. Although nuclear retention of mRNA has a regulatory potential, it is considered extremely rare in mammals. Here, to explore the extent of mRNA retention in metabolic tissues, we combine deep sequencing of nuclear and cytoplasmic RNA fractions with single-molecule transcript imaging in mouse beta cells, liver, and gut. We identify a wide range of protein-coding genes for which the levels of spliced polyadenylated mRNA are higher in the nucleus than in the cytoplasm. These include genes such as the transcription factor ChREBP, Nlrp6, Glucokinase, and Glucagon receptor. We demonstrate that nuclear retention of mRNA can efficiently buffer cytoplasmic transcript levels from noise that emanates from transcriptional bursts. Our study challenges the view that transcripts predominantly reside in the cytoplasm and reveals a role of the nucleus in dampening gene expression noise. PMID:26711333

  11. Optimal Down Regulation of mRNA Translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2017-01-01

    Down regulation of mRNA translation is an important problem in various bio-medical domains ranging from developing effective medicines for tumors and for viral diseases to developing attenuated virus strains that can be used for vaccination. Here, we study the problem of down regulation of mRNA translation using a mathematical model called the ribosome flow model (RFM). In the RFM, the mRNA molecule is modeled as a chain of n sites. The flow of ribosomes between consecutive sites is regulated by n + 1 transition rates. Given a set of feasible transition rates, that models the outcome of all possible mutations, we consider the problem of maximally down regulating protein production by altering the rates within this set of feasible rates. Under certain conditions on the feasible set, we show that an optimal solution can be determined efficiently. We also rigorously analyze two special cases of the down regulation optimization problem. Our results suggest that one must focus on the position along the mRNA molecule where the transition rate has the strongest effect on the protein production rate. However, this rate is not necessarily the slowest transition rate along the mRNA molecule. We discuss some of the biological implications of these results.

  12. Optimal Down Regulation of mRNA Translation

    PubMed Central

    Zarai, Yoram; Margaliot, Michael; Tuller, Tamir

    2017-01-01

    Down regulation of mRNA translation is an important problem in various bio-medical domains ranging from developing effective medicines for tumors and for viral diseases to developing attenuated virus strains that can be used for vaccination. Here, we study the problem of down regulation of mRNA translation using a mathematical model called the ribosome flow model (RFM). In the RFM, the mRNA molecule is modeled as a chain of n sites. The flow of ribosomes between consecutive sites is regulated by n + 1 transition rates. Given a set of feasible transition rates, that models the outcome of all possible mutations, we consider the problem of maximally down regulating protein production by altering the rates within this set of feasible rates. Under certain conditions on the feasible set, we show that an optimal solution can be determined efficiently. We also rigorously analyze two special cases of the down regulation optimization problem. Our results suggest that one must focus on the position along the mRNA molecule where the transition rate has the strongest effect on the protein production rate. However, this rate is not necessarily the slowest transition rate along the mRNA molecule. We discuss some of the biological implications of these results. PMID:28120903

  13. Post-transcriptional gene regulation by mRNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Boxuan Simen; Roundtree, Ian A.; He, Chuan

    2016-01-01

    The recent discovery of reversible mRNA methylation has opened a new realm of post-transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes. The identification and functional characterization of proteins that specifically recognize RNA N6-methyladenosine (m6A) unveiled it as a modification that cells utilize to accelerate mRNA metabolism and translation. N6-adenosine methylation directs mRNAs to distinct fates by grouping them for differential processing, translation and decay in processes such as cell differentiation, embryonic development and stress responses. Other mRNA modifications, including N1-methyladenosine (m1A), 5-methylcytosine (m5C) and pseudouridine, together with m6A form the epitranscriptome and collectively code a new layer of information that controls protein synthesis. PMID:27808276

  14. Multiplexed nanoflares: mRNA detection in live cells.

    PubMed

    Prigodich, Andrew E; Randeria, Pratik S; Briley, William E; Kim, Nathaniel J; Daniel, Weston L; Giljohann, David A; Mirkin, Chad A

    2012-02-21

    We report the development of the multiplexed nanoflare, a nanoparticle agent that is capable of simultaneously detecting two distinct mRNA targets inside a living cell. These probes are spherical nucleic acid (SNA) gold nanoparticle (Au NP) conjugates consisting of densely packed and highly oriented oligonucleotide sequences, many of which are hybridized to a reporter with a distinct fluorophore label and each complementary to its corresponding mRNA target. When multiplexed nanoflares are exposed to their targets, they provide a sequence specific signal in both extra- and intracellular environments. Importantly, one of the targets can be used as an internal control, improving detection by accounting for cell-to-cell variations in nanoparticle uptake and background. Compared to single-component nanoflares, these structures allow one to determine more precisely relative mRNA levels in individual cells, improving cell sorting and quantification.

  15. Effect of ribosome shielding on mRNA stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneke, Carlus; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Valleriani, Angelo

    2013-08-01

    Based on the experimental evidence that translating ribosomes stabilize the mRNAs, we introduce and study a theoretical model for the dynamic shielding of mRNA by ribosomes. We present an improved fitting of published decay assay data in E. coli and show that only one third of the decay patterns are exponential. Our new transcriptome-wide estimate of the average lifetimes and mRNA half-lives shows that these timescales are considerably shorter than previous estimates. We also explain why there is a negative correlation between mRNA length and average lifetime when the mRNAs are subdivided in classes sharing the same degradation parameters. As a by-product, our model indicates that co-transcriptional translation in E. coli may be less common than previously believed.

  16. Nonsense-mediated decay of human HEXA mRNA.

    PubMed

    Rajavel, K S; Neufeld, E F

    2001-08-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), the loss of mRNAs carrying premature stop codons, is a process by which cells recognize and degrade nonsense mRNAs to prevent possibly toxic effects of truncated peptides. Most mammalian nonsense mRNAs are degraded while associated with the nucleus, but a few are degraded in the cytoplasm; at either site, there is a requirement for translation and for an intron downstream of the early stop codon. We have examined the NMD of a mutant HEXA message in lymphoblasts derived from a Tay-Sachs disease patient homozygous for the common frameshift mutation 1278ins4. The mutant mRNA was nearly undetectable in these cells and increased to approximately 40% of normal in the presence of the translation inhibitor cycloheximide. The stabilized transcript was found in the cytoplasm in association with polysomes. Within 5 h of cycloheximide removal, the polysome-associated nonsense message was completely degraded, while the normal message was stable. The increased lability of the polysome-associated mutant HEXA mRNA shows that NMD of this endogenous mRNA occurred in the cytoplasm. Transfection of Chinese hamster ovary cells showed that expression of an intronless HEXA minigene harboring the frameshift mutation or a closely located nonsense codon resulted in half the normal mRNA level. Inclusion of multiple downstream introns decreased the abundance further, to about 20% of normal. Thus, in contrast to other systems, introns are not absolutely required for NMD of HEXA mRNA, although they enhance the low-HEXA-mRNA phenotype.

  17. High incidence of interleukin 10 mRNA but not interleukin 2 mRNA detected in human breast tumours.

    PubMed Central

    Venetsanakos, E.; Beckman, I.; Bradley, J.; Skinner, J. M.

    1997-01-01

    Despite the presence of a lymphocytic infiltrate in solid cancers, the failure for tumour growth to be contained suggests an inadequate immune response to the tumour. Poor cytotoxicity exerted by tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) against tumour cells in vitro, combined with continued tumour growth in vivo, suggests deficiencies in TIL function or numbers. Various theories have been postulated to explain how tumour cells may escape immunosurveillance and control. One of the many hypotheses is the failure of production of cytokines, which are necessary for T cells to mediate their function. Thus, the expression of cytokine mRNA in human breast tumour sections was investigated by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with cytokine-specific primers. A relatively consistent finding was detection of interleukin (IL) 10 mRNA among the tumours. No IL-2 and little IL-4 mRNA was detected in the tumours. IL-6 and IL-10 mRNA was detected in only one and two of the normal breast tissues respectively. IL-2, IL-4 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha mRNA was not detected in any of the normal breast tissues. The reduced function of TILs may be related to IL-10, which has known inhibitory effects on T-cell activation. Images Figure 1 PMID:9192989

  18. Post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate the mRNA noise and to increase the mRNA gain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Changhong; Wang, Shuqiang; Zhou, Tianshou; Jiang, Yiguo

    2015-10-01

    Post-transcriptional regulation is ubiquitous in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, but how it impacts gene expression remains to be fully explored. Here, we analyze a simple gene model in which we assume that mRNAs are produced in a constitutive manner but are regulated post-transcriptionally by a decapping enzyme that switches between the active state and the inactive state. We derive the analytical mRNA distribution governed by a chemical master equation, which can be well used to analyze the mechanism of how post-transcription regulation influences the mRNA expression level including the mRNA noise. We demonstrate that the mean mRNA level in the stochastic case is always higher than that in the deterministic case due to the stochastic effect of the enzyme, but the size of the increased part depends mainly on the switching rates between two enzyme states. More interesting is that we find that in contrast to transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation tends to attenuate noise in mRNA. Our results provide insight into the role of post-transcriptional regulation in controlling the transcriptional noise.

  19. X-ray crystal structures of manganese(II)-reconstituted and native toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase reveal rotamer shifts in conserved residues and an enhanced view of the protein interior.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Michael S; Sazinsky, Matthew H; Condon, Karen L; Lippard, Stephen J

    2006-11-29

    We report the X-ray crystal structures of native and manganese(II)-reconstituted toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase hydroxylase (ToMOH) from Pseudomonas stutzeri OX1 to 1.85 and 2.20 A resolution, respectively. The structures reveal that reduction of the dimetallic active site is accompanied by a carboxylate shift and alteration of the coordination environment for dioxygen binding and activation. A rotamer shift in a strategically placed asparagine 202 accompanies dimetallic center reduction and is proposed to influence protein component interactions. This rotamer shift is conserved between ToMOH and the corresponding residue in methane monooxygenase hydroxylase (MMOH). Previously unidentified hydrophobic pockets similar to those present in MMOH are assigned.

  20. Nonsense codons in human beta-globin mRNA result in the production of mRNA degradation products.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, S K; Sigmund, C D; Gross, K W; Maquat, L E

    1992-01-01

    Human beta zero-thalassemic beta-globin genes harboring either a frameshift or a nonsense mutation that results in the premature termination of beta-globin mRNA translation have been previously introduced into the germ line of mice (S.-K. Lim, J.J. Mullins, C.-M. Chen, K. Gross, and L.E. Maquat, EMBO J. 8:2613-2619, 1989). Each transgene produces properly processed albeit abnormally unstable mRNA as well as several smaller RNAs in erythroid cells. These smaller RNAs are detected only in the cytoplasm and, relative to mRNA, are longer-lived and are missing sequences from either exon I or exons I and II. In this communication, we show by using genetics and S1 nuclease transcript mapping that the premature termination of beta-globin mRNA translation is mechanistically required for the abnormal RNA metabolism. We also provide evidence that generation of the smaller RNAs is a cytoplasmic process: the 5' ends of intron 1-containing pre-mRNAs were normal, the rates of removal of introns 1 and 2 were normal, and studies inhibiting RNA synthesis with actinomycin D demonstrated a precursor-product relationship between full-length mRNA and the smaller RNAs. In vivo, about 50% of the full-length species that undergo decay are degraded to the smaller RNAs and the rest are degraded to undetectable products. Exposure of erythroid cells that expressed a normal human beta-globin transgene to either cycloheximide or puromycin did not result in the generation of the smaller RNAs. Therefore, a drug-induced reduction in cellular protein synthesis does not reproduce this aspect of cytoplasmic mRNA metabolism. These data suggest that the premature termination of beta-globin mRNA translation in either exon I or exon II results in the cytoplasmic generation of discrete mRNA degradation products that are missing sequences from exon I or exons I and II. Since these degradation products appear to be the same for all nonsense codons tested, there is no correlation between the position of

  1. Influenza Virus mRNA Trafficking Through Host Nuclear Speckles

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Amir; White, Alexander; Zhang, Ke; Thompson, Matthew; Esparza, Matthew; Muñoz-Moreno, Raquel; Koide, Kazunori; Lynch, Kristen W.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Fontoura, Beatriz M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus is a human pathogen whose genome is comprised of eight viral RNA segments that replicate in the nucleus. Two viral mRNAs are alternatively spliced. The unspliced M1 mRNA is translated into the matrix M1 protein while the ion channel M2 protein is generated after alternative splicing. These proteins are critical mediators of viral trafficking and budding. We show that influenza virus utilizes nuclear speckles to promote post-transcriptional splicing of its M1 mRNA. We assign previously unknown roles for the viral NS1 protein and cellular factors to an intranuclear trafficking pathway that targets the viral M1 mRNA to nuclear speckles, mediates splicing at these nuclear bodies, and exports the spliced M2 mRNA from the nucleus. Since nuclear speckles are storage sites for splicing factors, which leave these sites to splice cellular pre-mRNAs at transcribing genes, we reveal a functional subversion of nuclear speckles to promote viral gene expression. PMID:27347430

  2. Nuclear Decay Factors Crack Up mRNA.

    PubMed

    Tudek, Agnieszka; Schmid, Manfred; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2017-03-02

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Bresson et al. (2017) show that the nuclear RNA decay factors Nab3 and Mtr4 reshape the coding transcriptome during glucose starvation in budding yeast, placing nuclear mRNA metabolism as an important contributor of gene expression regulation.

  3. mRNA degradation machines in eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Tourrière, Hélène; Chebli, Karim; Tazi, Jamal

    2002-08-01

    The steady-state levels of mRNAs depend upon their combined rates of synthesis and processing, transport from the nucleus to cytoplasm, and decay in the cytoplasm. In eukaryotic cells, the degradation of mRNA is an essential determinant in the regulation of gene expression, and it can be modulated in response to developmental, environmental, and metabolic signals. This level of regulation is particularly important for proteins that are active for a brief period, such as growth factors, transcription factors, and proteins that control cell cycle progression. The mechanisms by which mRNAs are degraded and the sequence elements within the mRNAs that affect their stability are the subject of this review. We will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding cis-acting elements in mRNA and trans-acting factors that contribute to mRNA regulation decay. We will then consider the mechanisms by which specific signaling proteins seem to contribute to a dynamic organization of the mRNA degradation machinery in response to physiological stimuli.

  4. BIOMARKERS OF ENDOCRINE DISRUPTION AT THE MRNA LEVEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Denslow, Nancy D., Christopher J. Bowman, Gillian Robinson, H. Stephen Lee, Ronald J. Ferguson, Michael J. Hemmer and Leroy C. Folmar. 1999. Biomarkers of Endocrine Disruption at the mRNA Level. In: Environmental Toxicology and Risk Assessment: Standardization of Biomarkers for ...

  5. Sites of amyloid SAA mRNA production

    SciTech Connect

    Meek, R.L.; Benditt, E.P.

    1986-03-01

    To investigate possible extrahepatic sites of SAA production, male BALB/c mice were given a single 0.5 ml injection of either 10% casein or lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 mg/ml). Twenty hours after injection, RNA was extracted from liver, kidney, adrenal, testis, brain, spleen, skeletal muscle, heart, lung and small intestine. Northern blots of total RNA were hybridized with nick-translated /sup 32/P-labeled cDNA probes (length approximately 150 base pairs) corresponding to an homologous region of the three known SAA genes. Both casein and LPS elevated the mRNA in liver to about 200-fold above control levels; mRNA was elevated in adrenals from O to approximately 2% of liver. mRNA in some other tissues responded only to LPS injection: levels in kidney reached 15% of liver; pituitary, testis and brain reached 0.02 to 0.5% of liver; no apoSAA mRNA was detected in heart, skeletal muscle, lung, spleen or small intestine. Thus, some organs other than liver appear to have operational genes for apoSAA. The expression of apoSAA genes in different tissues is shared with other apoproteins; it remains to be seen whether all three or only selected genes are transcribed and translated in different tissues.

