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Sample records for alpha-chlorohydrin-induced infertile rats

  1. ALPHA-CHLOROHYDRIN INDUCED CHANGES IN SPERM ATP LEVELS AND MOTILITY IN THE RAT: ASSOCIATION WITH DIMINISHED IN VITRO FERTILIZATION. (R825351)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  2. ALPHA-CHLOROHYDRIN INDUCED CHANGES IN SPERM ATP LEVELS AND MOTILITY IN THE RAT: ASSOCIATION WITH DIMINISHED IN VITRO FERTILIZATION. (R825351)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  3. Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    Infertility means not being able to become pregnant after a year of trying. If a woman can ... keeps having miscarriages or stillbirths, that's also called infertility. Infertility is fairly common. After one year of ...

  4. Infertility.

    PubMed

    Jose-Miller, Alaina B; Boyden, Jennifer W; Frey, Keith A

    2007-03-15

    Infertility is defined as failure to achieve pregnancy during one year of frequent, unprotected intercourse. Evaluation generally begins after 12 months, but it can be initiated earlier if infertility is suspected based on history or if the female partner is older than 35 years. Major causes of infertility include male factors, ovarian dysfunction, tubal disease, endometriosis, and uterine or cervical factors. A careful history and physical examination of each partner can suggest a single or multifactorial etiology and can direct further investigation. Ovulation can be documented with a home urinary luteinizing hormone kit. Hysterosalpingography and pelvic ultrasonography can be used to screen for uterine and fallopian tube disease. Hysteroscopy and/or laparoscopy can be used if no abnormalities are found on initial screening. Women older than 35 years also may benefit from ovarian reserve testing of follicle-stimulating hormone and estradiol levels on day 3 of the menstrual cycle, the clomiphene citrate challenge test, or pelvic ultrasonography for antral follicle count to determine treatment options and the likelihood of success. Options for the treatment of male factor infertility include gonadotropin therapy, intrauterine insemination, or in vitro fertilization. Infertility attributed to ovulatory dysfunction often can be treated with oral ovulation-inducing agents in a primary care setting. Women with poor ovarian reserve have more success with oocyte donation. In certain cases, tubal disease may be treatable by surgical repair or by in vitro fertilization. Infertility attributed to endometriosis may be amenable to surgery, induction of ovulation with intrauterine insemination, or in vitro fertilization. Unexplained infertility may be managed with ovulation induction, intrauterine insemination, or both. The overall likelihood of successful pregnancy with treatment is nearly 50 percent.

  5. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Seppen, Jurgen

    2012-11-01

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements. -- Highlights: ► Gunn rats are partially deficient in detoxification by UDP glucuronyltransferases. ► Female Gunn rats are infertile on a soy containing diet. ► Soy contains genistein, a potent phytoestrogen. ► Inefficient glucuronidation of genistein causes female infertility.

  6. Treating Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Treating Infertility Home For Patients Search FAQs Treating Infertility Page ... Treating Infertility FAQ137, March 2015 PDF Format Treating Infertility Gynecologic Problems What is infertility? What treatment options ...

  7. Evaluating Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Evaluating Infertility Home For Patients Search FAQs Evaluating Infertility Page ... Evaluating Infertility FAQ136, October 2017 PDF Format Evaluating Infertility Gynecologic Problems What is an infertility evaluation? When ...

  8. GENE ARRAYS FOR ELUCIDATING MECHANISTIC DATA FROM MODELS OF MALE INFERTILITY AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE IN MICE, RATS AND HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene arrays for elucidating mechanistic data from models of male infertility and chemical exposure in mice, rats and humans
    John C. Rockett and David J. Dix
    Gamete and Early Embryo Biology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects ...

  9. GENE ARRAYS FOR ELUCIDATING MECHANISTIC DATA FROM MODELS OF MALE INFERTILITY AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURE IN MICE, RATS AND HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene arrays for elucidating mechanistic data from models of male infertility and chemical exposure in mice, rats and humans
    John C. Rockett and David J. Dix
    Gamete and Early Embryo Biology Branch, Reproductive Toxicology Division, National Health and Environmental Effects ...

  10. Defining Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  11. Splicing mutation in Sbf1 causes nonsyndromic male infertility in the rat.

    PubMed

    Liška, František; Chylíková, Blanka; Janků, Michaela; Šeda, Ondřej; Vernerová, Zdeňka; Pravenec, Michal; Křen, Vladimír

    2016-09-01

    In the inbred SHR/OlaIpcv rat colony, we identified males with small testicles and inability to reproduce. By selectively breeding their parents, we revealed the infertility to segregate as an autosomal recessive Mendelian character. No other phenotype was observed in males, and females were completely normal. By linkage using a backcross with Brown Norway strain, we mapped the locus to a 1.2Mbp segment on chromosome 7, harboring 35 genes. Sequencing of candidate genes revealed a G to A substitution in a canonical 'AG' splice site of intron 37 in Sbf1 (SET binding factor 1, alias myotubularin-related protein 5). This leads to either skipping exon 38 or shifting splicing one base downstream, invariantly resulting in frameshift, premature stop codon and truncation of the protein. Western blotting using two anti-Sbf1 antibodies revealed absence of the full-length protein in the mutant testis. Testicles of the mutant males were significantly smaller compared with SHR from 4weeks, peaked at 84% wild-type weight at 6weeks and declined afterward to 28%, reflecting massive germ cell loss. Histological examination revealed lower germ cell number; latest observed germ cell stage were round spermatids, resulting in the absence of sperm in the epididymis (azoospermia). SBF1 is a member of a phosphatase family lacking the catalytical activity. It probably modulates the activity of a phosphoinositol phosphatase MTMR2. Human homozygotes or compound heterozygotes for missense SBF1 mutations exhibit Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (manifested mainly as progressive neuropathy), while a single mouse knockout reported in the literature identified male infertility as the only phenotype manifestation.

  12. A diet containing the soy phytoestrogen genistein causes infertility in female rats partially deficient in UDP glucuronyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Seppen, Jurgen

    2012-11-01

    Soy beans contain genistein, a natural compound that has estrogenic effects because it binds the estrogen receptor with relatively high affinity. Genistein is therefore the most important environmental estrogen in the human diet. Detoxification of genistein is mediated through conjugation by UDP-glucuronyltransferase 1 and 2 (UGT1 and UGT2) isoenzymes. Gunn rats have a genetic deficiency in UGT1 activity, UGT2 activities are not affected. Because our Gunn rats stopped breeding after the animal chow was changed to a type with much higher soy content, we examined the mechanism behind this soy diet induced infertility. Gunn and control rats were fed diets with and without genistein. In these rats, plasma levels of genistein and metabolites, fertility and reproductive parameters were determined. Enzyme assays showed reduced genistein UGT activity in Gunn rats, as compared to wild type rats. Female Gunn rats were completely infertile on a genistein diet, wild type rats were fertile. Genistein diet caused a persistent estrus, lowered serum progesterone and inhibited development of corpora lutea in Gunn rats. Concentrations of total genistein in Gunn and control rat plasma were identical and within the range observed in humans after soy consumption. However, Gunn rat plasma contained 25% unconjugated genistein, compared to 3.6% in control rats. This study shows that, under conditions of reduced glucuronidation, dietary genistein exhibits a strongly increased estrogenic effect. Because polymorphisms that reduce UGT1 expression are prevalent in the human population, these results suggest a cautionary attitude towards the consumption of large amounts of soy or soy supplements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Persistence of infertility in GnRH immunized male rats treated with subdermal implants of dihydrotestosterone (DHT).

    PubMed

    Awoniyi, C A; Hurst, B S; Reece, M S; Kim, W K; Schlaff, W D

    1996-10-01

    Male hormonal contraception has been limited to date because two fundamental requirements have not been concurrently satisfied, these are, consistent and dependable azoospermia and infertility coupled with maintenance of libido. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which implants of potent androgen (DHT) will restore androgenization and spermatogenesis in hypogonadotropic infertile male rats. Twenty-five sexually mature male rats of proven fertility were actively immunized against gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) to induce azoospermia. After azoospermia was achieved, GnRH immunized rats received subdermal DHT-filled Silastic implants of 2, 4, 6, or 8 cm, or empty implants (n=5/group). Five untreated control rats received empty capsules. Eight weeks later, fertility was evaluated, sperm number was obtained from the testis, and weights of androgen-dependent organs were measured. The results indicate that immunoneutralization of GnRH induced complete azoospermia, and subsequent treatment with DHT implants of 2 or 4 cm for 8 wk restored accessory organ weights, but did not restore spermatogenesis or fertility. In addition, DHT implants of 6 to 8 cm partially restored spermatogenesis, but not fertility. We conclude that low-dose DHT supplementation of GnRH-immunized rats may be a suitable alternate therapy able to maintain androgenization in the face of persistent azoospermia in the rat. This may be an effective model for development of a male contraceptive.

  14. Developmental hormonal profiles in rdw rats with congenital hypothyroidism accompanying increased testicular size and infertility in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Umezu, Motoaki; Kagabu, Satoshi; Jiang, Jiany Y; Niimura, Sueo; Sato, Eimei

    2004-12-01

    Congenital hypothyroid mutant male rdw rats have enlarged testes in adulthood with dwarfism accompanied by infertility. To explain how rdw rats acquire enlarged testes in adulthood, we compared age-matched normal (N) rats at various developmental stages for blood levels of hormones, thyroxine (T4), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone (T), and investigated whether T4 therapy (rdw+T4) from 3 weeks of age (w) until adulthood could induce recovery of fertility in rdw rats, as well as how rdw+T4 affected hormonal patterns. Testes weights of rdw rats were higher than those of N rats at 19 w in adulthood though it was low during development. Serum T4 values in rdw rats were markedly lower than those in N rats but steadily increased up to 19 w. The serum FSH values in rdw rats were lower than those in N rats at all ages, and neither serum LH nor T value was significantly different at any age. The testes weight of rdw+T4 rats was significantly higher than that of N rats at 13 w with recovered growth, and was higher than that of rdw rats at 19 w. When they were mated with proestrous females after 16 w, all females became pregnant and gave birth to a normal number of pups. The T4 and FSH values of rdw+T4 rats were significantly higher than those in rdw rats, but similar to those in N rats in adulthood. The results suggest that even low levels of circulating thyroid hormone (TH) in rdw rats stimulate the development of their testes, probably through Sertoli cells, resulting in the enlarged adult testes without fertility, and that a sufficient circulating TH level from the immature stage plays a pivotal role in restoring mating activity, probably through FSH-mediated action towards adulthood.

  15. Transplantation of Autologous Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells into the Testes of Infertile Male Rats and New Germ Cell Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemzadeh-Hasankolaei, Mohammad; Batavani, Roozali; Eslaminejad, Mohamadreza Baghaban; Sayahpour, Foroughazam

    2016-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), have been suggested as a potential choice for treatment of male infertility. Yet, the effects of MSCs on regeneration of germinal epithelium of seminiferous tubules and recovery of spermatogenesis have remained controversial. In this research, we have evaluated and compared the fate of autologous bone marrow (BM)-MSCs during three different periods of time- 4, 6 and 8 weeks after transplantation into the testes of busulfan-induced infertile male rats. Methods Rats BM samples were collected from tibia bone under anesthesia. The samples were directly cultured in culture medium. Isolated, characterized and purified BM-MSCs were labeled with PKH26, and transplanted into the testes of infertile rats. After 4, 6 and 8 weeks, the testes were removed and underwent histological evaluations. Results Immunohistochemical analysis showed that transplanted BM-MSCs survived in all three groups. Some of the cells homed at the germinal epithelium and expressed spermatogonia markers (Dazl and Stella). The number of homed spermatogonia-like cells in 4-week testes, was more than the 6-week testes. The 8-week testes had the least numbers of homed cells (p<0.05). Immunostaining for vimentin showed that BM-MSCs did not differentiate into the sertoli cells in the testes. Conclusions From our results, it could be concluded that, autologous BM-MSCs could survive in the testis, migrate onto the seminiferous tubules basement membrane and differentiate into spermatogonia. Although, no more differentiation was observed in the produced spermatogonia, generation of such endogenous GCs would be a really promising achievement for treatment of male infertility using autologous stem cells. PMID:27430978

  16. Effects of Cynodon dactylon on Stress-Induced Infertility in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chidrawar, VR; Chitme, HR; Patel, KN; Patel, NJ; Racharla, VR; Dhoraji, NC; Vadalia, KR

    2011-01-01

    Cynodon dactylon (Family: Poaceae) is known to be a tackler in Indian mythology and is offered to Lord Ganesha. It is found everywhere, even on waste land, road side, dry places, and spreads vigorously on cultivated ground. This study was carried out with an objective to test if the constituents of this plant are useful in coping stress-induced sexual In this study, we considered immobilization stress to induce male infertility and the effect of C. dactylon in restoration of the dysfunction was evaluated by considering sexual behavioral observations, sexual performance, fructose content of the seminal vesicles, epididymal sperm concentration and histopathological examinations as parameters. Treatment of rats under stress with methanolic extract of C. dactylon has shown a promising effect in overcoming stress-induced sexual dysfunction, sexual performance, fructose content, sperm concentration and its effect on accessory sexual organs and body weight. We conclude that active constituents of C. dactylon present in methanolic extract have a potent aphrodisiac and male fertility activity. PMID:21607051

  17. Enhanced feminine sexual behavior and infertility in female rats prenatally treated with an antiestrogen.

    PubMed

    Vega Matuszczyk, Josefa

    2003-07-01

    An attempt to elucidate the possible role of prenatal estrogen on the development of feminine sexual behavior and reproductive function was made by treating females with the antiestrogen CI628 prenatally on days 13-19. Control females were prenatally treated with saline or remained untreated. The animals were delivered by caesarian section on day 22 of pregnancy and placed with foster mothers whose newborn pups had been previously removed. Intact peripubertal females in each treatment group were observed for several reproductive measures, including the capacity to become pregnant. Other females were ovariectomized in adulthood and treated with estradiol benzoate (EB) (1, 1.5, 2 or 4 micro g/rat) and 0.5 mg progesterone and tested for receptivity, proceptivity and sexual partner preference. Two weeks after the completion of these tests, the females were injected daily for 7 days with 0.25 mg testosterone and tested for sexual partner preference and mounting behavior. The results obtained showed accelerated vaginal opening, and infertility in the antiestrogen-treated intact females and enhanced receptivity and proceptivity in response to 1 micro g EB in the antiestrogen ovariectomized females. Sexual partner preference and mounting behavior did not differ between groups. These results suggest an involvement of prenatal estrogen on the development of female reproductive function, but not on behavioral differentiation.

  18. Female Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    Infertility means not being able to get pregnant after at least one year of trying (or 6 ... woman keeps having miscarriages, it is also called infertility. Female infertility can result from age, physical problems, ...

  19. Infertility - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - infertility ... The following organizations are good resources for information on infertility : Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc/gov/reproductivehealth/infertility March of Dimes -- www.marchofdimes.com/ ...

  20. Improvement of sperm density in neem-oil induced infertile male albino rats by Ipomoea digitata Linn

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, Ghanashyam Keshav; Mahajan, Raghunath Totaram; Mahajan, Arun Y.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Investigation has been carried out to validate folkloric claim of the potential of Ipomoea digitata (ID) based on reproductive health status in experimentally induced male albino rats. Materials and Methods: Emulsified neem oil fed albino rats were orally administered root powder of ID suspended in water for the doses of 250 and 500 mg/kg body weight for 40 days. Change in organ weight, sperm density and motility, serum hormonal levels and histomorphological changes were evaluated. Results: Significant increase in the sperm density and the sperm motility (P < 0.01) along with increase in the testis, and epididymes weight in neem-oil induced infertile rats treated with ID at both dose levels. This effect is vis-à-vis to serum hormonal levels. Presence of β-sitosterol in the root of ID likely to enhance the process of spermatogenesis as it is evident from histomorphological studies. Conclusion: Results of the present investigation reveal that ID is a good candidate for the management of male infertility. PMID:26401398

  1. Infertility FAQ's

    MedlinePlus

    ... cimetidine. Exposure to environmental toxins including exposure to pesticides, lead, cadmium, or mercury. What causes infertility in ... may be performed to further evaluate the uterine environment. What increases a woman's risk of infertility? Female ...

  2. Expression of E-cadherin and α-catenin in a varicocele-induced infertility rat model

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Hong Koo; Park, Hyun Jun; Park, Nam Cheol

    2011-01-01

    The roles of E-cadherin and α-catenin were evaluated in the development of varicocele-induced infertility. Analysis of the association between the expression of E-cadherin/α-catenin and clinical/pathological parameters was performed. Thirty 10-week-old male rats (experimental group) were used for the experiments; the left renal vein was ligated to form a varicocele. The abdomen was incised in 30 rats (control group) and no procedure was performed on 10 rats (baseline group). The weights of the left testis, serum reactive oxygen species (ROS), testosterone, luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules after 4 and 8 weeks were recorded. The expression of E-cadherin and α-catenin was evaluated by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining and Western blot analysis. The ROS increased in the 8-week experimental group, compared with the baseline and control groups (P<0.001 for both). Additionally, FSH significantly increased in the 4- and 8-week experimental group compared with the control groups (P=0.013 and P=0.032, respectively). The ratio of degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules of the experimental groups increased. The IHC staining showed that the expression of E-cadherin and α-catenin decreased in the 4- and 8-week experimental groups. Similar to the IHC staining, the experimental group had decreased reactivity on Western blot analysis. The expression of E-cadherin and α-catenin was significantly associated with the ROS and degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules. The results of this study suggest that damage to the blood–testis barrier (BTB) is associated with varicocele-induced male infertility, and that ROS may cause damage to the BTB. PMID:21399649

  3. Understanding Infertility - The Basics

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  4. Ovarian Drilling for Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  5. Stress and Infertility

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  6. Psychological Component of Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  7. Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  8. Smoking and Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  9. The radioprotective effects of Moringa oleifera against mobile phone electromagnetic radiation-induced infertility in rats.

    PubMed

    Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed; El-Kott, Attalla Farag

    2015-01-01

    The present study has investigated the effects of mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on fertility in rats. The purpose of this study was to explore the capability of polyphenolic-rich Moringa oleifera leaf extract in protecting rat testis against EMR-induced impairments based on evaluation of sperm count, viability, motility, sperm cell morphology, anti-oxidants (SOD & CAT), oxidative stress marker, testis tissue histopathology and PCNA immunohistochemistry. The sample consisted of sixty male Wistar rats which were divided into four equal groups. The first group (the control) received only standard diet while the second group was supplemented daily and for eight weeks with 200 mg/kg aqueous extract of Moringa leaves. The third group was exposed to 900 MHz fields for one hour a day and for (7) days a week. As for the fourth group, it was exposed to mobile phone radiation and received the Moringa extract. The results showed that the EMR treated group exhibited a significantly decrease sperm parameters. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to EMR and treated with MOE significantly enhanced the sperm parameters. However, histological results in EMR group showed irregular seminiferous tubules, few spermatogonia, giant multinucleated cells, degenerated spermatozoa and the number of Leydig cells was significantly reduced. PCNA labeling indices were significant in EMR group versus the control group. Also, EMR affects spermatogenesis and causes to apoptosis due to the heat and other stress-related EMR in testis tissue. This study concludes that chronic exposure to EMR marked testicular injury which can be prevented by Moringa oleifera leaf extract.

  10. The radioprotective effects of Moringa oleifera against mobile phone electromagnetic radiation-induced infertility in rats

    PubMed Central

    Bin-Meferij, Mashael Mohammed; El-kott, Attalla Farag

    2015-01-01

    The present study has investigated the effects of mobile phone electromagnetic radiation (EMR) on fertility in rats. The purpose of this study was to explore the capability of polyphenolic-rich Moringa oleifera leaf extract in protecting rat testis against EMR-induced impairments based on evaluation of sperm count, viability, motility, sperm cell morphology, anti-oxidants (SOD & CAT), oxidative stress marker, testis tissue histopathology and PCNA immunohistochemistry. The sample consisted of sixty male Wistar rats which were divided into four equal groups. The first group (the control) received only standard diet while the second group was supplemented daily and for eight weeks with 200 mg/kg aqueous extract of Moringa leaves. The third group was exposed to 900 MHz fields for one hour a day and for (7) days a week. As for the fourth group, it was exposed to mobile phone radiation and received the Moringa extract. The results showed that the EMR treated group exhibited a significantly decrease sperm parameters. Furthermore, concurrent exposure to EMR and treated with MOE significantly enhanced the sperm parameters. However, histological results in EMR group showed irregular seminiferous tubules, few spermatogonia, giant multinucleated cells, degenerated spermatozoa and the number of Leydig cells was significantly reduced. PCNA labeling indices were significant in EMR group versus the control group. Also, EMR affects spermatogenesis and causes to apoptosis due to the heat and other stress-related EMR in testis tissue. This study concludes that chronic exposure to EMR marked testicular injury which can be prevented by Moringa oleifera leaf extract. PMID:26550159

  11. Infertility induced by prostaglandins in albino rats by adrenergic block in the vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Chinoy, N J; Chinoy, M R

    1981-01-01

    The effects of subcutaneous injections of prostaglandins F2a and E1 (100 microgram/day/animal for 30 days) were studied on the histophysiology and contractile pattern of the vas deferens; morphology, density, motility of vasal spermatozoa; and the fertility rate of rats. The results revealed that both the prostaglandins altered the histology, metabolism, and adrenergic response of the vas deferens in comparison to the control. The sperm density and motility were significantly affected and the vas deferens spermatozoa revealed acrosomal, midpiece, and tail damage. Comparison of the effects of the two PGs showed that PGF2a was more effective in altering contractile pattern and cholinesterase activity of the vas deferens; whereas its metabolism, sperm morphology, and density were affected more by PGE1. However, both PGs caused 50% reduction in fertility rate and almost the same level of reduction in sperm motility and protein levels. We suggest that PGF2a and PGE1 have partial antifertility effects as they alter the sperm morphology and antagonize the adrenergic response to the vas deferens by blocking the a-adrenoreceptors.

  12. Causes of Male Infertility

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    ... Info Booklets FAQs Educational Videos State Infertility Insurance Laws Infographic Gallery Protect Your Fertility Infertility and Smoking Cessation Resources Overview Find a Healthcare Professional Fact ...

  13. Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?

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  14. Diagnostic Testing for Female Infertility

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    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  15. Primary infertility (image)

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    Primary infertility is a term used to describe a couple that has never been able to conceive a pregnancy ... to do so through unprotected intercourse. Causes of infertility include a wide range of physical as well ...

  16. Antioxidative effects of cerium dioxide nanoparticles ameliorate age-related male infertility: optimistic results in rats and the review of clinical clues for integrative concept of men health and fertility.

    PubMed

    Kobyliak, Nazarii M; Falalyeyeva, Tetyana M; Kuryk, Olena G; Beregova, Tetyana V; Bodnar, Petro M; Zholobak, Nadiya M; Shcherbakov, Oleksandr B; Bubnov, Rostyslav V; Spivak, Mykola Ya

    2015-01-01

    Male infertility has largely idiopathic, multifactorial origin. Oxidative stress is a major factor that affects spermatogenesis, in particular in aging. Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CNPs) due to their antioxidative properties are promising to impact on the development of male infertility. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of CNPs on fertility parameters in 24-month male rats and to overview relevant literature in the field of personalized treatments, predictive diagnosis, and preventive measures for male health and fertility. We included 30 24-month-old male rats. After a week of adaptation to the standard diet, the rats were randomly divided into three groups with ten rats in each. Group 1 (controls) received only a standard diet. The rats of group 2 and 3 in adjunct to the standard diet during 10 days received intragastrically 10 % sodium citrate and citrate-coated CNPs in dose 1 mg/kg, respectively. We assessed sex hormones, epididymal sperm parameters and spermatogenesis, ultrasound, and morphological data of rat reproductive organs. After a 10-day administration of CNPs, we revealed significant decrease of lipid peroxidation product levels in serum and increase of catalase and SOD activity, associated with increase of sperm count (p < 0.001) and improvement in quantitative sperm parameters (motility, viability, and percentage of spermatozoa). We found no significant changes between sperm quantitative parameters in citrate-treated rats and controls and observed age-related decrease of activated Leydig cell number and focal atrophy of the seminiferous tubules. In CNP group, we observed regeneration of seminiferous tubules, increase number and activation of Leydig cells, and 2.5-fold significant increase of serum testosterone. Ultrasound data showed the slight increase of linear measurement and volume of rat testes in CNP group. Review highlights the benefits for predictive diagnosis, preventive measures, and personalized approaches to

  17. Genetics of Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Neto, Filipe Tenorio Lira; Bach, Phil Vu; Najari, Bobby Baback; Li, Philip Shihua; Goldstein, Marc

    2016-10-01

    While 7 % of the men are infertile, currently, a genetic etiology is identified in less than 25 % of those men, and 30 % of the infertile men lack a definitive diagnosis, falling in the "idiopathic infertility" category. Advances in genetics and epigenetics have led to several proposed mechanisms for male infertility. These advances may result in new diagnostic tools, treatment approaches, and better counseling with regard to treatment options and prognosis. In this review, we focus on clinical aspects of male infertility and the role of genetics in elucidating etiologies and the potential of treatments.

  18. Testicular membrane lipid damage by complex mixture of leachate from municipal battery recycling site as indication of idiopathic male infertility in rat.

    PubMed

    Akintunde, Jacob K; Oboh, Ganiyu; Akindahunsi, Akintunde A

    2013-12-01

    Leachate from a municipal battery recycling site is a potent source of mixed-metal released into the environment. The present study investigated the degree at which mixed-metal exposure to the municipal auto-battery leachate (MABL) and to the Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site leachate (EOMABRL) affected the lipid membrane of the testes in in vitro experiment. The results showed elevated level of mixed-metals over the permissible levels in drinking water, as recommended by regulatory authorities. In the leachate samples, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a biomarker of lipid damage, was significantly (p<0.05) increased in rat testes in a dose-dependent manner. MDA induced by the municipal auto-battery leachate (MABL) was significantly (p<0.05) higher than the leachate from Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site (EOMABRL). The testicular lipid membrane capacity was compromised following treatment with leachate from the municipal battery recycling site, implicating mixed-metal exposure as the causative agent of testicular damage and male infertility.

  19. Testicular membrane lipid damage by complex mixture of leachate from municipal battery recycling site as indication of idiopathic male infertility in rat

    PubMed Central

    Oboh, Ganiyu; Akindahunsi, Akintunde A.

    2013-01-01

    Leachate from a municipal battery recycling site is a potent source of mixed-metal released into the environment. The present study investigated the degree at which mixed-metal exposure to the municipal auto-battery leachate (MABL) and to the Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site leachate (EOMABRL) affected the lipid membrane of the testes in in vitro experiment. The results showed elevated level of mixed-metals over the permissible levels in drinking water, as recommended by regulatory authorities. In the leachate samples, the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a biomarker of lipid damage, was significantly (p<0.05) increased in rat testes in a dose-dependent manner. MDA induced by the municipal auto-battery leachate (MABL) was significantly (p<0.05) higher than the leachate from Elewi Odo municipal auto-battery recycling site (EOMABRL). The testicular lipid membrane capacity was compromised following treatment with leachate from the municipal battery recycling site, implicating mixed-metal exposure as the causative agent of testicular damage and male infertility. PMID:24678257

  20. Psychosocial Consequences of Infertility on Infertile Women.

    PubMed

    Fatima, P; Rahman, D; Hossain, H B; Hossain, H N; Mughi, C R

    2015-10-01

    This study explores to find out the qualitative and quantitative psychosocial consequences of infertility in women coming for infertility treatment in tertiary infertility center. A total of 400 infertile couples who agreed to participate in the study were asked to fill up the questionnaires and later interviewed to access the psychosocial consequences of infertility on their personal life in a tertiary infertility clinic in Dhaka at Center for Assisted Reproduction (CARe Hospital), Dhaka from June 2011 to December 2011 and agreed to participate in the study were included in the study. The data was analyzed and the quantitative and qualitative psychosocial factors were evaluated. Four hundred infertile couple who filled the questionnaires was included in the study. Sixty three percent of the women belonged to age group >20 30 years at the time of interview. Regarding age at marriage 43.8% of the women were married by 20 years, 51.3% were married between 20 30 years. Mean±SD duration of present married life was 7.20±4.45 (range 1 to 28) years and 74.4% of the women were living with their husbands. Of them 75.5% women were housewife. When asked whether they knew what was the reason of infertility in the couple, 32.5% knew the cause was in the female partner, 14.5%, knew the cause was in the male partner, 10.3% knew the cause was in both partners, 21.5% knew cause of infertility was not in any of the partners, and 21.3% had no idea about the cause of infertility. The male partner's response about the issue of prognosis and outcome of couple's infertility revealed 37.3% believed their wives will conceive someday, 31.3% had no intention for a second marriage, 13% were indifferent, 11.3% blamed their wives for infertility and 4.8% threatened for a second marriage. Only 2.5% of the male partners were suggested on consulting and continuing treatment by specialist. The family pressure by in-laws and relatives towards their infertility was that 57.3% insisted on consulting

  1. Male rat infertility induction/spermatozoa and epididymal plasma abnormalities after oral administration of Kalanchoe gastonis bonnieri natural juice.

    PubMed

    de la Luz Miranda-Beltrán, María; Puebla-Pérez, Ana María; Guzmán-Sánchez, Arnoldo; Huacuja Ruiz, Luis

    2003-04-01

    Natural aqueous crude extracts (NACE) of several Crassulaceae family plants have been applied as a vaginal contraceptive by the populace. The aim of this work was to evaluate the inhibition of fertility in male Wistar rats and some physiological and biochemical changes in spermatozoa and epididymal plasma induced by NACE from Kalanchoe gastonis bonnieri (K. g. b.) (Crassulaceae). The NACE was obtained by mechanic pressure on grinding fresh plant leaves. Sublethal doses (150-300 mg/kg body weight) of NACE were orally administered to adult and fertile male rats daily for 30 days in a search for a contraceptive effect, and physiological and biochemical modifications on sperm cells and cauda epididymal plasma. The toxicity studies revealed that the lethal dose (LD(50)) calculated was 11 g/kg body weight. Sublethal doses induced 50%-100% fertility inhibition, with 100% recovery of fertility 30 days after stopping the treatment. The sperm motility, viability and spermatic density were also significantly decreased (p < 0.001). The outstanding biochemical change observed in the cauda epididymal plasma was a decrease of carnitine concentration. The NACE of K. gastonis contains one substance active on fertility by affecting spermatozoa motility, viability and sperm density with a significantly decreased carnitine and sialic acid (p < 0.001) in the caudal epididymal plasma. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Infertility and Fertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... are some causes of infertility?​​​ What is fertility preservation? When should I consult a health care provider?​ ... are some causes of infertility?​​​ What is fertility preservation? When should I consult a health care provider?​ ...

  3. Infertility with Testicular Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Kevin A; Walsh, Thomas J

    2015-08-01

    Testicular germ cell cancer is one of the most curable cancers. Most patients are treated during their reproductive years, making infertility a significant quality of life issue after successful treatment. This focused review evaluates the factors that contribute to infertility and specific fertility risks with the various testicular cancer treatments. Timing of patient discussions and current fertility treatments are reviewed.

  4. [Genetic aspects of male infertility].

    PubMed

    2014-04-01

    We examined 118 men with infertility. Among them we identified phenotypic syndromes associated with infertility in 4 and chromosomal abnormalities in 16. Further molecular genetic study of 98 infertile men found that microdeletions in AZFc-locus had 3, pathological AR allele had 2, CFTR gene mutation had 4 of them. In 37 infertile men an increased DNA fragmentation index (>20%) was found.

  5. Medical Imaging and Infertility.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Rebecca

    2016-11-01

    Infertility affects many couples, and medical imaging plays a vital role in its diagnosis and treatment. Radiologic technologists benefit from having a broad understanding of infertility risk factors and causes. This article describes the typical structure and function of the male and female reproductive systems, as well as congenital and acquired conditions that could lead to a couple's inability to conceive. Medical imaging procedures performed for infertility diagnosis are discussed, as well as common interventional options available to patients. © 2016 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  6. Iatrogenic causes of infertility.

    PubMed

    Schoysman, R; Segal, L

    1990-01-01

    The Authors review the list of the iatrogenic causes of infertility. In their opinion the more delicate the structure, the more heavy the price paid to clumsy or erroneous investigation. Such eventual incompetence may lead to further damage of the already existing situation. The Authors however look at the future with relative optimism: incidents become rarer, specialists in gynecology and infertility pay more attention to the delicacy of genital structures and there is an encouraging tendency to refer to infertility specialists those cases who need adequate work-up of their condition.

  7. [Sexuality and infertility].

    PubMed

    Salama, S; Boitrelle, F; Gauquelin, A; Jaoul, M; Albert, M; Bailly, M; Wainer, R; Veluire, M

    2012-12-01

    Following the recent medical innovations, it is now possible to disassociate sexuality and reproduction. With contraception, people can have free sexuality without the fear of an unexpected pregnancy. Frequently, Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART), with in vitro fertilization, can obtain a pregnancy without intercourse. There are three major problems concerning infertility and sexuality. Firstly, infertility because of a sexual disorder; secondly, sexual disorder induced by infertility diagnosis; thirdly, sexual disorder induced by ART. Praticians should be aware of possible existence of sexual problems to allow the couple to express them. Once diagnosed, these troubles can be treated by the pratician himself or the couple has to be referred to a psychologist or a sexologist.

  8. Female obesity and infertility.

    PubMed

    Talmor, Alon; Dunphy, Bruce

    2015-05-01

    Infertility affects one in seven couples, and its rate is on the increase. Ovulatory defects and unexplained causes account for >50% of infertile aetiologies. It is postulated that a significant proportion of these cases are either directly or indirectly related to obesity. The prevalence of overweight and obese men and women has topped 50% in some developed countries. Obesity is on the increase worldwide; in turn, the consequences in terms of the associated morbidity and mortality have also been increasing. Obesity is associated with various reproductive sequelae including anovulation, subfertility and infertility, increased risk of miscarriage and poor neonatal and maternal pregnancy outcomes. Thus, the combination of infertility and obesity poses some very real challenges in terms of both the short- and long-term management of these patients. The mechanism with which obesity impacts female reproductive function is summarised in this review.

  9. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  10. Parenthood after Primary Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frances-Fischer, Jana E.; Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the experience of parenting after primary infertility and describes construction and initial testing of an instrument for assessing characteristics of this understudied population. (Contains 52 references and 4 tables.) (GCP)

  11. Diagnostic Testing for Male Factor Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  12. Endometriosis and Infertility: Can Surgery Help?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  13. Diagnostic imaging of infertility

    SciTech Connect

    Winfield, A.C.; Wentz, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    This text presents a review of all the imaging modalities available in the diagnosis of infertility. This book integrates the perspectives of experts in ob/gyn, radiology, reproductive endocrinology, and urology. It's a one-of-a-kind ''how to'' guide to hysterosalpinography and infertility evaluation, providing complete clinical information on the techniques, pitfalls, problems encountered and differential diagnosis. Detailed descriptions accompany numerous high-quality illustrations to help correlate findings and give meaning to the radiographic and ultrasound images.

  14. [Imaging of female infertility].

    PubMed

    Maubon, A; Pouquet, M; Piver, P; Mazet, N; Viala-Trentini, M; Rouanet, J P

    2008-01-01

    Medical treatment of a couple's infertility depends upon the cause(s) of infertility. The goals of imaging are to determine these causes (male, female, mixed, unexplained), to evaluate their severity and type on the female side central, ovarian, uterine, tubal, peritoneal, endometriosis, in order to propose an adapted treatment. Imaging modalities are essentially non ionising (US and MRI). Hysterosalpingogram retains its indication to study tubal patency, it can be completed by tubal catheterisation in cases of proximal tubal obstruction.

  15. Endocrine disorders & female infertility.

    PubMed

    Unuane, David; Tournaye, Herman; Velkeniers, Brigitte; Poppe, Kris

    2011-12-01

    Female infertility occurs in about 37% of all infertile couples and ovulatory disorders account for more than half of these. The ovaries are in continuous interaction with the other endocrine organs. The interplay may account for infertility occurring at different levels and may render the diagnosis of infertility a difficult exercise for the involved physician. A hypothalamic cause of female infertility should be considered in an appropriate clinical context, with tests pointing to a hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. It can be functional, physiological or related to organic causes. Hyperprolactinemia has well characterized effects on the normal gonadal function and treatment is well established. Acromegaly and Cushing's disease may impair fertility at different levels, mechanisms involved however remain ill defined. Thyroid disorders, both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism, can interact with the ovaries, through a direct effect on ovarian function, but autoimmunity may be involved, as well as alterations of the sex hormone binding protein levels. Primary ovarian disorders, such as the polycystic ovary syndrome and primary ovarian insufficiency are frequent diseases, for which novel treatments are currently being developed and discussed. We will propose an algorithm for the diagnosis and approach of the female patient presenting with infertility on the basis of the available evidence in literature.

  16. Epigenetics of reproductive infertility.

    PubMed

    Das, Laxmidhar; Parbin, Sabnam; Pradhan, Nibedita; Kausar, Chahat; Patra, Samir K

    2017-06-01

    Infertility is a complex pathophysiological condition. It may caused by specific or multiple physical and physiological factors, including abnormalities in homeostasis, hormonal imbalances and genetic alterations. In recent times various studies implicated that, aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are associated with reproductive infertility. There might be transgenerational effects associated with epigenetic modifications of gametes and studies suggest the importance of alterations in epigenetic modification at early and late stages of gametogenesis. To determine the causes of infertility it is necessary to understand the altered epigenetic modifications of associated gene and mechanisms involved therein. This review is devoted to elucidate the recent mechanistic advances in regulation of genes by epigenetic modification and emphasizes their possible role related to reproductive infertility. It includes environmental, nutritional, hormonal and physiological factors and influence of internal structural architecture of chromatin nucleosomes affecting DNA and histone modifications in both male and female gametes, early embryogenesis and offspring. Finally, we would like to emphasize that research on human infertility by gene knock out of epigenetic modifiers genes must be relied upon animal models.

  17. Oxidative stress & male infertility.

    PubMed

    Makker, Kartikeya; Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh

    2009-04-01

    The male factor is considered a major contributory factor to infertility. Apart from the conventional causes for male infertility such as varicocoele, cryptorchidism, infections, obstructive lesions, cystic fibrosis, trauma, and tumours, a new and important cause has been identified: oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a result of the imbalance between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. It is a powerful mechanism that can lead to sperm damage, deformity and eventually, male infertility. This review discusses the physiological need for ROS and their role in normal sperm function. It also highlights the mechanism of production and the pathophysiology of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system and enumerate the benefits of incorporating antioxidants in clinical and experimental settings.

  18. Infertility: psychotherapeutic issues.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M B

    1992-01-01

    In supportive therapy with infertility patients, the clinician tries to relieve dysphoria and enhance self-esteem. Dynamically informed supportive interventions are designed to decrease guilt that may relate to past sexual activities, sexually related diseases, or abortions. These interventions should also be empathetic, promote optimism and reality testing, help with problem solving, allow catharsis and ventilation, decrease feelings of isolation and loneliness, educate and clarify, and praise and encourage where appropriate. Mental health clinicians have an important role to play in the treatment of these patients, provided they learn enough about the psychology of the experience of infertility and about the technology utilized in its treatment. As the number of people seeking treatment for infertility grows, the need for skilled therapists for this population will grow at a parallel rate.

  19. Imaging female infertility.

    PubMed

    Sadow, Cheryl A; Sahni, V Anik

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this pictorial review is to discuss causes of female infertility, in particular, those etiologies in which imaging plays a key role in detection. Included are disorders of cervical, ovarian, fallopian tube, and uterine origin. We also discuss the role of various imaging modalities including hysterosalpingography, pelvic ultrasonography, hysterosonography, and pelvic MR imaging in elucidating the cause of female infertility. Radiologists need to know the conditions to be aware of when these patients are sent for diagnostic imaging, as well as how to direct further management, if necessary, should an abnormality be detected.

  20. Infertility: Medical and Social Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Office of Technology Assessment.

    This report illustrates a range of options for Congressional action in nine principal areas of public policy related to infertility: (1) collecting data on reproductive health; (2) preventing infertility; (3) information to inform and protect consumers; (4) providing access to infertility services; (5) reproductive health of veterans; (6) transfer…

  1. The epidemiology of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Winters, Brian R; Walsh, Thomas J

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to integrate understanding of epidemiology and infertility. A primer on epidemiologic science and an example disease for which the design of epidemiologic investigations is readily apparent are provided. Key features of infertility that limit epidemiologic investigation are described and a survey of available data on the epidemiology of infertility provided. Finally, the work that must be completed to move this area of research forward is proposed, and, with this new perspective of "infertility as a disease," improvements envisioned in public health that may be gained through improved understanding of the epidemiology of male infertility.

  2. How Is Infertility Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NICHD Staff Directory Skip sharing on social media links Rollup Image Home > Health & Research > A-Z Topics > Infertility and ... for signs of hormone deficiency, such as increased body fat, decreased muscle mass, and decreased facial and body hair. The evaluation ...

  3. Parenting after Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  4. Parenting after Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olshansky, Ellen

    2009-01-01

    Becoming a parent after experiencing infertility can pose unique challenges to early parenthood. Parents may struggle with the normal anxiety and fatigue, as well as possible depression, that accompany new parenthood, but with added guilt or shame because of how much they wanted a child and how hard they worked to become parents. These feelings…

  5. Fertility and Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  6. Fertility and Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orgebin-Crist, Marie-Claire; And Others

    In this report, emphasis is placed on major research developments in the reproductive sciences, their impact on the health of individuals as well as on that of society, and on current trends that may provide new opportunities for future research in fertility and infertility. In the first section, major developments in the reproductive sciences are…

  7. Sexually transmitted diseases and infertility.

    PubMed

    Tsevat, Danielle G; Wiesenfeld, Harold C; Parks, Caitlin; Peipert, Jeffrey F

    2017-01-01

    Female infertility, including tubal factor infertility, is a major public health concern worldwide. Most cases of tubal factor infertility are attributable to untreated sexually transmitted diseases that ascend along the reproductive tract and are capable of causing tubal inflammation, damage, and scarring. Evidence has consistently demonstrated the effects of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae as pathogenic bacteria involved in reproductive tract morbidities including tubal factor infertility and pelvic inflammatory disease. There is limited evidence in the medical literature that other sexually transmitted organisms, including Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, and other microorganisms within the vaginal microbiome, may be important factors involved in the pathology of infertility. Further investigation into the vaginal microbiome and other potential pathogens is necessary to identify preventable causes of tubal factor infertility. Improved clinical screening and prevention of ascending infection may provide a solution to the persistent burden of infertility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiology of infertility: social problems of the infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Araoye, Margaret O

    2003-06-01

    Infertility is of public health importance in Nigeria and many other developing nations because of its high prevalence and especially due to its serious social implications. A review of the epidemiology of infertility in Nigeria and other parts of Sub-Saharan Africa is presented and socio-cultural issues including the social impact on couples are discussed. The major cause of infertility in Africa is infection--STDs, post-abortal and puerperal sepsis. Beliefs about causes, and failure of orthodox methods of treatment have led many couples to seek solution from traditional doctors and faith healers without success. Infertility causes marital disharmony, which often leads to divorce. Women are often blamed for the infertility and men engage in polygyny in an attempt to have children. The couple can also suffer stress from the management of the infertility. Adoption is not popular and assisted reproduction has medico-legal implications. Preventive measures are suggested, including counselling at every stage of the management.

  9. Chronic endometritis and infertility

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jong; Kim, You Shin; Yoon, Tae Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chronic endometritis (CE) is a condition involving the breakdown of the peaceful co-existence between microorganisms and the host immune system in the endometrium. A majority of CE cases produce no noticeable signs or mild symptoms, and the prevalence rate of CE has been found to be approximately 10%. Gynecologists and pathologists often do not focus much clinical attention on CE due to the time-consuming microscopic examinations necessary to diagnose CE, its mild clinical manifestations, and the benign nature of the disease. However, the relationship between CE and infertility-related conditions such as repeated implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage has recently emerged as an area of inquiry. In this study, we reviewed the literature on the pathophysiology of CE and how it may be associated with infertility, as well as the literature regarding the diagnosis and treatment of CE. In addition, we discuss the value of hysteroscopic procedures in the diagnosis and treatment of CE. PMID:28090456

  10. Chronic endometritis and infertility.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Jong; Kim, You Shin; Yoon, Tae Ki; Lee, Woo Sik

    2016-12-01

    Chronic endometritis (CE) is a condition involving the breakdown of the peaceful co-existence between microorganisms and the host immune system in the endometrium. A majority of CE cases produce no noticeable signs or mild symptoms, and the prevalence rate of CE has been found to be approximately 10%. Gynecologists and pathologists often do not focus much clinical attention on CE due to the time-consuming microscopic examinations necessary to diagnose CE, its mild clinical manifestations, and the benign nature of the disease. However, the relationship between CE and infertility-related conditions such as repeated implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage has recently emerged as an area of inquiry. In this study, we reviewed the literature on the pathophysiology of CE and how it may be associated with infertility, as well as the literature regarding the diagnosis and treatment of CE. In addition, we discuss the value of hysteroscopic procedures in the diagnosis and treatment of CE.

  11. The Investigation of Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Marko, John

    1970-01-01

    Many of the tests for causes of infertility can, and should be carried out by the family physician. This article describes tests such as the Sims test, basal body temperature tests and patency tests. The time factor is stressed, as is the necessity to establish the real need for these tests, since unnecessary testing often does more harm than good. Imagesp54-a PMID:20468496

  12. Infertility, infertility treatment and behavioural problems in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Obel, Carsten; Basso, Olga; Henriksen, Tine B; Bech, Bodil H; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Olsen, Jørn

    2011-09-01

    Behavioural patterns in children of infertile couples may be influenced by both the underlying causes of infertility and stress in the couples. Treatment procedures, such as culture media and manipulation of gametes and embryos, may also result in developmental problems. We examined behavioural problems in children as a function of infertility and infertility treatment, using data from three population-based birth cohorts in Denmark (Aalborg-Odense Birth Cohort, Aarhus Birth Cohort and Danish National Birth Cohort). Information on time to pregnancy and infertility treatment was collected during pregnancy. Children aged between 7 and 21 years were assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The SDQ was completed by mothers in all cohorts and, in addition, by teachers in the Aarhus cohort and by children themselves in the Aalborg-Odense cohort. Children born after a time to pregnancy of >12 months and no infertility treatment had a behavioural pattern similar to children of fertile parents. Teachers reported a higher total difficulties score for children born after infertility treatment, but no significant differences were seen on any subscales of the teachers' report, and neither the mothers nor the children reported any differences on the total difficulties score and the prosocial behaviour score. Our results are thus overall reassuring regarding behavioural problems in children born to infertile couples, regardless of infertility treatment.

  13. Tarlov Cyst and Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Azam, Amir; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    Background/Objective: Tarlov cysts or spinal perineurial cysts are uncommon lesions. These are mostly incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging or myelograms. The objectives of this study were to describe Tarlov cysts of the sacral region as a potential cause for retrograde ejaculations and review available management options. Methods: Case report and literature review. Results: A 28-year-old man presented with back pain and retrograde ejaculations resulting in infertility. After microsurgical excision of large perineurial cysts, back pain resolved, but semen quality showed only marginal improvement. Later, the couple successfully conceived by intrauterine insemination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Tarlov cyst associated with retrograde ejaculation and infertility. Conclusions: Despite being mostly asymptomatic and an incidental finding, Tarlov cyst is an important clinical entity because of its tendency to increase in size with time. Tarlov cysts of the sacral and cauda equina region may be a rare underlying cause in otherwise unexplained retrograde ejaculations and infertility. Microsurgical excision may be a good option in a select group of patients. PMID:19569467

  14. Immunology and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Mumford, D M

    1978-10-01

    This article has attempted to review evidence that suggests that immune factors may be operative in a small but significant number of infertile men. Although our current understanding of the possible processes by which autosensitization to previously sequestered reproductive antigens occurs is incomplete, there are laboratory assays presently available that give an indication, but do not prove, that immune factors may be contributing to the infertile state. Continued research is needed to develop new assays and more purified sperm antigens, which might enhance our knowledge of the underlying immunoreproductive changes. Until these are available, the following procedures should be considered when investigating a patient with infertility of suspected immune origin. The patient's history should be taken, and a physical examination should be performed. A complete blood count, urinalysis, and complete semen analysis and culture should be taken. Next, in vivo cervical tests (Sims-Huhner) are performed, followed by sperm antibody assessment (serum, semen) and perhaps in vitro cervical mucus sperm assays (especially the crossed hostility test). After the tests have been completed, the following possibe treatments exist: 1. Treatment of underlying infections 2. Correction of obstructions 3. Corticosteroid (or testosterone?) therapy 4. Washed sperm insemination 5. First portion of fresh ejaculate insemination 6. Artificial insemination with homologous donor 7. Adoption.

  15. Tarlov cyst and infertility.

    PubMed

    Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Vinay Kumar; Azam, Amir; Gupta, Sanjeev

    2009-01-01

    Tarlov cysts or spinal perineurial cysts are uncommon lesions. These are mostly incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging or myelograms. The objectives of this study were to describe Tarlov cysts of the sacral region as a potential cause for retrograde ejaculations and review available management options. Case report and literature review. A 28-year-old man presented with back pain and retrograde ejaculations resulting in infertility. After microsurgical excision of large perineurial cysts, back pain resolved, but semen quality showed only marginal improvement. Later, the couple successfully conceived by intrauterine insemination. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Tarlov cyst associated with retrograde ejaculation and infertility. Despite being mostly asymptomatic and an incidental finding, Tarlov cyst is an important clinical entity because of its tendency to increase in size with time. Tarlov cysts of the sacral and cauda equina region may be a rare underlying cause in otherwise unexplained retrograde ejaculations and infertility. Microsurgical excision may be a good option in a select group of patients.

  16. Lycopene and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Agarwal, Ashok; Ong, Chloe; Prashast, Pallavi

    2014-01-01

    Excessive amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause a state of oxidative stress, which result in sperm membrane lipid peroxidation, DNA damage and apoptosis, leading to decreased sperm viability and motility. Elevated levels of ROS are a major cause of idiopathic male factor infertility, which is an increasingly common problem today. Lycopene, the most potent singlet oxygen quencher of all carotenoids, is a possible treatment option for male infertility because of its antioxidant properties. By reacting with and neutralizing free radicals, lycopene could reduce the incidence of oxidative stress and thus, lessen the damage that would otherwise be inflicted on spermatozoa. It is postulated that lycopene may have other beneficial effects via nonoxidative mechanisms in the testis, such as gap junction communication, modulation of gene expression, regulation of the cell cycle and immunoenhancement. Various lycopene supplementation studies conducted on both humans and animals have shown promising results in alleviating male infertility—lipid peroxidation and DNA damage were decreased, while sperm count and viability, and general immunity were increased. Improvement of these parameters indicates a reduction in oxidative stress, and thus the spermatozoa is less vulnerable to oxidative damage, which increases the chances of a normal sperm fertilizing the egg. Human trials have reported improvement in sperm parameters and pregnancy rates with supplementation of 4–8 mg of lycopene daily for 3–12 months. However, further detailed and extensive research is still required to determine the dosage and the usefulness of lycopene as a treatment for male infertility. PMID:24675655

  17. Dermatoglyphic pattern in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Sontakke, B R; Talhar, S; Ingole, I V; Shende, M R; Pal, A K; Bhattacharaya, T

    2013-06-01

    Dermatoglyphics in infertile male patients were studied and compared with that of age matched controls to see whether any specific dermatoglyphic pattern exists in infertile male patients. Infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile were referred to Cytogenetic Laboratory for karyotyping. We selected twenty-four infertile male patients with abnormal semen profile. Out of twenty-four infertile male patients, nineteen were with normal Karyotype and five patients were with abnormal Karyotype. Loop was the commonest pattern observed in the infertile male patients. All these fingertip and palmar dermatoglyphic findings were compared with that of result on finger and palmar dermatoglyphics of equal number of age matched controls. Statistical evaluation was done with software "EPI- info, version-6.04 d". Infertile males had reduced number of loops as compared to that of controls which was statistically significant. Total whorls were increased in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant. Percentage of true palmar pattern in I 3 and I 4 areas was reduced in infertile male patients as compared to that of controls which was statistically insignificant.

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Y chromosome infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions Y chromosome infertility Y chromosome infertility Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Y chromosome infertility is a condition that affects the production of ...

  19. Strategies for Counseling Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith C.

    1991-01-01

    Presents specific intervention strategies that may serve to reinforce infertility experience as opportunity for personal and marital growth. Concludes through counseling clients may complete much of the emotional work required to reach a point of resolution and acceptance of their infertility. (Author/ABL)

  20. A Biopsychosocial Theory of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Briefly reviews the literature on infertility and its emotional, physical, existential, and relational effects on individuals, couples, and families. Life crisis and biopsychosocial theories are discussed as they apply to persons struggling with infertility issues. In addition, stage models derived from a biopsychosocial perspective are presented.…

  1. Strategies for Counseling Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith C.

    1991-01-01

    Presents specific intervention strategies that may serve to reinforce infertility experience as opportunity for personal and marital growth. Concludes through counseling clients may complete much of the emotional work required to reach a point of resolution and acceptance of their infertility. (Author/ABL)

  2. A Biopsychosocial Theory of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Briefly reviews the literature on infertility and its emotional, physical, existential, and relational effects on individuals, couples, and families. Life crisis and biopsychosocial theories are discussed as they apply to persons struggling with infertility issues. In addition, stage models derived from a biopsychosocial perspective are presented.…

  3. What Infertility Treatments Are Available?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are some causes of infertility?​​​ What is fertility preservation? When should I consult a health care provider?​ ... are some causes of infertility?​​​ What is fertility preservation? When should I consult a health care provider?​ ...

  4. Sexual dysfunction in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Zahra; Amirian, Malihe; Golmakani, Nahid; Mazlom, Reza; Laal Ahangar, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Background: Sexual problems have different effects on the life of people by influencing their interpersonal and marital relationships and satisfaction. Relationship between sexual dysfunctions and infertility can be mutual. Sexual dysfunction may cause difficulty conceiving but also attempts to conceive, may cause sexual dysfunction. Objective: This paper compares sexual dysfunction in fertile and infertile women. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 110 infertile couples referring to Montasarieh Infertility Clinic and 110 fertile couples referring to five healthcare centers in Mashhad were selected by class cluster sampling method. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Glombok-Rust Inventory of Sexual Satisfaction. Data were analyzed through descriptive and analytical statistical methods by SPSS. Results: There was no significant difference in total score of sexual problems and other dimensions of sexual problems (except infrequency) in fertile 28.9 (15.5) and infertile 29.0 (15.4) women. Fertile women had more infrequency than infertile women (p=0.002). Conclusion: There was no significant difference between fertile and infertile women in terms of sexual problems. Paying attention to sexual aspects of infertility and presence of programs for training of sexual skills seems necessary for couples. PMID:27200422

  5. Ethical issues in infertility.

    PubMed

    Serour, Gamal I; Serour, Ahmed G

    2017-03-01

    Infertility is a global medico-socio-cultural problem with gender-based suffering particularly in developing countries. Conventional methods of treatment for infertility do not usually raise ethical concerns. However, assisted reproductive technology (ART) has initiated considerable ethical debate, disagreement, and controversy. There are three ethical principles that provide an ethical basis for ART: the principle of liberty, principle of utility, and principle of justice. Medical ethics are based on the moral, religious, and philosophical ideas and principles of the society and are influenced by economics, policies, and law. This creates tension between the principles of justice and utility, which can result in disparity in the availability of and access to ART services between the rich and the poor. The moral status of the embryo is the key for all the ethical considerations and law regarding ART in different societies. This has resulted in cross-border ART. Conscientious objection of healthcare providers should not deprive couples from having access to a required ART service.

  6. Managed care of infertility.

    PubMed

    Hull, M G

    1996-08-01

    Mandated managed care of infertility, as for other branches of medicine, demands cost-effectiveness, appropriate use of proven clinical methods, and audit of the services provided. Proper standards, and protocols of clinical diagnosis and selection of treatment need to be agreed, although allowing for valid alternatives. A diagnostic process and classification staged for primary, secondary, and tertiary care as appropriate, which has been derived by consensus, is offered in this paper. It is assumed that all couples would be allowed access to diagnostic services. A national estimate has attributed one-quarter of the costs of full infertility services to diagnostic procedures and three-quarters to treatments. It is assumed that any constraints owing to funding would apply only to access to treatment. One model proposed would limit treatment to those couples and methods which could achieve a 50% birthrate target within a reasonable time limit or number of cycles. Although there is as yet no existing model of managed care on which to base exact costing, it should be possible by initial over-restrictiveness to leave room for annual adjustments of treatment provision and to allow for new developments. Other more equitable ways of sharing resources can be argued, and ethical standards should be agreed in any system of managed care for a population.

  7. Infertility, infertility treatment, and congenital malformations: Danish national birth cohort

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bille, Camilla; Olsen, Jørn

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether infertile couples (with a time to pregnancy of > 12 months), who conceive naturally or after treatment, give birth to children with an increased prevalence of congenital malformations. Design Longitudinal study. Setting Danish national birth cohort. Participants Three groups of liveborn children and their mothers: 50 897 singletons and 1366 twins born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy ≤ 12 months), 5764 singletons and 100 twins born of infertile couples who conceived naturally (time to pregnancy > 12 months), and 4588 singletons and 1690 twins born after infertility treatment. Main outcome measures Prevalence of congenital malformations determined from hospital discharge diagnoses. Results Compared with singletons born of fertile couples, singletons born of infertile couples who conceived naturally or after treatment had a higher prevalence of congenital malformations—hazard ratios 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.35) and 1.39 (1.23 to 1.57). The overall prevalence of congenital malformations increased with increasing time to pregnancy. When the analysis was restricted to singletons born of infertile couples, babies born after treatment had an increased prevalence of genital organ malformations (hazard ratio 2.32, 1.24 to 4.35) compared with babies conceived naturally. No significant differences existed in the overall prevalence of congenital malformations among twins. Conclusions Hormonal treatment for infertility may be related to the occurrence of malformations of genital organs, but our results suggest that the reported increased prevalence of congenital malformations seen in singletons born after assisted reproductive technology is partly due to the underlying infertility or its determinants. The association between untreated infertility and congenital malformations warrants further examination. PMID:16893903

  8. Infertility, infertility treatment, and congenital malformations: Danish national birth cohort.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bille, Camilla; Olsen, Jørn

    2006-09-30

    To examine whether infertile couples (with a time to pregnancy of > 12 months), who conceive naturally or after treatment, give birth to children with an increased prevalence of congenital malformations. Longitudinal study. Danish national birth cohort. Three groups of liveborn children and their mothers: 50,897 singletons and 1366 twins born of fertile couples (time to pregnancy < or = 12 months), 5764 singletons and 100 twins born of infertile couples who conceived naturally (time to pregnancy > 12 months), and 4588 singletons and 1690 twins born after infertility treatment. Prevalence of congenital malformations determined from hospital discharge diagnoses. Compared with singletons born of fertile couples, singletons born of infertile couples who conceived naturally or after treatment had a higher prevalence of congenital malformations-hazard ratios 1.20 (95% confidence interval 1.07 to 1.35) and 1.39 (1.23 to 1.57). The overall prevalence of congenital malformations increased with increasing time to pregnancy. When the analysis was restricted to singletons born of infertile couples, babies born after treatment had an increased prevalence of genital organ malformations (hazard ratio 2.32, 1.24 to 4.35) compared with babies conceived naturally. No significant differences existed in the overall prevalence of congenital malformations among twins. Hormonal treatment for infertility may be related to the occurrence of malformations of genital organs, but our results suggest that the reported increased prevalence of congenital malformations seen in singletons born after assisted reproductive technology is partly due to the underlying infertility or its determinants. The association between untreated infertility and congenital malformations warrants further examination.