  6. Destabilization of TNF-α mRNA by Rapamycin

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Woo; Jeon, Ye Ji; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ahn, So Ra; Ha, Shin Won; Bang, So Young; Park, Eun Kyung; Yi, Sang Ah; Lee, Min Gyu; Han, Jeung-Whan

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of mast cells through the high affinity IgE receptor (FcεRI) induces degranulation, lipid mediator release, and cytokine secretion leading to allergic reactions. Although various signaling pathways have been characterized to be involved in the FcεRI-mediated responses, little is known about the precious mechanism for the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in mast cells. Here, we report that rapamycin, a specific inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), reduces the expression of TNF-α in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells. IgE or specific antigen stimulation of RBL-2H3 cells increases the expression of TNF-α and activates various signaling molecules including S6K1, Akt and p38 MAPK. Rapamycin specifically inhibits antigen-induced TNF-α mRNA level, while other kinase inhibitors have no effect on TNF-α mRNA level. These data indicate that mTOR signaling pathway is the main regulation mechanism for antigen-induced TNF-α expression. TNF-α mRNA stability analysis using reporter construct containing TNF-α adenylate/uridylate-rich elements (AREs) shows that rapamycin destabilizes TNF-α mRNA via regulating the AU-rich element of TNF-α mRNA. The antigen-induced activation of S6K1 is inhibited by specific kinase inhibitors including mTOR, PI3K, PKC and Ca2+chelator inhibitor, while TNF-α mRNA level is reduced only by rapamycin treatment. These data suggest that the effects of rapamycin on the expression of TNF-α mRNA are not mediated by S6K1 but regulated by mTOR. Taken together, our results reveal that mTOR signaling pathway is a novel regulation mechanism for antigen-induced TNF-α expression in RBL-2H3 cells. PMID:24116273

  7. CYP63A2, a catalytically versatile fungal P450 monooxygenase capable of oxidizing higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkylphenols, and alkanes.

    PubMed

    Syed, Khajamohiddin; Porollo, Aleksey; Lam, Ying Wai; Grimmett, Paul E; Yadav, Jagjit S

    2013-04-01

    Cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (P450s) are known to oxidize hydrocarbons, albeit with limited substrate specificity across classes of these compounds. Here we report a P450 monooxygenase (CYP63A2) from the model ligninolytic white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium that was found to possess a broad oxidizing capability toward structurally diverse hydrocarbons belonging to mutagenic/carcinogenic fused-ring higher-molecular-weight polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HMW-PAHs), endocrine-disrupting long-chain alkylphenols (APs), and crude oil aliphatic hydrocarbon n-alkanes. A homology-based three-dimensional (3D) model revealed the presence of an extraordinarily large active-site cavity in CYP63A2 compared to the mammalian PAH-oxidizing (CYP3A4, CYP1A2, and CYP1B1) and bacterial aliphatic-hydrocarbon-oxidizing (CYP101D and CYP102A1) P450s. This structural feature in conjunction with ligand docking simulations suggested potential versatility of the enzyme. Experimental characterization using recombinantly expressed CYP63A2 revealed its ability to oxidize HMW-PAHs of various ring sizes, including 4 rings (pyrene and fluoranthene), 5 rings [benzo(a)pyrene], and 6 rings [benzo(ghi)perylene], with the highest enzymatic activity being toward the 5-ring PAH followed by the 4-ring and 6-ring PAHs, in that order. Recombinant CYP63A2 activity yielded monohydroxylated PAH metabolites. The enzyme was found to also act as an alkane ω-hydroxylase that oxidized n-alkanes with various chain lengths (C9 to C12 and C15 to C19), as well as alkyl side chains (C3 to C9) in alkylphenols (APs). CYP63A2 showed preferential oxidation of long-chain APs and alkanes. To our knowledge, this is the first P450 identified from any of the biological kingdoms that possesses such broad substrate specificity toward structurally diverse xenobiotics (PAHs, APs, and alkanes), making it a potent enzyme biocatalyst candidate to handle mixed pollution (e.g., crude oil spills).

  8. Methane monooxygenase from Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. Purification and properties of a three-component system with high specific activity from a type II methanotroph.

    PubMed

    Fox, B G; Froland, W A; Dege, J E; Lipscomb, J D

    1989-06-15

    Methane monooxygenase has been purified from the Type II methanotroph Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b. As observed for methane monooxygenase isolated from Type I methanotrophs, three protein components are required: a 39.7-kDa NADH reductase containing 1 mol each of FAD and a [2Fe-2S] cluster, a 15.8-kDa protein factor termed component B that contains no metals or cofactors, and a 245-kDa hydroxylase which appears to contain an oxo- or hydroxo-bridged binuclear iron cluster. Through the use of stabilizing reagents, the hydroxylase is obtained in high yield and exhibits a specific activity 8-25-fold greater than reported for previous preparations. The component B and reductase exhibit 1.5- and 4-fold greater specific activity, respectively. Quantitation of the hydroxylase oxo-bridged cluster using EPR and Mössbauer spectroscopies reveals that the highest specific activity preparations (approximately 1700 nmol/min/mg) contain approximately 2 clusters/mol. In contrast, hydroxylase preparations exhibiting a wide range of specific activities below 500 nmol/min/mg contain approximately 1 cluster/mol on average. Efficient turnover coupled to NADH oxidation requires all three protein components. However, both alkanes and alkenes are hydroxylated by the chemically reduced hydroxylase under single turnover conditions in the absence of component B and the reductase. Neither of these components catalyzes hydroxylation individually nor do they significantly affect the yield of hydroxylated product from the chemically reduced hydroxylase. Hydroxylase reduced only to the mixed valent [Fe(II).Fe(III)] state is unreactive toward O2 and yields little hydroxylated product on single turnover. This suggests that the catalytically active species is the fully reduced form. The data presented here provide the first evidence based on catalysis that the site of the monooxygenation reaction is located on the hydroxylase. It thus appears likely that the oxo-bridged iron cluster is capable of

  9. X-ray structure of a hydroxylase-regulatory protein complex from a hydrocarbon-oxidizing multicomponent monooxygenase, Pseudomonas sp. OX1 phenol hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Sazinsky, Matthew H; Dunten, Pete W; McCormick, Michael S; DiDonato, Alberto; Lippard, Stephen J

    2006-12-26

    Phenol hydroxylase (PH) belongs to a family of bacterial multicomponent monooxygenases (BMMs) with carboxylate-bridged diiron active sites. Included are toluene/o-xylene (ToMO) and soluble methane (sMMO) monooxygenase. PH hydroxylates aromatic compounds, but unlike sMMO, it cannot oxidize alkanes despite having a similar dinuclear iron active site. Important for activity is formation of a complex between the hydroxylase and a regulatory protein component. To address how structural features of BMM hydroxylases and their component complexes may facilitate the catalytic mechanism and choice of substrate, we determined X-ray structures of native and SeMet forms of the PH hydroxylase (PHH) in complex with its regulatory protein (PHM) to 2.3 A resolution. PHM binds in a canyon on one side of the (alphabetagamma)2 PHH dimer, contacting alpha-subunit helices A, E, and F approximately 12 A above the diiron core. The structure of the dinuclear iron center in PHH resembles that of mixed-valent MMOH, suggesting an Fe(II)Fe(III) oxidation state. Helix E, which comprises part of the iron-coordinating four-helix bundle, has more pi-helical character than analogous E helices in MMOH and ToMOH lacking a bound regulatory protein. Consequently, conserved active site Thr and Asn residues translocate to the protein surface, and an approximately 6 A pore opens through the four-helix bundle. Of likely functional significance is a specific hydrogen bond formed between this Asn residue and a conserved Ser side chain on PHM. The PHM protein covers a putative docking site on PHH for the PH reductase, which transfers electrons to the PHH diiron center prior to O2 activation, suggesting that the regulatory component may function to block undesired reduction of oxygenated intermediates during the catalytic cycle. A series of hydrophobic cavities through the PHH alpha-subunit, analogous to those in MMOH, may facilitate movement of the substrate to and/or product from the active site pocket

  10. Transcription Expression and Clinical Significance of Dishevelled-3 mRNA and δ-Catenin mRNA in Pleural Effusions from Patients with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Liu, Shu-Li; Cha, Na; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Wang, Shao-Cheng; Li, Wei-Nan; Wang, En-Hua; Wu, Guang-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate diagnostic utility of Dishevelled-3 (DVL-3) mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA expression in pleural effusions of patients with lung cancer. Methods. DVL-3 mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA levels were assessed by performing RT-PCR on pleural effusion specimens from patients with lung cancer (n = 75) and with lung benign disease (n = 51). Results. The expressions of DVL-3 mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA were significantly higher in malignant than in benign lung disease (P < 0.01) and were obviously higher than cytology in adenocarcinoma (P < 0.01). In single use, DVL-3 mRNA had the highest specificity (94.1%) and PPV (95.7%), whereas δ-catenin mRNA had the highest sensitivity (92.0%) and NPV (88.5%). When combinations of markers were evaluated together, DVL-3 mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA gave a high-diagnostic performance: sensitivity of 100.0%, NPV of 100.0%, and accuracy of 96.0%, respectively. Conclusion. As molecular markers of detecting pleural micrometastasis, DVL-3 mRNA and δ-catenin mRNA are helpful to diagnose the cancer cells in pleural effusions of patients with lung cancer. PMID:22461838

  11. Fragile X mental retardation protein control of neuronal mRNA metabolism: Insights into mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    De Rubeis, Silvia; Bagni, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    The fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA binding protein that has an essential role in neurons. From the soma to the synapse, FMRP is associated with a specific subset of messenger RNAs and controls their posttranscriptional fates, i.e., dendritic localization and local translation. Because FMRP target mRNAs encode important neuronal proteins, the deregulation of their expression in the absence of FMRP leads to a strong impairment of synaptic function. Here, we review emerging evidence indicating a critical role for FMRP in the control of mRNA stability. To date, two mRNAs have been identified as being regulated in this manner: PSD-95 mRNA, encoding a scaffolding protein, and Nxf1 mRNA, encoding a general export factor. Moreover, expression studies suggest that the turnover of other neuronal mRNAs, including those encoding for the GABA(A) receptors subunits, could be affected by the loss of FMRP. According to the specific target and/or cellular context, FMRP could influence mRNA stability in the brain.

  12. Cytokine mRNA expression in postischemic/reperfused myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Herskowitz, A.; Choi, S.; Ansari, A. A.; Wesselingh, S.

    1995-01-01

    While the role of cytokines in mediating injury during hind limb skeletal muscle ischemia followed by reperfusion has recently been described, the role of cytokines in myocardial infarction and ischemia/reperfusion have remained relatively unexplored. We hypothesize that cytokines play an important role in the regulation of postischemic myocardial inflammation. This study reports the temporal sequence of proinflammatory cytokine gene expression in postischemic/reperfused myocardium and localizes interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha)-protein by immunostaining. Rats were subjected to either permanent left anterior descending (LAD) occlusion or to 35 minutes of LAD occlusion followed by reperfusion and sacrificed up to 7 days later. Rat-specific oligonucleotide probes were used to semiquantitatively assess the relative expression of mRNA for TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta, IL-2, IL-6, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) utilizing the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction amplification technique. Increased cardiac mRNA levels for all cytokines except IL-6 and IFN-gamma were measurable within 15 to 30 minutes of LAD occlusion and increased levels were generally sustained for 3 hours. During early reperfusion, mRNA levels for IL-6 and TGF-beta 1 were significantly reduced compared with permanent LAD occlusion. In both groups, cytokine mRNA levels all returned to baseline levels at 24 hours, while IL-1 beta, TNF-alpha, and TGF-beta 1 mRNA levels again rose significantly at 7 days only in animals with permanent LAD occlusion. Immunostaining for IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha protein revealed two patterns of reactivity: 1) microvascular staining for both IL-1 beta and TNF-alpha protein only in postischemic reperfused myocardium in early post-reperfusion time points; and 2) staining of infiltrating macrophages in healing infarct zones which was most prominent at 7 days after permanent LAD occlusion

  13. MPN- and Real-Time-Based PCR Methods for the Quantification of Alkane Monooxygenase Homologous Genes (alkB) in Environmental Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-de-Mora, Alfredo; Schulz, Stephan; Schloter, Michael

    Hydrocarbons are major contaminants of soil ecosystems as a result of uncontrolled oil spills and wastes disposal into the environment. Ecological risk assessment and remediation of affected sites is often constrained due to lack of suitable prognostic and diagnostic tools that provide information of abiotic-biotic interactions occurring between contaminants and biological targets. Therefore, the identification and quantification of genes involved in the degradation of hydrocarbons may play a crucial role for evaluating the natural attenuation potential of contaminated sites and the development of successful bioremediation strategies. Besides other gene clusters, the alk operon has been identified as a major player for alkane degradation in different soils. An oxygenase gene (alkB) codes for the initial step of the degradation of aliphatic alkanes under aerobic conditions. In this work, we present an MPN- and a real-time PCR method for the quantification of the bacterial gene alkB (coding for rubredoxin-dependent alkane monooxygenase) in environmental samples. Both approaches enable a rapid culture-independent screening of the alkB gene in the environment, which can be used to assess the intrinsic natural attenuation potential of a site or to follow up the on-going progress of bioremediation assays.

  14. Structures of the Apo and FAD-Bound Forms of 2-Hydroxybiphenyl 3-monooxygenase (HbpA) Locate Activity Hotspots Identified by Using Directed Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Chantel N; Mielke, Tamara; Farrugia, Joseph E; Frank, Annika; Man, Henry; Hart, Sam; Turkenburg, Johan P; Grogan, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    The FAD-dependent monooxygenase HbpA from Pseudomonas azelaica HBP1 catalyses the hydroxylation of 2-hydroxybiphenyl (2HBP) to 2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl (23DHBP). HbpA has been used extensively as a model for studying flavoprotein hydroxylases under process conditions, and has also been subjected to directed-evolution experiments that altered its catalytic properties. The structure of HbpA has been determined in its apo and FAD-complex forms to resolutions of 2.76 and 2.03 Å, respectively. Comparisons of the HbpA structure with those of homologues, in conjunction with a model of the reaction product in the active site, reveal His48 as the most likely acid/base residue to be involved in the hydroxylation mechanism. Mutation of His48 to Ala resulted in an inactive enzyme. The structures of HbpA also provide evidence that mutants achieved by directed evolution that altered activity are comparatively remote from the substrate-binding site. PMID:25737306

  15. The small-scale production of (U-14C)acetylene from Ba14CO3: Application to labeling of ammonia monooxygenase in autotrophic nitrifying bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Hyman, M.R.; Arp, D.J. )

    1990-11-01

    A small-scale method has been adapted from an established procedure for the generation of (U-14C)acetylene from inexpensive and commonly available precursors. The method involves the fusing of Ba14CO3 with excess barium metal to produce Ba14C2. The BaC2 is reacted with water to generate acetylene which is then selectively dissolved into dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). The results presented demonstrate the effect of Ba:BaCO3 ratio on the concentrations of various gases released during the hydrolysis reaction and quantify the selectivity of the DMSO-trapping process for each gas. (U-14C)Acetylene generated by this method has been used to inactivate ammonia monooxygenase in three species of autotrophic nitrifying bacteria: Nitrosomonas europaea, Nitrosococcus oceanus, and Nitrosolobus multiformis. Our results demonstrate that acetylene inactivation of this enzyme in all three species results in the covalent incorporation of radioactive label into a polypeptide of apparent Mr of 25,000-27,000, as determined by sodium dodecylsulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography.

  16. The Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Gene and Essential Hypertension: The Joint Effect of Polymorphism E158K and Cigarette Smoking on Disease Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Bushueva, Olga; Solodilova, Maria; Churnosov, Mikhail; Ivanov, Vladimir; Polonikov, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    Gene encoding flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3), a microsomal antioxidant defense enzyme, has been suggested to contribute to essential hypertension (EH). The present study was designed to investigate whether common functional polymorphism E158K (rs2266782) of the FMO3 gene is associated with EH susceptibility in a Russian population. A total of 2 995 unrelated subjects from Kursk (1 362 EH patients and 843 healthy controls) and Belgorod (357 EH patients and 422 population controls) regions of Central Russia were recruited for this study. DNA samples from all study participants were genotyped for the FMO3 gene polymorphism through PCR followed by RFLP analysis. We found that the polymorphism E158K is associated with increased risk of essential hypertension in both discovery population from Kursk region (OR 1.36 95% CI 1.09–1.69, P = 0.01) and replication population from Belgorod region (OR 1.54 95% CI 1.07–1.89, P = 0.02) after adjustment for gender and age using logistic regression analysis. Further analysis showed that the increased hypertension risk in carriers of genotype 158KK gene occurred in cigarette smokers, whereas nonsmoker carriers of this genotype did not show the disease risk. This is the first study reporting the association of the FMO3 gene polymorphism and the risk of essential hypertension. PMID:25243081

  17. Evolutionary recruitment of a flavin-dependent monooxygenase for the detoxification of host plant-acquired pyrrolizidine alkaloids in the alkaloid-defended arctiid moth Tyria jacobaeae

    PubMed Central

    Naumann, Claudia; Hartmann, Thomas; Ober, Dietrich

    2002-01-01

    Larvae of Tyria jacobaeae feed solely upon the pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plant Senecio jacobaea. Ingested pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), which are toxic to unspecialized insects and vertebrates, are efficiently N-oxidized in the hemolymph of T. jacobaeae by senecionine N-oxygenase (SNO), a flavin-dependent monooxygenase (FMO) with a high substrate specificity for PAs. Peptide microsequences obtained from purified T. jacobaeae SNO were used to clone the corresponding cDNA, which was expressed in active form in Escherichia coli. T. jacobaeae SNO possesses a signal peptide characteristic of extracellular proteins, and it belongs to a large family of mainly FMO-like sequences of mostly unknown function, including two predicted Drosophila melanogaster gene products. The data indicate that the gene for T. jacobaeae SNO, highly specific for toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, was recruited from a preexisting insect-specific FMO gene family of hitherto unknown function. The enzyme allows the larvae to feed on PA-containing plants and to accumulate predation-deterrent PAs in the hemolymph. PMID:11972041

  18. Involvement of the CYP78A subfamily of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases in protonema growth and gametophore formation in the moss Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Katsumata, Takumi; Fukazawa, Jutarou; Magome, Hiroshi; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Kamiya, Yuji; Natsume, Masahiro; Kawaide, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Shinjiro

    2011-01-01

    CYP78 is a plant-specific family of cytochrome P450 monooxygenases, some members of which regulate the plastochron length and organ size in angiosperms. The CYP78 family appears to be highly conserved in land plants, but there have been no reports on the role of CYP78s in bryophytes. The moss, Physcomitrella patens, possesses two CYP78As, CYP78A27 and CYP78A28. We produced single and double mutants and overexpression lines for CYP78A27 and CYP78A28 by gene targeting to investigate the function of CYP78As in P. patens. Neither the cyp78a27 nor cyp78a28 single mutant showed any obvious phenotype, while the double mutant exhibited severely retarded protonemal growth and gametophore development. The endogenous levels of some plant hormones were also altered in the double mutant. Transgenic lines that overexpressed CYP78A27 or CYP78A28 showed delayed and reduced bud formation. Our results suggest that CYP78As participate in the synthesis of a critical growth regulator in P. patens.

  19. Molecular Insight into Substrate Recognition and Catalysis of Baeyer–Villiger Monooxygenase MtmOIV, the Key Frame Modifying Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of Anticancer Agent Mithramycin

    PubMed Central

    Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) have been shown to play key roles for the biosynthesis of important natural products. MtmOIV, a homodimeric FAD- and NADPH-dependent BVMO, catalyzes the key frame-modifying steps of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway, including an oxidative C-C bond cleavage, by converting its natural substrate premithramycin B into mithramycin DK, the immediate precursor of mithramycin. The drastically improved protein structure of MtmOIV along with the high-resolution structure of MtmOIV in complex with its natural substrate premithramycin B are reported here, revealing previously undetected key residues that are important for substrate recognition and catalysis. Kinetic analyses of selected mutants allowed us to probe the substrate binding pocket of MtmOIV, and also to discover the putative NADPH binding site. This is the first substrate-bound structure of MtmOIV providing new insights into substrate recognition and catalysis, which paves the way for the future design of a tailored enzyme for the chemo-enzymatic preparation of novel mithramycin analogues. PMID:23992662

  20. Allelic Analyses of the Arabidopsis YUC1 Locus Reveal Residues and Domains Essential for the Functions of YUC Family of Flavin Monooxygenases

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Xianhui; Liu, Sainan; Pierri, Florencia; Dai, Xinhua; Qu, Li-Jia; Zhao, Yunde

    2011-01-01

    Flavin monooxygenases (FMOs) play critical roles in plant growth and development by synthesizing auxin and other signaling molecules. However, the structure and function relationship within plant FMOs is not understood. Here we defined the important residues and domains of the Arabidopsis YUC1 FMO, a key enzyme in auxin biosynthesis. We previously showed that simultaneous inactivation of YUC1 and its homologue YUC4 caused severe defects in vascular and floral development. We mutagenized the yuc4 mutant and screened for mutants with phenotypes similar to those of yuc1 yuc4 double mutants. Among the isolated mutants, five of them contained mutations in the YUC1 gene. Interestingly, the mutations identified in the new yuc1 alleles were concentrated in the two GXGXXG motifs that are highly conserved among the plant FMOs. One such motif presumably binds to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor and the other binds to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH). We also identified the Ser139 to Phe conversion in yuc1, a mutation that is located between the two nucleotide-binding sites. By analyzing a series of yuc1 mutants, we identified key residues and motifs essential for the functions of YUC1 FMO. PMID:21205174

  1. DFT study of the mechanism for methane hydroxylation by soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO): effects of oxidation state, spin state, and coordination number.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shu-Ping; Shiota, Yoshihito; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2013-01-28

    The exact structure of the active site of intermediate Q, the methane-oxidizing species of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO), and the reaction mechanism of Q with methane molecule are still not fully clear. To gain further insights into the structure and reaction mechanism, five diiron models of Q that differ in shape, oxidation state, spin state, and coordination number of the two iron centers are studied. Different mechanisms in different spin states were explored. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations show that Fe(III)Fe(IV)(μ-O)(μ-OH) is more reactive than Fe(IV)(2)(μ-O)(2) in the oxygen-rich environment and that the reactivity of the active core of sMMO-Q is not enhanced by converting its oxo bridge into a terminal ligand. A four-coordinated diiron model is the most effective for methane hydroxylation. Both radical and non-radical intermediates are involved in the reactions for the four-coordinated diiron model.

  2. Enhanced production of epsilon-caprolactone by overexpression of NADPH-regenerating glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase in recombinant Escherichia coli harboring cyclohexanone monooxygenase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Heong; Park, Jin-Byung; Park, Kyungmoon; Kim, Myoung-Dong; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2007-08-01

    Whole-cell conversion of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone was attempted by recombinant Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) expressing cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus NCIMB 9871. High concentrations of cyclohexanone and epsilon-caprolactone reduced CHMO-mediated bioconversion of cyclohexanone to epsilon-caprolactone in the resting recombinant E. coli cells. Metabolically active cells were employed by adopting a fed-batch culture to improve the production of epsilon-caprolactone from cyclohexanone. A glucose-limited fed-batch Baeyer-Villiger oxidation where a cyclohexanone level was maintained less than 6 g/l resulted in a maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration of 11.0 g/l. The maximum epsilon-caprolactone concentration was improved further to 15.3 g/l by coexpression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, an NADPH-generating enzyme encoded by the zwf gene which corresponded to a 39% enhancement in epsilon-caprolactone concentration compared with the control experiment performed under the same conditions.

  3. Drug metabolizing capacity in vitro and in vivo--II. Correlations between hepatic microsomal monooxygenase markers in phenobarbital-induced rats.

    PubMed

    Matthew, D E; Houston, J B

    1990-08-15

    Pretreatment with various doses of phenobarbital (PB) has been used to create a pool of rats with a wide range of hepatic microsomal monooxygenase activity to systematically examine relationships between and within in vivo and in vitro markers. The in vivo clearance of tolbutamide (TOL), theophylline (TH), antipyrine (AP) and its metabolites were determined in the same rats used for hepatic microsome preparation and assessment of P450 content and activities (via 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD), 7 ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, 7-methoxycoumarin O-demethylase (MCOD) and aldrin epoxidase determinations). A graded dose-response relationship was found between PB treatment and most but not all parameters. The need for careful selection of in vivo and as well as in vitro markers is apparent from these studies. The most responsive parameters--TOL and AP clearances, MCOD and ECOD activities--were also those producing the strongest in vivo-in vitro correlations. Despite the diffuse nature of the PB induced response in P450 complement, good predictive relationships were apparent between ECOD and TOL clearance (r2 = 0.88).

  4. Spiroethers of German chamomile inhibit production of aflatoxin G and trichothecene mycotoxin by inhibiting cytochrome P450 monooxygenases involved in their biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Tomoya; Yaguchi, Atsushi; Takahashi-Ando, Naoko; Kimura, Makoto; Takahashi, Haruo; Nakajima, Takashi; Sugita-Konishi, Yoshiko; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Sakuda, Shohei

    2008-07-01

    The essential oil of German chamomile showed specific inhibition toward aflatoxin G(1) (AFG(1)) production, and (E)- and (Z)-spiroethers were isolated as the active compounds from the oil. The (E)- and (Z)-spiroethers inhibited AFG(1) production of Aspergillus parasiticus with inhibitory concentration 50% (IC(50)) values of 2.8 and 20.8 microM, respectively, without inhibiting fungal growth. Results of an O-methylsterigmatocystin (OMST) conversion study indicated that the spiroethers specifically inhibited the OMST to AFG(1) pathway. A cytochrome P450 monooxygenase, CYPA, is known as an essential enzyme for this pathway. Because CYPA has homology with TRI4, a key enzyme catalyzing early steps in the biosynthesis of trichothecenes, the inhibitory actions of the two spiroethers against TRI4 reactions and 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol (3-ADON) production were tested. (E)- and (Z)-spiroethers inhibited the enzymatic activity of TRI4 dose-dependently and interfered with 3-ADON production by Fusarium graminearum, with IC(50) values of 27.1 and 103 microM, respectively. Our results suggest that the spiroethers inhibited AFG(1) and 3-ADON production by inhibiting CYPA and TRI4, respectively.

  5. Microbial production of aliphatic (S)-epoxyalkanes by using Rhodococcus sp. strain ST-10 styrene monooxygenase expressed in organic-solvent-tolerant Kocuria rhizophila DC2201.

    PubMed

    Toda, Hiroshi; Ohuchi, Takuya; Imae, Ryouta; Itoh, Nobuya

    2015-03-01

    We describe the development of biocatalysis for producing optically pure straight-chain (S)-epoxyalkanes using styrene monooxygenase of Rhodococcus sp. strain ST-10 (RhSMO). RhSMO was expressed in the organic solvent-tolerant microorganism Kocuria rhizophila DC2201, and the bioconversion reaction was performed in an organic solvent-water biphasic reaction system. The biocatalytic process enantioselectively converted linear terminal alkenes to their corresponding (S)-epoxyalkanes using glucose and molecular oxygen. When 1-heptene and 6-chloro-1-hexene were used as substrates (400 mM) under optimized conditions, 88.3 mM (S)-1,2-epoxyheptane and 246.5 mM (S)-1,2-epoxy-6-chlorohexane, respectively, accumulated in the organic phase with good enantiomeric excess (ee; 84.2 and 95.5%). The biocatalysis showed broad substrate specificity toward various aliphatic alkenes, including functionalized and unfunctionalized alkenes, with good to excellent ee. Here, we demonstrate that this biocatalytic system is environmentally friendly and useful for producing various enantiopure (S)-epoxyalkanes.

  6. A collection of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes involved in modification and detoxification of herbicide atrazine in rice (Oryza sativa) plants.

    PubMed

    Rong Tan, Li; Chen Lu, Yi; Jing Zhang, Jing; Luo, Fang; Yang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    Plant cytochrome P450 monooxygenases constitute one of the largest families of protein genes involved in plant growth, development and acclimation to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, whether these genes respond to organic toxic compounds and their biological functions for detoxifying toxic compounds such as herbicides in rice are poorly understood. The present study identified 201 genes encoding cytochrome P450s from an atrazine-exposed rice transcriptome through high-throughput sequencing. Of these, 69 cytochrome P450 genes were validated by microarray and some of them were confirmed by real time PCR. Activities of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and p-nitroanisole O-demethylase (PNOD) related to toxicity were determined and significantly induced by atrazine exposure. To dissect the mechanism underlying atrazine modification and detoxification by P450, metabolites (or derivatives) of atrazine in plants were analyzed by ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS). Major metabolites comprised desmethylatrazine (DMA), desethylatrazine (DEA), desisopropylatrazine (DIA), hydroxyatrazine (HA), hydroxyethylatrazine (HEA) and hydroxyisopropylatrazine (HIA). All of them were chemically modified by P450s. Furthermore, two specific inhibitors of piperonyl butoxide (PBO) and malathion (MAL) were used to assess the correlation between the P450s activity and rice responses including accumulation of atrazine in tissues, shoot and root growth and detoxification.

  7. Peony-Glycyrrhiza Decoction, an Herbal Preparation, Inhibits Clozapine Metabolism via Cytochrome P450s, but Not Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase in In Vitro Models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Tian, Dan-Dan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Di; Tan, Qing-Rong; Wang, Chuan-Yue; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2015-07-01

    Our previous studies have shown the therapeutic efficacy and underlying mechanisms of Peony-Glycyrrhiza Decoction (PGD), an herbal preparation, in treating antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia in cultured cells, animal models, and human subjects. In the present study, we further evaluated pharmacokinetic interactions of PGD with clozapine (CLZ) in human liver microsomes (HLM), recombinantly expressed cytochrome P450s (P450s), and flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs). CLZ metabolites, N-demethyl-clozapine and clozapine-N-oxide, were measured. PGD, individual peony and glycyrrhiza preparations, and the two individual preparations in combination reduced production of CLZ metabolites to different extents in HLM. While the known bioactive constituents of PGD play a relatively minor role in the kinetic effects of PGD on P450 activity, PGD as a whole had a weak-to-moderate inhibitory potency toward P450s, in particular CYP1A2 and CYP3A4. FMOs are less actively involved in mediating CLZ metabolism and the PGD inhibition of CLZ. These results suggest that PGD has the capacity to suppress CLZ metabolism in the human liver microsomal system. This suppression is principally associated with the inhibition of related P450 activity but not FMOs. The present study provides in vitro evidence of herb-antipsychotic interactions.