  9. Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the American Society for Reproductive Medicine Endometriosis: Does It Cause Infertility? This fact sheet was developed in ... or intestines. This tissue can irritate structures that it touches, causing pain and adhesions (scar tissue) on ...

  10. Infertility Counseling and Support: When and Where to Find It

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home FAQs Frequently Asked Questions Quick Facts About Infertility FAQs About Infertility FAQs About the Psychological Component of Infertility FAQs About Cloning and Stem Cell Research SART's ...

  11. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Harton, Gary L; Tempest, Helen G

    2012-01-01

    Infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family. Despite this, the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered. Nevertheless, more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified. This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically: chromosomal aneuploidy, structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions. Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans. Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin, but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts. Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm. Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed, as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases. Clinical recommendations where possible will be made, as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility. PMID:22120929

  12. Chromosomal disorders and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Harton, Gary L; Tempest, Helen G

    2012-01-01

    Infertility in humans is surprisingly common occurring in approximately 15% of the population wishing to start a family. Despite this, the molecular and genetic factors underlying the cause of infertility remain largely undiscovered. Nevertheless, more and more genetic factors associated with infertility are being identified. This review will focus on our current understanding of the chromosomal basis of male infertility specifically: chromosomal aneuploidy, structural and numerical karyotype abnormalities and Y chromosomal microdeletions. Chromosomal aneuploidy is the leading cause of pregnancy loss and developmental disabilities in humans. Aneuploidy is predominantly maternal in origin, but concerns have been raised regarding the safety of intracytoplasmic sperm injection as infertile men have significantly higher levels of sperm aneuploidy compared to their fertile counterparts. Males with numerical or structural karyotype abnormalities are also at an increased risk of producing aneuploid sperm. Our current understanding of how sperm aneuploidy translates to embryo aneuploidy will be reviewed, as well as the application of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in such cases. Clinical recommendations where possible will be made, as well as discussion of the use of emerging array technology in PGD and its potential applications in male infertility.

  13. [Orchitis and male infertility].

    PubMed

    Schuppe, H-C; Pilatz, A; Hossain, H; Meinhardt, A; Bergmann, M; Haidl, G; Weidner, W

    2010-05-01

    Infections and inflammations of the genital tract are considered the most frequent causes of reduced male fertility, but conclusive epidemiological data are not available. In view of the exposure of germ cells to pathogenic components as well as the cells and mediators involved in the inflammatory processes, irreversible damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding decline of ejaculate quality are to be expected, particularly in cases of chronic orchitis. While the consequences of orchitis and epididymo-orchitis that exhibit clinical symptoms due to systemic or local infections are well known, including testicular atrophy and complete loss of fertility, those cases of inflammatory reactions of the testicles that manifest an asymptomatic or subclinical course, or are not even due to an infection, have received little attention until now. However, systematic histopathological analyses have shown a high prevalence of asymptomatic inflammatory reactions in testicular biopsies from infertile men. The mostly focal lymphocytic infiltrates correlate with the degree of damage to spermatogenesis and corresponding clinical and endocrinological parameters of testicular function. Noninvasive diagnostic techniques are not yet available so that chronic asymptomatic inflammations of the testicles as the primary cause or cofactor of male fertility disorders are underestimated. Except for administration of pathogen-specific antibiotics, treatment recommendations are to a large extent still lacking.

  14. Genetics of human male infertility.

    PubMed

    Poongothai, J; Gopenath, T S; Manonayaki, S

    2009-04-01

    Infertility is defined as a failure to conceive in a couple trying to reproduce for a period of two years without conception. Approximately 15 percent of couples are infertile, and among these couples, male factor infertility accounts for approximately 50 percent of causes. Male infertility is a multifactorial syndrome encompassing a wide variety of disorders. In more than half of infertile men, the cause of their infertility is unknown (idiopathic) and could be congenital or acquired. Infertility in men can be diagnosed initially by semen analysis. Seminograms of infertile men may reveal many abnormal conditions, which include azoospermia, oligozoospermia, teratozoospermia, asthenozoospermia, necrospermia and pyospermia. The current estimate is that about 30 percent of men seeking help at the infertility clinic are found to have oligozoospermia or azoospermia of unknown aetiology. Therefore, there is a need to find the cause of infertility. The causes are known in less than half of these cases, out of which genetic or inherited disease and specific abnormalities in the Y chromosome are major factors. About 10-20 percent of males presenting without sperm in the ejaculate carry a deletion of the Y chromosome. This deleted region includes the Azoospermia Factor (AZF) locus, located in the Yq11, which is divided into four recurrently deleted non-overlapping subregions designated as AZFa, AZFb, AZFc and AZFd. Each of these regions may be associated with a particular testicular histology, and several candidate genes have been found within these regions. The Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ) gene family is reported to be the most frequently deleted AZF candidate gene and is located in the AZFc region. Recently, a partial, novel Y chromosome 1.6-Mb deletion, designated "gr/gr" deletion, has been described specifically in infertile men with varying degrees of spermatogenic failure. The DAZ gene has an autosomal homologue, DAZL (DAZ-Like), on the short arm of the chromosome 3 (3

  15. Infertility and uterine fibroids.

    PubMed

    Zepiridis, Leonidas I; Grimbizis, Grigoris F; Tarlatzis, Basil C

    2016-07-01

    Uterine fibroids are the most common tumors in women and their prevalence is higher in patients with infertility. At present, they are classified according to their anatomical location, as no classification system includes additional parameters such as their size or number. There is a general agreement that submucosal fibroids negatively affect fertility, when compared to women without fibroids. Intramural fibroids above a certain size (>4 cm), even without cavity distortion, may also negatively influence fertility. However, the presence of subserosal myomas has little or no effect on fertility. Many possible theories have been proposed to explain how fibroids impair fertility: mechanisms involving alteration of local anatomical location, others involving functional changes of the myometrium and endometrium, and finally endocrine and paracrine molecular mechanisms. Nevertheless, any of the above mentioned mechanisms can cause reduced reproductive potential, thereby leading to impaired gamete transport, reduced ability for embryo implantation, and creation of a hostile environment. The published experience defines the best practice strategy, as not many large, well-designed, and properly powered studies are available. Myomectomy appears to have an effect in fertility improvement in certain cases. Excision of submucosal myomas seems to restore fertility with pregnancy rates after surgery similar to normal controls. Removal of intramural myomas affecting pregnancy outcome seems to be associated with higher pregnancy rates when compared to non-operated controls, although evidence is still nοt sufficient. Treatment of subserosal myomas of reasonable size is not necessary for fertility reasons. The results of endoscopic and open myomectomy are similar; thus, endoscopic treatment is the recommended approach due to its advantages in patient's postoperative course.

  16. Female infertility of endocrine origin.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Rita Vasconcellos; Clapauch, Ruth

    2014-03-01

    Infertility is defined as the failure to conceive, with no contraception, after one year of regular intercourse in women<35 years and after 6 months in women>35 years. A review on causes, management and treatment of endocrine causes of was performed. Epidemiological data suggest that around 10% to 15% of couples are infertile. Anovulatory problems are responsible from 25% to 50% of causes of . Advanced age, obesity, and drugs, have a negative effect on fertility. Different hypothalamic, pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, and ovarian disorders may affect fertility as well. Infertility is a growing phenomenon in developed societies. We here provide information about how to identify endocrine patients with ovulatory dysfunction. Women must be advised about limiting factors to be avoided, in order to protect their fertility.

  17. Immune Aspects of Female Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Brazdova, Andrea; Senechal, Helene; Peltre, Gabriel; Poncet, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Immune infertility, in terms of reproductive failure, has become a serious health issue involving approximately 1 out of 5 couples at reproductive age. Semen that is defined as a complex fluid containing sperm, cellular vesicles and other cells and components, could sensitize the female genital tract. The immune rejection of male semen in the female reproductive tract is explained as the failure of natural tolerance leading to local and/or systemic immune response. Present active immune mechanism may induce high levels of anti-seminal/sperm antibodies. It has already been proven that iso-immunization is associated with infertility. Comprehensive studies with regards to the identification of antibody-targets and the determination of specific antibody class contribute to the development of effective immuno-therapy and, on the other hand, potential immuno-contraception, and then of course to complex patient diagnosis. This review summarizes the aspects of female immune infertility. PMID:27123194

  18. Relative infertility: modeling clinical paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Jansen, R P

    1993-05-01

    To assume that a cause of relative infertility will decrease the monthly chance of conception (fecundability) in a dose-dependent manner and, by a mathematical model, to identify common clinical observations and paradoxes that are explainable within this hypothesis. An empirically based assumption of a population-mean fecundability of 0.2 and the accumulating probability of pregnancy equations and projections were used to examine over time the effects of diminishing such fecundability to one half, one fifth, and one twentieth of normal, and then reversing this effect with ideal treatment at points of 2 years and 5 years. [1] The duration of infertility is an important and powerful covariate in determining residual fecundability and the chance of pregnancy, with or without treatment. [2] The more substantial the pathology is, the greater should be the likelihood of pregnancy after its effective treatment. [3] Provided no harm is done by treatment, an increase in subsequent fecundability will result whatever the "dose" of the reproductive disturbance, but this will not always mean that pregnancy is probable. [4] The presence of a second infertility factor should compound dramatically the deleterious effects attributable to the first and make it more likely for either factor to be diagnosed. Duration of infertility is generally more important than the dose of an infertility factor as a covariate in clinical studies, and more emphasis should be placed on controlling for it. Discouraging clinical reports on the low success of treating certain conditions associated with infertility do not necessarily justify rejecting a hypothesis that such a condition decreases fertility in a dose-dependent manner.

  19. Infertility as a psychological problem.

    PubMed

    Podolska, Magdalena Z; Bidzan, Mariola

    2011-01-01

    Recently there has been enormous progress in couple infertility treatment and diagnostics. Some couples cannot conceive despite the fact that there seems to be no objective somatic or immunologic reasons. In such situations gynaecologists are helpless and couples may be overwhelmed by a sense of defeat and hopelessness. Thus, consulting a psychologist or therapist on how to cope better with the problem may be a good solution. The objective of the following paper is to discuss the dilemmas of couples undergoing infertility treatment, related psychological problems, and to determine the need for psychological and therapeutic support. The study demonstrates numerous infertility causes and concludes that there is no universal method of dealing with them. Very frequently psychological and somatic problems overlap. Psychological causes are often the primary factors, but sometimes they are secondary derivatives of the therapeutic process. A wide scope of factors must be considered to attempt psychological analysis of patients treated for infertility including the influence of the family and relations within, reaction to the diagnosis and suggested treatment, the influence of religion on the treatment, the evaluation of the relations in the family of procreation, sexual life assessment, the sense of a woman's self-esteem and self-acceptance. Basing on empirical analysis it was concluded that all women treated for infertility want to create a full family. They have problems in coping with emotional liability during treatment and a sense of fear and failure. Understanding the psychological mechanisms observed in patients treated for infertility might help to diagnose the causes of their problems with facing the new, extremely difficult situation.

  20. Endocrine causes of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Jarow, Jonathan P

    2003-02-01

    Although endocrinopathies are not often seen in infertile men, these disorders are clinically significant; they often have potentially serious medical significance, regardless of fertility issues. Correction of these disorders represents a possible way to restore normal fertility for the male partner. Male fertility is critically dependent upon a normal hormonal milieu. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is quite sensitive to disruption by endocrine disorders and other generalized medical disorders. Thus, male infertility is occasionally the presenting sign for significant underlying medical disease; it is important to properly evaluate these patients.

  1. Will artificial gametes end infertility?

    PubMed

    Smajdor, Anna; Cutas, Daniela

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we will look at the various ways in which infertility can be understood and at how need for reproductive therapies can be construed. We will do this against the background of research with artificial gametes (AGs). Having explored these questions we will attempt to establish the degree to which technologies such as AGs could expand the array of choices that people have to reproduce and/or become parents. Finally, we will examine whether and in what ways the most promising developments of such technologies are likely to bring about the "end of infertility".

  2. [Infertility and risk of cancer].

    PubMed

    Hippeläinen, Maritta

    2012-01-01

    Ovulation problems, ovarian endometriosis and impaired sperm quality may be factors underlying infertility and possibly predisposing to cancer diseases. Infertility therapies utilize products that alter the hormonal balance and may in theory increase the risk of cancer. Handling of gametes in the laboratory is also likely to influence gene regulation. Ovulation induction therapies may increase the risk of uterine cancer, and in vitro fertilization (IVF) therapies may increase ovarian tumors. Children born after IVF therapies seem to have a statistically elevated risk of cancer. Instead of risk ratios, the use of clear figures is recommended in patient information.

  3. Childlessness: Strategies for Coping with Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woollett, Anne

    1985-01-01

    Examines the coping strategies adopted by 50 infertile men and women. All interviewed had sought medical help, and many became knowledgeable about reproduction and infertility. Redefining the problem and managing negative concepts about infertility were other coping strategies. Seeking social support, positive identities, and other ways of meeting…

  4. Infertility: An Unanticipated and Prolonged Life Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Linda; Gilbert, Mary S.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews literature on infertility with a focus on myths and misunderstandings about the causes of infertility; a description of the crisis of infertility including common psychological responses; the additional psychological complexity introduced by medical procedures and reproductive technology; and suggestions for mental health counselors.…

  5. Infertility: A Crisis with No Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert R.; Koraleski, Stephanie

    1990-01-01

    Discusses helpful ways for mental health counselors to work with infertile clients, explaining nature of infertility, psychological crisis it provokes, common reactions of infertile clients, and strategies to help clients cope. Discusses specific strategies for assessing clients' potential for suicide or self-destructive acts and improving their…

  6. Sex and Intimacy among Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greil, Arthur; And Others

    Infertility is a widespread health problem in the United States, affecting anywhere from 10 to 15 percent and perhaps even a greater percentage of U.S. couples. Infertility can have far-reaching effects on life satisfaction, well-being, and psychological adjustment. This paper presents an analysis of sex and intimacy among infertile couples based…

  7. Infertility and Life Satisfaction among Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Julia; Stone, Rosalie A. Torres; Greil, Arthur L.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a random sample of 580 midwestern women, the authors explore the association between lifetime infertility and life satisfaction. Past research shows lower life satisfaction among those seeking help for infertility. The authors find no direct effects of lifetime infertility, regardless of perception of a problem, on life…

  8. Childlessness: Strategies for Coping with Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woollett, Anne

    1985-01-01

    Examines the coping strategies adopted by 50 infertile men and women. All interviewed had sought medical help, and many became knowledgeable about reproduction and infertility. Redefining the problem and managing negative concepts about infertility were other coping strategies. Seeking social support, positive identities, and other ways of meeting…

  9. Infertility and Life Satisfaction among Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Julia; Stone, Rosalie A. Torres; Greil, Arthur L.

    2007-01-01

    Using data from a random sample of 580 midwestern women, the authors explore the association between lifetime infertility and life satisfaction. Past research shows lower life satisfaction among those seeking help for infertility. The authors find no direct effects of lifetime infertility, regardless of perception of a problem, on life…

  10. Infertility: A Crisis with No Resolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Robert R.; Koraleski, Stephanie

    1990-01-01

    Discusses helpful ways for mental health counselors to work with infertile clients, explaining nature of infertility, psychological crisis it provokes, common reactions of infertile clients, and strategies to help clients cope. Discusses specific strategies for assessing clients' potential for suicide or self-destructive acts and improving their…

  11. Infertility: An Unanticipated and Prolonged Life Crisis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest, Linda; Gilbert, Mary S.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews literature on infertility with a focus on myths and misunderstandings about the causes of infertility; a description of the crisis of infertility including common psychological responses; the additional psychological complexity introduced by medical procedures and reproductive technology; and suggestions for mental health counselors.…

  12. Coping with infertility: a transcultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Liu, Botao; Li, Min

    2014-09-01

    To review the most important and interesting articles in infertility published in the last year. This systematic review covers 60 studies published in journals or dissertations in Science Direct and PubMed in the last year, including those related to prevention and treatment as well as related psychosocial services in infertility. We also propose some suggestions about coping with infertility in China. Infertility is a multidisciplinary problem that requires medical, social, and political efforts to prevent and offer infertile patients the best diagnostic, therapeutic, and psychosocial services. Cultural factors should be taken into consideration when designing coping strategies.

  13. Testicular cancer and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Darius A

    2006-11-01

    Testicular cancer and infertility affect a similar age group of patients and have common biologic, epidemiologic, and environmental backgrounds. In this review, we provide current literature on links between infertility and testicular cancer, and new developments in the management of testicular cancer aimed at improving quality of life in men with testicular cancer. In-utero environmental exposure to endocrine disruptors modulates the genetically determined fate of primitive gonad and results in testicular dysgenesis syndrome, which may result in infertility and testicular cancer. Excellent response of testicular cancer to radiation and chemotherapy results in over 90% of survival and quality of life--fertility and sexual function--is of significant concern to patients and clinicians. The testicular-sparing management of testicular masses emerges as a sound alternative to radical orchiectomy and allows for preservation of spermatogenesis and hormonal function, and at the same time achieving similar survival rates. Secondary malignancies, pulmonary, and cardiovascular complications are recognized as late complications of treatment for testicular cancer. Better understanding of common mechanisms involved in infertility and testicular cancer, and scientifically driven evidence-based treatment options should improve quality of life in young men faced with this potentially life-threatening disease.

  14. Evaluation and treatment of infertility.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Tammy J; Vitrikas, Kristen R

    2015-03-01

    Infertility is defined as the inability to achieve pregnancy after one year of regular, unprotected intercourse. Evaluation may be initiated sooner in patients who have risk factors for infertility or if the female partner is older than 35 years. Causes of infertility include male factors, ovulatory dysfunction, uterine abnormalities, tubal obstruction, peritoneal factors, or cervical factors. A history and physical examination can help direct the evaluation. Men should undergo evaluation with a semen analysis. Abnormalities of sperm may be treated with gonadotropin therapy, intrauterine insemination, or in vitro fertilization. Ovulation should be documented by serum progesterone level measurement at cycle day 21. Evaluation of the uterus and fallopian tubes can be performed by hysterosalpingography in women with no risk of obstruction. For patients with a history of endometriosis, pelvic infections, or ectopic pregnancy, evaluation with hysteroscopy or laparoscopy is recommended. Women with anovulation may be treated in the primary care setting with clomiphene to induce ovulation. Treatment of tubal obstruction generally requires referral for subspecialty care. Unexplained infertility in women or men may be managed with another year of unprotected intercourse, or may proceed to assisted reproductive technologies, such as intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization.

  15. Barriers to infertility treatment: an integrated study.

    PubMed

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Parandavar, Nehle; Abdollahifard, Sareh

    2013-11-25

    Infertility is one of the most important events in life. Despite the negative impact of infertility, a significant number of women struggling to conceive do not consult a physician and do not fallow up infertility treatment. This integrated study aimed to investigate a large amount of factors which influenced discontinuation of infertility treatment. This integrated study (qualitative - quantitative study) was done on infertile women who had referred to infertility center in Jahrom University of medical sciences using purposive sampling. In the first study, data were collected from a valid questionnaire with 22 questions in a 5-point likert scale about barriers to infertility treatments and in the second study, as a phenomenology approach, data collection was done using deep unstructured interviews and focused groups were aimed to identify deep individual experiences about it. major barriers to infertility treatments included the probability of treatment failure (52.5%), couple's age and possibility of high risk pregnancy (51.5%), Painfulness of some treatment methods such as laparoscopy (50.5%). Qualitative results led to the identification of three main themes: Nature of treatment, negative thinking, social and cultural factors. As a result, we suggest family education and enrichment of cultural context in the field of infertility; infertile people would be willing to pursue infertility treatments.

  16. Barriers to Infertility Treatment: An Integrated Study

    PubMed Central

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Parandavar, Nehle; Abdollahifard, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility is one of the most important events in life. Despite the negative impact of infertility, a significant number of women struggling to conceive do not consult a physician and do not fallow up infertility treatment. This integrated study aimed to investigate a large amount of factors which influenced discontinuation of infertility treatment. Methods: This integrated study (qualitative – quantitative study) was done on infertile women who had referred to infertility center in Jahrom University of medical sciences using purposive sampling. In the first study, data were collected from a valid questionnaire with 22 questions in a 5-point likert scale about barriers to infertility treatments and in the second study, as a phenomenology approach, data collection was done using deep unstructured interviews and focused groups were aimed to identify deep individual experiences about it. Results: major barriers to infertility treatments included the probability of treatment failure (52.5%), couple’s age and possibility of high risk pregnancy (51.5%), Painfulness of some treatment methods such as laparoscopy (50.5%). Qualitative results led to the identification of three main themes: Nature of treatment, negative thinking, social and cultural factors. Conclusion: As a result, we suggest family education and enrichment of cultural context in the field of infertility; infertile people would be willing to pursue infertility treatments. PMID:24373278

  17. Unexplained infertility: association with inherited thrombophilia.

    PubMed

    Fatini, Cinzia; Conti, Lucia; Turillazzi, Valentina; Sticchi, Elena; Romagnuolo, Ilaria; Milanini, Maria Novella; Cozzi, Cinzia; Abbate, Rosanna; Noci, Ivo

    2012-05-01

    Unexplained infertility represents one of the most common diagnoses in fertility care. Attention is being paid to the association between inherited thrombophilia and infertility causes. In this study we investigated the prevalence of inherited thrombophilia according to infertility causes. We studied Prothrombin gene G20210A mutation, Factor V Leiden, deficiencies in protein S and C and antithrombin in 930 Caucasian infertile women referred to Fertility Center of the Department of Sciences for Woman and Child's Health, University of Florence, of whom 230 with unexplained, 195 female and 283 male infertility, and in 240 women who have conceived naturally without hormonal stimulation therapy. A significant relationship between inherited thrombophilia [OR 95%CI 1.97 (1.05-3.68), p = 0.03] and unexplained infertility was observed, whereas no association between thrombophilia and female and male infertility was found. Significantly higher prevalence of prothrombin gene mutation in unexplained infertile women in comparison to that observed in fertile women was observed (5.7% vs 2.1% p = 0.04); the prevalence of the other thrombophilia determinants was higher, even if not significantly, in the unexplained infertile group. This study demonstrates the relationship between inherited thrombophilia and unexplained infertility, thus suggesting the contribution of genetic components in modulating unexplained infertility, behind anovulation, male and tubal factor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Psychiatric symptoms in Turkish infertile women.

    PubMed

    Guz, H; Ozkan, A; Sarisoy, G; Yanik, F; Yanik, A

    2003-12-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the psychiatric symptoms which may develop because of infertility in Turkish women and to find out the precipitating factors. Fifty women with primary infertility and 50 health controls were evaluated using the Beck Depression Inventory, Spielberger Stait-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Rosenberg self-esteem scale and Symptom Checklist scale. They were also asked to describe the reactions received from their husband, husbands' families and social group because of infertility. Psychiatric symptoms were not significantly different between the two groups. However, within the infertile group, depression and anxiety were more frequent in the women who received negative reactions from their husband, their husbands' families and social group. Depression, anxiety and self-esteem were improved in the infertile women as age and the duration of infertility increased. In conclusion, our findings indicate that the reactions the infertile women are faced with play an important role in the development of certain psychiatric symptoms.

  19. Psychogenic infertility--myths and facts.

    PubMed

    Wischmann, Tewes H

    2003-12-01

    The hypothesis of this review is that the role of psychological factors as the sole cause of infertility is generally overrated. A review is given of studies concerning the influence of psychological factors on the development of infertility. A prevalence of psychogenic infertility of 10-15 per cent must be discussed critically. A value of approximately 5 per cent is more realistic. Equating unexplained infertility with psychogenic infertility is not justified. A definition of psychogenic infertility according to the German guidelines Psychosomatics in Reproductive Medicine is presented. Spontaneous pregnancies following adoption or the decision to remain childless are the absolute exception. The association of stress and infertility in humans is still unclear. For many women the effect of infertility and notably of medical therapy is a considerable emotional stress. This may make psychosocial counseling necessary in certain cases. An exclusive psychological/psychodynamical point of view on the complexity of infertility is as inadequate as a strictly somatic point of view. Infertility should always be treated as a psychosomatic entirety.

  20. Genetic causes of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Stouffs, Katrien; Seneca, Sara; Lissens, Willy

    2014-05-01

    Male infertility, affecting around half of the couples with a problem to get pregnant, is a very heterogeneous condition. Part of patients are having a defect in spermatogenesis of which the underlying causes (including genetic ones) remain largely unknown. The only genetic tests routinely used in the diagnosis of male infertility are the analyses for the presence of Yq microdeletions and/or chromosomal abnormalities. Various other single gene or polygenic defects have been proposed to be involved in male fertility. Yet, their causative effect often remains to be proven. The recent evolution in the development of whole genome-based techniques may help in clarifying the role of genes and other genetic factors involved in spermatogenesis and spermatogenesis defects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Ethical issues in infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Pennings, Guido; Mertes, Heidi

    2012-12-01

    Two currently contentious domains in infertility treatment are discussed: assisted reproduction for same-sex couples and fertility preservation for women with cancer. Despite an increasing recognition of the rights of same-sex couples, in many countries they are still not eligible for assisted reproductive technology. The main justification for excluding same-sex couples from treatment is that the welfare of the future children would be compromised. Empirical evidence, however, shows that this is not the case. Another group of non-infertile women seeking assistance from reproductive medicine are women with cancer who are at risk of impaired or lost fertility as a result of their illness or cancer treatment. In this field, the future holds many promising options. Several of these, however, are currently in an experimental phase, which elicits ethical concerns about participant recruitment and research participation of children.

  2. [Circulating nucleic acids and infertility].

    PubMed

    Scalici, E; Mullet, T; Ferrières Hoa, A; Gala, A; Loup, V; Anahory, T; Belloc, S; Hamamah, S

    2015-09-01

    Circulating nucleic acids (cell-free DNA and microRNAs) have for particularity to be easily detectable in the biological fluids of the body. Therefore, they constitute biomarkers of interest in female and male infertility care. Indeed, in female, they can be used to detect ovarian reserve disorders (polycystic ovary syndrome and low functional ovarian reserve) as well as to assess follicular microenvironment quality. Moreover, in men, their expression levels can vary in case of spermatogenesis abnormalities. Finally, circulating nucleic acids have also the ability to predict successfully the quality of in vitro embryo development. Their multiple contributions during assisted reproductive technology (ART) make of them biomarkers of interest, for the development of new diagnostic and/or prognostic tests, applied to our specialty. Circulating nucleic acids would so offer the possibility of personalized medical care for infertile couples in ART.

  3. The Infertility Experience: Biopsychosocial Effects and Suggestions for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Kathryn J.; Baldo, Tracy D.

    2004-01-01

    Infertility affects many individuals and couples. This article begins with a case study of a couple who have experienced infertility yet do not identify infertility as their presenting problem. Clients and counselors alike often overlook infertility. This article offers an overview of the biology of infertility and its psychological and…

  4. The Infertility Experience: Biopsychosocial Effects and Suggestions for Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Kathryn J.; Baldo, Tracy D.

    2004-01-01

    Infertility affects many individuals and couples. This article begins with a case study of a couple who have experienced infertility yet do not identify infertility as their presenting problem. Clients and counselors alike often overlook infertility. This article offers an overview of the biology of infertility and its psychological and…

  5. [Overweight and secretory male infertility].

    PubMed

    Oshakbaev, K P; Abylaĭuly, Zh; Dukenbaeva, B A

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a trial with participation of 60 males aged 23-52. Of them, 30 had secretory male iufertility (SMI) and obesity. The control 30 patients were healthy volunteers. The protocol was performed by two stages. Stage 1 included: investigation of a clinico-laboratory status, of correlation between a sorption function of erythrocytes, endogenic metabolic intoxication (EMI) and spermogram parameters, concentration of serum testosterone in SMI patients. Stage 2 consisted in treatment of the intoxication by reducing body mass. All the infertile men were obese; 30% of them had low glucose tolerance, 46.7% had stage 2 hypertension, 23.3%--seasonal allergic symptoms. The level of organic substances on the surface of erythrocytes in infertile men was higher than in the controls (p < 0.01). A negative correlation was seen between spermogram parameters and organic substances content on erythrocytic surface (p < 0/05), concentration of serum testosterone and the above substances (p < 0.01). The loss of fat tissue by 7-14 kg by infertile men resulted in a positive trend in spermogram parameters and the level of serum testosterone (p < 0.01).

  6. Emerging molecular methods for male infertility investigation.

    PubMed

    Benkhalifa, Moncef; Montjean, Debbie; Belloc, Stephanie; Dalleac, Alain; Ducasse, Michel; Boyer, Pierre; Merviel, Philippe; Copin, Henri

    2014-01-01

    Male factors account for approximately 50% of reproductive pathology. Different disorders, including urogenital and endocrine system development abnormalities, lead to testicular and gametogenesis defects. Parallely, studies have reported that somatic and germ cell genome decay are a major cause of male infertility. It has been shown that in somatic karyotype, there is a higher incidence of chromosomal aberrations in infertile men than neonatal population and significant chromosome Y microdeletion or specific gene alterations in affected spermatogenesis. Karyotyping and FISH application at somatic and germ cell levels are no longer sufficient to investigate the potential contribution of genome disorders on male infertility. A wide range of molecular methods are required for better understanding of male infertility causes. Molecular omes and omics techniques have become a great tool to investigate male infertility from chromosome to protein. This review reports different molecular tests and methods that can be offered for male infertility investigation.

  7. Male Infertility and Its Causes in Human

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Tsujimura, Akira; Miyagawa, Yasushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Namiki, Mikio; Sengoku, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most serious social problems facing advanced nations. In general, approximate half of all cases of infertility are caused by factors related to the male partner. To date, various treatments have been developed for male infertility and are steadily producing results. However, there is no effective treatment for patients with nonobstructive azoospermia, in which there is an absence of mature sperm in the testes. Although evidence suggests that many patients with male infertility have a genetic predisposition to the condition, the cause has not been elucidated in the vast majority of cases. This paper discusses the environmental factors considered likely to be involved in male infertility and the genes that have been clearly shown to be involved in male infertility in humans, including our recent findings. PMID:22046184

  8. Relevance of genetic investigation in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Asero, P; Calogero, A E; Condorelli, R A; Mongioi', L; Vicari, E; Lanzafame, F; Crisci, R; La Vignera, S

    2014-05-01

    Genetic causes can be directly responsible for various clinical conditions of male infertility and spermatogenic impairment. With the increased use of assisted reproduction technologies our understanding of genetic basis of male infertility has large implications not only for understanding the causes of infertility but also in determining the prognosis and management of such couples. For these reasons, the genetic investigations represent today an essential and useful tool in the treatment of male infertility. Several evidences are available for the clinical practice regarding the diagnosis; however, there are less information relative to the treatment of the genetic causes of male infertility. Focus of this review is to discuss the main and more common genetic causes of male infertility to better direct the genetics investigation in the treatment of spermatogenic impairment.

  9. [Sophrology: a different tool for infertile couples].

    PubMed

    Heymès, O; Forges, T; Guillet-May, F; Zaccabri, A; Dandachi, N; Monnier, P

    2006-12-01

    Because of the high degree of complexity of assisted reproduction techniques (ART), the human and conscious dimensions of infertility problems are often neglected. Different strategies may help infertile couples coping with infertility and related treatments; among these, Caycedian sophrology relies on the cognitive, emotional, and somatic aspects of consciousness. In the present article, the authors report on their experience with sophrologic support for infertile patients by a midwife qualified in caycedian sophrology. Overall, since 1988, 310 couples have benefied from this kind of support, with an average of 10 sophrologic trainings per patient. Whereas some couples consider sophrology as a short time training to better cope with any particular aspect of their infertility treatment, others want to undertake more profound work on their body scheme. The authors wish to call the attention of ART professionals to this kind of medical support for infertile couples, and also to the particular role of midwives with sophrologic competence in an ART center.

  10. [The epidemiology of infertility in families].

    PubMed

    Aĭlamazian, E K; Ustinkina, T I; Balasanian, I G

    1990-09-01

    This study of epidemiology of infertility in families has employed the guidelines of the WHO Program on Human Reproduction. The study involved 1976 infertile couples. It elucidated major diagnosis-related groups in the female and male population and data sets of the couples. The basis of infertility remained uncertain in only 2.1% of the families. Infertility was underlied only by a female reproductive disease in 44.4% of the families, with about half of these cases being endocrine disorders. Diseases of husbands, primarily varicocele and primary testicular lesions, accounted for infertility in 19.3% of the families. Determinants of infertility in both spouses were identified in 34.2% of the families, mostly genital inflammatory diseases.

  11. Infertility trial outcomes: healthy moms and babies.

    PubMed

    Silver, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Traditionally, the primary outcome of infertility trials has been a positive pregnancy test or a clinically recognized pregnancy. However, parents desire a healthy baby that grows up to be a healthy adult, rather than a positive pregnancy test. Too often results of infertility trials are lacking in crucial obstetric details. This is problematic because treatments for infertility have the capacity to increase the risk for a variety of adverse obstetric outcomes. This review will outline important obstetric variables that should be included when reporting infertility research. The rationale for including these data, precise definitions of the variables, and cost-effective strategies for obtaining these obstetric details will be highlighted.

  12. Eastern medicine approaches to male infertility.

    PubMed

    Hu, Min; Zhang, Yuehui; Ma, Hongli; Ng, Ernest H Y; Wu, Xiao-Ke

    2013-07-01

    Male factor is a common cause of infertility and the male partner must be systematically evaluated in the workup of every infertile couple. Various Eastern medical strategies have been tried with variable success. This article describes the clinical effects of Eastern medicine approaches including acupuncture, Chinese herbal medicine, massage, yoga, tai chi, and qi gong, which could improve the sperm parameters and motility, genital inflammatory conditions, as well as immune system disorders, sexual dysfunction, and varicocele. Acupuncture reduces inflammation, increases sperm motility, improves semen parameters, modulates the immune system, and improves sexual and ejaculatory dysfunction in male infertility. The clinical effects may be mediated via activation of somatic afferent nerves innervating the skin and muscle. Chinese herbal medicines may also exert helpful effects in male infertility, and it is worth noting that some herbal drugs may result in male infertility. Massage also exerts positive effects in male infertility. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of clinical effects are unclear. Tai chi, qi gong, and yoga have not been investigated in male infertility, but it has been reported to regulate endocrine and central or autonomic nervous systems. In conclusion, Eastern medical approaches have beneficial on reproductive effects in male infertility. However, future well-designed, randomized, clinical control trials are needed to evaluate the safety, efficacy, and mechanisms of Eastern medical approaches for male infertility. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Role of female pelvic anatomy in infertility.

    PubMed

    Harris-Glocker, Miranda; McLaren, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    Infertility is defined as a couple's failure to achieve pregnancy after one year of regular, unprotected intercourse. The etiology of infertility can be due to female factors, male factors, combined male and female factors, or have an unknown etiology. This review focuses on the role of female pelvic anatomy in infertility. Normal anatomy and the physiology of reproduction will be discussed, as well as the anatomic and pathophysiologic processes that cause infertility including ovulatory disorders, endometriosis, pelvic adhesions, tubal blockage, mullerian anomalies, and abnormalities affecting the uterine cavity such as leiomyomata and endometrial polyps.

  14. Beyond the Mechanics of Infertility: Perspectives on the Social Psychology of Infertility and Involuntary Childlessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Anne Martin; Matthews, Ralph

    1986-01-01

    Examines the social and social psychological implications of infertility and involuntary childlessness. Examines the clinical and popular literature on the correlates and causes of infertility and the social psychological consequences of infertility. Suggests ways that family practitioners and researchers might overcome some of the limitations.…

  15. Beyond the Mechanics of Infertility: Perspectives on the Social Psychology of Infertility and Involuntary Childlessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Anne Martin; Matthews, Ralph

    1986-01-01

    Examines the social and social psychological implications of infertility and involuntary childlessness. Examines the clinical and popular literature on the correlates and causes of infertility and the social psychological consequences of infertility. Suggests ways that family practitioners and researchers might overcome some of the limitations.…

  16. Might uterus transplantation be an option for uterine factor infertility?

    PubMed

    Akar, Münire Erman

    2015-01-01

    Current data on uterus allotransplantation research has been reviewed and summarized. Over the past 15 years, progress in uterus transplantation research has increased dramatically. As a consequence, the first pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation in rats have been reported. The technique has been better defined. Although clinical pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation has been reported in humans, there are still many questions to be answered before clinical application. Gestational surrogacy still remains an important option for being a genetic parent in selected cases with uterine factor infertility.

  17. Might uterus transplantation be an option for uterine factor infertility?

    PubMed Central

    Akar, Münire Erman

    2015-01-01

    Current data on uterus allotransplantation research has been reviewed and summarized. Over the past 15 years, progress in uterus transplantation research has increased dramatically. As a consequence, the first pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation in rats have been reported. The technique has been better defined. Although clinical pregnancy and delivery following uterus allotransplantation has been reported in humans, there are still many questions to be answered before clinical application. Gestational surrogacy still remains an important option for being a genetic parent in selected cases with uterine factor infertility. PMID:25788850

  18. Domestic violence in Iranian infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhan, Zohre; Ozgoli, Giti; Azar, Mahyar; Alavimajd, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    Background: Millions of men and women suffer from infertility worldwide. In many cultures, infertile women are at risk of social and emotional problems. Infertility may affect the public health in many countries. Domestic violence is the intentional use of physical force, power or threat against oneself, another person or another group or community which leads to injury, death, mental harm, lack of development or deprivation. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of domestic violence against infertile women who referred to the infertility centres of Tehran, Iran in 2011. Methods: This was cross- sectional descriptive study conducted on 400 infertile women who were selected through convenient sampling method. The questionnaire used in this study included two sections: a demographic section with questions about demographic characteristics of the infertile women and their husbands; and the domestic violence questionnaire with questions about physical, emotional and sexual violence. Data were analysed by SPSS16; descriptive statistics, Spearman’s test, t- test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and logistic regression were used for data analysis. Results: Four hundred women with the average age of 30.50 ± 6.16 years participated in the study; of whom, 34.7% experienced domestic violence physical violence (5.3%), emotional violence (74.3%) and sexual violence (47.3%). Domestic violence was significantly associated with unwanted marriage, number of IVFs, drug abuse, emotional status of the women, smoking and addiction or drug abuse of the spouse, mental and physical diseases of the husband (p< 0.05). Conclusion: Many of the current problems in this society, particularly in families are due to the transition of the society from a traditional model to a modern one. The majority of the infertile women experience violence in Iran. Domestic violence against infertile women is a problem that should not be ignored. Clinicians should identify abused women. Providing

  19. Epigenetics, spermatogenesis and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Rajender, Singh; Avery, Kelsey; Agarwal, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications characterized by DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling are important regulators in a number of biological processes, including spermatogenesis. Several genes in the testes are regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, indicating a direct influence of epigenetic mechanisms on the process of spermatogenesis. In the present article, we have provided a comprehensive review of the epigenetic processes in the testes, correlation of epigenetic aberrations with male infertility, impact of environmental factors on the epigenome and male fertility, and significance of epigenetic changes/aberrations in assisted reproduction. The literature review suggested a significant impact of epigenetic aberrations (epimutations) on spermatogenesis, and this could lead to male infertility. Epimutations (often hypermethylation) in several genes, namely MTHFR, PAX8, NTF3, SFN, HRAS, JHM2DA, IGF2, H19, RASGRF1, GTL2, PLAG1, D1RAS3, MEST, KCNQ1, LIT1, and SNRPN, have been reported in association with poor semen parameters or male infertility. Environmental toxins/drugs may affect fertility via epigenetic modifications. For example, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, an anticancer agent, causes a decrease in global DNA methylation that leads to altered sperm morphology, decreased sperm motility, decreased fertilization capacity, and decreased embryo survival. Similarly, Endocrine disruptors, such as methoxychlor (an estrogenic pesticide) and vinclozolin (an anti-androgenic fungicide) have been found by experiments on animals to affect epigenetic modifications that may cause spermatogenic defects in subsequent generations. Assisted reproduction procedures that have been considered rather safe, are now being implicated in inducing epigenetic changes that could affect fertility in subsequent generations. Techniques such as intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and round spermatid injection (ROSI) may increase the incidence of imprinting disorders and

  20. Trends of male factor infertility, an important cause of infertility: A review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Naina; Singh, Amit Kant

    2015-01-01

    Infertility and problems of impaired fecundity have been a concern through ages and is also a significant clinical problem today, which affects 8–12% of couples worldwide. Of all infertility cases, approximately 40–50% is due to “male factor” infertility and as many as 2% of all men will exhibit suboptimal sperm parameters. It may be one or a combination of low sperm concentration, poor sperm motility, or abnormal morphology. The rates of infertility in less industrialized nations are markedly higher and infectious diseases are responsible for a greater proportion of infertility. The present literature will help in knowing the trends of male factor infertility in developing nations like India and to find out in future, various factors that may be responsible for male infertility. PMID:26752853

  1. Choices and Motivations of Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Balen, Frank; Verdurmen, Jacqueline; Ketting, Evert

    1997-01-01

    Infertile couples' (N=131) consideration of options for dealing with infertility (medical help, adoption, fostering, alternative medicine, and focusing on other life goals) is studied. Options were related to specific motivations including altruistic motives for adoption or foster care. Results, timing of choices, and motivations are discussed.…

  2. Pastoral Care to the Infertile Couple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louw, D. J.

    This paper examines the crisis of infertility in the context of the biological or instinctual, cultural, and religious root of parenting. A therapeutic approach to the problem of infertility suggests that pastoral care should make a thorough diagnosis of the correlation between the motivation for parenting, role expectations in the social and…

  3. Pastoral Care to the Infertile Couple.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louw, D. J.

    This paper examines the crisis of infertility in the context of the biological or instinctual, cultural, and religious root of parenting. A therapeutic approach to the problem of infertility suggests that pastoral care should make a thorough diagnosis of the correlation between the motivation for parenting, role expectations in the social and…

  4. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  5. Choices and Motivations of Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Balen, Frank; Verdurmen, Jacqueline; Ketting, Evert

    1997-01-01

    Infertile couples' (N=131) consideration of options for dealing with infertility (medical help, adoption, fostering, alternative medicine, and focusing on other life goals) is studied. Options were related to specific motivations including altruistic motives for adoption or foster care. Results, timing of choices, and motivations are discussed.…

  6. What are some causes of infertility?

    MedlinePlus

    ... are some causes of infertility?​​​ What is fertility preservation? When should I consult a health care provider?​ ... are some causes of infertility?​​​ What is fertility preservation? When should I consult a health care provider?​ ...

  7. Correlation between trichomoniasis vaginalis and female infertility.

    PubMed

    el-Sharkawy, I M; Hamza, S M; el-Sayed, M K

    2000-04-01

    Trichomoniasis vaginalis is one of the common parasitic infection in females. The present results showed that infertile women with T. vaginalis with or without pathogenic microorganisms have decreased C3 & C4, increased IgA level in vaginal discharge and increased serum prolactin. So. T. vaginalis is incriminated as one of the causes of their infertility.

  8. Is Infertility Associated with Childhood Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grether, Judith K.; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S.; Wu, Yvonne W.; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser…

  9. Is infertility associated with childhood autism?

    PubMed

    Grether, Judith K; Qian, Yinge; Croughan, Mary S; Wu, Yvonne W; Schembri, Michael; Camarano, Loretta; Croen, Lisa A

    2013-03-01

    Concerns persist about a possible link between infertility and risk of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Interpretation of existing studies is limited by racial/ethnic homogeneity of study populations and other factors. Using a case-control design, we evaluated infertility history and treatment documented in medical records of members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California. Among singletons (349 cases, 1,847 controls), we found no evidence to support an increase in risk of ASD associated with infertility. Among multiple births (21 cases, 54 controls), we found an increased risk associated with infertility history and with infertility evaluations and treatment around the time of index pregnancy conception; however, small sample size and lack of detailed data on treatments preclude firm interpretation of results for multiple births.

  10. General aspects of fertility and infertility.

    PubMed

    Damario, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Fertility rates have been declining in most Western nations over the past several decades, although it is not entirely clear if an increased rate of infertility substantially contributes to this. As compared to other species, the reproductive efficiency of humans is relatively low. Factors related to fertility include age, exposure to sexually transmitted diseases, frequency of intercourse, coital timing, as well as diet and lifestyle habits. Infertility is considered a disease due to its major disruption of major organ systems and life functions. An infertility evaluation is recommended after 12 months or more of regular, unprotected intercourse and may be considered after 6 months for those female patients over the age of 35 or with other known abnormalities. A proper infertility evaluation is a comprehensive examination of possibly identifiable infertility factors of both female and male partners, lending itself to the most appropriate and potentially effective treatment.

  11. Consequences of infertility in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Rouchou, Brittany

    2013-05-01

    Infertility affects more than 10% of the world's population. In developing countries, there are severe social, psychological and economic consequences for infertile men and women. All of the cited references are compiled from primary peer-reviewed research articles that were conducted through one-to-one interviews or focus groups in countries of developing regions, such as Africa, Asia and the Middle East. The following paper seeks to raise awareness of the consequences of infertility in developing nations and identify infertility as an under-observed, but significant public health issue. It is proposed that education programmes tailored to each society's specific religious beliefs and grounded traditions must be implemented in order to reverse the social stigma, detrimental psychological effects, and loss of economic security that results from infertility.

  12. Hyperprolactinemia and infertility: new insights

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical vignette: A 29-year-old woman is referred for management of infertility. After menarche at age 12, menses occurred irregularly for a year and then became regular. She initiated use of oral contraceptive pills at the age of 18, then stopped at age 27 to try to conceive. Evaluation revealed hyperprolactinemia with serum prolactin of 90 ng/ml; pituitary MRI showed a 6-mm microadenoma. Other pituitary function tested was normal. Therapy was initiated with bromocriptine, but it was poorly tolerated, with fatigue, nausea, and lightheadedness to the point of syncopal events during her work as a hairdresser. Treatment was changed to cabergoline, with similar difficulties. Prolactin levels declined to the 30s–40s, but she was never able to tolerate the medication sufficiently to attain normal prolactin levels, and menses were sporadic and infrequent, with only 2–3 occurring per year. She and her husband had not conceived despite regular unprotected intercourse. She asks whether other medical treatment options might be available for her infertility. PMID:23193578

  13. Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors, such as pesticides and other chemicals, and radiation. Cigarette smoking, alcohol, marijuana or taking certain medications, such as select antibiotics, antihypertensives, anabolic steroids or others, can also affect fertility. Frequent exposure to heat, such as in saunas or hot tubs, can ...

  14. Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as intrauterine insemination (IUI) and in vitro fertilization (IVF) Medicines to treat infections and clotting disorders ... not include advanced techniques such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). When to Contact a Medical Professional Call ...

  15. Smaller fetal size in singletons after infertility therapies: The influence of technology and the underlying infertility

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Amber R.; O’Neill, Kathleen E.; Allsworth, Jenifer E.; Jungheim, Emily S.; Odibo, Anthony O.; Gray, Diana L.; Ratts, Valerie S.; Moley, Kelle H.; Odem, Randall R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine whether fetal size differences exist between matched fertile and infertile women and among women with infertility achieving pregnancy through various treatment modalities. Design Retrospective cohort study with propensity score analysis Setting Tertiary care center and affiliated community hospitals Patients 1246 fertile and 461 infertile healthy women with singleton live-births over a ten-year period. Infertile women conceived 1) without medical assistance (WMA), 2) with ovulation induction (OI), or 3) with in vitro fertilization (IVF). Main Outcome Measure(s) Birthweight; secondary outcomes included crown rump length, second trimester estimated fetal weight, and incidence of low birth weight (LBW) and preterm delivery. Results Compared to matched fertile women, infertile women had smaller neonates at birth (3375±21 vs. 3231±21 grams; p<0.0001) and more LBW infants (RR=1.68, 95% CI 1.06, 2.67). Neonates conceived via OI were the smallest of infertility subgroups compared to those of fertile women (3092 ± 46 vs. 3397 ± 44 grams; p<0.001). First trimester fetal size was smaller in infertile vs. fertile women (CRL 7.9±0.1 vs. 8.5±0.1 mm, p<0.01). Within infertility subgroups, no differences in fetal or neonatal size were found. Conclusions The inherent pathologic processes associated with infertility may have a larger impact on fetal growth than infertility therapies. PMID:21944928

  16. Social and Cultural Aspects of Infertility in Mozambique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrits, Trudie

    1997-01-01

    The sociocultural aspects of infertility among members of the matrilineal ethnic group Macua are studied. Strategies applied by infertile women, the use of traditional healers versus modern hospital, and explanations given for infertility are presented. Solutions attempted, social consequences of infertility, and recommendations for culturally…

  17. Social and Cultural Aspects of Infertility in Mozambique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrits, Trudie

    1997-01-01

    The sociocultural aspects of infertility among members of the matrilineal ethnic group Macua are studied. Strategies applied by infertile women, the use of traditional healers versus modern hospital, and explanations given for infertility are presented. Solutions attempted, social consequences of infertility, and recommendations for culturally…

  18. Variations in Antioxidant Genes and Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Bolan; Huang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from both endogenous and environmental resources, which in turn may cause defective spermatogenesis and male infertility. Antioxidant genes, which include catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione S-transferase (GST), nitric oxide synthase (NOS), nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2), and superoxide dismutase (SOD), play important roles in spermatogenesis and normal sperm function. In this review, we discuss the association between variations in major antioxidant genes and male infertility. Numerous studies have suggested that genetic disruption or functional polymorphisms in these antioxidant genes are associated with a higher risk for male infertility, which include low sperm quality, oligoasthenoteratozoospermia, oligozoospermia, and subfertility. The synergistic effects of environmental ROS and functional polymorphisms on antioxidant genes that result in male infertility have also been reported. Therefore, variants in antioxidant genes, which independently or synergistically occur with environmental ROS, affect spermatogenesis and contribute to the occurrence of male infertility. Large cohort and multiple center-based population studies to identify new antioxidant genetic variants that increase susceptibility to male infertility as well as validate its potential as genetic markers for diagnosis and risk assessment for male infertility for precise clinical approaches are warranted. PMID:26618172

  19. Small Supernumerary Marker Chromosomes in Human Infertility.

    PubMed

    Armanet, Narjes; Tosca, Lucie; Brisset, Sophie; Liehr, Thomas; Tachdjian, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Small supernumerary marker chromosomes (sSMC) are structurally abnormal chromosomes that cannot be unambiguously identified by banding cytogenetics. The objective of this study was to provide an overview of sSMC frequency and characterization in a context of infertility and to review the literature describing sSMC in relation with male and female infertility. Therefore, a systematic literature review on sSMC associated with infertility was conducted by means of a PubMed literature and a sSMC database (http://ssmc-tl.com/sSMC.html) search. A total of 234 patients with infertility were identified as carriers of sSMC. All chromosomes, except chromosomes 10, 19 and the X, were involved in sSMC, and in 72% the sSMC originated from acrocentric chromosomes. Euchromatic imbalances were caused by the presence of sSMC in 30% of the cases. Putative genes have been identified in only 1.2% of sSMC associated with infertility. The implication of sSMC in infertility could be due to a partial trisomy of some genes but also to mechanical effects perturbing meiosis. Further precise molecular and interphase-architecture studies on sSMC are needed in the future to characterize the relationship between this chromosomal anomaly and human infertility. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Definition and epidemiology of unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Gelbaya, Tarek A; Potdar, Neelam; Jeve, Yadava B; Nardo, Luciano G

    2014-02-01

    The diagnosis of unexplained infertility can be made only after excluding common causes of infertility using standard fertility investigations,which include semen analysis, assessment of ovulation, and tubal patency test. These tests have been selected as they have definitive correlation with pregnancy. It is estimated that a standard fertility evaluation will fail to identify an abnormality in approximately 15% to 30% of infertile couples. The reported incidence of such unexplained infertility varies according to the age and selection criteria in the study population. We conducted a review of the literature via MEDLINE. Articles were limited to English-language, human studies published between 1950 and 2013. Since first coined more than 50 years ago, the term unexplained infertility has been a subject of debate. Although additional investigations are reported to explain or define other causes of infertility, these have high false-positive results and therefore cannot be recommended for routine clinical practice. Couples with unexplained infertility might be reassured that even after 12 months of unsuccessful attempts, 50% will conceive in the following 12 months and another 12% in the year after.

  1. [Risk factors associated to female infertility].

    PubMed

    Romero Ramos, Ricardo; Romero Gutiérrez, Gustavo; Abortes Monroy, Ignacio; Medina Sánchez, Héctor Gerardo

    2008-12-01

    Incidence of female infertility is growing worldwide and the its rate varies from 10 to 20%. It has been reported diverse risk factors associated with this medical complication. To identify the risk factors with significant association with female infertility. A case-control study was carried out. There were included 440 patients, divided into 220 women with primary or secondary female infertility (cases) and 220 women without infertility recruited at mediate postpartum (controls). Twenty sociodemographic and clinical risk factors for female infertility were analyzed. Statistical analysis was performed with percentages, arithmetic media, standard error, Student t test and chi squared. An alpha value was set at 0.05. There were 6 factors with statistical significance: advanced age (p < 0.001), elevated body mass index (p < 0.001), age of onset of sexual activity (p < 0.001), prior pelvic surgeries (p < 0.001), and presence of stress (p < 0.001). Other risk factors such as smoking, chemical and radiological treatments, pelvic inflammatory disease, exercise, contraceptive use, alcohol intake, drugs, coffee, solvents, glue and insecticides, were not significant. There are clinical and demographic risk factors associated with female infertility. Them identification in women at reproductive age could diminish the frequency of female infertility and, thus, avoid them consequences.

  2. Male infertility: an obstacle to sexuality?

    PubMed

    Bechoua, S; Hamamah, S; Scalici, E

    2016-05-01

    Interactions between infertility and sexuality are numerous and complex. Infertile men may suffer from sexual dysfunction (SD) when undergoing an assisted reproductive technology programme. We undertook a review both in French and English of the available data on male SD when being diagnosed with a fertility problem with a specific focus on azoospermic men. The review was performed over a 30-year time period using PubMed/Medline. The sexual concerns and needs of infertile/sterile men for whom potential parenting can be compromised were evaluated. When diagnosed with infertility, men usually go through a crisis that can have a deleterious effect on their sexuality with sometimes a feeling of sexual inadequacy. Infertile men will feel stigmatized because they are perceived as being deficient in a specific component of their masculinity. Hence, subsequent SD may occur that can impact the couple sexuality and the infertility management. However, little is known on how the announcement of azoospermia may affect male on a sexual and psychological point of view. The present review suggests that a global management through a healthcare network (biologist, andrologist, sexologist and psychologist) is required which will allow to consider infertility and its subsequent sexual disorders as a whole and not as dichotomized issues.

  3. Estimating the prevalence of infertility in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Bushnik, Tracey; Cook, Jocelynn L.; Yuzpe, A. Albert; Tough, Suzanne; Collins, John

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Over the past 10 years, there has been a significant increase in the use of assisted reproductive technologies in Canada, however, little is known about the overall prevalence of infertility in the population. The purpose of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of current infertility in Canada according to three definitions of the risk of conception. METHODS Data from the infertility component of the 2009–2010 Canadian Community Health Survey were analyzed for married and common-law couples with a female partner aged 18–44. The three definitions of the risk of conception were derived sequentially starting with birth control use in the previous 12 months, adding reported sexual intercourse in the previous 12 months, then pregnancy intent. Prevalence and odds ratios of current infertility were estimated by selected characteristics. RESULTS Estimates of the prevalence of current infertility ranged from 11.5% (95% CI 10.2, 12.9) to 15.7% (95% CI 14.2, 17.4). Each estimate represented an increase in current infertility prevalence in Canada when compared with previous national estimates. Couples with lower parity (0 or 1 child) had significantly higher odds of experiencing current infertility when the female partner was aged 35–44 years versus 18–34 years. Lower odds of experiencing current infertility were observed for multiparous couples regardless of age group of the female partner, when compared with nulliparous couples. CONCLUSIONS The present study suggests that the prevalence of current infertility has increased since the last time it was measured in Canada, and is associated with the age of the female partner and parity. PMID:22258658

  4. Parental infertility and sexual maturation in children.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Shrestha, Anshu; Olsen, Jørn

    2009-02-01

    The reproductive health of children born of infertile couples may be affected by infertility treatment or factors associated with infertility. We examined sexual maturation in children of parents with infertility. We used data from a follow-up of 3382 girls and 2810 boys born between 1984 and 1987 in the Aalborg-Odense Birth Cohort. We had mothers' report of time to pregnancy (TTP) and infertility treatment (at the time, mostly hormonal) from the pregnancy questionnaire administered in 1984-1987, and the children's report of their own sexual maturation from the follow-up questionnaire administered in 2005, when they were between 18 and 21 years old. Many reported age only in year when they had the events related to sexual maturation, and for each event, we imputed the month based on the median month at each year of age among those reporting both years and months. In girls, the mean age at menarche was 13.3 years and, in boys, the mean age at appearance of acne, voice break, regular shaving and first nocturnal emission were 14.5, 14.5, 17.2 and 14.7 years, respectively. We saw no significant differences in age at these events among children born of either fertile (with TTP of 0-12 months and no treatment), untreated infertile (with TTP of more than 12 months and no treatment) or treated infertile couples (with a history of examination or treatment for infertility). Our data suggest no significant association between parental infertility or hormonal treatment and timing of sexual maturation in the offspring.