  8. Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b Mutants Having Constitutive Expression of Soluble Methane Monooxygenase in the Presence of High Levels of Copper

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, Patricia A.; Agarwal, Sandeep K.; Speitel, Gerald E.; Georgiou, George

    1992-01-01

    The methanotrophic bacterium Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b is unusually active in degrading recalcitrant haloalkanes such as trichloroethylene (TCE). The first and rate-limiting step in the degradation of TCE is catalyzed by a soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO). This enzyme is not expressed when the cells are grown in the presence of copper at concentrations typically found in polluted groundwater. Under these conditions, M. trichosporium OB3b expresses a particulate form of the enzyme (pMMO), which has a narrow substrate specificity and does not degrade TCE at any significant rate. We have isolated M. trichosporium OB3b mutants that are deficient in pMMO and express sMMO constitutively in the presence of elevated concentrations of copper. One mutant (PP358) exhibited a TCE degradation rate which was almost twice as high as that of the wild-type strain grown under optimal conditions (without copper). All of the mutants lost the ability to express pMMO activity and to form stacked intracellular membranes characteristic of wild-type cells expressing pMMO. Images PMID:16348810

  9. Microbial Production of Aliphatic (S)-Epoxyalkanes by Using Rhodococcus sp. Strain ST-10 Styrene Monooxygenase Expressed in Organic-Solvent-Tolerant Kocuria rhizophila DC2201

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Hiroshi; Ohuchi, Takuya; Imae, Ryouta

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of biocatalysis for producing optically pure straight-chain (S)-epoxyalkanes using styrene monooxygenase of Rhodococcus sp. strain ST-10 (RhSMO). RhSMO was expressed in the organic solvent-tolerant microorganism Kocuria rhizophila DC2201, and the bioconversion reaction was performed in an organic solvent-water biphasic reaction system. The biocatalytic process enantioselectively converted linear terminal alkenes to their corresponding (S)-epoxyalkanes using glucose and molecular oxygen. When 1-heptene and 6-chloro-1-hexene were used as substrates (400 mM) under optimized conditions, 88.3 mM (S)-1,2-epoxyheptane and 246.5 mM (S)-1,2-epoxy-6-chlorohexane, respectively, accumulated in the organic phase with good enantiomeric excess (ee; 84.2 and 95.5%). The biocatalysis showed broad substrate specificity toward various aliphatic alkenes, including functionalized and unfunctionalized alkenes, with good to excellent ee. Here, we demonstrate that this biocatalytic system is environmentally friendly and useful for producing various enantiopure (S)-epoxyalkanes. PMID:25556188

  10. Formaldehyde production promoted by rat nasal cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases with nasal decongestants, essences, solvents, air pollutants, nicotine, and cocaine as substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Dahl, A.R.; Hadley, W.M.

    1983-02-01

    To identify compounds which might be metabolized to formaldehyde in the nasal cavity, 32 potential substrates for cytochrome P-450-dependent monooxygenases were screened with rat nasal and, for comparison, liver microsomes. Tested substrates included 6 nasal decongestants, cocaine, nicotine, 9 essences, 3 potential air pollutants, and 12 solvents. Each test substrate, with the possible exception of the air pollutants, contained one or more N-methyl, O-methyl, or S-methyl groups. Eighteen of the tested materials were metabolized to produce formaldehyde by nasal microsomes. Five substrates, namely, the solvents HMPA and dimethylaniline, cocaine, and the essences dimethyl anthranilate and p-methoxyacetophenone, were metabolized to produce formaldehyde at rates exceeding 1000 pmol/mg microsomal protein/min by nasal microsomes. Eight substrates, including four nasal decongestants, nicotine, and an extract of diesel exhaust particles, were metabolized to produce formaldehyde at rates of 200 to 1000 pmol/mg microsomal protein/min. Five other substrates were metabolized to formaldehyde at detectable rates. The results indicate that a variety of materials which often come in contact with the nasal mucosa can be metabolized to formaldehyde by nasal enzymes. The released formaldehyde may influence the irritancy of inhaled compounds and has been suggested to play a role in the tumorigenicity of some compounds.

  11. Biomimetic oxidation studies. 9. Mechanistic aspects of the oxidation of alcohols with functional,active site methane monooxygenase enzyme models in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Rabion, A. ||; Chen, S.; Wang, J.; Buchanan, R.M.; Seris, J.L.; Fish, R.H. |

    1995-12-13

    The syntheses of biomimetic complexes that mimic the major structural features of the hydroxylase component of methane monooxygenase enzyme (MMO) and, more importantly, that provide similar alkane functionalization activity, in the presence of an oxidant, have been of great interest to the discipline of bioinorganic chemistry. In this communication, we will demonstrate the feasibility of conducting biomimetic oxidation studies in H{sub 2}O with soluble substrates, i.e., alcohols (cyclohexanol, benzyl alcohol), using H{sub 2}O-stable MMO mimics at pH 4.2, and the oxidant, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP). Both the Mitusunobu procedure and the mesylate displacement reaction proceeded with complete inversion of the stereo-center and provided optically pure penultimate intermediate (>99.9% ee). The synthesis was completed by reduction of the nitro group under standard conditions to deliver LY300164 in 87%. In summary, we have developed an efficient and environmentally benign synthesis of the 5H-2,3-benzodiazepine LY300164 that provides the optically pure compound in 51% overall yield. Intramolecular hydrazone alkylation led to a remarkably facile and selective formation of the benzodiazepine. Furthermore, the application of resins to whole-cell-based biotransformations should find general utility for similar reactions that are complicated by component inhibition and product isolation. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Molecular Insight into Substrate Recognition and Catalysis of Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase MtmOIV, the Key Frame-Modifying Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of Anticancer Agent Mithramycin

    SciTech Connect

    Bosserman, Mary A.; Downey, Theresa; Noinaj, Nicholas; Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jürgen

    2014-02-14

    Baeyer–Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) have been shown to play key roles for the biosynthesis of important natural products. MtmOIV, a homodimeric FAD- and NADPH-dependent BVMO, catalyzes the key frame-modifying steps of the mithramycin biosynthetic pathway, including an oxidative C–C bond cleavage, by converting its natural substrate premithramycin B into mithramycin DK, the immediate precursor of mithramycin. The drastically improved protein structure of MtmOIV along with the high-resolution structure of MtmOIV in complex with its natural substrate premithramycin B are reported here, revealing previously undetected key residues that are important for substrate recognition and catalysis. Kinetic analyses of selected mutants allowed us to probe the substrate binding pocket of MtmOIV and also to discover the putative NADPH binding site. This is the first substrate-bound structure of MtmOIV providing new insights into substrate recognition and catalysis, which paves the way for the future design of a tailored enzyme for the chemo-enzymatic preparation of novel mithramycin analogues.

  13. Induction of cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases in northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens, by 3,3{prime},4,4{prime},5-pentachlorobiphenyl

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.; Jung, R.E.; Karasov, W.H.; Melancon, M.J.

    1998-08-01

    In the past decade, biochemical and physiological characteristics such as hepatic detoxifying system. DNA adducts, thyroid malfunction, and acetylcholinesterase inhibition have been used extensively as biomarkers for contaminant exposure. Northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were injected intraperitoneally either with a solution of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 m corn oil at a concentration of 0.2, 0.7, 2.3, or 7.8 mg/kg body weight or with corn oil alone. Appropriate assay conditions with hepatic microsomes were determined for four cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases: ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD), methoxy-ROD (MROD), benzyloxy-ROD (BROD), and pentoxy-ROD (PROD). One week after PCB administration, the specific activities of EROD, MROD, BROD, and PROD were not elevated at doses {le}0.7 mg/kg (p > 0.05) but were significantly increased at doses {ge}2.3 mg/kg compared to the control groups (p < 0.05). The increased activities of these four enzymes were 3 to 6.4 times those in the control groups. The increased activities were maintained for at least 4 weeks. Because of a lack of induction at low doses of PCB 126, which were still relatively high compared to currently known environmental concentration, the authors suspect that EROD, MROD, BROD, and PROD activities are not sensitive biomarkers for coplanar PCB exposure in leopard frogs.

  14. Induction of cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases in northern leopard frogs, Rana pipiens, by 3,3',4,4',5-pentachlorobiphenyl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huang, Y.-W.; Melancon, M.J.; Jung, R.E.; Karasov, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    Northern leopard frogs (Rana pipiens) were injected intraperitoneally either with a solution of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 in corn oil at a concentration of 0.2, 0.7, 2.3 and 7.8 mg/kg body weight or with corn oil alone. Appropriate assay conditions with hepatic microsomes were determined for four cytochrome P450-associated monooxygenases: ethoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase (EROD), methoxy-ROD (MROD), benzyloxy-ROD (BROD) and pentoxy-ROD (PROD). One week after PCB administration, the specific activities of EROD, MROD, BROD and PROD were not elevated at doses ? 0.7 mg/kg (p > 0.05), but were significantly increased at doses ? 2.3 mg/kg compared to the control groups (p < 0.05). The increased activity of these four enzymes ranged from 3to 6.4fold relative to control levels. The increased activities were maintained for at least four weeks. Due to a lack of induction at low doses of PCB 126, which were still relatively high compared to currentlyknown environmental concentrations, we suspect that EROD, MROD, BROD, and PROD activities are not sensitive biomarkers for coplanar PCB exposure in leopard frogs.

  15. Expression of an alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene and methyl tert-butyl ether co-metabolic oxidation in Pseudomonas citronellolis.

    PubMed

    Bravo, Ana Luisa; Sigala, Juan Carlos; Le Borgne, Sylvie; Morales, Marcia

    2015-04-01

    Pseudomonas citronellolis UAM-Ps1 co-metabolically transforms methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) to tert-butyl alcohol with n-pentane (2.6 mM), n-octane (1.5 mM) or dicyclopropylketone (DCPK) (4.4 mM), a gratuitous inducer of alkane hydroxylase (AlkB) activity. The reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the alkane monooxygenase (alkB) gene expression. The alkB gene was expressed in the presence of n-alkanes and DCPK and MTBE oxidation occurred only in cultures when alkB was transcribed. A correlation between the number of alkB transcripts and MTBE consumption was found (ΜΤΒΕ consumption in μmol = 1.44e(-13) x DNA copies, R(2) = 0.99) when MTBE (0.84 mM) was added. Furthermore, alkB was cloned and expressed into Escherichia coli and the recombinant AlkB had a molecular weight of 42 kDa. This is the first report where the expression of alkB is related to the co-metabolic oxidation of MTBE.

  16. Continuous cyclohexane oxidation to cyclohexanol using a novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase from Acidovorax sp. CHX100 in recombinant P. taiwanensis VLB120 biofilms.

    PubMed

    Karande, Rohan; Debor, Linde; Salamanca, Diego; Bogdahn, Fabian; Engesser, Karl-Heinrich; Buehler, Katja; Schmid, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The applications of biocatalysts in chemical industries are characterized by activity, selectivity, and stability. One key strategy to achieve high biocatalytic activity is the identification of novel enzymes with kinetics optimized for organic synthesis by Nature. The isolation of novel cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes from Acidovorax sp. CHX100 and their functional expression in recombinant Pseudomonas taiwanensis VLB120 enabled efficient oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanol. Although initial resting cell activities of 20 U gCDW (-1) were achieved, the rapid decrease in catalytic activity due to the toxicity of cyclohexane prevented synthetic applications. Cyclohexane toxicity was reduced and cellular activities stabilized over the reaction time by delivering the toxic substrate through the vapor phase and by balancing the aqueous phase mass transfer with the cellular conversion rate. The potential of this novel CYP enzyme was exploited by transferring the shake flask reaction to an aqueous-air segmented flow biofilm membrane reactor for maximizing productivity. Cyclohexane was continuously delivered via the silicone membrane. This ensured lower reactant toxicity and continuous product formation at an average volumetric productivity of 0.4 g L tube (-1) h(-1) for several days. This highlights the potential of combining a powerful catalyst with a beneficial reactor design to overcome critical issues of cyclohexane oxidation to cyclohexanol. It opens new opportunities for biocatalytic transformations of compounds which are toxic, volatile, and have low solubility in water.

  17. Coupled effects of methane monooxygenase and nitrogen source on growth and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) production of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Zhou, Jiti; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    The coupled effects of nitrogen source and methane monooxygenase (MMO) on the growth and poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulation capacity of methanotrophs were explored. The ammonia-supplied methanotrophs expressing soluble MMO (sMMO) grew at the highest rate, while N2-fixing bacteria expressing particulate MMO (pMMO) grew at the lowest rate. Further study showed that more hydroxylamine and nitrite was formed by ammonia-supplied bacteria containing pMMO, which might cause their slightly lower growth rate. The highest PHB content (51.0%) was obtained under nitrogen-limiting conditions with the inoculation of nitrate-supplied bacteria containing pMMO. Ammonia-supplied bacteria also accumulated a higher content of PHB (45.2%) with the expression of pMMO, while N2-fixing bacteria containing pMMO only showed low PHB production capacity (32.1%). The maximal PHB contents of bacteria expressing sMMO were low, with no significant change under different nitrogen source conditions. The low MMO activity, low cell growth rate and low PHB production capacity of methanotrophs continuously cultivated with N2 with the expression of pMMO were greatly improved in the cyclic NO3(-)N2 cultivation regime, indicating that long-term deficiency of nitrogen sources was detrimental to the activity of methanotrophs expressing pMMO.

  18. Expression in Escherichia coli of the flavin-containing monooxygenase D (form II) from adult human liver: determination of a distinct tertiary amine substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Lomri, N; Yang, Z; Cashman, J R

    1993-01-01

    The cDNA for a major component of the family of flavin-containing monooxygenases (FMOs) present in adult human liver (i.e., HLFMO-D) has been cloned and expressed in a prokaryotic system. Escherichia coli strain NM522 was transformed with pTrcHLFMO-D, and the HLFMO-D cDNA was expressed under the control of the Trc promoter. A variety of tertiary amine substrates [i.e., chlorpromazine and 10-[(N,N-dimethylamino)alkyl]- 2-(trifluoromethyl)phenothiazines] were efficiently oxygenated by HLFMO-D cDNA expressed in E. coli or by adult human liver microsomes. Approximate dimensions of the substrate binding channel for both adult human liver microsomal FMO and cDNA-expressed HLFMO-D were apparent from an examination of the N-oxygenation of a series of 10-[(N,N-dimethylamino)alkyl]-2-(trifluoromethyl)phenothiazines. The substrate regioselectivity studies suggest that adult human liver FMO form D possesses a distinct substrate specificity compared with form A FMO from animal hepatic sources. It is likely that the substrate specificity observed for cDNA-expressed adult human liver FMO-D may have consequences for the metabolism and distribution of tertiary amines and phosphorus- and sulfur-containing drugs in humans and may provide insight into the physiologic substrate(s) for adult human liver FMO.

  19. Diversity of alkane degrading bacteria associated with plants in a petroleum oil-contaminated environment and expression of alkane monooxygenase (alkB) genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andria, V.; Yousaf, S.; Reichenauer, T. G.; Smalla, K.; Sessitsch, A.

    2009-04-01

    Among twenty-six different plant species, Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum var. Taurus), Birdsfoot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus var. Leo), and the combination of both plants performed well in a petroleum oil contaminated soil. Hydrocarbon degrading bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere, root interior and shoot interior and subjected to the analysis of 16S rRNA, the 16S and 23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and alkane hydroxylase genes. Higher numbers of culturable, degrading bacteria were associated with Italian ryegrass, which were also characterized by a higher diversity, particularly in the plant interior. Only half of the isolated bacteria hosted known alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB and cytochrome P153-like). Our results indicated that alkB genes have spread through horizontal gene transfer, particularly in the Italian ryegrass rhizosphere, and suggested mobility of catabolic genes between Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. We furthermore studied the colonization behaviour of selected hydrocarbon-degrading strains (comprising an endopyhte and a rhizosphere strain) as well as the expression of their alkane monooxygenase genes in association with Italian ryegrass. Results showed that the endophyte strain better colonized the plant, particularly the plant interior, and also showed higher expression of alkB genes suggesting a more efficient degradation of the pollutant. Furthermore, plants inoculated with the endophyte were better able to grow in the presence of diesel. The rhizosphere strain colonized primarily the rhizosphere and showed low alkB gene expression in the plant interior.

  20. stcS, a putative P-450 monooxygenase, is required for the conversion of versicolorin A to sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed Central

    Keller, N P; Segner, S; Bhatnagar, D; Adams, T H

    1995-01-01

    Sterigmatocystin (ST) and aflatoxin are carcinogenic end point metabolites derived from the same biochemical pathway, which is found in several Aspergillus spp. Recently, an ST gene cluster, containing approximately 25 distinct genes that are each proposed to function specifically in ST biosynthesis, has been identified in Aspergillus nidulans. Each of these structural genes is named stc (sterigmatocystin) followed by a consecutive letter of the alphabet. We have previously described stcU (formerly verA) as encoding a keto-reductase required for the conversion of versicolorin A to ST. We now describe a second A. nidulans gene, stcS (formerly verB), that is located within 2 kb of stcU in the ST gene cluster. An stcS-disrupted strain of A. nidulans, TSS17, was unable to produce ST and converted ST/aflatoxin precursors to versicolorin A rather than ST, indicating that stcS functions at the same point in the pathway as stcU. Genomic sequence analysis of stcS shows that it encodes a cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase and constitutes a novel P-450 family, CYP59. Assuming that StcU activity mimics that of similar P-450s, it is likely that StcU catalyzes one of the proposed oxidation steps necessary to convert versicolorin A to ST. These results constitute the first genetic proof that the conversion of versicolorin A to ST requires more than one enzymatic activity. PMID:7486998

  1. Molecular cloning of seal myoglobin mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, D; Blanchetot, A; Jeffreys, A J

    1982-01-01

    Grey seal skeletal muscle containing high levels of myoglobin was used to prepare poly(A)+ RNA. In vitro translation of this RNA produced a range of polypeptides including myoglobin. cDNA was prepared by reverse transcription of muscle poly(A)+ RNA and cloned into the plasmid pAT 153. 4% of cDNA recombinants were shown to contain myoglobin cDNA inserts. DNA sequence analysis of one clone (pSM 178) which contained a relatively large myoglobin cDNA insert showed an incomplete cDNA comprising the terminal 293 nucleotides of 3' non-translated mRNA sequences. Hybridization experiments using this myoglobin cDNA indicated that seal myoglobin is coded by a single gene which is transcribed to give a 1400 nucleotide mRNA considerably longer than related haemoglobin mRNAs. Images PMID:6185919

  2. Peptide inhibitors of botulinum neurotoxin by mRNA display

    SciTech Connect

    Yiadom, Kwabena P.A.B.; Muhie, Seid; Yang, David C.H. . E-mail: yangdc@georgetown.edu

    2005-10-07

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are extremely toxic. The metalloproteases associated with the toxins cleave proteins essential for neurotransmitter secretion. Inhibitors of the metalloprotease are currently sought to control the toxicity of BoNTs. Toward that goal, we produced a synthetic cDNA for the expression and purification of the metalloprotease of BoNT/A in Escherichia coli as a biotin-ubiquitin fusion protein, and constructed a combinatorial peptide library to screen for BoNT/A light chain inhibitors using mRNA display. A protease assay was developed using immobilized intact SNAP-25 as the substrate. The new peptide inhibitors showed a 10-fold increase in affinity to BoNT/A light chain than the parent peptide. Interestingly, the sequences of the new peptide inhibitors showed abundant hydrophobic residues but few hydrophilic residues. The results suggest that mRNA display may provide a general approach in developing peptide inhibitors of BoNTs.

  3. Control of mRNA Translation in ALS Proteinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cestra, Gianluca; Rossi, Simona; Di Salvio, Michela; Cozzolino, Mauro

    2017-01-01

    Cells robustly reprogram gene expression during stress generated by protein misfolding and aggregation. In this condition, cells assemble the bulk of mRNAs into translationally silent stress granules (SGs), while they sustain the translation of specific mRNAs coding for proteins that are needed to overcome cellular stress. Alterations of this process are deeply associated to neurodegeneration. This is the case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a neurodegenerative disorder caused by a selective loss of motor neurons. Indeed, impairment of protein homeostasis as well as alterations of RNA metabolism are now recognized as major players in the pathogenesis of ALS. In particular, evidence shows that defective mRNA transport and translation are implicated. Here, we provide a review of what is currently known about altered mRNA translation in ALS and how this impacts on the ability of affected cells to cope with proteotoxic stress. PMID:28386218

  4. High lib mRNA expression in breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kazuki; Hata, Mitsumi; Yokota, Hiroshi

    2004-06-30

    Lib, first identified as a novel beta-amyloid responsive gene in rat astrocytes, has an extracellular domain of 15 leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) followed by a transmembrane domain and a short cytoplasmic region. It is a distinctly inducible gene and is thought to play a key role in inflammatory states via the LRR extracellular motif, an ideal structural framework for protein-protein and protein-matrix interactions. To evaluate potential roles of Lib, we screened various tumors for Lib expression. Lib mRNA expression was high and uniquely expressed in breast tumor tissues, compared to paired normal breast tissues. Lib mRNA was localized in the ductal carcinoma cells and Lib protein displayed a homophilic association on the surface of cultured cells. These data suggest that Lib may play a role in the progression of breast carcinomas and may be a diagnostic marker for breast tumors.

  5. The utility of protein and mRNA correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Samuel H.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic measurements are revolutionizing the way we model and predict cellular behavior, and multi-omic comparisons are being published with increased regularity. Some have expected a trivial and predictable correlation between mRNA and protein; however the manifest complexity of biological regulation suggests a more nuanced relationship. Indeed, observing this lack of strict correlation provides clues for new research topics, and has the potential for transformative biological insight.

  6. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  7. Modified mRNA Vaccines Protect against Zika Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Richner, Justin M; Himansu, Sunny; Dowd, Kimberly A; Butler, Scott L; Salazar, Vanessa; Fox, Julie M; Julander, Justin G; Tang, William W; Shresta, Sujan; Pierson, Theodore C; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Diamond, Michael S

    2017-03-09

    The emergence of ZIKV infection has prompted a global effort to develop safe and effective vaccines. We engineered a lipid nanoparticle (LNP) encapsulated modified mRNA vaccine encoding wild-type or variant ZIKV structural genes and tested immunogenicity and protection in mice. Two doses of modified mRNA LNPs encoding prM-E genes that produced virus-like particles resulted in high neutralizing antibody titers (∼1/100,000) that protected against ZIKV infection and conferred sterilizing immunity. To offset a theoretical concern of ZIKV vaccines inducing antibodies that cross-react with the related dengue virus (DENV), we designed modified prM-E RNA encoding mutations destroying the conserved fusion-loop epitope in the E protein. This variant protected against ZIKV and diminished production of antibodies enhancing DENV infection in cells or mice. A modified mRNA vaccine can prevent ZIKV disease and be adapted to reduce the risk of sensitizing individuals to subsequent exposure to DENV, should this become a clinically relevant concern.

  8. mRNA capping: biological functions and applications

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Anand; Robb, G. Brett; Chan, Siu-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The 5′ m7G cap is an evolutionarily conserved modification of eukaryotic mRNA. Decades of research have established that the m7G cap serves as a unique molecular module that recruits cellular proteins and mediates cap-related biological functions such as pre-mRNA processing, nuclear export and cap-dependent protein synthesis. Only recently has the role of the cap 2′O methylation as an identifier of self RNA in the innate immune system against foreign RNA has become clear. The discovery of the cytoplasmic capping machinery suggests a novel level of control network. These new findings underscore the importance of a proper cap structure in the synthesis of functional messenger RNA. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of the biological roles of mRNA caps in eukaryotic cells. We will also discuss different means that viruses and their host cells use to cap their RNA and the application of these capping machineries to synthesize functional mRNA. Novel applications of RNA capping enzymes in the discovery of new RNA species and sequencing the microbiome transcriptome will also be discussed. We will end with a summary of novel findings in RNA capping and the questions these findings pose. PMID:27317694

  9. Sequence and expression of ferredoxin mRNA in barley

    SciTech Connect

    Zielinski, R.; Funder, P.M.; Ling, V. )

    1990-05-01

    We have isolated and structurally characterized a full-length cDNA clone encoding ferredoxin from a {lambda}gt10 cDNA library prepared from barley leaf mRNA. The ferredoxin clone (pBFD-1) was fused head-to-head with a partial-length cDNA clone encoding calmodulin, and was fortuitously isolated by screening the library with a calmodulin-specific oligonucleotide probe. The mRNA sequence from which pBFD-1 was derived is expressed exclusively in the leaf tissues of 7-d old barley seedlings. Barley pre-ferredoxin has a predicted size of 15.3 kDal, of which 4.6 kDal are accounted for by the transit peptide. The polypeptide encoded by pBFD-1 is identical to wheat ferredoxin, and shares slightly more amino acid sequence similarity with spinach ferredoxin I than with ferredoxin II. Ferredoxin mRNA levels are rapidly increased 10-fold by white light in etiolated barley leaves.

  10. Identification of phloem-mobile mRNA.

    PubMed

    Notaguchi, Michitaka

    2015-01-01

    Signaling between cells, tissues and organs is essential for multicellular organisms to coordinate and adapt their development and growth to internal and environmental changes. Plants have evolved a plant-specific symplasmic pathway, called plasmodesmata, for efficient intercellular communication, in addition to the receptor-ligand-based apoplasmic pathway. Long-distance signaling between distant organs is enabled via the phloem tube system, where plasmodesmata contribute to phloem loading and unloading for photosynthate allocation. In addition to signaling by small molecules such as metabolites and phytohormones, the transport of proteins, small RNAs and mRNAs is also considered an important mechanism to achieve long-distance signaling in plants. Recent studies on phloem-mobile proteins and small RNAs have revealed their role in crucial physiological processes including flowering, systemic silencing and nutrient allocation. However, the biological role of mRNAs found in the phloem tube is not yet clear, though their mobility over long-distances has been well evidenced. To gain this knowledge, it is important to collect further information on mRNA profiles in the phloem translocation stream. In this review, I summarize the current approaches to identifying the mRNA population in the phloem translocation system, and discuss the possible role of short- and long-distance mRNA transport.

  11. Decreased albumin mRNA in immunodeficient wasted' mice

    SciTech Connect

    Libertin, C.R.; Buczek, N.; Weaver, P.; Mobarhan, S.; Woloschak, G.E. Argonne National Lab., IL )

    1991-03-15

    Mice bearing the autosomal recessive gene wst (wst/wst) develop a wasting syndrome' that leads to death by 28-32 days of age. These mice have faulty repair of damage induced by ionizing radiation, immunodeficiency at secretory sites, and neurologic abnormalities. In addition to a progressively more apparent wasted phenotype, wst/wst mice show other features of failure to thrive and malnutrition. Daily body weights of the animals revealed a loss in weight between 25 and 30 days of age, a time during which normal littermates were progressively and rapidly gaining weight. Albumin mRNA levels were measured by dilution dot blot hybridizations of liver-derived RNA preparations from wasted mice, littermates, and parental controls. In all wasted mice, albumin mRNA levels were reduced 5 to 10 fold compared to controls. Northern blots revealed that the albumin mRNA present in wasted mice was normal in length though reduced in amount. These results suggest there may be a relationship between low albumin synthesis and the wasting syndrome of the wst/wst mouse.

  12. Analysis of specific mRNA destabilization during Dictyostelium development.

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Bulfone, S; Giorda, R; Morandini, P; Ceccarelli, A; Hames, B D

    1989-07-01

    A number of specific mRNAs are destabilized upon disaggregation of developing Dictyostelium discoideum cells. Analysis of a family of cloned genes indicates that only prespore-enriched mRNAs are affected; constitutive mRNAs that are expressed throughout development and mRNAs that accumulate preferentially in prestalk cells are stable under these conditions. The decay of sensitive prespore mRNAs can be halted by allowing the cells to reaggregate, indicating that destabilization occurs by the progressive selection of individual molecules rather than on all members of an mRNA subpopulation at the time of disaggregation. Individual molecules of the sensitive mRNA species remain engaged in protein synthesis in the disaggregated cells until selected. Destabilization of sensitive mRNAs is induced by cell dissociation even in the presence of concentrations of nogalamycin that inhibit RNA synthesis. The reported prevention of disaggregation-induced mRNA decay by actinomycin D and daunomycin is therefore probably a secondary effect unrelated to the inhibition of transcription.

  13. Exaptive origins of regulated mRNA decay in eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Hamid, Fursham M.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene expression is extensively controlled at the level of mRNA stability and the mechanisms underlying this regulation are markedly different from their archaeal and bacterial counterparts. We propose that two such mechanisms, nonsense‐mediated decay (NMD) and motif‐specific transcript destabilization by CCCH‐type zinc finger RNA‐binding proteins, originated as a part of cellular defense against RNA pathogens. These branches of the mRNA turnover pathway might have been used by primeval eukaryotes alongside RNA interference to distinguish their own messages from those of RNA viruses and retrotransposable elements. We further hypothesize that the subsequent advent of “professional” innate and adaptive immunity systems allowed NMD and the motif‐triggered mechanisms to be efficiently repurposed for regulation of endogenous cellular transcripts. This scenario explains the rapid emergence of archetypical mRNA destabilization pathways in eukaryotes and argues that other aspects of post‐transcriptional gene regulation in this lineage might have been derived through a similar exaptation route. PMID:27438915

  14. Immunity of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SSY5 mRNA to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay

    PubMed Central

    Obenoskey, Jesseeca; Lane, Dakota R.; Atkin, Audrey L.; Kebaara, Bessie W.

    2014-01-01

    The nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway is a specialized pathway that triggers the rapid degradation of select mRNAs. Initially, identified as a pathway that degrades mRNAs with premature termination codons, NMD is now recognized as a pathway that also regulates some natural mRNAs. Since natural mRNAs do not typically contain premature termination codons, these mRNAs contain features that target them to NMD. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae mRNAs with atypically long 3′-UTRs are usually degraded by NMD, however in some conditions a constitutively expressed SSY5 mRNA with multiple NMD targeting signals including an atypically long 3′-UTR is an exception. We investigated the features of the SSY5 mRNAs that confer immunity to NMD. We found that the SSY5 mRNA 3′-UTRs are sufficient to target NMD insensitive mRNA to the pathway. Replacing the SSY5 3′-UTRs with the cyc1-512 3′-UTRs, known to target mRNAs to NMD or with the CYC1 3′-UTR, known not to target mRNAs to NMD, resulted in production of SSY5 mRNAs that were regulated by NMD. These observations suggest that the SSY5 mRNAs require sequences both within the 5′-UTR and/or ORF as well as the 3′-UTR to escape decay by NMD. PMID:25988166

  15. A Lytic Polysaccharide Monooxygenase with Broad Xyloglucan Specificity from the Brown-Rot Fungus Gloeophyllum trabeum and Its Action on Cellulose-Xyloglucan Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kojima, Yuka; Várnai, Anikó; Ishida, Takuya; Sunagawa, Naoki; Petrovic, Dejan M.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Jellison, Jody; Goodell, Barry; Alfredsen, Gry; Westereng, Bjørge

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fungi secrete a set of glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) to degrade plant polysaccharides. Brown-rot fungi, such as Gloeophyllum trabeum, tend to have few LPMOs, and information on these enzymes is scarce. The genome of G. trabeum encodes four auxiliary activity 9 (AA9) LPMOs (GtLPMO9s), whose coding sequences were amplified from cDNA. Due to alternative splicing, two variants of GtLPMO9A seem to be produced, a single-domain variant, GtLPMO9A-1, and a longer variant, GtLPMO9A-2, which contains a C-terminal domain comprising approximately 55 residues without a predicted function. We have overexpressed the phylogenetically distinct GtLPMO9A-2 in Pichia pastoris and investigated its properties. Standard analyses using high-performance anion-exchange chromatography–pulsed amperometric detection (HPAEC-PAD) and mass spectrometry (MS) showed that GtLPMO9A-2 is active on cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, and xyloglucan. Importantly, compared to other known xyloglucan-active LPMOs, GtLPMO9A-2 has broad specificity, cleaving at any position along the β-glucan backbone of xyloglucan, regardless of substitutions. Using dynamic viscosity measurements to compare the hemicellulolytic action of GtLPMO9A-2 to that of a well-characterized hemicellulolytic LPMO, NcLPMO9C from Neurospora crassa revealed that GtLPMO9A-2 is more efficient in depolymerizing xyloglucan. These measurements also revealed minor activity on glucomannan that could not be detected by the analysis of soluble products by HPAEC-PAD and MS and that was lower than the activity of NcLPMO9C. Experiments with copolymeric substrates showed an inhibitory effect of hemicellulose coating on cellulolytic LPMO activity and did not reveal additional activities of GtLPMO9A-2. These results provide insight into the LPMO potential of G. trabeum and provide a novel sensitive method, a measurement of dynamic viscosity, for monitoring LPMO activity. IMPORTANCE Currently, there are

  16. Mechanism of inhibition of dopamine beta-monooxygenase by quinol and phenol derivatives, as determined by solvent and substrate deuterium isotope effects.