  5. Infertility, assisted reproduction and rights.

    PubMed

    Chan, C C W; Ho, P-C

    2006-06-01

    The rights to reproduce and found a family are recognized as basic human rights. Infertile couples should enjoy the same right to reproduce as those who have the ability to do so without assistance. Both positive and negative rights to access to assisted reproductive technologies are required in order to fully realize the reproductive rights. However, there is a limit to such a claim. The positive right of individuals to have state-funded assisted reproductive treatments has to be balanced against the provision of other societal goods and healthcare rationing. The negative right to acquire access to assisted reproductive technologies by individuals' own resources is also restrained. The barrier to such access is often of a moral nature, the standard of which depends on the values of the society.

  6. Obesity and anovulatory infertility: A review.

    PubMed

    Giviziez, Christiane R; Sanchez, Eliane G M; Approbato, Mário S; Maia, Monica C S; Fleury, Eliamar Aparecida B; Sasaki, Reinaldo S A

    2016-12-01

    This global overweight and obesity epidemics has become one of the largest public health problem worldwide and is increasingly more common among women in reproductive age. Along with the prevalence of overweight women, there is an increase in women with anovulatory infertility. Thus, we carried out a bibliographic research in the PubMed, Lilacs and SciELO databases, using the combinations in Portuguese, Spanish and English of the following descriptors: "Body Mass Index", "obesity", "overweight", "female infertility" and "anovulation". The aim of this study was to assess the effects of obesity on the ovulatory profile of infertile women in the available literature.

  7. Obesity and anovulatory infertility: A review

    PubMed Central

    Giviziez, Christiane R; Sanchez, Eliane G M; Approbato, Mário S; Maia, Monica C S; Fleury, Eliamar Aparecida B; Sasaki, Reinaldo S A

    2016-01-01

    This global overweight and obesity epidemics has become one of the largest public health problem worldwide and is increasingly more common among women in reproductive age. Along with the prevalence of overweight women, there is an increase in women with anovulatory infertility. Thus, we carried out a bibliographic research in the PubMed, Lilacs and SciELO databases, using the combinations in Portuguese, Spanish and English of the following descriptors: "Body Mass Index", "obesity", "overweight", "female infertility" and "anovulation". The aim of this study was to assess the effects of obesity on the ovulatory profile of infertile women in the available literature. PMID:28050960

  8. The economics of infertility: developing an infertility managed-care plan.

    PubMed

    Bates, G W; Bates, S R

    1996-04-01

    Infertility is a natural disorder for developing a managed-care plan. Infertility has a clearly defined end point. The treatment regimens and protocols used for treating infertile couples have predictable outcomes; it is possible to develop rational treatment plans over a limited period of time. It is not unreasonable for infertile couples to share the cost of treatment and for the physician-providers to share the economic risk by providing a bundle of optimal services at a fixed price. We present the theoretic basis for an infertility managed-care plan and the requirements for developing a plan that can be sold in the marketplace. Finally, we discuss some of the consequences of an infertility managed-care plan on physician relationships, physician manpower, research, and education.

  9. Genital tract infections and infertility.

    PubMed

    Pellati, Donatella; Mylonakis, Ioannis; Bertoloni, Giulio; Fiore, Cristina; Andrisani, Alessandra; Ambrosini, Guido; Armanini, Decio

    2008-09-01

    Infectious agents can impair various important human functions, including reproduction. Bacteria, fungi, viruses and parasites are able to interfere with the reproductive function in both sexes. Infections of male genito-urinary tract account for about 15% of the case of male infertility. Infections can affect different sites of the male reproductive tract, such as the testis, epididymis and male accessory sex glands. Spermatozoa themselves subsequently can be affected by urogenital infections at different levels of their development, maturation and transport. Among the most common microorganisms involved in sexually transmitted infections, interfering with male fertility, there are the Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Less frequently male infertility is due to non-sexually transmitted epididymo-orchitis, mostly caused by Escherichia coli. In female, the first two microorganisms are certainly involved in cervical, tubal, and peritoneal damage, while Herpes simplex cervicitis is less dangerous. The overall importance of cervical involvement is still under discussion. Tubo-peritoneal damage seems to be the foremost manner in which microorganisms interfere with human fertility. C. trachomatis is considered the most important cause of tubal lacerations and obstruction, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and adhesions. N. gonorrhoeae, even though its overall incidence seems to decline, is still to be considered in the same sense, while bacterial vaginosis should not be ignored, as causative agents can produce ascending infections of the female genital tract. The role of infections, particularly co-infections, as causes of the impairment of sperm quality, motility and function needs further investigation. Tropical diseases necessitate monitoring as for their diffusion or re-diffusion in the western world.

  10. Prevalence of Infertility Problems among Iranian Infertile Patients Referred to Royan Institute

    PubMed Central

    Sepidarkish, Mahdi; Almasi-Hashiani, Amir; Shokri, Fatemeh; Vesali, Samira; Karimi, Elaheh; Omani Samani, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Few studies have been conducted on the infertility problems in Iran. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of infertility problems and related factors in Iranian infertile patients. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 405 infertile patients referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran, between 2014 and 2015, were selected by simple random sampling. Participants completed the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI) including 46 questions in five domains (social concern, sexual concern, relationship concern, rejection of parenthood, and need for parenthood). Mean difference between male and female was verified using independent-samples Student’s t test. A generalized linear model (GLM) was also used for testing the effect of variables on the fertility problems. Data was analyzed using Stata software version 13. Results: The mean age (SD) of participants was 31.28 (5.42). Our results showed that 160 infertile men (95.23%) were classified as very high prevalence of infertility problems. Among infertile women, 83 patients (35.02%) were as very high prevalence of infertility problems, and 154 patients (64.98%) were as high prevalence. Age (P<0.001), sex (P<0.001), a history of abortion (P=0.009), failure of previous treatment (P<0.001), and education (P=0.014) had a significant relationship with FPI scores. Conclusion: Bases on the results of current study, an younger male with lower education level, history of abortion and history of previous treatments failure experienced more infertility problems. PMID:27695609

  11. Sexual behavior of infertile women: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Bokaie, Mahshid; Simbar, Masoumeh; Yassini Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba

    2015-10-01

    Infertility makes an essential challenge to the sexual life of couples, especially infertile women. When pregnancy does not happen, infertile women think that sexual intercourse is not fruitful and sexual desire became reduce gradually. Infertile women progressively forget that their sexual relationship is also a response to their natural need. This qualitative study was conducted to explore the infertility consequences in the sexual behavior of infertile women. This was a qualitative content analysis study; and it was part of a widespread study, used a sequential mixed-method and conducted from August 2014 until February 2015. A purposeful sampling was used to recruit infertile women who had referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility. Data gathering techniques employed in this research included in-depth semi structured open face-to-face interviews and field notes. Credibility, transferability, confirm ability, and dependability were assessed for the rigor of the data collection. Totally, 15 infertile women and 8 key informants were interviewed. Data analysis showed four themes about impact of infertility on female sexual behavior: 1/ Impact of infertility drugs on couple sexual behavior, 2/ Impact of assisted reproductive technologies on female sexual behavior, 3/ Timed intercourse during infertility and 4/ The psychological impact of infertility on sexual behavior. Some of Iranian infertile women could cope with their problems, but some of them were very affected by infertility drugs and assisted reproductive technologies procedures. Psychosexual counseling before medical treatment could help them to have a better sexual life.

  12. VINCLOZOLIN (V) TREATMENT INDUCES REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS AND INFERTILITY IN F1 MALE RATS WHEN ADMINISTERED DURING SEXUAL BUT NOT GONADAL DIFFERENTIATION. THE EFFECTS ARE NOT TRANSMITTED TO THE SUBSEQUENT GENERATIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    V produces adverse reproductive effects in male rats when administered during sexual differentiation by acting as an androgen-antagonist. It was recently reported that four generations of SD rats, derived from dams dosed via ip injection GD8-15 with 100 mg V/kg/day, displayed pro...

  13. VINCLOZOLIN (V) TREATMENT INDUCES REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS AND INFERTILITY IN F1 MALE RATS WHEN ADMINISTERED DURING SEXUAL BUT NOT GONADAL DIFFERENTIATION. THE EFFECTS ARE NOT TRANSMITTED TO THE SUBSEQUENT GENERATIONS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    V produces adverse reproductive effects in male rats when administered during sexual differentiation by acting as an androgen-antagonist. It was recently reported that four generations of SD rats, derived from dams dosed via ip injection GD8-15 with 100 mg V/kg/day, displayed pro...

  14. Secondary Infertility: Why Does It Happen?

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016. http://accessmedicine.com. Accessed Nov. 29, 2016. Hacker NF, et al. Infertility and assisted reproductive technologies. In: Hacker & Moore's Essentials of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 6th ed. ...

  15. Psychological and ethical implications related to infertility.

    PubMed

    Minucci, Daria

    2013-12-01

    Being a parent is deeply demanding and one of the most important events in life; parents experience the deepening of human relationships with their partner, within their families, and in society, and moreover the fundamental relationship between parent and child. Every medical, social, and political effort must be made to prevent infertility but also to offer infertile couples the best diagnostic and therapeutic paths. Understanding the suffering of the couple and their families prevents and helps ease the possible psychological and social complications of infertility. Therefore, infertility concerns not only biomedical sciences but also psychological and social ones-ethics and law-in their combined efforts to identify areas of understanding and of research for solutions while respecting the dignity of the couple and unborn child. The Catholic Church offers an ongoing contribution through dialogue in looking for ethical principles guiding scientific and medical research respectful of the true life of human beings.

  16. Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    The Society for Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility SREI Members-only Forum Home About Us About SREI Vision and Mission ... Fact Sheets and Booklets SREI is an affiliated society to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine . Below ...

  17. DNA methylation in spermatogenesis and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiangrong; Jing, Xuan; Wu, Xueqing; Yan, Meiqin; Li, Qiang; Shen, Yan; Wang, Zhenqiang

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a significant problem for human reproduction, with males and females equally affected. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying male infertility remain unclear. Spermatogenesis is a highly complex process involving mitotic cell division, meiosis cell division and spermiogenesis; during this period, unique and extensive chromatin and epigenetic modifications occur to bring about specific epigenetic profiles in spermatozoa. It has recently been suggested that the dysregulation of epigenetic modifications, in particular the methylation of sperm genomic DNA, may serve an important role in the development of numerous diseases. The present study is a comprehensive review on the topic of male infertility, aiming to elucidate the association between sperm genomic DNA methylation and poor semen quality in male infertility. In addition, the current status of the genetic and epigenetic determinants of spermatogenesis in humans is discussed. PMID:27698683

  18. [The multiple interactions between infertility and sexuality].

    PubMed

    Mimoun, S

    1993-03-01

    After investigating into literature and clinical experience, we shall line out in this study 4 types of interactions between sexuality and infertility: sexual causes to feminine (vaginism, with and without heavy dyspareunia) or masculine (impotency, ante-portas ejaculation, anejaculation, dysejaculation), infertility; influence of tests and of treatments for infertility on sexual life; influence of infertility on sexuality focusing on the various ambiguous feelings (of culpability, inferiority, aggressivity, passivity); and last, the psychological and sexual interactions with medical assisted procreation, reinforcing the sexual separation of man and woman if the body is considered a machine. Psychosomatic guidance of the couple during these steps (with reassurance as the being helped conception) will allow maintaining on removing sexual attraction.

  19. Unexplained male infertility: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Alaa; Esteves, Sandro C; Nizza, Mark; Agarwal, Ashok

    2012-01-01

    Unexplained male infertility is a diagnosis reserved for men in whom routine semen analyses results are within normal values and physical as well as endocrine abnormalities were ruled out. In addition to erectile problems and coital factors, immunologic causes and sperm dysfunction may contribute to such condition. New etiologies of unexplained male infertility include low level leukocytospermia and mitochondrial DNA polymerase gene polymorphism. Contemporary andrology may reveal cellular and sub-cellular sperm dysfunctions which may explain subfertility in such cases, thus aiding the clinician to direct the further work-up, diagnosis and counseling of the infertile male. The objective of this article is to highlight the concept of unexplained male infertility and focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of this condition in the era of modern andrology and assisted reproductive techniques. Extensive literature review was performed using the search engines: Pubmed, Science-direct, Ovid and Scopus.

  20. Lost in transition: women experiencing infertility.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Nicola

    2014-09-01

    This paper illustrates key findings from a qualitative doctoral research project exploring women's experience of infertility. Six women maintained treatment diaries, reflecting on their experiences prior to, during and beyond infertility treatment. The following key themes are identified: hopefulness, adaptation, transitioning and shifting focus. The data suggest that treatment, clinic experience and living a life 'on hold' act as turning points within the individual life course. It is at the intersection between treatment and outcome that difficulties negotiating the expected and anticipated life course become illuminated, revealing limited connectivity and transitioning through and beyond the treatment process. This is a critical focus area and one that sets the scene for effective future adaptation. The data suggest that the accessibility of supportive care moving through and beyond treatment is limited. This paper argues that the infertility clinic is a critical space and place and one where effective supportive care may enable effective transitioning beyond the experience of infertility as an unanticipated life course disruption.

  1. Perspective in infertility: the ovarian stem cells.

    PubMed

    Silvestris, Erica; D'Oronzo, Stella; Cafforio, Paola; D'Amato, Giuseppe; Loverro, Giuseppe

    2015-08-07

    Infertility is a medical and social condition that affects millions of women worldwide and is today considered so far as a new disease. A considerable progress has been recently pursued in the field of the reproductive medicine and the infertility treatment may account for novel and modern procedures such as in vitro oocyte fertilization, egg donation, pregnancy surrogacy and preimplantation diagnosis. However, great interest has lately been reserved to the ovarian stem cells (OSCs) whose existence in woman ovaries has been proven. OSCs are thus suitable for developmental studies in infertility and in other clinical applications as endocrine derangements due to premature ovarian failure, or for infertility treatment after cancer chemotherapies, as well as in restoring the hormonal balance in postmenopausal age.

  2. Infertility, Fertility Treatment, and Risk of Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Farland, Leslie V; Grodstein, Francine; Srouji, Serene S; Forman, John P; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Chavarro, Jorge E; Missmer, Stacey A

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association between infertility and fertility treatments on subsequent risk of hypertension. Design Cohort Study Setting Nurses’ Health Study II Patients 116,430 female nurses followed from 1993 to June 2011 as part of the Nurses' Health Study II cohort. Intervention None Main Outcome Measures Self-reported, physician diagnosed hypertension Results Compared to women who never reported infertility, infertile women were at no greater risk of hypertension (multi-variable adjusted relative risk (RR) = 1.01 95% confidence interval [0.94–1.07]). Infertility due to tubal disease was associated with a higher risk of hypertension (RR=1.15 [1.01–1.31]) but all other diagnoses were not associated with hypertension risk compared to women who did not report infertility (ovulatory disorder: RR=1.03 [0.94–1.13], cervical: RR=0.88 [0.70–1.10], male factor: RR= 1.05 [0.95–1.15], other reason: RR=1.02 [0.94–1.11], reason not found: RR=1.02 [0.95–1.10]). Among infertile women there were 5,070 cases of hypertension. No clear pattern between use of fertility treatment and hypertension was found among infertile women (Clomiphene: RR =0.97 [0.90–1.04], Gonadotropin alone: RR=0.97 [0.87–1.08], IUI: RR=0.86 [0.71–1.03], IVF: RR=0.86 [0.73–1.01]). Conclusion Among this relatively young cohort of women, there was no apparent increase in hypertension risk among infertile women or among women who underwent fertility treatment in the past. PMID:26049054

  3. Out of controll: one aspect of infertility.

    PubMed

    McCormick, T M

    1980-01-01

    A perceived loss of control over many aspects of life often accompanies the problem of infertility. While most couples feel the effects of this lack of control in their lifestyle, relationship, and reproductive capacities, there are also some benfits inherent in giving up some control of the problem to outside sources. Nursing interventions are discussed which incorporate the concept of control into the plan of care for the infertile couple.

  4. The impact of infertility on infertile men and women in Ibadan, Oyo State, Nigeria: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuis, Sonja L; Odukogbe, Akin-Tunde A; Theobald, Sally; Liu, Xiaoyun

    2009-09-01

    This study explored the impact of infertility on infertile men and women in Ibadan, Nigeria. The qualitative study design included the application of focus group discussions with community members (7 FGDs, n=42), in-depth interviews with infertile men (n=7), infertile women (n=8) and professionals (n=13). The findings revealed that infertile men and women and community members commonly perceived that contraceptives and abortion cause infertility, as well as supernatural and behavioural factors. Measures to prevent infertility were not well known by the participants. Infertility treatment is sought from a mixture of biomedical, faith-based and traditional service providers. Infertile women prioritize the psychological impact of infertility while infertile men prioritize the economic impact, and reported spending between 55-100% of their income to address infertility. Infertility has a serious social, psychological and economic impact on women and men's lives. Efforts to reduce the impact should prioritize education on the causes, prevention and treatment of infertility, offer psychological support and ensure an efficient referral system for managing infertility.

  5. Gestational surrogacy: Viewpoint of Iranian infertile women.

    PubMed

    Rahmani, Azad; Sattarzadeh, Nilofar; Gholizadeh, Leila; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Allahbakhshian, Atefeh; Hassankhani, Hadi

    2011-09-01

    Surrogacy is a popular form of assisted reproductive technology of which only gestational form is approved by most of the religious scholars in Iran. Little evidence exists about the Iranian infertile women's viewpoint regarding gestational surrogacy. To assess the viewpoint of Iranian infertile women toward gestational surrogacy. This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. The study sample consisted of 238 infertile women who were selected using the eligible sampling method. Data were collected by using a researcher developed questionnaire that included 25 items based on a five-point Likert scale. Data analysis was conducted by SPSS statistical software using descriptive statistics. Viewpoint of 214 women (89.9%) was positive. 36 (15.1%) women considered gestational surrogacy against their religious beliefs; 170 women (71.4%) did not assume the commissioning couple as owners of the baby; 160 women (67.2%) said that children who were born through surrogacy would better not know about it; and 174 women (73.1%) believed that children born through surrogacy will face mental problems. Iranian infertile women have positive viewpoint regarding the surrogacy. However, to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile women, further efforts are needed.

  6. Gestational surrogacy: Viewpoint of Iranian infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani, Azad; Sattarzadeh, Nilofar; Gholizadeh, Leila; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Allahbakhshian, Atefeh; Hassankhani, Hadi

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surrogacy is a popular form of assisted reproductive technology of which only gestational form is approved by most of the religious scholars in Iran. Little evidence exists about the Iranian infertile women's viewpoint regarding gestational surrogacy. AIM: To assess the viewpoint of Iranian infertile women toward gestational surrogacy. SETTING AND DESIGN: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of 238 infertile women who were selected using the eligible sampling method. Data were collected by using a researcher developed questionnaire that included 25 items based on a five-point Likert scale. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data analysis was conducted by SPSS statistical software using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Viewpoint of 214 women (89.9%) was positive. 36 (15.1%) women considered gestational surrogacy against their religious beliefs; 170 women (71.4%) did not assume the commissioning couple as owners of the baby; 160 women (67.2%) said that children who were born through surrogacy would better not know about it; and 174 women (73.1%) believed that children born through surrogacy will face mental problems. CONCLUSION: Iranian infertile women have positive viewpoint regarding the surrogacy. However, to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile women, further efforts are needed. PMID:22346081

  7. Psychological interactions with infertility among women.

    PubMed

    Cwikel, J; Gidron, Y; Sheiner, E

    2004-12-01

    Despite the fact that various studies have demonstrated the importance of the mind-body connection and fertility, the psychosocial aspects of infertility have not been adequately addressed. Fertility treatments, ranging from medical monitoring, to hormonal remedies and in vitro fertilization (IVF), are both a physical and emotional burden on women and their partners. Psychological factors such as depression, state-anxiety, and stress-induced changes in heart rate and cortisol are predictive of a decreased probability of achieving a viable pregnancy. A couple that is trying to conceive will undoubtedly experience feelings of frustration and disappointment if a pregnancy is not easily achieved. However, if the difficulties progress and the man and or woman are labelled as having fertility problems, then this may result in a severe insult to self-esteem, body image, and self-assessed masculinity or femininity. Three types of relationships have been hypothesized between psychological factors and infertility. These include: (1) psychological factors are risk factors of subsequent infertility; (2) the experience of the diagnosis and treatment of infertility causes subsequent psychological distress; (3) a reciprocal relationship exists between psychological factors and infertility. The evidence for these three relationships is reviewed and an alternative approach to the treatment of infertility including stress evaluation that precedes or is concurrent to fertility treatment is suggested.

  8. Psychopathology, emotional aspects and psychological counselling in infertility: a review.

    PubMed

    De Berardis, D; Mazza, M; Marini, S; Del Nibletto, L; Serroni, N; Pino, M C; Valchera, A; Ortolani, C; Ciarrocchi, F; Martinotti, G; Di Giannantonio, M

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, infertility has been variably defined. Infertility affects approximately 80 million people from all parts of the world. An important area of discussion has been represented by the possible causal link between psychopathology and infertility. In the past, the prevalence of psychiatric problems among infertile couples was estimated to be 25-60%. The incidence of depression and anxiety in infertile couples is significantly high than in fertile controls and in the general population respectively. Infertility has been linked to obsessive-compulsive symptoms, psychoticism, substance abuse and eating disorders. Psychological impact of infertility is greater in women than in men. Additionally, authors found that infertile patients were more alexithymic than healthy controls. In relation to the different needs, different psychological therapeutic interventions may be indicated. Psychological counseling can provide valuable assistance in dealing with infertility treatments and their eventual failures.

  9. Sub-clinical hypothyroidism in infertile Nigerian women with hyperprolactinaemia.

    PubMed

    Emokpae, M A; Osadolor, H B; Omole Ohonsi, A

    2011-11-23

    Studies on the impact of subclinical hypothyroidism in infertility are scarce and this seeks to determine the proportion of infertile Nigerian women with hyperprolactinaemia that had subclinical hypothyroidism. Serum prolactin and thyroid stimulating hormone were determined using ELECSYS 1010 auto analyzer. Two hundred infertile women were evaluated and 67(33.7%) had hyperprolactinaemia. Subclinical hypothyroidism was observed in 14.9% of women with hyperprolactinaemia, 4.5% and 10.5% of women with primary and secondary infertility, while hyperprolactinaemia was observed in 29.9% and 70.1% in primary and secondary infertility respectively. Mean levels of thyroid stimulating hormone and prolactin were higher in secondary infertility than primary infertility. Subclinical hypothyroidism and hyperprolactinaemia were higher in secondary infertility than primary infertility. The ratio of proportions between hypothyroidism and hyperprolactinaemia was 1:7.

  10. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws.

  11. Insurance coverage for male infertility care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Dupree, James M

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a common condition experienced by many men and women, and treatments are expensive. The World Health Organization and American Society of Reproductive Medicine define infertility as a disease, yet private companies infrequently offer insurance coverage for infertility treatments. This is despite the clear role that healthcare insurance plays in ensuring access to care and minimizing the financial burden of expensive services. In this review, we assess the current knowledge of how male infertility care is covered by insurance in the United States. We begin with an appraisal of the costs of male infertility care, then examine the state insurance laws relevant to male infertility, and close with a discussion of why insurance coverage for male infertility is important to both men and women. Importantly, we found that despite infertility being classified as a disease and males contributing to almost half of all infertility cases, coverage for male infertility is often excluded from health insurance laws. Excluding coverage for male infertility places an undue burden on their female partners. In addition, excluding care for male infertility risks missing opportunities to diagnose important health conditions and identify reversible or irreversible causes of male infertility. Policymakers should consider providing equal coverage for male and female infertility care in future health insurance laws. PMID:27030084

  12. Use of the internet related to infertility by infertile women and men in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Satir, Duygu Gulec; Kavlak, Oya

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To determine differences in use of the Internet related to infertility between infertile women and men, whether they benefit or are negatively affected from information on the Internet, and share this information with health professional. Methods: This cross-sectional study was carried out with 285 infertile women and 158 men between December 2015 and February 2016. Data were collected by a survey Form which included questions related to sociodemographic characteristics, related to infertility (duration of treatment, type of treatment) and questions about use of the Internet. Chi-square analysis was used to evaluate the differences in Internet use and independent variables for patients. Results: Seventy-four percent of women and 68.4% of men used the Internet related to infertility. Women and men most often looked for information related to assisted reproductive technology and the causes of infertility. Men searched for information related to fertility drugs used in treatment significantly less than women. They often visited the websites of fertility centers and doctors. A high percentage of them have benefited from information on the Internet. Almost half of the women and men shared the information obtained from the Internet with health professional. Conclusion: Most frequently, infertile patients use the Internet to obtain information related to infertility and they benefited from information on the Internet. For health professional it is important to direct Internet users to safe and true information resources. PMID:28523019

  13. Use of the internet related to infertility by infertile women and men in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Satir, Duygu Gulec; Kavlak, Oya

    2017-01-01

    To determine differences in use of the Internet related to infertility between infertile women and men, whether they benefit or are negatively affected from information on the Internet, and share this information with health professional. This cross-sectional study was carried out with 285 infertile women and 158 men between December 2015 and February 2016. Data were collected by a survey Form which included questions related to sociodemographic characteristics, related to infertility (duration of treatment, type of treatment) and questions about use of the Internet. Chi-square analysis was used to evaluate the differences in Internet use and independent variables for patients. Seventy-four percent of women and 68.4% of men used the Internet related to infertility. Women and men most often looked for information related to assisted reproductive technology and the causes of infertility. Men searched for information related to fertility drugs used in treatment significantly less than women. They often visited the websites of fertility centers and doctors. A high percentage of them have benefited from information on the Internet. Almost half of the women and men shared the information obtained from the Internet with health professional. Most frequently, infertile patients use the Internet to obtain information related to infertility and they benefited from information on the Internet. For health professional it is important to direct Internet users to safe and true information resources.

  14. Root traits for infertile soils

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.; George, Timothy S.; Dupuy, Lionel X.; Karley, Alison J.; Valentine, Tracy A.; Wiesel, Lea; Wishart, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Crop production is often restricted by the availability of essential mineral elements. For example, the availability of N, P, K, and S limits low-input agriculture, the phytoavailability of Fe, Zn, and Cu limits crop production on alkaline and calcareous soils, and P, Mo, Mg, Ca, and K deficiencies, together with proton, Al and Mn toxicities, limit crop production on acid soils. Since essential mineral elements are acquired by the root system, the development of crop genotypes with root traits increasing their acquisition should increase yields on infertile soils. This paper examines root traits likely to improve the acquisition of these elements and observes that, although the efficient acquisition of a particular element requires a specific set of root traits, suites of traits can be identified that benefit the acquisition of a group of mineral elements. Elements can be divided into three Groups based on common trait requirements. Group 1 comprises N, S, K, B, and P. Group 2 comprises Fe, Zn, Cu, Mn, and Ni. Group 3 contains mineral elements that rarely affect crop production. It is argued that breeding for a limited number of distinct root ideotypes, addressing particular combinations of mineral imbalances, should be pursued. PMID:23781228

  15. Meiotic abnormalities in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Egozcue, J; Sarrate, Z; Codina-Pascual, M; Egozcue, S; Oliver-Bonet, M; Blanco, J; Navarro, J; Benet, J; Vidal, F

    2005-01-01

    Meiotic anomalies, as reviewed here, are synaptic chromosome abnormalities, limited to germ cells that cannot be detected through the study of the karyotype. Although the importance of synaptic errors has been underestimated for many years, their presence is related to many cases of human male infertility. Synaptic anomalies can be studied by immunostaining of synaptonemal complexes (SCs), but in this case their frequency is probably underestimated due to the phenomenon of synaptic adjustment. They can also be studied in classic meiotic preparations, which, from a clinical point of view, is still the best approach, especially if multiplex fluorescence in situ hybridization is at hand to solve difficult cases. Sperm chromosome FISH studies also provide indirect evidence of their presence. Synaptic anomalies can affect the rate of recombination of all bivalents, produce achiasmate small univalents, partially achiasmate medium-sized or large bivalents, or affect all bivalents in the cell. The frequency is variable, interindividually and intraindividually. The baseline incidence of synaptic anomalies is 6-8%, which may be increased to 17.6% in males with a severe oligozoospermia, and to 27% in normozoospermic males with one or more previous IVF failures. The clinical consequences are the production of abnormal spermatozoa that will produce a higher number of chromosomally abnormal embryos. The indications for a meiotic study in testicular biopsy are provided.

  16. Identification of human candidate genes for male infertility by digital differential display.

    PubMed

    Olesen, C; Hansen, C; Bendsen, E; Byskov, A G; Schwinger, E; Lopez-Pajares, I; Jensen, P K; Kristoffersson, U; Schubert, R; Van Assche, E; Wahlstroem, J; Lespinasse, J; Tommerup, N

    2001-01-01

    Evidence for the importance of genetic factors in male fertility is accumulating. In the literature and the Mendelian Cytogenetics Network database, 265 cases of infertile males with balanced reciprocal translocations have been described. The candidacy for infertility of 14 testis-expressed transcripts (TETs) were examined by comparing their chromosomal mapping position to the position of balanced reciprocal translocation breakpoints found in the 265 infertile males. The 14 TETs were selected by using digital differential display (electronic subtraction) to search for apparently testis-specific transcripts in the TIGR database. The testis specificity of the 14 TETs was further examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) on adult and fetal tissues showing that four TETs (TET1 to TET4) were testis-expressed only, six TETs (TET5 to TET10) appeared to be differentially expressed and the remaining four TETs (TET11 to TET14) were ubiquitously expressed. Interestingly, the two tesis expressed-only transcripts, TET1 and TET2, mapped to chromosomal regions where seven and six translocation breakpoints have been reported in infertile males respectively. Furthermore, one ubiquitously, but predominantly testis-expressed, transcript, TET11, mapped to 1p32-33, where 13 translocation breakpoints have been found in infertile males. Interestingly, the mouse mutation, skeletal fusions with sterility, sks, maps to the syntenic region in the mouse genome. Another transcript, TET7, was the human homologue of rat Tpx-1, which functions in the specific interaction of spermatogenic cells with Sertoli cells. TPX-1 maps to 6p21 where three cases of chromosomal breakpoints in infertile males have been reported. Finally, TET8 was a novel transcript which in the fetal stage is testis-specific, but in the adult is expressed in multiple tissues, including testis. We named this novel transcript fetal and adult testis-expressed transcript (FATE).

  17. [Hysteroscopic evaluation in patients with infertility].

    PubMed

    Lasmar, Ricardo Bassil; Barrozo, Paulo Roberto Mussel; Parente, Raphael Câmara Medeiros; Lasmar, Bernardo Portugal; da Rosa, Daniela Baltar; Penna, Ivan Araujo; Dias, Rogério

    2010-08-01

    to describe hysteroscopy findings in infertile patients. this was a retrospective series of 953 patients with diagnosis of infertility evaluated by hysteroscopy. A total of 957 patients investigated for infertility were subjected to hysteroscopy, preferentially during the first phase of the menstrual cycle. When necessary, directed biopsies (under direct visualization during the exam) or guided biopsies were obtained using a Novak curette after defining the site to be biopsied during the hysteroscopic examination. Outcome frequencies were determined as percentages, and the χ2 test was used for the correlations. The statistical software EpiInfo 2000 (CDC) was used for data analysis. a normal uterine cavity was detected in 436 cases (45.8%). This was the most frequent diagnosis for women with primary infertility and for women with one or no abortion (p<0.05). Abnormal findings were obtained in 517 of 953 cases (54.2%), including intrauterine synechiae in 185 patients (19.4%), endometrial polyps in 115 (12.1%), endocervical polyps in 66 (6.0%), submucosal myomas in 47 (4.9%), endometrial hyperplasia in 39 (4.1%), adenomyosis in five (0.5%), endometritis (with histopathological confirmation) in four (0.4%), endometrial bone metaplasia in two (0.4%), and cancer of the endometrium in one case (0.1%). Morphological and functional changes of the uterus were detected in 5.6% of the cases, including uterine malformations in 32 (3.4%) and isthmus-cervical incompetence in 21 (2.2%). intrauterine synechiae were the most frequent abnormal findings in patients evaluated for infertility. Patients with a history of abortion and infertility should be submitted to hysteroscopy in order to rule out intrauterine synechiae as a possible cause of infertility.

  18. Association between infertility factors and non-physical partner abuse in infertile couples

    PubMed Central

    Taebi, Mahboubeh; Gandomani, Sedighe Jamali; Nilforoushan, Parisa; GholamiDehaghi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility predisposes the couples to mental and psychological problems such as anxiety, depression, anger, and partner abuse. This study aimed to investigate the association between infertility factors and the non-physical abuse between infertile spouses. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted on 262 infertile couples (131 female and 131 male), selected through convenient sampling, who referred to infertility centers in Isfahan. Data were collected by Partner Abuse Scale: Non-physical (PASNP), designed to measure the non-physical abuse experienced in relationship with partner and Non-physical Abuse of Partner Scale (NPAPS), designed to measure the non-physical abuse delivered upon the partner. All data were analyzed through SPSS version 16. Results: Mean scores of NPAPS were 23.1% and 21.3% in men and women, respectively. Mean scores of PASNP were 13.8% and 20.3% among men and women, respectively. There was a significant difference in the mean scores of perceived non-physical partner abuse between men and women (P < 0.001). There was also a significant difference in the mean scores of perceived non-physical partner abuse and factor of infertility (P < 0.01). Conclusions: Perceived non-physical abuse and delivered non-physical abuse upon the partner were low among infertile couples. Women had a higher perception of abuse when the cause of infertility was female factor, compared to men. However, special attention should be paid to infertile couples. Marital counseling, besides infertility counseling, should be conducted for these couples. PMID:27563319

  19. Screening the SPO11 and EIF5A2 genes in a population of infertile men.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Greg L; Ivanov, Ivaylo P; Atkins, John F; Mielnik, Anna; Schlegel, Peter N; Carrell, Douglas T

    2005-09-01

    Populations of infertile and fertile men were screened for mutations in SPO11 and EIF5A2, two infertility candidate genes. Three heterozygous amino acid changes that might contribute to infertility were identified in the infertile group.

  20. Women's beliefs about infertility and sexual behaviors: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bokaie, Mahshid; Simbar, Masoumeh; Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba Yassini; Majd, Hamid Alavi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a reproductive health problem and its prevalence is increasing in developing countries. This problem has some significant effects on the sexual behaviors of infertile women, especially during infertility treatment periods. Discovering the existing beliefs in the field of sexual and reproductive health and also determining the misconceptions would define the educational needs for providing sexual health programs for infertile women. Women should be able to distinguish risky behaviors from healthy behaviors that falsely have been marked as infertility-related behaviors. This qualitative study was conducted to determine women's beliefs about infertility and sexual behaviors among Iranian infertile women. Materials and Methods: The present study was a qualitative conventional content analysis study conducted on 15 infertile women and 8 key informants until reaching data saturation. Guba and Lincoln evaluative criteria were used for ensuring rigor of the study. Results: Data analysis defined three classes of beliefs that directly or indirectly affected sexual behaviors in infertile women: 1) Cultural, religious, or ethnic beliefs, 2) believing in the effect of diet on infertility, and 3) effect of the type of intercourse on getting pregnant. Conclusions: Three themes of religious, cultural, and ethnic beliefs, believing in the effect of diet on infertility, and the effect of the type of intercourse were the most important factors indicating sexual behaviors among infertile women. It seems that cultural and social matters are the most effective factors on sexual behaviors of infertile Iranian women. PMID:27563321

  1. Hormonal and seminal parameters in infertile men.

    PubMed

    Bruno, B; Francavilla, S; Properzi, G; Martini, M; Fabbrini, A

    1986-01-01

    500 infertile patients (250 with and 250 without left side varicocele) and 33 fertile men were evaluated as far as seminal parameters and the hormonal status were concerned. Sperm motility was constantly lower in infertile patients also when infertile group was compared to fertile one with the same sperm density. Serum testosterone levels were lower in infertile groups when compared to fertile men, and this confirms the existence of an androgenic deficit as a common finding in infertility associated or not to varicocele. FSH and LH increased (p less than 0.001) when sperm density dropped to less than 5 X 10(6) spermatozoa/ml. A negative correlation was found between both gonadotropins and sperm count (p less than 0.001), also after exclusion of azoo- and oligozoospermic (less than 5 X 10(6) spermatozoa/ml) patients (p less than 0.01). Gonadotropins were moreover tightly correlated between each other (p less than 0.001). Our data suggest that both gonadotropins are tightly tuned with sperm output and thus with the spermatogenic potential.

  2. Attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy

    PubMed Central

    Kian, Ensiyeh Mohebbi; Riazi, Hedieh; Bashirian, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surrogacy arrangements are multifaceted in nature, involving multiple controversial aspects and engaging ethical, moral, psychological and social issues. Successful treatment in reproductive medicine is strongly based on the mutual agreement of both partners, especially in Iran where men often make the final decision for health-related problems of this nature. AIM: The aim of the following study is to assess the attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy. SETTING AND DESIGN: This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Hamadan university of medical sciences, Iran. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study sample consisted of 150 infertile couples selected using a systematic randomized method. Data collection was based on responses to a questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: P <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. RESULTS: While 33.3% of men and 43.3% of women surveyed insisted on not using surrogacy, the overall attitudes toward surrogacy were positive (53.3% of women and 54.6% of men surveyed). CONCLUSION: Although, there was not a significant difference between the overall positive attitudes of infertile women and men toward surrogacy, the general attitude toward using this method is not strongly positive. Therefore, further efforts are required to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile couples. PMID:24829531

  3. Attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Kian, Ensiyeh Mohebbi; Riazi, Hedieh; Bashirian, Saeid

    2014-01-01

    Surrogacy arrangements are multifaceted in nature, involving multiple controversial aspects and engaging ethical, moral, psychological and social issues. Successful treatment in reproductive medicine is strongly based on the mutual agreement of both partners, especially in Iran where men often make the final decision for health-related problems of this nature. The aim of the following study is to assess the attitudes of Iranian infertile couples toward surrogacy. This descriptive study was conducted at the infertility clinic of Hamadan university of medical sciences, Iran. The study sample consisted of 150 infertile couples selected using a systematic randomized method. Data collection was based on responses to a questionnaire consisting of 22 questions. P <0.05 were considered to be statistically significant. While 33.3% of men and 43.3% of women surveyed insisted on not using surrogacy, the overall attitudes toward surrogacy were positive (53.3% of women and 54.6% of men surveyed). Although, there was not a significant difference between the overall positive attitudes of infertile women and men toward surrogacy, the general attitude toward using this method is not strongly positive. Therefore, further efforts are required to increase the acceptability of surrogacy among infertile couples.

  4. [Phenomenological study of infertile women with obesity].

    PubMed

    Arranz-Lara, Lilia; Martínez-Lemus, Hugo; Ruíz-Ornelas, Jaime; Sauceda-González, Luciano; Pimentel, Elizabeth; Anguiano, Norma; Sondón, Zoé; Cedillo, Javier; Chávez, Alvaro; Regalado, Miguel Angel; Moreno, Daniel

    2010-10-01

    Obesity is a condition strongly associated with polycystic ovary and other conditions that interfere with or complicate the treatment of assisted reproduction. To examine, from a phenomenological point of view, the perception of infertile women obesity problem before undergoing assisted reproduction treatment. This analysis should help to design a psychotherapeutic strategy focused on this problem. One hundred patients with infertility, with a BMI equal to or greater than 30, candidates for assisted reproductive treatments in the service of Human Reproduction, Centro Médico Nacional 20 de Noviembre, ISSSTE. The phenomenological qualitative analysis was performed in 72 women who agreed to be interviewed in depth. The phenomenon is to study obesity in infertile women candidates for assisted reproduction treatment. Obese infertile women subject to assisted reproduction treatment perceive their difficulty losing weight is closely associated with infertility. Most patients had social feelings of worthlessness, sadness, worthlessness, and family rejection. The inability to obtain a steady weight loss is regarded as a minor frustration that sterility. It is very important to perform intensive, multidisciplinary labor, which is focused on concepts associated with psychological distress, such as: management of depression by sterility, control of anxiety and stress, control of social pressures and management of the illusion of motherhood. Also rely on specialists of eating habits and exercise.

  5. Roles and Role Conflict of Women in Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Janet R.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the experience of role conflict for women in infertile couples. Findings lead to an understanding of infertility as part of an interactional system for dealing with potentially intolerable sources of role conflict. (Author)

  6. The experience of infertility treatment: the male perspective

    PubMed Central

    Arya, Shafali Talisa; Dibb, Bridget

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Current research surrounding infertility is focused primarily on women alone, thus removing men from the fertility equation. However, alternative research has indicated that, although men also experience infertility, there is a paucity of research on men. Therefore, very little is understood about the experiences of infertility from the male perspective. This study adopted a qualitative approach in an attempt to explore the infertility experience from the perspective of men. Fifteen men who had experienced infertility were interviewed to explore their experiences. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to analyse the data. Five superordinate themes were developed, and these included: (1) the influence of society on infertility; (2) feeling unacknowledged; (3) natural verses assisted conception; (4) emotional reactions; and (5) improving the infertility experience. The findings of this research indicated that men experience infertility as a mentally, physically and socially demanding condition. Comparisons to previous research have been made, and future research is proposed. PMID:27563936

  7. Roles and Role Conflict of Women in Infertile Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Janet R.

    1979-01-01

    Explores the experience of role conflict for women in infertile couples. Findings lead to an understanding of infertility as part of an interactional system for dealing with potentially intolerable sources of role conflict. (Author)

  8. Consider Acupuncture for Incontinence, Not Certain Infertility Cases

    MedlinePlus

    ... 166898.html Consider Acupuncture for Incontinence, Not Certain Infertility Cases Research yields mixed results for this traditional ... and the other on a cause of female infertility. A research team found acupuncture did improve symptoms ...

  9. How Common is Male Infertility, and What Are Its Causes?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Trials Resources and Publications How common is male infertility, and what are its causes? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Infertility is defined clinically in women and men who ...

  10. Impact of obesity on infertility in women.

    PubMed

    Dağ, Zeynep Özcan; Dilbaz, Berna

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity and overweight are increasing and have become an epidemic worldwide. Obesity has detrimental influences on all systems, including reproductive health. The prevalence of obesity in infertile women is high, and it is well known that there is an association between obesity and infertility. The relationship between obesity and reproductive functions is still being explored. Overweight women have a higher incidence of menstrual dysfunction and anovulation. Overweight and obese women are at a high risk for reproductive health. The risk of subfecundity and infertility, conception rates, miscarriage rates, and pregnancy complications are increased in these women. They have poor reproductive outcomes in natural as well as assisted conception. These poor reproductive outcomes include assisted reproduction such as ovulation induction, in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF/ICSI), and ovum donation cycles. Weight loss has beneficial effects on the reproductive outcomes in these patients.

  11. Management of infertility in women with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Grzechocinska, Barbara; Wielgos, Miroslaw

    2012-01-01

    Although there is confirmed an association between endometriosis and infertility, precise standards of managements have not yet been established. Ablation of endometriotic lesions plus adhesiolysis in minimal to mild endometriosis is more effective than diagnostic laparoscopy alone in improving fertility. Suppression of ovarian function and hormonal treatment alone are not effective in improving fertility. In women with stage I/II endometriosis associated infertility, expectant management or IUI after laparoscopy can be considered for younger patients. Women 35 years of age or older should be treated with IUI or IVF-ET. IVF pregnancy rate are lower in women with endometriosis than in those with tubal infertility. For women with stage III/IV endometriosis who fail to conceive following conservative surgery IVF-ET is should be offered.

  12. Clinical approaches to infertility in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Wilborn, Robyn R; Maxwell, Herris S

    2012-05-01

    When presented with the apparently infertile bitch, the practitioner must sort through a myriad of facts, historical events, and diagnostic tests to uncover the etiology of the problem. Many bitches that present for infertility are reproductively normal and are able to conceive with appropriate intervention and breeding management. An algorithmic approach is helpful in cases of infertility, where simple questions lead to the next appropriate step. Most bitches can be categorized as either cyclic or acyclic, and then further classified based on historical data and diagnostic testing. Each female has a unique set of circumstances that can affect her reproductive potential. By utilizing all available information and a logical approach, the clinician can narrow the list of differentials and reach a diagnosis more quickly.

  13. Forgotten intrauterine device contributing to infertility

    PubMed Central

    Igberase, Gabriel O.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study is to show that long standing forgotten intrauterine device contributes to infertility, reporting three cases presented at Central Hospital Warri, Nigeria, a government tertiary health center. Three cases of forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) contributing to infertility were seen. Two were inserted for contraceptive reasons while one was inserted while being managed for uterine synechae. Health care providers should ensure proper documentation of all procedures carried out, adequate counseling which should include taking an informed consent and also ensuring both short and long term follow up of their clients. Also all patients being evaluated for infertility and clients with past history of intrauterine device must have a speculum examination and ultrasound scan carried out. PMID:24765335

  14. Forgotten intrauterine device contributing to infertility.

    PubMed

    Igberase, Gabriel O

    2011-07-01

    The aim of the study is to show that long standing forgotten intrauterine device contributes to infertility, reporting three cases presented at Central Hospital Warri, Nigeria, a government tertiary health center. Three cases of forgotten intrauterine contraceptive device (IUCD) contributing to infertility were seen. Two were inserted for contraceptive reasons while one was inserted while being managed for uterine synechae. Health care providers should ensure proper documentation of all procedures carried out, adequate counseling which should include taking an informed consent and also ensuring both short and long term follow up of their clients. Also all patients being evaluated for infertility and clients with past history of intrauterine device must have a speculum examination and ultrasound scan carried out.

  15. Infertility and the provision of infertility medical services in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Ombelet, Willem; Cooke, Ian; Dyer, Silke; Serour, Gamal; Devroey, Paul

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Worldwide more than 70 million couples suffer from infertility, the majority being residents of developing countries. Negative consequences of childlessness are experienced to a greater degree in developing countries when compared with Western societies. Bilateral tubal occlusion due to sexually transmitted diseases and pregnancy-related infections is the most common cause of infertility in developing countries, a condition that is potentially treatable with assisted reproductive technologies (ART). New reproductive technologies are either unavailable or very costly in developing countries. This review provides a comprehensive survey of all important papers on the issue of infertility in developing countries. METHODS Medline, PubMed, Excerpta Medica and EMBASE searches identified relevant papers published between 1978 and 2007 and the keywords used were the combinations of ‘affordable, assisted reproduction, ART, developing countries, health services, infertility, IVF, simplified methods, traditional health care'. RESULTS The exact prevalence of infertility in developing countries is unknown due to a lack of registration and well-performed studies. On the other hand, the implementation of appropriate infertility treatment is currently not a main goal for most international non-profit organizations. Keystones in the successful implementation of infertility care in low-resource settings include simplification of diagnostic and ART procedures, minimizing the complication rate of interventions, providing training-courses for health-care workers and incorporating infertility treatment into sexual and reproductive health-care programmes. CONCLUSIONS Although recognizing the importance of education and prevention, we believe that for the reasons of social justice, infertility treatment in developing countries requires greater attention at National and International levels. PMID:18820005

  16. [Internet as a source of information about infertility among infertile patients].

    PubMed

    Talarczyk, Joanna; Hauke, Jan; Poniewaz, Marta; Serdyńska-Szuster, Monika; Pawelczyk, Leszek; Jedrzejczak, Piotr

    2012-04-01

    Around one million couples in Poland suffer from infertility People in reproductive age are most active Internet users. The aim of the study was to assess Internet habits of infertile patients. We checked to what extent infertile patients seek information about infertility on-line and what is their approach to the information found. 85 female patients treated for infertility for at least one year were surveyed. The anonymous questionnaire was designed by the authors of the publication. It consisted of questions related to medical history of the patients and sources of information about infertility they used. It also checked Internet activity of the patients and contained Beck's Depression Inventory (BDI). Chi-square test and Spearman's correlation test were used to evaluate the results. The majority of patients used Internet to find information about infertility (93%); 46% of the respondent declared Internet forums to be their main source of information about it. Patients used on-line sources of information more often than stricte medical sources. Internet influenced their relation with the physician. 64% of patients verified on-line information and treatment proposed by their doctor before using them. One third of the surveyed women claimed their knowledge about infertility comes more from the Internet than the specialist who treated them. There was a positive correlation between patients who checked diagnostic or therapeutic methods proposed by their physician with depression in BDI. Considering the great impact of Internet forums and web pages on patient approach to diagnostics and treatment of infertility there seems to be a need to create a professional Polish website and forum to provide the patients with reliable information about the disease.

  17. Predictive value of hormonal parameters for live birth in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertile women might get pregnant sometime after fertility treatment, but today, there is no prediction model on who will eventually have children. The objective of the present study was to characterize hormone levels in an arbitrary menstrual cycle in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility, and to determine the predictive value for long-term possibility of live birth. Methods In this cross-sectional study, with 71 infertile women with diagnosis unexplained infertility and male infertility, blood samples were obtained during the proliferative and secretory phases of an arbitrary menstrual cycle. Serum concentrations of FSH, LH, AMH, inhibin B, estradiol, progesterone, PRL and TSH were determined. The predictive value of ovulation and hormonal analysis was determined by identifying the proportion of women with at least one live birth. Mann Whitney U test, chi2 test and Spearman’s correlation were used for statistical analysis. A value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results There were no differences in hormone values and live birth rates between women with unexplained infertility and male infertility. The best sole predictors of live birth were age of the women, followed by ovulatory cycle, defined as serum progesterone concentration of greater than or equal to 32 nmol/L, and a serum TSH concentration of less than or equal to 2.5 mIU/L. Combining the age with the ovulatory cycle and serum TSH less than or equal to 2.5 mIU/L or serum AMH greater than or equal to 10 pmol/L the predictive value was close to 90%. Conclusions Age in combination with the presence of an ovulatory cycle and serum TSH or serum AMH is predictive for long-term live birth. The advantage of serum AMH compared with serum TSH is the very little variation throughout the menstrual cycle, which makes it a useful tool in infertility diagnosis. PMID:23844631

  18. Predictive value of hormonal parameters for live birth in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Murto, Tiina; Bjuresten, Kerstin; Landgren, Britt-Marie; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli

    2013-07-11

    Infertile women might get pregnant sometime after fertility treatment, but today, there is no prediction model on who will eventually have children. The objective of the present study was to characterize hormone levels in an arbitrary menstrual cycle in women with unexplained infertility and male infertility, and to determine the predictive value for long-term possibility of live birth. In this cross-sectional study, with 71 infertile women with diagnosis unexplained infertility and male infertility, blood samples were obtained during the proliferative and secretory phases of an arbitrary menstrual cycle. Serum concentrations of FSH, LH, AMH, inhibin B, estradiol, progesterone, PRL and TSH were determined. The predictive value of ovulation and hormonal analysis was determined by identifying the proportion of women with at least one live birth. Mann Whitney U test, chi2 test and Spearman's correlation were used for statistical analysis. A value of p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. There were no differences in hormone values and live birth rates between women with unexplained infertility and male infertility. The best sole predictors of live birth were age of the women, followed by ovulatory cycle, defined as serum progesterone concentration of greater than or equal to 32 nmol/L, and a serum TSH concentration of less than or equal to 2.5 mIU/L. Combining the age with the ovulatory cycle and serum TSH less than or equal to 2.5 mIU/L or serum AMH greater than or equal to 10 pmol/L the predictive value was close to 90%. Age in combination with the presence of an ovulatory cycle and serum TSH or serum AMH is predictive for long-term live birth. The advantage of serum AMH compared with serum TSH is the very little variation throughout the menstrual cycle, which makes it a useful tool in infertility diagnosis.

  19. Exploration of Infertile Couples’ Support Requirements: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Jafarzadeh-Kenarsari, Fatemeh; Ghahiri, Ataollah; Habibi, Mojtaba; Zargham-Boroujeni, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background Due to high prevalence of infertility, increasing demand for infertility treatment, and provision of high quality of fertility care, it is necessary for healthcare professionals to explore infertile couples’ expectations and needs. Identification of these needs can be a prerequisite to plan the effective supportive interventions. The current study was, therefore, conducted in an attempt to explore and to understand infertile couples’ experiences and needs. Materials and Methods This is a qualitative study based on a content analysis ap- proach. The participants included 26 infertile couples (17 men and 26 women) and 7 members of medical personnel (3 gynecologists and 4 midwives) as the key informants. The infertile couples were selected from patients attending public and private infertility treatment centers and private offices of infertility specialists in Isfahan and Rasht, Iran, during 2012-2013. They were selected through purposive sampling method with maximum variation. In-depth unstructured interviews and field notes were used for data gathering among infertile couples. The data from medical personnel was collected through semi-structured interviews. The interview data were analyzed using conventional content analysis method. Results Data analysis revealed four main categories of infertile couples’ needs, including: i. Infertility and social support, ii. Infertility and financial support, iii. Infertility and spiritual support and iv. Infertility and informational support. The main theme of all these categories was assistance and support. Conclusion The study showed that in addition to treatment and medical needs, infertile couples encounter various challenges in different emotional, psychosocial, communicative, cognitive, spiritual, and economic aspects that can affect various areas of their life and lead to new concerns, problems, and demands. Thus, addressing infertile couples’ needs and expectations alongside their medical treatments as

  20. Histomorphological Patterns of Endometrium in Infertility.

    PubMed

    Nandedkar, Shirish S; Patidar, Ekta; Gada, Dhiraj B; Malukani, Kamal; Munjal, Kavita; Varma, Amit

    2015-10-01

    Endometrium is the most sensitive indicator of ovarian function and endometrial biopsy is one of the most important investigations in infertility. The current study was carried out to investigate the histomorphological patterns of endometrium in infertile women and to compare the results with other similar studies. A cross-sectional study on 2,080 infertile women was carried out to find the incidence of various histomorphological patterns in hematoxylin-eosin stained sections of endometrium and compare them with other Indian studies. In the current study majority of cases (88.50 %) were of primary infertility; the highest number of cases was in the age group of 21-30 years and the oldest patient was of 50 years age. The various abnormalities observed were anovulatory endometrium (15.75 %), inadequate proliferative (1.90 %), inadequate secretory (9.52 %), glandulo-stromal disparity (GSD) (4.21 %), hyperplasia (1.10 %), and endometritis (1.63 %). In 3.0 % cases menstrual cycle history was not available and curettage was done at inappropriate period of the cycle in 11.63 %. Comparison with other studies revealed the results matching with some and differing with others. In the current study, anovulatory endometrium and luteal phase defect are the major causes of infertility, and tuberculous endometritis, non-specific endometritis and GSD are minor contributing factors. These are treatable causes. Premenstrual endometrial biopsy, if accompanied by information of menstrual cycle and date of biopsy, can be a very reliable diagnostic tool for hormonal dysfunction and intrinsic endometrial factors in infertility.

  1. Overtreatment in couples with unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Kersten, F A M; Hermens, R P G M; Braat, D D M; Hoek, A; Mol, B W J; Goddijn, M; Nelen, W L D M

    2015-01-01

    What is the percentage of overtreatment, i.e. fertility treatment started too early, in couples with unexplained infertility who were eligible for tailored expectant management? Overtreatment occurred in 36% of couples with unexplained infertility who were eligible for an expectant management of at least 6 months. Prognostic models in reproductive medicine can help to identify infertile couples that would benefit from fertility treatment. In couples with unexplained infertility with a good chance of natural conception within 1 year, based on the Hunault prediction model, an expectant management of 6-12 months, as recommended in international fertility guidelines, prevents unnecessary treatment. A retrospective cohort study in 25 participating clinics, with follow-up of all couples who were seen for infertility in 2011-2012. In all, 9818 couples were seen for infertility in the participating clinics. Couples were eligible to participate if they were diagnosed with unexplained infertility and had a good prognosis of natural conception (>30%) within 1 year based on the Hunault prediction model. Data to assess overtreatment were collected from medical records. Multilevel regression analyses were performed to investigate associations of overtreatment with patient and clinic characteristics. Five hundred and forty-four couples eligible for expectant management were included in this study. Among these, overtreatment, i.e. starting medically assisted reproduction within 6 months, occurred in 36%. The underlying quality indicators showed that in 34% no prognosis was calculated and that in 42% expectant management was not recommended. Finally, 16% of the couples for whom a correct recommendation of expectant management for at least 6 months was made, started treatment within 6 months anyway. Overtreatment was associated with childlessness, higher female age and a longer duration of infertility. No associations between overtreatment and clinic characteristics were found. The

  2. Metabolic syndrome and infertility in men.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Christopher D; Brannigan, Robert E

    2015-05-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a compilation of symptoms including central obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and hypertension. Initially used to predict cardiovascular disease, it is now clear that the molecular and physiologic abnormalities seen in metabolic syndrome extend well beyond the cardiovascular system. Growing evidence has linked metabolic syndrome and its individual symptoms to the increasing prevalence of male infertility. This manuscript reviews the recent evidence connecting metabolic syndrome to male infertility as well as the underlying pathophysiology. Currently, there are limited prospective studies examining the effects of treating metabolic syndrome on male reproduction and these relationships will need to be a focus of further investigation.

  3. [Anxiety status and influential factors in patients with infertility].

    PubMed

    Wu, Fang; Liu, Yang; Li, Xiaogang

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the anxiety status of infertile patients and the influential factors.
 A questionnaire survey was performed in 306 infertile patients, who were consulted in Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, and Productive and Genetic Hospital of CITIC-Xiangya from June, 2013 to June, 2014. A self-designed questionnaire and general information on the anxiety due to infertility were used in the investigation.
 The anxiety incidence for the participants was 61.4%. The single factor analysis showed that some information about the patients, including ages, marriage age, duration of infertility, number of reproductive technological intervention, infertility sources, the cost of treatment and the number of infertility clinic visits, significantly affected the anxiety of infertile patients (P<0.05). The multivariate analysis showed that the number of reproductive technological intervention and infertile causes was related to the anxiety of infertile patients. Among them, the number of reproductive intervention more than 6 times was the risk factor for the low score of anxiety while the infertile causes from both spouses were the protective factor for low scores of anxiety.
 Infertility treatment are of complexity and long duration with the relatively low cure rate, which may cause and aggravate the patient's psychological burden, leading to the anxiety. As a result, infertility patients were the high-risk groups for anxiety symptoms.

  4. Frustrated Fertility: Infertility and Psychological Distress among Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Julia; Greil, Arthur L.; White, Lynn; Jacob, Mary Casey

    2003-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that women who have experienced infertility report higher psychological distress. Examines whether roles or resources condition the effects of infertility or whether its effects are limited to childless women. Infertility combined with involuntary childlessness is associated with significantly greater distress. For women in…

  5. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Infertility Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.

    2011-01-01

    Women and men diagnosed with infertility experience a variety of infertility-related stressors, including changes to their family and social networks, strain on their sexual relationship, and difficulties and unexpected challenges in their relationship. Infertility stress is linked with depression and psychological distress, and can lead to…

  6. Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Treat Infertility Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Eifert, Georg H.