    PubMed

    Kim, S C; Klinman, J P

    1991-08-20

    The mechanism of interaction of quinols and phenols with dopamine beta-monooxygenase (D beta M) has been investigated. The ratio of quinone formation (from catechol) to oxygen consumption rises from a value of 1 in the presence of phenethylamine substrate to 2 in the absence of substrate. These results implicate quinol oxidation at both the reductant- and substrate-binding sites of D beta M. In the presence of saturating ascorbate, catechol and p-hydroquinol behave as mechanism-based inhibitors of D beta M, with partitioning ratios of turnover to inactivation of 21:1 and 41:1, respectively. Phenol is found to inactivate the enzyme in a manner similar to p-cresol, suggesting that the methyl group of p-cresol is not an essential component of enzyme inhibition. Solvent isotope effects on inactivation and turnover have been measured for various inactivators. Although the majority of these inhibitors, including catechol, p-hydroquinol, aniline, phenethylenediamine, and benzylhydrazine, are characterized by relatively small solvent isotope effects (1.5-2.5) on the inactivation rate constant (ki), solvent isotope effects on ki for phenol and p-cresol are 5.7 and 7.4, respectively. By contrast, solvent isotope effects on the turnover of p-cresol are almost unity. Using p-cresol-d7 as substrate, we observe D(kcat) = 5.2 and D(kcat/Km) = 3.1, while isotope effects on inactivation are D(ki) = 0.95 and D(ki/Ki) = 0.59. These results lead us to propose that inhibitors fall into two mechanistic classes, involving either one-electron oxidation to form radical cation intermediates (quinols) or hydrogen atom abstraction (phenols).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Dioxygen Activation at Non-Heme Diiron Centers: Oxidation of a Proximal Residue in the I100w Variant of Toluene/O-Xylene Monooxygenase Hydroxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, L.J.; Garcia-Serres, R.; McCormick, M.S.; Davydov, R.; Naik, S.G.; Kim, S.-H.; Hoffman, B.M.; Huynh, B.H.; Lippard, S.J.

    2009-06-03

    At its carboxylate-bridged diiron active site, the hydroxylase component of toluene/o-xylene monooxygenase activates dioxygen for subsequent arene hydroxylation. In an I100W variant of this enzyme, we characterized the formation and decay of two species formed by addition of dioxygen to the reduced, diiron(II) state by rapid-freeze quench (RFQ) EPR, Moessbauer, and ENDOR spectroscopy. The dependence of the formation and decay rates of this mixed-valent transient on pH and the presence of phenol, propylene, or acetylene was investigated by double-mixing stopped-flow optical spectroscopy. Modification of the {alpha}-subunit of the hydroxylase after reaction of the reduced protein with dioxygen-saturated buffer was investigated by tryptic digestion coupled mass spectrometry. From these investigations, we conclude that (i) a diiron(III,IV)-W{sup {sm_bullet}} transient, kinetically linked to a preceding diiron(III) intermediate, arises from the one-electron oxidation of W100, (ii) the tryptophan radical is deprotonated, (iii) rapid exchange of either a terminal water or hydroxide ion with water occurs at the ferric ion in the diiron(III,IV) cluster, and (iv) the diiron(III,IV) core and W{sup {sm_bullet}} decay to the diiron(III) product by a common mechanism. No transient radical was observed by stopped-flow optical spectroscopy for reactions of the reduced hydroxylase variants I100Y, L208F, and F205W with dioxygen. The absence of such species, and the deprotonated state of the tryptophanyl radical in the diiron(III,IV)-W{sup {sm_bullet}} transient, allow for a conservative estimate of the reduction potential of the diiron(III) intermediate as lying between 1.1 and 1.3 V. We also describe the X-ray crystal structure of the I100W variant of ToMOH.

  18. The participation of human hepatic P450 isoforms, flavin-containing monooxygenases and aldehyde oxidase in the biotransformation of the insecticide fenthion

    SciTech Connect

    Leoni, Claudia; Buratti, Franca M. Testai, Emanuela

    2008-12-01

    Although fenthion (FEN) is widely used as a broad spectrum insecticide on various crops in many countries, very scant data are available on its biotransformation in humans. In this study the in vitro human hepatic FEN biotransformation was characterized, identifying the relative contributions of cytochrome P450 (CYPs) and/or flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMOs) by using single c-DNA expressed human enzymes, human liver microsomes and cytosol and CYP/FMO-specific inhibitors. Two major metabolites, FEN-sulfoxide and FEN-oxon (FOX), are formed by some CYPs although at very different levels, depending on the relative CYP hepatic content. Formation of further oxidation products and the reduction of FEN-sulfoxide back to FEN by the cytosolic aldehyde oxidase enzyme were ruled out. Comparing intrinsic clearance values, FOX formation seemed to be favored and at low FEN concentrations CYP2B6 and 1A2 are mainly involved in its formation. At higher levels, a more widespread CYP involvement was evident, as in the case of FEN-sulfoxide, although a higher efficiency of CYP2C family was suggested. Hepatic FMOs were able to catalyze only sulfoxide formation, but at low FEN concentrations hepatic FEN sulfoxidation is predominantly P450-driven. Indeed, the contribution of the hepatic isoforms FMO{sub 3} and FMO{sub 5} was generally negligible, although at high FEN concentrations FMO's showed activities comparable to the active CYPs, accounting for up to 30% of total sulfoxidation. Recombinant FMO{sub 1} showed the highest efficiency with respect to CYPs and the other FMOs, but it is not expressed in the adult human liver. This suggests that FMO{sub 1}-catalysed sulfoxidation may represent the major extra-hepatic pathway of FEN biotransformation.

  19. Testing the Specificity of Primers to Environmental Ammonia Monooxygenase (amoA) Genes in Groundwater Treated with Urea to Promote Calcite Precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, S.; Reed, D.W.; Fujita, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA) genes in DNA isolated from microorganisms in groundwater were characterized by amplification of amoA DNA using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) analysis, and sequencing. The amoA gene is characteristic of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB). The DNA extracts were acquired from an experiment where dilute molasses and urea were sequentially introduced into a well in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (ESRPA) in Idaho to examine whether such amendments could stimulate enhanced ureolytic activity. The hydrolysis of urea into ammonium and carbonate serves as the basis for a potential remediation technique for trace metals and radionuclide contaminants that can co-precipitate in calcite. The ammonium ion resulting from ureolysis can promote the growth of AOB. The goal of this work was to investigate the effectiveness of primers designed for quantitative PCR of environmental amoA genes and to evaluate the effect of the molasses and urea amendments upon the population diversity of groundwater AOB. PCR primers designed to target a portion of the amoA gene were used to amplify amoA gene sequences in the groundwater DNA extracts. Following PCR, amplified gene products were cloned and the clones were characterized by RFLP, a DNA restriction technique that can distinguish different DNA sequences, to gauge the initial diversity. Clones exhibiting unique RFLP patterns were subjected to DNA sequencing. Initial sequencing results suggest that the primers were successful at specific detection of amoA sequences and the RFLP analyses indicated that the diversity of detected amoA sequences in the ESRPA decreased with the additions of molasses and urea.

  20. Two enzymes of a complete degradation pathway for linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) surfactants: 4-sulfoacetophenone Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase and 4-sulfophenylacetate esterase in Comamonas testosteroni KF-1.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Michael; Denger, Karin; Huhn, Thomas; Schleheck, David

    2012-12-01

    Complete biodegradation of the surfactant linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) is accomplished by complex bacterial communities in two steps. First, all LAS congeners are degraded into about 50 sulfophenylcarboxylates (SPC), one of which is 3-(4-sulfophenyl)butyrate (3-C(4)-SPC). Second, these SPCs are mineralized. 3-C(4)-SPC is mineralized by Comamonas testosteroni KF-1 in a process involving 4-sulfoacetophenone (SAP) as a metabolite and an unknown inducible Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) to yield 4-sulfophenyl acetate (SPAc) from SAP (SAPMO enzyme); hydrolysis of SPAc to 4-sulfophenol and acetate is catalyzed by an unknown inducible esterase (SPAc esterase). Transcriptional analysis showed that one of four candidate genes for BVMOs in the genome of strain KF-1, as well as an SPAc esterase candidate gene directly upstream, was inducibly transcribed during growth with 3-C(4)-SPC. The same genes were identified by enzyme purification and peptide fingerprinting-mass spectrometry when SAPMO was enriched and SPAc esterase purified to homogeneity by protein chromatography. Heterologously overproduced pure SAPMO converted SAP to SPAc and was active with phenylacetone and 4-hydroxyacetophenone but not with cyclohexanone and progesterone. SAPMO showed the highest sequence homology to the archetypal phenylacetone BVMO (57%), followed by steroid BVMO (55%) and 4-hydroxyacetophenone BVMO (30%). Finally, the two pure enzymes added sequentially, SAPMO with NADPH and SAP, and then SPAc esterase, catalyzed the conversion of SAP via SPAc to 4-sulfophenol and acetate in a 1:1:1:1 molar ratio. Hence, the first two enzymes of a complete LAS degradation pathway were identified, giving evidence for the recruitment of members of the very versatile type I BVMO and carboxylester hydrolase enzyme families for the utilization of a xenobiotic compound by bacteria.

  1. Structural features of covalently cross-linked hydroxylase and reductase proteins of soluble methane monooxygenase as revealed by mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Daniel A; Berg, Eric A; Costello, Catherine E; Lippard, Stephen J

    2003-06-06

    Soluble methane monooxygenase requires complexes between its three component proteins for efficient catalysis. The hydroxylase (MMOH) must bind both to the reductase (MMOR) and to the regulatory protein (MMOB) to facilitate oxidation of methane to methanol. Although structures of MMOH, MMOB, and one domain of MMOR have been determined, less geometric information is available for the complexes. To address this deficiency, MMOH and MMOR were cross-linked by a carbodiimide reagent and analyzed by specific proteolysis, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, and capillary high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Tandem mass spectra conclusively identified two amine-to-carboxylate cross-linked sites involving the alpha subunit of MMOH and the [2Fe-2S] domain of MMOR (MMOR-Fd). In particular, the N terminus of the MMOH alpha subunit forms cross-links to the side chains of MMOR-Fd residues Glu-56 and Glu-91. These Glu residues are close to one another on the surface of MMOR-Fd and >25 A from the [2Fe-2S] cluster. Because the N terminus of the alpha subunit of MMOH was not located in the crystal structure of MMOH, a detailed structural model of the complex based on the cross-link was precluded; however, a previously proposed binding site for MMOR on MMOH could be ruled out. Based on the cross-linking results, a MMOR E56Q/E91Q double mutant was generated. The mutant retains >80% of MMOR NADH oxidase activity but reduces sMMO activity to approximately 65% of the level supported by the wild type reductase. Cross-linking to MMOH was diminished but not abolished in the double mutant, indicating that other residues of MMOR also form cross-links to MMOH.

  2. Methane monooxygenase component B and reductase alter the regioselectivity of the hydroxylase component-catalyzed reactions. A novel role for protein-protein interactions in an oxygenase mechanism.

    PubMed

    Froland, W A; Andersson, K K; Lee, S K; Liu, Y; Lipscomb, J D

    1992-09-05

    The soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) system, consisting of reductase, component B, and hydroxylase (MMOH), catalyzes NADH and O2-dependent monooxygenation of many hydrocarbons. MMOH contains 2 mu-(H or R)oxo-bridged dinuclear iron clusters thought to be the sites of catalysis. Although rapid NADH-coupled turnover requires all three protein components, three less complex systems are also functional: System I, NADH, O2, reductase, and MMOH; System II, H2O2 and oxidized MMOH; System III, MMOH reduced nonenzymatically by 2e- and then exposed to O2 (single turnover). All three systems give the same products, suggesting a common reactive oxygen species. However, the distribution of products observed for most substrates that are hydroxylated in more than one position is different for each system. For several of these substrates, addition of component B to Systems I, II, or III causes the product distributions to shift dramatically. These shifts result in identical product distributions for Systems I and III in which MMOH passes through the 2e- reduced state ([Fe(II).Fe(II)]) during catalysis. In contrast, System II (in which MMOH probably does not become reduced) generally gives a unique product distribution. It is proposed that changes in MMOH structure occurring upon diiron cluster reduction and/or component complex formation cause substrates to be presented differently to the activated oxygen species. Kinetic studies show that component B strongly activates System I and, in most cases, strongly deactivates System II. The effect of component B on product distribution of System I (and III) occurs at less than 5% of the MMOH concentration, while nearly stoichiometric concentrations are required to maximize the rate of System I. This shows that component B has at least two roles in catalysis. EPR monitored titration of reduced MMOH ([Fe(II).Fe(II)]) with component B suggests that the effect of substoichiometric component B on product distribution is due to hysteresis in

  3. Engineering of Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase-based Escherichia coli biocatalyst for large scale biotransformation of ricinoleic acid into (Z)-11-(heptanoyloxy)undec-9-enoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Hwan-Hee; Jeon, Eun-Yeong; Song, Young-Ha; Shin, Chul-Soo; Park, Jin-Byung

    2016-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are able to catalyze regiospecific Baeyer-Villiger oxygenation of a variety of cyclic and linear ketones to generate the corresponding lactones and esters, respectively. However, the enzymes are usually difficult to express in a functional form in microbial cells and are rather unstable under process conditions hindering their large-scale applications. Thereby, we investigated engineering of the BVMO from Pseudomonas putida KT2440 and the gene expression system to improve its activity and stability for large-scale biotransformation of ricinoleic acid (1) into the ester (i.e., (Z)-11-(heptanoyloxy)undec-9-enoic acid) (3), which can be hydrolyzed into 11-hydroxyundec-9-enoic acid (5) (i.e., a precursor of polyamide-11) and n-heptanoic acid (4). The polyionic tag-based fusion engineering of the BVMO and the use of a synthetic promoter for constitutive enzyme expression allowed the recombinant Escherichia coli expressing the BVMO and the secondary alcohol dehydrogenase of Micrococcus luteus to produce the ester (3) to 85 mM (26.6 g/L) within 5 h. The 5 L scale biotransformation process was then successfully scaled up to a 70 L bioreactor; 3 was produced to over 70 mM (21.9 g/L) in the culture medium 6 h after biotransformation. This study demonstrated that the BVMO-based whole-cell reactions can be applied for large-scale biotransformations. PMID:27311560

  4. Salicylate 5-Hydroxylase from Ralstonia sp. Strain U2: a Monooxygenase with Close Relationships to and Shared Electron Transport Proteins with Naphthalene Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ning-Yi; Al-Dulayymi, Jumáa; Baird, Mark S.; Williams, Peter A.

    2002-01-01

    The genes from the oxygenase cluster nagAaGHAbAcAd of naphthalene-degrading Ralstonia sp. strain U2 were cloned and overexpressed. Salicylate 5-hydroxylase (S5H) activity, converting salicylate to gentisate, was present in vitro only in the single extract of cells with overexpressed nagAaGHAb or in a mixture of three cell extracts containing, respectively, NagGH (the oxygenase components), NagAa (ferredoxin reductase), and NagAb (ferredoxin). Each of the three extracts required for S5H activity was rate limiting in the presence of excess of the others but, when in excess, did not affect the rate of catalysis. S5H catalyzed the 5-hydroxylation of the aromatic rings of 3- and 4-substituted salicylates. However, the methyl group of 5-methylsalicylate was hydroxylated to produce the 5-hydroxymethyl derivative and the 6-position on the ring of 5-chlorosalicylate was hydroxylated, producing 5-chloro-2,6-dihydroxybenzoate. In an assay for the nag naphthalene dioxygenase (NDO) based on the indole-linked oxidation of NADH, three extracts were essential for activity (NagAcAd, NagAa, and NagAb). NDO and S5H were assayed in the presence of all possible combinations of the nag proteins and the corresponding nah NDO proteins from the “classical” naphthalene degrader P. putida NCIMB9816. All three oxygenase components functioned with mixed combinations of the electron transport proteins from either strain. The S5H from strain U2 is a unique monooxygenase which shares sequence similarity with dioxygenases such as NDO but is also sufficiently similar in structure to interact with the same electron transport chain and probably does so in vivo during naphthalene catabolism in strain U2. PMID:11872705

  5. In vivo and in vitro biotransformation of theobromine by phenobarbital- and 3-methylcholanthrene-inducible cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases in rat liver. Role of thiol compounds.

    PubMed

    Shively, C A; Vesell, E S

    1987-01-01

    A new in vitro method was developed and applied to establish the role of the hepatic cytochrome P-450 monooxygenases in theobromine biotransformation by control and phenobarbital (PB)- and 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC)-induced Sprague-Dawley rats. In vivo theobromine metabolite formation and pharmacokinetic parameters were also determined to serve as a comparison for in vitro studies. In vivo, the major urinary metabolite was 6-amino-5-[N-methylformylamino]-1-methyluracil (3,7DAU) with lesser amounts of 3,7-dimethyluric acid (3,7DMU), 3-methylxanthine, 7-methylxanthine, 7-methyluric acid, and traces of dimethylallantoin (DMA). Following induction with 3MC, but not PB, selective increases occurred in the urinary excretion of 3,7DAU, indicating that a 3MC-inducible cytochrome P-450 isozyme plays a significant role in this metabolic pathway. Both PB and 3MC induction increased slightly urinary elimination of DMA, a minor metabolite. Pharmacokinetic studies after a single oral dose of 5 mg/kg theobromine revealed a marked effect of 3MC treatment on theobromine elimination, as evidenced by a 59% decrease in theobromine t1/2, a 75% decrease in AUC, and a 284% increase in clearance. By contrast, PB had no effect. Fecal 14C elimination accounted for approximately 5% of the administered theobromine dose, and biliary excretion studies revealed the presence of 3,7DMU, DMA, 3,7DAU, and unchanged theobromine. Studies in vitro indicated that 3,7DMU was the major theobromine metabolite produced by liver microsomes. Conversion rates in PB- and 3MC-induced rats were 2- and 11-fold higher, respectively, than in controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. Kinetic Studies of Ammonia Monooxygenase Inhibition in Nitrosomonas europaea by Hydrocarbons and Halogenated Hydrocarbons in an Optimized Whole-Cell Assay

    PubMed Central

    Keener, William K.; Arp, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of 15 hydrocarbons and halogenated hydrocarbons on NH3 oxidation by ammonia monooxygenase (AMO) in intact cells of the nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas europaea were determined. Determination of AMO activity, measured as NO2- production, required coupling of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) activity with NH3-dependent NH2OH production by AMO. Hydrazine, an alternate substrate for HAO, was added to the reaction mixtures as a source of reductant for AMO. Most inhibitors exhibited competitive or noncompetitive inhibition patterns. The competitive character generally decreased (KiE/KiES increased) as the molecular size of the inhibitors increased. For example, CH4 and C2H4 were competitive inhibitors of NH3 oxidation, whereas the remaining alkanes (up to C4) and monohalogenated (Cl, Br, I) alkanes were noncompetitive. Oxidation of C2H5Br (noncompetitive) increased as the NH4+ concentration increased up to 40 mM, whereas oxidations of inhibitors with competitive character (KiE ≪ KiES) were diminished at 40 mM NH4+. Multichlorinated compounds produced nonlinear Lineweaver-Burk plots. Iodinated alkanes (CH3I, C2H5I) and C2Cl4 were potent inhibitors of NH3 oxidation. Maximum rates of NH3, C2H4, and C2H6 oxidations were approximately equivalent, suggesting a common rate-determining step. These data support an active-site model for AMO consisting of an NH3-binding site and a second site that binds noncompetitive inhibitors, with oxidation occurring at either site. PMID:16349014

  7. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-01-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg−1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites. PMID:26184609

  8. Trimethylamine and Trimethylamine N-Oxide, a Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 (FMO3)-Mediated Host-Microbiome Metabolic Axis Implicated in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fennema, Diede; Phillips, Ian R.

    2016-01-01

    Flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) is known primarily as an enzyme involved in the metabolism of therapeutic drugs. On a daily basis, however, we are exposed to one of the most abundant substrates of the enzyme trimethylamine (TMA), which is released from various dietary components by the action of gut bacteria. FMO3 converts the odorous TMA to nonodorous TMA N-oxide (TMAO), which is excreted in urine. Impaired FMO3 activity gives rise to the inherited disorder primary trimethylaminuria (TMAU). Affected individuals cannot produce TMAO and, consequently, excrete large amounts of TMA. A dysbiosis in gut bacteria can give rise to secondary TMAU. Recently, there has been much interest in FMO3 and its catalytic product, TMAO, because TMAO has been implicated in various conditions affecting health, including cardiovascular disease, reverse cholesterol transport, and glucose and lipid homeostasis. In this review, we consider the dietary components that can give rise to TMA, the gut bacteria involved in the production of TMA from dietary precursors, the metabolic reactions by which bacteria produce and use TMA, and the enzymes that catalyze the reactions. Also included is information on bacteria that produce TMA in the oral cavity and vagina, two key microbiome niches that can influence health. Finally, we discuss the importance of the TMA/TMAO microbiome-host axis in health and disease, considering factors that affect bacterial production and host metabolism of TMA, the involvement of TMAO and FMO3 in disease, and the implications of the host-microbiome axis for management of TMAU. PMID:27190056

  9. Structural and electronic snapshots during the transition from a Cu(II) to Cu(I) metal center of a lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase by X-ray photoreduction.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, Mikael; Kim, Seonah; Wu, Miao; Ishida, Takuya; Momeni, Majid Hadadd; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Lundberg, Daniel; Royant, Antoine; Ståhlberg, Jerry; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Beckham, Gregg T; Sandgren, Mats

    2014-07-04

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs) are a recently discovered class of enzymes that employ a copper-mediated, oxidative mechanism to cleave glycosidic bonds. The LPMO catalytic mechanism likely requires that molecular oxygen first binds to Cu(I), but the oxidation state in many reported LPMO structures is ambiguous, and the changes in the LPMO active site required to accommodate both oxidation states of copper have not been fully elucidated. Here, a diffraction data collection strategy minimizing the deposited x-ray dose was used to solve the crystal structure of a chitin-specific LPMO from Enterococcus faecalis (EfaCBM33A) in the Cu(II)-bound form. Subsequently, the crystalline protein was photoreduced in the x-ray beam, which revealed structural changes associated with the conversion from the initial Cu(II)-oxidized form with two coordinated water molecules, which adopts a trigonal bipyramidal geometry, to a reduced Cu(I) form in a T-shaped geometry with no coordinated water molecules. A comprehensive survey of Cu(II) and Cu(I) structures in the Cambridge Structural Database unambiguously shows that the geometries observed in the least and most reduced structures reflect binding of Cu(II) and Cu(I), respectively. Quantum mechanical calculations of the oxidized and reduced active sites reveal little change in the electronic structure of the active site measured by the active site partial charges. Together with a previous theoretical investigation of a fungal LPMO, this suggests significant functional plasticity in LPMO active sites. Overall, this study provides molecular snapshots along the reduction process to activate the LPMO catalytic machinery and provides a general method for solving LPMO structures in both copper oxidation states.

  10. The Combined Structural and Kinetic Characterization of a Bacterial Nitronate Monooxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Establishes NMO Class I and II*

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Francesca; Agniswamy, Johnson; Yuan, Hongling; Vercammen, Ken; Pelicaen, Rudy; Cornelis, Pierre; Spain, Jim C.; Weber, Irene T.; Gadda, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Nitronate monooxygenase (NMO) oxidizes the mitochondrial toxin propionate 3-nitronate (P3N) to malonate semialdehyde. The enzyme has been previously characterized biochemically in fungi, but no structural information is available. Based on amino acid similarity 4,985 genes are annotated in the GenBankTM as NMO. Of these, 4,424 (i.e. 89%) are bacterial genes, including several Pseudomonads that have been shown to use P3N as growth substrate. Here, we have cloned and expressed the gene pa4202 of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1, purified the resulting protein, and characterized it. The enzyme is active on P3N and other alkyl nitronates, but cannot oxidize nitroalkanes. P3N is the best substrate at pH 7.5 and atmospheric oxygen with kcatapp/Kmapp of 12 × 106 m−1 s−1, kcatapp of 1300 s−1, and Kmapp of 110 μm. Anerobic reduction of the enzyme with P3N yields a flavosemiquinone, which is formed within 7.5 ms, consistent with this species being a catalytic intermediate. Absorption spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and x-ray crystallography demonstrate a tightly, non-covalently bound FMN in the active site of the enzyme. Thus, PA4202 is the first NMO identified and characterized in bacteria. The x-ray crystal structure of the enzyme was solved at 1.44 Å, showing a TIM barrel-fold. Four motifs in common with the biochemically characterized NMO from Cyberlindnera saturnus are identified in the structure of bacterial NMO, defining Class I NMO, which includes bacterial, fungal, and two animal NMOs. Notably, the only other NMO from Neurospora crassa for which biochemical evidence is available lacks the four motifs, defining Class II NMO. PMID:25002579

  11. Characterization of sulfoxygenation and structural implications of human flavin-containing monooxygenase isoform 2 (FMO2.1) variants S195L and N413K.

    PubMed

    Krueger, Sharon K; Henderson, Marilyn C; Siddens, Lisbeth K; VanDyke, Jonathan E; Benninghoff, Abby D; Karplus, P Andrew; Furnes, Bjarte; Schlenk, Daniel; Williams, David E

    2009-08-01

    Catalytically active human flavin-containing monooxygenase isoform 2 (FMO2.1) is encoded by an allele detected only in individuals of African or Hispanic origin. Genotyping and haplotyping studies indicate that S195L and N413K occasionally occur secondary to the functional FMO2*1 allele encoding reference protein Gln472. Sulfoxygenation under a range of conditions reveals the role these alterations may play in individuals expressing active FMO2 and provides insight into FMO structure. Expressed S195L lost rather than gained activity as pH was increased or when cholate was present. The activity of S195L was mostly eliminated after heating at 45 degrees C for 5 min in the absence of NADPH, but activity was preserved if NADPH was present. By contrast, Gln472 was less sensitive to heat, a response not affected by NADPH. A major consequence of the S195L mutation was a mean 12-fold increase in K(m) for NADPH compared with Gln472. Modeling an S213L substitution, the equivalent site, in the structural model of FMO from the Methylophaga bacterium leads to disruption of interactions with NADP(+). N413K had the same pattern of activity as Gln472 in response to pH, cholate, and magnesium, but product formation was always elevated by comparison. N413K also lost more activity when heated than Gln472; however, NADPH attenuated this loss. The major effects of N413K were increases in velocity and k(cat) compared with Gln472. Although these allelic variants are expected to occur infrequently as mutations to the FMO2*1 allele, they contribute to our overall understanding of mammalian FMO structure and function.

  12. Characterization of Sulfoxygenation and Structural Implications of Human Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase Isoform 2 (FMO2.1) Variants S195L and N413KS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Sharon K.; Henderson, Marilyn C.; Siddens, Lisbeth K.; VanDyke, Jonathan E.; Benninghoff, Abby D.; Karplus, P. Andrew; Furnes, Bjarte; Schlenk, Daniel; Williams, David E.

    2009-01-01

    Catalytically active human flavin-containing monooxygenase isoform 2 (FMO2.1) is encoded by an allele detected only in individuals of African or Hispanic origin. Genotyping and haplotyping studies indicate that S195L and N413K occasionally occur secondary to the functional FMO2*1 allele encoding reference protein Gln472. Sulfoxygenation under a range of conditions reveals the role these alterations may play in individuals expressing active FMO2 and provides insight into FMO structure. Expressed S195L lost rather than gained activity as pH was increased or when cholate was present. The activity of S195L was mostly eliminated after heating at 45°C for 5 min in the absence of NADPH, but activity was preserved if NADPH was present. By contrast, Gln472 was less sensitive to heat, a response not affected by NADPH. A major consequence of the S195L mutation was a mean 12-fold increase in Km for NADPH compared with Gln472. Modeling an S213L substitution, the equivalent site, in the structural model of FMO from the Methylophaga bacterium leads to disruption of interactions with NADP+. N413K had the same pattern of activity as Gln472 in response to pH, cholate, and magnesium, but product formation was always elevated by comparison. N413K also lost more activity when heated than Gln472; however, NADPH attenuated this loss. The major effects of N413K were increases in velocity and kcat compared with Gln472. Although these allelic variants are expected to occur infrequently as mutations to the FMO2*1 allele, they contribute to our overall understanding of mammalian FMO structure and function. PMID:19420133

  13. A Two-Component para-Nitrophenol Monooxygenase Initiates a Novel 2-Chloro-4-Nitrophenol Catabolism Pathway in Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300.

    PubMed

    Min, Jun; Zhang, Jun-Jie; Zhou, Ning-Yi

    2015-11-13

    Rhodococcus imtechensis RKJ300 (DSM 45091) grows on 2-chloro-4-nitrophenol (2C4NP) and para-nitrophenol (PNP) as the sole carbon and nitrogen sources. In this study, by genetic and biochemical analyses, a novel 2C4NP catabolic pathway different from those of all other 2C4NP utilizers was identified with hydroxyquinol (hydroxy-1,4-hydroquinone or 1,2,4-benzenetriol [BT]) as the ring cleavage substrate. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that the pnp cluster located in three operons is likely involved in the catabolism of both 2C4NP and PNP. The oxygenase component (PnpA1) and reductase component (PnpA2) of the two-component PNP monooxygenase were expressed and purified to homogeneity, respectively. The identification of chlorohydroquinone (CHQ) and BT during 2C4NP degradation catalyzed by PnpA1A2 indicated that PnpA1A2 catalyzes the sequential denitration and dechlorination of 2C4NP to BT and catalyzes the conversion of PNP to BT. Genetic analyses revealed that pnpA1 plays an essential role in both 2C4NP and PNP degradations by gene knockout and complementation. In addition to catalyzing the oxidation of CHQ to BT, PnpA1A2 was also found to be able to catalyze the hydroxylation of hydroquinone (HQ) to BT, revealing the probable fate of HQ that remains unclear in PNP catabolism by Gram-positive bacteria. This study fills a gap in our knowledge of the 2C4NP degradation mechanism in Gram-positive bacteria and also enhances our understanding of the genetic and biochemical diversity of 2C4NP catabolism.