    2011-01-01

    Women and men diagnosed with infertility experience a variety of infertility-related stressors, including changes to their family and social networks, strain on their sexual relationship, and difficulties and unexpected challenges in their relationship. Infertility stress is linked with depression and psychological distress, and can lead to…

  7. Frustrated Fertility: Infertility and Psychological Distress among Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuillan, Julia; Greil, Arthur L.; White, Lynn; Jacob, Mary Casey

    2003-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that women who have experienced infertility report higher psychological distress. Examines whether roles or resources condition the effects of infertility or whether its effects are limited to childless women. Infertility combined with involuntary childlessness is associated with significantly greater distress. For women in…

  8. Infertility classification: a work in progress sounds like SOAP revisited.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Joseph S

    2005-04-01

    Documentation and communication regarding infertility evaluation and management continue to be a work in progress. Grading systems focused on the degree of infertility and the associated prognosis are a step in the right direction. A subjective, objective, assessment, plan (SOAP) approach is a logical way to provide a detailed method of communication and documentation when dealing with infertile couples.

  9. Aspects of Psychosocial Development in Infertile Versus Fertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Binaafar, Sima; Ardakani, Zohreh Behjati; Kamali, Kourosh; Kosari, Haleh; Ghorbani, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertility is one of the most difficult life experiences that a couple might encounter. Infertility as a bio-psycho-social phenomenon, could influence all aspects of life. While paying special attention to the psychological aspects of infertility in couples; many studies have investigated the non-clinical aspects of infertility, however, they rarely have evaluated the psychosocial development of infertile versus fertile men. We aimed to study the effects of infertility on psychosocial development in men. Methods In fact, we designed the study based on “Erikson's theory of psychosocial development”. We focused on the relationship between psychosocial development and some self-conceived indices. For this purpose, we divided the participants volunteers into two groups of cases (80 infertile men) and controls (40 fertile men) and asked them to complete a 112 (questions questionnaire based on “self description”). The statistical analysis was performed by SPSS (version 13) using independent t-test, Pearson correlation coefficient and analysis of covariance. A p-value <0.05 was considered significant. Results Data analysis showed significant inter and intra group differences. Infertile and fertile groups showed significant differences in trust, autonomy, generativity and integrity stages (p < 0.05). Infertile intergroup analysis represents us to higher scores in positive than negative stages. Conclusion Infertility as a phenomenon had its own effects on the psychosocial development of infertile men. However, good coping skills are powerful tools to manage these myriad of feelings surrounding infertile men. PMID:23926571

  10. Prevalence and predictors of infertility-specific stress in women diagnosed with primary infertility: A clinic-based study

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ansha; Sharma, P. S. V. N.; Narayan, Pratapkumar; Binu, V. S.; Dinesh, N.; Pai, Praveena Joglekar

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to the existing literature on infertility, stress appears to be inevitably associated with infertility diagnosis and treatment in sub-fertile individuals. The epidemiological data on the prevalence and predictors of infertility-specific stress in cultural specific scenario are scarce. The objective of the present study was to estimate the prevalence of infertility-specific stress and identify predictors of infertility-specific stress in women diagnosed with primary infertility. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 300 infertile married women, diagnosed with primary infertility. The tools used for the assessment were “semi-structured questionnaire” compiled by the authors, “ICD-10 Classification of Mental and Behavioral Disorders (Clinical Descriptions and Diagnostic Guidelines),” and “Psychological Evaluation Test for infertility.” STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 15). Chi-square test was used for univariate analysis followed by multiple logistic regressions between stress and the predictor variables. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The prevalence of stress among women was 80%. Univariate analysis revealed that predictors of stress were years of marital life, duration of infertility, infertility type, history of gynecological surgery, cycles of ovulation induction with timed intercourse and intra-uterine inseminations, present and past psychiatric morbidity, coping difficulties, gynecological diagnosis, and severity of premenstrual dysphoria. Multivariate analysis showed leading associations of stress with infertility type and coping difficulties. PMID:27110075

  11. Sexual behavior of infertile women: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Bokaie, Mahshid; Simbar, Masoumeh; Yassini Ardekani, Seyed Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility makes an essential challenge to the sexual life of couples, especially infertile women. When pregnancy does not happen, infertile women think that sexual intercourse is not fruitful and sexual desire became reduce gradually. Infertile women progressively forget that their sexual relationship is also a response to their natural need. Objective: This qualitative study was conducted to explore the infertility consequences in the sexual behavior of infertile women. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative content analysis study; and it was part of a widespread study, used a sequential mixed-method and conducted from August 2014 until February 2015. A purposeful sampling was used to recruit infertile women who had referred to Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility. Data gathering techniques employed in this research included in-depth semi structured open face-to-face interviews and field notes. Credibility, transferability, confirm ability, and dependability were assessed for the rigor of the data collection. Results: Totally, 15 infertile women and 8 key informants were interviewed. Data analysis showed four themes about impact of infertility on female sexual behavior: 1/ Impact of infertility drugs on couple sexual behavior, 2/ Impact of assisted reproductive technologies on female sexual behavior, 3/ Timed intercourse during infertility and 4/ The psychological impact of infertility on sexual behavior. Conclusion: Some of Iranian infertile women could cope with their problems, but some of them were very affected by infertility drugs and assisted reproductive technologies procedures. Psychosexual counseling before medical treatment could help them to have a better sexual life. PMID:26644793

  12. Infertility, infertility treatment and psychomotor development: the Danish National Birth Cohort.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jin Liang; Basso, Olga; Obel, Carsten; Hvidtjørn, Dorte; Olsen, Jørn

    2009-03-01

    Babies born of infertile couples, regardless of treatment, have a higher risk of preterm birth and low birthweight, conditions associated with delayed development. We examined developmental milestones in singletons as a function of parental infertility [time to pregnancy (TTP) > 12 months] and infertility treatment. From the Danish National Birth Cohort (1997-2003), we identified 37 897 singletons born of fertile couples (TTP < or = 12 months), 4351 born of infertile couples conceiving naturally (TTP > 12 months), and 3309 born after infertility treatment. When the children were about 18 months old, mothers reported 12 developmental milestones by responding to structured questions. We defined a failure to achieve the assessed milestone or the minimal numbers of milestones in a summary (motor, or cognitive/language skills) as delay. Naturally conceived children born of infertile couples had a pattern of psychomotor development similar to that of children born of fertile couples, but increasing TTP correlated with a modest delay. When the analysis was restricted to infertile couples (treated and untreated), children born after treatment showed a slight delay in cognitive/language development (odds ratio 1.24, [95% confidence interval 1.01, 1.53]) for not meeting at least three out of six cognitive/language milestones); children born after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) had the highest estimated relative risk of delay for most milestones, especially motor milestones. These results suggest that a long TTP may be associated with a modest developmental delay. Infertility treatment, especially ICSI, may be associated with a slight delay for some of these early milestones.

  13. Sexual function in infertile women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P; Legro, Richard S; Coutifaris, Christos; Alvero, Ruben; Robinson, Randal D; Casson, Peter A; Christman, Gregory M; Huang, Hao; Hansen, Karl R; Baker, Valerie; Usadi, Rebecca; Seungdamrong, Aimee; Bates, G Wright; Rosen, R Mitchell; Schlaff, William; Haisenleder, Daniel; Krawetz, Stephen A; Barnhart, Kurt; Trussell, J C; Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

    2017-08-01

    While female sexual dysfunction is a frequent occurrence, characteristics in infertile women are not well delineated. Furthermore, the impact of infertility etiology on the characteristics in women with differing androgen levels observed in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility has not been assessed. The objective of the study was to determine the characteristics of sexual dysfunction in women with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility. A secondary data analysis was performed on 2 of Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Cooperative Reproductive Medicine Networks clinical trials: Pregnancy in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Study II and Assessment of Multiple Intrauterine Gestations From Ovarian Stimulation. Both protocols assessed female sexual function using the Female Sexual Function Inventory and the Female Sexual Distress Scale. Women with polycystic ovary syndrome had higher weight and body mass index than women with unexplained infertility (each P < .001), greater phenotypic (Ferriman-Gallwey hirsutism score, sebum score, and acne score; each P < .001), and hormonal (testosterone, free testosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone; each P < .001) evidence of androgen excess. Sexual function scores, as assessed by the Female Sexual Function Inventory, were nearly identical. The Female Sexual Distress Scale total score was higher in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. The mean Female Sexual Function Inventory total score increased slightly as the free androgen index increased, mainly as a result of the desire subscore. This association was more pronounced in the women with unexplained infertility. Reproductive-age women with infertility associated with polycystic ovary syndrome and unexplained infertility, despite phenotypic and biochemical differences in androgenic manifestations, do not manifest clinically significant differences in sexual function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc

  14. Coital frequency and infertility: which male factors predict less frequent coitus among infertile couples?

    PubMed

    Perlis, Nathan; Lo, Kirk C; Grober, Ethan D; Spencer, Leia; Jarvi, Keith

    2013-08-01

    To determine the coital frequency among infertile couples and which factors are associated with less frequent coitus. Cross-sectional study. Tertiary-level male infertility clinic. A total of 1,298 infertile men. Administration of computer-based survey, semen analysis, and serum hormone evaluation. Monthly coital frequency. A total of 1,298 patients presented to clinic for infertility consultation and completed the computer-based survey. The median male age was 35 years (interquartile range [IQR] 32-39 years) and the median duration of infertility was 2 years (IQR 1-4 years) before consultation. Median monthly coital frequency was seven (IQR 5-10; range 0-40); 24% of couples were having intercourse ≤ 4 times per month. Overall, 0.6%, 2.7%, 4.8%, 5.8%, and 10.8% of the men reported having intercourse 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 times per month, respectively. When simultaneously taking into account the influence of age, libido, erectile function, and semen volume on coital frequency, older patients had 1.05 times higher odds (per year of age) of less frequent coitus (odds ratio 1.05, 95% confidence interval 1.03-1.08). In addition, patients with better erectile function had 1.12 times higher odds (per point on Sexual Health Inventory for Men scale) of more frequent coitus (odds ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.18). Similar to the general population, most infertile couples report having coitus more than four times per month. Older male age and erectile dysfunction are independent risk factors for less frequent coitus among infertile men, which could have an impact on fertility. Coital frequency should be considered in infertility assessments. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Male infertility: pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Csilla

    2011-04-01

    Infertility affects about 7% of all men. The etiology of impaired sperm production and function can be related to factors acting at pre-testicular, post-testicular or directly at the testicular level. Primary testicular failure accounts for about 75% of all male factor infertility. Genetic factors can be identified in about 15% of cases (congenital hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism, congenital absence of vas deferens, primitive testicular failure). Despite progresses, mainly in the field of genetics, the etiology is still unknown in about 50% cases and it is termed "idiopathic infertility". A part from few exceptions, the only available therapy for male factor infertility is assisted reproduction which allows conception also in severe male factor, including azoospermia following testicular sperm extraction. The complete diagnostic workup is important for: i) the identification of treatable/reversible or health-threatening conditions; ii) selection of patients for assisted reproductive techniques; iii) for appropriate genetic counselling including preventive measures (preimplanatation or prenatal diagnosis) to safeguard the health of future offspring. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [CHROMOSOMAL ABNORMALITIES IN PATIENTS WITH INFERTILITY].

    PubMed

    Pylyp, L Y; Spinenko, L O; Verhoglyad, N V; Kashevarova, O O; Zukin, V D

    2015-01-01

    To assess the frequency and structure of chromosomal abnormalities in patients with infertility, a retrospective analysis of cytogenetic studies of 3414 patients (1741 females and 1673 males), referred to the Clinic of reproductive medicine "Nadiya" from 2007 to 2012, was performed. Chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 2.37% patients: 2.79% in males and 1.95% in females. Balanced structural chromosomal abnormalities prevailed over numerical abnormalities and corresponded to 80.2% of all chromosomal abnormalities detected in the studied group. Sex chromosome abnormalities made up 23.5% of chromosomal pathology (19/81) and included gonosomal aneuploidies in 84% of cases (16/19) and structural abnormalities of chromosome Y in 16% of cases (3/19). The low level sex chromosome mosaicism was detected with the frequency of 0.55%. Our results highlight the importance of cytogenetic studies in patients seeking infertility treatment by assisted reproductive technologies, since an abnormal finding not only provide a firm diagnosis to couples with infertility, but also influences significantly the approach to infertility treatment in such patients.

  17. Bariatric Surgery, Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, and Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, James; Deguara, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Background. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the commonest cause of female infertility. Visceral obesity and insulin resistance are key pathophysiological mechanisms behind PCOS. Women suffering from this syndrome and infertility often seek bariatric surgery hoping that they would be able to conceive postoperatively. Objective. At present, there is no consensus on the role of bariatric surgery in the management of PCOS-associated infertility within the medical community, making it difficult to give specific advice to these women, so a review of the literature was necessary. Results. A detailed review of the literature was performed. Only 6 manuscripts were relevant and contained quantitative data. They demonstrated that bariatric surgery results in postoperative conception rates varying from 33% to 100%. Surgery is also associated with amelioration of menstrual irregularities, hormonal abnormalities, and hirsutism that are associated with PCOS. These studies were retrospective and only had a small number of participants with infertility. Conclusions. Bariatric surgery has been shown to conclusively improve life expectancy, quality of life, and comorbidities like type 2 diabetes and obstructive sleep apnea. However, further research is required to identify whether weight loss surgery results in significant improvement in fertility of women with PCOS and to investigate which operation has the best results. PMID:27965894

  18. Coping Processes of Couples Experiencing Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Newton, Christopher R.; Rosen, Karen H.; Schulman, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the coping processes of couples experiencing infertility. Participants included 420 couples referred for advanced reproductive treatments. Couples were divided into groups based on the frequency of their use of eight coping strategies. Findings suggest that coping processes, which are beneficial to individuals, may be…

  19. Melatonin hormone profile in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Awad, Hosni; Halawa, Fawzy; Mostafa, Taymour; Atta, Hazem

    2006-06-01

    Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland. There is much controversy about its relationship to the male reproductive process. In this study, seminal plasma as well as the serum melatonin levels were studied in different infertile male groups and were correlated with their semen parameters and hormonal levels. One hundred twenty male cases subdivided into six equal groups were consecutively included; fertile normozoospermic men, oligoasthenozoospermia (OA), OA with leucocytospermia, OA with varicocele, non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA) with high serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) and NOA with normal FSH. Semen analysis, estimation of melatonin, FSH, testosterone (T) and prolactin (PRL) hormone was carried out. Mean level of serum melatonin was higher than its corresponding seminal concentrations in all investigated groups with a positive correlation between their levels (r = 0.532, p = 0.01). Serum and seminal plasma melatonin levels in all infertile groups were reduced significantly compared with their levels in the fertile group. The lowest concentrations were in OA with leucocytospermia group. Melatonin in both serum and semen demonstrated significant correlation with sperm motility (r = 607, 0.623 respectively, p = 0.01). Serum melatonin correlated positively with serum PRL (r = 0.611, p = 0.01). It may be concluded that melatonin may be involved in the modulation of reproductive neuroendocrine axis in male infertility. Also, low levels of melatonin in semen were observed in infertile groups having reduced sperm motility, leucocytospermia, varicocele and NOA.

  20. Characteristics of the Biopsychosocial Crisis of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Ellen Piel

    1987-01-01

    Presents a framework for understanding the crisis of infertility which is characterized by extensive anxiety, damaged self-esteem, grief, uncertainty about the future, and estranged relationships with each other and with family and friends. Proposes some interventions appropriate to helpers from a variety of disciplines. (ABB)

  1. Characteristics of the Biopsychosocial Crisis of Infertility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Ellen Piel

    1987-01-01

    Presents a framework for understanding the crisis of infertility which is characterized by extensive anxiety, damaged self-esteem, grief, uncertainty about the future, and estranged relationships with each other and with family and friends. Proposes some interventions appropriate to helpers from a variety of disciplines. (ABB)

  2. Coping Processes of Couples Experiencing Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brennan D.; Newton, Christopher R.; Rosen, Karen H.; Schulman, Robert S.

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the coping processes of couples experiencing infertility. Participants included 420 couples referred for advanced reproductive treatments. Couples were divided into groups based on the frequency of their use of eight coping strategies. Findings suggest that coping processes, which are beneficial to individuals, may be…

  3. Hypnosis in the treatment of functional infertility.

    PubMed

    Gravitz, M A

    1995-07-01

    The literature was reviewed and found to contain sparse information regarding the applicability of clinical hypnosis in the treatment of functional infertility. Two cases were then described in which hypnosis based on imagery and a relaxation strategy was successful in facilitating pregnancy in both instances. The treatment was considered to have resulted in beneficial modification of attitude, optimism, and mind-body interaction.

  4. Civil war and male infertility in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Kobeissi, Loulou; Inhorn, Marcia C; Hannoun, Antoine B; Hammoud, Najwa; Awwad, Johnny; Abu-Musa, Antoine A

    2008-08-01

    To investigate the long-term impacts of the 15-year Lebanese civil war on male infertility. Clinic-based, case-control study, using reproductive history and risk factor interview data and laboratory-based semen analysis. Two IVF clinics in Beirut, Lebanon, during an 8-month period (January-August 2003). One hundred twenty infertile male cases and 100 fertile male controls, distinguished by semen analysis and reproductive history. None. Standard clinical semen analysis. Infertile male cases were more likely than fertile controls to have lived through the Lebanese civil war and to have experienced war-related trauma (residence in bombing areas, participation in combat, injuries, kidnapping, and displacement from home). Cases had a 57% increase in their odds of exposure to civil war-related trauma. This case-control study demonstrates an association between the Lebanese civil war and male infertility. Wartime and postwar exposure to a number of potential reproductive risk factors-including toxins, injuries, and stress-is believed to be the main factor leading to this finding.

  5. Markers of genital tuberculosis in infertility.

    PubMed

    Khanna, A; Agrawal, A

    2011-12-01

    Although genital tuberculosis is a condition that is prevalent worldwide, it is still a diagnostic dilemma. This study aimed to find an effective diagnostic modality for the condition. A total of 100 infertile women were clinically evaluated with haemoglobin estimation, total and differential count, Mantoux test, tubercle bacilli enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TB ELISA), hysterosalpingography, pelvic ultrasonography, laparohysteroscopy, premenstrual endometrial biopsy for histopathology, culture and tubercle bacilli polymerase chain reaction (TBPCR). The womens' Day 2 hormonal profile (luteinising, follicle-stimulating, prolactin and thyroidstimulating hormones) and their husbands' semen analysis were also conducted. A total of 58 women had primary infertility and 42 had secondary infertility. Female factor infertility was present in 63 percent of the cases (mostly tubal; 45.97 percent). 26 women tested positive for endometrial TBPCR. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, Mantoux test, TB ELISA and hysterosalpingography were found to have high negative predictive value (greater than 80 percent), while the positive predictive value was 35-45 percent. Laparoscopy findings were suggestive of tuberculosis in 13 percent of the women, out of which 83.3 percent were positive for endometrial TBPCR. Hysteroscopy revealed intrauterine adhesions in 34.8 percent of the women, with 68.8 percent being positive for tubercular bacilli. Our study established that in cases of genital tuberculosis, the use of expensive endometrial TBPCR tests may be avoided with a detailed workup, which would also help in the institution of anti-tubercular treatment in early disease, thus enhancing the chance of pregnancy.

  6. Masculinity, infertility, stigma and media reports.

    PubMed

    Gannon, Kenneth; Glover, Lesley; Abel, Paul

    2004-09-01

    There is growing concern about the health of men in the developed West. Compared with women they have higher rates of morbidity and mortality and are less likely to seek out and employ medical services. Several authors have drawn on social constructionist models, such as the concept of hegemonic masculinity, to account for these gender differences in risk and behaviour. One might anticipate that certain conditions, such as male infertility, would be perceived as posing a particular threat to conventional views of masculinity. There is some support for this, although there is little research into the social construction of male infertility. In this study Discourse Analysis was employed to analyse newspaper accounts of a reported decline in sperm counts in order to study the way in which infertility and masculinity were represented and constructed in the media. The results indicate a construction of fertility as being in crisis and of male infertility as conflated with impotence. Men were positioned as vulnerable and threatened by forces outside their control. The accounts drew on a range of stereotypically masculine reference points, such as warfare and mechanical analogies. These results are consistent with concepts of hegemonic masculinity and suggest that men are offered a highly restricted set of options in terms of perceiving and representing their bodies and their health.

  7. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-08-06

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms "IBD AND male infertility", "Crohn's disease AND male infertility", "ulcerative colitis AND male infertility". References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options.

  8. [Male infertility: non-surgical therapy].

    PubMed

    Gulino, Gaetano; Stefanucci, Marco; Antonucci, Michele; Racioppi, Marco; Sacco, Emilio; Pinto, Francesco; Bassi, Pier Francesco

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is defined as the inability of a couple to conceive after 12 months of unprotected intercourse and affects 15% of couples with male component of 50%. The failure of spermatogenesis can result from hypothalamic, pituitary or testicular disorders although in the majority of cases it remains idiopathic. The diagnostic process includes medical history, semen analysis, hormonal studies, genetic studies and radiological evaluation.Targeted hormonal therapies are available for patients whose infertility is caused by altered levels of androgens, prolactin, or TSH. Main treatments aim to restore normal sexual function by administering testosterone and to increase spermatogenesis with pulsatile GnRH.Fertility in men suffering from hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism can be restored through hormone therapy using GnRH or with the use of gonadotropins when there is hypothalamic failure. In the past, treatment options for the factors of idiopathic male infertility were mainly based on the use of anti-estrogens that cause an increased secretion of FSH and LH and therefore of testosterone.Oxytocin promotes the progression of the sperm and increases the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone. The aromatase's inhibitors decrease the conversion of androgens to estrogens, increasing serum levels of androgens, resulting in an increased release of gonadotropins.Two areas showed interesting future perspectives for the treatment of infertility: gene therapy and transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells.

  9. Genetic testing and counselling for male infertility.

    PubMed

    Krausz, Csilla; Chianese, Chiara

    2014-06-01

    Genetic disorders can be identified in about 15% of cases of male infertility. With the widespread application of assisted reproductive technology, infertile patients are now given the possibility of having their biological children; however, a genetic risk exists for assisted reproductive technology-born offspring, implying the necessity for future parents to be appropriately informed about potential consequences. In this review, we provide current recommendations on clinical genetic testing and genetic counselling. New insights are presented concerning Klinefelter syndrome, X and Y chromosome-linked deletions, monogenic diseases and pharmacogenetics. As for Klinefelter patients, novel preventive measures to preserve fertility have been proposed although they are not yet applicable in the routine setting. Y-chromosome deletions have both diagnostic and prognostic values and their testing is advised to be performed according to the new European Academy of Andrology/European Molecular Genetics Quality Network guidelines. Among monogenic diseases, major advances have been obtained in the identification of novel genes of hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. Pharmacogenetic approaches of hormonal treatment in infertile men with normal values of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) are promising and based on FSHR and FSHB polymorphisms. X chromosome-linked deletions are relevant for impaired spermatogenesis. In about 40% of male infertility, the cause is unknown and novel genetic factors are expected to be discovered in the near future.

  10. A new classification for female infertility.

    PubMed

    Aflatoonian, A; Baghianimoghadam, B; Partovi, P; Abdoli, A; Hemmati, P; Tabibnejad, N; Dehghani, M

    2011-01-01

    Infertility is defined as the inability of a couple to conceive after 12 months of regular, unprotected intercourse. However infertility is a clinical presentation and not a disease. Thus to be able to offer a new classification, it is necessary to apply a clinical presentation (philosophy) suggested by the University of Calgary in 1991. In recent years several classification algorithms have been proposed which apply key predictors of clinical, imaging, or morphological types to determine the diseases that can cause infertility. On the other hand, an algorithm is a product of an expert's mind after many years of practice and experience, which is too difficult to understand by a medical student. However there has not been any simple schematic classification based on a logical justification applying integration of etiologies with basic science to break down etiologies into categories, subcategories and disease classes of this clinical presentation. Because etiology has also become an important criterion for the characterization of causes of infertility, a classification proposal is presented here that attempts to include all relevant (basic science) features of the causative diseases of this clinical presentation.

  11. Infertility and childlessness: a qualitative study of the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Infertility is a global reproductive health issue that affects many individuals and couples. Despite the high prevalence of infertility in Ghana, no study has been done on the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana. This study therefore explored the experiences of infertile couples in Northern Ghana using the Upper West Region as a case study. Methods We interviewed fifteen childless couples, forty-five couples with children, and eight key informants using a semi-structured interview guide. We also carried out three focus group discussions; one for childless women, one for women with children and one for men with children. The data were transcribed, coded, arranged and analyzed for categories and themes. Results Infertile couples are socially stigmatised and excluded from leadership roles in their communities. Couples without children are denied membership in the ancestral world thereby losing the opportunity to live again. Both males and females are engaged in sex with multiple partners to prove their fertility. Conclusions Both men and women suffer from the social effects of childlessness. The desire to have biological children in a pronatalist society results in unhealthy practices. Health policy makers and gender advocates should be more concerned about infertility. PMID:23517021

  12. Unexplained infertility: an update and review of practice.

    PubMed

    Ray, Arpita; Shah, Amit; Gudi, Anil; Homburg, Roy

    2012-06-01

    Of the couples unable to conceive without any identifiable cause, 30% are defined as having unexplained infertility. Management depends on duration of infertility and age of female partner. This review describes and comments on the definition and evidence for the management of unexplained infertility. A literature search was conducted in EMBASE, Medline, Ovid and Cochrane Database of Systematic reviews using the terms 'infertility', 'unexplained infertility', 'idiopathic infertility', 'definition of infertility', 'treatment options', 'intrauterine insemination', 'ovulation induction', 'Fallopian tube sperm', 'GIFT' and 'IVF'. There is no uniform definition for unexplained infertility. This varies in the literature depending on the duration of infertility and the age of the female partner. The treatment of unexplained infertility is empirical and many different regimens have been used. Among these are expectant management, ovulation stimulation with clomiphene citrate, gonadotrophins and aromatase inhibitors, Fallopian tube sperm perfusion, tubal flushing, intrauterine insemination, gamete intra-Fallopian transfer and IVF. The standard protocol is to progress from low-technology to high-technology treatment options. On the best available evidence, an algorithm for management is suggested. There is a definite need for multicentre randomized controlled trials to identify the best treatment option in unexplained infertility using a standard definition.

  13. Infertility in Mazandaran province - north of Iran: an etiological study

    PubMed Central

    Karimpour Malekshah, Abbasali; Esmailnejad Moghaddam, Amir; Moslemizadeh, Narges; Peivandi, Sepideh; Barzegarnejad, Ayyub; Musanejad, Nadali; Jursarayee, Gholamali

    2011-01-01

    Background: The prevalence and etiology of infertility are not similar in different parts of the world. There are only few reports of this topic in Iran. Objective: This study was conducted to determine the clinical patterns and major causes of infertility in Mazandaran province in north of Iran. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 3734 consecutive couples attending two infertility clinics in Mazandaran province, from 2003 to 2008, were reviewed. The couples had not had a viable birth after at least 1 year of unprotected intercourse and were fully investigated. Results: Of the entire samples, 78.7% had primary infertility and 21.3% had secondary infertility. The mean duration of infertility in couples was 5.7±4 years. The etiology of infertility in couples revealed; male factor in 38.9%, female factor in 34.7%, combined factors in 14.6% and undetermined cause in 11.8%. Conclusion: In this study, delayed attendance of infertile couples to the infertility clinic was found. Therefore, there is a need to revise public health program on infertility to focus on the education and prevention of infertility and its risk factors. PMID:25356077

  14. New insights into the genetic basis of infertility

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Suresh, Padmanaban S; Tsutsumi, Rie

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is a disease of the reproductive system characterized by inability to achieve pregnancy after 12 or more months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. A variety of factors, including ovulation defects, spermatogenic failure, parental age, obesity, and infections have been linked with infertility, in addition to specific karyotypes and genotypes. The study of genes associated with infertility in rodent models has expanded the field of translational genetics in identifying the underlying cause of human infertility problems. Many intriguing aspects of the molecular basis of infertility in humans remain poorly understood; however, application of genetic knowledge in this field looks promising. The growing literature on the genetics of human infertility disorders deserves attention and a critical concise summary is required. This paper provides information obtained from a systematic analysis of the literature related to current research into the genetics of infertility affecting both sexes. PMID:25506236

  15. A survey on depression among infertile women in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The desire of many young women to become parents may be influenced by the premium placed on children by society. In Africa, children are highly valued for social, cultural and economic reasons. Infertile and childless women in Africa are therefore confronted with a series of societal discrimination and stigmatization which may lead to psychological disorders such as anxiety and depression. Even though some research has been done on the prevalence of infertility in Ghana, very little is known about the psychological impact of childlessness among infertile women. The present study aimed to examine prevalence and severity of depression in relation to age, type of infertility and duration of infertility in Ghanaian infertile women. Methods A total of 100 infertile women who met the selection criteria and had agreed to participate in the study were interviewed using the Beck Depression Inventory questionnaire from December 2012 to April 2013 at the Tamale Teaching Hospital, Tamale/Ghana. Data concerning socio-demographic characteristics such as age, monthly income, duration of infertility, marital status, educational level, number of previous conception, number of previous children, religion, as well as occupation of the respondents were recorded. Results The prevalence of depression among the women was 62.0% with the level of depression showing a significant positive correlation with age of the women and the duration of infertility. The level of depression was significantly higher among subjects with low or no formal education and among the unemployed. Women with primary infertility also presented with high depression scores as measured by BDI. Conclusions In conclusion, the prevalence of depression among the infertile women is high, especially among infertile women age 26 and above, those who are less educated, those with primary infertility, as well as those who have been diagnosed as infertile for more than 3 years. Interventions to decrease and prevent

  16. Social Consequences of Infertility on Families in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Mohammad; Khosravi, Ahmad; Chaman, Reza; Sadeghi, Zakieh; Raei, Mehdi; Jahanitiji, Mohammad Ali; Mehrabian, Fardin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Social reactions to infertility are one of the concerns infertile people. This study aimed to investigate the social consequences of infertility among urban and rural population of Shahroud in northeast of Iran. Method: This study is a comparative study that was conducted in 2013. In this study, 1,528 women (511 infertile and 1017 fertile ones) were randomly selected. The 36-item questionnaire included 18 items about women’s attitude towards infertility and 18 questions about the consequences of infertility was used. Data were analyzed using chi-square test, one-way analysis of variance and t test. Findings: The prevalence of infertility in rural areas was estimated to be 2.23 percent. 42.2% of the participants were living the city (n= 645) and 57.8 % were living in the village (n=883). 49.2% of the participants had education below high school diploma (n=751), 31.7% had high school diploma (n=484) and 19.2% had university degrees (n=293). 51.9% of the people referred to the infertility problem among distant relatives, 24.9% referred to infertility among the close relatives and 9% reported the infertility among their family members. The mean score of attitude of the fertile was 56.6±7.0 and that of the infertile was 56.8± 6.6 and there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (P>0.05). There was a significant association between fertility status and encouraging divorce, encouraging remarriage and encouraging adoption (P=0.001). Conclusion: Infertility causes a negative attitude toward infertile people. But the interference of others leads to further encouragement of divorce and remarriage among the infertile people. PMID:26652089

  17. Proteomics, oxidative stress and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Halabi, Jacques; Peng, Jason; Vazquez-Levin, Monica

    2014-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been established as one of the main causes of male infertility and has been implicated in many diseases associated with infertile men. It results from high concentrations of free radicals and suppressed antioxidant potential, which may alter protein expression in seminal plasma and/or spermatozoa. In recent years, proteomic analyses have been performed to characterize the protein profiles of seminal ejaculate from men with different clinical conditions, such as high oxidative stress. The aim of the present review is to summarize current findings on proteomic studies performed in men with high oxidative stress compared with those with physiological concentrations of free radicals, to better understand the aetiology of oxidative stress-induced male infertility. Each of these studies has suggested candidate biomarkers of oxidative stress, among them are DJ-1, PIP, lactotransferrin and peroxiredoxin. Changes in protein concentrations in seminal plasma samples with oxidative stress conditions were related to stress responses and to regulatory pathways, while alterations in sperm proteins were mostly associated to metabolic responses (carbohydrate metabolism) and stress responses. Future studies should include assessment of post-translational modifications in the spermatozoa as well as in seminal plasma proteomes of men diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. Oxidative stress, which occurs due to a state of imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants, has been implicated in most cases of male infertility. Cells that are in a state of oxidative stress are more likely to have altered protein expression. The aim of this review is to better understand the causes of oxidative stress-induced male infertility. To achieve this, we assessed proteomic studies performed on the seminal plasma and spermatozoa of men with high levels of oxidative stress due to various clinical conditions and compared them with men who had physiological concentrations of free

  18. Psychological profile of women with infertility: A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Poddar, Shuvabrata; Sanyal, Nilanjana; Mukherjee, Urbi

    2014-01-01

    Background: An endeavour to probe into the psychological profile of infertile women in a comparative stance with the fertile women is not very common. This study is an attempt to explore the possible non-apparent personality factors which contribute to the unexplained pain of infertility. Methods: The main objectives of the present study were (a) to examine whether infertile women are different from fertile women in terms of selected psychological variables- narcissistic components, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defensive manoeuvres; and (b) whether the primary infertile women (n=18) are different from the secondary infertile women (n=12) with respect to those variables. A total of 60 individuals (30 infertile women and 30 matched fertile women) were assessed through Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ), Narcissistic Personality Inventory (NPI) and Defense Style Questionnaire (DSQ-40). General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) was administered on to the fertile women to rule out the psychiatric morbidity. Results: Findings revealed that infertile women group differed from fertile women group with respect to narcissism, dimensions of attachment style and uses of defense mechanism. The primary infertile group also showed marked difference from the secondary infertile group with respect to those variables. Conclusions: This study endeavours to enrich the knowledge regarding the personality dynamics of infertile women to design psychotherapeutic programme to aid their well-being, help them to cherish the flavour of parenthood and improve their quality of life. PMID:25788801

  19. Emoting infertility online: A qualitative analysis of men's forum posts.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Esmée; Gough, Brendan

    2016-07-01

    Relatively little research on infertility focuses exclusively or significantly on men's experiences, particularly in relation to emotional aspects. Evidence that does exist around male infertility suggests that it is a distressing experience for men, due to stigma, threats to masculinity and the perceived need to suppress emotions, and that men and women experience infertility differently. Using thematic analysis, this article examines the online emoting of men in relation to infertility via forum posts from a men-only infertility discussion board. It was noted that men 'talked' to each other about the emotional burdens of infertility, personal coping strategies and relationships with others. Three major themes were identified following in-depth analysis: 'the emotional rollercoaster', 'the tyranny of infertility' and 'infertility paranoia'. This article then offers insights into how men experience infertility emotionally, negotiate the emotional challenges involved (especially pertaining to diagnosis, treatment outcomes and their intimate relationships) and how they share (and find value in doing so) with other men the lived experience of infertility.

  20. Qualitative research on infertile Chinese couples' understanding of sexuality.

    PubMed

    Zhuoran, Wang; Wanpeng, Liu; Tao, Peng; Coates, Rosemary

    2017-07-23

    Family physicians play an important role in the initial counselling and evaluation of infertility. Despite infertility regarded as a stressor and a life crisis for individuals or couples, little is known about the psychosexual aspects of infertility. On the basis that sexuality is a crucial part of quality of life, it is worthwhile to give more attention to sexuality of infertile couples during their time of experiencing infertility. This study aimed to gain insight into the dynamic features of the sexuality of infertile couples and to provide meaningful evidence for improving their quality of life. We employed a qualitative approach to conduct this study. Utilizing purposive sampling method, 56 participants (28 infertile Chinese couples) were recruited from the reproductive medicine centre of a general hospital, and in-depth interviews were conducted with each participant. Thematic content analysis was used to analyse the transcripts. Four themes emerged from the respondents' narratives; these themes relate to the infertile couples' understanding of sexuality: (i) gender identity, (ii) communication about sex, (iii) sexual life and (iv) sexual satisfaction. It was further found that Chinese culture's values of fertility, perceptions about sexuality and sex, social norms regarding gender, and expectations about marital sexual life can have significant effects on infertile Chinese couples' sexuality. These findings should be highly considered by family physicians in their practice to provide infertile couples with information related to sexual well-being, coping styles, relationship, etc.

  1. ICSI Outcome in Infertile Couples with Different Causes of Infertility: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Jahanian Sadatmahalleh, Shahideh; Akhoond, Mohammad Reza; Ghaffari, Firouzeh; Zolfaghari, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Background: Different success rate of Intracytoplasmic Sperm injection (ICSI) has been observed in various causes of infertility. In this study, we evaluated the relation between ICSI outcome and different causes of infertility. We also aimed to examine parameters that might predict the pregnancy success rate following ICSI. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study included1492 infertile women referred to Infertility Center of Royan Institute between 2010 and 2011. We assigned two groups including pregnant (n=504) and non-pregnant (n=988), while all participants underwent ICSI cycles. All statistics were performed by SPSS program. Statistical Analysis was carried out using Chi-square and t test. Logistic regression was done to build a prediction model in ICSI cycles. Results: The overall clinical pregnancy rate in our study was 33.9% (n=1492). There was a statistically significant difference in mean serum concentration on day 3 after application of luteinizing hormone (LH) between the pregnant and the non-pregnant groups (p<0.05). However, There were no significant differences between two groups in the serum concentrations on day 3 after application of the following hormones: folliclestimulating hormone (FSH), thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), and metoclopramidestimulated prolactin (PRL) . We found no association between different causes of infertility and clinical outcomes . The number of metaphase II (MII) oocytes, embryo transfer, number of good embryo (grade A, B, AB), total dose of gonadotropin, endometrial thickness, maternal age, number of previous cycle were statistically significant between two groups (p<0.05). Conclusion: Our results indicate that ICSI in an effective option in couples with different causes of infertility. These variables were integrated into a statistical model to allow the prediction for the chance of pregnancy following ICSI cycles. It is required that each infertility center gather enough information about the causes of

  2. Are we exploiting the infertile couple?

    PubMed

    Blackwell, R E; Carr, B R; Chang, R J; DeCherney, A H; Haney, A F; Keye, W R; Rebar, R W; Rock, J A; Rosenwaks, Z; Seibel, M M

    1987-11-01

    We hope that this article brings into focus some problems that merit consideration and debate. These thoughts come from a group of individuals who are actively engaged in reproductive endocrine/infertility practices with special interests ranging from ovulation induction to IVF to laser surgery. As a group, we practice in all parts of the country, and the problems mentioned are not restricted to any individual or region. We urge that all of us be candid with ourselves and our colleagues about what we can and cannot do for the infertile couple. We suggest that gynecologists ask themselves this question and proceed when the answer is affirmative: "Is this procedure really in the patient's best interest?"

  3. Male infertility and varicocele: myths and reality

    PubMed Central

    Kantartzi, P D; Goulis, Ch D; Goulis, G D; Papadimas, I

    2007-01-01

    Varicocele is among the most common causes of male infertility. It is also one of the most controversial issues in the field of Andrology, especially regarding why, when and to whom varicocelectomy should be applied. Many experts believe that the surgical repair of varicocele should be applied only in a meticulously selected group of infertile men, although there are no generally accepted criteria. Up to now, the only confirmed prognostic factor for achievement of pregnancy after varicocelectomy is the age of the female partner. Given the wide application of intra - cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) during the last few years, the modern research approaches should compare the benefits of varicocelectomy and ICSI, taking under consideration both the efficacy and the cost-effectiveness of the methods. PMID:19582201

  4. [Treatment options for age-related infertility].

    PubMed

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle

    2010-06-20

    There has been a consistent trend towards delayed childbearing in most Western countries. Treatment options for age-related infertility includes controlled ovarian hyperstimulation with intrauterine insemination and in vitro fertilization (IVF). A sharp decline in pregnancy rate with advancing female age is noted with assisted reproductive technologies (ART) including IVF. Evaluation and treatment of infertility should not be delayed in women 35 years and older. No treatment other than oocyte donation has been shown to be effective for women over 40 and for those with compromised ovarian reserve, but its pratice is not easy in France hence the procreative tourism. As an increasing number of couples choose to postpone childbearing, they should be informed that maternal age is an important risk factor for failure to conceive.

  5. Stress and coping in couples facing infertility.

    PubMed

    Pasch, Lauri A; Sullivan, Kieran T

    2017-02-01

    Infertility presents an ideal setting for examining how stress impacts couple relationships. The effect of facing fertility problems on couple relationships is highly varied. Traditional stress and coping models are limited, because they do not account for partner interdependence. We propose a stress and coping in couples model which argues that couples whose approaches to managing infertility (i.e., their appraisal and coping efforts) are compatible will experience more positive communication, and be more likely to experience a strengthening of their relationship; whereas couples with incompatible approaches will be more likely to experience negative communication and a weakening of their relationship. Evidence in support of this model is reviewed. Our approach to counseling couples emerges from the proposed model and represents a specific application of Integrative Behavioral Couples Therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Management of female infertility from hormonal causes.

    PubMed

    Luciano, Antony A; Lanzone, Antonio; Goverde, Angelique J

    2013-12-01

    Hormonal causes of female infertility involve ovulatory dysfunctions that may result from dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, peripheral endocrine glands, nonendocrine organs, or metabolic disorders. It is important to think of anovulation not as a diagnosis but as a symptom of a metabolic or endocrine disorder that requires a thorough diagnostic evaluation to identify the specific cause and to implement effective therapies that assure the best possible pregnancy outcome and avoid long-term adverse health consequences. In most instances, the medical history points to the underlying dysfunction, which can usually be confirmed with laboratory or imaging tests. For more challenging cases, more extensive evaluations may be needed, including perturbation studies. Nevertheless, the management of anovulatory infertility is gratifying because its causes are often manifest and the treatment usually results in resumption of ovulatory cycles, restoration of fertility, and healthy offspring through natural conception without requiring expensive and intrusive assisted reproductive technologies. © 2013.

  7. Infertility in male aquatic invertebrates: a review.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Ceri; Ford, Alex T

    2012-09-15

    As a result of endocrine disruptor studies, there are numerous examples of male related reproductive abnormalities observed in vertebrates. Contrastingly, within the invertebrates there have been considerably less examples both from laboratory and field investigations. This has in part been due to a focus of female related endpoints, inadequate biomarkers and the low number of studies. Whether contaminant induced male infertility is an issue within aquatic invertebrates and their wider communities therefore remains largely unknown and represents a key knowledge gap in our understanding of pollutant impacts in aquatic wildlife. This paper reviews the current knowledge regarding pollutants impacting male infertility across several aquatic invertebrate phyla; which biomarkers are currently being used and where the science needs to be expanded. The limited studies conducted so far have revealed reductions in sperm numbers, examples of poor fertilisation success, DNA damage to spermatozoa and inhibition of sperm motility that can be induced by a range of environmental contaminants. This limited data is mainly comprised from laboratory studies with only a few studies of sperm toxicity in natural populations. Clearly, there is a need for further studies in this area, to include both laboratory and field studies from clean and reference sites, with a focus on broadcast spawners and those with direct fertilisation. Biomarkers developed for measuring sperm quantity and quality in vertebrates are easily transferable to invertebrates but require optimisation for particular species. We discuss how sperm tracking and techniques for measuring DNA strand breaks and sperm viability have been successfully transferred from human infertility clinics to aquatic invertebrate ecotoxicology. Linking sperm toxicity and male infertility effects to higher level impacts on the reproductive biology and dynamics of populations requires a much greater understanding of fertilisation dynamics and

  8. Psychological and emotional concomitants of infertility diagnosis in women with diminished ovarian reserve or anatomical cause of infertility.

    PubMed

    Nicoloro-SantaBarbara, Jennifer M; Lobel, Marci; Bocca, Silvina; Stelling, James R; Pastore, Lisa M

    2017-07-01

    To examine the magnitude and predictors of emotional reactions to an infertility diagnosis in two groups of women: those with diminished ovarian reserve (DOR), and those clinically diagnosed with an anatomical cause of infertility (ACI). Cross-sectional study. Academic and private fertility clinics. Women diagnosed with DOR (n = 51) and women diagnosed with ACI (n = 51). Not applicable. Fertility Problem Inventory (infertility distress), Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, Health Orientation Scale (emotional reactions to receiving a diagnosis). Women with DOR had statistically significantly higher infertility distress scores than women with ACI and higher scores on subscales assessing distress from social concerns, sexual concerns, and a need for parenthood. In both groups, higher self-esteem was associated with lower infertility distress. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses revealed that for women with DOR and those with ACI lower infertility distress but not self-esteem predicted a more positive emotional reaction toward receiving a fertility diagnosis. Women diagnosed with DOR have greater infertility distress but similar self-esteem and emotional reactions to their diagnosis compared with women who have an anatomical cause of infertility. These results suggest that for both groups distress surrounding infertility itself may influence the way women respond to learning the cause of their infertility. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities and y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men with varicocele and idiopathic infertility of South Indian origin.

    PubMed

    Rao, Lakshmi; Babu, Arvind; Kanakavalli, Murthy; Padmalatha, Venkata; Singh, Amarpal; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Deenadayal, Mamata; Singh, Lalji

    2004-01-01

    Various factors cause spermatogenesis arrest in men and, in a large number of cases, the underlying reason still remains unknown. Little attention is paid to determining the genetic defects of varicocele-related infertility. The objective of our present study was to investigate the chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in infertile men of South Indian origin with varicocele and idiopathic infertility. Metaphase chromosomes of 251 infertile men with varicocele and unexplained infertility were analyzed using Giemsa-Trypsin-Giemsa (GTG) banding and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The microdeletions in 6 genes and 18 sequence-tagged-sites (STS) in the Yq region were screened using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Out of 251 infertile men, 57 (22.7%) men were with varicocele, of which 8.77% were azoospermic, 26.31% were severely oligozoospermic, 21.05% were mildly oligozoospermic, and 43.85% were oligoasthenoteratozoospermic (OAT), and 194 (77.29%), with idiopathic infertility, of which 51% were azoospermic, 13.40% were severely oligozoospermic, 19.07% were mildly oligozoospermic, and 16.4% were with OAT. Genetic defects were observed in 38 (15.13%) infertile individuals, including 14 (24.56%) men with varicocele and 24 (12.37%) men with idiopathic infertility. The frequencies of chromosomal defects in varicocele and idiopathic infertility were 19.3% and 8.76%, respectively, whereas Y chromosome microdeletions were 5.26% and 3.60%, respectively. Overall rate of incidence of chromosomal anomalies and microdeletions in 251 infertile men were 11.5% and 3.98%, respectively, indicating a very significant higher association of genetic defects with varicocele than idiopathic male infertility. Our data also demonstrate that, among infertile men with varicocele, severely oligozoospermic and OAT men with varicocele have higher incidences of genetic defects than mildly oligozoospermic and azoospermic men.

  10. Resolved Parental Infertility and Children's Educational Achievement.

    PubMed

    Branigan, Amelia R; Helgertz, Jonas

    2017-06-01

    Although difficulty conceiving a child has long been a major medical and social preoccupation, it has not been considered as a predictor of long-term outcomes in children ultimately conceived. This is consistent with a broader gap in knowledge regarding the consequences of parental health for educational performance in offspring. Here we address that omission, asking how resolved parental infertility relates to children's academic achievement. In a sample of all Swedish births between 1988 and 1995, we find that involuntary childlessness prior to either a first or a second birth is associated with lower academic achievement (both test scores and GPA) in children at age 16, even if the period of infertility was prior to a sibling's birth rather than the child's own. Our results support a conceptualization of infertility as a cumulative physical and social experience with effects extending well beyond the point at which a child is born, and emphasize the need to better understand how specific parental health conditions constrain children's educational outcomes.

  11. Testicular Biopsy in Evaluation of Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Meinhard, Elizabeth; McRae, C. U.; Chisholm, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Testicular biopsy findings in 100 infertile men were correlated with the clinical findings. Mild or moderately severe tubular lesions were seen in 57 cases and severe changes in 43. Clinical examination and semen analysis were no guide to the severity of the testicular lesion. Though patients with normal sized testes more commonly had mild tubular lesions, many were severe. Patients with small testes more often had severe lesions but some had only mild tubular changes. Biopsy findings in both aspermic and oligospermic patients ranged from normal to a complete loss of germinal tissue. Testicular biopsy is advocated in infertile men for the complete assessment of the case and for identifying those which are potentially treatable. Patients with a severe lesion can be spared further investigations. The choice and results of treatment are discussed, particularly the surgical treatment of varicocele or obstruction. Only patients with a mild or moderate testicular tubular lesion should participate in future trials with drugs for male infertility. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8FIG. 9FIG. 10 PMID:4726930

  12. Human infertility: are endocrine disruptors to blame?

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Pinto, André; Carvalho, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Over recent decades, epidemiological studies have been reporting worrisome trends in the incidence of human infertility rates. Extensive detection of industrial chemicals in human serum, seminal plasma and follicular fluid has led the scientific community to hypothesise that these compounds may disrupt hormonal homoeostasis, leading to a vast array of physiological impairments. Numerous synthetic and natural substances have endocrine-disruptive effects, acting through several mechanisms. The main route of exposure to these chemicals is the ingestion of contaminated food and water. They may disturb intrauterine development, resulting in irreversible effects and may also induce transgenerational effects. This review aims to summarise the major scientific developments on the topic of human infertility associated with exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs), integrating epidemiological and experimental evidence. Current data suggest that environmental levels of EDs may affect the development and functioning of the reproductive system in both sexes, particularly in foetuses, causing developmental and reproductive disorders, including infertility. EDs may be blamed for the rising incidence of human reproductive disorders. This constitutes a serious public health issue that should not be overlooked. The exposure of pregnant women and infants to EDs is of great concern. Therefore, precautionary avoidance of exposure to EDs is a prudent attitude in order to protect humans and wildlife from permanent harmful effects on fertility. PMID:23985363

  13. Human infertility: are endocrine disruptors to blame?

    PubMed

    Marques-Pinto, André; Carvalho, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Over recent decades, epidemiological studies have been reporting worrisome trends in the incidence of human infertility rates. Extensive detection of industrial chemicals in human serum, seminal plasma and follicular fluid has led the scientific community to hypothesise that these compounds may disrupt hormonal homoeostasis, leading to a vast array of physiological impairments. Numerous synthetic and natural substances have endocrine-disruptive effects, acting through several mechanisms. The main route of exposure to these chemicals is the ingestion of contaminated food and water. They may disturb intrauterine development, resulting in irreversible effects and may also induce transgenerational effects. This review aims to summarise the major scientific developments on the topic of human infertility associated with exposure to endocrine disruptors (EDs), integrating epidemiological and experimental evidence. Current data suggest that environmental levels of EDs may affect the development and functioning of the reproductive system in both sexes, particularly in foetuses, causing developmental and reproductive disorders, including infertility. EDs may be blamed for the rising incidence of human reproductive disorders. This constitutes a serious public health issue that should not be overlooked. The exposure of pregnant women and infants to EDs is of great concern. Therefore, precautionary avoidance of exposure to EDs is a prudent attitude in order to protect humans and wildlife from permanent harmful effects on fertility.

  14. Anabolic steroids abuse and male infertility.

    PubMed

    El Osta, Rabih; Almont, Thierry; Diligent, Catherine; Hubert, Nicolas; Eschwège, Pascal; Hubert, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    For several decades, testosterone and its synthetic derivatives have been used with anabolic and androgenic purposes. These substances were first restricted to professional bodybuilders, but become more and more popular among recreational athletes. Up to date, 3,000,000 anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) users have been reported in the United States with an increasing prevalence, making AAS consumption a major public health growing concern. Infertility is defined by the WHO as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months or more of regular unprotected sexual intercourse and a male factor is present in up to 50 % of all infertile couples. Several conditions may be related to male infertility. Substance abuse, including AAS, is commonly associated to transient or persistent impairment on male reproductive function, through different pathways. Herein, a brief overview on AAS is offered. Steroids biochemistry, patterns of use, physiological and clinical issues are enlightened. A further review about fertility outcomes among male AAS abusers is also presented, including the classic reports on transient anabolic steroid-induced hypogonadism (ASIH), and the more recent experimental reports on structural and genetic sperm damage.

  15. The role of epigenetics in idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Gunes, Sezgin; Arslan, Mehmet Alper; Hekim, Gulgez Neslihan Taskurt; Asci, Ramazan

    2016-05-01

    Infertility is a complex disorder with multiple genetic and environmental causes. Although some specific mutations have been identified, other factors responsible for sperm defects remain largely unknown. Despite considerable efforts to identify the pathophysiology of the disease, we cannot explain the underlying mechanisms of approximately half of infertility cases. This study reviews current data on epigenetic regulation and idiopathic male infertility. Recent data have shown an association between epigenetic modifications and idiopathic infertility. In this regard, epigenetics has emerged as one of the promising research areas in understanding male infertility. Many studies have indicated that epigenetic modifications, including DNA methylation in imprinted and developmental genes, histone tail modifications and short non-coding RNAs in spermatozoa may have a role in idiopathic male infertility.

  16. Sexually transmitted diseases and their relation to male infertility.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, M O; Mellinger, B C

    1992-02-01

    Controversy surrounds the role of sexually transmitted diseases in male infertility. Because our understanding of male infertility is limited, and because diagnostic tests such as semen analysis including culture and leukocyte count are variable, definitive conclusions on STDs and their effect on infertility cannot be substantiated. Prospective investigations of infertile couples using appropriate control groups, sophisticated semen collection protocols, proper microbiologic techniques, and standardization of seminal fluid analysis are required to understand the role of STDs in male infertility. Regardless of the ongoing research to delineate the role of STDs in male infertility, advocating primary prevention by increasing public awareness of the negative effects of STDs and the use of contraceptive methods to prevent the spread of STDs is mandatory for the health care professional.

  17. Hormonal treatment of male infertility: promises and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Madhukar, Dama; Rajender, Singh

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 50% of infertility issues are attributable to male factors. A number of different factors may result in similar reductions of sperm count or motility and affect sperm morphology. Not only is the etiology of male infertility difficult to understand, but it is equally challenging to treat male infertility because of its etiological heterogeneity. Because of complex and incomplete knowledge of the underlying causes, most infertile men are described as idiopathically oligozoospermic and/or asthenozoospermic. Different hormonal treatments have been attempted, aiming to improve mainly endogenous follicle-stimulating hormone and/or androgen levels and subsequent spermatogenesis. Various studies have tried to treat infertility through natural pregnancies or increased sperm retrieval for in vitro fertilization techniques, or by treating spermatozoa in vitro to improve its fertilizing potential. The present review focuses on all of the aspects of male infertility treatment by hormone supplementation.

  18. Do alterations in follicular fluid proteases contribute to human infertility?

    PubMed

    Cookingham, Lisa Marii; Van Voorhis, Bradley J; Ascoli, Mario

    2015-05-01

    Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are known to play critical roles in follicular rupture, ovulation, and fertility in mice. Similar studies in humans are limited; however, both are known to increase during the periovulatory period. No studies have examined either protease in the follicular fluid of women with unexplained infertility or infertility related to advanced maternal age (AMA). We sought to determine if alterations in cathepsin L and/or ADAMTS-1 existed in these infertile populations. Patients undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) for unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility were prospectively recruited for the study; patients with tubal or male factor infertility were recruited as controls. Follicular fluid was collected to determine gene expression (via quantitative polymerase chain reaction), enzyme concentrations (via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays), and enzymatic activities (via fluorogenic enzyme cleavage assay or Western blot analysis) of cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1. The analysis included a total of 42 patients (14 per group). We found no statistically significant difference in gene expression, enzyme concentration, or enzymatic activity of cathepsin L or ADAMTS-1 in unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility as compared to controls. We also found no statistically significant difference in expression or concentration with advancing age. Cathepsin L and ADAMTS-1 are not altered in women with unexplained infertility or AMA-related infertility undergoing IVF, and they do not decline with advancing age. It is possible that differences exist in natural cycles, contributing to infertility; however, our findings do not support a role for protease alterations as a common cause of infertility.

  19. Inequity between male and female coverage in state infertility laws.

    PubMed

    Dupree, James M; Dickey, Ryan M; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-06-01

    To analyze state insurance laws mandating coverage for male factor infertility and identify possible inequities between male and female coverage in state insurance laws. We identified states with laws or codes related to infertility insurance coverage using the National Conference of States Legislatures' and the National Infertility Association's websites. We performed a primary, systematic analysis of the laws or codes to specifically identify coverage for male factor infertility services. Not applicable. Not applicable. Not applicable. The presence or absence of language in state insurance laws mandating coverage for male factor infertility care. There are 15 states with laws mandating insurance coverage for female factor infertility. Only eight of those states (California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Montana, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, and West Virginia) have mandates for male factor infertility evaluation or treatment. Insurance coverage for male factor infertility is most specific in Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York, yet significant differences exist in the male factor policies in all eight states. Three states (Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York) exempt coverage for vasectomy reversal. Despite national recommendations that male and female partners begin infertility evaluations together, only 8 of 15 states with laws mandating infertility coverage include coverage for the male partner. Excluding men from infertility coverage places an undue burden on female partners and risks missing opportunities to diagnose serious male health conditions, correct reversible causes of infertility, and provide cost-effective treatments that can downgrade the intensity of intervention required to achieve a pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The role of microsurgical varicocelectomy in treating male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Brannigan, Robert E.

    2017-01-01

    Varicoceles are the most common cause of male infertility. They afflict 15–20% of the general male population and 40% of males with primary infertility. Although multiple treatment modalities exist, including radiographic embolization and laparoscopy, open subinguinal microsurgical varicocelectomy is currently the gold standard of treatment for this condition. In this article, we discuss the role of varicocelectomy in the treatment of the modern infertile male and present a practical, safe, and reproducible technique for the microsurgical approach.

  1. Health and life style among infertile men and women.

    PubMed

    Revonta, M; Raitanen, J; Sihvo, S; Koponen, P; Klemetti, R; Männistö, S; Luoto, R

    2010-08-01

    Lifetime prevalence of infertility among couples is approximately 10-15%, but studies addressing their health behavior are few. Our aim was to describe health and life style of Finnish men and women who had experienced infertility. Cross-sectional survey. Finland. Data from a population-based survey (n=7021) was utilized. Life style of infertile men (n=289) and women (n=155) were compared to other men and fertile women. Life style (dietary factors, use of alcohol, physical activity), reproductive factors, other diseases and symptoms. After adjusting for age, area and education, infertile women under 50 years consumed more polyunsaturated fat (OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.03-1.46), less saturated fat (OR 0.83, 95% CI 0.74-0.92) and had experienced more hangovers during previous year (OR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05) than fertile women. Infertile men under 50 years consumed more total fat (OR 1.06, 95% CI 1.03-1.10), polyunsaturated fat (OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.05-1.37) and monounsaturated fat (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.06-1.28) compared to other men. Infertile men did not consume more alcohol nor smoke more cigarettes but reported more often allergies than fertile men. Infertile women also had Chlamydia trachomatis infection, benign tumor in their uterus and intestinal disease more often than fertile women. Infertile women over 50 years were more often current smokers than fertile women, but the differences in other age-groups were not significant. Women with infertility experience reported more diseases and less use of oral contraceptives than other women, possibly reflecting reasons to infertility. Since both infertility and unhealthy use of alcohol are an increasing public health issues in western societies, more attention should be paid towards life style, especially alcohol use of infertile women. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Management of male-factor infertility.

    PubMed

    Tournaye, Herman J; Cohlen, Ben J

    2012-12-01

    For many years, the management of male-factor infertility has been empirical rather than evidence-based. In current clinical practice, assisted reproductive techniques are the most successful methods of alleviating male-factor infertility. To date, it remains unclear what adjuvant actions can be taken to improve the outcome of assisted reproductive techniques for male-factor infertility. Evidence shows that smoking adversely affects sperm quality to some extent, and the genetic make-up of sperm to a greater extent; however, because of the scarcity and heterogeneity of studies, its effect on in-vitro fertilisation outcome remains largely unknown. Although smoking cessation should be part of the assisted reproductive techniques treatment plan, the benefit of antioxidant treatment in either smokers or non-smokers undergoing assisted reproductive techniques is still under scrutiny. Other lifestyle modifications in subfertile men, such as refraining from moderate alcohol and caffeine consumption, are even more controversial. When embarking on assisted reproductive techniques to alleviate male-factor infertility, intrauterine insemination may be considered as a first-line treatment for couples in whom the female partner has a normal fertility status, and at least 0.8 × 10(6) progressively motile spermatozoa are recovered after sperm preparation. If no pregnancy is achieved after three to six cycles of intrauterine insemination, in-vitro fertilisation can be proposed. When too few progressively motile spermatozoa are obtained after sperm processing for in-vitro fertilisation, or when surgically retrieved sperm are to be used, intracytoplasmic sperm injection is preferable. Although the outcome of no other assisted reproductive techniques has been scrutinised so much, and no large-scale 'macro-problems' have yet been observed after intracytoplasmic sperm injection, malformation rates are reported to be higher compared with the general population. Therefore, candidates

  3. Frequency and outcome of treatment in polycystic ovaries related infertility

    PubMed Central

    Arain, Farzana; Arif, Nesreen; Halepota, Hafeez

    2015-01-01

    Background: Infertility is defined as inability of couple to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse. The prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is 21.9%. The most common cause of medically treatable infertility is polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCO). This study was conducted to see the frequency and outcome of treatment in PCOs related infertility in infertile couples coming to Mohammad Medical College Hospital, Mirpurkhas, Sindh. Methods: This prospective observational study was conducted at Muhammad Medical College for three years from 2005 to 2008. Total 1289 infertile couples were included in this study. Result: The frequency of PCOs in female related infertility was 38.5%. Other causes of female infertility were in the frequency of 44% pelvic inflammatory disease, 12.3% endometriosis, 2.9% hyperprolactenemia, and 1.35% hypothyroidism. Patients with PCOS were given different treatment modalities. One hundred fifty patients with PCO were given ovulation induction with clomephene citrate and out of them 109 (72%) conceived. Sixty three women were given combination of clomephene citrate and Metformin. Out of them 50 (79%) conceived. Five patients were given gonadotrophins, Out of them 2 (40%) patients conceived. Five patients had laparoscopic drilling out of them 3 (60%) conceived. Conclusion: In contrast to the literature review Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome turned out to be the second most common cause of female related infertility. But as the international literature shows it had very good out come after medical and /or surgical treatment. PMID:26150870

  4. Risk of breast cancer in a cohort of infertile women.

    PubMed

    Rossing, M A; Daling, J R; Weiss, N S; Moore, D E; Self, S G

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess: (1) the risk of breast cancer associated with use of ovulation-inducing agents (such as clomiphene citrate) as treatment for infertility; and (2) the risk associated with ovulatory abnormalities that result in infertility. We performed a case-cohort study among 3837 women evaluated for infertility at clinics in Seattle, Washington, at some time during 1974-1985. Computer linkage with a population-based tumor registry was used to identify women diagnosed with breast cancer before January 1, 1992. Data regarding infertility testing and treatment were abstracted from the infertility clinic medical records for women who developed breast cancer and a randomly selected subcohort. Twenty-seven women in the cohort developed in situ or invasive breast cancer, in comparison with an expected number of 28.8 cases (standardized incidence ratio, 0.9; 95% confidence interval (CI), ).6-1.4). Infertile women with evidence of an ovulatory abnormality were at a risk of breast cancer similar to that of women whose infertility was believed to be due to other causes. The risk among women who had taken clomiphene was reduced relative to infertile women who had not used this drug (adjusted relative risk, 0.5; 95% CI, 0.2-1.2), but the reduction in risk did not increase with duration of use. The possibility that use of clomiphene as treatment for infertility lowers the risk of breast cancer should be examined in other, larger studies.

  5. Precancerous lesions of the cervix uteri in infertile women.

    PubMed Central

    Holst, N; Abyholm, T

    1983-01-01

    A study of 318 patients with tubal infertility and a control group of 200 unselected infertile women yielded 14 (4.4%) and 1 (0.5%), respectively, with precancerous lesions of the cervix uteri. The one patient in the control group with severe dysplasia was later shown to have tubal infertility. The overall incidence of premalignant lesions of the cervix uteri as reported to the National Cancer Registry of Norway was 0.1% for the age group and period studied. Women with tubal infertility represent a small but comparatively high risk group for the development of precancerous lesions of the cervix uteri. PMID:6412931

  6. What every gynecologist should know about male infertility: an update.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Sandro C; Hamada, Alaa; Kondray, Victor; Pitchika, Aruna; Agarwal, Ashok

    2012-07-01

    Our article reviews the evolving concepts in the field of male infertility for gynecologists and other health professionals involved in the care of men and women experiencing difficulty in having a child. The increased knowledge will help in the better management and treatment of infertile couples. Review of literature through Pubmed, Science Direct, Online Library. Gynecologists are often the first healthcare providers to assess an infertile couple. Because half of all infertility problems stem from male factors, it is crucial for the gynecologist to remain updated on the main conditions that cause male infertility as well as current diagnostic tools and treatment options, including conventional strategies and assisted reproductive techniques. Extraordinary advances have been achieved in the field of male infertility over the past several years and many old concepts are now challenged. Therefore, it is imperative that male infertility physicians should update the gynecologists about the recent advances in the work-up of infertile men in terms of diagnosis and management. Such convention will help improve the standards of care for the infertile couple and enhance the cooperation between male and female reproductive endocrinologists.

  7. Confronting infertility in Iranian clients: a grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Zandi, Mitra; Mohammadi, Eesa; Vanaki, Zohreh; Shiva, Marziyeh; Bagheri Lankarani, Narges; Zarei, Faezeh

    2017-02-10

    The present study examined how infertile Iranian clients confront infertility. Research on infertility has confirmed the significance of a socio-cultural context in the formation of responses to infertility. This study used the grounded theory approach to explore the experiences of infertile individuals presenting at the Royan Institute in Iran from October 2013 to September 2014. Clients with infertility of at least two years in duration were recruited using purposive sampling followed by theoretical sampling. A total of 41 interviews were conducted with 36 people. Data were collected through in-depth unstructured interviews and field notes. Data analysis was performed using MAXQDA 2007. A sense of 'insecurity about personal and family identity' shaped in the context of 'facing the cultural-economic dilemmas' was identified as the main concern of infertile clients. The clients dealt with this concern through a series of strategies that included gradual acceptance of infertility, seeking information and consultation, pursuing treatment, focusing on saving the marriage, self-control and resilience and fighting inner turmoil. All these approaches suggest 'protecting personal and family identity' as the core concept. The findings highlight the need for the health care system to treat infertility as a broad concept than mere individual and biological dysfunction.

  8. Dioxins in the semen of men with infertility.

    PubMed

    Galimova, E F; Amirova, Z K; Galimov, Sh N

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess ejaculate contamination by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans in male infertility. The database of 168 infertile and 49 fertile men was included in the study. Dioxin content was determined using gas chromatography/high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/HRMS). In the ejaculate of infertile men, the content of dioxins and furans was 2.2-2.3 times higher than in fertile donors. The maximum level of the most toxic dioxin congener was detected in pathospermia. Contamination of semen of infertile men by polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans supports the hypothesis about the relationship between environmental factors and reproductive health.

  9. Current medical management of endocrine-related male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Joshua D; Lwin, Aye A; Köhler, Tobias S

    2016-01-01

    Male factor contributes to 50%–60% of overall infertility but is solely responsible in only 20% of couples. Although most male factor infertility is ascertained from an abnormal semen analysis, other male factors can be contributory especially if the sample returns normal. Male infertility can be due to identifiable hormonal or anatomical etiologies that may be reversible or irreversible. This manuscript will highlight existing guidelines and our recommendations for hormone evaluation for male infertility and empiric therapies including multivitamins, estrogen receptor modulators (clomiphene), estrogen conversion blockers (anastrozole), and hormone replacement. PMID:27098657

  10. Current medical management of endocrine-related male infertility.

    PubMed

    Ring, Joshua D; Lwin, Aye A; Köhler, Tobias S

    2016-01-01

    Male factor contributes to 50%-60% of overall infertility but is solely responsible in only 20% of couples. Although most male factor infertility is ascertained from an abnormal semen analysis, other male factors can be contributory especially if the sample returns normal. Male infertility can be due to identifiable hormonal or anatomical etiologies that may be reversible or irreversible. This manuscript will highlight existing guidelines and our recommendations for hormone evaluation for male infertility and empiric therapies including multivitamins, estrogen receptor modulators (clomiphene), estrogen conversion blockers (anastrozole), and hormone replacement.

  11. Assessing infertility-related stress: the factor structure of the Fertility Problem Inventory in Italian couples undergoing infertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Donarelli, Zaira; Gullo, Salvatore; Lo Coco, Gianluca; Marino, Angelo; Scaglione, Piero; Volpes, Aldo; Allegra, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    The factor structure of the Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI) and its invariance across gender were examined in Italian couples undergoing infertility treatment. About 1000 subjects (both partners of 500 couples) completed two questionnaires prior to commencing infertility treatment at a private Clinic in Palermo, Italy. Confirmatory Factor Analysis demonstrated that the original factor structure of the FPI was partially confirmed. Two correlated factors (Infertility Life Domains and Importance of Parenthood) were obtained via a post hoc Exploratory Factor Analysis. Finally, the invariance of this factor structure across gender was confirmed. The study supported the relevance of two interrelated factors specific to infertility stress which could help clinicians to focus on the core infertility-related stress domains of infertile couples.

  12. Letrozole, Gonadotropin, or Clomiphene for Unexplained Infertility.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P; Legro, Richard S; Coutifaris, Christos; Alvero, Ruben; Robinson, Randal D; Casson, Peter; Christman, Gregory M; Ager, Joel; Huang, Hao; Hansen, Karl R; Baker, Valerie; Usadi, Rebecca; Seungdamrong, Aimee; Bates, G Wright; Rosen, R Mitchell; Haisenleder, Daniel; Krawetz, Stephen A; Barnhart, Kurt; Trussell, J C; Ohl, Dana; Jin, Yufeng; Santoro, Nanette; Eisenberg, Esther; Zhang, Heping

    2015-09-24

    The standard therapy for women with unexplained infertility is gonadotropin or clomiphene citrate. Ovarian stimulation with letrozole has been proposed to reduce multiple gestations while maintaining live birth rates. We enrolled couples with unexplained infertility in a multicenter, randomized trial. Ovulatory women 18 to 40 years of age with at least one patent fallopian tube were randomly assigned to ovarian stimulation (up to four cycles) with gonadotropin (301 women), clomiphene (300), or letrozole (299). The primary outcome was the rate of multiple gestations among women with clinical pregnancies. After treatment with gonadotropin, clomiphene, or letrozole, clinical pregnancies occurred in 35.5%, 28.3%, and 22.4% of cycles, and live birth in 32.2%, 23.3%, and 18.7%, respectively; pregnancy rates with letrozole were significantly lower than the rates with standard therapy (gonadotropin or clomiphene) (P=0.003) or gonadotropin alone (P<0.001) but not with clomiphene alone (P=0.10). Among ongoing pregnancies with fetal heart activity, the multiple gestation rate with letrozole (9 of 67 pregnancies, 13%) did not differ significantly from the rate with gonadotropin or clomiphene (42 of 192, 22%; P=0.15) or clomiphene alone (8 of 85, 9%; P=0.44) but was lower than the rate with gonadotropin alone (34 of 107, 32%; P=0.006). All multiple gestations in the clomiphene and letrozole groups were twins, whereas gonadotropin treatment resulted in 24 twin and 10 triplet gestations. There were no significant differences among groups in the frequencies of congenital anomalies or major fetal and neonatal complications. In women with unexplained infertility, ovarian stimulation with letrozole resulted in a significantly lower frequency of multiple gestation but also a lower frequency of live birth, as compared with gonadotropin but not as compared with clomiphene. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health and others; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01044862.).

  13. Management of endometriosis in the infertile patient.

    PubMed

    Kistner, R W

    1975-12-01

    Infertility has a 30-40% incidence in women with endometriosis. However, conservative surgical procedures can result in pregnancy for 40-90% of these patients. The pregnancy rate is influenced by 5 factors: 1) extent of the disease, 2) age, 3) history of previous surgery for endometriosis, 4) duration of infertility before surgery, and 5) length of postsurgical follow-up. The factor responsible for infertility among women with endometriosis is believed to be an inadequacy of the tubo-ovarian motility secondary to fibrosis and scarring, which results in imperfect ovum acceptance by the fimbriae. Therapy encompasses 4 approaches: 1) prophylaxis, 2) observation and analgesia, 3) suppression of ovulation, and 4) surgical treatment. Pregnancy is suggested as the optimal prophylactic treatment for endometriosis since the symptoms and signs regress during gestation and for varying periods thereafter. This regression is probably due to a combination of anovulation and amenorrhea caused by adenohypophyseal suppression. It may also be due to a transformation of functioning endometriotic tissue into decidua by increasing levels of chorionic estrogen and progesterone. If pregnancy is not desired, anovulation can be secured by the administration of sex hormones. Pseudopregnancy for 6 months, induced by norgestrel plus ethinyl estradiol or norethynodrel plus mestranol, can lead to pregnancy in 50% of patients whose only abnormality is surface ovarian endometriosis within 1 year of cessation of therapy. Short periods of pseudopregnancy are also advocated after conservative surgery if all areas of endometriosis cannot be excised. 40-50% of these patients can expect to become pregnant within 24 months. The incidence of postoperative tubo-ovarian adhesions may be diminished by use of dexamethasone and promethazine.

  14. Coenzyme Q10 and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Balercia, G; Mancini, A; Paggi, F; Tiano, L; Pontecorvi, A; Boscaro, M; Lenzi, A; Littarru, G P

    2009-07-01

    We had previously demonstrated that Coenzyme Q10 [(CoQ10) also commonly called ubiquinone] is present in well-measurable levels in human seminal fluid, where it probably exerts important metabolic and antioxidant functions; seminal CoQ10 concentrations show a direct correlation with seminal parameters (count and motility). Alterations of CoQ10 content were also shown in conditions associated with male infertility, such as asthenozoospermia and varicocele (VAR). The physiological role of this molecule was further clarified by inquiring into its variations in concentrations induced by different medical or surgical procedures used in male infertility treatment. We therefore evaluated CoQ10 concentration and distribution between seminal plasma and spermatozoa in VAR, before and after surgical treatment, and in infertile patients after recombinant human FSH therapy. The effect of CoQ10 on sperm motility and function had been addressed only through some in vitro experiments. In two distinct studies conducted by our group, 22 and 60 patients affected by idiopathic asthenozoospermia were enrolled, respectively. CoQ10 and its reduced form, ubiquinol, increased significantly both in seminal plasma and sperm cells after treatment, as well as spermatozoa motility. A weak linear dependence among the relative variations, at baseline and after treatment, of seminal plasma or intracellular CoQ10, ubiquinol levels and kinetic parameters was found in the treated group. Patients with lower baseline value of motility and CoQ10 levels had a statistically significant higher probability to be responders to the treatment. In conclusion, the exogenous administration of CoQ10 increases both ubiquinone and ubiquinol levels in semen and can be effective in improving sperm kinetic features in patients affected by idiopathic asthenozoospermia.

  15. Testosterone replacement in the infertile man

    PubMed Central

    Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Hypogonadism is a common clinical condition affecting men of different age groups. In addition to its sexual consequences, it has several implications posing significant concerns for a man’s health and well-being. Recent advances in testosterone (T) supplementation have facilitated hypogonadism treatment. Despite that, patients complaining of infertility or seeking conception are still hindered by the unfavorable effects supplemental T has on testicular function. Consequently, alternative approaches that can stimulate endogenous T production are favored. Selective estrogen receptor modulators, gonadotropins and aromatase inhibitors (AIs) can be successful in restoring serum T levels, preserving fertility, and providing symptomatic relief. PMID:28078217

  16. Infertility Part I: Pathophysiology and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Burns, T

    1977-03-01

    There appears to be an increasing incidence of infertility, defined as the inability to conceive after a year of unprotected coitus. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis of sexual development and function is briefly reviewed. The history-taking procedure and physical examination of the female and male is described. Basic screening procedures to define the general problem areas are: 1) basal body temperature recordings, 2) further evaluation of ovulatory function through an endometrial biopsy and plasma progesterone analysis, 3) semen analysis, 4) tubal patency tests by tubal insufflation or hysterosalpingography, and 5) Sims-Huhner postcoital examination.

  17. [L-arginine and male infertility].

    PubMed

    Scibona, M; Meschini, P; Capparelli, S; Pecori, C; Rossi, P; Menchini Fabris, G F

    1994-12-01

    The clinical efficacy and acceptance of L-arginina HCL was tested in 40 infertile men. All of these men had a normal number of spermatozoa (> 20 million/ml), but a decreased motility; this decreased motility was not due to infection or to immunological disorders. The treatment consisted of 80 ml of 10% L-arginine HCL administered daily per os for 6 months. L-arginine HCL showed to be able to improve the motility of spermatozoa without any side-effects.

  18. Genomics: Tool to predict and prevent male infertility.

    PubMed

    Halder, Ashutosh; Kumar, Prashant; Jain, Manish; Kalsi, Amanpreet Kaur

    2017-06-01

    A large number of human diseases arise as a result of genetic abnormalities. With the advent of improved molecular biology techniques, the genetic etiology of male infertility is increasing. The common genetic factors responsible for male infertility are chromosomal abnormalities, Yq microdeletion and cystic fibrosis. These are responsible for approximately 30 percent cases of male infertility. About 40 percent cases of male infertility are categorized as idiopathic. These cases may be associated with genetic and genomic abnormalities. During last few years more and more genes are implicated in male infertility leading to decline in prevalence of idiopathic etiology. In this review we will summarize up to date published works on genetic etiologies of male infertility including our own works. We also briefly describe reproductive technologies used to overcome male infertility, dangers of transmitting genetic disorders to offspring and ways to prevent transmission of genetic disorders during assisted reproduction. At the end we will provide our points on how genomic information can be utilized for prediction and prevention of male infertility in coming years.

  19. Infertility in the Gambia: Traditional and Modern Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundby, Johanne

    1997-01-01

    A population survey was undertaken to study infertility in Gambia. All infertile women in 24 randomly selected enumeration areas were assessed. Problems faced, coping mechanisms employed, and types of health care available were examined. Patterns of consultation with traditional versus formal health care and rural/urban differences were uncovered…

  20. Themes of Hope and Healing: Infertile Couples' Experiences of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith C.; Hurtig-Mitchell, Joss

    2003-01-01

    Using qualitative approach, authors explored the experiences of becoming parents through adoption after unsuccessful infertility treatments. Analysis of data revealed three overarching themes. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for counselors who work with infertile couples considering adoption, clients engaged in adoption…

  1. Associations of Psychosocial Factors with the Stress of Infertility Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Myra G.; Forthofer, Melinda S.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement…

  2. Psychotherapy for Infertility: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach for Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Lisa B.; Wark, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Describes a cognitive-behavioral model for treating couples' negative reactions to infertility. After a discussion of why the cognitive-behavioral approach can competently address the goals of couples coping with infertility, three phases of treatment are outlined: assessment, therapy, and closure. Areas for assessment include spouses, marital…

  3. Predictors of Psychological Distress among Infertility Clinic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Kelly A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated predictors of psychological distress among infertility clinic patients. Analyses indicated that infertile men and women reported greater psychological distress than the general population. Self-blame and avoidance coping significantly predicted psychological distress among men and women. Increased age and childlessness added to…

  4. [Genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients].

    PubMed

    Piña-Aguilar, Raúl Eduardo; Chima-Galán, María del Carmen; Yerena-de-vega, María de la Concepción A; Regalado-Hernández, Miguel Angel; Sánchez-Guerrero, Cecilia; García-Ortiz, Liliana; Santillán-Hernández, Yuritzi; Moreno-García, Jesús Daniel

    2013-05-01

    Recently Mexican Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology Colleges (Federación Mexicana de Colegios de Obstetricia y Ginecologia, FEMECOG) published the Mexican guideline forthe management of male infertility, which suggests performing genetic laboratory tests as part of diagnosis and management of infertile patients and states that these should receive genetic counseling. This paper reviews the genetic approach proposed by Mexican guideline. A systematic review of medical literature was performed in Pubmed and Web of Knowledge from 1980 to 2012 in order to find reports of genetic variants associated to male infertility in Mexican patients. Also it is discussed the current knowledge of these variants, their clinical implications and finally the guidelines and recommendations for their molecular diagnosis. Most genetic variants in Mexican infertile patients are chromosome abnormalities. In relation to other variants there is only a report of Y chromosome microdeletions, repeated CAG in androgen receptor and more common mutations in CFTR, and other article reporting mutations in CFTR in patients with congenital absence of vas deferens. Little is known about the genetics of Mexican infertile patients apart from chromosome abnormalities. However, the contribution of genetics as etiology of male infertility is taking more relevance and currently the consensual management of infertile male should include the screening of genetic background. This review pretends to be a quick guide for clinicians who want to know about reports of genetic variants related to male infertility in Mexican population and how to approach their diagnosis.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: CATSPER1-related nonsyndromic male infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avenarius MR, Hildebrand MS, Zhang Y, Meyer NC, Smith LL, Kahrizi K, Najmabadi H, Smith RJ. Human male infertility caused by mutations in ... article on PubMed Central Hildebrand MS, Avenarius MR, Smith RJH. CATSPER-Related Male Infertility. 2009 Dec 3 [ ...

  6. A Study of Couple Burnout in Infertile Couples

    PubMed Central

    Ghavi, Fatemeh; Jamale, Safieh; Mosalanejad, Leili; Mosallanezhad, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Infertility is a major crisis that can cause psychological problems and emotionally distressing experiences, and eventually affect a couples’ relationship. The objective of this study is to investigate couple burnout in infertile couples who were undergoing treatmentat the Infertility Clinic of Yazd, Iran. Method: The present study is a cross-sectional descriptive one on 98 infertile couples referringto the Infertility Centerof Yazd, Iran, who were chosen on a simple random sampling basis. The measuring tools consisted of the Couple Burnout Measure (CBM) and a demographic questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS 16 and the statistical tests of ANOVA and t-test. P-values less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: The results show that infertile women experience higher levels of couple burnout than their husbands (p<0.001). Also, a comparison of the scales of couple burnout—psychological burnout (p<0.01), somatic burnout (p<0.01), and emotional burnout (p<0.001)—between wives and husbands show that women are at greater risk. Conclusion: Infertile couples’ emotional, mental, and sexual problems need to be addressed as part of the infertility treatment programs, and psychotherapists should be included in the medical team. PMID:26573033

  7. Associations of Psychosocial Factors with the Stress of Infertility Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Myra G.; Forthofer, Melinda S.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated psychosocial factors thought to be associated with perceived stress over the course of infertility treatment. The research was based on secondary analysis of data from the Study of Marriage, Family, and Life Quality with a sample of 128 people who completed an infertility-related stress instrument at all three measurement…

  8. Psychotherapy for Infertility: A Cognitive-Behavioral Approach for Couples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Lisa B.; Wark, Linda

    1996-01-01

    Describes a cognitive-behavioral model for treating couples' negative reactions to infertility. After a discussion of why the cognitive-behavioral approach can competently address the goals of couples coping with infertility, three phases of treatment are outlined: assessment, therapy, and closure. Areas for assessment include spouses, marital…

  9. Predictors of Psychological Distress among Infertility Clinic Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Kelly A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Investigated predictors of psychological distress among infertility clinic patients. Analyses indicated that infertile men and women reported greater psychological distress than the general population. Self-blame and avoidance coping significantly predicted psychological distress among men and women. Increased age and childlessness added to…

  10. Infertility in the Gambia: Traditional and Modern Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundby, Johanne

    1997-01-01

    A population survey was undertaken to study infertility in Gambia. All infertile women in 24 randomly selected enumeration areas were assessed. Problems faced, coping mechanisms employed, and types of health care available were examined. Patterns of consultation with traditional versus formal health care and rural/urban differences were uncovered…

  11. Themes of Hope and Healing: Infertile Couples' Experiences of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniluk, Judith C.; Hurtig-Mitchell, Joss

    2003-01-01

    Using qualitative approach, authors explored the experiences of becoming parents through adoption after unsuccessful infertility treatments. Analysis of data revealed three overarching themes. Findings are discussed in terms of their implications for counselors who work with infertile couples considering adoption, clients engaged in adoption…

  12. Is There a Relationship between Ovarian Epithelial Dysplasia and Infertility?

    PubMed

    Chene, Gautier; Penault-Llorca, Frédérique; Tardieu, Anne; Cayre, Anne; Lagarde, Nicole; Jaffeux, Patricia; Aublet-Cuvelier, Bruno; Dechelotte, Pierre; Felloni, Bertrand; Pouly, Jean-Luc; Dauplat, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Aim. Ovarian epithelial dysplasia was initially described in material from prophylactic oophorectomies performed in patients at genetic risk of ovarian cancer. Similar histopathological abnormalities have been revealed after ovulation stimulation. Since infertility is also a risk factor for ovarian neoplasia, the aim of this study was to study the relationship between infertility and ovarian dysplasia. Methods. We blindly reviewed 127 histopathological slides of adnexectomies or ovarian cystectomies according to three groups-an exposed group to ovulation induction (n = 30), an infertile group without stimulation (n = 35), and a spontaneously fertile control group (n = 62)-in order to design an eleven histopathological criteria scoring system. Results. The ovarian dysplasia score was significantly higher in exposed group whereas dysplasia score was low in infertile and control groups (resp., 8.21 in exposed group, 3.69 for infertile patients, and 3.62 for the controls). In the subgroup with refractory infertility there was a trend towards a more severe dysplasia score (8.53 in ovulation induction group and 5.1 in infertile group). Conclusion. These results raise questions as to the responsibility of drugs used to induce ovulation and/or infertility itself in the genesis of ovarian epithelial dysplasia.

  13. Management of the infertile couple: an evidence-based protocol

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infertility is defined as inability of a couple to conceive naturally after one year of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. It remains a major clinical and social problem, affecting perhaps one couple in six. Evaluation usually starts after 12 months; however it may be indicated earlier. The most common causes of infertility are: male factor such as sperm abnormalities, female factor such as ovulation dysfunction and tubal pathology, combined male and female factors and unexplained infertility. Objectives The aim of this study is to provide the healthcare professionals an evidence-based management protocol for infertile couples away from medical information overload. Methods A comprehensive review where the literature was searched for "Management of infertility and/or infertile couples" at library website of University of Bristol (MetaLib) by using a cross-search of different medical databases besides the relevant printed medical journals and periodicals. Guidelines and recommendations were retrieved from the best evidence reviews such as that from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (ACOG), American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM), Canadian Fertility and Andrology Society (CFAS), and Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). Results A simple guide for the clinicians to manage the infertile couples. Conclusions The study deploys a new strategy to translate the research findings and evidence-base recommendations into a simplified focused guide to be applied on routine daily practice. It is an approach to disseminate the recommended medical care for infertile couple to the practicing clinicians. PMID:20205744

  14. Treatment of Chinese Herbal Medicine for Female Infertility.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dan; Li, Lily; Zeng, Bai-Yun

    2017-01-01

    Female infertility is when a woman of reproductive age and sexual active, without contraception, cannot get pregnant after a year and more or keeps having miscarriages. Although conventional treatments for infertility such as hormone therapy, in vitro fertilization and many more, helped many female patients with infertility get pregnant during past a few decades, it is far from satisfactory with prolonging treatment time frames and emotional and financial burden. In recent years, more patients with infertile problems are seeking to alternative and complementary medicines to achieve a better outcome. In particular, Chinese herbal medicine (CHM) is increasingly popular for treating infertility due to its effectiveness and complimentary with conventional treatments. However, the mechanisms of action of CHM in treating female infertility are not well understood. In this chapter authors reviewed research development of CHM applied in many infertile models and CHM clinical studies in many conditions associated with female infertility, published in past 15 years. The data of review showed that CHM has either specific target mechanisms of action or multitarget mechanisms of action, via regulating relevant hormone levels in female reproductive system, improving ovary function, enhancing uterine receptivity. More studies are warranted to explore the new drugs from CHM and ensure safety, efficacy, and consistency of CHM. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Environmentally Induced Epigenetic Transgenerational Inheritance of Altered Sertoli Cell Transcriptome and Epigenome: Molecular Etiology of Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Savenkova, Marina; Haque, Md. Muksitul; Nilsson, Eric; Skinner, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental toxicants have been shown to induce the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease, including testis disease and male infertility. The current study was designed to determine the impact of an altered sperm epigenome on the subsequent development of an adult somatic cell (Sertoli cell) that influences the onset of a specific disease (male infertility). A gestating female rat (F0 generation) was exposed to the agriculture fungicide vinclozolin during gonadal sex determination and then the subsequent F3 generation progeny used for the isolation of Sertoli cells and assessment of testis disease. As previously observed, enhanced spermatogenic cell apoptosis was observed. The Sertoli cells provide the physical and nutritional support for the spermatogenic cells. Over 400 genes were differentially expressed in the F3 generation control versus vinclozolin lineage Sertoli cells. A number of specific cellular pathways were identified to be transgenerationally altered. One of the key metabolic processes affected was pyruvate/lactate production that is directly linked to spermatogenic cell viability. The Sertoli cell epigenome was also altered with over 100 promoter differential DNA methylation regions (DMR) modified. The genomic features and overlap with the sperm DMR were investigated. Observations demonstrate that the transgenerational sperm epigenetic alterations subsequently alters the development of a specific somatic cell (Sertoli cell) epigenome and transcriptome that correlates with adult onset disease (male infertility). The environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of testis disease appears to be a component of the molecular etiology of male infertility. PMID:23555832

  16. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of altered Sertoli cell transcriptome and epigenome: molecular etiology of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Savenkova, Marina; Haque, Md Muksitul; Nilsson, Eric; Skinner, Michael K

    2013-01-01

    Environmental toxicants have been shown to induce the epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of adult onset disease, including testis disease and male infertility. The current study was designed to determine the impact of an altered sperm epigenome on the subsequent development of an adult somatic cell (Sertoli cell) that influences the onset of a specific disease (male infertility). A gestating female rat (F0 generation) was exposed to the agriculture fungicide vinclozolin during gonadal sex determination and then the subsequent F3 generation progeny used for the isolation of Sertoli cells and assessment of testis disease. As previously observed, enhanced spermatogenic cell apoptosis was observed. The Sertoli cells provide the physical and nutritional support for the spermatogenic cells. Over 400 genes were differentially expressed in the F3 generation control versus vinclozolin lineage Sertoli cells. A number of specific cellular pathways were identified to be transgenerationally altered. One of the key metabolic processes affected was pyruvate/lactate production that is directly linked to spermatogenic cell viability. The Sertoli cell epigenome was also altered with over 100 promoter differential DNA methylation regions (DMR) modified. The genomic features and overlap with the sperm DMR were investigated. Observations demonstrate that the transgenerational sperm epigenetic alterations subsequently alters the development of a specific somatic cell (Sertoli cell) epigenome and transcriptome that correlates with adult onset disease (male infertility). The environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of testis disease appears to be a component of the molecular etiology of male infertility.

  17. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica E.; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P.; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure. PMID:27740937

  18. Male infertility and endocrinopathies in Kano, Northwestern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Emokpae, M A; Uadia, P O; Omale-Itodo, A; Orok, T N

    2007-06-01

    Endocrinologic disorders and infertility are common all over the world; the prevalence of infertility is high in sub-Saharan Africa. Several authors have suggested that the increased incidence of infertility in Africa is due to high prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases. To evaluate the contributions of endocrine abnormalities to infertility in the male in Kano, Northern Nigeria. A total of five hundred males, aged between 28 and 56 years were evaluated over a period of 4 years (2001-2004). The hormones were analyzed using electrochemiluminescene immunoassay technique. Hormonal abnormalities were detected in 22% oligospermic, 40.7% severe oligospermic, and 42.7% azoospermic subjects. Endocrine abnormalities are common in the infertile males. The reason for the observed endocrinopathies is not known, appropriate laboratory investigations are essential for effective patients management. Further study to ascertain the cause(s) of hormonal derangements is suggested.

  19. Experimental Methods to Preserve Male Fertility and Treat Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Gassei, Kathrin; Orwig, Kyle E.

    2016-01-01

    Infertility is a prevalent condition that has insidious impacts on the infertile individuals, their families and society that extend far beyond the inability to have a biological child. Lifestyle changes, fertility treatments and assisted reproductive technologies are available to help many infertile couples achieve their reproductive goals. All of these technologies require that the infertile individual is able to produce at least a small number of functional gametes (eggs or sperm). It is not possible for a person who does not produce gametes to have a biological child. This review focuses on the infertile man and describes several stem cell-based methods and gene therapy approaches that are in the research pipeline and may lead to new fertility treatment options for azoospermic men. PMID:26746133

  20. Implications of immune dysfunction on endometriosis associated infertility.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica E; Ahn, Soo Hyun; Monsanto, Stephany P; Khalaj, Kasra; Koti, Madhuri; Tayade, Chandrakant

    2017-01-24

    Endometriosis is a complex, inflammatory disease that affects 6-10% of reproductive-aged women. Almost half of the women with endometriosis experience infertility. Despite the excessive prevalence, the pathogenesis of endometriosis and its associated infertility is unknown and a cure is not available. While many theories have been suggested to link endometriosis and infertility, a consensus among investigators has not emerged. In this extensive review of the literature as well as research from our laboratory, we provide potential insights into the role of immune dysfunction in endometriosis associated infertility. We discuss the implication of the peritoneal inflammatory microenvironment on various factors that contribute to infertility such as hormonal imbalance, oxidative stress and how these could further lead to poor oocyte, sperm and embryo quality, impaired receptivity of the endometrium and implantation failure.

  1. Effect of fertility and infertility on longevity.

    PubMed

    Ehrlich, Shelley

    2015-05-01

    Changing demographic trends and projections of the survival and fertility rates of each generation have been a topic of great interest to not only demographers and epidemiologists but also to evolutionary biologists and reproductive endocrinologists. Compelling evolutionary theories suggest that there is an inverse association between fertility and longevity. Multiple historic, demographic, and current studies have since been conducted to test this theory, but the results have been inconclusive. The average number of children born to each woman has been declining progressively in developed countries during recent decades. This is in part due to changes in the behavior of couples but also to environmental factors. While improved accessibility to assisted reproductive technology can relieve some of the burden of infertility on these couples and lessen the problem of low total fertility rates in many developed countries, it is not enough to overcome the overall decrease in total fertility rates that we have witnessed in recent decades. This article critically reviews some important studies and provides an overview of this ongoing debate, while highlighting the relevance of trying to understand the possible mechanisms that may link fertility and infertility to longevity. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. One consequence of infertility treatment: multifetal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Little, Cindy M

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the issue of multifetal pregnancy as a result of fertility treatments. Pregnancies with multiple gestations are associated with serious infant and maternal health risks as well as psychological distress and significant financial consequences, and are a far too common consequence of infertility treatments such as assisted reproductive technology (ART) and ovulation induction drugs. Women with multifetal pregnancies are at a higher risk for multiple pregnancy complications and maternal morbidity/mortality as well as stress, depression, and anxiety disorders, especially when there is the threat of a loss of one or more fetuses. The rise in rates of multifetal gestation and the accompanying increased risk to both mother and fetuses have led the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and the Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology to develop guidelines to limit the number of transferred embryos during in vitro fertilization. Nurses who work with infertile women are in a position to educate them about the risks, benefits, and alternatives associated with ARTs and multifetal pregnancies, and should endeavor to learn as much as possible about this topic.

  3. Obesity and male infertility: a practical approach.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Ahmad O; Meikle, A Wayne; Reis, Leonardo Oliveira; Gibson, Mark; Peterson, C Matthew; Carrell, Douglas T

    2012-12-01

    Obesity in men is associated with infertility in numerous studies, and the temporal trend for a decline in semen parameters parallels the increasing prevalence of obesity in the developed world. In addition to impaired semen quality, fertility among obese men may be affected by decreased libido and erectile dysfunction. This spectrum of expression of hypogonadism among obese men originates from multiple interacting factors including reduced levels of gonadotropins and testosterone, altered androgen-to-estrogen ratios, insulin resistance, and sleep apnea. No evidence-based treatment that increases the likelihood of pregnancy for the infertility associated with male obesity has been demonstrated to date. Interventions associated with improvement of intermediate outcomes that include the endocrine profile, semen parameters, and sexual function may be appropriately selected based on history, physical findings, as well as endocrine and metabolic evaluation. Among these interventions are weight loss through lifestyle change, relief from sleep apnea, use of aromatase inhibitors, gonadotropin administration, phosphodiesterase inhibitors, and insulin-sensitizing agents. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  4. Novel immunotherapeutic approaches for treatment of infertility.

    PubMed

    Abdolmohammadi-Vahid, Samaneh; Danaii, Shahla; Hamdi, Kobra; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Ahmadi, Majid; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-12-01

    One of the most important reasons of infertility and human reproductive failure is related to uncontrolled immunological response of maternal immune system to early embryo or fetus, that cause rejection of this semi-allograft. Therefore, a tolerance in the immune system is essential to modulate the reactions against the fetus to avoid rejection. The immune system imbalance during implantation or pregnancy may lead to implantation failure or miscarriage. So, use of immunosuppressive or immunomodulator agents can be helpful to prevent immunological attack. Initially, there was a focus on steroids like prednisolone or intralipids in treatment of miscarriage that suppressed the activity of most immune cells, Intravenous Immunoglobulin (IVIG) was then introduced with various mechanisms. Nowadays, novel and specific strategies are established such as monoclonal antibodies and cytokines. More recently, Tacrolimus and Cyclosporine, which were utilized in prevention of transplantation reject, are used as immunosuppressive factors in modulation of immune responses against the fetus. This review is focused on the main immunotherapeutic methods of infertility treatment.

  5. Endocrinology of male infertility: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Rebecca Z

    2009-03-01

    A normal functioning reproductive endocrine system is a prerequisite for normal male fertility. Any disruption of the delicately coordinated interaction between the components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis may lead to hypogonadism and/or infertility. The goal of the clinical evaluation is to determine if the patient has an abnormality of testosterone production or action, the etiology of the abnormality, and if hormone therapy will correct the infertility. Based on a careful history, physical examination, and evaluation of the hormones of the reproductive axis, the physician will ascertain if the patient's hypogonadism is (1) prepubertal or postpubertal in onset; (2) the result of an abnormality in the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, the testes, or the androgen receptor; or (3) associated with another underlying medical condition. This information will place the patient into one of four diagnostic categories: hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, testicular failure, 5alpha-reductase deficiency, or androgen resistance. Within each category are disorders with identifiable pathogenic mechanisms. Recent studies have added to these lists and have provided insights into the molecular basis and inheritance patterns of several of these endocrinopathies.

  6. Developments in infertility counselling and its accreditation.

    PubMed

    Monach, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Infertility counselling was placed in a unique position by the passage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 and the requirement that couples being treated should be offered counselling. However professional counselling was, and largely still is, at a stage at which there was no universal agreement on the knowledge, standards or qualifications required for practice. Nevertheless, infertility counselling became the first example of counselling to be required by statute, beyond the more generalised requirement in adoption birth records access. Counselling is intended to describe skilled talking therapy offered by a professional with specific training and qualifications directed to helping individuals and couples to achieve goals they own themselves. The therapeutic intervention of counselling is primarily directed to helping clients in a stressful situation to deploy their own coping skills effectively and thus make the difficult choices inseparable from ART. Counselling outcome research consistently demonstrates the effectiveness of the sort of counselling delivered in assisted conception units with mild-moderate anxiety and depression delivered by skilled and experienced practitioners. This article reviews the role of counsellors as members of the assisted conception clinical team and the status of regulation and accreditation in this very new profession.

  7. [Infertility, fertility treatment and breast cancer risk].

    PubMed

    Riskin-Mashiah, Shlomit

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in Israel and throughout the world. It is the leading cause of death from cancer in women. The cause of breast cancer is unknown; however gynecological history and hormonal factors have a major impact on the risk to develop breast cancer. Infertility affects 15-20% of couples in developed countries and most of them will need fertility treatment. The variety of fertility treatments and their use has been widespread during the last 50 years and especially since the introduction of in vitro fertilization. During fertility treatment, and depending on the type of treatment, there is ovarian hyperstimulation with maturation of several follicles and higher than normal estradiol levels. This article reviews the leading studies that evaluated the possible link between fertility treatment and the development of breast cancer. Most studies showed no association between fertility drugs and breast cancer. Whereas other researchers demonstrated a possible link between some fertility drugs and increased risk for breast cancer in certain subgroups. Therefore, larger studies with longer follow-up periods and better control for all possible confounding factors are needed in order to confirm the safety of fertility treatments in the long run. The combination of infertility and fertility treatment might cause harm, such as an increased risk for breast cancer Therefore, one has to consider carefully, together with the woman, the need for fertility treatment and give the lowest possible dosage for the shortest duration in order to minimize the risk.

  8. Incidence of autoantibodies in the infertile population.

    PubMed

    Cubillos, J; Lucena, A; Lucena, C; Mendoza, J C; Ruiz, H; Arango, A; Quiroga, G; Ferro, J; Lucena, E

    1997-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of autoantibodies in patients with no term pregnancies. Patients selected included 43 with primary infertility and 110 with a history of pregnancy loss. In the first group the incidence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) and IgG and IgM antiphospholipid antibodies (APL) was 37.2% (p < 0.05) and 53.5% (p < 0.05), respectively. In the group of patients with a history of miscarriage, 31.8% (p < 0.05) were positive for ANA and 38.2% (p < 0.05) for APL. Controls were 35 healthy patients with proven fertility and no history of pregnancy loss or autoimmune disease. In this group the incidence of ANA was 5.7% and 11.4% for APL. The high incidence of autoantibodies found in patients with primary infertility might suggest a direct involvement of these antibodies in reproductive failure and consequently in IVF and assisted fertility procedures. The prevalence of ANA and APL has been extensively described in patients with a history of recurrent pregnancy losses (RPL). In this study we observed antibodies even after the first miscarriage. We therefore conclude that patients with a history of reproductive failure should be immunologically evaluated and treated before undergoing assisted fertilization techniques or before a new pregnancy in those cases of RPL.

  9. Selenium status of idiopathic infertile Nigerian males.

    PubMed

    Akinloye, Oluyemi; Arowojolu, A O; Shittu, O B; Adejuwon, C A; Osotimehin, Babatunde

    2005-04-01

    Selenium concentration in the sera and seminal plasma of 60 infertile males (40 oligospermia and 20 azoospermia) and 40 males with proven evidence of fertility (normospermia; control group) were estimated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Results were correlated with spermatogram and hormonal levels in order to determine their relationship and significance in male infertility. The mean serum concentrations of selenium was found to be significantly increased in oligospermic compared to azoospermic subjects and controls (p < 0.01), whereas the seminal plasma level was significantly higher in azoospermic compared to oligospermic subjects and controls (p < 0.001). Thus, the ratio of serum selenium to seminal plasma selenium was 1: 1 in controls, 4: 1 in oligospermia, and 1: 2 in azoospermic subject.A significant inverse correlation was observed between serum selenium level and sperm count (p < 0.01). Similarly, seminal plasma selenium correlated with spermatozoa motility, viability, and morphology. Serum selenium level shows positive correlation with the serum testosterone level (p < 0.01). In conclusion, there appears to be a physiological balance in the distribution of selenium in serum and seminal plasma compartment of control males. A disturbance in this balance has a significant influence on spermatogenesis. Selenium appears to have a positive influence on Leydig cells, thus influencing the secretion of testosterone.

  10. Infertility treatment and the risk of cancer.

    PubMed

    Storeng, Ritsa; Vangen, Siri; Omland, Anne Katerine; Oldereid, Nan Birgitte

    2012-11-27

    A possible correlation between hormonal stimulation during treatment of infertility and the risk of cancer of the breast, the ovaries, the cervix or the uterus has been investigated in a number of epidemiological studies. The purpose of this article is to review the relevant literature and summarise the findings. KNOWLEDGE BASE: This review article is based on literature searches in the databases MEDLINE, Cochrane and EMBASE. No studies showed a specific general correlation between hormonal ovulatory stimulation used as pre-treatment to assisted fertilisation and an increased risk of cancer of the breast, the ovaries, the cervix or the uterus. Most studies detected no increased risk. Some studies, however, showed an increased risk of cancer among certain sub-groups, such as women who have received repeated treatment with clomiphene citrate. On the basis of the studies reviewed, the conclusions are ambiguous. It is therefore necessary to monitor the long-term effects of infertility treatment on women's health. Further good-quality large-scale population studies are necessary, with longer follow-up periods and better adjustment for confounding factors.

  11. Evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility.

    PubMed

    Boivin, Jacky; Gameiro, Sofia

    2015-08-01

    Five key paradigm shifts are described to illustrate the evolution of psychology and counseling in infertility. The first paradigm shift was in the 1930s when psychosomatic concepts were introduced in obstetrics and gynecology as causal factors to explain why some couples could not conceive despite the absence of organic pathology. In the second shift, the nurse advocacy movement of the 1970s stimulated the investigation of the psychosocial consequences of infertility and promoted counseling to help couples grieve childlessness when medical treatments often could not help them conceive. The third shift occurred with the advent of IVF, which created a demand for mental health professionals in fertility clinics. Mental health professionals assessed the ability of couples to withstand the demands of this new high technology treatment as well as their suitability as potential parents. The fourth shift, in the 1990s, saw reproductive medicine embrace the principles of evidence-based medicine, which introduced a much more rigorous approach to medical practice (effectiveness and safety) that extended to psychosocial interventions. The most recent paradigm shift, in the new millennium, occurred with the realization that compliance with protracted fertility treatment depended on the adoption of an integrated approach to fertility care. An integrated approach could reduce treatment burden arising from multiple sources (i.e., patient, clinic, and treatment). This review describes these paradigm shifts and reflects on future clinical and research directions for mental health professionals. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Female Infertility and Serum Auto-antibodies: a Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Deroux, Alban; Dumestre-Perard, Chantal; Dunand-Faure, Camille; Bouillet, Laurence; Hoffmann, Pascale

    2016-09-14

    On average, 10 % of infertile couples have unexplained infertility. Auto-immune disease (systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-phospholipid syndrome) accounts for a part of these cases. In the last 20 years, aspecific auto-immunity, defined as positivity of auto-antibodies in blood sample without clinical or biological criteria for defined diseases, has been evoked in a subpopulation of infertile women. A systematic review was performed (PUBMED) using the MESH search terms "infertility" and "auto-immunity" or "reproductive technique" or "assisted reproduction" or "in vitro fertilization" and "auto-immunity." We retained clinical and physiopathological studies that were applicable to the clinician in assuming joint management of both infertility associated with serum auto-antibodies in women. Thyroid auto-immunity which affects thyroid function could be a cause of infertility; even in euthyroidia, the presence of anti-thyroperoxydase antibodies and/or thyroglobulin are related to infertility. The presence of anti-phospholipid (APL) and/or anti-nuclear (ANA) antibodies seems to be more frequent in the population of infertile women; serum auto-antibodies are associated with early ovarian failure, itself responsible for fertility disorders. However, there exist few publications on this topic. The methods of dosage, as well as the clinical criteria of unexplained infertility deserve to be standardized to allow a precise response to the question of the role of serum auto-antibodies in these women. The direct pathogenesis of this auto-immunity is unknown, but therapeutic immunomodulators, prescribed on a case-by-case basis, could favor pregnancy even in cases of unexplained primary or secondary infertility.

  13. Serum and seminal plasma hormonal profiles of infertile Nigerian male.

    PubMed

    Akinloye, O; Arowojolu, A O; Shittu, O B; Abbiyesuku, F M; Adejuwon, C A; Osotimehin, B

    2006-12-01

    Male infertility constitutes a worldwide problem, especially in Nigeria where most men do not readily accept that they may contribute to the couple's infertility. In order to assess hormonal disturbances in the male infertility we compared male reproductive hormonal levels in human serum and seminal plasma and evaluated the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular-axis in infertile Nigerian males. The biophysical semen parameters were assessed by W.H.O. standard manual method. Serum and seminal plasma male reproductive hormones (Leutinizing hormones, Follicular stimulating hormone, Prolactin and Testosterone) were measured by Enzyme Immunoassay (EIA) technique of W.H.O. in sixty (60) infertile adult male Nigerians (Oligospermic; n = 40 and azoopermic; n = 20) and forty controls of proven fertility (Normospermic subjects; n = 40). The results show that the serum concentrations of gonadotropins (LH and FSH) were significantly higher (P<0.05) in infertile subjects than controls. Patterns of serum prolactin levels were similar. The values of gonadotropins in serum were significantly higher (P<0.05) than those of seminal plasma. Seminal plasma testosterone in infertile subjects was significantly higher (P<0.005) than that of controls but the serum levels of testosterone were significantly higher (P<0.05) in azoospermic than oligospermic subjects and controls. There was no significant correlation between serum hormonal level and seminal plasma hormonal level in all the groups (P<0.05). We concluded that male infertility in Nigerians is characterized by hyperprolactinaemia, raised serum gonadotropins (LH, FSH), and raised seminal plasma testosterone. Hormonal profiles in serum and seminal plasma were not significantly correlated, and hence cannot be used as exclusive alternative in male infertility investigations. The observed spermogram in spite of significant elevation of seminal plasma testosterone in infertile males investigated suggests Sertoli cells malfunction.

  14. Infertility Evaluation and Treatment among Women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Lawrence M.; Craig, Benjamin M.; Plosker, Shayne M.; Reed, Damon R.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine the characteristics of women seeking infertility evaluation and treatment. Design Cross-sectional survey based on in-person interviews, followed by two-step hurdle analysis. Participants 4,558 married or cohabitating women ages 25–44 Setting U.S. household population of women based on the 2006–2010 National Survey of Family Growth Intervention None Main Outcome Measure(s) Likelihood of seeking preliminary infertility evaluation. Likelihood of seeking infertility treatment once evaluated. Treatment type provided. Results 623 women (13.7%) reported seeking infertility evaluation, of which 328 reported undergoing subsequent infertility treatment. Age at marriage, marital status, education, health insurance status, race/ethnicity, and religion were associated with the likelihood of seeking infertility evaluation. For example, the predicted probability that a non-White woman who married at 25 will seek evaluation was 12%. This probability increased to 34% for White women with a graduate degree who married at age 30. Among women who are evaluated, income, employment status, and ethnicity correlated strongly with the likelihood of seeking infertility treatment. Infertility drug therapy was the most frequent treatment used. Reproductive surgery and in vitro fertilization (IVF) were used the least. Conclusions The use of infertility services is not random and understanding the socio-demographic factors correlated with use may assist new couples with family planning. Roughly 50% of the women evaluated for infertility progressed to treatment, and only a small proportion were treated with more advanced assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs) such as IVF therapy. Future research aimed at improving access to effective healthcare treatments within the boundaries of affordability is warranted. PMID:23849845

  15. Increasing trend of prevalence of infertility in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxia; Wang, Shuyu; Zhang, Songwen; Wang, Tao; Deng, Xiaohong

    2014-01-01

    Infertility is one of the most important and underappreciated reproductive health problems in developing countries. However, epidemiological data in the Chinese population are still sparse. The aim of the present study was to determine the current prevalence and prevalence trend of infertility in Beijing, and to identify the risk factors associated with infertility. This cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing in 2012. A stratified cluster sampling method was used to select 12 448 couples of whom the female partners were born between 1955 and 1985. All subjects were interviewed face to face. Infertility was defined as the failure to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12 months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. Of the 12 448 couples, 12 342 (99.1%) answered the questions appropriately. The prevalence of infertility was 4.2% (3.1% as primary and 1.1% as secondary infertility). An increase in the prevalence of infertility according to the age of the female partner was found: 1.3% infertility for married females born in the 1950s and 11.4% for married females born in the 1980s. The increase was found in both urban and suburban areas. In addition, a Logistic regression showed that for the female partner, higher education levels, an older age at first marriage, adverse occupational conditions, mental labor and pre-pregnancy contraception after marriage were all significantly associated with a higher risk of infertility. The prevalence of infertility has increased significantly among couples in Beijing, possibly because of an interaction among multiple factors.

  16. Empiric medical therapy with hormonal agents for idiopathic male infertility.

    PubMed

    Tadros, Nicholas N; Sabanegh, Edmund S

    2017-01-01

    Infertility affects approximately 15% of all couples, and male factor contribute to up to 50% of cases. Unfortunately, the cause of male infertility is unknown in about 30% of these cases. Infertility of unknown origin is classified as idiopathic male infertility when abnormal semen parameters are present. Despite not having a definable cause, these men may respond to treatment. This review focuses on the use of empiric hormonal therapies for idiopathic male infertility. A detailed PubMed/MEDLINE search was conducted to identify all publications pertaining to empiric use of hormonal therapies in the treatment of idiopathic male infertility using the keywords "idiopathic," "male infertility," "empiric treatment," "clomiphene," "SERM," "gonadotropin," "aromatase inhibitor," and "androgen." These manuscripts were reviewed to identify treatment modalities and results. Gonadotropins, androgens, aromatase inhibitors, and selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) have all been used with varying results. The studies on these treatments are of variable quality. The most well-studied agents are the SERMs which show a modest increase in semen parameters and pregnancy rates. Aromatase inhibitors are most effective in non-idiopathic patients. Gonadotropin treatment is limited by their inconvenience and relative ineffectiveness in this population. Testosterone suppresses spermatogenesis and should not be used to treat infertility. Gonadotropins, SERMs, and aromatase inhibitors may improve semen parameters and hormone levels in men with idiopathic infertility with the best results from SERMs. Testosterone should never be used to treat infertility. Large multicenter randomized controlled studies are needed to better determine the success of empiric use of hormonal therapy on pregnancy rates.

  17. Infertility and the use of infertility treatments in Finland: prevalence and socio-demographic determinants 1992-2004.

    PubMed

    Terävä, Anna-Niina; Gissler, Mika; Hemminki, Elina; Luoto, Riitta

    2008-01-01

    To examine changes in the use of infertility treatments by time, the causes of infertility, lifetime prevalence of subfertility, and the use of infertility treatments by socio-demographic factors. Aggregate IVF statistics (1992-2004) and two nationally representative cross-sectional surveys (1997 and 2002). Total number of IVF, ICSI and FET treatments initiated more than tripled between 1992 and 2004. The proportion of tubal injury as a cause of infertility treatment decreased over time while other female factors, male factor and multiple causes became more common. Self-reported lifetime subfertility was 16.0% in 2002 among women aged 25-64 years. Subfertility differed notably by age and education: young less educated women and older more educated women more frequently reported subfertility. Use of hormone therapy to treat subfertility (1997 and 2002) and participation in infertility treatments or medical examinations (2002) was more common among urban, highly educated and affluent women. The use of infertility treatments increased and the proportions of causes of infertility have changed over time. Self-reported subfertility differed by age and education. There are socio-demographic differences in the use of infertility treatments.

  18. Gender differences in infertility-related stress and the relationship between stress and social support in Thai infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Sreshthaputra, Opas; Sreshthaputra, Rung-aroon; Vutyavanich, Teraporn

    2008-12-01

    To study infertility-related stress among men and women and to examine its relationship with the level of perceived social support. The Fertility Problem Inventory (FPI) and the Personal Resource Questionnaire (PRQ) were translated into Thai and used to assess the level of infertility-related stress and perceived social support, respectively, in 238 infertile subjects. The global FPI scores for men and women were 154.2 +/- 18.3 and 154.7 +/- 22.6, respectively (p > 0.05). There was no significant difference in their perceived social support (PRQ scores = 137.8 + 14.0 and 134.0 +/- 16. 7 respectively). A significant negative correlation (r = -0.1894; p < 0.001) existed between global stress and social support in women, but not in men. Thai infertile couples experienced a high level of stress. Unlike previous studies from Western countries, there was no gender diference in infertility-related stress.

  19. Complementary and alternative medicine utilization by a sample of infertile couples in Jordan for infertility treatment: clinics-based survey.

    PubMed

    Bardaweel, Sanaa K; Shehadeh, Mayadah; Suaifan, Ghadeer A R Y; Kilani, Maria-Vanessa Z

    2013-02-16

    Although there is little information available to quantify the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), growing evidence suggests that CAM prevalence among patients seeking infertility treatment is increasing worldwide. There are many products available on the market and many infertile patients demand information about CAM from their health care providers. This paper investigates the prevalence of CAM use among infertile couples in Jordan. Additionally, trends and factors contributing to CAM use for infertility treatment among these couples have been evaluated. A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information, use of CAM for medical conditions, in general, and types of CAM used for infertility treatment, in specific, was completed by one thousand twenty one infertile patients attending at two types of facilities; in vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers at both public and private hospitals and infertility private clinics. Both types of facilities were distributed in different areas of Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The study was conducted between May and August 2012. Our results show that CAM therapies for infertility treatment were encountered in 44.7% of the study sample. The vast majority of CAM users were females. The most commonly used CAM therapies were herbs and spiritual healing. A clear correlation between the use of CAM for infertility versus the use of CAM for other chronic medical conditions has been found. The prevalence of CAM use for infertility treatment in Jordan is relatively high, particularly among young females, well educated and with a low income, in consistence with the studies reported elsewhere. Herbs and spiritual healing are widely used among patients in adjunct to conventional medical interventions. As CAM use is prevalent among patients, there is a clear need for health providers to become more aware of this phenomenon and for further research in this field.

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine utilization by a sample of infertile couples in Jordan for infertility treatment: clinics-based survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although there is little information available to quantify the use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), growing evidence suggests that CAM prevalence among patients seeking infertility treatment is increasing worldwide. There are many products available on the market and many infertile patients demand information about CAM from their health care providers. This paper investigates the prevalence of CAM use among infertile couples in Jordan. Additionally, trends and factors contributing to CAM use for infertility treatment among these couples have been evaluated. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire inquiring demographic information, use of CAM for medical conditions, in general, and types of CAM used for infertility treatment, in specific, was completed by one thousand twenty one infertile patients attending at two types of facilities; in vitro Fertilization (IVF) centers at both public and private hospitals and infertility private clinics. Both types of facilities were distributed in different areas of Amman, the capital city of Jordan. The study was conducted between May and August 2012. Results Our results show that CAM therapies for infertility treatment were encountered in 44.7% of the study sample. The vast majority of CAM users were females. The most commonly used CAM therapies were herbs and spiritual healing. A clear correlation between the use of CAM for infertility versus the use of CAM for other chronic medical conditions has been found. Conclusions The prevalence of CAM use for infertility treatment in Jordan is relatively high, particularly among young females, well educated and with a low income, in consistence with the studies reported elsewhere. Herbs and spiritual healing are widely used among patients in adjunct to conventional medical interventions. As CAM use is prevalent among patients, there is a clear need for health providers to become more aware of this phenomenon and for further research in this field. PMID:23414246

  1. Evaluation of urinary metal concentrations and sperm DNA damage in infertile men from an infertility clinic.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yan; Fu, Xiao-Ming; He, Dong-Liang; Zou, Xue-Min; Wu, Cheng-Qiu; Guo, Wei-Zhen; Feng, Wei

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to examine associations between urinary metal concentrations and sperm DNA damage. Thirteen metals [arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), lead (Pb), manganese (Mn), molybdenum (Mo), mercury (Hg), nickel (Ni), selenium (Se), and zinc (Zn)] were detected in urine samples of 207 infertile men from an infertility clinic using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and also, sperm DNA damage (tail length, percent DNA tail, and tail distributed moment) were assessed using neutral comet assay. We found that urinary Hg and Ni were associated with increasing trends for tail length (both p for trend<0.05), and that urinary Mn was associated with increasing trend for tail distributed moment (p for trend=0.02). These associations did persist even when considering multiple metals. Our results suggest that environmental exposure to Hg, Mn, and Ni may be associated with increased sperm DNA damage.

  2. Infertility and Parenthood: Does Becoming a Parent Increase Well-Being?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined parenthood among 174 infertile couples and 74 presumed fertile couples. Infertile women who became parents experienced greater global well-being but diminished marital well-being, compared with infertile women who had not become parents. Infertile men who became parents experienced same negative effects that wives reported but did not…

  3. Psychosocial Predictors of Life Quality: How Are They Affected by Infertility, Gender, and Parenthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Longitudinally examined effects of infertility on marital and global life quality with 174 infertile couples and 74 fertile couples. By third interview, 42% of infertile couples and 36% of fertile couples were parents. Psychosocial predictors of life quality were highly similar for members of infertile and fertile couples and for couples with and…

  4. Psychosocial Predictors of Life Quality: How Are They Affected by Infertility, Gender, and Parenthood?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Longitudinally examined effects of infertility on marital and global life quality with 174 infertile couples and 74 fertile couples. By third interview, 42% of infertile couples and 36% of fertile couples were parents. Psychosocial predictors of life quality were highly similar for members of infertile and fertile couples and for couples with and…

  5. Infertility and Parenthood: Does Becoming a Parent Increase Well-Being?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Antonia; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Examined parenthood among 174 infertile couples and 74 presumed fertile couples. Infertile women who became parents experienced greater global well-being but diminished marital well-being, compared with infertile women who had not become parents. Infertile men who became parents experienced same negative effects that wives reported but did not…

  6. The experience of infertility: a review of recent literature.

    PubMed

    Greil, Arthur L; Slauson-Blevins, Kathleen; McQuillan, Julia

    2010-01-01

    About 10 years ago Greil published a review and critique of the literature on the socio-psychological impact of infertility. He found at the time that most scholars treated infertility as a medical condition with psychological consequences rather than as a socially constructed reality. This article examines research published since the last review. More studies now place infertility within larger social contexts and social scientific frameworks although clinical emphases persist. Methodological problems remain but important improvements are also evident. We identify two vigorous research traditions in the social scientific study of infertility. One tradition uses primarily quantitative techniques to study clinic patients in order to improve service delivery and to assess the need for psychological counselling. The other tradition uses primarily qualitative research to capture the experiences of infertile people in a sociocultural context. We conclude that more attention is now being paid to the ways in which the experience of infertility is shaped by social context. We call for continued progress in the development of a distinctly sociological approach to infertility and for the continued integration of the two research traditions identified here.

  7. [Causes of male infertility. The contribution of the endocrine factor].

    PubMed

    Devoto, E; Madariaga, M; Lioi, X

    2000-02-01

    Male infertility is responsible for 35% of infertile couples. To investigate the causes of male infertility and the relative importance of endocrine factors. Patients referred to an andrology clinic due to an abnormal spermiogram were studied. A testicular examination, spermiogram and determination of FSH, LH, testosterone and prolactin were done to all. Testicular biopsy was done to patients with severe oligospermia or azoospermia. Causes of infertility were defined and classified as pretesticular, testicular, posttesticular or unclassified. Two hundred fifty seven males were studied. In 3.5% of them, the cause of infertility was defined as pretesticular (that included hypothalamic and pituitary endocrine causes), in 66.9% it was classified as testicular, in 15.6% as posttesticular and in 14%, as unclassified. Thirty percent of infertility cases were idiopathic, 17.9% were associated to varicocele, 12.8% were associated to cryptorchidism, 8.9% to Klinefelter syndrome and 6.6% to exposure to toxic substances. In 50% of patients with cryptorchidism, this abnormality was found during the specialized andrological examination and referrals for surgical correction were made late. Two thirds of patients with Klinefelter syndrome were hypoandrogenic. Causes for male infertility should be investigated and diagnosed accurately. Primary hypoandrogenic testicular failures must be treated with hormone replacement therapy.

  8. Investigation of male infertility using quantitative comparative proteomics.

    PubMed

    Légaré, Christine; Droit, Arnaud; Fournier, Frédéric; Bourassa, Sylvie; Force, André; Cloutier, Francine; Tremblay, Roland; Sullivan, Robert

    2014-12-05

    Male factors account for 40% of infertility cases. The identification of differentially expressed proteins on spermatozoa from fertile and infertile men can help in the elucidation of the molecular basis of male infertility. The aim of this study was to compare sperm proteomes from 3 different groups: fertile men, normozoospermic men consulting for infertility, and normozoospermic men with an impaired capacity for fertilization (IVF-failure). We used differential proteomics with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling, and LC-MS analysis to identify proteins that are differentially expressed. A total of 348 unique proteins were identified and quantified. The analysis identified 33 proteins that were differentially expressed in the IVF-failure group vs the fertile group. Comparison of the infertile and fertile groups revealed that 18 proteins appeared to be differentially expressed. Four proteins were similarly altered in the IVF-failure and infertile groups: semenogelin 1 (SEMG1), prolactin-induced protein (PIP), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS), and phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2). These protein markers were selected for validation using multiple reactions monitoring mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) and further confirmed by Western blot analysis. Overall, these results suggest that a panel of proteins may be used as biomarkers for future studies of infertility.

  9. Are oxidative stress markers associated with unexplained male infertility?

    PubMed

    Mayorga-Torres, B J M; Camargo, M; Cadavid, Á P; du Plessis, S S; Cardona Maya, W D

    2016-08-10

    Male infertility can be responsible for up to 20% of the cases attending fertility consultation facilities; nonetheless, the underlying molecular mechanisms that could explain it are still elusive. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate conventional and functional parameters of semen samples from patients who presented with male infertility of unknown origin. Conventional semen parameters and functional parameters (i.e. intracellular reactive oxygen species production, mitochondrial membrane potential, sperm chromatin structure assay, sperm membrane lipid peroxidation and antioxidant capacity of seminal plasma) were evaluated on semen samples from 54 healthy donors, 23 patients with idiopathic infertility and 34 fertile controls. No significant differences were observed in the conventional seminal parameters between the fertile and infertile men. However, increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA fragmentation were observed in the infertile patients compared to the fertile group. Alterations in intracellular ROS production and DNA fragmentation could be associated with male idiopathic infertility. These parameters could eventually distinguish both groups more accurately than the conventional parameters. Our current results are encouraging, and the efficacy of these parameters in the clinical settings needs to be further assessed to establish their predictive potential as a marker of unexplained male infertility.

  10. Cardiovascular risk may be increased in women with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz Zeyrek, Fadile; Zebitay, Ali Galip; Akyol, Hurkan

    2017-01-01

    Objective Growing evidence suggests that increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is associated with female infertility caused by conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease, obesity, thyroid dysfunction, and endometriosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether any relationship exists between CVD and unexplained infertility. Methods Sixty-five women with unexplained infertility and 65 fertile controls were enrolled in the study. CVD risk markers such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), insulin resistance (defined by the homeostasis model assessment ratio), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were assessed. Results TG, TC, LDL, and hs-CRP levels were higher and HDL levels were lower in patients with unexplained infertility than in fertile controls (p<0.05 for all). Positive associations were found between unexplained infertility and TG, TC, LDL, and hs-CRP levels, and a negative correlation was found for HDL (p<0.05 for all). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that TG, HDL, and hs-CRP were independent variables associated with unexplained infertility. Conclusion Our study showed that women with unexplained infertility had an atherogenic lipid profile and elevated hs-CRP levels, suggesting a higher risk of developing CVD in the future. Further studies with larger groups are needed to investigate the nature of this link. PMID:28428941

  11. Cardiovascular risk may be increased in women with unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Verit, Fatma Ferda; Yildiz Zeyrek, Fadile; Zebitay, Ali Galip; Akyol, Hurkan

    2017-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk is associated with female infertility caused by conditions such as polycystic ovarian disease, obesity, thyroid dysfunction, and endometriosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether any relationship exists between CVD and unexplained infertility. Sixty-five women with unexplained infertility and 65 fertile controls were enrolled in the study. CVD risk markers such as low-density lipoprotein (LDL), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), insulin resistance (defined by the homeostasis model assessment ratio), and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were assessed. TG, TC, LDL, and hs-CRP levels were higher and HDL levels were lower in patients with unexplained infertility than in fertile controls (p<0.05 for all). Positive associations were found between unexplained infertility and TG, TC, LDL, and hs-CRP levels, and a negative correlation was found for HDL (p<0.05 for all). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that TG, HDL, and hs-CRP were independent variables associated with unexplained infertility. Our study showed that women with unexplained infertility had an atherogenic lipid profile and elevated hs-CRP levels, suggesting a higher risk of developing CVD in the future. Further studies with larger groups are needed to investigate the nature of this link.

  12. A study on Trichomoniasis vaginalis and female infertility.

    PubMed

    El-Shazly, A M; El-Naggar, H M; Soliman, M; El-Negeri, M; El-Nemr, H E; Handousa, A E; Morsy, T A

    2001-08-01

    A total of 280 patients, 240 infertile and 40 pregnant were subjected to thorough history taking, general and local examination for exclusion of organic lesion, laboratory investigations to exclude parasitic, bacterial and fungal infections. Sterile vaginal swab from the posterior fornix was taken, and examined by wet smear preparation, Giemsa staining and cultivation on C.P.L.M. medium for trichomoniasis infection. The mean age of the infertile group was 25.75+/-3.92, and of the control group was 21.6+/-2.38 (in years). The mean duration of infertility was 2.81+/-1.51 (years). Out of 240 infertile women, 18.75% complained of discharge, 17.5% itching, 15.42% dysuria, 14.58% dyspareunia, and 10% had cervical lesion. Of the 40 controls, 5% complained of discharge, 2.5% complained of itching, dysuria, dyspareunia, but none had cervical lesion. Of the total cases (280), 36 (12.9%) had T. vaginalis. The clinical data observed were significantly higher among the infertile group than the control group. Cultures were positive in 14.58% of the infertile group and 2.5% in the control group. The difference between the 2 groups was statistically significant. No doubt, T. vaginalis plays an important role in female infertility.

  13. Models Predicting Success of Infertility Treatment: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Zarinara, Alireza; Zeraati, Hojjat; Kamali, Koorosh; Mohammad, Kazem; Shahnazari, Parisa; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertile couples are faced with problems that affect their marital life. Infertility treatment is expensive and time consuming and occasionally isn’t simply possible. Prediction models for infertility treatment have been proposed and prediction of treatment success is a new field in infertility treatment. Because prediction of treatment success is a new need for infertile couples, this paper reviewed previous studies for catching a general concept in applicability of the models. Methods: This study was conducted as a systematic review at Avicenna Research Institute in 2015. Six data bases were searched based on WHO definitions and MESH key words. Papers about prediction models in infertility were evaluated. Results: Eighty one papers were eligible for the study. Papers covered years after 1986 and studies were designed retrospectively and prospectively. IVF prediction models have more shares in papers. Most common predictors were age, duration of infertility, ovarian and tubal problems. Conclusion: Prediction model can be clinically applied if the model can be statistically evaluated and has a good validation for treatment success. To achieve better results, the physician and the couples’ needs estimation for treatment success rate were based on history, the examination and clinical tests. Models must be checked for theoretical approach and appropriate validation. The privileges for applying the prediction models are the decrease in the cost and time, avoiding painful treatment of patients, assessment of treatment approach for physicians and decision making for health managers. The selection of the approach for designing and using these models is inevitable. PMID:27141461

  14. Counselling in infertility: individual, couple and group interventions.

    PubMed

    Van den Broeck, Uschi; Emery, Marysa; Wischmann, Tewes; Thorn, Petra

    2010-12-01

    Infertility is considered a biopsychosocial crisis and infertility counselling is recommended as an integral part of a multidisciplinary approach. This article will outline the theoretical background and describe common interventions used in infertility counselling for individuals, couples and in a group setting. This article summarizes the proceedings of the first campus workshop of the Special interest group of Psychology and Counselling of the European Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE). Infertility counselling offers the opportunity to explore, discover and clarify ways of living more satisfyingly and resourcefully when fertility impairments have been diagnosed. The Heidelberg Fertility Consultation Service is presented as a framework for individual and couples counselling and highlights important issues in counselling patients. For group work a number of steps to set up a group within an infertility framework are discussed. In recent years, infertility counselling has become a specialist form of counselling requiring professional expertise and qualification. Key issues and common interventions are presented to raise awareness for the specific counselling needs of individuals and couples experiencing infertility and undergoing medical treatment. Mental health professionals new to the field of reproductive technologies as well as those in other areas of mental health counselling clients with fertility disorders can benefit from the topics addressed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The experience of infertility: A review of recent literature

    PubMed Central

    Greil, Arthur L.; Slauson-Blevins, Kathleen; McQuillan, Julia

    2011-01-01

    About 10 years ago Greil published a review and critique of the literature on the socio-psychological impact of infertility. He found at the time that most scholars treated infertility as a medical condition with psychological consequences rather than as a socially constructed reality. This article examines research published since the last review. More studies now place infertility within larger social contexts and social scientific frameworks although clinical emphases persist. Methodological problems remain but important improvements are also evident. We identify two vigorous research traditions in the social scientific study of infertility. One tradition uses primarily quantitative techniques to study clinic patients in order to improve service delivery and to assess the need for psychological counseling. The other tradition uses primarily qualitative research to capture the experiences of infertile people in a sociocultural context. We conclude that more attention is now being paid to the ways in which the experience of infertility is shaped by social context. We call for continued progress in the development of a distinctly sociological approach to infertility and for the continued integration of the two research traditions identified here. PMID:20003036

  16. Online and in-person health-seeking for infertility.

    PubMed

    Slauson-Blevins, Kathleen S; McQuillan, Julia; Greil, Arthur L

    2013-12-01

    Using data from Wave 1 (2004-2006) of the National Survey of Fertility Barriers (NSFB), a national probability sample of women ages 25-45, we examine online information-seeking among ever-infertile women. Of the 1352 women who met criteria for infertility, 459 (34%) neither talked to a doctor nor went online for information, 9% went online only for information, 32% talked to a doctor but did not go online, and 25% did both. Guided by Chrisman's Health-Seeking Model and previous research on Internet use to obtain health information, we employ multinomial logistic regression to compare these four groups of ever-infertile women. Findings generally support Chrisman's model. Infertile women tend to seek information online as a complement to, rather than as a substitute for, in-person health-seeking. Greater faith in the ability of medical science to treat infertility and greater perceived stigma were associated with higher odds of using the Internet to obtain information about infertility. In general, women who perceived the symptoms of infertility as more salient had higher odds of using both online and in-person or only in-person health-seeking compared to online health-seeking. Women with greater resources had higher odds of using online sources of information. Strong network encouragement to seek treatment was associated with higher odds of in-person health-seeking and combining in-person and online health-seeking compared to only going online or doing nothing.

  17. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in women with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Sabeti, Parvin; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis (GTB) is an important cause of female infertility, especially in developing countries. The positive results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in endometrial GTB in the absence of tubal damage raise the possibility of the detection of sub-clinical or latent disease, with doubtful benefits of treatment. Objective: To evaluate the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in endometrial biopsy samples collected from unexplained infertile women attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility by using PCR techniques. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 144 infertile women with unexplained infertility aged 20-35 years old and normal Histro-saplango graphy findings were enrolled. Endometrial biopsy samples from each participant were tested for mycobacterium tuberculosis detecting by PCR. In 93 patients, peritoneal fluid was also taken for culture and PCR. Results: The PCR results of endometrial specimens were negative in all cases, demonstrating that there was no GTB infection among our patients. Conclusion: Our results showed that GTB could not be considered as a major problem in women with unexplained infertility. Although, studies have indicated that PCR is a useful method in diagnosing early GTB disease in infertile women with no demonstrable evidence of tubal or endometrial involvement. PMID:27141534

  18. [Diagnostic value of sperm DNA fragmentation for male infertility].

    PubMed

    Fei, Qianjin; Huang, Hang; Jin, Jianyuan; Huang, Xuefeng

    2014-02-01

    To assess the diagnostic value of sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) for male infertility. Two hundred and ninety-nine males attending infertility clinic were classified into 157 primary infertile cases and 142 fertile controls. Semen analysis was performed as recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). SDF was assessed by sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) assay, and the results were expressed as DNA fragmentation index (DFI). The DFI was significantly higher in infertile males than that in fertile controls [(17.1± 9.3)% vs. (14.2± 9.0)%](P< 0.01). No significant difference was detected in the age of male and female partners, seminal volume, sperm count, motility and morphology between infertile males and fertile controls (P> 0.05). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.861 [95% confidence interval (CI)= 0.814-0.907] for 15.1% of SDF. The threshold level of 15.1% was derived as cut-off value to discriminate infertile men from fertile controls. By this threshold, specificity was 88.2% and sensitivity was 81.8%. The 299 men were divided into group A (n= 120) with DFI≥ 15.1% and group B (n= 179) with DFI< 15.1% based on the cut-off value. The percentage of infertile men in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (79.2% vs. 34.6%) (P< 0.01). The odds ratio (OR) for infertility in the two groups was 7.2 (95%CI= 4.2-12.3). Sperms with high-level of DNA fragmentation can impair male fertility. DFI can be used as a good diagnostic marker for male infertility.

  19. Psychosocial interventions for infertile couples: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ka-Ming; Cheung, Mei-Chun; Cheung, Irene Km

    2016-08-01

    This critical review aims to identify, summarize and critically appraise the current literature evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial interventions to improve infertile couples' well-being. It also aims to identify the design implications of effective psychosocial interventions for the management of psychosocial distress in infertile couples, especially culturally specific interventions for Chinese infertile couples. Directions for future research are discussed. Infertility is a life crisis affecting 15% of couples in most countries. The affected couples experience considerable psychological distress and impaired interpersonal relationships. Assisted reproductive technologies offer couples hope for pregnancy, but pose an unbearable psychological burden. Psychosocial interventions have been developed to offer support; however, their effectiveness has been inconsistent. A thorough analysis of the literatures on the topic of psychosocial interventions for infertile couples. A systematic search of MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, British Nursing Index and GoogleScholar from 2003-2015 was conducted to identify English language articles with the keywords 'psychosocial intervention' and 'infertility'. Two authors assessed all of the identified articles independently for inclusion in the review. Twelve studies were included in the review: seven were interventional studies and five were review studies. The findings indicated that the psychosocial interventions in general improved psychological outcomes, marital relationships and pregnancy rates among infertile couples. Psychosocial interventions should be incorporated into routine practice for infertile couples to provide timely support and counselling. The implications of the review findings for the effective design of psychosocial interventions, including the content, format, duration and intervener for clinical practice are discussed. In confirming the efficacy of such intervention design, randomized controlled trials

  20. Initiative for standardization of reporting genetics of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Traven, Eva; Ogrinc, Ana; Kunej, Tanja

    2017-02-01

    The number of publications on research of male infertility is increasing. Technologies used in research of male infertility generate complex results and various types of data that need to be appropriately managed, arranged, and made available to other researchers for further use. In our previous study, we collected over 800 candidate loci for male fertility in seven mammalian species. However, the continuation of the work towards a comprehensive database of candidate genes associated with different types of idiopathic human male infertility is challenging due to fragmented information, obtained from a variety of technologies and various omics approaches. Results are published in different forms and usually need to be excavated from the text, which hinders the gathering of information. Standardized reporting of genetic anomalies as well as causative and risk factors of male infertility therefore presents an important issue. The aim of the study was to collect examples of diverse genomic loci published in association with human male infertility and to propose a standardized format for reporting genetic causes of male infertility. From the currently available data we have selected 75 studies reporting 186 representative genomic loci which have been proposed as genetic risk factors for male infertility. Based on collected and formatted data, we suggested a first step towards unification of reporting the genetics of male infertility in original and review studies. The proposed initiative consists of five relevant data types: 1) genetic locus, 2) race/ethnicity, number of participants (infertile/controls), 3) methodology, 4) phenotype (clinical data, disease ontology, and disease comorbidity), and 5) reference. The proposed form for standardized reporting presents a baseline for further optimization with additional genetic and clinical information. This data standardization initiative will enable faster multi-omics data integration, database development and sharing

  1. Tubal Factor Infertility and Perinatal Risk After Assisted Reproductive Technology

    PubMed Central

    Kawwass, Jennifer F.; Crawford, Sara; Kissin, Dmitry M.; Session, Donna R.; Boulet, Sheree; Jamieson, Denise J.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess trends of tubal factor infertility and to evaluate risk of miscarriage and delivery of preterm or low birth weight (LBW) neonates among women with tubal factor infertility using assisted reproductive technology (ART). METHODS We assessed trends of tubal factor infertility among all fresh and frozen, donor, and nondonor ART cycles performed annually in the United States between 2000 and 2010 (N=1,418,774) using the National ART Surveillance System. The data set was then limited to fresh, nondonor in vitro fertilization cycles resulting in pregnancy to compare perinatal outcomes for cycles associated with tubal compared with male factor infertility. We performed bivariate and multivariable analyses controlling for maternal characteristics and calculated adjusted risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS The percentage of ART cycles associated with tubal factor infertility diagnoses decreased from 2000 to 2010 (26.02–14.81%). Compared with male factor infertility, tubal factor portended an increased risk of miscarriage (14.0% compared with 12.7%, adjusted RR 1.08, 95% CI 1.04–1.12); risk was increased for both early and late miscarriage. Singleton neonates born to women with tubal factor infertility had an increased risk of pre-term birth (15.8% compared with 11.6%, adjusted RR 1.27, 95% CI 1.20–1.34) and LBW (10.9% compared with 8.5%, adjusted RR 1.28, 95% CI 1.20–1.36). Significant increases in risk persisted for early and late preterm delivery and very low and moderately LBW delivery. A significantly elevated risk was also detected for twin, but not triplet, pregnancies. CONCLUSION Tubal factor infertility, which is decreasing in prevalence in the United States, is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage, preterm birth, and LBW delivery as compared with couples with male factor infertility using ART. PMID:23812461

  2. TGFβ3 (TGFB3) polymorphism is associated with male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Droździk, Marek; Kaczmarek, Maciej; Malinowski, Damian; Broś, Urszula; Kazienko, Anna; Kurzawa, Rafał; Kurzawski, Mateusz

    2015-01-01

    Factors affecting the blood-testis barrier function may be involved in testicular damage and male infertility. Two cytokines play an important role in the barrier regulation, namely transforming growth factor beta 3 (TGF-β3) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α). The aim of this study was to investigate the potential association between TGF-β3 (TGFB3) and TNF-α (TNF) gene polymorphisms and male infertility. A total of 846 subjects, 423 diagnosed with male infertility and 423 fertile men were enrolled. TGFB3 (rs2268626:T > C, rs3917158:C > T, rs2284792:A > G, rs2268625:T > C, rs3917187:C > T) and TNF (rs1800629:-308G > A) gene polymorphisms were genotyped. No association between TNF genotype and infertility was observed. As for TGFB3, the genotypes distribution was similar in infertile and fertile men. However, rs2284792 minor allele frequency was significantly higher among infertile subjects. Heterozygous rs2284792 AG genotype was associated with increased odds for infertility [OR = 1.40 (95% CI 1.05–1.86), p = 0.021] and similar results were observed for G allele carrier status [OR = 1.40 (95% CI 1.06–1.84), p = 0.017]. Heterozygosity in TGFB3 rs3917158 was also associated with the infertility [OR = 1.37 (95% CI 1.01–1.87), p = 0.041]. The TGFB3 variant genotypes were associated with lower spermatozoa motility parameters in fertile men. The results indicate that variants in TGFB3 gene may be associated with male infertility. However, the findings require further replication and validation. PMID:26612435

  3. Role of Imaging in the Evaluation of Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Pardeep K; Little, Brent; Harri, Peter A; Miller, Frank H; Alexander, Lauren F; Kalb, Bobby; Camacho, Juan C; Master, Viraj; Hartman, Matthew; Moreno, Courtney C

    2017-01-01

    Infertility is defined herein as the inability to achieve pregnancy after frequently engaging in unprotected sexual intercourse for 1 year. Among infertile couples, the cause of infertility involves the male partner in approximately 50% of cases. Male infertility is usually caused by conditions affecting sperm production, sperm function, or both, or blockages that prevent the delivery of sperm. Chronic health problems, injuries, lifestyle choices, anatomic problems, hormonal imbalances, and genetic defects can have a role in male infertility. The diagnostic workup of male infertility should include a thorough medical and reproductive history, physical examination, and semen analysis, followed by imaging. The main role of imaging is identification of the causes of infertility, such as congenital anomalies and disorders that obstruct sperm transport and may be correctable. Scrotal ultrasonography is the most common initially performed noninvasive examination used to image the male reproductive system, including the testes and extratesticular structures such as the epididymis. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is another noninvasive imaging modality used in the pelvis to evaluate possible obstructive lesions involving the ductal system. MR imaging of the brain is extremely useful for evaluating relevant neurologic abnormalities, such as pituitary gland disorders, that are suspected on the basis of hormone analysis results. Invasive techniques are usually reserved for therapeutic interventions in patients with known abnormalities. In this article, the causes and imaging findings of obstructive and nonobstructive azoospermia are discussed. In addition to detecting treatable conditions that are related to male infertility, identifying the life-threatening entities associated with infertility and the genetic conditions that could be transmitted to offspring-especially in patients who undergo assisted reproduction-is critical. (©)RSNA, 2017.

  4. Androgen receptor roles in spermatogenesis and infertility.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-08-01

    Androgens such as testosterone are steroid hormones essential for normal male reproductive development and function. Mutations of androgen receptors (AR) are often found in patients with disorders of male reproductive development, and milder mutations may be responsible for some cases of male infertility. Androgens exert their action through AR and its signalling in the testis is essential for spermatogenesis. AR is not expressed in the developing germ cell lineage so is thought to exert its effects through testicular Sertoli and peri-tubular myoid (PTM) cells. AR signalling in spermatogenesis has been investigated in rodent models where testosterone levels are chemically supressed or models with transgenic disruption of AR. These models have pinpointed the steps of spermatogenesis that require AR signalling, specifically maintenance of spermatogonial numbers, blood-testis barrier integrity, completion of meiosis, adhesion of spermatids and spermiation, together these studies detail the essential nature of androgens in the promotion of male fertility.

  5. Occupation-related male infertility: a review.

    PubMed

    Henderson, J; Baker, H W; Hanna, P J

    1986-04-01

    Male infertility is a significant health problem for which few aetiological factors have been identified. The role of occupational exposure is largely unknown but certain substances such as 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane, oestrogen, heat, lead and microwaves have been reported to impair spermatogenesis in workers. Other agents which interfere with reproductive performance in experimental animals such as cadmium, manganese, organophosphates and some solvents have not been studied sufficiently for their occupational risks to be fully known. Some occupational exposures, extensively studied, appear to convey little or no risk to male fertility including radiological exposure, anaesthetic gases and Agent Orange. It is clear that the range of substances potentially hazardous to male reproduction is great but the number of agents for which the evidence is unequivocal is very small.

  6. Recent advances in understanding & managing male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Bieniek, Jared M.; Lo, Kirk C.

    2016-01-01

    Male infertility remains a struggle to definitively diagnose and treat with many men labelled as “idiopathic infertility” and eventually requiring assisted reproductive techniques.  Along those lines, research groups are continuing to explore current social and environmental factors, including the obesity epidemic, and their effects on male fertility potential.  Novel biomarkers of natural fertility status and azoospermia etiology have additionally seen recent attention with ACRV1 and TEX101/ECM1 assays either currently or soon to be commercially available.  Despite these advancements, however, medical treatment options have seen little progress.  Though surgical therapies have similarly seen little transformation, groups are exploring the use of testicular sperm for couples with elevated sperm DNA fragmentation and either planned or previously failed IVF/ICSI.  Concerted collaborative efforts will be needed as we move forward to better understand the challenges men face when struggling to conceive. PMID:27990271

  7. Hormonal treatment of male infertility: FSH.

    PubMed

    Foresta, C; Selice, R; Ferlin, A; Arslan, P; Garolla, A

    2007-12-01

    FSH plays a crucial role in spermatogenesis. In the fetal and neonatal development stages, FSH activates the proliferation of the Sertoli cells and successively, during the pubertal phase, it influences the mitotic activity of the spermatogonia and encourages cellular differentiation, until arrival at the round spermatid stage. Because of its physiological role in spermatogenesis, various attempts have been made to treat idiopathic oligozoospermic men with FSH. However, the results obtained so far are still controversial. In this research, attention was focused on the possible criteria able to predict a seminal response to this specific hormonal treatment. Furthermore, the effectiveness of FSH therapy was evaluated in terms of sperm count and pregnancy rate. Thus far, based on more recent knowledge about the FSH receptor gene, the authors have correlated different polymorphisms of this gene with the outcome of FSH treatment. In this paper, the literature is reviewed and the authors' experience on using FSH in male infertility is discussed.

  8. Evaluation and treatment of anovulatory and unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Propst, Anthony M; Bates, G Wright

    2012-12-01

    Anovulatory disorders are a primary cause of female infertility. Polycystic ovarian syndrome is the major cause of anovulation and is generally associated with obesity. Lifestyle changes to encourage weight loss are the initial therapy for overweight and obese patients, followed by clomiphene citrate for ovulation induction. For those patients who fail to ovulate on clomiphene citrate, alternatives, such as letrozole; gonadotropins; and complimentary agents to enhance clomiphene citrate, such as metformin and glucocorticoids, are reviewed. Women with unexplained infertility (no identifiable cause of infertility on a routine evaluation) may benefit from ovulation induction with clomiphene citrate, letrozole, or gonadotropins.

  9. Need for accessible infertility care in Ghana: the patients’ voice

    PubMed Central

    Osei, Nana Yaw

    2016-01-01

    Abstract According to the Ghana Statistical Service (GSS) infertility and childlessness are the most important reason for divorce in Ghana. The traditional Ghanaian society is pro-natal and voluntary childlessness is very uncommon. Patient groups are almost non-existent in Sub-Saharan Africa, aggravating the situation of childless couples. Due to the lack of enough and affordable high quality infertility services, many women resort to traditional healing, witchcraft and spiritual mediation. Considering the severe sociocultural and economic consequences of childlessness, especially for women, there is an urgent need for accessible and affordable high quality infertility care in Ghana. PMID:27909570

  10. Introduction: Training in reproductive endocrinology and infertility: meeting worldwide needs.

    PubMed

    de Ziegler, Dominique; Meldrum, David R

    2015-07-01

    Training in reproductive endocrinology (REI) and its male variant, andrology, has been profoundly influenced by the central role captured by assisted reproductive technologies (ART). The marked differences in financial, regulatory, and societal/ethical restrictions on ART in different countries of the world also prominently influence the clinical management of infertility. Training should strive for comprehensive teaching of all medically indicated procedures, even if only to optimize cross-border care. Better international standardization of infertility practices and training would benefit worldwide infertility care and should be promoted by international societies.

  11. [The psychosocial consequences of infertility and fertility treatment].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Lone; Sejbæk, Camilla Sandal

    2012-10-08

    Infertility and its treatment are severe, chronic, low-control stressors. Among women unsuccessful treatment is associated with increased risk of developing depressive symptoms. Among men infertility is associated with more negative emotional responses. Lifelong involuntary childlessness is associated with reduced mental well-being. It is recommended in the future to integrate mental health professionals at fertility clinics in Denmark in order to secure that also the psychosocial consequences of infertility and fertility treatment are taken care of with the highest professional standard based on scientific knowledge within this field.

  12. Royal jelly counteracts bucks' "summer infertility".

    PubMed

    Elnagar, Samar A

    2010-08-01

    Exposure of male rabbits to heat stress during summer adversely affects their fertility leading to major production losses. A total number of 24 male rabbits were randomly divided into four experimental groups exposed to temperatures ranging from a high of 32 degrees C to a low of 23 degrees C. Animals of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th group were individually orally given 200, 400, or 800 mg royal jelly (RJ)/kg body weight once a week to evaluate the ability of RJ feeding to counteract "summer infertility" in bucks and enhance their physiological status. Royal jelly treatments significantly boosted testosterone level to 133, 143 and 124% of basal, increased ejaculated volume by 36, 31 and 18%, increased seminal plasma fructose to 122, 124, and 111%, improved sperm motility by 15, 18 and 5%, increase sperm total output by 65, 63 and 35%, reduced abnormal sperm by 24, 24 and 15% and dead sperm by 27, 25 and 17% compared to the heat stressed control animals. Serum total protein, albumin and globulin increased while serum total lipids, cholesterol and triglycerides decreased with RJ treatments. Creatinine was reduced by 5, 13 and 8% and uric acid by 4, 7 and 4%, respectively for the three doses of RJ compared to control. Alkaline phosphatase has significantly increased to reach 114, 118, and 108% of heat stressed level with the three doses of RJ, indicating the occurrence of active bone deposition. Glucose level increased significantly to reach 105, 112, and 116% of heat stressed control and both calcium and phosphorus increased significantly with RJ treatments. It was concluded that royal jelly administration to heat stressed male rabbits can counteract their "summer infertility" and improve their physiological status.

  13. Increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment: A phenomenology study

    PubMed Central

    Mosalanejad, Leili; Parandavar, Nehle; Gholami, Morteza; Abdollahifard, Sareh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Assisted reproductive technology (ART) provide the hope of pregnancy for infertile women, but do not always turn this hope into reality. Objective: The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experience of infertile women from increasing and decreasing factors of hope in infertile women with failure in infertility treatment. Materials and Methods: Using a qualitative research design (Phenomenology study), 23 subjects were selected who had experienced infertility failure visited by gynecologist (Rasekh Infertility center) in 2012. The data were collected through semi structured interviews and analyzed using interpretive research strategies of phenomenology by Collizi's seven-stage method. Results: Totally 96 codes were identified. The data arranged in two categories. The factors decreasing and increasing hope in infertility treatments. Totally 5 themes and 20 sub themes were extracted. The increasing factors which emerged from the data contain "spiritual source", "family interaction and support" and "information through the media", and decreasing factors contain "nature of treatments" and "negatively oriented mind". PMID:24799869

  14. The emotional-psychological consequences of infertility among infertile women seeking treatment: Results of a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpoor-Azghdy, Seyede Batool; Simbar, Masoumeh; Vedadhir, Abouali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Infertility is a major life event that brings about social and psychological problems. The type and rate these problems in the context of socio-cultural of different geographical areas and sex of people is different. Objective: The aim of this qualitative study was to explain the psychological consequences of infertility in Iranian infertile women seeking treatment. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was done using qualitative content analysis on 25 women affected by primary and secondary infertility with no surviving children in 2012. They were purposefully selected with maximum sample variation from a large Fertility Health Research Center in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected using 32 semi-structured interviews and analyzed by the conventional content analysis method. Results: The findings of this study include four main themes: 1. Cognitive reactions of infertility (mental engagement; psychological turmoil). 2. Cognitive reactions to therapy process (psychological turmoil; being difficult to control in some situations; reduced self-esteem; feelings of failure). 3. Emotional-affective reactions of infertility (fear, anxiety and worry; loneliness and guilt; grief and depression; regret). 4. Emotional-affective reactions to therapy process (fear, anxiety and worry; fatigue and helplessness; grief and depression; hopelessness). Conclusion: This study revealed that Iranian infertile women seeking treatment face several psychological-emotional problems with devastating effects on the mental health and well-being of the infertile individuals and couples, while the infertility is often treated as a biomedical issue in Iranian context with less attention on the mental-emotional, social and cultural aspects. This article extracted from Ph.D. thesis. (Seyede Batool Hasanpoor-Azghady) PMID:24799871

  15. Occupational risk for male infertility: a case-control study of 218 infertile and 227 fertile men.

    PubMed

    Chia, S E; Tay, S K

    2001-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if certain occupations pose an increased risk for infertility (of no known cause) among a group of infertile men compared with a group of fertile men. A total of 640 consecutive men whose spouses were unable to conceive were recruited from an infertility clinic. Of these, 218 men (cases) were found to have no known cause for their infertility. A total of 227 men whose spouses were pregnant at the time of the study were recruited as controls. The Singapore Standard Occupational Classification was used to code the subjects' occupations. Semen parameters (density, total sperm counts, motility, viability, and normal morphology) in all of the cases were significantly poorer than those in the controls. The risk for infertility is associated with smoking adjusted odds ratio (OR) 2.85 and 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.91 to 4.24. Work, independently, is not a risk factor for infertility. Engineering technicians (adjusted OR, 2.75; 95% CI, 1.36 to 5.54), finance analysts (adjusted OR, 4.66; 95% CI, 1.90 to 11.40), corporate and computing managers (adjusted OR, 2.49; 95% CI, 1.04 to 5.98), and teachers (adjusted OR, 7.72; 95% CI, 1.86 to 32.10) were at a greater risk of infertility compared with "services and clerical workers." Using services and clerical workers as a reference group, certain occupations are at a higher risk for infertility. Higher work demands and possible electromagnetic field exposure could be contributory factors for infertility.

  16. Protective Effect of Decursin Extracted from Angelica gigas in Male Infertility via Nrf2/HO-1 Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Bae, Woong Jin; Ha, U Syn; Choi, Jin Bong; Kim, Kang Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Wang, Zhiping; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Higher testicular temperature results in altered spermatogenesis due to heat-related oxidative stress. We examined the effects of decursin extracted from Angelica gigas Nakai on antioxidant activity in vitro and in a cryptorchidism-induced infertility rat model. TM3 Leydig cell viability was measured based on oxidative stress according to treatment. Either distilled water or AG 400 mg/kg of A. gigas extract was administered orally for 4 weeks after unilateral cryptorchidism was induced. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks, six rats from the control group and six rats from treatment group were sacrificed. Testicular weight, semen quality, antioxidant activities, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein, and mRNA expression of Nrf2-regulated genes were analyzed. Treatment with A. gigas extract (1) protected TM3 cells against oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, (2) improved the mean weight of the cryptorchid testis, (3) maintained sperm counts, motility, and spermatogenic cell density, (4) decreased levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), (5) significantly increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and (6) significantly decreased apoptosis. This study suggests that decursin extracted from A. gigas is a supplemental agent that can reduce oxidative stress by Nrf2-mediated upregulation of HO-1 in rat experimentally induced unilateral cryptorchidism and may improve cryptorchidism-induced infertility.

  17. Protective Effect of Decursin Extracted from Angelica gigas in Male Infertility via Nrf2/HO-1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Woong Jin; Ha, U. Syn; Choi, Jin Bong; Kim, Kang Sup; Kim, Su Jin; Cho, Hyuk Jin; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Wang, Zhiping; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Kim, Sae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Higher testicular temperature results in altered spermatogenesis due to heat-related oxidative stress. We examined the effects of decursin extracted from Angelica gigas Nakai on antioxidant activity in vitro and in a cryptorchidism-induced infertility rat model. TM3 Leydig cell viability was measured based on oxidative stress according to treatment. Either distilled water or AG 400 mg/kg of A. gigas extract was administered orally for 4 weeks after unilateral cryptorchidism was induced. After 1, 2, and 4 weeks, six rats from the control group and six rats from treatment group were sacrificed. Testicular weight, semen quality, antioxidant activities, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) protein, and mRNA expression of Nrf2-regulated genes were analyzed. Treatment with A. gigas extract (1) protected TM3 cells against oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, (2) improved the mean weight of the cryptorchid testis, (3) maintained sperm counts, motility, and spermatogenic cell density, (4) decreased levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and increased levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), (5) significantly increased Nrf2 and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and (6) significantly decreased apoptosis. This study suggests that decursin extracted from A. gigas is a supplemental agent that can reduce oxidative stress by Nrf2-mediated upregulation of HO-1 in rat experimentally induced unilateral cryptorchidism and may improve cryptorchidism-induced infertility. PMID:27034737

  18. Cadmium Concentrations in Blood and Seminal Plasma: Correlations with Sperm Number and Motility in Three Male Populations (Infertility Patients, Artificial Insemination Donors, and Unselected Volunteers)

    PubMed Central

    Benoff, Susan; Hauser, Russ; Marmar, Joel L; Hurley, Ian R; Napolitano, Barbara; Centola, Grace M

    2009-01-01

    To investigate a possible common environmental exposure that may partially explain the observed decrease in human semen quality, we correlated seminal plasma and blood cadmium levels with sperm concentration and sperm motility. We studied three separate human populations: group 1, infertility patients (Long Island, NY, USA); group 2, artificial insemination donors (AID) (Rochester, NY, USA); and group 3, general population volunteers (Rochester, NY, USA). Information about confounding factors was collected by questionnaire. Seminal plasma cadmium did not correlate with blood cadmium (Spearman correlation, n = 91, r = −0.092, P = 0.386, NS). Both blood and seminal plasma cadmium were significantly higher among infertility patients than the other subjects studied (for example, median seminal plasma cadmium was 0.282 μg/L in infertility patients versus 0.091 μg/L in AID and 0.092 μg/L in general population volunteers; Kruskal–Wallis test, P < 0.001). The percentage of motile sperm and sperm concentration correlated inversely with seminal plasma cadmium among the infertility patients (r = −0.201, P < 0.036 and r = −0.189, P < 0.05, respectively), but not in the other two groups. Age (among infertility patients) was the only positive confounder correlating with seminal plasma cadmium. To validate our human findings in an animal model, we chronically exposed adolescent male Wistar rats to low-moderate cadmium in drinking water. Though otherwise healthy, the rats exhibited decreases in epididymal sperm count and sperm motility associated with cadmium dose and time of exposure. Our human and rat study results are consistent with the hypothesis that environmental cadmium exposures may contribute significantly to reduced human male sperm concentration and sperm motility. PMID:19593409

  19. Bacterial agents as a cause of infertility in humans.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Melania; Cannas, Sara; Cubeddu, Marina; Molicotti, Paola; Piras, Gennarina Laura; Dessole, Salvatore; Zanetti, Stefania

    2016-07-01

    Infertility is a problem affecting almost 15% of couples. There are many causes for this condition, among which urogenital bacterial infections seem to play an important role. Many studies have explained the mechanisms by which bacteria cause infertility both in men and women. Therefore we undertook this study to evaluate the presence of genito-urinary infections in infertile couples who sought counselling to investigate their condition. Microbiological analysis was performed on semen and vaginal/cervical samples of both partners of each couple. The percentage of individuals affected by a urogenital bacterial infection was between 14 and 20%. More significantly, most of the species isolated both in men and women have been described in the literature as potential causes of infertility.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: sensorineural deafness and male infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... 502. Citation on PubMed Hildebrand MS, Avenarius MR, Smith RJH. CATSPER-Related Male Infertility. 2009 Dec 3 [ ... Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  1. Hidden costs of infertility treatment in employee health benefits plans.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, R E; Team, W M

    2000-04-01

    Many employers exclude infertility treatment from coverage under their health benefits plans. However, infertility treatment is often provided under other diagnoses or in association with therapy rendered for other disease processes. This study attempted to estimate those hidden costs and to determine what the impact would be of providing coverage for infertility treatment. A 1-year retrospective analysis was carried out to isolate the hidden costs of infertility treatment from specific medical claims data gathered from a large representative employer with no infertility benefit provided. Data were analyzed in the context of the claims experience of a health plan covering approximately 28,000 employees. Infertility treatment was excluded under this plan. Medical claims for specific procedures and diagnoses in 1996 were analyzed by using Current Procedural Terminology codes in conjunction with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes to estimate the hidden costs of infertility treatment. Forty-one Current Procedural Terminology codes and 68 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes were used for the analysis. Clinical practice experience was used to set boundaries (conservative and moderate estimate) regarding the likelihood of a given treatment being associated with infertility. This was compared with 100% covered charges to generate claims per employee per month. Procedures covered operative, diagnostic, and laboratory services. These figures were used to compute a range of cost for infertility treatment per member per month. Forty-one Current Procedural Terminology codes were identified that indicated possible infertility treatment. These covered the areas of laparoscopic and hysteroscopic surgery, lysis of adhesions, neosalpingostomy, cyst drainage, oocyte retrieval or embryo transfer, echography, and various hormonal analyses. Sixty-eight International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision codes indicated the

  2. Gene Linked to Excess Male Hormones in Female Infertility Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... April 15, 2014 Gene linked to excess male hormones in female infertility disorder Discovery by NIH-supported ... may lead to the overproduction of androgens — male hormones similar to testosterone — occurring in women with polycystic ...

  3. Hysterosalpingography in infertility investigation protocol: is it still useful?

    PubMed

    Capobianco, G; Crivelli, P; Piredda, N; Maiore, M; Cherchi, P L; Dessole, M; Virdis, G; Dessole, S; Meloni, G B

    2015-01-01

    to assess the radiological findings of women undergoing hysterosalpingography (HSG) as initial infertility investigation protocol. A retrospective study on infertile women who underwent HSG at Institute of Radiology of Sassari University, Italy. The present case series included 2,845 HSG, performed from January 1997 to March 2014. The age of the patients ranged from 20 to 48 years. The negative exams (tubal patency) were 2,039 out of 2,845 (71.67%). A technique of diagnostic imaging for the evaluation of infertility should be non-invasive, not expensive, rapid, of simple execution, and also be able to provide information on tubal patency and pelvic diseases. For these reasons, HSG today remains a useful diagnostic investigation tool in the diagnostic work-up of infertile patients.

  4. Anovulatory and ovulatory infertility: results with simplified management.

    PubMed Central

    Hull, M G; Savage, P E; Bromham, D R

    1982-01-01

    A simplified scheme for the management of anovulatory and of ovulatory (usually called unexplained) infertility was evaluated in 244 women. Eighteen patients were excluded because of primary ovarian failure, 164 were treated for ovulatory failure, and 62 with ovulatory infertility remained untreated. Twenty-five patients had a properly validated negative postcoital test. In the remaining 201 patients the two-year conception rates were 96% in patients with amenorrhoea, 83% in those with oligomenorrhoea, 74% in those with luteal deficiency, and 88% in those with ovulatory infertility. Comparison with normal rates implied that amenorrhoea represents a pure form of ovulatory failure that is completely correctable whereas in other conditions unexplained factors also contribute to infertility though to a much smaller extent than was previously thought. PMID:6805656

  5. Chinese Herbal Products for Female Infertility in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Yu-Chiang; Kao, Chao-Wei; Lin, Che-Chen; Liao, Yen-Nung; Wu, Bei-Yu; Hung, I-Ling; Hu, Wen-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Female infertility and low birth rate are significant public health issues with profound social, psychological, and economic consequences. Some infertile women resort to conventional, complementary, or alternative therapies to conceive. The aim of this study was to identify the Chinese herbal products (CHPs) most commonly used for female infertility in Taiwan. The usage of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and the frequency of CHP prescriptions to infertile women were determined based on a nationwide 1-million randomly sampled cohort of National Health Insurance Research Database beneficiaries. Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were employed to estimate the adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for TCM usage and potential risk factors. In total, 8766 women with newly diagnosed infertility were included in this study. Of those, 8430 (96.17%) had sought TCM treatment in addition to visiting the gynecologist. We noted that female infertility patients with risk factors (e.g., endometriosis, uterine fibroids, or irregular menstrual cycle) were more likely to use TCM than those without TCM medication (aOR = 1.83, 1.87, and 1.79, respectively). The most commonly used formula and single CHP were Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San (17.25%) and Semen Cuscutae (27.40%), respectively. CHP formula combinations (e.g., Dang-Gui-Sha-Yao-San plus Wen-Jing-Tang 3.10%) or single Chinese herbal combinations (e.g., Semen Cuscutae plus Leonurus japonicus 6.31%) were also commonly used to treat female infertility. Further well-conducted, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies will be needed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of these CHP combinations for female infertility. PMID:26986137

  6. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile couples in romania.

    PubMed

    Mierla, D; Malageanu, M; Tulin, R; Albu, D

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in one of the partners and infertility. This retrospective study was performed at the Department of Reproductive Medicine, Life Memorial Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, between August 2007 to December 2011. Two thousand, one hundred and ninety-five patients with reproductive problems were investigated, and the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was calculated. The control group consisting of 87 fertile persons who had two or more children, was investigated in this retrospective study. All the patients of this study were investigated by cytogenetic techniques and the results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher's exact test. In this study, 94.99% patients had a normal karyotype and 5.01% had chromosomal abnormalities (numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities). In the study group, numerical chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.14% of infertile men and 0.62% of infertile women, and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.38% of infertile men and 1.87% of infertile women, respectively. The correlation between the incidence of chromosomal anomalies in the two sexes in couple with reproductive problems was not statistically significant. Recently, a possible association between infertility and chromosomal abnormalities with a significant statistical association has been reported. Our study shows that there is no association between chromosomal abnormalities and infertility, but this study needs to be confirmed with further investigations and a larger control group to establish the role of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of infertility.

  7. Evidence-Based Care for Couples With Infertility.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Eleanor L; Hershberger, Patricia E; Bergh, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    When couples cannot achieve pregnancy, they often seek health care from medical and nursing specialists. The care the couple receives begins with a thorough assessment to determine the possible cause of infertility and to plan appropriate care to ensure the best chance for the couple to have a biological child. In this article, we provide an overview of the etiology and evaluation of infertility, the various treatment options available, and the appropriate clinical implications.

  8. Prevalence of chromosomal abnormalities in infertile couples in romania

    PubMed Central

    Mierla, D; Malageanu, M; Tulin, R; Albu, D

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a correlation between the presence of chromosomal abnormalities in one of the partners and infertility. This retrospective study was performed at the Department of Reproductive Medicine, Life Memorial Hospital, Bucharest, Romania, between August 2007 to December 2011. Two thousand, one hundred and ninety-five patients with reproductive problems were investigated, and the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities was calculated. The control group consisting of 87 fertile persons who had two or more children, was investigated in this retrospective study. All the patients of this study were investigated by cytogenetic techniques and the results of the two groups were compared by a two-tailed Fisher’s exact test. In this study, 94.99% patients had a normal karyotype and 5.01% had chromosomal abnormalities (numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities). In the study group, numerical chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.14% of infertile men and 0.62% of infertile women, and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 1.38% of infertile men and 1.87% of infertile women, respectively. The correlation between the incidence of chromosomal anomalies in the two sexes in couple with reproductive problems was not statistically significant. Recently, a possible association between infertility and chromosomal abnormalities with a significant statistical association has been reported. Our study shows that there is no association between chromosomal abnormalities and infertility, but this study needs to be confirmed with further investigations and a larger control group to establish the role of chromosomal abnormalities in the etiology of infertility. PMID:26929902

  9. Special antigens on sperm from autoimmune infertile men.

    PubMed

    Mathur, S; Chao, L; Goust, J M; Milroy, G T; Woodley-Miller, C; Caldwell, J Z; Daru, J; Williamson, H O

    1988-05-01

    Sera from three fertile men and four infertile men without sperm antibodies, 17 infertile men with sperm antibodies in serum and seminal plasma (S.P.), and 25 infertile men with sperm antibodies in S.P. were tested by Western Blot analysis against sperm membrane extracts and S.P. from fertile nonautoimmune men and infertile autoimmune men. Sera from fertile men reacted against common antigens with molecular weights (MW) of 28, 38, 48, 60, and 68 kD present on sperm from autoimmune and nonautoimmune men and special antigen of MW 76 kD on the sperm of fertile men. Sera from 15 of 17 (88%) autoimmune infertile men with sperm antibodies in serum and S.P. detected special antigens with MW of 58 kD (sera reactivity in 47% of these men), 43kD (in 29%), 30 kD (in 24%), 35 kD (in 18%), 52 kD (in 12%), 41 kD (in 6%), and 71 kD (in 6%) on the sperm of autoimmune men in addition to the common antigens. Sera from 15 of 25 (60%) men with sperm antibodies in their S.P. showed reactivity to special antigens with MW 52 kD (in 20%), 35 kD (in 16%), 41 kD (in 16%), 58 kD (in 8%), 70/71 kD (in 8%), 30 kD (in 8%), and 56 kD (in 4%). Sera from 18 of 42 (43%) infertile men with sperm antibodies also detected special antigens of MW 26, 46, and 76 kD present only in fertile men's sperm. Sera from only 15 of 42 (36%) autoimmune infertile men reacted against special antigens with MW 17, 20, 23, 30, 43, and 58 kD in the seminal plasma of autoimmune infertile men.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Quality of life and its related factors in infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Keramat, Afsaneh; Masoomi, Seyyedeh Zahra; Mousavi, Seyed Abbas; Poorolajal, Jalal; Shobeiri, Fatemeh; Hazavhei, Seyyed Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Health related quality of life (QoL) has now been considered as a main tool for outcome measurement in infertility. The present study aimed to determine the association between general and specified QoL with different psychological aspects of self-esteem, social support, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction in a sample of Iranian infertile couples. This cross-sectional study was conducted on 385 infertile couples referred to the Fatemieh Hospital in Hamadan City, western Iran in 2012.To measure the self-esteem, the Iseng test was used. The social support scaling developed by Cassidy and Long was used for assessment of social support. The sexual satisfaction was also assessed by the Lindaberg questionnaire. For assessing the general QoL state, the WHO-QoL-BREF and FertiQoL tools were employed. Self-esteem scores were lower in the couples with longer infertility duration. The social support mean score was lower in low income couples. Those with higher educational level, shorter infertility duration, and higher income were more satisfied from their marital relationships. Besides, we revealed that the previous failed efforts for treatment of infertility were adversely associated with the lower social support and sexual satisfaction. The higher educational level, higher monthly income, living in urban area, shorter duration of marriage and infertility, and male gender were associated with better. QoL status in the most components.Associations between QoL and self-esteem, social support, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction were significant (P<0.05). The QoL status in infertile couples is directly associated with their self-esteem, social support, sexual satisfaction, and marital satisfaction.

  11. Psychological Disorders among Iranian Infertile Couples Undergoing Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART).

    PubMed

    Karimzadeh, Mansoureh; Salsabili, Nasser; Akbari Asbagh, Firouzeh; Teymouri, Robab; Pourmand, Golamreza; Soleimanieh Naeini, Tahereh

    2017-03-01

    Worldwide, infertility affects 10%-15% of couples and most of them seek medical help including Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) treatments. Undergoing ART treatments create many physical and emotional burdens. This study examined the psychological consequences of infertility in Iranian infertile males and females as well as their spouses, unlike previous studies that examined mainly females with infertility. Subjects in this descriptive analytical design were recruited from the IVF Department of Mirza Koochak Khan Hospital and the Rouyesh Infertility Treatment Center of Tehran, Iran between Aug 2014 and Sep 2015. Overall, 256 couples (64% response rate), consisting of 78 infertile male and their spouses and 50 infertile female and their spouses, were included in this research. The psychological disorders were measured by the Persian version of Symptoms Checklist-90-Revised and Cattle Inventory. Psychological disorders of infertile couples are significantly associated with increasing age, higher education, longer duration of infertility and unemployment (P<0.05). Prevalence of anxiety, depression, hypochondriasis and paranoia in infertile females and spouses of infertile males were significantly higher than husbands of infertile females (P<0.05). Obsession was more sever in infertile females was significantly greater than infertile males (P=0.01). Depression was significantly lower in infertile males than their spouses (P=0.016). Iranian infertile females and spouses of infertile males experienced more psychological disorders than infertile males and spouses of infertile females. These results may be due to the impact of cultural beliefs and gender roles in Iranian society. Anxiety, depression, obsession, paranoia and hypochondriasis should be addressed before any ART treatments.

  12. [Association study of telomere length with idiopathic male infertility].

    PubMed

    Shuyuan, Liu; Changjun, Zhang; Haiying, Peng; Xiaoqin, Huang; Hao, Sun; Keqin, Lin; Kai, Huang; Jiayou, Chu; Zhaoqing, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Telomeres are evolutionary conserved, multifunctional DNA-protein complexes located at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. Telomeres maintain chromosome stability and genome integrity and also play an important role in meiosis which aid in synapsis, homologous recombination, and segregation. Sperm telomere has been reported to play an important role in fertilization and embryo development. Nowadays, the association between telomere and reproduction is one of the major areas of interest, however whether sperm telomere associated with male infertility is not clear. In this study, in order to find out the association between Chinese idiopathic infertility and sperm telomere length, we analyzed the difference of sperm telomere length between idiopathic infertile men and normal fertile men, as well as the correlations between sperm telomere length and human semen characteristics. We analyzed 126 Chinese idiopathic infertile men and 138 normal fertile men for sperm telomere length by using quantitative PCR. We found that the relative sperm mean telomere length of infertile men was significantly shorter than that of fertile men (2.894 ± 0.115 vs. 4.016 ± 0.603, P=5.097 x 10⁻⁵). Both sperm count and semen progressive motility are related with telomere length. Our results suggest that sperm telomere length is associated with idiopathic male infertility of China and we proposed the possibility that shorter telomeres in sperm chromosome will reduce spermatogenesis and sperm functions, which finally affected the fertility of male.

  13. Evaluating Acquisition of Knowledge about Infertility Using a Whiteboard Video.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Ashley A; Brown, Meghan; Zhang, Shannon; Stern, Emily; Hahn, Philip M; Reid, Robert L

    2016-07-01

    Myths about fertility are commonplace in society. Few studies have investigated educational approaches to bridge gaps in knowledge among consumers. We evaluated the effectiveness of an animated, 15-minute whiteboard video to effect change in knowledge about infertility. We recruited medical students in their first or second year of training for participation. The students completed the study before their formal lectures on infertility issues. Participants completed questionnaires assessing infertility knowledge immediately before and one week after watching the educational video. Before and after scores (maximum = 50 points) were compared using paired t tests. The study cohort included 101 medical students; 69% (70/101) were female and 31% (31/101) were male. Overall, students increased their score by 4.0/50 (95% CI 3.2 to 4.8, P < 0.001) from 36.5/50 to 40.5/50. Female students improved slightly more in their responses than did male students (mean improvement 4.7/50 vs. 2.5/50). A whiteboard video presentation on infertility resulted in short-term improvement in medical students' knowledge of basic reproductive biology, infertility risk factors, treatments, and common myths associated with infertility. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada/La Société des obstétriciens et gynécologues du Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [The role of parasites and fungi in secondary infertility].

    PubMed

    Kranjcić-Zec, Ivana; Dzamić, Aleksander; Mitrović, Sanja; Arsić-Arsenijević, Valentina; Radonjić, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    Parasite-host relationships can cause diminished or absent ability to conceive, ectopic pregnancy or pregnancy with undesired course. There are reports that some protozoa, helminths and fungi may impair women's reproductive capacity, causing deformities of genital tract, so that conception is impossible, or, if it does occur, normal implantation and development of placenta are impossible. Schistosoma haematobium may cause vulvar papule, swelling, tumors, irregular vaginal hemorrhage, tubular infertility and ectopic pregnancies. Patients with cirrhosis caused by schistosomas have gonadal dysfunction and schistosomiasis itself can lead to tubular infertility. Some authors found microfilaria of Mansonella perstans in follicular aspirates in patients with tubular adhesions. Chronic Entamoeba histolytica infection can cause pelvic pain and dyspareunia in some patients. Although Trichomonas vaginalis is a common cause of tubal inflammation, this protozoa affects semen quality and leads to secondary infertility. Soluble parasite extract of T. vaginalis can lead to impaired motility of 50% spermatozoa in vitro and affects semen quality by increased viscosity and amount of debris, or damage spermatozoid membrane. In enterobiosis, presence of adult worms and eggs in fallopian tube, can be followed by chronic salpingitis and tubal occlusion. Also in ascariosis, presence of adult forms and eggs can lead to acute colpitis. chronic endometritis, salpingitis or ovarian abscess. The consequence of fungal infections, such as colpitis and endometritis, caused by Candida albicans, may be infertility. Also, according to some reports, C. albicans leads to decreased spermatozoan motility. Hence parasites and fungi can cause infertility, we recommend examination of both partners in treatment of infertility.

  15. Endometriosis and uterine malformations: infertility may increase severity of endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Boujenah, Jeremy; Salakos, Eleonora; Pinto, Mélodie; Shore, Joanna; Sifer, Christophe; Poncelet, Christophe; Bricou, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    The aim of our study was to compare the stage and severity of endometriosis in fertile and infertile women with congenital uterine malformations. We performed an observational study from September 2007 to December 2015 in a tertiary care university hospital and assisted reproductive technology center. A total of 52 patients with surgically proven uterine malformations were included. We compared 41 infertile patients with uterine malformations with 11 fertile patients with uterine malformation. The main outcome was the stage, score and type of endometriosis in regard to infertility and class of uterine malformation. The rate of endometriosis did not differ between the two groups (43.9 vs. 36.4%). The mean revised American Fertility Society score was higher in infertile patients with uterine malformations (19.02 vs. 6, p < 0.05). No significant difference was found in the rate of superficial peritoneal endometriosis (43.9 vs. 37.5%). Endometrioma and deep infiltrating endometriosis were associated with uterine malformations in infertile women, respectively 14.6 and 0%. No difference in the characteristics of endometriosis was found regarding the class of malformation. The association of uterine malformations and infertility may increase the severity of endometriosis and raise the issue of their diagnosis and management. © 2016 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  16. The Genetics of Infertility: Current Status of the Field

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla, Michelle; Yatsenko, Alexander N

    2013-01-01

    Infertility is a relatively common health condition, affecting nearly 7% of all couples. Clinically, it is a highly heterogeneous pathology with a complex etiology that includes environmental and genetic factors. It has been estimated that nearly 50% of infertility cases are due to genetic defects. Hundreds of studies with animal knockout models convincingly showed infertility to be caused by gene defects, single or multiple. However, despite enormous efforts, progress in translating basic research findings into clinical studies has been challenging. The genetic causes remain unexplained for the vast majority of male or female infertility patients. A particular difficulty is the huge number of candidate genes to be studied; there are more than 2,300 genes expressed in the testis alone, and hundreds of those genes influence reproductive function in humans and could contribute to male infertility. At present, there are only a handful of genes or genetic defects that have been shown to cause, or to be strongly associated with, primary infertility. Yet, with completion of the human genome and progress in personalized medicine, the situation is rapidly changing. Indeed, there are 10-15 new gene tests, on average, being added to the clinical genetic testing list annually. PMID:24416713

  17. Male infertility: a critical review of pharmacologic management.

    PubMed

    Hamada, Alaa J; Montgomery, Brian; Agarwal, Ashok

    2012-12-01

    Male factor infertility contributes partially and solely to the problem of childlessness in around 50% of the cases. Unfortunately, 30 - 50% of the etiologies of male infertility are unknown and therefore, no specific therapy can be instituted. Evidence-based medical therapy for male infertility is an attractive research area where a large number of clinical trials, controlled and uncontrolled, using different types of medications have been conducted yielding variable results and outcomes. In this review, we summarize and evaluate the most important and most recent information pertaining to the use of different medications in male infertility and assign level of evidence to these medications. An extensive literature search was performed using the search engines: Pubmed, Science-direct, Ovid and Scopus. Male infertility represents a very challenging area of clinical medicine. Many different types of medications have been tried and very few have had satisfactory results. There is a huge need to advance and develop andrologic diagnostic techniques, focusing on the metabolomics and proteomics of the sperm, seminal plasma, and testicular tissue. Clarification of the causes of idiopathic male infertility and the discovery of novel molecular targets will help guide future innovative development of new pharmacologic agents.

  18. The role of intrauterine insemination in male infertility.

    PubMed

    Akanji Tijani, Hammed; Bhattacharya, Siladitya

    2010-12-01

    Male infertility is a common condition and intrauterine insemination (IUI) is used to treat the mild to moderate forms. Male subfertility determination is usually based on routine semen analysis but recent publications have questioned its diagnostic and prognostic accuracy as well as the effectiveness of IUI itself, as a treatment modality. We carried out a structured review of the literature to assess the current evidence regarding the diagnosis of male infertility, the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of IUI in male infertility and factors that affect the outcome of IUI. There is still uncertainty regarding the criteria for diagnosing male infertility and predicting treatment outcome based on standard semen parameters. The presence of seminal defects compromises the outcome of IUI in comparison with unexplained infertility. The total motile sperm count (TMSC) appears to have a consistent, direct relationship with treatment outcome, but there is no definite predictive threshold for success. However, it is reasonable to offer IUI as first-line treatment if TMSC is greater than 10 million when balancing the risk and cost of alternate treatments, such as in vitro fertilization (IVF). Sperm DNA studies and sperm preparation techniques warrant further studies in order to establish their clinical relevance. There are limited data on the clinical and cost-effectiveness of IUI in male infertility and large high-quality randomized controlled trials are warranted. However the difficulties in organizing such a study, at the present time, are a matter for discussion.

  19. Pregnancy rate following bromocriptine treatment in infertile women with galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Eftekhari, Nahid; Mohammadalizadeh, Sakineh

    2009-02-01

    Infertility is one of the most common causes of women refer to gynecology clinics. Galactorrhea is defined as one of the causes of infertility caused by luteal phase defect and anovulatory cycles. The study aim was to investigate the effect of bromocriptine on pregnancy rate in infertile women with galactorrhea with or without high prolactin level. In a prospective study, consecutive women with infertility and galactorrhea who referred to Afzalipour Hospital and a private clinic during 5 years from May 2001 to May 2006 were included. The study was conducted on 205 infertile women (18-39 years) with galactorrhea. They were treated with 2.5 mg bromocriptine BID for up to 6 months. The mean duration of sterility was 43.1 +/- 37.1 months (range, 12-16). 76.1% of patients showed positive signs for pregnancy. The pregnancy rate was 81.7% in the patients with high prolactin level (>20 ng/dl) and 74.3% in the patients with normal prolactin level (P = 0.26). There was a significant difference between mean duration of treatment with bromocriptine in women with and without pregnancy, 103.71 and 193.03 days, respectively (P < 0.001). Considering the efficacy of bromocriptine in the treatment of infertile women with galactorrhea, we suggest treatment with bromocriptine in these patients regardless of serum prolactin level.

  20. Online psychoeducational support for infertile women: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Cousineau, Tara M.; Green, Traci C.; Corsini, Evelyn; Seibring, A; Showstack, Marianne T.; Applegarth, Linda; Davidson, Marie; Perloe, Mark

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND The study goal was to develop and test the effectiveness of a brief online education and support program for female infertility patients. METHODS A randomized-controlled trial was conducted. Using a Solomon-four group design, 190 female patients were recruited from three US fertility centers and were randomized into two experimental and two no-treatment control groups. The psychological outcomes assessed included infertility distress, infertility self-efficacy, decisional conflict, marital cohesion and coping style. Program dosage and satisfaction were also assessed at four weeks follow-up. RESULTS Women exposed to the online program significantly improved in the area of social concerns (P = 0.038) related to infertility distress, and felt more informed about a medical decision with which they were contending (P = 0.037). Trends were observed for decreased global stress (P = 0.10), sexual concerns (P = 0.059), distress related to child-free living (P = 0.063), increased infertility self-efficacy (P = 0.067) and decision making clarity (P = 0.079). A dosage response was observed in the experimental groups for women who spent >60 min online for decreased global stress (P = 0.028) and increased self efficacy (P = 0.024). CONCLUSIONS This evidence-based eHealth program for women experiencing infertility suggests that a web-based patient education intervention can have beneficial effects in several psychological domains and may be a cost effective resource for fertility practices. PMID:18089552

  1. Absence of Sperm Rna Elements Correlates With Idopathic Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Jodar, Meritxell; Sendler, Edward; Moskovtsev, Sergey I.; Librach, Clifford L.; Goodrich, Robert; Swanson, Sonja; Hauser, Russ; Diamond, Michael P.; Krawetz, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Semen parameters have been used to diagnose male infertility and specify clinical interventions.. In idiopathic infertile couples, an unknown male factor could be the cause of infertility even when the semen parameters are normal. Next Generation Sequencing of spermatozoal RNAs has provided an objective measure of the paternal contribution that may be able to help guide the care of these couples. Spermatozoal RNAs from 96 couples presenting with idiopathic infertility were assessed in the context of fertility treatment and final reproductive outcome and sperm RNA elements (SREs) reflective of fecundity status were identified. The absence of required SREs reduced the probability to achieve live birth by Timed Intercourse (TIC) or Intrauterine Insemination (IUI) from 73% to 27%. However, the absence of these same sperm RNA elements does not appear to be critical when assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) with or without Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI) are employed. Approximately 30% of the idiopathic infertile couples presented an incomplete set of required SREs suggesting a male component as the cause of their infertility. Similarly, analysis of couples that failed to achieve a live birth when presented with a complete set of SREs suggested that a female factor was perhaps involved as confirmed by their diagnosis. The data presented from this study suggests that SRE analysis has the potential to inform on the individual success rate of different fertility treatments to reduce the time to achieve live birth. PMID:26157032

  2. New studies link IUDs, infertility; say copper devices safer.

    PubMed

    1985-06-01

    2 studies sponsored by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) report direct evidence of a link between IUDs and infertility. Both studies indicate that copper-bearing IUDs are less likely than inert IUDs to lead to infertility, but increased risk was evident for both types of IUDs. 2 of the studies' authors said the findings confirm the current practice of many clinicians to discourage women who have no children from using IUDs as their contraceptive method. 1 study involved about 90% of the infertility specialists in Seattle. Janet R. Daling, Ph.D., University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine, and colleagues compared rates of IUD use in 159 childless women who had tubal infertility with an equal number of new mothers. They reached the following conclusions: using any IUD more than doubled (2.6 times) the risk of tubal infertility compared with not using an IUD; the type of IUD affected risk with Dalkon Shield users having 6.8 times the risk of tubal infertility compared with women who never used IUDs, Lippes Loop or Saf-Toil users having 3.2 times the risk, and Copper-7 or Copper-T users having 1.9 times the risk if a copper device was used at 1 time and a plastic device at another time but 1.3 times the risk if only a copper device was used; and the risk of tubal infertility for IUD users increased among women who did not have symptoms of infection as well as those who did. A 2nd larger study involved 7 infertility centers and collaborating hospitals. Dr. Daniel W. Cramer, Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, headed the investigation, which evaluated IUD use in 283 childless women with tubal infertility, 69 women with tubal infertility after 1 child, and 3833 new mothers. The Boston-based study found the following: overall the cumulative experience with all IUD use doubled (2.0 relative risk) the risk of tubal infertility; the type of IUD affected the risk of tubal infertility; no increased risk of

  3. Sperm chromatin integrity in young men with no experiences of infertility and men from idiopathic infertility couples.

    PubMed

    Rybar, R; Markova, P; Veznik, Z; Faldikova, L; Kunetkova, M; Zajicova, A; Kopecka, V; Rubes, J

    2009-06-01

    Damage to the genetic component of spermatozoa seems to play the main role in a majority of cases where current approaches fail to reveal the specific cause of male infertility. In this study, we compared semen quality in men assigned to two defined groups: men from couples with unexplained infertility - idiopathic infertility (A) and young men with no experiences of infertility (B). All samples were examined by standard ejaculate analysis and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Sperm chromatin damage was significantly higher in men from group A than in those from group B. Similar results were obtained by comparison of men from group A (all men were normozoospermic) with normozoospermic men from group B. According to these results, we can suppose that chromatin disorders may be the causal factor of subfertility or infertility in some of these men. No evidence for a strong association between chromatin disorders and standard parameters of ejaculates was found. We failed to confirm a relationship between smoking and sperm quality in men from any of the investigated groups. SCSA is a method that facilitates the identification of infertile men who otherwise show normal semen variables.

  4. Efficacy of aphrodisiac plants towards improvement in semen quality and motility in infertile males.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ghanashyam Keshav; Mahajan, Arun Yashwant; Mahajan, Raghunath Totaram

    2012-02-17

    Infertility is the inability to conceive after one year of unprotected intercourse. In the present study, herbal composition prepared by using medicinal plants having aphrodisiac potentials was administered orally to the albino rats for 40 days and to the oligospermic patients for 90 days in order to prove the efficacy of herbal composition. Herbal composition was the mixture (powder form) of the medicinal plants namely, Mucuna pruriens (Linn), Chlorophytum borivillianum (Sant and Fernand), and Eulophia campestris (Wall). In the neem oil treated albino rats, there was significant reduction in almost all the parameters viz. body weight, testes and epididymes weight, sperm density and motility, serum levels of testosterone, FSH, and LH compared with control rats. Treatment with said herbal composition for 40 days results significant increased in the body weight, testis, and epididymes weight in rats. Concomitantly the sperm motility and the sperm density were significantly increased. After 90 days of treatment with this herbal composition, sperm density vis-a-vis motility was increased in oligozoospermic patients as a result of elevation in serum testosterone levels. No side effects were noticed during the entire duration of the trial.

  5. Variation in distress among women with infertility: evidence from a population-based sample†

    PubMed Central

    Greil, Arthur L.; Shreffler, Karina M.; Schmidt, Lone; McQuillan, Julia

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND We examine variation in fertility-specific distress (FSD) and general distress according to different experiences of infertility among 1027 US women who have experienced infertility within the previous 10 years. METHODS General distress was measured by a short form of the Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression. Multiple regression analysis was conducted on self-report data (based on a telephone interview) from a probability-based sample of US women aged 25–45 years. We compare women with infertility who have had a prior pregnancy (secondary infertility, n = 628) to women with infertility with no prior pregnancies (primary infertility, n = 399). We further distinguish between women with infertility who were actually ‘trying’ to become pregnant (the infertile with intent) with those who met the medical definition of infertile but did not describe themselves as trying to become pregnant (infertile without intent). RESULTS Both types of infertility (primary versus secondary) (β = 0.31*) and intentionality (infertile with and without intent) (β = 0.08*) are associated with FSD. These associations persist when we control for resource and demographic variables, life course variables, social support and social pressure variables. General distress does not vary by infertility type or intentionality. CONCLUSIONS Results reveal variation in women's recalled experiences of infertility and that FSD is more sensitive to effects of different experiences than general distress. Women with primary infertility who were explicitly trying to become pregnant at the time of the infertility episode stand out as a particularly distressed group. Caregivers should be aware that the emotional needs of women with primary infertility may differ from those with secondary infertility. PMID:21659313

  6. Human oocyte cryopreservation in infertility and oncology.

    PubMed

    Porcu, Eleonora; Bazzocchi, Antonia; Notarangelo, Leonardo; Paradisi, Roberto; Landolfo, Chiara; Venturoli, Stefano

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the present state of research and clinical application of human oocyte cryopreservation in infertility and oncology. Recent literature documents have an increasing interest in cryopreserving human eggs. A number of studies report on different freezing protocols and various types of clinical application. Increasing attention is paid to vitrification as an alternative to slow cooling for oocyte cryopreservation. Several studies cover the modification of meiotic spindle during cryopreservation in order to assess the less damaging cryopreservation system. The first births with cryopreserved oocytes in cancer patients are reported. Egg freezing may circumvent the ethical and legal concerns regarding embryo cryopreservation, increase assisted reproduction flexibility and be a concrete option to save fertility in women with cancer. Recently, egg survival and pregnancy rates improved, with the birth of more than 500 children. The birth rate per thawed oocyte is around 5-6%. As regards safety, data on birth defects seems to be reassuring so far but must be monitored by an international registry. Comparative studies between slow freezing and vitrification in the same patient population are needed to elucidate pros and cons of each technique.

  7. Obesity, male infertility, and the sperm epigenome.

    PubMed

    Craig, James R; Jenkins, Timothy G; Carrell, Douglas T; Hotaling, James M

    2017-04-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic and a common problem among reproductive-age men that can both cause and exacerbate male-factor infertility by means of endocrine abnormalities, associated comorbidities, and direct effects on the fidelity and throughput of spermatogenesis. Robust epidemiologic, clinical, genetic, epigenetic, and nonhuman animal data support these findings. Recent works in the burgeoning field of epigenetics has demonstrated that paternal obesity can affect offspring metabolic and reproductive phenotypes by means of epigenetic reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells. Understanding the impact of this reprogramming is critical to a comprehensive view of the impact of obesity on subsequent generations. Furthermore, and perhaps more importantly, conveying the impact of these lifestyle changes on future progeny can serve as a powerful tool for obese men to modify their behavior. Reproductive urologists and endocrinologists must learn to assimilate these new findings to better counsel men about the importance of paternal preconception health, a topic recently being championed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Magnetic resonance imaging structured reporting in infertility.

    PubMed

    Montoliu-Fornas, Guillermina; Martí-Bonmatí, Luis

    2016-06-01

    Our objective was to define and propose a standardized magnetic resonance (MR) imaging structured report in patients with infertility to have clinical completeness on possible diagnosis and severity. Patients should be studied preferable on 3T equipment with a surface coil. Standard MR protocol should include high-resolution fast spin-echo T2-weighted, diffusion-weighted images and gradient-echo T1-weighted fat suppression images. The report should include ovaries (polycystic, endometrioma, tumor), oviduct (hydrosalpinx, hematosalpinx, pyosalpinx, peritubal anomalies), uterus (agenesia, hypoplasia, unicornuate, uterus didelphys, bicornuate, septate uterus), myometrium (leiomyomas, adenomyosis), endometrium (polyps, synechia, atrophy, neoplasia), cervix and vagina (isthmoceles, mucosal-parietal irregularity, stenosis, neoplasia), peritoneum (deep endometriosis), and urinary system-associated abnormalities. To be clinically useful, radiology reports must be structured, use standardized terminology, and convey actionable information. The structured report must comprise complete, comprehensive, and accurate information, allowing radiologists to continuously interact with patients and referring physicians to confirm that the information is used properly to affect the decision making process.

  9. Endocrine autoimmune diseases and female infertility.

    PubMed

    Sen, Aritro; Kushnir, Vitaly A; Barad, David H; Gleicher, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence suggests that immune-mediated processes affect female reproductive success at multiple levels. Crosstalk between endocrine and immune systems regulates a large number of biological processes that affect target tissues, and this crosstalk involves gene expression, cytokine and/or lymphokine release and hormone action. In addition, endocrine-immune interactions have a major role in the implantation process of the fetal (paternally derived) semi-allograft, which requires a reprogramming process of the maternal immune system from rejection to temporary tolerance for the length of gestation. Usually, the female immune system is supportive of all of these processes and, therefore, facilitates reproductive success. Abnormalities of the female immune system, including autoimmunity, potentially interfere at multiple levels. The relevance of the immune system to female infertility is increasingly recognized by investigators, but clinically is often not adequately considered and is, therefore, underestimated. This Review summarizes the effect of individual autoimmune endocrine diseases on female fertility, and points towards selected developments expected in the near future.

  10. Infertility in men with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Takeshi; Okada, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) predominantly affects young adults. Fertility-related issues are therefore important in the management of patients with IBD. However, relatively modest attention has been paid to reproductive issues faced by men with IBD. To investigate the effects of IBD and its treatment on male fertility, we reviewed the current literature using a systematic search for published studies. A PubMed search were performed using the main search terms “IBD AND male infertility”, “Crohn’s disease AND male infertility”, “ulcerative colitis AND male infertility”. References in review articles were used if relevant. We noted that active inflammation, poor nutrition, alcohol use, smoking, medications, and surgery may cause infertility in men with IBD. In surgery such as proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis, rectal incision seems to be associated with sexual dysfunction. Of the medications used for IBD, sulfasalazine reversibly reduces male fertility. No other medications appear to affect male fertility significantly, although small studies suggested some adverse effects. There are limited data on the effects of drugs for IBD on male fertility and pregnancy outcomes; however, patients should be informed of the possible effects of paternal drug exposure. This review provides information on fertility-related issues in men with IBD and discusses treatment options. PMID:27602237

  11. Knockdown of hypothalamic RFRP3 prevents chronic stress-induced infertility and embryo resorption

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Anna C; Muroy, Sandra E; Zhao, Sheng; Bentley, George E; Kriegsfeld, Lance J; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Whereas it is well established that chronic stress induces female reproductive dysfunction, whether stress negatively impacts fertility and fecundity when applied prior to mating and pregnancy has not been explored. In this study, we show that stress that concludes 4 days prior to mating results in persistent and marked reproductive dysfunction, with fewer successful copulation events, fewer pregnancies in those that successfully mated, and increased embryo resorption. Chronic stress exposure led to elevated expression of the hypothalamic inhibitory peptide, RFamide-related peptide-3 (RFRP3), in regularly cycling females. Remarkably, genetic silencing of RFRP3 during stress using an inducible-targeted shRNA completely alleviates stress-induced infertility in female rats, resulting in mating and pregnancy success rates indistinguishable from non-stress controls. We show that chronic stress has long-term effects on pregnancy success, even post-stressor, that are mediated by RFRP3. This points to RFRP3 as a potential clinically relevant single target for stress-induced infertility. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04316.001 PMID:25581095

  12. The effect of mahogunin gene mutant on reproduction in male mice: a new sight for infertility?

    PubMed

    Cheng, D; Xiong, C; Li, J; Sui, C; Wang, S; Li, H; Jiang, X

    2014-03-01

    Mahogunin is an important mediator of chromogenesis and neurodegeneration. Mahoganoid is a mutation of the mahogunin gene, which causes a pleiotropic phenotype that includes suppression of obesity, spongiform neurodegeneration and improvement of insulin sensitivity. Our previous research found that mahoganoid widely expressed in the male rat reproductive system, and mahoganoid-deficient mice have reduced embryonic viability. But the reproductive change in mahogunin knockout (md(nc) ) male mice has not been reported previously. Here, we report that the mahogunin mRNA also widely exists in reproductive system of male mice, and its mRNA expression in the testis was in accordance with the first spermatogenesis wave cycle. Moreover, we find that md(nc) male mice were able to mate with females but no pups are delivered. Besides, the sperms' active progressive motility and hormone secretion (E2, FSH, LH, PRL) were obviously decreased while abnormal sperm rate showed no significant difference in md(nc) compared to wild-type (WT) male mice. This study indicates the mahogunin deficiency results in the infertility of male mice, disruption of hormones secretion and impaired active progressive motility, which may additionally illuminate the aetiology of male infertility in human.

  13. Human parasitic protozoan infection to infertility: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shiadeh, Malihe Nourollahpour; Niyyati, Maryam; Fallahi, Shirzad; Rostami, Ali

    2016-02-01

    Protozoan parasitic diseases are endemic in many countries worldwide, especially in developing countries, where infertility is a major burden. It has been reported that such infections may cause infertility through impairment in male and female reproductive systems. We searched Medline, PubMed, and Scopus databases and Google scholar to identify the potentially relevant studies on protozoan parasitic infections and their implications in human and animal model infertility. Literature described that some of the protozoan parasites such as Trichomonas vaginalis may cause deformities of the genital tract, cervical neoplasia, and tubal and atypical pelvic inflammations in women and also non-gonoccocal urethritis, asthenozoospermia, and teratozoospermia in men. Toxopalasma gondii could cause endometritis, impaired folliculogenesis, ovarian and uterine atrophy, adrenal hypertrophy, vasculitis, and cessation of estrus cycling in female and also decrease in semen quality, concentration, and motility in male. Trypanosoma cruzi inhibits cell division in embryos and impairs normal implantation and development of placenta. Decrease in gestation rate, infection of hormone-producing glands, parasite invasion of the placenta, and overproduction of inflammatory cytokines in the oviducts and uterine horns are other possible mechanisms induced by Trypanosoma cruzi to infertility. Plasmodium spp. and Trypanosoma brucei spp. cause damage in pituitary gland, hormonal disorders, and decreased semen quality. Entamoeba histolytica infection leads to pelvic pain, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess, and genital ulcers. Cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis can induce genital lesion, testicular amyloidosis, inflammation of epididymis, prostatitis, and sperm abnormality in human and animals. In addition, some epidemiological studies have reported that rates of protozoan infections in infertile patients are higher than healthy controls. The current review indicates that protozoan parasitic

  14. Quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Fatima, P; Ishrat, S; Rahman, D; Banu, J; Deeba, F; Begum, N; Anwary, S A; Hossain, H B

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is an important health issue which has been neglected in the developing countries. First test-tube babies (triplet) in Bangladesh were born on 30th May, 2001. Although there is no tertiary level infertility center in the public sector, several private centers have come up with the facilities. The objective of the study was to find i) the quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh and ii) the cause of infertility in the attending patients iii) the treatment seeking behaviors iv) and the reasons for not taking treatment among the attending patients. There are now 10 tertiary level Infertility centers in Bangladesh. The information was collected in a preformed datasheet about the facilities and the profile of the patients and the treatment seeking behavior of the attending patients. Out of the ten centers two centers refused to respond and did not disclose their data. Around 16700 new patients are enrolled in a year in the responsive clinics. Five percent (5%) of the patients underwent ART, 7% of the patients gave only one visit, 84% of the patients completed their evaluation, 76% of the patients took treatment. Causes of infertility in the patients taking treatment were male factor in 36.4%, bilateral tubal block in 20.2%, PCOS and anovulation in 31.7%, endometriosis in 19.6%, unexplained in 10.95, combined in 3.5%, ovarian failure in 1.4%, testicular failure in 0.33%, congenital anomaly in 0.3%. The main reason for not taking treatment was financial constrainment. The quality and quantity of infertility care is dependent on the available resources and on the use of the resources by the patients. In developing countries the resources are merging and confined to specified areas which cannot meet the demand of their population. The study gives us the idea of the need and the demand of the services in the country.

  15. Sexually Transmitted Disease and Male Infertility: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fode, Mikkel; Fusco, Ferdinando; Lipshultz, Larry; Weidner, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Theoretically, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) have the potential to disrupt male fertility; however, the topic remains controversial. To describe the possible association between STDs and male infertility and to explore possible pathophysiologic mechanisms. We performed a systematic literature review in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles published before January 1, 2016, using the MeSH terms for a variety of STDs and infertility. The search was restricted to human studies performed in men and published in English. Studies were included if they contained original data on a possible association or a cause-and-effect relationship between STD and male infertility. Studies were considered only if they included an appropriate control group and/or comprehensive laboratory data. Due to heterogeneity in the literature, a qualitative analysis was performed. Relevant studies on Chlamydia trachomatis, genital mycoplasmas, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and viral infections were identified. For all pathogens, the studies were contradictory and generally of limited quality. In studies confirming an association, there was a tendency for authors to perform multiple analyses without appropriate corrections and to subsequently focus solely on outcomes that seemed to suggest a positive association; however, the body of literature that does not confirm an association between STDs and male infertility is also of inadequate quality. The data regarding possible pathophysiologic mechanisms are inconclusive. There may be an association between STDs and male infertility of unknown genesis and possibly with different pathogenic mechanisms for different pathogens. Alternatively, some STDs may cause male infertility, whereas others may not; however, there is hardly a strong correlation. High-quality studies of the subject are needed. Sexually transmitted diseases may cause male infertility through

  16. Perfluoroalkyl substances and endometriosis-related infertility in Chinese women.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Rongrong; Jin, Fan; Lou, Hangying; Mao, Yuchan; Zhu, Wenting; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Ping; Zhang, Jun

    2017-03-07

    Endometriosis is one of the main causes for female infertility. Previous studies suggested that perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), a group of ubiquitous environmental chemicals with properties of endocrine disruption and reproductive toxicity, were risk factors for endometriosis but there lacks direct evidence on the possible role of PFASs in endometriosis-related infertility. To fill this gap, we examined the association between PFASs and endometriosis-related infertility among Chinese reproductive-age women in a case-control study, which comprised 157 surgically confirmed endometriosis cases and 178 controls seeking infertility treatment because of male reproductive dysfunction in 2014 and 2015. Blood specimens were collected at the enrollment and analyzed for ten PFASs. Logistic regression was utilized to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for individual PFAS compound. Plasma concentrations of perfluorobutane sulfonic acid (PFBS) were associated with an increased risk of endometriosis-related infertility (second vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.74, 95% CI: 2.04, 6.84; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.04, 95% CI: 1.65, 5.57). This association remained consistent when we restricted to subjects with no previous pregnancy (second vs. lowest tertile: OR=2.91, 95% CI: 1.28, 6.61; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.41, 95% CI: 1.52, 7.65) or to subjects without other gynecologic pathology (second vs. lowest tertile: OR=4.65, 95% CI: 2.21, 9.82; highest vs. lowest tertile: OR=3.36, 95% CI: 1.58, 7.15). Plasma concentrations of perfluoroheptanoic acid (PFHpA), perfluorohexane sulfonic acid (PFHxS) and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were inversely associated with endometriosis-related infertility, but the associations were attenuated in the sensitivity analyses. Our preliminary evidence suggests that exposure to PFBS may increase the risk of female infertility due to endometriosis. Future prospective studies are necessary to confirm these

  17. A qualitative study of Ottawa university students' awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART).

    PubMed

    Sabarre, Kelley-Anne; Khan, Zainab; Whitten, Amanda N; Remes, Olivia; Phillips, Karen P

    2013-08-20

    Awareness of infertility risk factors is an essential first step to safeguard future fertility. Whereas several studies have examined university students' awareness of female fertility and related risk factors, the topic of male infertility has not been well examined. The objective of this study was to assess young men and women's awareness, knowledge and perceptions of infertility, male and female infertility risk factors and assisted reproductive technologies (ART). Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2008 with a multi-ethnic sample of sixteen male and twenty-three female Ottawa university students, followed by qualitative data analysis to identify major themes. Interview topics included awareness of male and female infertility risk factors, infertility diagnosis/treatments and personal options in the event of future infertility. Participants were generally familiar with infertility as a biomedical health problem, could identify sex-specific risk factors but overestimated fertility of women in their thirties and ART success rates. Reproductive health knowledge gaps and confusion of the physiological life-stage of menopause with infertility were apparent. Most participants would pursue in vitro fertilization or international adoption in the event of personal infertility. Some participants wished to use a 'natural' approach and were concerned with potential side effects of ART-related medications. The general awareness of infertility in young adults is promising and supports the potential uptake for health promotion of fertility preservation. This study underscores the continued need for comprehensive sexual and reproductive health education and promotion for adolescents and young adults.

  18. Chromosomal polymorphisms are associated with female infertility and adverse reproductive outcomes after infertility treatment: a 7-year retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ran; Ma, Yaxian; Nie, Ying; Qiao, Xiaoyong; Yang, Zhilan; Zeng, Rujun; Xu, Liangzhi

    2017-07-01

    Data from 19,950 women were retrospectively analysed to determine the effect of chromosomal polymorphisms on female infertility and pregnancy outcome; fertile women were used as controls. Frequency of chromosomal polymorphisms and adverse pregnancy outcomes were compared between groups. A significantly higher incidence of chromosomal polymorphisms was found in total infertile patients, and patients with tubal infertility, ovulatory dysfunction, cervical and uterine abnormalities, and unexplained infertility compared with controls (5.53% [P < 0.001], 4.86% [P = 0.012] 5.40% [P < 0.001], 5.75% [P < 0.001] and 8.51% [P < 0.001], versus 3.74%, respectively). Infertile women had a higher incidence of 9qh+ and inv(9) compared with controls (P < 0.001 and P = 0.027). Logistic regression analysis showed an effect of chromosomal polymorphisms on female infertility (adjusted OR 1.662, 95% CI 1.551 to 1.796, P < 0.001). All couples reported a phenotypically normal baby. In control and tubal infertility groups, miscarriage rates were higher in women with chromosomal polymorphisms than in women with normal chromosomes (4.95% versus 0.96%, P = 0.001 and 6.17% versus 1.08%, P < 0.001). Preterm birth rate showed a similar trend. Chromosomal polymorphisms adversely affected spontaneous miscarriage rates (adjusted OR 1.625, 95% CI 1.514 to 1.769, P = 0.005). Copyright © 2017 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Empirical medical therapy in idiopathic male infertility: Promise or panacea?

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hung

    2014-01-01

    Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility and in 25% of cases, the etiology of male infertility is unknown. Effective treatments are well-established for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, male accessory gland infection, retrograde ejaculation, and positive antisperm antibody. However, the appropriate treatment for idiopathic male infertility is unclear. Empirical medical treatment (EMT) has been used in men with idiopathic infertility and can be divided into two categories based on the mode of action: hormonal treatment and antioxidant supplementation. Hormonal medications consist of gonadotropins, androgens, estrogen receptor blockers, and aromatase inhibitors. Antioxidants such as vitamins, zinc, and carnitines have also been widely used to reduce oxidative stress-induced spermatozoa damage. Although scientifically acceptable evidence of EMT is limited because of the lack of large, randomized, controlled studies, recent systematic reviews with meta-analyses have shown that the administration of gonadotropins, anti-estrogens, and oral antioxidants results in a significant increase in the live birth rate compared with control treatments. Therefore, all physicians who treat infertility should bear in mind that EMT can improve semen parameters and subsequent fertility potential through natural intercourse. PMID:25309854

  20. Microbiota of the seminal fluid from healthy and infertile men

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Dongsheng; Zhou, Xia; Zhong, Xue; Settles, Matt; Herring, Jessica; Wang, Li; Abdo, Zaid; Forney, Larry J.; Xu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To explore potential causes of male infertility by determining the composition and structure of commensal bacterial communities in seminal fluids. Design: Microscopy of gram stained semen samples and classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences to determine the species composition of semen bacterial communities. Setting(s): Clinical andrology laboratory and academic research laboratories. Patient(s): 19 sperm donors and 58 infertility patients. Intervention(s): None. Main Outcome Measure(s): Classification of 16S rRNA gene sequences, clustering of seminal microbial communities, and multiple statistical tests. Result(s): High numbers of diverse kinds of bacteria were present in most samples of both sperm donors and infertility patients. The bacterial communities varied widely between subjects, but they could be clustered into six groups based on similarities in composition and the rank abundances of taxa. Overall there were no significant differences between sperm donors and infertility patients. However, multiple statistical tests showed a significant negative association between sperm quality and the presence of Anaerococcus. The results also indicated that many of the bacterial taxa identified in semen also occur in the vaginal communities of some women, especially those with bacterial vaginosis, which suggests heterosexual sex partners may share bacteria. Conclusion(s): Diverse kinds of bacteria were present in the human semen, there were no significant differences between sperm donors and infertility patients, The presence of Anaerococcus might be a biomarker for low sperm quality. PMID:23993888

  1. [Infertility over forty: Pros and cons of IVF].

    PubMed

    Belaisch-Allart, J; Maget, V; Mayenga, J-M; Grefenstette, I; Chouraqui, A; Belaid, Y; Kulski, O

    2015-09-01

    The population attempting pregnancy and having babies is ageing. The declining fertility potential and the late age of motherhood are increasing significantly the number of patients over forty consulting infertility specialists. Assisted reproductive technologies (ART) cannot compensate the natural decline in fertility with age. In France, in public hospital, ART is free of charge for women until 43 years, over 43, social insurance does not reimburse ART. Hence, 43 years is the usual limit, but between 40 and 42 is ART useful? The answer varies according to physicians, couples or society. On medical level, the etiology of the infertility must be taken into account. If there is an explanation to infertility (male or tubal infertility) ART is better than abstention. If the infertility is only due to age the question is raised. In France, the reimbursement by the society of a technique with very low results is discussed. However efficacy is not absolutely compulsory in Medicine. On the opposite to give false hopes may be discussed too. To obtain a reasonable consensus is rather difficult.

  2. Cellular and molecular basis for endometriosis-associated infertility.

    PubMed

    Stilley, Julie A W; Birt, Julie A; Sharpe-Timms, Kathy L

    2012-09-01

    Endometriosis is a gynecological disease characterized by the presence of endometrial glandular epithelial and stromal cells growing in the extra-uterine environment. The disease afflicts 10%-15% of menstruating women causing debilitating pain and infertility. Endometriosis appears to affect every part of a woman's reproductive system including ovarian function, oocyte quality, embryo development and implantation, uterine function and the endocrine system choreographing the reproductive process and results in infertility or spontaneous pregnancy loss. Current treatments are laden with menopausal-like side effects and many cause cessation or chemical alteration of the reproductive cycle, neither of which is conducive to achieving a pregnancy. However, despite the prevalence, physical and psychological tolls and health care costs, a cure for endometriosis has not yet been found. We hypothesize that endometriosis causes infertility via multifaceted mechanisms that are intricately interwoven thereby contributing to our lack of understanding of this disease process. Identifying and understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for endometriosis-associated infertility might help unravel the confounding multiplicities of infertility and provide insights into novel therapeutic approaches and potentially curative treatments for endometriosis.

  3. Tubal infertility in relation to prior induced abortion.

    PubMed

    Daling, J R; Weiss, N S; Voigt, L; Spadoni, L R; Soderstrom, R; Moore, D E; Stadel, B V

    1985-03-01

    One hundred twenty-seven women who had been given diagnoses of tubal infertility between 1979 and 1981 in King County, Washington, yet previously had been pregnant, were interviewed to determine their prior history of legally induced abortion. Their responses were compared with those of 395 women who conceived a child at the same time the infertile women began their unsuccessful attempt to become pregnant. In making the comparison, we adjusted for the effects of variables that in this population were related both to having an induced abortion and to the occurrence of infertility, i.e., age, number of prior pregnancies, number of sexual partners, cigarette smoking habits, Dalkon Shield (A. H. Robins Company, Richmond, VA) use, and whether the woman worked outside the home. The risk of tubal infertility in women who had had an induced abortion was not increased above that of other women (relative risk, 1.15; 95% confidence interval, 0.70 to 1.89). For women with two or more abortions, the relative risk was 1.29 (95% confidence interval, 0.39 to 4.20). When only the most recent pregnancy was considered, the relative risk was 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 0.72 to 1.97). Our results suggest that legal abortion, as performed during the past decade in the United States, does not carry an excess risk for future tubal infertility.

  4. Empirical medical therapy in idiopathic male infertility: Promise or panacea?

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Hung; Seo, Ju Tae

    2014-09-01

    Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility and in 25% of cases, the etiology of male infertility is unknown. Effective treatments are well-established for hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, male accessory gland infection, retrograde ejaculation, and positive antisperm antibody. However, the appropriate treatment for idiopathic male infertility is unclear. Empirical medical treatment (EMT) has been used in men with idiopathic infertility and can be divided into two categories based on the mode of action: hormonal treatment and antioxidant supplementation. Hormonal medications consist of gonadotropins, androgens, estrogen receptor blockers, and aromatase inhibitors. Antioxidants such as vitamins, zinc, and carnitines have also been widely used to reduce oxidative stress-induced spermatozoa damage. Although scientifically acceptable evidence of EMT is limited because of the lack of large, randomized, controlled studies, recent systematic reviews with meta-analyses have shown that the administration of gonadotropins, anti-estrogens, and oral antioxidants results in a significant increase in the live birth rate compared with control treatments. Therefore, all physicians who treat infertility should bear in mind that EMT can improve semen parameters and subsequent fertility potential through natural intercourse.

  5. Concordance of vitamin D peripheral levels in infertile couples' partners.

    PubMed

    Paffoni, Alessio; Ferrari, Stefania; Mangiarini, Alice; Noli, Stefania; Bulfoni, Alessandro; Vigano, Paola; Parazzini, Fabio; Somigliana, Edgardo

    2017-08-01

    A large number of evidence supports the role of vitamin D insufficiency in both women and men infertility. However, no studies have evaluated the rate of concordance of vitamin D status between the partners. This finding might open new scenarios in the interpretation of the available data linking vitamin D insufficiency and infertility. In the present cross-sectional study, 103 consecutive infertile couples were recruited between April and May 2014. Both partners concomitantly provided a serum sample for the assessment of 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25-(OH)-D]. Vitamin D insufficiency was defined as serum 25-(OH)-D <20 ng/ml. One hundred-fifty subjects (73 women and 77 males) were 25-(OH)-D insufficient, corresponding to a rate of 73%. Overall, concordance was observed in 73 couples (71%), thus higher than the expected 61% (0.732 + 0.272) based on chance (p = 0.007). The Pearson coefficient of correlation R2 between the partners of the couples was 0.52 (p < 0.001). No statistically significant differences emerged when evaluating the rate of 25-(OH)-D insufficiency according to the causes of infertility. Serum 25-(OH)-D correlates within the partners of infertile couples. Further evidence is warranted to determine the clinical relevance and possible clinical applications of this finding.

  6. Treatment of Leukocytospermia in Male Infertility: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Jae Hung; Kim, Myung Ha; Kim, Jiye; Baik, Soon Koo; Koh, Sang-Baek; Park, Hyun Jun

    2016-01-01

    Male factors account for 20% to 50% of infertility cases, and infection in the genitourinary tract may play a contributing role in up to 15% of male infertility. Leukocytospermia is a well-known indicator of infection or inflammation in the male sex glands and the urogenital tract. Although great deal of effort has been expended to elucidate definite management strategies in infertile men with leukocytospermia, the gold standard of treatment remains unclear. Until recently, broad spectrum antibiotics and antioxidants have been used in the treatment of leukocytospermia for male infertility to eliminate infection and reduce reactive oxygen free radicals produced inside cellular mitochondria as a result of inflammation. The present review reveals that antibiotics might improve sperm parameters, the rate of resolution of leukocytospermia, the bacteriologic cure rate, and even the pregnancy rate, although some reports conflict. Antioxidants might also have clinical benefits for sperm function as shown by in vitro studies. However, the data are insufficient to conclude whether antibiotics and antioxidants for the treatment of infertile men with leukocytospermia are effective or not. Better designed investigations into leukocytospermia are needed. PMID:28053945

  7. Research on infertility: which definition should we use?

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ulla

    2005-04-01

    Different definitions of infertility are used in clinical practice as well as in epidemiological and demographic research. This study assessed whether the definition makes a difference for estimates of the prevalence and sociodemographic differentials of infertility and whether one definition would be applicable in both research and clinical practice. Cross-sectional study. Moshi town in northern Tanzania. Community-based sample of 1,125 women, ages 20 to 44 years, in first union. Six definitions of infertility. Similar levels and sociodemographic characteristics of infertile women were obtained from asking the question "How long have you tried to get pregnant?" and from secondary data collected in a birth history that included date of marriage, date of last birth, current contraceptive use, and whether the woman wants another child. The infertility definition made a difference. The World Health Organization definition based on 24 months of trying to get pregnant is recommended as the definition that is useful in clinical practice and research among different disciplines.

  8. Clinical Outcomes of Varicocele Repair in Infertile Men: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Masato

    2016-01-01

    Varicoceles are a major cause of impaired spermatogenesis and the most common correctable cause of male infertility. They are found in approximately 40% of men with primary infertility and 80% of men with secondary infertility, although they also occur in 12% of men with normal semen parameters. The presence of a varicocele does not always affect spermatogenesis, as it has been reported that only 20% of men with documented varicoceles suffer fertility problems. However, varicocele repair appears to have beneficial effects in men with impaired semen parameters and palpable varicoceles. Currently, the main procedures employed for varicocele repair are microsurgical subinguinal or inguinal varicocelectomy, laparoscopic varicocelectomy, and radiological percutaneous embolization. Microsurgical varicocelectomy appears to be the optimal treatment in most cases, whereas the other procedures are useful only in specific cases. After treatment, it typically takes 3 to 6 months for patients' semen parameters to improve; thus, other therapies, including assisted reproductive technology, should be considered if infertility persists after this interval, especially in older couples. Controversies still remain regarding how varicoceles in certain subgroups, such as adolescents or men with azoospermia, should be treated. Due to their relatively high prevalence rate among the general population, varicoceles can occur concomitantly with other conditions that cause impaired spermatogenesis. Further studies are necessary in order to identify the patients who are most likely to benefit from treatment. In this review, we sought to summarize the issues currently associated with varicocele treatment in infertile men. PMID:27574593

  9. Infertility Education: Experiences and Preferences of Childhood Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Cherven, Brooke O; Mertens, Ann; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Williamson, Rebecca; Meacham, Lillian R

    2016-07-01

    The majority of children diagnosed with cancer will become long-term survivors; however, many will suffer late effects of treatment, including infertility. Educating patients about potential risk for infertility is important, yet little is known regarding when patients would like to hear this information. The purpose of this study was to assess young adult survivors' previous experience in receiving education about their risk for infertility and determine their preferences for infertility education at various time points during and after treatment. Only 36% of survivors report receiving education about risk for infertility at diagnosis, 39% at end of therapy, and 72% in long-term follow-up/survivor clinic visits. Survivors consistently identified their oncologist as a preferred educator at each time point. Although almost all participants identified wanting education at diagnosis, this time point alone may not be sufficient. End of therapy and survivorship may be times this message should be repeated and adapted for the survivor's needs and developmental stage: conversations about the impact of cancer treatment on future fertility should be ongoing. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  10. Association between endometriosis and hyperprolactinemia in infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilzadeh, Seddigheh; Mirabi, Parvaneh; Basirat, Zahra; Zeinalzadeh, Mahtab; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Background: The association of endometriosis with hyperprolactinemia is controversial. Objective: The present study aimed to determine the frequency of endometriosis and association of prolactin with endometriosis in infertile women. Materials and Methods: 256 infertile women who underwent diagnostic laparoscopy for the evaluation of infertility, referred to Fatemezahra Infertility and Reproductive Health Research Center were included in a cross-sectional study. The presence of endometriosis was evaluated. To investigate the association of endometriosis with hyperprolactinemia, the patients whose infertility was not caused by endometriosis were included as control group. Serum prolactin (PRL) level was measured in both groups. The comparison of basal serum PRL levels between the two groups was performed, using independent t-test. One way ANOVA was used to determine PRL association with endometriosis stages. Results: The frequency of endometriosis was found to be 29%. PRL levels were significantly higher in endometriosis group compared to control group (23.02±1.25 vs. 17.22±1.22 respectively, p=0.004). Statistically significant associations were found between staging of endometriosis and prolactin levels (p=0.01). Conclusion: Hyperprolactinemia may be associated with endometriosis and its progression. PMID:26000006

  11. Chlamydia trachomatis urogenital infection in women with infertility.

    PubMed

    Wilkowska-Trojniel, M; Zdrodowska-Stefanow, B; Ostaszewska-Puchalska, I; Zbucka, M; Wołczyński, S; Grygoruk, C; Kuczyński, W; Zdrodowski, M

    2009-01-01

    The study objective was to evaluate the prevalence of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis (C.tr.) infection in women with diagnosed infertility. The study involved patients from the Department of Gynecological Endocrinology and from the Center for Reproductive Medicine "Kriobank" in Bialystok. Female patients (n=71), aged 23-41, were divided into two groups according to the main diagnosis: A--tubal infertility (23) and B--infertility of another origin (48). For direct testing, PCR method was used to detect C.tr. infection in cervical samples (Roche, Molecular Systems, N.J., USA). Specific IgA and IgG anti-chlamydial antibodies in the serum were determined by immunoenzymatic assay (medac, Hamburg, Germany). Diagnostic procedures were performed at the Centre for STD Research and Diagnostics in Bialystok. In group A, C.tr. infection was detected in: 8.7% patients, in group B--8.3%. Specific anti-C.tr. antibodies IgA were detected in: 13.0% in group A and 6.3% in group B, IgG respectively in 39.1% and in 10.4%. 1. C.tr. infection is very important etiological factor of female infertility. 2. The detection of specific antichlamydial antibodies is a valuable, noninvasive diagnostic procedure. 3. Infertile women should be routinely tested for C.tr. infection.

  12. Study of Body Image in Fertile and Infertile Men

    PubMed Central

    Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Dadkhah, Asghar; Bagherpour, Ahmad; Ardakani, Zohreh Behjati; Kamali, Kourosh; Binaafar, Sima; Kosari, Haleh; Ghorbani, Behzad

    2011-01-01

    Background Body Image as a multidimensional entity is related to both physical and psychological aspects of the image one has of his or her own body. Lack/absence of an acceptable body image is one of the reasons of mental distress in infertile individuals. Methods In this study, an equal number (No=120) of fertile and infertile men attending Avicenna Infertility Clinic (AIC) were enrolled. The participants were compared in regard to body image variables based on the "Multidimensional Body-Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ)" consisting of 10 subscales. Data was analyzed by SPSS, version 11.5, using Chi square and independent t-tests. Results Fertile men had a more positive body image as compared to infertile individuals. Significant statistical differences were observed when body image subscales were compared in both groups; in other words appearance evaluation, appearance orientation, Novy, health evaluation, health orientation, illness orientation, body satisfaction, overweight preoccupation and self-classified weight showed differences, while no significant difference was observed in regard to fitness orientation. Conclusion It seems that the ability and efficiency of body image is affected by infertility leading to dissatisfaction of one's body image. PMID:23926517

  13. Infertility evaluation and management. Strategies for family physicians.

    PubMed Central

    Case, Allison M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review family physicians' role in investigation and management of infertile couples. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: MEDLINE and PubMed were searched using the MeSH headings infertility, advanced maternal age, polycystic ovarian syndrome, clomiphene citrate, and insulin sensitizers. Bibliographies of review articles and textbooks were also searched. Review articles, randomized trials, observational studies, and case series are cited. MAIN MESSAGE: Approximately 8% of Canadian couples have difficulty conceiving. Mother's age significantly affects ability to conceive. Infertility assessment focuses on ovulatory dysfunction, tubal factors, sexual factors, and male factors. Women older than 35 years more than 12 months infertile; women younger than 35 more than 18 months infertile; women likely to have such problems as anovulation, tubal disease, or endometriosis; women whose partners' semen tests abnormal; and women who request referral should be referred. Patients treated with clomiphene citrate should be aware of its potential side effects. CONCLUSION: Family physicians have an important role in preconception counseling. Detailed and focused assessment facilitates initial investigations and treatment and can identify couples who could benefit from referral for further assessment. PMID:14649985

  14. Undescended testis and infertility-Is hormonal therapy indicated?

    PubMed

    Hollowell, Jean G

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to review hormonal therapy in cryptorchidism in boys to improve fertility. Multiple searches, primarily in PubMed, were performed using various combinations of the terms: cryptorchidism, undescended testis (UDT), hormonal therapy, fertility, infertility, germ cell numbers, spermatogonia and semen analyses. In additions the pertinent articles from the reference lists in these papers were also obtained and reviewed. Data on fertility in unilateral cryptorchidism does not reveal a significant risk for infertility. Testes biopsies in childhood do not correlate with fertility parameters in adulthood. In bilateral cryptorchidism there is a significant risk of infertility. Results of hormonal treatment were not reported separately for bilateral cryptorchidism. Current data is insufficient to know if hormonal therapy is efficacious in bilateral UDT. Hormonal therapy should not be used in childhood to improve fertility in cases of unilateral cryptorchidism. Testes biopsies in childhood to identify those at risk for infertility should not be performed in unilateral cryptorchidism. More data are needed to answer whether hormonal therapy is beneficial in bilateral UDT. There is insufficient data to establish that testis biopsies are helpful in bilateral cryptorchidism in identifying the subgroup with risk for infertility. They should not be performed in the routine clinical setting but may have a role in a research protocol.

  15. Seminal biomarkers for the evaluation of male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Bieniek, Jared M; Drabovich, Andrei P; Lo, Kirk C

    2016-01-01

    For men struggling to conceive with their partners, diagnostic tools are limited and often consist of only a standard semen analysis. This baseline test serves as a crude estimation of male fertility, leaving patients and clinicians in need of additional diagnostic biomarkers. Seminal fluid contains the highest concentration of molecules from the male reproductive glands, therefore, this review focuses on current and novel seminal biomarkers in certain male infertility scenarios, including natural fertility, differentiating azoospermia etiologies, and predicting assisted reproductive technique success. Currently available tests include antisperm antibody assays, DNA fragmentation index, sperm fluorescence in situ hybridization, and other historical sperm functional tests. The poor diagnostic ability of current assays has led to continued efforts to find more predictive biomarkers. Emerging research in the fields of genomics, epigenetics, proteomics, transcriptomics, and metabolomics holds promise for the development of novel male infertility biomarkers. Seminal protein-based assays of TEX101, ECM1, and ACRV1 are already available or under final development for clinical use. Additional panels of DNA, RNA, proteins, or metabolites are being explored as we attempt to understand the pathophysiologic processes of male infertility. Future ventures will need to continue data integration and validation for the development of clinically useful infertility biomarkers to aid in male infertility diagnosis, treatment, and counseling. PMID:26975492

  16. The biology of infertility: research advances and clinical challenges

    PubMed Central

    Matzuk, Martin M; Lamb, Dolores J

    2013-01-01

    Reproduction is required for the survival of all mammalian species, and thousands of essential ‘sex’ genes are conserved through evolution. Basic research helps to define these genes and the mechanisms responsible for the development, function and regulation of the male and female reproductive systems. However, many infertile couples continue to be labeled with the diagnosis of idiopathic infertility or given descriptive diagnoses that do not provide a cause for their defect. For other individuals with a known etiology, effective cures are lacking, although their infertility is often bypassed with assisted reproductive technologies (ART), some accompanied by safety or ethical concerns. Certainly, progress in the field of reproduction has been realized in the twenty-first century with advances in the understanding of the regulation of fertility, with the production of over 400 mutant mouse models with a reproductive phenotype and with the promise of regenerative gonadal stem cells. Indeed, the past six years have witnessed a virtual explosion in the identification of gene mutations or polymorphisms that cause or are linked to human infertility. Translation of these findings to the clinic remains slow, however, as do new methods to diagnose and treat infertile couples. Additionally, new approaches to contraception remain elusive. Nevertheless, the basic and clinical advances in the understanding of the molecular controls of reproduction are impressive and will ultimately improve patient care. PMID:18989307

  17. Different approaches to establish infertile rooster.

    PubMed

    Ghadimi, Fereshteh; Shakeri, Malak; Zhandi, Mahdi; Zaghari, Mojtaba; Piryaei, Abbas; Moslehifar, Parham; Rajabinejad, Alireza

    2017-08-26

    Several methods have been developed to suppress spermatogenesis in recipient males before spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) transplantation. The aim of this study was to compare two different methods of depleting endogenous spermatogenesis in recipient ROSS 308 strain adult roosters. Gamma-radiation and alkylating agent busulfan were utilized to infertilize adult roosters (ROSS 308 strain). Two radiation therapy regimes (based on (60)co isotope) were conducted locally to testes using 40Gy (5×8Gy with three-day intervals) and 30Gy (3×10Gy with three-day intervals). And two different levels of busulfan 60mg(40+20) and 50mg(30+20) with 10-day intervals were injected intraperitoneally. The results showed that both radiation therapy regimes and both busulfan levels reduced sperm motility and sperm concentration significantly compared with control group. Moreover, there were no significant differences between gamma radiation and busulfan treatments in progressive and total motility of sperm reduction. Sperm concentration reached to zero at the end of the 4th week of experiment in all treatment groups. Also histological examinations revealed that both treatments could significantly reduce the diameter of seminiferous tubules and thickness of epithelium. None of the treatments had significant effect on body weight in comparison with control group and the health status of experimental roosters remained good throughout the study. Given that, the risk probability of high doses of radiation exposure and busulfan, it can be concluded that the 30Gy (3×10Gy) and 50mg (30+20) are appropriate for suppression of endogenous spermatogenesis in mature roosters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. 2.5 Million U.S. Women Have Condition That Can Cause Infertility

    MedlinePlus

    ... Million U.S. Women Have Condition That Can Cause Infertility Pelvic inflammatory disease often caused by sexually transmitted ... infection of the reproductive tract that can cause infertility and lasting abdominal pain, a new U.S. government ...

  19. Infertility in the light of new scientific reports - focus on male factor.

    PubMed

    Szkodziak, Piotr; Wozniak, Slawomir; Czuczwar, Piotr; Wozniakowska, Ewa; Milart, Paweł; Mroczkowski, Artur; Paszkowski, Tomasz

    2016-06-02

    Epidemiological data indicate that infertility is a problem of global proportions, affecting one- fifth of couples trying to conceive worldwide (60-80 mln). According to the trends observed, the problem is predicted to increase by another two million cases annually. In Poland, infertility-related issues are found in about 19% of couples, including 4% with infertility and 15% with limited fertility. Inability to conceive occurs equally in men and women (50%), irrespective of the direct cause. Although it is generally thought that reproductive issues concern women, infertility affects men and women equally. This study is an attempted to systematize knowledge about the role of the male factor in infertility, particularly current knowledge concerning the environmental factors of infertility. For this purpose, the Medline and CINAHL databases and the Cochrane Library was searched for articles published in English during the last 10 years, using the following keywords: infertility, male factor, semen examination and environmental factor of infertility.

  20. Male infertility in China: laboratory finding for AZF microdeletions and chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men from Northeastern China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Xue; Fu, Chao; Yang, Ya-Ping; Han, Rong-Rong; Dong, Yuan; Dai, Ru-Lin; Liu, Rui-Zhi

    2010-07-01

    To investigate the frequencies of AZF microdeletions and chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men from Northeastern China. Moreover, to compare the prevalence of these abnormalities with other countries and regions in the world. 305 infertile men were enrolled. A complete semen analysis and reproductive hormones were measured according to standard methods. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using nine specific sequence-tagged sites (STS) were used to detect AZF microdeletions. Karyotype analyses were performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes with standard G-banding. Of the 305 infertile men, 28 (9.2%) had AZF microdeletions and 26 (8.5%) had chromosomal abnormalities. The most frequent microdeletions were in the AZFc+d, followed by AZFc, AZFb+c+d and AZFa. A total of 19 patients (82.6%) had Klinefelter's syndrome (47, XXY) in the azoospermic group. The freqencies of AZF microdeletions and chromosomal abnormalities in infertile men from Northeastern China were comparable with infertile men from other countries and regions. However, there was a slightly higher prevalence rate of AZF microdeletions in oligozoospermic patients than reported in previous studies.

  1. Effect of Palm Pollen on Sperm Parameters of Infertile Man.

    PubMed

    Rasekh, Athar; Jashni, Hojjatollah Karimi; Rahmanian, Karamatollah; Jahromi, Abdolreza Sotoodeh

    2015-04-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in the developing countries. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of orally administered Date Palm Pollen (DPP) on the results of semen analysis in adult infertile men. Forty infertile men participated in our study. They were treated by Pollen powder 120 mg kg(-1) in gelatinous capsules every other day, for two months. Before and at the end of therapy, the semen was collected after masturbation and sperm numbers, motility and morphology were determined. Our findings revealed that consumption of DPP improved the sperm count. The treatment was significantly increased sperm motility, morphology and forward progressive motility. Date palm pollen seems to cure male infertility by improving the quality of sperm parameters.

  2. The Role of Estrogen Modulators in Male Hypogonadism and Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Rambhatla, Amarnath; Mills, Jesse N.; Rajfer, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol, normally considered a female hormone, appears to play a significant role in men in a variety of physiologic functions, such as bone metabolism, cardiovascular health, and testicular function. As such, estradiol has been targeted by male reproductive and sexual medicine specialists to help treat conditions such as infertility and hypogonadism. The compounds that modulate estradiol levels in these clinical conditions are referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) and aromatase inhibitors (AIs). In a certain subset of infertile men, particularly those with hypogonadism, or those who have a low serum testosterone to estradiol ratio, there is some evidence suggesting that SERMs and AIs can reverse the low serum testosterone levels or the testosterone to estradiol imbalance and occasionally improve any associated infertile or subfertile state. This review focuses on the role these SERMs and AIs play in the aforementioned reproductive conditions. PMID:27601965

  3. The effect of obesity on sperm disorders and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Du Plessis, Stefan S; Cabler, Stephanie; McAlister, Debra A; Sabanegh, Edmund; Agarwal, Ashok

    2010-03-01

    The results of several studies point to an increased likelihood of abnormal semen parameters among overweight men, and an elevated risk for subfertility among couples in which the male partner is obese. Obesity is, therefore, associated with a higher incidence of male factor infertility. Several mechanisms might account for the effect of obesity on male infertility, both directly and indirectly, by inducing sleep apnea, alterations in hormonal profiles (reduced inhibin B and androgen levels accompanied by elevated estrogen levels) and increased scrotal temperatures, ultimately manifesting as impaired semen parameters (decreased total sperm count, concentration and motility; increased DNA fragmentation index). Neither the reversibility of obesity-associated male infertility with weight loss nor effective therapeutic interventions have been studied in-depth. The increasing prevalence of obesity calls for greater clinical awareness of its effects on fertility, better understanding of underlying mechanisms, and exploration into avenues of treatment.

  4. Infertility in resource-constrained settings: moving towards amelioration.

    PubMed

    Hammarberg, Karin; Kirkman, Maggie

    2013-02-01

    It is often presumed that infertility is not a problem in resource-poor areas where fertility rates are high. This is challenged by consistent evidence that the consequences of childlessness are very severe in low-income countries, particularly for women. In these settings, childless women are frequently stigmatized, isolated, ostracized, disinherited and neglected by the family and local community. This may result in physical and psychological abuse, polygamy and even suicide. Attitudes among people in high-income countries towards provision of infertility care in low-income countries have mostly been either dismissive or indifferent as it is argued that scarce healthcare resources should be directed towards reducing fertility and restricting population growth. However, recognition of the plight of infertile couples in low-income settings is growing. One of the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals was for universal access to reproductive health care by 2015, and WHO has recommended that infertility be considered a global health problem and stated the need for adaptation of assisted reproductive technology in low-resource countries. This paper challenges the construct that infertility is not a serious problem in resource-constrained settings and argues that there is a need for infertility care, including affordable assisted reproduction treatment, in these settings. It is often presumed that infertility is not a problem in densely populated, resource-poor areas where fertility rates are high. This presumption is challenged by consistent evidence that the consequences of childlessness are very severe in low-income countries, particularly for women. In these settings, childless women are frequently stigmatized, isolated, ostracized, disinherited and neglected by the family and local community. This may result in physical and psychological abuse, polygamy and even suicide. Because many families in low-income countries depend on children for economic survival

  5. Infertility and its treatment--an emotional roller coaster.

    PubMed

    Alesi, Rita

    2005-03-01

    Receiving a diagnosis of infertility is a significant life crisis, and subsequent in vitro fertilisation (IVF) treatment presents a physical and psychological challenge for many patients. This article aims to provide the health professional with an insight into the psychological stressors associated with the experience of infertility, and provide strategies for providing support during this difficult journey. Feelings of grief and loss are very common as couples come to terms with the fact that they are not able to conceive naturally. Different emotional coping styles between men and women may add to what is an already stressful time. The grieving process in IVF is often stagnated and chronic, and acceptance and resolution is not psychologically possible until closure is achieved, either by becoming pregnant and giving birth, or ending infertility treatment and ceasing trying to conceive.

  6. Molecular approaches to the diagnosis of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Jeremias, J; Witkin, S S

    1996-03-01

    The introduction of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a technique to selectively amplify and identify specific DNA and RNA sequences has revolutionized the field of molecular medicine. Application of these newly developed molecular techniques to the field of male infertility has made the delineation of subtle causes of infertility-an inapparent genital tract infection, immune system activation within the genital tract, mutations in sperm mitochondrial or chromosomal DNA, alterations in sperm components involved in receptor-ligand interactions, and production of sperm autoantibodies-all increasingly amenable to clinical analysis. Continued investigations at the molecular level of the causes of male infertility will also lead to novel treatment regimens as well as development of new methods of fertility regulation.

  7. Denying and preserving self: Batswana women's experiences of infertility.

    PubMed

    Mogobe, Dintle K

    2005-08-01

    This qualitative study was conducted to understand and theoretically explain infertility from the perspective of 40 infertile women and four members of the traditional health care system. Symbolic interaction and feminism were combined to under-gird the study. Through ongoing data collection and analysis, a theoretical framework of denying and preserving self was constructed. Preserving self or self-preservation means developing personal measures aimed at preventing o rreducing harm inflicted by others as a result of one's infertility. Contributory factors to denying of self include denial of status as a woman; denial of immortality; denial of experiences of pregnancy, labour and delivery; denial of economic and social security; and the belief that they are being chastised by God and the forefathers. In addition, the women develop strategies to deal with such denials by looking for deeper meaning, working it out, giving in to feelings, getting more involved, getting away, and doin gadoption. Implications of the study are discussed.

  8. In vitro fertilization for endometriosis-associated infertility.

    PubMed

    Polat, Mehtap; Yaralı, İrem; Boynukalın, Kübra; Yaralı, Hakan

    2015-08-01

    Endometriosis is an enigmatic disease affecting 10-15% of reproductive aged women and is encountered in 25-35% of women suffering from infertility. IVF is an effective tool to overcome endometriosis-associated infertility when expectant management or surgery fails. Direct IVF should be envisioned if the female age is greater than 38 year and infertility is long lasting. Likewise, semen characteristics or tubal status that is incompatible with natural conception mandates going straight to IVF. IVF, not only bypasses the distortion of pelvic anatomy associated with advanced stage endometriosis, but also removes gametes from a hostile peritoneal environment. In this article, we address the impact, if any, of endometriosis and endometriomason IVF outcome, whether surgical treatment of early-stage disease, endometriomas or deep infiltrating endometriosis would enhance pregnancy rates in IVF, which protocol to employ for controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for IVF and finally the impact, if any, of controlled ovarian hyperstimulation for IVF on progression of endometriosis.

  9. Causes of infertility in men with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Stefanidis, K; Belitsos, P; Fotinos, A; Makris, N; Loutradis, D; Antsaklis, A

    2011-10-01

    Men with Down syndrome are considered as infertile although the causes of infertility are not known in detail yet. Although this constitutes a general rule there are three confirmed cases of parenting by fathers with Down syndrome. Many investigators have addressed the causes of infertility and their studies indicate that the causes may be hormonal deficits, morphological alterations of the gonads, abnormal spermatogenesis, psychological and social factors related to the mental retardation. It is obvious that the extra chromosome 21 has a detrimental direct and indirect effect on the reproductive capacity of the affected male patient. But the definite cause of the insufficient and inadequate spermatogenesis remains to be discovered. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Conceiving silence: infertility as discursive contradiction in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Allison, Jill

    2011-03-01

    This article examines the production and reproduction of silence around infertility in Ireland. Based on narratives collected during 18 months of fieldwork, this article locates the contradictory role of silence in both the private experiences of individuals faced with a difficulty conceiving and in institutions constituted as mechanisms of public support. For many people who experience infertility, silence is rooted in the social stigma associated with reproductive failure or sexual inadequacy. Silence protects privacy while at the same time foreclosing both challenges to assumptions that fertility is the norm and any counterdiscourse to the heteronormative, profamily society in Ireland. I show how the reproduction of silence about infertility is a legacy of Ireland's history, reproductive politics, and the cultural idiom of choice. I argue that support networks and Internet bulletin boards on websites create opportunities to dialogue in silence, reproducing isolation rather than creating public discourse.

  11. Environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Bosagna, Carlos; Skinner, Michael K

    2014-06-01

    Decreasing male fertility has been observed for the past fifty years. Examples of affected reproductive parameters include decreases in sperm count and sperm quality and increases in testicular cancer, cryptorchidism and hypospadias. Exposures to environmental toxicants during fetal development and early postnatal life have been shown to promote infertility. Environmental exposures inducing epigenetic changes related to male infertility range from life style, occupational exposures, environmental toxicants and nutrition. Exposures during fetal gonadal sex determination have been shown to alter the epigenetic programming of the germline that then can transmit this altered epigenetic information to subsequent generations in the absence of any exposures. This environmentally induced epigenetic transgenerational inheritance of disease will be a component of the etiology of male infertility.

  12. Utilization of Infertility Services: How Much Does Money Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Farley Ordovensky Staniec, J; Webb, Natalie J

    2007-01-01

    Objective To estimate the effects of financial access and other individual characteristics on the likelihood that a woman pursues infertility treatment and the choice of treatment type. Data Source/Study Setting The 1995 National Survey of Family Growth. Study Design We use a binomial logit model to estimate the effects of financial access and individual characteristics on the likelihood that a woman pursues infertility treatment. We then use a multinomial logit model to estimate the differential effects of these variables across treatment types. Data Collection/Extraction Method This study analyzes the subset of 1,210 women who meet the definition of infertile or subfecund from the 1995 National Survey of Family Growth. Principal Findings We find that income, insurance coverage, age, and parity (number of previous births) all significantly affect the probability of seeking infertility treatment; however, the effect of these variables on choice of treatment type varies significantly. Neither income nor insurance influences the probability of seeking advice, a relatively low cost, low yield treatment. At the other end of the spectrum, the choice to pursue assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs)—a much more expensive but potentially more productive option—is highly influenced by income, but merely having private insurance has no significant effect. In the middle of the spectrum are treatment options such as testing, surgery, and medications, for which “financial access” increases their probability of selection. Conclusions Our results illustrate that for the sample of infertile of subfecund women of childbearing age studied, and considering their options, financial access to infertility treatment does matter. PMID:17489899

  13. In vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection for male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Merchant, Rubina; Gandhi, Goral; Allahbadia, Gautam N.

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the field of assisted reproduction, and particularly micromanipulation, now heralds a new era in the management of severe male factor infertility, not amenable to medical or surgical correction. By overcoming natural barriers to conception, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), subzonal sperm insemination, partial zona dissection, and intracytoplasmatic injection of sperm (ICSI) now offer couples considered irreversibly infertile, the option of parenting a genetically related child. However, unlike IVF, which necessitates an optimal sperm number and function to successfully complete the sequence of events leading to fertilization, micromanipulation techniques, such as ICSI, involving the direct injection of a spermatozoon into the oocyte, obviate all these requirements and may be used to alleviate severe male factor infertility due to the lack of sperm in the ejaculate due to severely impaired spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia) or non-reconstructable reproductive tract obstruction (obstructive azoospermia). ICSI may be performed with fresh or cryopreserved ejaculate sperm where available, microsurgically extracted epididymal or testicular sperm with satisfactory fertilization, clinical pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates. However, despite a lack of consensus regarding the genetic implications of ICSI or the application and efficacy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART), the widespread use of ICSI, increasing evidence of the involvement of genetic factors in male infertility and the potential risk of transmission of genetic disorders to the offspring, generate major concerns with regard to the safety of the technique, necessitating a thorough genetic evaluation of the couple, classification of infertility and adequate counseling of the implications and associated risks prior to embarking on the procedure. The objective of this review is to highlight the indications, advantages

  14. In vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection for male infertility.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Rubina; Gandhi, Goral; Allahbadia, Gautam N

    2011-01-01

    Progress in the field of assisted reproduction, and particularly micromanipulation, now heralds a new era in the management of severe male factor infertility, not amenable to medical or surgical correction. By overcoming natural barriers to conception, in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF-ET), subzonal sperm insemination, partial zona dissection, and intracytoplasmatic injection of sperm (ICSI) now offer couples considered irreversibly infertile, the option of parenting a genetically related child. However, unlike IVF, which necessitates an optimal sperm number and function to successfully complete the sequence of events leading to fertilization, micromanipulation techniques, such as ICSI, involving the direct injection of a spermatozoon into the oocyte, obviate all these requirements and may be used to alleviate severe male factor infertility due to the lack of sperm in the ejaculate due to severely impaired spermatogenesis (non-obstructive azoospermia) or non-reconstructable reproductive tract obstruction (obstructive azoospermia). ICSI may be performed with fresh or cryopreserved ejaculate sperm where available, microsurgically extracted epididymal or testicular sperm with satisfactory fertilization, clinical pregnancy, and ongoing pregnancy rates. However, despite a lack of consensus regarding the genetic implications of ICSI or the application and efficacy of preimplantation genetic diagnosis prior to assisted reproductive technology (ART), the widespread use of ICSI, increasing evidence of the involvement of genetic factors in male infertility and the potential risk of transmission of genetic disorders to the offspring, generate major concerns with regard to the safety of the technique, necessitating a thorough genetic evaluation of the couple, classification of infertility and adequate counseling of the implications and associated risks prior to embarking on the procedure. The objective of this review is to highlight the indications, advantages

  15. Analysis of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile male subjects.

    PubMed

    Almeamar, Hussein Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Ismail, Patimah; Nadkarni, Prashan; Fawzi, Nora

    2013-04-01

    Complete deletions in the AZF (a, b, and c) sub-regions of the Y-chromosome have been shown to contribute to unexplained male infertility. However, the role of partial AZFc deletions in male infertility remains to be verified. Three types of partial AZFc deletions have been identified. They are gr/gr, b1/b3, and b2/b3 deletions. A recent meta-analysis showed that ethnic and geographical factors might contribute to the association of partial AZFc deletions with male infertility. This study analyzed the association of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile males. Fifty two oligozoospermic infertile males and 63 fertile controls were recruited to this study. Screening for partial AZFc deletions was done using the two sequence-tagged sites approach (SY1291 and SY1191) which were analyzed using both the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis and the high resolution melt, HRM method. Gr/gr deletions were found in 11.53% of the cases and 9.52% of the controls (p = 0.725). A B2/b3 deletion was found in one of the cases (p = 0.269). No B1/b3 deletions were identified in this study. The results of HRM analysis were consistent with those obtained using the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis method. The HRM analysis was highly repeatable (95% limit of agreement was -0.0879 to 0.0871 for SY1191 melting temperature readings). In conclusion, our study showed that partial AZFc deletions were not associated with male infertility in Malaysian subjects. HRM analysis was a reliable, repeatable, fast, cost-effective, and semi-automated method which can be used for screening of partial AZFc deletions.

  16. Impact of microwave at X-band in the aetiology of male infertility.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjay; Behari, J; Sisodia, Rashmi

    2012-09-01

    Reports of declining male fertility have renewed interest in assessing the role of environmental and occupational exposures to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) in the aetiology of human infertility. Testicular functions are particularly susceptible to electromagnetic fields. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of 10-GHz EMF on male albino rat's reproductive system and to investigate the possible causative factor for such effect of exposure. The study was carried out in two groups of 70-day old adult male albino rats: a sham-exposed and a 10-GHz-exposed group (2 h a day for 45 days). Immediately after completion of the exposure, animals were sacrificed and sperms were extracted from the cauda and caput part of testis for the analysis of MDA, melatonin, and creatine kinase. Creatine kinase results revealed an increased level of phosphorylation that converts creatine to creatine phosphate in sperms after EMF exposure. EMF exposure also reduced the level of melatonin and MDA. It is concluded that microwave exposure could adversely affect male fertility by reducing availability of the above parameters. These results are indications of deleterious effects of these radiations on reproductive pattern of male rats.

  17. [Application prospect of adult stem cells in male infertility].

    PubMed

    Yang, Rui-Feng; Xiong, Cheng-Liang

    2013-05-01

    The study on stem cells is a hot field in biomedical science in recent years, and has furthered from laboratory to clinical application. Stem cells, according to their developmental stage and differential properties, can be divided into embryonic stem cells, induced PS cells and adult stem cells, among which, adult stem cells have already been applied to the clinical treatment of many systemic diseases. Currently, the study of spermatogonial stem cells and adult stem cells is in the front of the basic researches on the treatment of male infertility, but the time has not yet arrived for their clinical application. This paper outlines the application prospect of adult stem cells in male infertility.

  18. Infertility: from a personal to a public health problem.

    PubMed Central

    Fidler, A T; Bernstein, J

    1999-01-01

    The inability to conceive a child is most often viewed as a private matter, but public health perspectives and skills can contribute greatly to our knowledge about infertility, and the development of effective and rational public policy for prevention, access to health care, and regulation of new technologies. We offer a primer of public health aspects of infertility in an effort to encourage the broad spectrum of public health professionals to become more knowledgeable about these topics and join in the national debate about preventive strategies, cost-benefit assessment, resource allocation, and ethics. Images p494-a p495-a p499-a p506-a PMID:10670617

  19. Inadequate cervical mucus--a cause of "idiopathic" infertility.

    PubMed

    Sher, G; Katz, M

    1976-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate and treat a group of patients referred for "idiopathic" infertility in whom no apparent cause for infertility, apart from inadequate cervical mucus, was found. Hormone investigations revealed that these patients could be divided into two groups: those with low sex steroid profiles despite apparent ovulation, and a second group with normal sex steroid profiles. All patients were treated with ovulation-inducing agents in an attempt to produce "controlled" ovarian hyperstimulation and an improved cervical mucus. Four of six patients conceived. The rationale behind the use of ovulation-inducing agents in this situation is discussed.

  20. Genetic and epigenetic factors: Role in male infertility

    PubMed Central

    Shamsi, M. B.; Kumar, K.; Dada, R.

    2011-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute upto 15%–30% cases of male infertility. Formation of spermatozoa occurs in a sequential manner with mitotic, meiotic, and postmeiotic differentiation phases each of which is controlled by an intricate genetic program. Genes control a variety of physiologic processes, such as hypothalamus–pituitary–gonadal axis, germ cell development, and differentiation. In the era of assisted reproduction technology, it is important to understand the genetic basis of infertility to provide maximum adapted therapeutics and counseling to the couple. PMID:21716934

  1. Hydatid of Morgagni: a possible underestimated cause of unexplained infertility.

    PubMed

    Rasheed, Salah M; Abdelmonem, Allam M

    2011-09-01

    To evaluate the possible role of hydatid of Morgagni in patients with unexplained infertility. This was a non-randomized controlled trial conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology of Sohag University, Egypt. Two hundred and thirteen patients with unexplained infertility and hydatid of Morgagni diagnosed at laparoscopy were included. The laterality (bilateral vs unilateral), location (fimbrial vs juxta-fimbrial), number (single vs multiple) and diameter of the hydatids of Morgagni were recorded. Patients were allocated to a study group (n=127) who underwent laparoscopic excision of hydatid of Morgagni and a control group (n=86) who underwent no intervention. Patients were followed for six months without any infertility or hormonal treatment to detect spontaneous pregnancy. Patients missed during the follow-up or who received infertility treatment were excluded. Statistical analysis was done using Chi-square test and Student's t-test. To find the most important character of hydatid of Morgagni which impedes pregnancy, logistic regression analysis of the dependent variable (no pregnancy) and independent variables (different characters of hydatid of Morgagni) was carried out in the control group. Hydatid of Morgagni was detected in 52.1% of patients with unexplained infertility compared to 25.6% of those with explained infertility (p<0.001). The pregnancy rate was higher in the study group than the control group (58.7% vs 20.6%, p<0.001). The pregnancy rate was significantly higher in the study group than the control group if the hydatid cyst was bilateral (85.7% vs 5.3%, p<0.001), fimbrial (85.6% and 9.1%, p<0.001), single (57.6% and 30.3%, p<0.001) or 1-2 cm in diameter (58.1% and 25.5%, p<0.001). Logistic analysis showed that the bilaterality and fimbrial location of the hydatid of Morgagni were the most significant characteristics impeding pregnancy (odds ratio=7.27 and 3.67 respectively). Hydatid of Morgagni is a possible underestimated cause of

  2. Recent Advances in the Management of Infertility of Women

    PubMed Central

    Mitton, D. M.; Macleod, S. C.

    1970-01-01

    The management of infertility rests on correct diagnosis of the reasons for failure to conceive. Both marriage partners must be examined and an adequate history taken of both. Dealing with infertility in women involves taking complete menstrual history, testing for endometriosis, examination of the cervix, testing for sperm antibody and investigation of the tubal factor. Endocrine disorders deserve special attention, especially those which point to failure to ovulate. Finally, there are many cases where no adequate reason for failure to conceive can be found—for these cases supportive therapy is the only treatment. PMID:20468559

  3. What Are the Issues Confronting Infertile Women? A Qualitative and Quantitative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammerli, Katja; Znoj, Hansjorg; Berger, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Infertility is a stressful experience, yet little is known about the specific issues confronting infertile women. In the present study, researchers sought to identify themes important to infertile women and examine possible associations with mental health levels. Using qualitative content analysis, researchers analyzed the email messages of 57…

  4. Infertility: Towards an Awareness of a Need among Family Life Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Nancy L.; Christopher, F. Scott

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional problems related to infertility investigation and treatment. Reviews causes and treatment of infertility, coping patterns, and the role of counselors and family life educators in easing the crises of infertility and facilitating successful resolution of associated emotional problems. (JAC)

  5. The Effect of Social Coping Resources and Growth-Fostering Relationships on Infertility Stress in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

    2002-01-01

    The experience of infertility often results in multiple stresses and needs for coping in these women. Study examines the relationship between the uses of social coping resources, growth-fostering relationships, and infertility stress. Results support the use of social coping resources for coping with infertility stress. (Contains 62 references and…

  6. Socio-Demographic Correlates of Women’s Infertility and Treatment Seeking Behavior in India

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Sanjit; Gupta, Pallavi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Infertility is an emergent issue in India. Until recently, very few studies have understood the patterns and consequences of infertility in India. Family planning programs in India also viewed exclusively the patterns and determinants of overfertility rather than infertility. Furthermore, there is the lack of information about treatment seeking behavior of infertile couples. Therefore, this paper aimed to examine the extent of infertility and treatment seeking behavior among infertile women in India. An attempt was also made to evaluate the effects of socio-demographic factors on treatment seeking behavior. Methods: The study used the data from the District Level Household and Facility Survey carried out in India during 2007–08. Several statistical techniques such as chi-square test, proportional hazard model and binary logistic regression model were used for the analysis. Results: Approximately, 8% of currently married women suffered from infertility in India and most of them were secondary infertile (5.8%). Within India, women’s infertility rate was the highest in west Bengal (13.9 percent) and the lowest in Meghalaya (2.5 percent). About 80% of infertile women sought treatment but a substantial proportion (33%) received non-allopathic and traditional treatment due to expensive modern treatment and lack of awareness. Conclusion: In the context of policy response, it can be said that there is a need to improve the existing services and quality of care for infertile women. Treatment for infertility should be integrated into the larger reproductive health packages. PMID:27141468

  7. The Effect of Social Coping Resources and Growth-Fostering Relationships on Infertility Stress in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

    2002-01-01

    The experience of infertility often results in multiple stresses and needs for coping in these women. Study examines the relationship between the uses of social coping resources, growth-fostering relationships, and infertility stress. Results support the use of social coping resources for coping with infertility stress. (Contains 62 references and…

  8. Infertility: Towards an Awareness of a Need among Family Life Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Nancy L.; Christopher, F. Scott

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional problems related to infertility investigation and treatment. Reviews causes and treatment of infertility, coping patterns, and the role of counselors and family life educators in easing the crises of infertility and facilitating successful resolution of associated emotional problems. (JAC)

  9. Epidemiological Survey and Risk Factor Analysis of Recurrent Spontaneous Miscarriages in Infertile Women at Large Infertility Centers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Qiao, Jie; Sun, Xiao-Xi; Wang, Shu-Yu; Liang, Xiao-Yan; Sun, Yun; Liu, Feng-Hua

    2017-01-01

    Background: A higher frequency of spontaneous miscarriage has been observed in infertile couples, and there is a higher prevalence of infertility among patients with a history of recurrent spontaneous miscarriages (RSMs; ≥2 miscarriages). This study aimed to determine the proportion of infertile patients with RSM and examine risk factors associated in patients with RSM being treated with assisted reproductive technologies. Methods: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted at six reproductive medicine centers in three cities of China. Data of 751 patients with at least one spontaneous miscarriage were analyzed. Demographic data and etiological factors associated with infertility were compiled and compared between patients with a single spontaneous miscarriage (SSM) and those with RSM. Results: Two hundred (26.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 23.50–29.95%) patients experienced RSMs and 551 (73.4%) had a single miscarriage. The odds of RSM increased with increasing age (odds ratio [OR] = 1.06), uterine disorders (OR = 2.09), endocrine disorders (OR = 2.48), and immune disorders (OR = 2.98). Higher education level, masters or above, and a pelvic cavity disorder were associated with lower risk of RSM (OR = 0.27 and 0.46, respectively). Late spontaneous miscarriages were more frequent in patients with RSM than in those with a SSM (31.5% vs. 14.2%, respectively, P < 0.001) and were associated with a history of uterine cavity procedures (OR = 2.095) and cervical factors related to infertility (OR = 4.136, 95% CI: 1.012–16.90). Conclusions: Compared to patients with only a SSM, the conditions of patients with RSM are more complicated. To increase the success rate of assisted reproductive technology, factors including uterus cavity adhesion, cervical relaxation, endocrine disorders, and immune disorders should be treated before assisted reproduction is initiated. These data may provide treatment guidance for infertile patients with a history of RSM. PMID

  10. Infertility, infertility treatment, and achievement of pregnancy in female survivors of childhood cancer: a report from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study cohort

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Sara E.; Najita, Julie S.; Ginsburg, Elizabeth S.; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita E.; Sklar, Charles A.; Robison, Leslie L.; Diller, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Background Prior studies have documented decreased pregnancy rates and early menopause in female cancer survivors; however, infertility rates and reproductive interventions have not been studied. This study investigates infertility and time to pregnancy among female childhood cancer survivors, and analyzes treatment characteristics associated with infertility and subsequent pregnancy. Methods The Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) is a cohort study including five-year cancer survivors from 26 institutions who were <21 years old at the time of diagnosis between January 1, 1970, and December 31, 1986, and a sibling control group. CCSS females ages 18–39 years reporting they had ever been sexually active (3,531 survivors and 1,366 female controls) were studied. Self-reported infertility, medical treatment for infertility, the time to first pregnancy in survivors and siblings, and the risk of infertility in survivors by demographic, disease, and treatment variables were analyzed. Findings Survivors had an increased risk of clinical infertility (>1 year of attempts at conception without success) compared to siblings which was most pronounced at early reproductive ages (≤24 years Relative Risk (RR)=2·92, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1·18–7·20; 25–29 years RR=1·61, 95% CI 1·05–2·48; 30–39 years RR=1·37, 95% CI 1·11–1·69). Despite being equally likely to seek treatment for infertility, survivors were less likely to be prescribed medication for treatment of infertility (RR=0·57, 95% CI 0·46–0·70). Increasing doses of uterine radiation and alkylating agent chemotherapy were most strongly associated with infertility. Although survivors had an increased time to pregnancy interval (p=0·032), 64·2% (292/455) with infertility achieved a pregnancy. Interpretation A more comprehensive understanding of infertility after cancer is critical for counseling and decision-making regarding future attempts at conception as well as fertility preservation

  11. Introduction: choosing the main outcome of an infertility trial is harder than you think.

    PubMed

    Legro, Richard S; Wu, Xiaoke

    2014-05-01

    Clinical trials in infertility choose from a variety of outcomes including change in some surrogate marker of gamete quality to healthy live birth. Incomplete reporting of outcomes makes it difficult to compare studies and to determine the clinical impact of infertility treatments. In this Views and Reviews, we explore the merits of collecting various outcomes of interest in infertility trials from the vantage point of infertility specialists, an obstetrician, and a pediatrician. These articles support more complete reporting of maternal, paternal, fetal, and infant outcomes from infertility trials to improve patient care and ultimately public health.

  12. AB084. The fertility quality of life (FertiQol) in Chinese infertile women

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ming; Ji, Xingzhe; Zhou, Liang; Zhang, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective Infertility is defined as the failure to achieve clinical pregnancy after twelve months of regular unprotected sexual intercourse. In recent years, there is a rising trend of infertility in China, data shows that every eight couples have a pair of infertility, and the number of Chinese infertility patients has more than 50 million. Female infertility has various negative impacts on quality of life. In the past, various generic measurement tools were used for assessing Qol in infertile patients. Recently, a specifically Qol tool designed for infertile couples, has been developed and used internationally—The Fertility Quality of life(FertiQol)-questionaire. To the best of our knowledge, there was no published data regarding the general Qol in infertile women in mainland china. Our goal of this study is to understand the preliminary level of Qol in infertile women in mainland china, secondary aims was to compare Qol in women with primary and secondary infertility. Methods The FertiQol tool, a self-report questionnaire, was distributed to our department of Reproductive Center for infertile women who undergoing the treatment of in vitro fertilization from 2015.1 to 2015.4. Patients with primary and secondary infertility were compared for Qol subscales, and other confounding factors were investigated using multiple regression analysis. Results A total of 230 copies of eligible FertiQol questionnaires were collected, among them, 162 cases for primary infertility and 68 cases for Secondary infertility. The mean age of participants was 32.6±3.3 years and years of marriage was 4.2±1.3. Scores of mind-body (55.4), relational (57.4), environment (54.0), and tolerability (45.0) subscales in Chinese infertile women were lower than those (54.8, 68.7, 61.5 and 58.8) in western infertile women. According to the increase of infertility time, relational score (relation with husband) was decreased. Women with secondary infertility obtained higher scores in emotional

  13. Aneuploidies level in sperm nuclei in patients with infertility.

    PubMed

    Alchinbayev, Mirzakarim Karimovich; Aralbayeva, Araylyim Nugmanovna; Tuleyeva, Lazzat Namatullaevna; Duysenbayeva, Svetlana Melsovna; Makazhanov, Marat Abzalovich

    2016-09-01

    Male infertility is a relevant social and medical problem. Male infertility is mostly caused by genetic disorders. The purpose of the study was to analyze the correlation of chromosome aberrations, as well as DNA fragmentation and various manifestations of spermatogenesis disorder. Sperm samples of 58 males with infertility and 23 conditionally healthy males were studied. All patients diagnosed with asthenozoospermia, teratozoospermia, oligoasthenozoospermia and oligoteratozoospermia underwent subsequent analysis of sperm DNA fragmentation. Sperm DNA fragmentation was examined with sperm chromatin dispersion test (sperm chromatin dispersion, Spermprocessor, India) with an Axioscope 40 fluorescent microscope. Fluorescence in situ hybridization with fluorescent probes (Vysis Multi Vysion PGT, Abbot Molecular) was used to study chromosome abnormalities in sperm nuclei with regard to X and Y chromosomes, as well as to chromosomes 18 and 21. It was found that the development of pathospermia was characterized by genetic discontinuity, which manifests as DNA fragmentation and disjunction of chromosomes in meiosis with spermatogenesis. It was also found that the prevailing type of pathospermia in men with infertility was oligozoospermia. In addition, this group also had the highest rate of numerical chromosome abnormalities. This was caused by the degeneration of spermatozoids with aneuploidies in chromosomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the UK Environmental Mutagen Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Men from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Suganya, Jaganathan; Kujur, Smita B; Selvaraj, Kamala; Suruli, Muthiah S; Haripriya, Geetha; Samuel, Chandra R

    2015-07-01

    Male infertility has been associated with aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities, Yq microdeletions and specific gene mutations and/or polymorphisms. Besides genetic factors, any block in sperm delivery, endocrine disorders, testicular tumours, infectious diseases, medications, lifestyle factors and environmental toxins can also play a causative role. This study aimed to determine the constitutional karyotype in infertile males having normal female partners in a south Indian population. A total of 180 men with a complaint of primary infertility ranging from 1 to 25 years were screened for chromosomal abnormalities through conventional analysis of GTG-banded metaphases from cultured lymphocytes. Four individuals were diagnosed to have Klinefelter syndrome. Two cases exhibited reciprocal translocations and one showed a maternally inherited insertion. Polymorphisms were seen in sixty-seven patients (37.2%). The occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities in 4.6% and variants involving the heterochromatic regions of Y, chromosome 9 and the acrocentric chromosomes in 38.2% of the infertile men with an abnormal seminogram strongly reiterates the inclusion of routine cytogenetic testing and counselling in the diagnostic work-up prior to the use of assisted reproduction technologies.

  15. Screening for chromosomal abnormalities in 2650 infertile couples undergoing ICSI.

    PubMed

    Kayed, Hesham F; Mansour, Ragaa T; Aboulghar, Mohamed A; Serour, Gamal I; Amer, Alaa E; Abdrazik, Ashraf

    2006-03-01

    Chromosomal abnormalities are the major contributor to the genetic risks of infertility treatment associated with intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). The study objective was to assess prospectively the frequency of chromosomal aberrations in couples undergoing ICSI. A total of 2650 infertile couples (5300 patients) underwent chromosome analysis before undergoing ICSI in the Egyptian IVF-ET Centre. Heparinized blood samples were cultured, harvested and banded according to standard methods. Overall, 96.94% of the patients studied (5138/5300) had a normal karyotype, while the remaining 162 patients (3.06%) had an abnormal karyotype. Male patients constituted the majority of abnormalities; 138 males (85.19%) and 24 females (14.81%). These chromosomal aberrations included 117 cases (2.2%) of sex chromosome abnormalities; 113 males and four females. Forty-five patients (0.85%) had autosomal aberrations; 25 of them were males and 20 were females. The current data show that chromosomal abnormalities affect 3.06% of infertile patients, and occur in both sexes, but more predominantly in males undergoing ICSI for male factor infertility. It is recommended that chromosomal analysis be performed before undergoing ICSI, to identify patients who can be offered preimplantation genetic diagnosis.

  16. Profile of infertility status of male in Dhaka city.

    PubMed

    Khondker, L; Khan, S I; Ahamed, R S

    2012-07-01

    A cross sectional study was done to determine the important etiological profile of infertility status of male in Dhaka city. A total of eighty seven patients of male infertility were selected purposively. Among them, highest percentage of patients, 44(50.6%) were in between the 21-30 years old, 36(41.4%) had 6-10 years of post- marriage duration, 56(64.4%) patients stated that they stayed with their wife interruptedly, 54(62.1%) had primary infertility and 33(37.9%) had secondary infertility. It was found that among the patients 6(5.50%) had anti-sperm antibody, 45(40.9%) had sexually transmitted disease (STD), 41(37.3%) had varicocele, 2(1.80%) had loss of libido, 4(3.6%) had premature ejaculation and 12(10.9%) had hydrocele. It was observed that 14(12.7%) were tobacco user, 26(23.6%) were obese, 12(10.9%) had malnutrition, 7(6.4%) had exposure to heat etc and it was found that 61(70.1%) had free testosterone below the normal level and 51(58.6%) had prolactin level above the normal level. The semen analysis revealed that 48(55.2 %) had abnormal morphology of sperm, 26(29.9%) had feebly motile sperm and 27(31%) had non-motile sperm, 36(41.4%) had oligospermia, 6(6.9%) had azoospermia and 17(19.5%) had oligoasthenozoospermia.

  17. [An approach to male infertility from economic sociology].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lian-ming; Jiang, Hui; Sui, Yu-jie; Tang, Wen-hao; Yuan, Ren-pei; Ma, Lu-lin

    2007-09-01

    To study the psychology of infertility patients from the perspective of economic sociology so as to prevent the patients from medical frauds in seeking medical treatment. We investigated 902 infertility patients of the Third Hospital of Peking University from September 2005 to January 2006 using a randomized questionnaire. Of the total number, 84.4% had education below college level; the majority had a low monthly family income, 36.6% below Y1,000, 19.7% from Y1,000 to Y2,000, 16.5% from Y2,000 to Y3,000, 7.8% from Y3,000 to Y4,000 and 19.4% above Y4,000; 88.7% had a strong desire for a child; 60.3% were psychologically stressed. As for the advertisements for the treatment of infertility, 50.2% of the patients disbelieved them, 6.2% wanted to have a try and about 43.6% accepted them to be true. Regarding the treatment in individual hospitals, 55.2% disbelieved in it, 5.8% wanted to try it and about 39.0% believed in it. Infertility patients of low economic status usually have a lower educational level but a higher desire for children, and therefore are more likely to be the victims of medical frauds and more psychologically stressed. It calls for our attention how to provide them with medical help.

  18. Survey of Japanese infertile couples' attitudes toward surrogacy.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshiko; Matsuo, Hiroya

    2009-09-01

    To clarify Japanese infertile couples' attitudes toward surrogacy, and analyse the results according to the contextual factors: ethical, social and medical aspects. We performed a questionnaire survey anonymously on the attitude toward gestational surrogacy and traditional surrogacy in Japanese infertile couples (103 women and 60 men) between June and August 2000. We examined the relation between the acceptability of surrogacy and the background factors (age, type of procedure, the number of clinics visited, etc.), and also analysed the woman required as each type of surrogate mother whether the presence or absence of siblings in any of the infertile couple. The rates of using gestational and traditional surrogacy if they were necessary were 17% and 7% of women, 23% and 8% of men, respectively. ART group, > or =35 years of age group and < or =2 clinics visited group as a contextual factor influenced their affirmative determinants. Approximately 70% of the infertile couples preferred anonymity as a surrogate gestational mother. Regardless of whether each partner had a full sister, these tendencies were observed. We found the contextual factors related to the acceptability of surrogacy. The ongoing deliberations toward surrogacy considering certain conditions of a concerned couple would be highly desirable.

  19. Chromosomal Abnormalities in Infertile Men from Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Suganya, Jaganathan; Kujur, Smita B; Selvaraj, Kamala; Suruli, Muthiah S.; Haripriya, Geetha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Male infertility has been associated with aneuploidies and structural chromosomal abnormalities, Yq microdeletions and specific gene mutations and/or polymorphisms. Besides genetic factors, any block in sperm delivery, endocrine disorders, testicular tumours, infectious diseases, medications, lifestyle factors and environmental toxins can also play a causative role. This study aimed to determine the constitutional karyotype in infertile males having normal female partners in a south Indian population. Materials and Methods A total of 180 men with a complaint of primary infertility ranging from 1 to 25 years were screened for chromosomal abnormalities through conventional analysis of GTG-banded metaphases from cultured lymphocytes. Results Four individuals were diagnosed to have Klinefelter syndrome. Two cases exhibited reciprocal translocations and one showed a maternally inherited insertion. Polymorphisms were seen in sixty-seven patients (37.2%). Conclusion The occurrence of chromosomal abnormalities in 4.6% and variants involving the heterochromatic regions of Y, chromosome 9 and the acrocentric chromosomes in 38.2% of the infertile men with an abnormal seminogram strongly reiterates the inclusion of routine cytogenetic testing and counselling in the diagnostic work-up prior to the use of assisted reproduction technologies. PMID:26393143

  20. Cultural Considerations in Counseling Couples Who Experience Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Infertility creates challenges affecting various aspects of couples' intimate lives. Practices regarding reproduction are often shaped by cultural messages. Culturally sensitive treatment methods help counselors provide effective therapy to couples with fertility problems. This article describes cultural influences, challenges, and counseling…

  1. Five Medical Treatment Stages of Infertility: Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the marital happiness, state/trait anxiety, coping techniques, and types of support received for a national sample of men and women experiencing the infertility medical process. Suggests that counselors should be aware that medical treatment affects the distress level of the individual and couple and the types of coping used. Further…

  2. Is the wrong question being asked in infertility research?

    PubMed

    Luke, Barbara; Stern, Judy E; Hornstein, Mark D; Kotelchuck, Milton; Diop, Hafsatou; Cabral, Howard; Declercq, Eugene R

    2016-01-01

    A persistent finding is that assisted reproductive technology (ART) is associated with compromised birth outcomes, including higher risks for prematurity, low birthweight, and congenital malformations, even among singletons. Over the past decade, our research group, the Massachusetts Outcome Study of Assisted Reproductive Technology (MOSART), has evaluated pregnancy and birth outcomes among three groups of women, those women treated with ART, those with indicators of subfertility but without ART treatment, and fertile women. We have also explored the influence of infertility-related diagnoses on outcomes for women and infants. Over the course of our research, we have changed our perspective from an original focus on ART treatment parameters as the primary cause of excess morbidity to one centered instead on the underlying infertility-related diagnoses. This paper summarizes the research findings from our group that support this change in focus for infertility-based research from a primary emphasis on ART treatment to greater attention to the contribution of preexisting pathology underlying the infertility and suggests directions for future analyses.

  3. Gender and Infertility: A Relational Approach To Counseling Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

    2000-01-01

    The Relational Model (J. V. Jordan, 1995) of women's development is a theory that explains women's development in a context of relationships, specifically relationships that promote growth for self and others. This model is applied to counseling women who are experiencing infertility, and a case presentation is provided to illustrate the approach.…

  4. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis
    New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000

    Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa:
    Potential for Infertility Research

    David Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3
    1Reproductive ...

  5. Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

  6. Modifiable Risk Factors and Infertility: What are the Connections?

    PubMed

    Rossi, Brooke V; Abusief, Mary; Missmer, Stacey A

    Infertility is a relatively common condition, greatly affecting couples medically and psychologically. Although infertility treatment is safe, it can be time-intensive, expensive and increase the risk of multiple gestations. Thus, to reduce costs and risks, couples may initially consider lifestyle change to increase their fertility and chances of pregnancy. For many of the diet factors studied (for example: caffeine, soy, protein, iron), there are conflicting data. However, there are some items men and women consume that are detrimental to fertility, such as alcohol and tobacco. The data on exercise are varied but may have an effect on ovulation and fertility - positive or negative. Body mass index appears to impact fertility also, with obesity in both men and women negatively affecting pregnancy rates. In addition, there remains concern and a growing body of research on environmental toxin exposures and reproductive health. Finally, supporting patients through infertility diagnosis and treatment is critical, as psychological stress may impact conception. It is imperative that the relationship between lifestyle factors and fertility continue to be explored as to lessen the morbidity associated with infertility.

  7. Infertile men’s needs and assessment of fertility care

    PubMed Central

    Sylvest, Randi; Fürbringer, Jeanette Krogh; Schmidt, Lone; Pinborg, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Male infertility is potentially a severe, low-control stressor. There is limited knowledge of the expectations, needs, and assessment of fertility care among men with severe infertility. The aim of this study was to explore experience, expectations, needs, and assessment of fertility care among Danish men having severe male-factor infertility. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interview study with 10 men with very low sperm quality initiating intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatment at the Fertility Clinic, Copenhagen University Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark. Five of the men participated in a follow-up interview after their first ICSI treatment. The data collection took place during November 2014 to May 2015. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results Two themes were found: ‘The maze’ and ‘Desire for care’. It felt like an eternity for the men from the referral until treatment started. The men did not understand the process, and it was like being in a maze. The men saw fatherhood as something to strive for. They felt that they could not do what a man is supposed to do, and they felt pushed aside and that treatment focused on the women. The men appreciated the staff’s kindness and professionalism but desired the staff to address emotional subjects too. Conclusion The process from referral to treatment felt like a maze for these men. They needed the staff to give them the opportunity to speak of the psychosocial consequences of severe male-factor infertility. PMID:27501219

  8. Sperm mitochondrial DNA deletion in Iranian infertiles with asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Bahrehmand Namaghi, I; Vaziri, H

    2017-04-01

    Asthenozoospermia is an important cause of male infertility. The mutations in sperm mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) result in either functionless or malfunctioning some proteins, subsequently affecting sperm motility leading to asthenozoospermia. The purpose of this study was to investigate sperm mtDNA 4,977-bp deletion in infertile men with low sperm motility/immotile spermatozoa compared to healthy subjects with high sperm motility. Semen samples of 256 asthenozoospermic infertiles and 200 controls from northern Iran were collected. After extraction of spermatozoa total DNA, Gap-polymerase chain reaction (Gap-PCR) was performed. The deletion was observed in 85.93% of patients with asthenozoospermia compared with 14% in controls [OR = 37.5397, 95% confidence interval = 12.937-108.9276, p < .0001]. It is concluded that there is a strong association between sperm mtDNA 4,977-bp deletion and asthenozoospermia-induced infertility in the population examined. Large-scale mtDNA deletions in spermatozoa may induce bioenergetic disorders. Nevertheless, to validate our results broader research may be needed.

  9. Five Medical Treatment Stages of Infertility: Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerrity, Deborah A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the marital happiness, state/trait anxiety, coping techniques, and types of support received for a national sample of men and women experiencing the infertility medical process. Suggests that counselors should be aware that medical treatment affects the distress level of the individual and couple and the types of coping used. Further…

  10. MOLECULAR ANALYSIS OF HUMAN SPERMATOZOA: POTENTIAL FOR INFERTILITY RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gordon Research Conference: Mammalian Gametogenesis and Embryogenesis
    New London, CT, July 1-6, 2000

    Molecular Analysis of Human Spermatozoa:
    Potential for Infertility Research

    David Miller 1, David Dix2, Robert Reid 3, Stephen A Krawetz 3
    1Reproductive ...

  11. Gender and Infertility: A Relational Approach To Counseling Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Donna M.; Myers, Jane E.

    2000-01-01

    The Relational Model (J. V. Jordan, 1995) of women's development is a theory that explains women's development in a context of relationships, specifically relationships that promote growth for self and others. This model is applied to counseling women who are experiencing infertility, and a case presentation is provided to illustrate the approach.…

  12. Cultural Considerations in Counseling Couples Who Experience Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    Infertility creates challenges affecting various aspects of couples' intimate lives. Practices regarding reproduction are often shaped by cultural messages. Culturally sensitive treatment methods help counselors provide effective therapy to couples with fertility problems. This article describes cultural influences, challenges, and counseling…

  13. Incorporating Ideological Context in Counseling Couples Experiencing Infertility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Judith A.; Panchal, Krishna

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the influence of ideological values on couples' experience of infertility. Contextual issues are considered in terms of how they influence medical decision making as well as emotional factors. Strength-based counseling interventions that attend to couples' diverse values are described. Last, implications for counselors,…

  14. Modifiable Risk Factors and Infertility: What are the Connections?

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Brooke V.; Abusief, Mary; Missmer, Stacey A.

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is a relatively common condition, greatly affecting couples medically and psychologically. Although infertility treatment is safe, it can be time-intensive, expensive and increase the risk of multiple gestations. Thus, to reduce costs and risks, couples may initially consider lifestyle change to increase their fertility and chances of pregnancy. For many of the diet factors studied (for example: caffeine, soy, protein, iron), there are conflicting data. However, there are some items men and women consume that are detrimental to fertility, such as alcohol and tobacco. The data on exercise are varied but may have an effect on ovulation and fertility - positive or negative. Body mass index appears to impact fertility also, with obesity in both men and women negatively affecting pregnancy rates. In addition, there remains concern and a growing body of research on environmental toxin exposures and reproductive health. Finally, supporting patients through infertility diagnosis and treatment is critical, as psychological stress may impact conception. It is imperative that the relationship between lifestyle factors and fertility continue to be explored as to lessen the morbidity associated with infertility. PMID:27594813

  15. Spermatozoa protein alterations in infertile men with bilateral varicocele

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ashok; Sharma, Rakesh; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Cui, Zhihong; Ayaz, Ahmet; Gupta, Sajal; Willard, Belinda; Gopalan, Banu; Sabanegh, Edmund

    2016-01-01

    Among infertile men, a diagnosis of unilateral varicocele is made in 90% of varicocele cases and bilateral in the remaining varicocele cases. However, there are reports of under-diagnosis of bilateral varicocele among infertile men and that its prevalence is greater than 10%. In this prospective study, we aimed to examine the differentially expressed proteins (DEP) extracted from spermatozoa cells of patients with bilateral varicocele and fertile donors. Subjects consisted of 17 men diagnosed with bilateral varicocele and 10 proven fertile men as healthy controls. Using the LTQ-orbitrap elite hybrid mass spectrometry system, proteomic analysis was done on pooled samples from 3 patients with bilateral varicocele and 5 fertile men. From these samples, 73 DEP were identified of which 58 proteins were differentially expressed, with 7 proteins unique to the bilateral varicocele group and 8 proteins to the fertile control group. Majority of the DEPs were observed to be associated with metabolic processes, stress responses, oxidoreductase activity, enzyme regulation, and immune system processes. Seven DEP were involved in sperm function such as capacitation, motility, and sperm-zona binding. Proteins TEKT3 and TCP11 were validated by Western blot analysis and may serve as potential biomarkers for bilateral varicocele. In this study, we have demonstrated for the first time the presence of DEP and identified proteins with distinct reproductive functions which are altered in infertile men with bilateral varicocele. Functional proteomic profiling provides insight into the mechanistic implications of bilateral varicocele-associated male infertility. PMID:25999357

  16. Prevalence of low serum cobalamin in infertile couples.

    PubMed

    Pront, R; Margalioth, E J; Green, R; Eldar-Geva, T; Maimoni, Z; Zimran, A; Elstein, D

    2009-02-01

    A high prevalence of low levels of cobalamin had been found in a survey of multi-ethnic normal individuals in Israel. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of cobalamin deficiency among Israeli couples suffering from infertility. All couples seen at the in vitro fertilization clinic at an urban hospital (Shaare Zedek Medical Center) in Jerusalem for a 6-month period were invited. Mean cobalamin levels were 259.2 pg ml(-1) in males and 275.1 pg ml(-1) in females (normal >200 pg ml(-1)), 35.5% of 172 men and 23.3% of 223 females had cobalamin deficiency (P = 0.01). There were 171 couples with complete demographic questionnaires and cobalamin values for each partner. In 74 couples (43.3%), one partner was cobalamin deficient, with no significant difference between those with unexplained infertility versus those with explained infertility; and in 13 couples, both partners were cobalamin deficient. Thirty-nine per cent of all men with an abnormal semen analysis had cobalamin deficiency, a finding that requires further investigation. This study questions whether higher rates of male infertility in Israel are partially ascribable to cobalamin deficiency. Recommendation for supplementation in both males and females to achieve high-normal levels of cobalamin would be prudent.

  17. Gonadal dysfunction and infertility in kidney transplant patients receiving sirolimus.

    PubMed

    Boobes, Yousef; Bernieh, Bassam; Saadi, Hussein; Raafat Al Hakim, M; Abouchacra, Samra

    2010-06-01

    Sirolimus is an immunosupressor of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors (mTOR-I) group. Recent studies have emphasized a potential impact of sirolimus on male gonadal function. We report our clinical experience with sirolimus-induced gonadal dysfunction and infertility in both male and female kidney transplant patients. Of the 170 kidney transplant patients, nine (5.3%) patients (six males and three females) were receiving sirolimus. Follow-up data for two male patients were not available. The one unmarried female patient developed amenorrhea post-transplantation and had resumption of her menstrual cycles after discontinuation of sirolimus. The remaining six married patients (four males and two females), who all had fathered or conceived children in the pre-transplantation period, developed gonadal dysfunction and infertility on average 5-12 months after transplantation. Sirolimus was discontinued in all four male patients with full recovery of the oligo/azospermia and restoration of fertility. Both married female patients developed amenorrhea post-transplantation. Sirolimus was discontinued in one female patient with resumption of her menstrual cycles. In this small population of patients treated with sirolimus, the prevalence rate of reversible gonadal dysfunction and infertility was significant in both males and females. Infertility secondary to sirolimus is under-diagnosed and should be studied further.

  18. Dietary intakes in infertile women a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Colombo, Ottavia; Pinelli, Giovanna; Comelli, Mario; Marchetti, Pierpaolo; Sieri, Sabina; Brighenti, Furio; Nappi, Rossella E; Tagliabue, Anna

    2009-11-10

    The reproductive axis is closely linked to nutritional status. The purpose of this study was to compare the nutritional status in two groups of young infertile women, without clinically overt eating disorders: hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Eighteen young infertile women (10 HA, 8 PCOS) attending an outpatient gynecological endocrinology unit, underwent evaluation of anthropometry, body composition, dietary intakes by means of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a seven-day food diary (7DD), and psychological characteristics by means of EDI2 and SCL90 tests. HA women had lower BMI and body fat compared to PCOS women. Habitual intake derived from FFQs showed a similar macronutrient distribution between groups (about 16% protein, 33% fat, 52% carbohydrates). The psychometric profiles of the two groups did not differ significantly. The underreporting of dietary intakes (measured as habitual energy intake by FFQs/basal metabolic rate) was found to be negatively correlated with the interpersonal sensitivity SCL-90 subscale scores (r = -0.54, p = 0.02). Our study identified differences in body composition but not in dietary habits between HA and PCOS infertile women. We documented, for the first time, a relationship between the accuracy of dietary surveys and the psychological characteristics of subjects with anovulation. This finding suggests that it may be important to be aware of the psychological terrain when planning a dietary survey in infertile women.

  19. The effects of tomato juice on male infertility.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yu; Aizawa, Koichi; Mieno, Makiko; Karamatsu, Mika; Hirano, Yasuko; Furui, Kuniko; Miyashita, Tatsuya; Yamazaki, Kazumitsu; Inakuma, Takahiro; Sato, Ikuo; Suganuma, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Teruaki

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of tomato juice consumption on seminal plasma lycopene levels and sperm parameters in infertile men. Subjects were male infertility patients with poor sperm concentration (<20×10 6/mL) and/or motility (<50%). Following a fourweek observation period, subjects were randomly assigned among three groups: a tomato juice group, an antioxidant group, and a control group. The subjects in the tomato juice group and the antioxidant group daily consumed one can of tomato juice (containing 30 mg of lycopene) or one antioxidant capsule (containing vitamin C 600 mg, vitamin E 200 mg, and glutathione 300 mg), respectively, for 12 weeks (feeding period). Seminal plasma lycopene levels and sperm parameters were measured every 6 weeks during the feeding period. Forty-four patients completed the study (control group: 12, antioxidant group: 15, tomato juice group: 17). In the tomato juice group, plasma lycopene level was significantly increased at the 12th week of the feeding period. Moreover, a decrease in seminal plasma white blood cells and an increase in sperm motility in the tomato juice group were statistically significant at the 12th and 6th weeks, respectively, compared to the control group. In the antioxidant capsule group, no significant improvement was observed in semen parameters. In conclusion, regular consumption of tomato juice seems to improve sperm motility in infertile patients. This is the first report to show that commercially available food, such as tomato juice, might be beneficial for male infertility.

  20. Dietary intakes in infertile women a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The reproductive axis is closely linked to nutritional status. The purpose of this study was to compare the nutritional status in two groups of young infertile women, without clinically overt eating disorders: hypothalamic amenorrhea (HA) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Methods Eighteen young infertile women (10 HA, 8 PCOS) attending an outpatient gynecological endocrinology unit, underwent evaluation of anthropometry, body composition, dietary intakes by means of a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and a seven-day food diary (7DD), and psychological characteristics by means of EDI2 and SCL90 tests. Results HA women had lower BMI and body fat compared to PCOS women. Habitual intake derived from FFQs showed a similar macronutrient distribution between groups (about 16% protein, 33% fat, 52% carbohydrates). The psychometric profiles of the two groups did not differ significantly. The underreporting of dietary intakes (measured as habitual energy intake by FFQs/basal metabolic rate) was found to be negatively correlated with the interpersonal sensitivity SCL-90 subscale scores (r = -0.54, p = 0.02). Conclusion Our study identified differences in body composition but not in dietary habits between HA and PCOS infertile women. We documented, for the first time, a relationship between the accuracy of dietary surveys and the psychological characteristics of subjects with anovulation. This finding suggests that it may be important to be aware of the psychological terrain when planning a dietary survey in infertile women. PMID:19903344