  14. Development of a Surface Plasmon Resonance Assay for the Characterization of Small-Molecule Binding Kinetics and Mechanism of Binding to Kynurenine 3-Monooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Poda, Suresh B; Kobayashi, Masakazu; Nachane, Ruta; Menon, Veena; Gandhi, Adarsh S; Budac, David P; Li, Guiying; Campbell, Brian M; Tagmose, Lena

    2015-10-01

    Kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO), a pivotal enzyme in the kynurenine pathway, was identified as a potential therapeutic target for treating neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders. In this article, we describe a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay that delivers both kinetics and the mechanism of binding (MoB) data, enabling a detailed characterization of KMO inhibitors for the enzyme in real time. SPR assay development included optimization of the protein construct and the buffer conditions. The stability and inhibitor binding activity of the immobilized KMO were significantly improved when the experiments were performed at 10°C using a buffer containing 0.05% n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) as the detergent. The KD values of the known KMO inhibitors (UPF648 and RO61-8048) from the SPR assay were in good accordance with the biochemical LC/MS/MS assay. Also, the SPR assay was able to differentiate the binding kinetics (k(a) and k(d)) of the selected unknown KMO inhibitors. For example, the inhibitors that showed comparable IC50 values in the LC/MS/MS assay displayed differences in their residence time (τ = 1/k(d)) in the SPR assay. To better define the MoB of the inhibitors to KMO, an SPR-based competition assay was developed, which demonstrated that both UPF648 and RO61-8048 bound to the substrate-binding site. These results demonstrate the potential of the SPR assay for characterizing the affinity, the kinetics, and the MoB profiles of the KMO inhibitors.

  15. Predicting the Metabolic Sites by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase on Drug Molecules Using SVM Classification on Computed Quantum Mechanics and Circular Fingerprints Molecular Descriptors

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chien-wei; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2017-01-01

    As an important enzyme in Phase I drug metabolism, the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) also metabolizes some xenobiotics with soft nucleophiles. The site of metabolism (SOM) on a molecule is the site where the metabolic reaction is exerted by an enzyme. Accurate prediction of SOMs on drug molecules will assist the search for drug leads during the optimization process. Here, some quantum mechanics features such as the condensed Fukui function and attributes from circular fingerprints (called Molprint2D) are computed and classified using the support vector machine (SVM) for predicting some potential SOMs on a series of drugs that can be metabolized by FMO enzymes. The condensed Fukui function fA− representing the nucleophilicity of central atom A and the attributes from circular fingerprints accounting the influence of neighbors on the central atom. The total number of FMO substrates and non-substrates collected in the study is 85 and they are equally divided into the training and test sets with each carrying roughly the same number of potential SOMs. However, only N-oxidation and S-oxidation features were considered in the prediction since the available C-oxidation data was scarce. In the training process, the LibSVM package of WEKA package and the option of 10-fold cross validation are employed. The prediction performance on the test set evaluated by accuracy, Matthews correlation coefficient and area under ROC curve computed are 0.829, 0.659, and 0.877 respectively. This work reveals that the SVM model built can accurately predict the potential SOMs for drug molecules that are metabolizable by the FMO enzymes. PMID:28072829

  16. Diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase genes in the rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria isolated from PAH-contaminated sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Anping; Liu, Juan; Ling, Wanting; Chen, Zeyou; Gao, Yanzheng

    2015-07-01

    This is the first investigation of the diversity and distribution of 16S rRNA and phenol monooxygenase (PHE) genes in endophytic and rhizosphere bacteria of plants at sites contaminated with different levels of PAHs. Ten PAHs at concentrations from 34.22 to 55.29 and 45.79 to 97.81 mg·kg-1 were measured in rhizosphere soils of Alopecurus aequalis Sobol and Oxalis corniculata L., respectively. The diversity of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere soils or plants changed with varying PAH pollution levels, as shown based on PCR-DGGE data. Generally, higher Shannon-Weiner indexes were found in mild or moderate contaminated areas. A total of 82 different bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences belonging to five phyla; namely, Acfinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Cyanophyta, and Bacteroidetes, were obtained from rhizosphere soils. For the 57 identified PHE gene sequences, 18 were excised from rhizosphere bacteria and 39 from endophytic bacteria. The copy numbers of 16S rRNA and PHE genes in rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria varied from 3.83 × 103 to 2.28 × 106 and 4.17 × 102 to 1.99 × 105, respectively. The copy numbers of PHE genes in rhizosphere bacteria were significantly higher than in endophytic bacteria. Results increase our understanding of the diversity of rhizosphere and endophytic bacteria from plants grown in PAH-contaminated sites.

  17. Two Enzymes of a Complete Degradation Pathway for Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) Surfactants: 4-Sulfoacetophenone Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase and 4-Sulfophenylacetate Esterase in Comamonas testosteroni KF-1

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Michael; Denger, Karin; Huhn, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Complete biodegradation of the surfactant linear alkylbenzenesulfonate (LAS) is accomplished by complex bacterial communities in two steps. First, all LAS congeners are degraded into about 50 sulfophenylcarboxylates (SPC), one of which is 3-(4-sulfophenyl)butyrate (3-C4-SPC). Second, these SPCs are mineralized. 3-C4-SPC is mineralized by Comamonas testosteroni KF-1 in a process involving 4-sulfoacetophenone (SAP) as a metabolite and an unknown inducible Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenase (BVMO) to yield 4-sulfophenyl acetate (SPAc) from SAP (SAPMO enzyme); hydrolysis of SPAc to 4-sulfophenol and acetate is catalyzed by an unknown inducible esterase (SPAc esterase). Transcriptional analysis showed that one of four candidate genes for BVMOs in the genome of strain KF-1, as well as an SPAc esterase candidate gene directly upstream, was inducibly transcribed during growth with 3-C4-SPC. The same genes were identified by enzyme purification and peptide fingerprinting-mass spectrometry when SAPMO was enriched and SPAc esterase purified to homogeneity by protein chromatography. Heterologously overproduced pure SAPMO converted SAP to SPAc and was active with phenylacetone and 4-hydroxyacetophenone but not with cyclohexanone and progesterone. SAPMO showed the highest sequence homology to the archetypal phenylacetone BVMO (57%), followed by steroid BVMO (55%) and 4-hydroxyacetophenone BVMO (30%). Finally, the two pure enzymes added sequentially, SAPMO with NADPH and SAP, and then SPAc esterase, catalyzed the conversion of SAP via SPAc to 4-sulfophenol and acetate in a 1:1:1:1 molar ratio. Hence, the first two enzymes of a complete LAS degradation pathway were identified, giving evidence for the recruitment of members of the very versatile type I BVMO and carboxylester hydrolase enzyme families for the utilization of a xenobiotic compound by bacteria. PMID:23001656

  18. Predicting the Metabolic Sites by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase on Drug Molecules Using SVM Classification on Computed Quantum Mechanics and Circular Fingerprints Molecular Descriptors.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chien-Wei; Lin, Thy-Hou

    2017-01-01

    As an important enzyme in Phase I drug metabolism, the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) also metabolizes some xenobiotics with soft nucleophiles. The site of metabolism (SOM) on a molecule is the site where the metabolic reaction is exerted by an enzyme. Accurate prediction of SOMs on drug molecules will assist the search for drug leads during the optimization process. Here, some quantum mechanics features such as the condensed Fukui function and attributes from circular fingerprints (called Molprint2D) are computed and classified using the support vector machine (SVM) for predicting some potential SOMs on a series of drugs that can be metabolized by FMO enzymes. The condensed Fukui function fA- representing the nucleophilicity of central atom A and the attributes from circular fingerprints accounting the influence of neighbors on the central atom. The total number of FMO substrates and non-substrates collected in the study is 85 and they are equally divided into the training and test sets with each carrying roughly the same number of potential SOMs. However, only N-oxidation and S-oxidation features were considered in the prediction since the available C-oxidation data was scarce. In the training process, the LibSVM package of WEKA package and the option of 10-fold cross validation are employed. The prediction performance on the test set evaluated by accuracy, Matthews correlation coefficient and area under ROC curve computed are 0.829, 0.659, and 0.877 respectively. This work reveals that the SVM model built can accurately predict the potential SOMs for drug molecules that are metabolizable by the FMO enzymes.

  19. Revisiting the mechanism of dioxygen activation in soluble methane monooxygenase from M. capsulatus (Bath): evidence for a multi-step, proton-dependent reaction pathway.

    PubMed

    Tinberg, Christine E; Lippard, Stephen J

    2009-12-29

    Stopped-flow kinetic investigations of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) from M. capsulatus (Bath) have clarified discrepancies that exist in the literature regarding several aspects of catalysis by this enzyme. The development of thorough kinetic analytical techniques has led to the discovery of two novel oxygenated iron species that accumulate in addition to the well-established intermediates H(peroxo) and Q. The first intermediate, P*, is a precursor to H(peroxo) and was identified when the reaction of reduced MMOH and MMOB with O(2) was carried out in the presence of >or=540 microM methane to suppress the dominating absorbance signal due to Q. The optical properties of P* are similar to those of H(peroxo), with epsilon(420) = 3500 M(-1) cm(-1) and epsilon(720) = 1250 M(-1) cm(-1). These values are suggestive of a peroxo-to-iron(III) charge-transfer transition and resemble those of peroxodiiron(III) intermediates characterized in other carboxylate-bridged diiron proteins and synthetic model complexes. The second identified intermediate, Q*, forms on the pathway of Q decay when reactions are performed in the absence of hydrocarbon substrate. Q* does not react with methane, forms independently of buffer composition, and displays a unique shoulder at 455 nm in its optical spectrum. Studies conducted at different pH values reveal that rate constants corresponding to P* decay/H(peroxo) formation and H(peroxo) decay/Q formation are both significantly retarded at high pH and indicate that both events require proton transfer. The processes exhibit normal kinetic solvent isotope effects (KSIEs) of 2.0 and 1.8, respectively, when the reactions are performed in D(2)O. Mechanisms are proposed to account for the observations of these novel intermediates and the proton dependencies of P* to H(peroxo) and H(peroxo) to Q conversion.

  20. Cistanches Herba aqueous extract affecting serum BGP and TRAP and bone marrow Smad1 mRNA, Smad5 mRNA, TGF-β1 mRNA and TIEG1 mRNA expression levels in osteoporosis disease.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hai-Dong; Yu, Fang; Tong, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Hong-Quan; Liang, Wu

    2013-02-01

    We studied molecular mechanism of Cistanches Herba aqueous extract (CHAE) in ovariectomized (OVX) rats, as an experimental model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Female rats were either sham-operated or bilaterally OVX; and at 60 days postoperatively. The OVX group (n = 8) received an ovariectomy and treatment with normal saline for 90 days commencing from 20th post ovariectomy day. The ovariectomized +CHAE (OVX + CHAE) group (n = 8) received an ovariectomy and were treated with Cistanches Herba aqueous extract of 100 mg/kg body weight daily for 90 days commencing from 22nd post ovariectomy day. The ovariectomy +CHAE (OVX + CHAE) group (n = 8) received an ovariectomy, and were treated with the of 200 mg/kg body weight daily for 90 days commencing from 20th post ovariectomy day. Serum BGP and TRAP, E2, FSH and LH level, bone marrow Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1 mRNA expression levels were examined. Results showed that serum BGP and TRAP, FSH and LH levels were significantly increased, whereas E2, Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1 mRNA and proteins expression levels were significantly decreased in OVX rats compared to sham rats. 90 days of CHAE treatment could significantly decrease serum BGP and TRAP, FSH and LH levels, and increase E2, Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1 mRNA and proteins expression levels in OVX rats. It can be concluded that CHAE play its protective effect against OVX-induced bone degeneration partly by regulating some bone metabolism related genes, e.g. Smad1, Smad5, TGF-β1 and TIEG1.

  1. Mechanisms of mRNA translation of interferon stimulated genes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Sonali; Kaur, Surinder; Kroczynska, Barbara; Platanias, Leonidas C

    2010-01-01

    Over the last two decades, a lot of research work has been focused on the interferon (IFN)-regulated JAK-STAT pathway and understanding the mechanisms governing the transcription of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs). Evidence suggests that the JAK-STAT pathway alone does not account in its entirety for mediating cellular responses to IFNs. There is emerging evidence that non-Stat pathways play important roles in mediating signals for the generation of IFN-responses. Various studies have underscored the importance of mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs), especially p38 and ERK1/2, as well as the PI 3'K/AKT pathway in transmitting signals that are of critical importance for the biological effects of IFNs. Besides regulating the transcription of ISGs in some cases, engagement of these signaling pathways by the IFN-receptor (IFNR) associated complexes also plays an important role in mediating the translation of ISGs. The mechanisms regulating mRNA translation of ISGs is an area of ongoing active research and a lot more efforts will be required to complete our understanding of the various cellular elements involved in this process. In this review we highlight the mechanisms regulating translation of ISGs. We focus on the proteins regulated by the PI 3'K/AKT pathway, their role in mediating mRNA translation of ISGs and the functional consequences of this regulation. In addition, MAPKs are known to regulate the phosphorylation of various eukaryotic initiation factors and we summarize the roles of eIF4B and eIF4E phosphorylations on the translation of ISGs. The emerging roles of microRNAs in mRNA translation of ISGs are also discussed.

  2. Role of mRNA Methylation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    TERMS mRNA methylation, FTO, MeRIP-seq, RNA -seq, m6A 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...FTO, MeRIP-seq, RNA -seq, m6A, gene regulation 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS:  What were the major goals of the project? Task 1. To determine how FTO...knockdown Months 1-2 100% 1/1/2014 Work out MeRIP experiment Months 1-2 100% 8/1/2014 Perform RNA -Seq analysis of control and FTO-knockdown LNCaP

  3. Hypothalamic expression of NPY mRNA, vasopressin mRNA and CRF mRNA in response to food restriction and central administration of the orexigenic peptide GHRP-6.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Louise E; Srisawat, Rungrudee; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit; Leng, Gareth

    2005-03-01

    In this study, we examined the effects of restricted feeding and of central administration of an orexigenic ghrelin agonist GHRP-6 on peptide mRNA expression in the hypothalamus. We compared rats fed ad libitum with rats that were allowed food for only 2?h every day, and treated with a continuous chronic i.c.v. infusion of GHRP-6 or vehicle. Ad libitum fed rats exposed to GHRP-6 increased their food intake and body weight over 6 days, but, at the end of this period, neuropeptide Y mRNA expression in the arcuate nucleus was not different to that in control rats. By contrast, expression of neuropeptide Y mRNA in the arcuate nucleus was elevated in food-restricted rats, consistent with the interpretation that increased expression reflects increased hunger. However, neuropeptide Y mRNA expression was no greater in food-restricted rats infused with GHRP-6 than in food-restricted rats infused with vehicle; thus if the drive to eat was stronger in rats infused with GHRP-6, this was not reflected by higher levels of neuropeptide Y mRNA expression. Expression of vasopressin mRNA and corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) was not changed by food restriction. GHRP-6 infusion increased CRF mRNA expression in ad libitum rats only.

  4. Differential regulation of host mRNA translation during obligate pathogen-plant interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus infection reprograms the plant messenger RNA (mRNA) transcriptome by activating or interfering with a variety of signaling pathways, but the effects on host mRNA translation have not been explored on a genome-wide scale. To address this issue, Arabidopsis thaliana mRNA transcripts were quantif...

  5. Metabolic pathway involved in 2-methyl-6-ethylaniline degradation by Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 and cloning of the novel flavin-dependent monooxygenase system meaBA.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei; Cui, Zhongli

    2015-12-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02' in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase.