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Sample records for alpha-glucan acting enzymes

  1. Functional characterization of alpha-glucan,water dikinase, the starch phosphorylating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, René; Baunsgaard, Lone; Blennow, Andreas

    2004-01-15

    GWD (alpha-glucan,water dikinase) is the enzyme that catalyses the phosphorylation of starch by a dikinase-type reaction in which the beta-phosphate of ATP is transferred to either the C-6 or the C-3 position of the glycosyl residue of amylopectin. GWD shows similarity in both sequence and reaction mechanism to bacterial PPS (pyruvate,water dikinase) and PPDK (pyruvate,phosphate dikinase). Amino acid sequence alignments identified a conserved histidine residue located in the putative phosphohistidine domain of potato GWD. Site-directed mutagenesis of this histidine residue resulted in an inactive enzyme and loss of autophosphorylation. Native GWD is a homodimer and shows a strict requirement for the presence of alpha-1,6 branch points in its polyglucan substrate, and exhibits a sharp 20-fold increase in activity when the degree of polymerization is increased from 27.8 to 29.5. In spite of the high variability in the degree of starch phosphorylation, GWD proteins are ubiquitous in plants. The overall reaction mechanism of GWD is similar to that of PPS and PPDK, but the GWD family appears to have arisen after divergence of the plant kingdom. The nucleotide-binding domain of GWD exhibits a closer phylogenetic relationship to prokaryotic PPSs than to PPDKs. PMID:14525539

  2. Structure of a novel highly branched alpha-glucan enzymatically produced from maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Tsusaki, Keiji; Watanabe, Hikaru; Nishimoto, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Takuo; Kubota, Michio; Chaen, Hiroto; Fukuda, Shigeharu

    2009-11-01

    The bacterial strain PP710, isolated from soil and identified as Paenibacillus species, produced a low-digestibility alpha-glucan containing a large amylase-resistant portion. This alpha-glucan was obtained in high yields from maltodextrin (dextrose equivalent 3) by using the condensed culture supernatant of the strain as the enzyme preparation. The water-soluble dietary fiber content of the low-digestibility alpha-glucan was 80.2%, and showed resistance to a rat intestinal enzyme preparation. The alpha-glucan was found to be a novel highly branched alpha-glucan by acid hydrolysis, NMR analysis, gel permeation chromatography, methylation analysis, and enzymatic digestion.

  3. Effect of glucose on alpha-glucan degradation in Polyporus circinatus.

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, M B; Zancan, G T

    1981-01-01

    The effect of glucose on the enzymes involved in the degradation of a reserve alpha-glucan in Polyporus circinatus was studied. The levels of phosphorylase activity, endoamylase, amylo-1,6-glucosidase were regulated by glucose concentration. PMID:6161914

  4. Safety evaluation of highly-branched cyclic dextrin and a 1,4-alpha-glucan branching enzyme from Bacillus stearothermophilus.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sharon S H; Danielewska-Nikiel, Barbara; Ohdan, Kohji; Kojima, Iwao; Takata, Hiroki; Kuriki, Takashi

    2009-12-01

    Highly-branched cyclic dextrin (HBCD), a dextrin food ingredient presently only used in Japan, was investigated for digestibility and potential toxicity. HBCD was readily hydrolyzed in vitro to maltose and maltotriose by human salivary and porcine pancreatic alpha-amylases. Incubation of HBCD with a rat intestinal homogenate, containing digestive enzymes, resulted in the formation of maltose, maltotriose, and maltotetraose, and with longer incubation times, resulted in the formation of glucose. In an acute toxicity study, Wistar rats orally administered a single-dose of 2000mg/kg body weight of HBCD did not display mortality or any signs or symptoms of toxicity or abnormalities upon necropsy. Transient loose stools were observed, but were resolved within 24h of HBCD administration, and therefore, were not considered as compound-specific adverse effects. In the Ames assay, HBCD was non-mutagenic with or without metabolic activation. Toxicity testing of the branching enzyme (BE) involved in the synthesis of HBCD showed that the BE also was not acutely toxic when orally administered to rats and was non-mutagenic in the mouse lymphoma assay. The results of this study demonstrate that HBCD is digested to normal and safe products of carbohydrate digestion, and therefore, support the safety of HBCD for human consumption. PMID:19651182

  5. O-allyl decoration on alpha-glucan isolated from the haloalkaliphilic Halomonas pantelleriensis bacterium.

    PubMed

    Corsaro, Maria Michela; Gambacorta, Agata; Lanzetta, Rosa; Nicolaus, Barbara; Pieretti, Giuseppina; Romano, Ida; Parrilli, Michelangelo

    2007-07-01

    An alpha-glucan containing the unprecedented peculiar O-allyl substituent was isolated from the haloalkaliphilic Gram-negative Halomonas pantelleriensis bacterium. Its dextran-like structure was deduced from chemical degradative and spectroscopic methods.

  6. Identification of a putative alpha-glucan synthase essential for cell wall construction and morphogenesis in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hochstenbach, Frans; Klis, Frans M.; van den Ende, Herman; van Donselaar, Elly; Peters, Peter J.; Klausner, Richard D.

    1998-01-01

    The cell wall protects fungi against lysis and determines their cell shape. Alpha-glucan is a major carbohydrate component of the fungal cell wall, but its function is unknown and its synthase has remained elusive. Here, we describe a fission yeast gene, ags1+, which encodes a putative alpha-glucan synthase. In contrast to the structure of other carbohydrate polymer synthases, the predicted Ags1 protein consists of two probable catalytic domains for alpha-glucan assembly, namely an intracellular domain for alpha-glucan synthesis and an extracellular domain speculated to cross-link or remodel alpha-glucan. In addition, the predicted Ags1 protein contains a multipass transmembrane domain that might contribute to transport of alpha-glucan across the membrane. Loss of Ags1p function in a temperature-sensitive mutant results in cell lysis, whereas mutant cells grown at the semipermissive temperature contain decreased levels of cell wall alpha-glucan and fail to maintain rod shapes, causing rounding of the cells. These findings demonstrate that alpha-glucan is essential for fission yeast morphogenesis. PMID:9689051

  7. The Structural Basis of Alpha-Glucan Recognition by a Family 41 Carbohydrate-Binding Module from Therotoga Maritima

    SciTech Connect

    van Bueren,A.; Boraston, A.

    2006-01-01

    Starch recognition by carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs) is important for the activity of starch-degrading enzymes. The N-terminal family 41 CBM, TmCBM41 (from pullulanase PulA secreted by Thermotoga maritima) was shown to have {alpha}-glucan binding activity with specificity for {alpha}-1, 4-glucans but was able to tolerate the {alpha}-1, 6-linkages found roughly every three or four glucose units in pullulan. Using X-ray crystallography, the structures were solved for TmCBM41 in an uncomplexed form and in complex with maltotetraose and 63-{alpha}-d-glucosyl-maltotriose (GM3). Ligand binding was facilitated by stacking interactions between the {alpha}-faces of the glucose residues and two tryptophan side-chains in the two main subsites of the carbohydrate-binding site. Overall, this mode of starch binding is quite well conserved by other starch-binding modules. The structure in complex with GM3 revealed a third binding subsite with the flexibility to accommodate an {alpha}-1, 4- or an {alpha}-1, 6-linked glucose.

  8. Alpha-glucan phosphorylase from Escherichia coli. Cloning of the gene, and purification and characterization of the protein.

    PubMed

    Yu, F; Jen, Y; Takeuchi, E; Inouye, M; Nakayama, H; Tagaya, M; Fukui, T

    1988-09-25

    By using a synthetic oligonucleotide probe identical to a part of the gene for the Escherichia coli major outer membrane lipoprotein, we have cloned a gene from E. coli chromosomal DNA. However, the cloned gene was not one of the lipoprotein genes. The amino acid sequence deduced from its nucleotide sequence shows extensive similarities instead to alpha-glucan phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1). The gene, glgP, is located immediately downstream from glgA, the gene for glycogen synthase. The glgP gene was inserted into pUC9 vector and expressed in the presence of the lac inducer. The gene product was purified to apparent homogeneity as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In all chromatographies, the protein was eluted accompanied by a low phosphorylase activity. The final preparation showed phosphorolytic activity to various alpha-glucans, although the specific activity was extremely low compared to other alpha-glucan phosphorylases under the standard assay conditions. Its enzymatic activity, however, increased almost linearly as the concentration of glucan increased, reaching a value comparable with those of other phosphorylases. The amino acid sequence deduced was compared with those of alpha-glucan phosphorylases from other sources. PMID:3047129

  9. The Laforin-like dual-specificity phosphatase SEX4 from Arabidopsis hydrolyzes both C6- and C3-phosphate esters introduced by starch-related dikinases and thereby affects phase transition of alpha-glucans.

    PubMed

    Hejazi, Mahdi; Fettke, Joerg; Kötting, Oliver; Zeeman, Samuel C; Steup, Martin

    2010-02-01

    The biochemical function of the Laforin-like dual-specific phosphatase AtSEX4 (EC 3.1.3.48) has been studied. Crystalline maltodextrins representing the A- or the B-type allomorph were prephosphorylated using recombinant glucan, water dikinase (StGWD) or the successive action of both plastidial dikinases (StGWD and AtPWD). AtSEX4 hydrolyzed carbon 6-phosphate esters from both the prephosphorylated A- and B-type allomorphs and the kinetic constants are similar. The phosphatase also acted on prelabeled carbon-3 esters from both crystalline maltodextrins. Similarly, native starch granules prelabeled in either the carbon-6 or carbon-3 position were also dephosphorylated by AtSEX4. The phosphatase did also hydrolyze phosphate esters of both prephosphorylated maltodextrins when the (phospho)glucans had been solubilized by heat treatment. Submillimolar concentrations of nonphosphorylated maltodextrins inhibited AtSEX4 provided they possessed a minimum of length and had been solubilized. As opposed to the soluble phosphomaltodextrins, the AtSEX4-mediated dephosphorylation of the insoluble substrates was incomplete and at least 50% of the phosphate esters were retained in the pelletable (phospho)glucans. The partial dephosphorylation of the insoluble glucans also strongly reduced the release of nonphosphorylated chains into solution. Presumably, this effect reflects fast structural changes that following dephosphorylation occur near the surface of the maltodextrin particles. A model is proposed defining distinct stages within the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation-dependent transition of alpha-glucans from the insoluble to the soluble state.

  10. Functional Characterization of a Newly Identified Group B Streptococcus Pullulanase Eliciting Antibodies Able to Prevent Alpha-Glucans Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bosello, Mattia; Berti, Francesco; Mariani, Massimo; Telford, John L.; Grandi, Guido; Soriani, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Streptococcal pullulanases have been recently proposed as key components of the metabolic machinery involved in bacterial adaptation to host niches. By sequence analysis of the Group B Streptococcus (GBS) genome we found a novel putative surface exposed protein with pullulanase activity. We named such a protein SAP. The sap gene is highly conserved among GBS strains and homologous genes, such as PulA and SpuA, have been described in other pathogenic streptococci. The SAP protein contains two N-terminal carbohydrate-binding motifs, followed by a catalytic domain and a C-terminal LPXTG cell wall-anchoring domain. In vitro analysis revealed that the recombinant form of SAP is able to degrade α-glucan polysaccharides, such as pullulan, glycogen and starch. Moreover, NMR analysis showed that SAP acts as a type I pullulanase. Studies performed on whole bacteria indicated that the presence of α-glucan polysaccharides in culture medium up-regulated the expression of SAP on bacterial surface as confirmed by FACS analysis and confocal imaging. Deletion of the sap gene resulted in a reduced capacity of bacteria to grow in medium containing pullulan or glycogen, but not glucose or maltose, confirming the pivotal role of SAP in GBS metabolism of α-glucans. As reported for other streptococcal pullulanases, we found specific anti-SAP antibodies in human sera from healthy volunteers. Investigation of the functional role of anti-SAP antibodies revealed that incubation of GBS in the presence of sera from animals immunized with SAP reduced the capacity of the bacterium to degrade pullulan. Of interest, anti-SAP sera, although to a lower extent, also inhibited Group A Streptococcus pullulanase activity. These data open new perspectives on the possibility to use SAP as a potential vaccine component inducing functional cross-reacting antibodies interfering with streptococcal infections. PMID:19023424

  11. Phylogenetic and biochemical characterization of a novel cluster of intracellular fungal alpha-amylase enzymes.

    PubMed

    van der Kaaij, R M; Janecek, S; van der Maarel, M J E C; Dijkhuizen, L

    2007-12-01

    Currently known fungal alpha-amylases are well-characterized extracellular enzymes that are classified into glycoside hydrolase subfamily GH13_1. This study describes the identification, and phylogenetic and biochemical analysis of novel intracellular fungal alpha-amylases. The phylogenetic analysis shows that they cluster in the recently identified subfamily GH13_5 and display very low similarity to fungal alpha-amylases of family GH13_1. Homologues of these intracellular enzymes are present in the genome sequences of all filamentous fungi studied, including ascomycetes and basidiomycetes. One of the enzymes belonging to this new group, Amy1p from Histoplasma capsulatum, has recently been functionally linked to the formation of cell wall alpha-glucan. To study the biochemical characteristics of this novel cluster of alpha-amylases, we overexpressed and purified a homologue from Aspergillus niger, AmyD, and studied its activity product profile with starch and related substrates. AmyD has a relatively low hydrolysing activity on starch (2.2 U mg(-1)), producing mainly maltotriose. A possible function of these enzymes in relation to cell wall alpha-glucan synthesis is discussed. PMID:18048915

  12. Enzyme

    MedlinePlus

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  13. Triple-acting Lytic Enzyme Treatment of Drug-Resistant and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen C; Roach, Dwayne R; Chauhan, Vinita S; Shen, Yang; Foster-Frey, Juli; Powell, Anne M; Bauchan, Gary; Lease, Richard A; Mohammadi, Homan; Harty, William J; Simmons, Chad; Schmelcher, Mathias; Camp, Mary; Dong, Shengli; Baker, John R; Sheen, Tamsin R; Doran, Kelly S; Pritchard, David G; Almeida, Raul A; Nelson, Daniel C; Marriott, Ian; Lee, Jean C; Donovan, David M

    2016-04-28

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over used conventional antibiotics. Here we describe engineered triple-acting staphylolytic peptidoglycan hydrolases wherein three unique antimicrobial activities from two parental proteins are combined into a single fusion protein. This effectively reduces the incidence of resistant strain development. The fusion protein reduced colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a rat nasal colonization model, surpassing the efficacy of either parental protein. Modification of a triple-acting lytic construct with a protein transduction domain significantly enhanced both biofilm eradication and the ability to kill intracellular S. aureus as demonstrated in cultured mammary epithelial cells and in a mouse model of staphylococcal mastitis. Interestingly, the protein transduction domain was not necessary for reducing the intracellular pathogens in cultured osteoblasts or in two mouse models of osteomyelitis, highlighting the vagaries of exactly how protein transduction domains facilitate protein uptake. Bacterial cell wall degrading enzyme antimicrobials can be engineered to enhance their value as potent therapeutics.

  14. Triple-acting Lytic Enzyme Treatment of Drug-Resistant and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Stephen C.; Roach, Dwayne R.; Chauhan, Vinita S.; Shen, Yang; Foster-Frey, Juli; Powell, Anne M.; Bauchan, Gary; Lease, Richard A.; Mohammadi, Homan; Harty, William J.; Simmons, Chad; Schmelcher, Mathias; Camp, Mary; Dong, Shengli; Baker, John R.; Sheen, Tamsin R.; Doran, Kelly S.; Pritchard, David G.; Almeida, Raul A.; Nelson, Daniel C.; Marriott, Ian; Lee, Jean C.; Donovan, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over used conventional antibiotics. Here we describe engineered triple-acting staphylolytic peptidoglycan hydrolases wherein three unique antimicrobial activities from two parental proteins are combined into a single fusion protein. This effectively reduces the incidence of resistant strain development. The fusion protein reduced colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a rat nasal colonization model, surpassing the efficacy of either parental protein. Modification of a triple-acting lytic construct with a protein transduction domain significantly enhanced both biofilm eradication and the ability to kill intracellular S. aureus as demonstrated in cultured mammary epithelial cells and in a mouse model of staphylococcal mastitis. Interestingly, the protein transduction domain was not necessary for reducing the intracellular pathogens in cultured osteoblasts or in two mouse models of osteomyelitis, highlighting the vagaries of exactly how protein transduction domains facilitate protein uptake. Bacterial cell wall degrading enzyme antimicrobials can be engineered to enhance their value as potent therapeutics. PMID:27121552

  15. Triple-acting Lytic Enzyme Treatment of Drug-Resistant and Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Becker, Stephen C; Roach, Dwayne R; Chauhan, Vinita S; Shen, Yang; Foster-Frey, Juli; Powell, Anne M; Bauchan, Gary; Lease, Richard A; Mohammadi, Homan; Harty, William J; Simmons, Chad; Schmelcher, Mathias; Camp, Mary; Dong, Shengli; Baker, John R; Sheen, Tamsin R; Doran, Kelly S; Pritchard, David G; Almeida, Raul A; Nelson, Daniel C; Marriott, Ian; Lee, Jean C; Donovan, David M

    2016-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant bacteria are a persistent problem in modern health care, food safety and animal health. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over used conventional antibiotics. Here we describe engineered triple-acting staphylolytic peptidoglycan hydrolases wherein three unique antimicrobial activities from two parental proteins are combined into a single fusion protein. This effectively reduces the incidence of resistant strain development. The fusion protein reduced colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in a rat nasal colonization model, surpassing the efficacy of either parental protein. Modification of a triple-acting lytic construct with a protein transduction domain significantly enhanced both biofilm eradication and the ability to kill intracellular S. aureus as demonstrated in cultured mammary epithelial cells and in a mouse model of staphylococcal mastitis. Interestingly, the protein transduction domain was not necessary for reducing the intracellular pathogens in cultured osteoblasts or in two mouse models of osteomyelitis, highlighting the vagaries of exactly how protein transduction domains facilitate protein uptake. Bacterial cell wall degrading enzyme antimicrobials can be engineered to enhance their value as potent therapeutics. PMID:27121552

  16. Peculiarities and applications of galactanolytic enzymes that act on type I and II arabinogalactans.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Tatsuji; Ishimaru, Megumi

    2013-06-01

    Arabinogalactans (AGs) are branched galactans to which arabinose residues are bound as side chains and are widely distributed in plant cell walls. They can be grouped into two types based on the structures of their backbones. Type I AGs have β-1,4-galactan backbones and are often covalently linked to the rhamnogalacturonan-I region of pectins. Type II AGs have β-1,3-galactan backbones and are often covalently linked to proteins. The main enzymes involved in the degradation of AGs are endo-β-galactanases, exo-β-galactanases, and β-galactosidases, although other enzymes such as α-L-arabinofuranosidases, β-L-arabinopyranosidases, and β-D-glucuronidases are required to remove the side chains for efficient degradation of the polysaccharides. Galactanolytic enzymes have a wide variety of potential uses, including the bioconversion of AGs to fermentable sugars for production of commodity chemicals like ethanol, biobleaching of cellulose pulp, modulation of pectin properties, improving animal feed, and determining the chemical structure of AGs. This review summarizes our current knowledge about the biochemical properties and potential applications of AG-degrading enzymes.

  17. Calorimetric versus Growth Microbial Analysis of Cellulase Enzymes Acting on Cellulose

    PubMed Central

    Lovrien, Rex E.; Williams, Karl K.; Ferrey, Mark L.; Ammend, David A.

    1987-01-01

    Assay of cellulase enzymology on cellulose was investigated by two methods: (i) plate colony counting to determine microbial growth and (ii) microbial calorimetry. These methods were chosen because they accept raw samples and have the potential to be far more specific than spectrophotometric reducing sugar assays. Microbial calorimetry requires ca. 0.5 to 1 h and 10 to 100 μM concentrations of cellulolytic lower sugars (glucose and cellobiose). Growth assay (liquid culture, plating, colony counting) requires 15 to 20 h and ca. 0.5 mM sugars. Microbial calorimetry requires simply aerobic metabolism, whereas growth assay requires completion of the cell cycle. A stripping technique is described for use in conjunction with the calorimetric method to enable separate analysis of the two sugars. Mixtures of glucose and cellobiose are equilibrated with Escherichia coli and spun out to remove glucose. The supernatant is calorimetrically combusted with Klebsiella sp. to quantitate cellobiose, and the same organism combusting the nonstripped mixture gives heat proportional to the sum of the two sugars. Calorimetry of cellulolysis products from individual exo- and endocellulases, and from their reconstituted mixture, was carried out to develop a microbial calorimetric means for demonstrating enzyme synergism. PMID:16347508

  18. Enzyme-catalyzed formation of beta-peptides: beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases BapA and DmpA acting as beta-peptide-synthesizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Heck, Tobias; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Limbach, Michael; Flögel, Oliver; Seebach, Dieter; Geueke, Birgit

    2007-09-01

    In recent studies, we discovered that the three beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases, BapA from Sphingosinicella xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4, BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2, and DmpA from Ochrobactrum anthropi LMG7991, possess the unique feature of cleaving N-terminal beta-amino acid residues from beta- and alpha/beta-peptides. Herein, we investigated the use of the same three enzymes for the reverse reaction catalyzing the oligomerization of beta-amino acids and the synthesis of mixed peptides with N-terminal beta-amino acid residues. As substrates, we employed the beta-homoamino acid derivatives H-beta hGly-pNA, H-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-beta3 hPhe-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hPhe-pNA, and H-beta3 hLeu-pNA. All three enzymes were capable of coupling the six beta-amino acids to oligomers with chain lengths of up to eight amino acid residues. With the enzyme DmpA as the catalyst, we observed very high conversion rates, which correspond to dimer yields of up to 76%. The beta-dipeptide H-beta3 hAla-beta3 hLeu-OH and the beta/alpha-dipeptide H-beta hGly-His-OH (carnosine) were formed with almost 50% conversion, when a five-fold excess of beta3-homoleucine or histidine was incubated with H-beta3 hAla-pNA and H-beta hGly-pNA, respectively, in the presence of the enzyme BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2. BapA from S. xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4 turned out to be a versatile catalyst capable of coupling various beta-amino acid residues to the free N-termini of beta- and alpha-amino acids and even to an alpha-tripeptide. Thus, these aminopeptidases might be useful to introduce a beta-amino acid residue as an N-terminal protecting group into a 'natural' alpha-peptide, thereby stabilizing the peptide against degradation by other proteolytic enzymes. PMID:17886858

  19. Enzyme-catalyzed formation of beta-peptides: beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases BapA and DmpA acting as beta-peptide-synthesizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Heck, Tobias; Kohler, Hans-Peter E; Limbach, Michael; Flögel, Oliver; Seebach, Dieter; Geueke, Birgit

    2007-09-01

    In recent studies, we discovered that the three beta-peptidyl aminopeptidases, BapA from Sphingosinicella xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4, BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2, and DmpA from Ochrobactrum anthropi LMG7991, possess the unique feature of cleaving N-terminal beta-amino acid residues from beta- and alpha/beta-peptides. Herein, we investigated the use of the same three enzymes for the reverse reaction catalyzing the oligomerization of beta-amino acids and the synthesis of mixed peptides with N-terminal beta-amino acid residues. As substrates, we employed the beta-homoamino acid derivatives H-beta hGly-pNA, H-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hAla-pNA, H-beta3 hPhe-pNA, H-(R)-beta3 hPhe-pNA, and H-beta3 hLeu-pNA. All three enzymes were capable of coupling the six beta-amino acids to oligomers with chain lengths of up to eight amino acid residues. With the enzyme DmpA as the catalyst, we observed very high conversion rates, which correspond to dimer yields of up to 76%. The beta-dipeptide H-beta3 hAla-beta3 hLeu-OH and the beta/alpha-dipeptide H-beta hGly-His-OH (carnosine) were formed with almost 50% conversion, when a five-fold excess of beta3-homoleucine or histidine was incubated with H-beta3 hAla-pNA and H-beta hGly-pNA, respectively, in the presence of the enzyme BapA from S. microcystinivorans Y2. BapA from S. xenopeptidilytica 3-2W4 turned out to be a versatile catalyst capable of coupling various beta-amino acid residues to the free N-termini of beta- and alpha-amino acids and even to an alpha-tripeptide. Thus, these aminopeptidases might be useful to introduce a beta-amino acid residue as an N-terminal protecting group into a 'natural' alpha-peptide, thereby stabilizing the peptide against degradation by other proteolytic enzymes.

  20. The Catalytic Scaffold fo the Haloalkanoic Acid Dehalogenase Enzyme Superfamily Acts as a Mold for the Trigonal Bipyramidal Transition State

    SciTech Connect

    Lu,Z.; Dunaway-Mariano, D.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of new catalytic activities and specificities within an enzyme superfamily requires the exploration of sequence space for adaptation to a new substrate with retention of those elements required to stabilize key intermediates/transition states. Here, we propose that core residues in the large enzyme family, the haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase enzyme superfamily (HADSF) form a 'mold' in which the trigonal bipyramidal transition states formed during phosphoryl transfer are stabilized by electrostatic forces. The vanadate complex of the hexose phosphate phosphatase BT4131 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 (HPP) determined at 1.00 Angstroms resolution via X-ray crystallography assumes a trigonal bipyramidal coordination geometry with the nucleophilic Asp-8 and one oxygen ligand at the apical position. Remarkably, the tungstate in the complex determined to 1.03 Angstroms resolution assumes the same coordination geometry. The contribution of the general acid/base residue Asp-10 in the stabilization of the trigonal bipyramidal species via hydrogen-bond formation with the apical oxygen atom is evidenced by the 1.52 Angstroms structure of the D10A mutant bound to vanadate. This structure shows a collapse of the trigonal bipyramidal geometry with displacement of the water molecule formerly occupying the apical position. Furthermore, the 1.07 Angstroms resolution structure of the D10A mutant complexed with tungstate shows the tungstate to be in a typical 'phosphate-like' tetrahedral configuration. The analysis of 12 liganded HADSF structures deposited in the protein data bank (PDB) identified stringently conserved elements that stabilize the trigonal bipyramidal transition states by engaging in favorable electrostatic interactions with the axial and equatorial atoms of the transferring phosphoryl group.

  1. The snf1 gene of Ustilago maydis acts as a dual regulator of cell wall degrading enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nadal, Marina; Garcia-Pedrajas, Maria D; Gold, Scott E

    2010-12-01

    Many fungal plant pathogens are known to produce extracellular enzymes that degrade cell wall elements required for host penetration and infection. Due to gene redundancy, single gene deletions generally do not address the importance of these enzymes in pathogenicity. Cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDEs) in fungi are often subject to carbon catabolite repression at the transcriptional level such that, when glucose is available, CWDE-encoding genes, along with many other genes, are repressed. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the main players controlling this process is SNF1, which encodes a protein kinase. In this yeast, Snf1p is required to release glucose repression when this sugar is depleted from the growth medium. We have employed a reverse genetic approach to explore the role of the SNF1 ortholog as a potential regulator of CWDE gene expression in Ustilago maydis. We identified U. maydis snf1 and deleted it from the fungal genome. Consistent with our hypothesis, the relative expression of an endoglucanase and a pectinase was higher in the wild type than in the Δsnf1 mutant strain when glucose was depleted from the growth medium. However, when cells were grown in derepressive conditions, the relative expression of two xylanase genes was unexpectedly higher in the Δsnf1 strain than in the wild type, indicating that, in this case, snf1 negatively regulated the expression of these genes. Additionally, we found that, contrary to several other fungal species, U. maydis Snf1 was not required for utilization of alternative carbon sources. Also, unlike in ascomycete plant pathogens, deletion of snf1 did not profoundly affect virulence in U. maydis.

  2. The directionality of processive enzymes acting on recalcitrant polysaccharides is reflected in the kinetic signatures of oligomer degradation.

    PubMed

    Hamre, Anne Grethe; Schaupp, Daniel; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Sørlie, Morten

    2015-07-01

    The enzymatic degradation of the closely related insoluble polysaccharides; cellulose (β(1-4)-linked glucose) by cellulases and chitin (β(1-4)-linked N-acetylglucosamine) by chitinases, is of large biological and economical importance. Processive enzymes with different inherent directionalities, i.e. attacking the polysaccharide chains from opposite ends, are crucial for the efficiency of this degradation process. While processive cellulases with complementary functions differ in structure and catalytic mechanism, processive chitinases belong to one single protein family with similar active site architectures. Using the unique model system of Serratia marcescens with two processive chitinases attacking opposite ends of the substrate, we here show that different directionalities of processivity are correlated to distinct differences in the kinetic signatures for hydrolysis of oligomeric tetra-N-acetyl chitotetraose.

  3. The catecholamine biosynthetic enzyme dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH): first genome-wide search positions trait-determining variants acting additively in the proximal promoter

    PubMed Central

    Mustapic, Maja; Maihofer, Adam X.; Mahata, Manjula; Chen, Yuqing; Baker, Dewleen G.; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Nievergelt, Caroline M.

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH) is the biosynthetic enzyme catalyzing formation of norepinephrine. Changes in DBH expression or activity have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and neuropsychiatric disorders. Genetic determination of DBH enzymatic activity and its secretion are only incompletely understood. We began with a genome-wide association search for loci contributing to DBH activity in human plasma. Initially, in a population sample of European ancestry, we identified the proximal DBH promoter as a region harboring three common trait-determining variants (top hit rs1611115, P = 7.2 × 10−51). We confirmed their effects on transcription and showed that the three variants each acted additively on gene expression. Results were replicated in a population sample of Native American descent (top hit rs1611115, P = 4.1 × 10−15). Jointly, DBH variants accounted for 57% of DBH trait variation. We further identified a genome-wide significant SNP at the LOC338797 locus on chromosome 12 as trans-quantitative trait locus (QTL) (rs4255618, P = 4.62 × 10−8). Conditional analyses on DBH identified a third genomic region contributing to DBH variation: a likely cis-QTL adjacent to DBH in SARDH (rs7040170, P = 1.31 × 10−14) on chromosome 9q. We conclude that three common SNPs in the DBH promoter act additively to control phenotypic variation in DBH levels, and that two additional novel loci (SARDH and LOC338797) may also contribute to the expression of this catecholamine biosynthetic trait. Identification of DBH variants with strong effects makes it possible to take advantage of Mendelian randomization approaches to test causal effects of this intermediate trait on disease. PMID:24986918

  4. Peroxisomal multifunctional enzyme type 2 from the fruitfly: dehydrogenase and hydratase act as separate entities, as revealed by structure and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Haataja, Tatu J K; Koski, M Kristian; Hiltunen, J Kalervo; Glumoff, Tuomo

    2011-05-01

    All of the peroxisomal β-oxidation pathways characterized thus far house at least one MFE (multifunctional enzyme) catalysing two out of four reactions of the spiral. MFE type 2 proteins from various species display great variation in domain composition and predicted substrate preference. The gene CG3415 encodes for Drosophila melanogaster MFE-2 (DmMFE-2), complements the Saccharomyces cerevisiae MFE-2 deletion strain, and the recombinant protein displays both MFE-2 enzymatic activities in vitro. The resolved crystal structure is the first one for a full-length MFE-2 revealing the assembly of domains, and the data can also be transferred to structure-function studies for other MFE-2 proteins. The structure explains the necessity of dimerization. The lack of substrate channelling is proposed based on both the structural features, as well as by the fact that hydration and dehydrogenation activities of MFE-2, if produced as separate enzymes, are equally efficient in catalysis as the full-length MFE-2.

  5. Catalyzed enzyme electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A.; Wilson, M.S.; Rishpon, J.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1992-12-31

    An enzyme electrode is prepared with a composite coating on an electrical conductor. The composite coating is formed from a casting solution of a perfluorosulfonic acid, polymer, an enzyme, and a carbon supported catalyst. The solution may be cast directly on the conductor surface or may be formed as a membrane and applied to the surface. The perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer formed from the casting solution provides an insoluble biocompatible protective matrix for the enzyme and acts to retain the enzyme for long term availability in the electrode structure. The carbon supported catalyst provides catalytic sites throughout the layer for the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide from the enzyme reactions. The carbon support then provides a conductive path for establishing an electrical signal to the electrical conductor. In one embodiment, the electrical conductor is a carbon cloth that permits oxygen or other gas to be introduced to the perfluorosulfonic polymer to promote the enzyme reaction independent of oxygen in the solution being tested.

  6. Catalyzed enzyme electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zawodzinski, T.A.; Wilson, M.S.; Rishpon, J.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1993-07-13

    An enzyme electrode is prepared with a composite coating on an electrical conductor. The composite coating is formed from a casting solution of a perfluorosulfonic acid polymer, an enzyme, and a carbon supported catalyst. The solution may be cast directly on the conductor surface or may be formed as a membrane and applied to the surface. The perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer formed from the casting solution provides an insoluble biocompatible protective matrix for the enzyme and acts to retain the enzyme for long term availability in the electrode structure. The carbon supported catalyst provides catalytic sites throughout the layer for the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide from the enzyme reactions. The carbon support then provides a conductive path for establishing an electrical signal to the electrical conductor. In one embodiment, the electrical conductor is a carbon cloth that permits oxygen or other gas to be introduced to the perfluorosulfonic polymer to promote the enzyme reaction independent of oxygen in the solution being tested.

  7. Catalyzed enzyme electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Zawodzinski, Thomas A.; Wilson, Mahlon S.; Rishpon, Judith; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    1993-01-01

    An enzyme electrode is prepared with a composite coating on an electrical conductor. The composite coating is formed from a casting solution of a perfluorosulfonic acid polymer, an enzyme, and a carbon supported catalyst. The solution may be cast directly on the conductor surface or may be formed as a membrane and applied to the surface. The perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer formed from the casting solution provides an insoluble biocompatible protective matrix for the enzyme and acts to retain the enzyme for long term availability in the electrode structure. The carbon supported catalyst provides catalytic sites throughout the layer for the oxidation of hydrogen peroxide from the enzyme reactions. The carbon support then provides a conductive path for establishing an electrical signal to the electrical conductor. In one embodiment, the electrical conductor is a carbon cloth that permits oxygen or other gas to be introduced to the perfluorosulfonic polymer to promote the enzyme reaction independent of oxygen in the solution being tested.

  8. A novel branching enzyme of the GH-57 family in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Taira; Kanai, Tamotsu; Takata, Hiroki; Kuriki, Takashi; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2006-08-01

    Branching enzyme (BE) catalyzes formation of the branch points in glycogen and amylopectin by cleavage of the alpha-1,4 linkage and its subsequent transfer to the alpha-1,6 position. We have identified a novel BE encoded by an uncharacterized open reading frame (TK1436) of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. TK1436 encodes a conserved protein showing similarity to members of glycoside hydrolase family 57 (GH-57 family). At the C terminus of the TK1436 protein, two copies of a helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) motif were found. TK1436 orthologs are distributed in archaea of the order Thermococcales, cyanobacteria, some actinobacteria, and a few other bacterial species. When recombinant TK1436 protein was incubated with amylose used as the substrate, a product peak was detected by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography, eluting more slowly than the substrate. Isoamylase treatment of the reaction mixture significantly increased the level of short-chain alpha-glucans, indicating that the reaction product contained many alpha-1,6 branching points. The TK1436 protein showed an optimal pH of 7.0, an optimal temperature of 70 degrees C, and thermostability up to 90 degrees C, as determined by the iodine-staining assay. These properties were the same when a protein devoid of HhH motifs (the TK1436DeltaH protein) was used. The average molecular weight of branched glucan after reaction with the TK1436DeltaH protein was over 100 times larger than that of the starting substrate. These results clearly indicate that TK1436 encodes a structurally novel BE belonging to the GH-57 family. Identification of an overlooked BE species provides new insights into glycogen biosynthesis in microorganisms. PMID:16885460

  9. Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moe, Owen; Cornelius, Richard

    1988-01-01

    Conveys an appreciation of enzyme kinetic analysis by using a practical and intuitive approach. Discusses enzyme assays, kinetic models and rate laws, the kinetic constants (V, velocity, and Km, Michaels constant), evaluation of V and Km from experimental data, and enzyme inhibition. (CW)

  10. Testing and characterizing enzymes and membrane-bound carrier proteins acting on amphipathic ligands in the presence of bilayer membrane material and soluble binding protein. Application to the uptake of oleate into isolated cells.

    PubMed Central

    Heirwegh, K P; Meuwissen, J A

    1992-01-01

    1. A multiphasic modelling approach [Heirwegh, Meuwissen, Vermeir & De Smedt (1988) Biochem. J. 254, 101-108] is applied to systems containing poorly water-soluble amphipathic reactants, membrane material, soluble binding protein and acceptor protein (enzyme or membrane-bound carrier protein). 2. The field of application is constrained by the assumptions (i) that the amount of acceptor-bound substrate is small compared with the total amount and (ii) that all preceding chemical reactions and steps of mass transport are rapid compared with the chemical change monitored. 3. Initial-rate formulae for systems in which an acceptor interacts with unbound or protein-bound ligand are given. The saturation curves are near-hyperbolic or sigmoidal, depending both (i) on the form of ligand (unbound or protein-bound) acted upon by the acceptor and (ii) on whether the assays are performed at constant concentration of soluble binding protein Cp or at constant substrate/binding-site molar ratio RS. 4. Several diagnostic features permit unequivocal distinction between acceptor action on unbound or protein-bound substrate. In the former case, saturation curves, run at the same constant concentration of one of several binding proteins of increasing binding affinity, will show progressively increasing inhibition, the shape changing from near-hyperbolic at Km' less than K1' to sigmoidal at Km' greater than K1'.Km' is the effective Michaelis constant of the acceptor and K1' the effective dissociation constant of the binding sites of the soluble protein (for the sites with the higher binding affinity, if several classes of binding site are present on the protein). Alternatively, the maximum velocity obtained at constant RS less than or equal to 1 should increase hyperbolically with RS/(1-RS) for a binding protein with a single class of binding site. The formula that applies when the binding protein contains two classes of independent binding site is also available. When the acceptor acts

  11. Enzyme complexity in intermediary metabolism.

    PubMed

    Van Schaftingen, Emile; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Linster, Carole L

    2015-07-01

    A good appraisal of the function of enzymes is essential for the understanding of inborn errors of metabolism. However, it is clear now that the 'one gene, one enzyme, one catalytic function' rule oversimplifies the actual situation. Genes often encode several related proteins, which may differ in their subcellular localisation, regulation or function. Furthermore, enzymes often show several catalytic activities. In some cases, this is because they are multifunctional, possessing two or more different active sites that catalyse different, physiologically related reactions. In enzymes with broad specificity or in multispecificity enzymes, a single type of catalytic site performs the same reaction on different physiological substrates at similar rates. Enzymes that act physiologically in only one reaction often show nonetheless substrate promiscuity: they act at low rates on compounds that resemble their physiological substrate(s), thus forming non-classical metabolites, which are in some cases eliminated by metabolite repair. In addition to their catalytic role, enzymes may have moonlighting functions, i.e. non-catalytic functions that are most often not related with their catalytic activity. Deficiency in such functions may participate in the phenotype of inborn errors of metabolism. Evolution has also made that some enzymes have lost their catalytic activity to become allosteric proteins.

  12. Food Enzymes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBroom, Rachel; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2007-01-01

    Many students view biology and chemistry as two unrelated, separate sciences; how these courses are generally taught in high schools may do little to change that impression. The study of enzymes provide a great opportunity for both biology and chemistry teachers to share with students the interdisciplinary nature of science. This article describes…

  13. Zinc Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertini, I.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Discusses the role of zinc in various enzymes concerned with hydration, hydrolysis, and redox reactions. The binding of zinc to protein residues, properties of noncatalytic zinc(II) and catalytic zinc, and the reactions catalyzed by zinc are among the topics considered. (JN)

  14. Enzyme Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Lam, C. F.; Priest, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    One of the most generally applicable algorithms for the derivation of steady-state rate equations for complex enzyme reaction mechanisms is that of King and Altman. Several modifications of this algorithm have been suggested; however, each requires the generation of numerous valid and invalid patterns and the subsequent elimination of those that are invalid. A method is presented, employing topological theory of linear graphs, for the systematic generation of only those patterns which are valid. This method is readily adaptable to use on a digital computer. An independent method for the calculation of the number of valid patterns is also presented. This calculation can be used to substantiate the accuracy of the patterns obtained. This calculation is also adaptable to computerization. Examples are included to demonstrate both the generation of patterns and the calculation of their number for specific enzyme mechanisms. PMID:5016111

  15. Alkylating enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wessjohann, Ludger A; Keim, Jeanette; Weigel, Benjamin; Dippe, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Chemospecific and regiospecific modifications of natural products by methyl, prenyl, or C-glycosyl moieties are a challenging and cumbersome task in organic synthesis. Because of the availability of an increasing number of stable and selective transferases and cofactor regeneration processes, enzyme-assisted strategies turn out to be promising alternatives to classical synthesis. Two categories of alkylating enzymes become increasingly relevant for applications: firstly prenyltransferases and terpene synthases (including terpene cyclases), which are used in the production of terpenoids such as artemisinin, or meroterpenoids like alkylated phenolics and indoles, and secondly methyltransferases, which modify flavonoids and alkaloids to yield products with a specific methylation pattern such as 7-O-methylaromadendrin and scopolamine.

  16. Primary enzyme quantitation

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, G.C.

    1982-03-04

    The disclosure relates to the quantitation of a primary enzyme concentration by utilizing a substrate for the primary enzyme labeled with a second enzyme which is an indicator enzyme. Enzyme catalysis of the substrate occurs and results in release of the indicator enzyme in an amount directly proportional to the amount of primary enzyme present. By quantifying the free indicator enzyme one determines the amount of primary enzyme present.

  17. ACT: Acting Out Central Theme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kise, Joan Duff

    1982-01-01

    The author describes ACT (Acting Out Central Theme), a method for dealing with psychomotor, cognitive, and affective domains in slow readers. The ACT approach involves three sessions which focus on discussion of a theme such as friendship, presentaton of the theme as a skit, and assignment of topics to individual students. (SW)

  18. Heavy enzymes--experimental and computational insights in enzyme dynamics.

    PubMed

    Swiderek, Katarzyna; Ruiz-Pernía, J Javier; Moliner, Vicent; Tuñón, Iñaki

    2014-08-01

    The role of protein motions in the chemical step of enzyme-catalyzed reactions is the subject of an open debate in the scientific literature. The systematic use of isotopically substituted enzymes has been revealed as a useful tool to quantify the role of these motions. According to the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, changing the mass of the protein does not change the forces acting on the system but alters the frequencies of the protein motions, which in turn can affect the rate constant. Experimental and theoretical studies carried out in this field are presented in this article and discussed in the framework of Transition State Theory.

  19. Juggling Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudalevige, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Two education bills from George W. Bush's first term are long overdue for reauthorization. One, of course, is the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB), passed in late 2001. The other is the Education Sciences Reform Act (ESRA), which in November 2002 replaced the Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI) with a new Institute of Education…

  20. Engineering Cellulase Enzymes for Bioenergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Meera Elizabeth

    Sustainable energy sources, such as biofuels, offer increasingly important alternatives to fossil fuels that contribute less to global climate change. The energy contained within cellulosic biofuels derives from sunlight energy stored in the form of carbon-carbon bonds comprising sugars such as glucose. Second-generation biofuels are produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, including agricultural waste products and non-food crops like Miscanthus, that contain lignin and the polysaccharides hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose is the most abundant biological material on Earth; it is a polymer of glucose and a structural component of plant cell walls. Accessing the sugar is challenging, as the crystalline structure of cellulose resists degradation; biochemical and thermochemical means can be used to depolymerize cellulose. Cellulase enzymes catalyze the biochemical depolymerization of cellulose into glucose. Glucose can be used as a carbon source for growth of a biofuel-producing microorganism. When it converts glucose to a hydrocarbon fuel, this microbe completes the biofuels process of transforming sunlight energy into accessible, chemical energy capable of replacing non-renewable transportation fuels. Due to strong intermolecular interactions between polymer chains, cellulose is significantly more challenging to depolymerize than starch, a more accessible polymer of glucose utilized in first-generation biofuels processes (often derived from corn). While most mammals cannot digest cellulose (dietary fiber), certain fungi and bacteria produce cellulase enzymes capable of hydrolyzing it. These organisms secrete a wide variety of glycoside hydrolase and other classes of enzymes that work in concert. Because cellulase enzymes are slow-acting and expensive to produce, my aim has been to improve the properties of these enzymes as a means to make a cellulosic biofuels process possible that is more efficient and, consequently, more economical than current

  1. ACT Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page helpful? Also known as: ACT; Activated Coagulation Time Formal name: Activated Clotting Time Related tests: ... in the blood called platelets and proteins called coagulation factors are activated in a sequence of steps ...

  2. Acting Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farin, Susan Archie

    1997-01-01

    Describes a fun game in which students act as electrons, protons, and neutrons. This activity is designed to help students develop a concrete understanding of the abstract concept of atomic structure. (DKM)

  3. Can the local enzyme scaffold act as an H-donor for a Co(I)H bond formation? The curious case of methionine synthase-bound cob(I)alamin.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2013-09-01

    The density functional calculations and analysis of the existing X-ray crystallographic data have been carried out to gain mechanistic insight into the reactivation cycle of methionine synthase (MetH) enzyme. The calculations were carried out on the cobinamide-type model complexes of cob(I)alamin (Co(I)Cbx) testing H2O and PhOH as possible β-axial ligands. The PhOH motif was used to mimic the tyrosine (Y1139) residue that has been found in the active site of the MetH-bound cob(II)alamin (Co(II)Cbx). The calculations indicate that the β-axial PhOH ligand forms stronger Co(I)H bonds than H2O ligand due to its better H-donor capacity. The calculated redox tuning of Co(I)H interactions on the reduction potential of Co(II)/Co(I) couple (60-800 mV vs standard hydrogen electrode (SHE)), irrespective of the β-axial ligand considered, is significantly higher than the biological redox gap between the reduction potential of Co(II)/Co(I) couple and that of the biological reducing agents (50 mV vs SHE). The analysis of existing crystallographic data for the reactivation conformation of MetH enzyme (1K7Y (@3.0 Å); 1K98 (@3.8 Å) and 3IVA (@2.7 Å)) indicates that the Y1139 residue and the β-axial H2O ligand in the MetH-bound Co(II)Cbx complex are equidistant from the Co(II) ion (Y1139Co(II)=3.97 Å; H2OCo(II)=3.96 Å). Taking into account that the Y1139-induced Co(I)H linkages are thermodynamically more stable than the H2O-induced ones, the present calculations suggest that the Y1139 residue may serve as the β-axial ligand in the reactivation conformation of MetH enzyme.

  4. Biocatalytic Single Enzyme Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; Kim, Jungbae

    2004-03-31

    As an innovative way of enzyme stabilization, we recently developed a new enzyme composite of nano-meter scale that we call "single-enzyme nanoparticles (SENs)" (9). Each enzyme molecule is surrounded with a porous composite organic/inorganic network of less than a few nanometers think. This approach represents a new type of enzyme-containing nanostructure. In experiments with perotease (chymotrypsin, CT), the activity of single enzyme nanoparticle form of the enzyme was greatly stabilized compared to the free form, without imposing a serious mass transfer limitation of substrates. In this chapter we will describe the synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of the new SENs.

  5. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-10-20

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the (bio)processing of lignocellulosic feedstocks, more effective degradation methods of lignin are in demand. Nature has found ways to fully degrade lignin through the production of dedicated ligninolytic enzyme systems. While such enzymes have been well thoroughly studied for ligninolytic fungi, only in recent years biochemical studies on bacterial enzymes capable of lignin modification have intensified. This has revealed several types of enzymes available to bacteria that enable them to act on lignin. Two major classes of bacterial lignin-modifying enzymes are DyP-type peroxidases and laccases. Yet, recently also several other bacterial enzymes have been discovered that seem to play a role in lignin modifications. In the present review, we provide an overview of recent advances in the identification and use of bacterial enzymes acting on lignin or lignin-derived products. PMID:27544286

  6. Bacterial enzymes involved in lignin degradation.

    PubMed

    de Gonzalo, Gonzalo; Colpa, Dana I; Habib, Mohamed H M; Fraaije, Marco W

    2016-10-20

    Lignin forms a large part of plant biomass. It is a highly heterogeneous polymer of 4-hydroxyphenylpropanoid units and is embedded within polysaccharide polymers forming lignocellulose. Lignin provides strength and rigidity to plants and is rather resilient towards degradation. To improve the (bio)processing of lignocellulosic feedstocks, more effective degradation methods of lignin are in demand. Nature has found ways to fully degrade lignin through the production of dedicated ligninolytic enzyme systems. While such enzymes have been well thoroughly studied for ligninolytic fungi, only in recent years biochemical studies on bacterial enzymes capable of lignin modification have intensified. This has revealed several types of enzymes available to bacteria that enable them to act on lignin. Two major classes of bacterial lignin-modifying enzymes are DyP-type peroxidases and laccases. Yet, recently also several other bacterial enzymes have been discovered that seem to play a role in lignin modifications. In the present review, we provide an overview of recent advances in the identification and use of bacterial enzymes acting on lignin or lignin-derived products.

  7. Engineering Cellulase Enzymes for Bioenergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atreya, Meera Elizabeth

    Sustainable energy sources, such as biofuels, offer increasingly important alternatives to fossil fuels that contribute less to global climate change. The energy contained within cellulosic biofuels derives from sunlight energy stored in the form of carbon-carbon bonds comprising sugars such as glucose. Second-generation biofuels are produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks, including agricultural waste products and non-food crops like Miscanthus, that contain lignin and the polysaccharides hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose is the most abundant biological material on Earth; it is a polymer of glucose and a structural component of plant cell walls. Accessing the sugar is challenging, as the crystalline structure of cellulose resists degradation; biochemical and thermochemical means can be used to depolymerize cellulose. Cellulase enzymes catalyze the biochemical depolymerization of cellulose into glucose. Glucose can be used as a carbon source for growth of a biofuel-producing microorganism. When it converts glucose to a hydrocarbon fuel, this microbe completes the biofuels process of transforming sunlight energy into accessible, chemical energy capable of replacing non-renewable transportation fuels. Due to strong intermolecular interactions between polymer chains, cellulose is significantly more challenging to depolymerize than starch, a more accessible polymer of glucose utilized in first-generation biofuels processes (often derived from corn). While most mammals cannot digest cellulose (dietary fiber), certain fungi and bacteria produce cellulase enzymes capable of hydrolyzing it. These organisms secrete a wide variety of glycoside hydrolase and other classes of enzymes that work in concert. Because cellulase enzymes are slow-acting and expensive to produce, my aim has been to improve the properties of these enzymes as a means to make a cellulosic biofuels process possible that is more efficient and, consequently, more economical than current

  8. Insolubilization process increases enzyme stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billingham, J.; Lyn, J.

    1971-01-01

    Enzymes complexed with polymeric matrices contain properties suggesting application to enzyme-controlled reactions. Stability of insolubilized enzyme derivatives is markedly greater than that of soluble enzymes and physical form of insolubilized enzymes is useful in column and batch processes.

  9. Bacterial Enzymes and Antibiotic Resistance- Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Lauren

    2015-08-25

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β-lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes.

  10. Developments in Enzyme Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaplin, M. F.

    1984-01-01

    Enzyme technology has a well-established industrial base, with applications that have survived competition. The most prominent applications of enzymes in biotechnology are examined with an explanation of some theoretical background. Topics include extending an enzyme's useful life, partition and diffusion, industrial uses, and therapeutic uses.…

  11. Chloroplast and Cytoplasmic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise E.; Advani, Vimal R.

    1970-01-01

    Three pea (Pisum sativum) leaf chloroplast enzymes—triose phosphate isomerase, glyceric acid 3-phosphate kinase, and fructose 1,6-diphosphate aldolase—have been separated from the corresponding cytoplasmic enzymes by isoelectric focusing. These three enzymes of the reductive pentose phosphate cycle are therefore distinct proteins, not identical with the analogous enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway. PMID:16657347

  12. Cooperation of Aspergillus nidulans enzymes increases plant polysaccharide saccharification.

    PubMed

    Tramontina, Robson; Robl, Diogo; Maitan-Alfenas, Gabriela Piccolo; de Vries, Ronald P

    2016-07-01

    Efficient polysaccharide degradation depends on interaction between enzymes acting on the main chain and the side chains. Previous studies demonstrated cooperation between several enzymes, but not all enzyme combinations have been explored. A better understanding of enzyme cooperation would enable the design of better enzyme mixtures, optimally profiting from synergistic effects. In this study, we analyzed the cooperation of several enzymes involved in the degradation of xylan, glucan, xyloglucan and crude plant biomass from Aspergillus nidulans by single and combined incubations with their polymeric substrate. Positive effects were observed between most enzymes, although not always to the same extent. Moreover, the tailor made cocktails formulated in this study resulted in efficient release of glucose from plant biomass. This study also serves as an example for the complex cooperation that occurs between enzymes in plant biomass saccharification and how expression in easily-accessible hosts, such as Pichia pastoris, can help in revealing these effects. PMID:26848939

  13. The average enzyme principle.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Ed; Chaudhary, Osman; Segrè, Daniel

    2013-09-01

    The Michaelis-Menten equation for an irreversible enzymatic reaction depends linearly on the enzyme concentration. Even if the enzyme concentration changes in time, this linearity implies that the amount of substrate depleted during a given time interval depends only on the average enzyme concentration. Here, we use a time re-scaling approach to generalize this result to a broad category of multi-reaction systems, whose constituent enzymes have the same dependence on time, e.g. they belong to the same regulon. This "average enzyme principle" provides a natural methodology for jointly studying metabolism and its regulation.

  14. Act resilient.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Genie; Bice-Stephens, Wynona

    2014-01-01

    Attendees have reported changing from being fearful to serene, from listless to energized, from disengaged to connected, and becoming markedly less anxious in a few weeks. Anecdotally, self-reported stress levels have been reduced by over 50% after just one class. Attendees learn not to be afraid of their feelings by working with emotions in a playful manner. When a person can act angry, but separate himself from his personal story, the emotional energy exists in a separate form that is not attached to specific events, and can be more easily dealt with and neutralized. Attendees are taught to "take out the emotional trash" through expressive comedy. They become less intimated by their own emotional intensity and triggers as they learn how even metaphorical buckets of anger, shame, guilt and hurt can be emotionally emptied. The added benefit is that this is accomplished without the disclosure of personal information of the requirement to reexperience past pain which can trigger its own cascade of stress. PMID:24706248

  15. Mucosal C-terminal maltase-glucoamylase hydrolyzes large size starch digestion products that may contribute to rapid postprandial glucose generation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The four mucosal alpha-glucosidases, which differ in their digestive roles, generate glucose from glycemic carbohydrates and accordingly can be viewed as a control point for rate of glucose delivery to the body. In this study, individual recombinant enzymes were used to understand how alpha-glucan o...

  16. Profiling the orphan enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sorokina, Maria; Stam, Mark; Médigue, Claudine; Lespinet, Olivier; Vallenet, David

    2014-06-06

    The emergence of Next Generation Sequencing generates an incredible amount of sequence and great potential for new enzyme discovery. Despite this huge amount of data and the profusion of bioinformatic methods for function prediction, a large part of known enzyme activities is still lacking an associated protein sequence. These particular activities are called "orphan enzymes". The present review proposes an update of previous surveys on orphan enzymes by mining the current content of public databases. While the percentage of orphan enzyme activities has decreased from 38% to 22% in ten years, there are still more than 1,000 orphans among the 5,000 entries of the Enzyme Commission (EC) classification. Taking into account all the reactions present in metabolic databases, this proportion dramatically increases to reach nearly 50% of orphans and many of them are not associated to a known pathway. We extended our survey to "local orphan enzymes" that are activities which have no representative sequence in a given clade, but have at least one in organisms belonging to other clades. We observe an important bias in Archaea and find that in general more than 30% of the EC activities have incomplete sequence information in at least one superkingdom. To estimate if candidate proteins for local orphans could be retrieved by homology search, we applied a simple strategy based on the PRIAM software and noticed that candidates may be proposed for an important fraction of local orphan enzymes. Finally, by studying relation between protein domains and catalyzed activities, it appears that newly discovered enzymes are mostly associated with already known enzyme domains. Thus, the exploration of the promiscuity and the multifunctional aspect of known enzyme families may solve part of the orphan enzyme issue. We conclude this review with a presentation of recent initiatives in finding proteins for orphan enzymes and in extending the enzyme world by the discovery of new activities.

  17. Novel enzymes for the degradation of cellulose

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The bulk terrestrial biomass resource in a future bio-economy will be lignocellulosic biomass, which is recalcitrant and challenging to process. Enzymatic conversion of polysaccharides in the lignocellulosic biomass will be a key technology in future biorefineries and this technology is currently the subject of intensive research. We describe recent developments in enzyme technology for conversion of cellulose, the most abundant, homogeneous and recalcitrant polysaccharide in lignocellulosic biomass. In particular, we focus on a recently discovered new type of enzymes currently classified as CBM33 and GH61 that catalyze oxidative cleavage of polysaccharides. These enzymes promote the efficiency of classical hydrolytic enzymes (cellulases) by acting on the surfaces of the insoluble substrate, where they introduce chain breaks in the polysaccharide chains, without the need of first “extracting” these chains from their crystalline matrix. PMID:22747961

  18. Self-powered enzyme micropumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, Samudra; Patra, Debabrata; Ortiz-Rivera, Isamar; Agrawal, Arjun; Shklyaev, Sergey; Dey, Krishna K.; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo; Mallouk, Thomas E.; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-05-01

    Non-mechanical nano- and microscale pumps that function without the aid of an external power source and provide precise control over the flow rate in response to specific signals are needed for the development of new autonomous nano- and microscale systems. Here we show that surface-immobilized enzymes that are independent of adenosine triphosphate function as self-powered micropumps in the presence of their respective substrates. In the four cases studied (catalase, lipase, urease and glucose oxidase), the flow is driven by a gradient in fluid density generated by the enzymatic reaction. The pumping velocity increases with increasing substrate concentration and reaction rate. These rechargeable pumps can be triggered by the presence of specific analytes, which enables the design of enzyme-based devices that act both as sensor and pump. Finally, we show proof-of-concept enzyme-powered devices that autonomously deliver small molecules and proteins in response to specific chemical stimuli, including the release of insulin in response to glucose.

  19. Enzyme kinetics of conjugating enzymes: PAPS sulfotransferase.

    PubMed

    James, Margaret O

    2014-01-01

    The sulfotransferase (SULT) enzymes catalyze the formation of sulfate esters or sulfamates from substrates that contain hydroxy or amine groups, utilizing 3'-phosphoadenosyl-5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as the donor of the sulfonic group. The rate of product formation depends on the concentrations of PAPS and substrate as well as the sulfotransferase enzyme; thus, if PAPS is held constant while varying substrate concentration (or vice versa), the kinetic constants derived are apparent constants. When studied over a narrow range of substrate concentrations, classic Michaelis-Menten kinetics can be observed with many SULT enzymes and most substrates. Some SULT enzymes exhibit positive or negative cooperativity during conversion of substrate to product, and the kinetics fit the Hill plot. A characteristic feature of most sulfotransferase-catalyzed reactions is that, when studied over a wide range of substrate concentrations, the rate of product formation initially increases as substrate concentration increases, then decreases at high substrate concentrations, i.e., they exhibit substrate inhibition or partial substrate inhibition. This chapter gives an introduction to sulfotransferases, including a historical note, the nomenclature, a description of the function of SULTs with different types of substrates, presentation of examples of enzyme kinetics with SULTs, and a discussion of what is known about mechanisms of substrate inhibition in the sulfotransferases.

  20. Divergence and Convergence in Enzyme Evolution*

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative analysis of the sequences of enzymes encoded in a variety of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes reveals convergence and divergence at several levels. Functional convergence can be inferred when structurally distinct and hence non-homologous enzymes show the ability to catalyze the same biochemical reaction. In contrast, as a result of functional diversification, many structurally similar enzyme molecules act on substantially distinct substrates and catalyze diverse biochemical reactions. Here, we present updates on the ATP-grasp, alkaline phosphatase, cupin, HD hydrolase, and N-terminal nucleophile (Ntn) hydrolase enzyme superfamilies and discuss the patterns of sequence and structural conservation and diversity within these superfamilies. Typically, enzymes within a superfamily possess common sequence motifs and key active site residues, as well as (predicted) reaction mechanisms. These observations suggest that the strained conformation (the entatic state) of the active site, which is responsible for the substrate binding and formation of the transition complex, tends to be conserved within enzyme superfamilies. The subsequent fate of the transition complex is not necessarily conserved and depends on the details of the structures of the enzyme and the substrate. This variability of reaction outcomes limits the ability of sequence analysis to predict the exact enzymatic activities of newly sequenced gene products. Nevertheless, sequence-based (super)family assignments and generic functional predictions, even if imprecise, provide valuable leads for experimental studies and remain the best approach to the functional annotation of uncharacterized proteins from new genomes. PMID:22069324

  1. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    DOEpatents

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  2. Rational enzyme redesign

    SciTech Connect

    Ornstein, R.L.

    1994-05-01

    Protein engineering is first a means of elucidating structure-function relations in an enzyme, and second, a means of changing a protein to make it serve a different, but generally related, purpose. In principle, one may change the functional characteristics of an enzyme by altering its substrate specificity, kinetics, optimum range of activity, and chemical mechanism. Obviously one cannot make all possible combinations of amino acid changes for even the smallest enzyme, so the essential question is which changes to make. The intent of rational protein/enzyme redesign is to alter a protein/enzyme in a timely and premeditated fashion. This article provides an outline of the process of rational enzyme redesign.

  3. Adenylate-forming enzymes.

    PubMed

    Schmelz, Stefan; Naismith, James H

    2009-12-01

    Thioesters, amides, and esters are common chemical building blocks in a wide array of natural products. The formation of these bonds can be catalyzed in a variety of ways. For chemists, the use of an activating group is a common strategy and adenylate enzymes are exemplars of this approach. Adenylating enzymes activate the otherwise unreactive carboxylic acid by transforming the normal hydroxyl leaving group into adenosine monophosphate. Recently there have been a number of studies of such enzymes and in this review we suggest a new classification scheme. The review highlights the diversity in enzyme fold, active site architecture, and metal coordination that has evolved to catalyze this particular reaction. PMID:19836944

  4. Extracting enzyme processivity from kinetic assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barel, Itay; Reich, Norbert O.; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-12-01

    A steady-state analysis for the catalytic turnover of molecules containing two substrate sites is presented. A broad class of Markovian dynamic models, motivated by the action of DNA modifying enzymes and the rich variety of translocation mechanisms associated with these systems (e.g., sliding, hopping, intersegmental transfer, etc.), is considered. The modeling suggests an elementary and general method of data analysis, which enables the extraction of the enzyme's processivity directly and unambiguously from experimental data. This analysis is not limited to the initial velocity regime. The predictions are validated both against detailed numerical models and by revisiting published experimental data for EcoRI endonuclease acting on DNA.

  5. Enzyme technology: an overview.

    PubMed

    van Beilen, Jan B; Li, Zhi

    2002-08-01

    Enzymes are being used in numerous new applications in the food, feed, agriculture, paper, leather, and textiles industries, resulting in significant cost reductions. At the same time, rapid technological developments are now stimulating the chemistry and pharma industries to embrace enzyme technology, a trend strengthened by concerns regarding health, energy, raw materials, and the environment.

  6. Cotton cellulose: enzyme adsorption and enzymic hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Beltrame, P.L.; Carniti, P.; Focher, B.; Marzetti, A.; Cattaneo, M.

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of a crude cellulase complex from Trichoderma viride on variously pretreated cotton cellulose samples was studied in the framework of the Langmuir approach at 2-8 degrees. The saturation amount of adsorbed enzyme was related to the susceptibility of the substrates to hydrolysis. In every case the adsorption process was faster by 2-3 orders of magnitude than the hydrolysis step to give end products. For ZnCl/sub 2/-treated cotton cellulose the Langmuir parameters correlated fairly well with the value of the Michaelis constant, measured for its enzymic hydrolysis, and the adsorptive complex was indistinguishable from the complex of the Michaelis-Menten model for the hydrolysis.

  7. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Dimarogona, Maria; Topakas, Evangelos; Christakopoulos, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs), cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs) and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33). PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future. PMID:24688656

  8. Chemotactic separation of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna Kanti; Das, Sambeeta; Poyton, Matthew F; Sengupta, Samudra; Butler, Peter J; Cremer, Paul S; Sen, Ayusman

    2014-12-23

    We demonstrate a procedure for the separation of enzymes based on their chemotactic response toward an imposed substrate concentration gradient. The separation is observed within a two-inlet, five-outlet microfluidic network, designed to allow mixtures of active (ones that catalyze substrate turnover) and inactive (ones that do not catalyze substrate turnover) enzymes, labeled with different fluorophores, to flow through one of the inlets. Substrate solution prepared in phosphate buffer was introduced through the other inlet of the device at the same flow rate. The steady-state concentration profiles of the enzymes were obtained at specific positions within the outlets of the microchannel using fluorescence microscopy. In the presence of a substrate concentration gradient, active enzyme molecules migrated preferentially toward the substrate channel. The excess migration of the active enzyme molecules was quantified in terms of an enrichment coefficient. Experiments were carried out with different pairs of enzymes. Coupling the physics of laminar flow of liquid and molecular diffusion, multiphysics simulations were carried out to estimate the extent of the chemotactic separation. Our results show that, with appropriate microfluidic arrangement, molecular chemotaxis leads to spontaneous separation of active enzyme molecules from their inactive counterparts of similar charge and size.

  9. A Hands-On Classroom Simulation to Demonstrate Concepts in Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junker, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    A classroom exercise is described to introduce enzyme kinetics in an undergraduate biochemistry or chemistry course. The exercise is a simulation in which a student acts as an enzyme that "catalyzes" the unscrewing of a nut from a bolt. With other students assisting, the student enzyme carries out reactions with bolt-nut substrates under different…

  10. Basic models for differential inhibition of enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Mario; Moschini, Roberta; Balestri, Francesco; Mura, Umberto; Del-Corso, Antonella

    2014-03-14

    The possible preferential action exerted by an inhibitor on the transformation of one of two agonist substrates catalyzed by the same enzyme has recently been reported in studies on aldose reductase inhibition. This event was defined as "intra-site differential inhibition" and the molecules able to exert this action as "differential inhibitors". This work presents some basic kinetic models describing differential inhibition. Using a simple analytic approach, the results show that differential inhibition can occur through either competitive or mixed type inhibition in which the inhibitor prevalently targets the free enzyme. The results may help in selecting molecules whose differential inhibitory action could be advantageous in controlling the activity of enzymes acting on more than one substrate.

  11. Chondroitinase: A promising therapeutic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Kasinathan, Narayanan; Volety, Subrahmanyam M; Josyula, Venkata Rao

    2016-05-01

    Even after 20 years of granting orphan status for chondroitinase by US FDA, there is no visible outcome in terms of clinical use. The reasons are many. One of them could be lack of awareness regarding the biological application of the enzyme. The biological activity of chondroitinase is due to its ability to act on chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). CSPGs are needed for normal functioning of the body. An increase or decrease in the level of CSPGs results in various pathological conditions. Chondroitinase is useful in conditions where there is an increase in the level of CSPGs, namely spinal cord injury, vitreous attachment and cancer. Over the last decade, various animal studies showed that chondroitinase could be a good drug candidate. Research focusing on developing a suitable carrier system for delivering chondroitinase needs to be carried out so that pharmacological activity observed in vitro and preclinical studies could be translated to clinical use. Further studies on distribution of chondroitinase as well need to be focused so that chondroitinase with desired attributes could be discovered. The present review article discusses about various biological applications of chondroitinase, drug delivery systems to deliver the enzyme and distribution of chondroitinase among microbes.

  12. Commercial production of microbial enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Munro, I.G.

    1985-01-01

    The advantages and uses of industrially produced microbial enzymes are described. The processes involved in the production of these enzymes, cultivation techniques, enzyme extraction, enzyme purification and immobilization are outlined. Both the history of enzyme technology and its future development are discussed.

  13. RNA as an Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews current findings that explain RNA's function as an enzyme in addition to being an informational molecule. Highlights recent research efforts and notes changes in the information base on RNA activity. Includes models and diagrams of RNA activity. (ML)

  14. Enzymes in Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishman, Myer M.

    1980-01-01

    Presents tabular information concerning recent research in the field of enzymes in analytic chemistry, with methods, substrate or reaction catalyzed, assay, comments and references listed. The table refers to 128 references. Also listed are 13 general citations. (CS)

  15. Overproduction of ligninolytic enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Torok, Tamas

    2014-06-17

    Methods, compositions, and systems for overproducing ligninolytic enzymes from the basidiomycetous fungus are described herein. As described, the method can include incubating a fungal strain of Cerrena unicolor IBB 303 in a fermentation system having growth medium which includes lignocellulosic material and then cultivating the fungal strain in the fermentation system under conditions wherein the fungus expresses the ligninolytic enzymes. In some cases, the lignocellulosic material is mandarin peel, ethanol production residue, walnut pericarp, wheat bran, wheat straw, or banana peel.

  16. RNA-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ferré-D'Amaré, Adrian R

    2003-02-01

    A bewildering number of post-transcriptional modifications are introduced into cellular RNAs by enzymes that are often conserved among archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. The modifications range from those with well-understood functions, such as tRNA aminoacylation, to widespread but more mysterious ones, such as pseudouridylation. Recent structure determinations have included two types of RNA nucleobase modifying enzyme: pseudouridine synthases and tRNA guanine transglycosylases.

  17. Measurement of enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Harris, T K; Keshwani, M M

    2009-01-01

    To study and understand the nature of living cells, scientists have continually employed traditional biochemical techniques aimed to fractionate and characterize a designated network of macromolecular components required to carry out a particular cellular function. At the most rudimentary level, cellular functions ultimately entail rapid chemical transformations that otherwise would not occur in the physiological environment of the cell. The term enzyme is used to singularly designate a macromolecular gene product that specifically and greatly enhances the rate of a chemical transformation. Purification and characterization of individual and collective groups of enzymes has been and will remain essential toward advancement of the molecular biological sciences; and developing and utilizing enzyme reaction assays is central to this mission. First, basic kinetic principles are described for understanding chemical reaction rates and the catalytic effects of enzymes on such rates. Then, a number of methods are described for measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rates, which mainly differ with regard to techniques used to detect and quantify concentration changes of given reactants or products. Finally, short commentary is given toward formulation of reaction mixtures used to measure enzyme activity. Whereas a comprehensive treatment of enzymatic reaction assays is not within the scope of this chapter, the very core principles that are presented should enable new researchers to better understand the logic and utility of any given enzymatic assay that becomes of interest.

  18. Enzyme and microbial sensors for environmental monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wollenberger, U.; Neumann, B.; Scheller, Frieder W.

    1993-03-01

    Biosensors employing the biocatalyst on a different level of integration have been developed for monitoring environmental pollution. These probes range from laboratory specimen to commercial detectors applied to analyzers. This paper presents a selection of recent developments on amperometric enzyme and microbial biosensors. A monoenzymatic bulk type carbon electrode is described for biosensing organic hydroperoxides in aqueous solutions. Here, peroxidase is immobilized within the electrode body and the direct electron transfer between electrode and enzyme is measured. Both, reversible and irreversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase have been quantified by using a kinetically controlled acetylcholine enzyme sequence electrode. The inhibitory effect of pesticides such as butoxycarboxime, dimethoate, and trichlorfon could be quantified within 6 min in micrometers olar concentrations. Different multi-enzyme electrodes have been developed for the determination of inorganic phosphate. These sensors represent examples of sequentially acting enzymes in combination with enzymatic analyte recycling. Using this type of amplification nanomolar concentrations could be measured. A very fast responding microbial sensor for biological oxygen demand has been developed by immobilizing Trichosporon cutaneum onto an oxygen electrode. With this whole cell sensor waste water can be assayed with a sample frequency of 20 per hour and a working stability of more than 30 days.

  19. Novel insights in the use of hydrolytic enzymes secreted by fungi with biotechnological potential.

    PubMed

    Pereira, J L; Noronha, E F; Miller, R N G; Franco, O L

    2007-06-01

    Entomopathogenic and mycoparasitic fungi synthesize hydrolytic enzymes such as chitinases, proteinases and beta-glucanases. These enzymes can act synergistically, helping fungi to control insect pests and pathogens that attack productive crops, and offer potential economic benefit to agribusiness. A number of hydrolytic enzymes have also been utilized in industrial applications. This review focuses on biochemical and structural analyses of fungal enzymes, together with current research information on secretion mechanisms.

  20. Aminoglycoside Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Maria S.; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.

    2010-01-01

    Aminoglycosides have been an essential component of the armamentarium in the treatment of life-threatening infections. Unfortunately, their efficacy has been reduced by the surge and dissemination of resistance. In some cases the levels of resistance reached the point that rendered them virtually useless. Among many known mechanisms of resistance to aminoglycosides, enzymatic modification is the most prevalent in the clinical setting. Aminoglycoside modifying enzymes catalyze the modification at different −OH or −NH2 groups of the 2-deoxystreptamine nucleus or the sugar moieties and can be nucleotidyltranferases, phosphotransferases, or acetyltransferases. The number of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes identified to date as well as the genetic environments where the coding genes are located is impressive and there is virtually no bacteria that is unable to support enzymatic resistance to aminoglycosides. Aside from the development of new aminoglycosides refractory to as many as possible modifying enzymes there are currently two main strategies being pursued to overcome the action of aminoglycoside modifying enzymes. Their successful development would extend the useful life of existing antibiotics that have proven effective in the treatment of infections. These strategies consist of the development of inhibitors of the enzymatic action or of the expression of the modifying enzymes. PMID:20833577

  1. Red cell enzymes.

    PubMed

    Paniker, N V

    1975-03-01

    As compared to other cells of the body, the mammalian red cell has one of the simplest structural organizations. As a result, this cell has been extensively used in studies involving the structure, function, and integrity of cell membranes as well as cytoplasmic events. Additionally, the metabolic activities of the red blood cell are also relatively simple. During the past quarter century or so, an ocean of knowledge has been gathered on various aspects of red cell metabolism and function. The fields of enzymes, hemoglobin, membrane, and metabolic products comprise the major portion of this knowledge. These advances have made valuable contributions to biochemistry and medicine. Despite these favorable aspects of this simple, anucleated cell, it must be conceded that our knowledge about the red cell is far from complete. We are still in the dark concerning the mechanism involved in several aspects of its membrane, hemoglobin, enzymes, and a large number of other constituents. For example, a large number of enzymes with known catalytic activity but with unknown function have eluded investigators despite active pursuit. This review will be a consolidation of our present knowledge of human red cell enzymes, with particular reference to their usefulness in the diagnosis and therapy of disease. Owing to the multitude of publications by prominent investigators on each of the approximately 50 enzymes discussed in this review, it was impossible to cite a majority of them.

  2. Random-walk enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C →U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  3. Random-walk enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics.

  4. Random-walk enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Chi H.; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A.; Goodman, Myron F.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C → U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  5. Random-walk enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Chi H; Pham, Phuong; Afif, Samir A; Goodman, Myron F

    2015-09-01

    Enzymes that rely on random walk to search for substrate targets in a heterogeneously dispersed medium can leave behind complex spatial profiles of their catalyzed conversions. The catalytic signatures of these random-walk enzymes are the result of two coupled stochastic processes: scanning and catalysis. Here we develop analytical models to understand the conversion profiles produced by these enzymes, comparing an intrusive model, in which scanning and catalysis are tightly coupled, against a loosely coupled passive model. Diagrammatic theory and path-integral solutions of these models revealed clearly distinct predictions. Comparison to experimental data from catalyzed deaminations deposited on single-stranded DNA by the enzyme activation-induced deoxycytidine deaminase (AID) demonstrates that catalysis and diffusion are strongly intertwined, where the chemical conversions give rise to new stochastic trajectories that were absent if the substrate DNA was homogeneous. The C→U deamination profiles in both analytical predictions and experiments exhibit a strong contextual dependence, where the conversion rate of each target site is strongly contingent on the identities of other surrounding targets, with the intrusive model showing an excellent fit to the data. These methods can be applied to deduce sequence-dependent catalytic signatures of other DNA modification enzymes, with potential applications to cancer, gene regulation, and epigenetics. PMID:26465508

  6. Pancreatic enzyme pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Ferrone, Marcus; Raimondo, Massimo; Scolapio, James S

    2007-06-01

    Supplemental pancreatic enzyme preparations are provided to patients with conditions of pancreatic exocrine deficiency such as chronic pancreatitis and cystic fibrosis. These patients frequently experience steatorrhea, which occurs from inadequate fat absorption. The delivery of sufficient enzyme concentrations into the duodenal lumen simultaneously with meals can reduce nutrient malabsorption, improve the symptoms of steatorrhea, and in some cases alleviate the pain associated with chronic pancreatitis. Current clinical practices dictate administration of lipase 25,000-40,000 units/meal by using pH-sensitive pancrelipase microspheres, along with dosage increases, compliance checks, and differential diagnosis in cases of treatment failure. Despite the large number of specialty enzyme replacements available commercially, many patients remain dissatisfied with standard therapy, and future developments are needed to optimize treatment in these individuals.

  7. Enzymes in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuma, T.; Bergel, F.; Bray, R. C.

    1967-01-01

    1. A procedure for partial purification of asparaginase from chicken liver is presented. 2. The bulk of the enzyme is located in the soluble fraction of chicken liver. 3. Molecular weights of chicken-liver asparaginase and of the guinea-pig serum enzyme, estimated by gel filtration, were 306000 and 210000 respectively. The Michaelis constants (Km) at 37° and pH8·5 were 6·0×10−5m and 7·2×10−5m respectively. 4. At 50° the chicken-liver enzyme was moderately stable, some activity being lost by aggregation; in dilute electrolyte solutions the activity rapidly diminished. 5. The anti-lymphoma effect of guinea-pig serum in mice carrying the 6C3HED tumour was confirmed. Chicken-liver asparaginase also showed an effect but in this case the enzyme preparation had to be administered repeatedly. 6. Guinea-pig serum asparaginase was stable for several days in mouse blood, after intraperitoneal injection, whereas chicken-liver asparaginase rapidly disappeared. 7. Aspartic acid β-hydrazide was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of chicken-liver asparaginase with Ki approx. 5·6×10−4m. In mice it produced an anti-lymphoma effect, as reported previously. PMID:6033763

  8. Toying with Enzyme Catalysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Debbie

    1998-01-01

    Describes a set of manipulatives that are used to establish a secure understanding of the concepts related to the environmental factors that affect the activities of enzymes. Includes a description of the model components and procedures for construction of the model. (DDR)

  9. Photoperiodism and Enzyme Activity

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Orlando; Morel, Claudine

    1974-01-01

    Metabolic readjustments after a change from long days to short days appear, in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana, to be achieved through the operation of two main mechanisms: variation in enzyme capacity, and circadian rhythmicity. After a lag time, capacity in phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and capacity in aspartate aminotransferase increase exponentially and appear to be allometrically linked during 50 to 60 short days; then a sudden fall takes place in the activity of the former. Malic enzyme and alanine aminotransferase behave differently. Thus, the operation of the two sections of the pathway (before and after the malate step) give rise to a continuously changing functional compartmentation in the pathway. Circadian rhythmicity, on the other hand, produces time compartmentation through phase shifts and variation in amplitude, independently for each enzyme. These characteristics suggest that the operation of a so-called biological clock would be involved. We propose the hypothesis that feedback regulation would be more accurate and efficient when applied to an already oscillating, clock-controlled enzyme system. PMID:16658749

  10. Monitoring enzyme kinetic behavior of enzyme-quantum dot bioconjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claussen, Jonathan C.; Walper, Scott A.; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G.; Medintz, Igor L.

    2014-05-01

    Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) hold tremendous promise for in vivo biosensing, cellular imaging, theranostics, and smart molecular sensing probes due to their small size and favorable photonic properties such as resistance to photobleaching, size-tunable PL, and large effective Stokes shifts. Herein, we demonstrate how QD-based bioconjugates can be used to enhance enzyme kinetics. Enzyme-substrate kinetics are analyzed for solutions containing both alkaline phosphatase enzymes and QDs with enzyme-to- QD molar ratios of 2, 12, and 24 as well as for a solution containing the same concentration of enzymes but without QDs. The enzyme kinetic paramters Vmax, KM, and Kcat/KM are extracted from the enzyme progress curves via the Lineweaver-Burk plot. Results demonstrate an approximate increase in enzyme efficiency of 5 - 8% for enzymes immobilized on the QD versus free in solution without QD immobilization.

  11. The Moderately Efficient Enzyme: Futile Encounters and Enzyme Floppiness.

    PubMed

    Bar-Even, Arren; Milo, Ron; Noor, Elad; Tawfik, Dan S

    2015-08-18

    The pioneering model of Henri, Michaelis, and Menten was based on the fast equilibrium assumption: the substrate binds its enzyme reversibly, and substrate dissociation is much faster than product formation. Here, we examine this assumption from a somewhat different point of view, asking what fraction of enzyme-substrate complexes are futile, i.e., result in dissociation rather than product formation. In Knowles' notion of a "perfect" enzyme, all encounters of the enzyme with its substrate result in conversion to product. Thus, the perfect enzyme's catalytic efficiency, kcat/KM, is constrained by only the diffusion on-rate, and the fraction of futile encounters (defined as φ) approaches zero. The available data on >1000 different enzymes suggest that for ≥90% of enzymes φ > 0.99 and for the "average enzyme" φ ≥ 0.9999; namely, <1 of 10(4) encounters is productive. Thus, the "fast equilibrium" assumption holds for the vast majority of enzymes. We discuss possible molecular origins for the dominance of futile encounters, including the coexistence of multiple sub-states of an enzyme's active site (enzyme floppiness) and/or its substrate. Floppiness relates to the inherent flexibility of proteins, but also to conflicting demands, or trade-offs, between rate acceleration (the rate-determining chemical step) and catalytic turnover, or between turnover rate and accuracy. The study of futile encounters and active-site floppiness may contribute to a better understanding of enzyme catalysis, enzyme evolution, and improved enzyme design.

  12. Peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, P A; Chen, W W; Harris, C J; Hoefler, G; Hoefler, S; Blake, D C; Balfe, A; Kelley, R I; Moser, A B; Beard, M E

    1989-01-01

    Peroxisomal function was evaluated in a male infant with clinical features of neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. Very long chain fatty acid levels were elevated in both plasma and fibroblasts, and beta-oxidation of very long chain fatty acids in cultured fibroblasts was significantly impaired. Although the level of the bile acid intermediate trihydroxycoprostanoic acid was slightly elevated in plasma, phytanic acid and L-pipecolic acid levels were normal, as was plasmalogen synthesis in cultured fibroblasts. The latter three parameters distinguish this case from classical neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy. In addition, electron microscopy and catalase subcellular distribution studies revealed that, in contrast to neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy, peroxisomes were present in the patient's tissues. Immunoblot studies of peroxisomal beta-oxidation enzymes revealed that the bifunctional enzyme (enoyl-CoA hydratase/3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase) was deficient in postmortem liver samples, whereas acyl-CoA oxidase and the mature form of beta-ketothiolase were present. Density gradient centrifugation of fibroblast homogenates confirmed that intact peroxisomes were present. Immunoblots of fibroblasts peroxisomal fractions showed that they contained acyl-CoA oxidase and beta-ketothiolase, but bifunctional enzyme was not detected. Northern analysis, however, revealed that mRNA coding for the bifunctional enzyme was present in the patient's fibroblasts. These results indicate that the primary biochemical defect in this patient is a deficiency of peroxisomal bifunctional enzyme. It is of interest that the phenotype of this patient resembled neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy and would not have been distinguished from this disorder by clinical study alone. Images PMID:2921319

  13. The Enzyme Function Initiative.

    PubMed

    Gerlt, John A; Allen, Karen N; Almo, Steven C; Armstrong, Richard N; Babbitt, Patricia C; Cronan, John E; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Imker, Heidi J; Jacobson, Matthew P; Minor, Wladek; Poulter, C Dale; Raushel, Frank M; Sali, Andrej; Shoichet, Brian K; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2011-11-22

    The Enzyme Function Initiative (EFI) was recently established to address the challenge of assigning reliable functions to enzymes discovered in bacterial genome projects; in this Current Topic, we review the structure and operations of the EFI. The EFI includes the Superfamily/Genome, Protein, Structure, Computation, and Data/Dissemination Cores that provide the infrastructure for reliably predicting the in vitro functions of unknown enzymes. The initial targets for functional assignment are selected from five functionally diverse superfamilies (amidohydrolase, enolase, glutathione transferase, haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase, and isoprenoid synthase), with five superfamily specific Bridging Projects experimentally testing the predicted in vitro enzymatic activities. The EFI also includes the Microbiology Core that evaluates the in vivo context of in vitro enzymatic functions and confirms the functional predictions of the EFI. The deliverables of the EFI to the scientific community include (1) development of a large-scale, multidisciplinary sequence/structure-based strategy for functional assignment of unknown enzymes discovered in genome projects (target selection, protein production, structure determination, computation, experimental enzymology, microbiology, and structure-based annotation), (2) dissemination of the strategy to the community via publications, collaborations, workshops, and symposia, (3) computational and bioinformatic tools for using the strategy, (4) provision of experimental protocols and/or reagents for enzyme production and characterization, and (5) dissemination of data via the EFI's Website, http://enzymefunction.org. The realization of multidisciplinary strategies for functional assignment will begin to define the full metabolic diversity that exists in nature and will impact basic biochemical and evolutionary understanding, as well as a wide range of applications of central importance to industrial, medicinal, and pharmaceutical efforts.

  14. Recovery Act Milestones

    ScienceCinema

    Rogers, Matt

    2016-07-12

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  15. Recovery Act Milestones

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Every 100 days, the Department of Energy is held accountable for a progress report on the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Update at 200 days, hosted by Matt Rogers, Senior Advisor to Secretary Steven Chu for Recovery Act Implementation.

  16. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  17. The dermatology acting internship.

    PubMed

    Stephens, John B; Raimer, Sharon S; Wagner, Richard F

    2011-07-15

    Acting internships are an important component of modern day medical school curriculum. Several specialties outside of internal medicine now offer acting internship experiences to fourth year medical students. We have found that a dermatology acting internship is a valuable experience for fourth year medical students who are interested in pursuing a residency in dermatology. Our experience with the dermatology acting internship over the 2010-2011 academic year is described.

  18. Forgetting ACT UP

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juhasz, Alexandra

    2012-01-01

    When ACT UP is remembered as the pinnacle of postmodern activism, other forms and forums of activism that were taking place during that time--practices that were linked, related, just modern, in dialogue or even opposition to ACT UP's "confrontational activism"--are forgotten. In its time, ACT UP was embedded in New York City, and a larger world,…

  19. Enzyme linked immunoassay with stabilized polymer saccharide enzyme conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, M.R.; Bednarski, M.D.; Gruber, P.R.

    1997-11-25

    An improvement in enzyme linked immunoassays is disclosed wherein the enzyme is in the form of a water soluble polymer saccharide conjugate which is stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises the enzyme which is linked to the polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups. 19 figs.

  20. Enzyme Molar Fractions: A Powerful Tool for Understanding Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Serra, Juan L.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Deduces the relationship between reduced velocity and molar fractions for productive enzyme complexes; obtains the mathematical expression of molar fractions for an enzyme with two specific binding sites per molecule; and proposes a useful plot to follow the dependence of enzyme molar fractions with the concentration of one of its ligands. (JN)

  1. Enzyme linked immunoassay with stabilized polymer saccharide enzyme conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Callstrom, Matthew R.; Bednarski, Mark D.; Gruber, Patrick R.

    1997-01-01

    An improvement in enzyme linked immunoassays is disclosed wherein the enzyme is in the form of a water soluble polymer saccharide conjugate which is stable in hostile environments. The conjugate comprises the enzyme which is linked to the polymer at multiple points through saccharide linker groups.

  2. Sulfite oxidizing enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Changjian; Tollin, Gordon; Enemark, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Sulfite oxidizing enzymes are essential mononuclear molybdenum (Mo) proteins involved in sulfur metabolism of animals, plants and bacteria. There are three such enzymes presently known: (1) sulfite oxidase (SO) in animals, (2) SO in plants, and (3) sulfite dehydrogenase (SDH) in bacteria. X-ray crystal structures of enzymes from all three sources (chicken SO, Arabidopsis thaliana SO, and Starkeya novella SDH) show nearly identical square pyramidal coordination around the Mo atom, even though the overall structures of the proteins and the presence of additional cofactors vary. This structural information provides a molecular basis for studying the role of specific amino acids in catalysis. Animal SO catalyzes the final step in the degradation of sulfur-containing amino acids and is critical in detoxifying excess sulfite. Human SO deficiency is a fatal genetic disorder that leads to early death, and impaired SO activity is implicated in sulfite neurotoxicity. Animal SO and bacterial SDH contain both Mo and heme domains, whereas plant SO only has the Mo domain. Intraprotein electron transfer (IET) between the Mo and Fe centers in animal SO and bacterial SDH is a key step in the catalysis, which can be studied by laser flash photolysis in the presence of deazariboflavin. IET studies on animal SO and bacterial SDH clearly demonstrate the similarities and differences between these two types of sulfite oxidizing enzymes. Conformational change is involved in the IET of animal SO, in which electrostatic interactions may play a major role in guiding the docking of the heme domain to the Mo domain prior to electron transfer. In contrast, IET measurements for SDH demonstrate that IET occurs directly through the protein medium, which is distinctly different from that in animal SO. Point mutations in human SO can result in significantly impaired IET or no IET, thus rationalizing their fatal effects. The recent developments in our understanding of sulfite oxidizing enzyme

  3. Extracting enzyme processivity from kinetic assays

    SciTech Connect

    Barel, Itay; Brown, Frank L. H.; Reich, Norbert O.

    2015-12-14

    A steady-state analysis for the catalytic turnover of molecules containing two substrate sites is presented. A broad class of Markovian dynamic models, motivated by the action of DNA modifying enzymes and the rich variety of translocation mechanisms associated with these systems (e.g., sliding, hopping, intersegmental transfer, etc.), is considered. The modeling suggests an elementary and general method of data analysis, which enables the extraction of the enzyme’s processivity directly and unambiguously from experimental data. This analysis is not limited to the initial velocity regime. The predictions are validated both against detailed numerical models and by revisiting published experimental data for EcoRI endonuclease acting on DNA.

  4. Treating Wastewater With Immobilized Enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show enzymes are immobilized on supporting materials to make biocatalyst beds for treatment of wastewater. With suitable combination of enzymes, concentrations of various inorganic and organic contaminants, including ammonia and urea, reduced significantly.

  5. The Catalytic Function of Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Splittgerber, Allan G.

    1985-01-01

    Discusses: structure of the enzyme molecule; active site; reaction mechanism; transition state; factors affecting enzyme reaction rates, concentration of enzyme; concentration of substrate; product concentration; temperature effects and pH effects; factors causing a lowering of activation energy; proximity and orientation effects; substrate strain…

  6. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  7. Act II of the Sunshine Act.

    PubMed

    Pham-Kanter, Genevieve

    2014-11-01

    To coincide with the introduction in the United States of the Sunshine Act, Genevieve Pham-Kanter discusses what we need to look for to fight hidden bias and deliberate or unconscious corruption. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  8. Anion-π Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we introduce artificial enzymes that operate with anion-π interactions, an interaction that is essentially new to nature. The possibility to stabilize anionic intermediates and transition states on an π-acidic surface has been recently demonstrated, using the addition of malonate half thioesters to enolate acceptors as a biologically relevant example. The best chiral anion-π catalysts operate with an addition/decarboxylation ratio of 4:1, but without any stereoselectivity. To catalyze this important but intrinsically disfavored reaction stereoselectively, a series of anion-π catalysts was equipped with biotin and screened against a collection of streptavidin mutants. With the best hit, the S112Y mutant, the reaction occurred with 95% ee and complete suppression of the intrinsically favored side product from decarboxylation. This performance of anion-π enzymes rivals, if not exceeds, that of the best conventional organocatalysts. Inhibition of the S112Y mutant by nitrate but not by bulky anions supports that contributions from anion-π interactions exist and matter, also within proteins. In agreement with docking results, K121 is shown to be essential, presumably to lower the pKa of the tertiary amine catalyst to operate at the optimum pH around 3, that is below the pKa of the substrate. Most importantly, increasing enantioselectivity with different mutants always coincides with increasing rates and conversion, i.e., selective transition-state stabilization. PMID:27413782

  9. Anion-π Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cotelle, Yoann; Lebrun, Vincent; Sakai, Naomi; Ward, Thomas R; Matile, Stefan

    2016-06-22

    In this report, we introduce artificial enzymes that operate with anion-π interactions, an interaction that is essentially new to nature. The possibility to stabilize anionic intermediates and transition states on an π-acidic surface has been recently demonstrated, using the addition of malonate half thioesters to enolate acceptors as a biologically relevant example. The best chiral anion-π catalysts operate with an addition/decarboxylation ratio of 4:1, but without any stereoselectivity. To catalyze this important but intrinsically disfavored reaction stereoselectively, a series of anion-π catalysts was equipped with biotin and screened against a collection of streptavidin mutants. With the best hit, the S112Y mutant, the reaction occurred with 95% ee and complete suppression of the intrinsically favored side product from decarboxylation. This performance of anion-π enzymes rivals, if not exceeds, that of the best conventional organocatalysts. Inhibition of the S112Y mutant by nitrate but not by bulky anions supports that contributions from anion-π interactions exist and matter, also within proteins. In agreement with docking results, K121 is shown to be essential, presumably to lower the pK a of the tertiary amine catalyst to operate at the optimum pH around 3, that is below the pK a of the substrate. Most importantly, increasing enantioselectivity with different mutants always coincides with increasing rates and conversion, i.e., selective transition-state stabilization. PMID:27413782

  10. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution. PMID:26840640

  11. Industrial use of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    DiCosimo, Robert; McAuliffe, Joseph; Poulose, Ayrookaran J; Bohlmann, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Although many methods for enzyme immobilization have been described in patents and publications, relatively few processes employing immobilized enzymes have been successfully commercialized. The cost of most industrial enzymes is often only a minor component in overall process economics, and in these instances, the additional costs associated with enzyme immobilization are often not justified. More commonly the benefit realized from enzyme immobilization relates to the process advantages that an immobilized catalyst offers, for example, enabling continuous production, improved stability and the absence of the biocatalyst in the product stream. The development and attributes of several established and emerging industrial applications for immobilized enzymes, including high-fructose corn syrup production, pectin hydrolysis, debittering of fruit juices, interesterification of food fats and oils, biodiesel production, and carbon dioxide capture are reviewed herein, highlighting factors that define the advantages of enzyme immobilization. PMID:23436023

  12. Characterising Complex Enzyme Reaction Data.

    PubMed

    Dönertaş, Handan Melike; Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Rahman, Syed Asad; Thornton, Janet M

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between enzyme-catalysed reactions and the Enzyme Commission (EC) number, the widely accepted classification scheme used to characterise enzyme activity, is complex and with the rapid increase in our knowledge of the reactions catalysed by enzymes needs revisiting. We present a manual and computational analysis to investigate this complexity and found that almost one-third of all known EC numbers are linked to more than one reaction in the secondary reaction databases (e.g., KEGG). Although this complexity is often resolved by defining generic, alternative and partial reactions, we have also found individual EC numbers with more than one reaction catalysing different types of bond changes. This analysis adds a new dimension to our understanding of enzyme function and might be useful for the accurate annotation of the function of enzymes and to study the changes in enzyme function during evolution.

  13. Industrial use of immobilized enzymes.

    PubMed

    DiCosimo, Robert; McAuliffe, Joseph; Poulose, Ayrookaran J; Bohlmann, Gregory

    2013-08-01

    Although many methods for enzyme immobilization have been described in patents and publications, relatively few processes employing immobilized enzymes have been successfully commercialized. The cost of most industrial enzymes is often only a minor component in overall process economics, and in these instances, the additional costs associated with enzyme immobilization are often not justified. More commonly the benefit realized from enzyme immobilization relates to the process advantages that an immobilized catalyst offers, for example, enabling continuous production, improved stability and the absence of the biocatalyst in the product stream. The development and attributes of several established and emerging industrial applications for immobilized enzymes, including high-fructose corn syrup production, pectin hydrolysis, debittering of fruit juices, interesterification of food fats and oils, biodiesel production, and carbon dioxide capture are reviewed herein, highlighting factors that define the advantages of enzyme immobilization.

  14. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88...

  15. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88...

  16. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88...

  17. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88...

  18. Purification and characterization of a tuliposide-converting enzyme from bulbs of Tulipa gesneriana.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yasuo; Shoji, Kazuaki; Ubukata, Makoto; Shigetomi, Kengo; Sato, Yukio; Nakajima, Noriyuki; Ogita, Shinjiro

    2009-08-01

    An enzyme that catalyzes the stoichiometric conversion of 6-tuliposide into tulipalin was purified and characterized from bulbs of Tulipa gesneriana. The enzyme appeared to be a dimer, the relative molecular mass (Mr) of each subunit being 34,900; it had maximum activity and stability at neutral pH and moderate temperature. The enzyme preferentially acted on such glucose esters as 6-tuliposides, and to a lesser extent on p-nitrophenylacetate.

  19. A sensitive enzyme electrode for phenol monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Kulys, J.; Schmid, R.D. )

    1990-01-01

    Tyrosinase (EC.1.14.18.1) was immobilized onto graphite electrodes, which had been modified with tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The response time, 12 or 35 s, was dependent on the enzyme immobilization technique used. The electrodes showed a linear calibration function up to 25 or 65 {mu}M phenol, and a sensitivity of 0.36 or 2.2 A/M was achieved which was also dependent on the enzyme immobilization technique used. The detection limit for phenol was 0.23 {mu}M. The electrodes acted from potentials of {minus}200 to +180 mV (vs. a saturated Ag/AgCl electrode). The electrode signal was independent of pH within the pH range 4.5-6.0. The enzyme electrode responded to phenol (100%), p-cresol (93%) and catechol (330%), but not to o-cresol and L-tyrosine. The electrodes showed a stability for more than one week. The electrodes can be utilized for the sensitive assay of phenol in water.

  20. ACT and College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleyaert, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    What is the relationship between ACT scores and success in college? For decades, admissions policies in colleges and universities across the country have required applicants to submit scores from a college entrance exam, most typically the ACT (American College Testing) or SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test). This requirement suggests that high school…

  1. Americans with Disabilities Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updating School Board Policies, 1992

    1992-01-01

    Addressed to school board members, this article attempts to summarize requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and its implications for school districts. It warns against hasty purchase of private compliance assistance; then provides an overview of each of the Act's five Titles which address employment practices, activities…

  2. Paradoxical Roles of Antioxidant Enzymes: Basic Mechanisms and Health Implications.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xin Gen; Zhu, Jian-Hong; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Bao, Yongping; Ho, Ye-Shih; Reddi, Amit R; Holmgren, Arne; Arnér, Elias S J

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are generated from aerobic metabolism, as a result of accidental electron leakage as well as regulated enzymatic processes. Because ROS/RNS can induce oxidative injury and act in redox signaling, enzymes metabolizing them will inherently promote either health or disease, depending on the physiological context. It is thus misleading to consider conventionally called antioxidant enzymes to be largely, if not exclusively, health protective. Because such a notion is nonetheless common, we herein attempt to rationalize why this simplistic view should be avoided. First we give an updated summary of physiological phenotypes triggered in mouse models of overexpression or knockout of major antioxidant enzymes. Subsequently, we focus on a series of striking cases that demonstrate "paradoxical" outcomes, i.e., increased fitness upon deletion of antioxidant enzymes or disease triggered by their overexpression. We elaborate mechanisms by which these phenotypes are mediated via chemical, biological, and metabolic interactions of the antioxidant enzymes with their substrates, downstream events, and cellular context. Furthermore, we propose that novel treatments of antioxidant enzyme-related human diseases may be enabled by deliberate targeting of dual roles of the pertaining enzymes. We also discuss the potential of "antioxidant" nutrients and phytochemicals, via regulating the expression or function of antioxidant enzymes, in preventing, treating, or aggravating chronic diseases. We conclude that "paradoxical" roles of antioxidant enzymes in physiology, health, and disease derive from sophisticated molecular mechanisms of redox biology and metabolic homeostasis. Simply viewing antioxidant enzymes as always being beneficial is not only conceptually misleading but also clinically hazardous if such notions underpin medical treatment protocols based on modulation of redox pathways.

  3. Evolution of Enzyme Kinetic Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ulusu, Nuriye Nuray

    2015-06-01

    This review paper discusses the reciprocal kinetic behaviours of enzymes and the evolution of structure-function dichotomy. Kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to alterations in ecological and metabolic conditions. The kinetic mechanisms of single-substrate mono-substrate enzyme reactions are easier to understand and much simpler than those of bi-bi substrate enzyme reactions. The increasing complexities of kinetic mechanisms, as well as the increasing number of enzyme subunits, can be used to shed light on the evolution of kinetic mechanisms. Enzymes with heterogeneous kinetic mechanisms attempt to achieve specific products to subsist. In many organisms, kinetic mechanisms have evolved to aid survival in response to changing environmental factors. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzyme promiscuity is defined as adaptation to changing environmental conditions, such as the introduction of a toxin or a new carbon source. Enzymes with broad substrate specificity and promiscuous properties are believed to be more evolved than single-substrate enzymes. This group of enzymes can adapt to changing environmental substrate conditions and adjust catalysing mechanisms according to the substrate's properties, and their kinetic mechanisms have evolved in response to substrate variability.

  4. The Clean Water Act

    SciTech Connect

    Piatt, J.

    1995-12-31

    The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, commonly called the Clean Water Act (CWA), was adopted on 18 October 1972. Since then it has been amended 18 times, the last amendments were adopted on 4 February 1987. As established, its objective is: to restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation`s waters. And has, as an interim goal: water quality which provides for the protection and propagation of fish, shellfish, and wildlife and provides for recreation in and on the water. It should be noted that Congress established as the Act`s ultimate goal: the discharge of pollutants into the navigable waters be eliminated. The Act set out to meet this lofty objective and goal through the development and implementation of controls on the point source discharges and the nonpoint source release of pollutants. The regulation of point and nonpoint sources as well as future requirements are discussed.

  5. Measuring the Enzyme Activity of Arabidopsis Deubiquitylating Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Isono, Erika

    2016-01-01

    Deubiquitylating enzymes, or DUBs, are important regulators of ubiquitin homeostasis and substrate stability, though the molecular mechanisms of most of the DUBs in plants are not yet understood. As different ubiquitin chain types are implicated in different biological pathways, it is important to analyze the enzyme characteristic for studying a DUB. Quantitative analysis of DUB activity is also important to determine enzyme kinetics and the influence of DUB binding proteins on the enzyme activity. Here, we show methods to analyze DUB activity using immunodetection, Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining, and fluorescence measurement that can be useful for understanding the basic characteristic of DUBs.

  6. Microbial Enzymes with Special Characteristics for Biotechnological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Poonam Singh

    2013-01-01

    This article overviews the enzymes produced by microorganisms, which have been extensively studied worldwide for their isolation, purification and characterization of their specific properties. Researchers have isolated specific microorganisms from extreme sources under extreme culture conditions, with the objective that such isolated microbes would possess the capability to bio-synthesize special enzymes. Various Bio-industries require enzymes possessing special characteristics for their applications in processing of substrates and raw materials. The microbial enzymes act as bio-catalysts to perform reactions in bio-processes in an economical and environmentally-friendly way as opposed to the use of chemical catalysts. The special characteristics of enzymes are exploited for their commercial interest and industrial applications, which include: thermotolerance, thermophilic nature, tolerance to a varied range of pH, stability of enzyme activity over a range of temperature and pH, and other harsh reaction conditions. Such enzymes have proven their utility in bio-industries such as food, leather, textiles, animal feed, and in bio-conversions and bio-remediations. PMID:24970183

  7. Human Lung Angiotensin Converting Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Friedland, Joan; Silverstein, Emanuel; Drooker, Martin; Setton, Charlotte

    1981-01-01

    To enable its immunohistologic localization, angiotensin converting enzyme (EC 3.4.15.1) from human lung was solubilized by trypsinization and purified ∼2,660-fold to apparent homogeneity from a washed lung particulate fraction. The specific activity of pure enzyme was estimated to be 117 μmol/min per mg protein with the substrate hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine. Consistent with previously described lung enzyme studies, catalytic activity was strongly inhibited by EDTA, O-phenanthroline, SQ 20,881, and SQ 14,225 and increased by CoCl2. SQ 20,881 was a somewhat more potent inhibitor than SQ 14,225, unlike rabbit lung enzyme. The Michaelis constant (Km) with hippuryl-l-histidyl-l-leucine was 1.6 mM. The molecular weight was estimated at 150,000 from sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a single polypeptide chain estimated at 130,000 daltons. Rabbit antibody to human lung enzyme was prepared by parenteral administration of pure angiotensin-converting enzyme in Freund's adjuvant. Rabbit antibody to human lung angiotensin-converting enzyme appeared to crossreact weakly with the rabbit enzyme and strongly inhibited the catalytic activity of the enzymes from human serum, lung, and lymph node. The specificity of the rabbit antibody and purity of the final human lung enzyme preparation was suggested by the single precipitin lines obtained by radial double immunodiffusion, and by the coincidence of enzyme catalytic activity and immunoreactivity on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, with both relatively pure and highly impure enzymes. Generally applicable sensitive analysis of acrylamide gels for immunoreactivity (and subsequently for any other activity) by use of intact gel slices in radial double immunodiffusion was devised. Human lung enzyme was very tightly bound to and catalytically active on anti-human enzyme antibody covalently bound to Sepharose 4B, and could not be readily dissociated without

  8. Enzyme molecules in solitary confinement.

    PubMed

    Liebherr, Raphaela B; Gorris, Hans H

    2014-09-12

    Large arrays of homogeneous microwells each defining a femtoliter volume are a versatile platform for monitoring the substrate turnover of many individual enzyme molecules in parallel. The high degree of parallelization enables the analysis of a statistically representative enzyme population. Enclosing individual enzyme molecules in microwells does not require any surface immobilization step and enables the kinetic investigation of enzymes free in solution. This review describes various microwell array formats and explores their applications for the detection and investigation of single enzyme molecules. The development of new fabrication techniques and sensitive detection methods drives the field of single molecule enzymology. Here, we introduce recent progress in single enzyme molecule analysis in microwell arrays and discuss the challenges and opportunities.

  9. Direct in situ observation of synergism between cellulolytic enzymes during the biodegradation of crystalline cellulose fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingpeng; Quirk, Amanda; Lipkowski, Jacek; Dutcher, John R; Clarke, Anthony J

    2013-12-01

    High-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to image the real-time in situ degradation of crystalline by three types of T. reesei cellulolytic enzymes-TrCel6A, TrCel7A, and TrCel7B-and their mixtures. TrCel6A and TrCel7A are exo-acting cellobiohydrolases processing cellulose fibers from the nonreducing and reducing ends, respectively. TrCel7B is an endoglucanase that hydrolyzes amorphous cellulose within fibers. When acting alone on native cellulose fibers, each of the three enzymes is incapable of significant degradation. However, mixtures of two enzymes exhibited synergistic effects. The degradation effects of this synergism depended on the order in which the enzymes were added. Faster hydrolysis rates were observed when TrCel7A (exo) was added to fibers pretreated first with TrCel7B (endo) than when adding the enzymes in the opposite order. Endo-acting TrCel7B removed amorphous cellulose, softened and swelled the fibers, and exposed single microfibrils, facilitating the attack by the exo-acting enzymes. AFM images revealed that exo-acting enzymes processed the TrCel7B-pretreated fibers preferentially from one specific end (reducing or nonreducing). The most efficient (almost 100%) hydrolysis was observed with the mixture of the three enzymes. In this mixture, TrCel7B softened the fiber and TrCel6A and TrCel7A were directly observed to process it from the two opposing ends. This study provides high-resolution direct visualization of the nature of the synergistic relation between T. reesei exo- and endo-acting enzymes digesting native crystalline cellulose.

  10. Enzyme therapeutics for systemic detoxification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Lu, Yunfeng

    2015-08-01

    Life relies on numerous biochemical processes working synergistically and correctly. Certain substances disrupt these processes, inducing living organism into an abnormal state termed intoxication. Managing intoxication usually requires interventions, which is referred as detoxification. Decades of development on detoxification reveals the potential of enzymes as ideal therapeutics and antidotes, because their high substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency are essential for clearing intoxicating substances without adverse effects. However, intrinsic shortcomings of enzymes including low stability and high immunogenicity are major hurdles, which could be overcome by delivering enzymes with specially designed nanocarriers. Extensive investigations on protein delivery indicate three types of enzyme-nanocarrier architectures that show more promise than others for systemic detoxification, including liposome-wrapped enzymes, polymer-enzyme conjugates, and polymer-encapsulated enzymes. This review highlights recent advances in these nano-architectures and discusses their applications in systemic detoxifications. Therapeutic potential of various enzymes as well as associated challenges in achieving effective delivery of therapeutic enzymes will also be discussed.

  11. Enzyme Mimics: Advances and Applications.

    PubMed

    Kuah, Evelyn; Toh, Seraphina; Yee, Jessica; Ma, Qian; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2016-06-13

    Enzyme mimics or artificial enzymes are a class of catalysts that have been actively pursued for decades and have heralded much interest as potentially viable alternatives to natural enzymes. Aside from having catalytic activities similar to their natural counterparts, enzyme mimics have the desired advantages of tunable structures and catalytic efficiencies, excellent tolerance to experimental conditions, lower cost, and purely synthetic routes to their preparation. Although still in the midst of development, impressive advances have already been made. Enzyme mimics have shown immense potential in the catalysis of a wide range of chemical and biological reactions, the development of chemical and biological sensing and anti-biofouling systems, and the production of pharmaceuticals and clean fuels. This Review concerns the development of various types of enzyme mimics, namely polymeric and dendrimeric, supramolecular, nanoparticulate and proteinic enzyme mimics, with an emphasis on their synthesis, catalytic properties and technical applications. It provides an introduction to enzyme mimics and a comprehensive summary of the advances and current standings of their applications, and seeks to inspire researchers to perfect the design and synthesis of enzyme mimics and to tailor their functionality for a much wider range of applications. PMID:27062126

  12. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme.

    PubMed

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  13. Moonlighting transcriptional activation function of a fungal sulfur metabolism enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Levati, Elisabetta; Sartini, Sara; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Montanini, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins, including metabolic enzymes acting as transcription factors (TF), are present in a variety of organisms but have not been described in higher fungi so far. In a previous genome-wide analysis of the TF repertoire of the plant-symbiotic fungus Tuber melanosporum, we identified various enzymes, including the sulfur-assimilation enzyme phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate reductase (PAPS-red), as potential transcriptional activators. A functional analysis performed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, now demonstrates that a specific variant of this enzyme, PAPS-red A, localizes to the nucleus and is capable of transcriptional activation. TF moonlighting, which is not present in the other enzyme variant (PAPS-red B) encoded by the T. melanosporum genome, relies on a transplantable C-terminal polypeptide containing an alternating hydrophobic/hydrophilic amino acid motif. A similar moonlighting activity was demonstrated for six additional proteins, suggesting that multitasking is a relatively frequent event. PAPS-red A is sulfur-state-responsive and highly expressed, especially in fruitbodies, and likely acts as a recruiter of transcription components involved in S-metabolism gene network activation. PAPS-red B, instead, is expressed at low levels and localizes to a highly methylated and silenced region of the genome, hinting at an evolutionary mechanism based on gene duplication, followed by epigenetic silencing of this non-moonlighting gene variant. PMID:27121330

  14. Enzyme actuated bioresponsive hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Andrew Nolan

    Bioresponsive hydrogels are emerging with technological significance in targeted drug delivery, biosensors and regenerative medicine. Conferred with the ability to respond to specific biologically derived stimuli, the design challenge is in effectively linking the conferred biospecificity with an engineered response tailored to the needs of a particular application. Moreover, the fundamental phenomena governing the response must support an appropriate dynamic range and limit of detection. The design of these systems is inherently complicated due to the high interdependency of the governing phenomena that guide the sensing, transduction, and the actuation response of hydrogels. To investigate the dynamics of these materials, model systems may be used which seek to interrogate the system dynamics by uni-variable experimentation and limit confounding phenomena such as: polymer-solute interactions, polymer swelling dynamics and biomolecular reaction-diffusion concerns. To this end, a model system, alpha-chymotrypsin (Cht) (a protease) and a cleavable peptide-chromogen (pro-drug) covalently incorporated into a hydrogel, was investigated to understand the mechanisms of covalent loading and release by enzymatic cleavage in bio-responsive delivery systems. Using EDC and Sulfo-NHS, terminal carboxyl groups of N-succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide, a cleavable chromogen, were conjugated to primary amines of a hydrated poly(HEMA)-based hydrogel. Hydrogel discs were incubated in buffered Cht causing enzyme-mediated cleavage of the peptide and concomitant release of the chromophore for monitoring. To investigate substrate loading and the effects of hydrogel morphology on the system, the concentration of the amino groups (5, 10, 20, and 30 mol%) and the cross-linked density (1, 5, 7, 9 and 12 mol%) were independently varied. Loading-Release Efficiency of the chromogen was shown to exhibit a positive relation to increasing amino groups (AEMA). The release rates demonstrated a

  15. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward.

  16. ACTS mobile SATCOM experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Frye, Robert E.; Jedrey, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    Over the last decade, the demand for reliable mobile satellite communications (satcom) for voice, data, and video applications has increased dramatically. As consumer demand grows, the current spectrum allocation at L-band could become saturated. For this reason, NASA and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory are developing the Advanced Communications Technology Satellites (ACTS) mobile terminal (AMT) and are evaluating the feasibility of K/Ka-band (20/30 GHz) mobile satcom to meet these growing needs. U.S. industry and government, acting as co-partners, will evaluate K/Ka-band mobile satcom and develop new technologies by conducting a series of applications-oriented experiments. The ACTS and the AMT testbed will be used to conduct these mobile satcom experiments. The goals of the ACTS Mobile Experiments Program and the individual experiment configurations and objectives are further presented.

  17. Assertive Community Treatment (ACT)

    MedlinePlus

    ... community treatment? Assertive community treatment (ACT) is a model of psychiatric care that can be very effective ... it the most. Similar to the “treatment team” model of an inpatient psychiatric unit, which includes nurses, ...

  18. The ACTS propagation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakraborty, Dayamoy; Davarian, Faramaz

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) is to demonstrate the feasibility of the Ka-band (20 and 30 GHz) spectrum for satellite communications, as well as to help maintain U.S. leadership in satellite communications. ACTS incorporates such innovative schemes as time division multiple access (TDMA), microwave and baseband switching, onboard regeneration, and adaptive application of coding during rain-fade conditions. The success or failure of the ACTS experiment will depend on how accurately the rain-fade statistics and fade dynamics can be predicted in order to derive an appropriate algorithm that will combat weather vagaries, specifically for links with small terminals, such as very small aperture terminals (VSAT's) where the power margin is a premium. This article describes the planning process and hardware development program that will comply with the recommendations of the ACTS propagation study groups.

  19. Enzyme catalysis: Evolution made easy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Eugene J. H.; Trau, Matt

    2014-09-01

    Directed evolution is a powerful tool for the development of improved enzyme catalysts. Now, a method that enables an enzyme, its encoding DNA and a fluorescent reaction product to be encapsulated in a gel bead enables the application of directed evolution in an ultra-high-throughput format.

  20. Making the Rate: Enzyme Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragsdale, Frances R.

    2004-01-01

    An enzyme exercise to address the problem of students inability to visualize chemical reaction at the molecular level is described. This exercise is designed as a dry lab exercise but can be modified into a classroom activity then can be augmented by a wet lab procedure, thereby providing students with a practical exposure to enzyme function.

  1. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  2. Moonlighting enzymes in parasitic protozoa.

    PubMed

    Collingridge, Peter W; Brown, Robert W B; Ginger, Michael L

    2010-08-01

    Enzymes moonlight in a non-enzymatic capacity in a diverse variety of cellular processes. The discovery of these non-enzymatic functions is generally unexpected, and moonlighting enzymes are known in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Importantly, this unexpected multi-functionality indicates that caution might be needed on some occasions in interpreting phenotypes that result from the deletion or gene-silencing of some enzymes, including some of the best known enzymes from classic intermediary metabolism. Here, we provide an overview of enzyme moonlighting in parasitic protists. Unequivocal and putative examples of moonlighting are discussed, together with the possibility that the unusual biological characteristics of some parasites either limit opportunities for moonlighting to arise or perhaps contribute to the evolution of novel proteins with clear metabolic ancestry.

  3. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  4. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  5. The CEO's second act.

    PubMed

    Nadler, David A

    2007-01-01

    When a CEO leaves because of performance problems, the company typically recruits someone thought to be better equipped to fix what the departing executive couldn't--or wouldn't. The board places its confidence in the new person because of the present dilemma's similarity to some previous challenge that he or she dealt with successfully. But familiar problems are inevitably succeeded by less familiar ones, for which the specially selected CEO is not quite so qualified. More often than not, the experiences, skills, and temperament that yielded triumph in Act I turn out to be unequal to Act II's difficulties. In fact, the approaches that worked so brilliantly in Act I may be the very opposite of what is needed in Act II. The CEO has four choices: refuse to change, in which case he or she will be replaced; realize that the next act requires new skills and learn them; downsize or circumscribe his or her role to compensate for deficiencies; or line up a successor who is qualified to fill a role to which the incumbent's skills and interests are no longer suited. Hewlett-Packard's Carly Fiorina exemplifies the first alternative; Merrill Lynch's Stanley O'Neal the second; Google's Sergey Brin and Larry Page the third; and Quest Diagnostics' Ken Freeman the fourth. All but the first option are reasonable responses to the challenges presented in the second acts of most CEOs' tenures. And all but the first require a power of observation, a propensity for introspection, and a strain of humility that are rare in the ranks of the very people who need those qualities most. There are four essential steps executives can take to discern that they have entered new territory and to respond accordingly: recognition that their leadership style and approach are no longer working; acceptance of others' advice on why performance is faltering; analysis and understanding of the nature of the Act II shift; and, finally, decision and action.

  6. The CEO's second act.

    PubMed

    Nadler, David A

    2007-01-01

    When a CEO leaves because of performance problems, the company typically recruits someone thought to be better equipped to fix what the departing executive couldn't--or wouldn't. The board places its confidence in the new person because of the present dilemma's similarity to some previous challenge that he or she dealt with successfully. But familiar problems are inevitably succeeded by less familiar ones, for which the specially selected CEO is not quite so qualified. More often than not, the experiences, skills, and temperament that yielded triumph in Act I turn out to be unequal to Act II's difficulties. In fact, the approaches that worked so brilliantly in Act I may be the very opposite of what is needed in Act II. The CEO has four choices: refuse to change, in which case he or she will be replaced; realize that the next act requires new skills and learn them; downsize or circumscribe his or her role to compensate for deficiencies; or line up a successor who is qualified to fill a role to which the incumbent's skills and interests are no longer suited. Hewlett-Packard's Carly Fiorina exemplifies the first alternative; Merrill Lynch's Stanley O'Neal the second; Google's Sergey Brin and Larry Page the third; and Quest Diagnostics' Ken Freeman the fourth. All but the first option are reasonable responses to the challenges presented in the second acts of most CEOs' tenures. And all but the first require a power of observation, a propensity for introspection, and a strain of humility that are rare in the ranks of the very people who need those qualities most. There are four essential steps executives can take to discern that they have entered new territory and to respond accordingly: recognition that their leadership style and approach are no longer working; acceptance of others' advice on why performance is faltering; analysis and understanding of the nature of the Act II shift; and, finally, decision and action. PMID:17286076

  7. Registration of heavy metal ions and pesticides with ATR planar waveguide enzyme sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabok, Alexei; Haron, Saharudin; Ray, Asim

    2004-11-01

    The proposed novel type of enzyme optical sensors is based on a combination of SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2 planar waveguide ATR (attenuated total reflection) transducer, fabricated by standard silicon planar technology, with the composite polyelectrolyte self-assembled coating containing both organic chromophores and enzyme molecules. Such devices were deployed to monitor typical industrial and agricultural water pollutants, such as heavy metal ions and pesticides, acting as inhibitors of enzyme reactions. The sensitivity of registration of these pollutants in the range of 1 ppb was achieved. The use of different enzymes in the sensitive membrane provides a background for pattern recognition of the above pollutants.

  8. Production of theabrownins using a crude fungal enzyme concentrate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiuping; Gong, Jiashun; Chisti, Yusuf; Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote

    2016-08-10

    Theabrownins were produced from infusions of sun-dried green tea leaves using a crude enzyme concentrate of Aspergillus tubingensis TISTR 3647. This fungus had been isolated from a solid state fermentation of Pu-erh type tea. The crude enzyme concentrate contained activities of peroxidase, catechol oxidase and laccase. The enzyme concentrate effectively oxidized the phenolic compounds in green tea infusion to theabrownins. A theabrownins concentration of 56.0g/L was obtained in 44h. The reaction mixture contained the green tea infusion and crude enzyme concentrate in the volume ratio of 1: 0.205. The tea infusion had been produced using 200g of tea leaves per liter of distilled water. The reaction was carried out in a stirred bioreactor at 37°C with an aeration rate of 1 vvm, an agitation speed of 250rpm and a controlled pH of 7.0. Peroxidase, catechol oxidase, and laccase acted synergistically to convert the phenolic compounds in green tea infusion to theabrownins. Previously, theabrownins had been produced from green tea infusions only by using live fungal cultures. Production using the microorganism-free enzyme concentrate was comparable to production using the fungus A. tubingensis TISTR 3647. The proposed novel production process using the fungal crude enzymes and green tea infusion, offers a more controlled, reproducible and highly productive option for commercial production of theabrownins. PMID:27318175

  9. An investigation into keratinolytic enzymes to enhance ungual drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Mohorcic, M; Torkar, A; Friedrich, J; Kristl, J; Murdan, S

    2007-03-01

    The topical therapy of nail diseases is limited by the low permeability of drugs through the nail plate. To increase drug penetration, the integrity of the nail plate must be compromised to a certain extent. We hypothesised that keratinolytic enzymes might decrease the barrier properties of the nail plate by hydrolysing the nail keratins, and thereby enhance ungual drug permeation. To determine enzyme action on nail plates, nail clippings were incubated at 35 degrees C, in the presence of keratinase at optimal pH for 48h, after which the nail plates were examined using scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the enzyme acted on the intercellular matrix which holds nail cells together, such that corneocytes on the dorsal surface separated from one another and 'lifted off' the nail plate. In addition, the surface of the corneocytes was corroded. Permeation studies using modified Franz diffusion cells and bovine hoof membranes as a model for the nail plate showed that the enzyme enhanced drug permeation through the hoof membrane. The permeability and partition coefficients, and the drug flux were found to be significantly increased in the presence of the enzyme. We can conclude that the enzyme, via its hydrolytic action on nail plate proteins, could increase ungual drug delivery.

  10. Clinical uses of an enzyme-containing dentifrice.

    PubMed

    Midda, M; Cooksey, M W

    1986-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that the inclusion of certain enzymes in mouthrinses and dentifrices will reduce plaque and gingivitis scores. The enzymes that are most effective clinically have, as their active ingredients, amyloglucosidase and glucose oxidase. These produce hydrogen peroxide from dietary fermentable carbohydrates which in turn converts thiocyanate to hypothiocyanite in the presence of salivary lactoperoxidase. The resultant hypothiocyanite acts as a bacterial inhibitor by interfering with cell metabolism; thus, there is a reduction in plaque accumulation and therefore in gingival inflammation. Pilot studies have compared over a short period the action of the trial dentifrice with enzymes and fluoride at 1100 ppm, using as controls the paste without enzymes but with fluoride and a commercial fluoride paste. There was an expected reduction in all scores with all products due to the mechanical removal of plaque, but a significantly greater reduction in gingivitis was noted in the paste with enzymes. This study is of longer duration with many more subjects. Baseline data include plaque and gingival indices and Periotron readings for crevicular fluid. The trial is of a double-blind non-crossover study design using a split-mouth technique. One side of the mouth is given a prophylaxis and the subject given one of the 3 test pastes to use. Readings were repeated every 2 weeks for 3 months. The results show a significant reduction in gingivitis scores in the enzyme-containing dentifrice group.

  11. Integrated microdroplet-based system for enzyme synthesis and sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapierre, Florian; Best, Michel; Stewart, Robert; Oakeshott, John; Peat, Thomas; Zhu, Yonggang

    2013-12-01

    Microdroplet-based microfluidic devices are emerging as powerful tools for a wide range of biochemical screenings and analyses. Monodispersed aqueous microdroplets from picoliters to nanoliters in volume are generated inside microfluidic channels within an immiscible oil phase. This results in the formation of emulsions which can contain various reagents for chemical reactions and can be considered as discrete bioreactors. In this paper an integrated microfluidic platform for the synthesis, screening and sorting of libraries of an organophosphate degrading enzyme is presented. The variants of the selected enzyme are synthesized from a DNA source using in-vitro transcription and translation method. The synthesis occurs inside water-in-oil emulsion droplets, acting as bioreactors. Through a fluorescence based detection system, only the most efficient enzymes are selected. All the necessary steps from the enzyme synthesis to selection of the best genes (producing the highest enzyme activity) are thus integrated inside a single and unique device. In the second part of the paper, an innovative design of the microfluidic platform is presented, integrating an electronic prototyping board for ensuring the communication between the various components of the platform (camera, syringe pumps and high voltage power supply), resulting in a future handheld, user-friendly, fully automated device for enzyme synthesis, screening and selection. An overview on the capabilities as well as future perspectives of this new microfluidic platform is provided.

  12. Sodium and Potassium Ions in Proteins and Enzyme Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Vašák, Milan; Schnabl, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The group I alkali metal ions Na(+) and K(+) are ubiquitous components of biological fluids that surround biological macromolecules. They play important roles other than being nonspecific ionic buffering agents or mediators of solute exchange and transport. Molecular evolution and regulated high intracellular and extracellular M(+) concentrations led to incorporation of selective Na(+) and K(+) binding sites into enzymes to stabilize catalytic intermediates or to provide optimal positioning of substrates. The mechanism of M(+) activation, as derived from kinetic studies along with structural analysis, has led to the classification of cofactor-like (type I) or allosteric effector (type II) activated enzymes. In the type I mechanism substrate anchoring to the enzyme active site is mediated by M(+), often acting in tandem with a divalent cation like Mg(2+), Mn(2+) or Zn(2+). In the allosteric type II mechanism, M(+) binding enhances enzyme activity through conformational transitions triggered upon binding to a distant site. In this chapter, following the discussion of the coordination chemistry of Na(+) and K(+) ions and the structural features responsible for the metal binding site selectivity in M(+)-activated enzymes, well-defined examples of M(+)-activated enzymes are used to illustrate the structural basis for type I and type II activation by Na(+) and K(+).

  13. Targeting Inactive Enzyme Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sijiu; Zeng, Li-Fan; Wu, Li; Yu, Xiao; Xue, Ting; Gunawan, Andrea M.; Ya-Qiu, Long; Zhang, Zhong-Yin

    2009-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) as a therapeutic target for diabetes, obesity, as well as cancer. Identifying inhibitory compounds with good bioavailability is a major challenge of drug discovery programs targeted toward PTPs. Most current PTP active site-directed pharmacophores are negatively charged pTyr mimetics which cannot readily enter the cell. This lack of cell permeability limits the utility of such compounds in signaling studies and further therapeutic development. We identify aryl diketoacids as novel pTyr surrogates and show that neutral amide-linked aryl diketoacid dimers also exhibit excellent PTP inhibitory activity. Kinetic studies establish that these aryl diketoacid derivatives act as noncompetitive inhibitors of PTP1B. Crystal structures of ligand-bound PTP1B reveal that both the aryl diketoacid and its dimeric derivative bind PTP1B at the active site, albeit with distinct modes of interaction, in the catalytically inactive, WPD loop open conformation. Furthermore, dimeric aryl diketoacids are cell permeable and enhance insulin signaling in hepatoma cells, suggesting that targeting the inactive conformation may provide a unique opportunity for creating active site-directed PTP1B inhibitors with improved pharmacological properties. PMID:19012396

  14. ACTS broadband aeronautical terminal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agan, M. J.; Densmore, A. C.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the design of, and experiments with, the ACTS Broadband Aeronautical Terminal. As part of the ongoing effort to investigate commercial applications of ACTS technologies, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and various industry/government partners are developing a broadband mobile terminal for aeronautical applications. The ACTS Broadband Aeronautical Terminal is designed to explore the use of K/Ka-band for high data rate aeronautical satellite communications. Currently available commercial aeronautical satellite communications systems are only capable of achieving data rates on the order of tens of kilobits per second. The broadband terminal used in conjunction with the ACTS mechanically steerable antenna, can achieve data rates of 384 kilobits per second, while use of an ACTS spot beam antenna with this terminal will allow up to T1 data rates (1.544 megabits per second). The aeronautical terminal will be utilized to test a variety of applications that require a high data rate communications link. The use of the K/Ka-band for wideband aeronautical communications has the advantages of spectrum availability and smaller antennas, while eliminating the one major drawback of this frequency band, rain attenuation, by flying above the clouds the majority of the time.

  15. Determination of lipolytic enzyme activities.

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Kovacic, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a versatile human opportunistic pathogen that produces and secretes an arsenal of enzymes, proteins and small molecules many of which serve as virulence factors. Notably, about 40 % of P. aeruginosa genes code for proteins of unknown function, among them more than 80 encoding putative, but still unknown lipolytic enzymes. This group of hydrolases (EC 3.1.1) is known already for decades, but only recently, several of these enzymes have attracted attention as potential virulence factors. Reliable and reproducible enzymatic activity assays are crucial to determine their physiological function and particularly assess their contribution to pathogenicity. As a consequence of the unique biochemical properties of lipids resulting in the formation of micellar structures in water, the reproducible preparation of substrate emulsions is strongly dependent on the method used. Furthermore, the physicochemical properties of the respective substrate emulsion may drastically affect the activities of the tested lipolytic enzymes. Here, we describe common methods for the activity determination of lipase, esterase, phospholipase, and lysophospholipase. These methods cover lipolytic activity assays carried out in vitro, with cell extracts or separated subcellular compartments and with purified enzymes. We have attempted to describe standardized protocols, allowing the determination and comparison of enzymatic activities of lipolytic enzymes from different sources. These methods should also encourage the Pseudomonas community to address the wealth of still unexplored lipolytic enzymes encoded and produced by P. aeruginosa.

  16. Targeting enzymes for cancer therapy: old enzymes in new roles.

    PubMed Central

    Deonarain, M. P.; Epenetos, A. A.

    1994-01-01

    Enzymes which traditionally have played no role in cell-directed cytotoxicity are finding their way into schemes for prodrug activation and immunotoxins owing to such useful enzymatic activity. Alkaline phosphatase, carboxypeptidases, beta-glucosidases and beta-lactamases among many others are being utilised to regenerate potent anti-cancer drugs or toxic small molecules from precursors in a bid to enhance their activity in tumours. These prodrug activation systems require the pretargeting of the enzyme to the surface of a tumour cell, usually by an antibody or its immunoreactive fragment. A recent novel approach proposes the intracellular delivery of appropriate enzymes, such as phosphodiesterases, to particular cellular compartments. There, enzyme activity can cause substantive damage resulting in cell death. Cell targeting of mammalian phosphodiesterase promises to improve upon conventional immunotoxins because of their increased cytotoxicity when targeted to the appropriate compartment and their expected lack of, or lower, immunogenicity in clinical use. PMID:7947082

  17. A New Versatile Microarray-based Method for High Throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-active Enzymes*

    PubMed Central

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L.; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B.; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. PMID:25657012

  18. Characterization of a chimeric enzyme comprising feruloyl esterase and family 42 carbohydrate-binding module.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Takuya; Mochizuki, Keiji; Kisara, Hiroe; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Fushinobu, Shinya; Murayama, Tetsuya; Shiono, Yoshihito

    2010-03-01

    We engineered a chimeric enzyme (AwFaeA-CBM42) comprising of type-A feruloyl esterase from Aspergillus awamori (AwFaeA) and family 42 carbohydrate-binding module (AkCBM42) from glycoside hydrolase family 54 alpha-L-arabinofuranosidase of Aspergillus kawachii. The chimeric enzyme was successfully produced in Pichia pastoris and accumulated in the culture broth. The purified chimeric enzyme had an apparent relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 53,000. The chimeric enzyme binds to arabinoxylan; this indicates that the AkCBM42 in AwFaeA-CBM42 binds to arabinofuranose side chain moiety of arabinoxylan. The thermostability of the chimeric enzyme was greater than that of AwFaeA. No significant difference of the specific activity toward methyl ferulate was observed between the AwFaeA and chimeric enzyme, but the release of ferulic acid from insoluble arabinoxylan by the chimeric enzyme was approximately 4-fold higher than that achieved by AwFaeA alone. In addition, the chimeric enzyme and xylanase acted synergistically for the degradation of arabinoxylan. In conclusion, the findings of our study demonstrated that the components of the AwFaeA-CBM42 chimeric enzyme act synergistically to bring about the degradation of complex substrates and that the family 42 carbohydrate-binding module has potential for application in the degradation of polysaccharides.

  19. A new versatile microarray-based method for high throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G T

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths.

  20. Affordable Care Act.

    PubMed

    Rak, Sofija; Coffin, Janis

    2013-01-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (PPACA), although a subject of much debate in the Unites States, was enacted on March 23, 2010, and upheld by the Supreme Court on June 28, 2012. This act advocates that "healthcare is a right, not a privilege." The main goals of PPACA are to minimize the number of uninsured Americans and make healthcare available to everyone at an affordable price. The Congressional Budget Office has determined that 94% of Americans will have healthcare coverage while staying under the $900 billion limit that President Barack Obama established by bending the healthcare cost curve and reducing the deficit over the next 10 years. PMID:23767130

  1. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  2. Inhibitors of the peptidoglycan biosynthesis enzymes MurA-F.

    PubMed

    Hrast, Martina; Sosič, Izidor; Sink, Roman; Gobec, Stanislav

    2014-08-01

    The widespread emergence of resistant bacterial strains is becoming a serious threat to public health. This thus signifies the need for the development of new antibacterial agents with novel mechanisms of action. Continuous efforts in the design of novel antibacterials remain one of the biggest challenges in drug development. In this respect, the Mur enzymes, MurA-F, that are involved in the formation of UDP-N-acetylmuramyl-pentapeptide can be genuinely considered as promising antibacterial targets. This review provides an in-depth insight into the recent developments in the field of inhibitors of the MurA-F enzymes. Special attention is also given to compounds that act as multiple inhibitors of two, three or more of the Mur enzymes. Moreover, the reasons for the lack of preclinically successful inhibitors and the challenges to overcome these hurdles in the next years are also debated.

  3. Flow-cell fibre-optic enzyme sensor for phenols

    SciTech Connect

    Papkovsky, D.B.; Ghindilis, A.L.; Kurochkin, I.N. )

    1993-07-01

    A solid-state fibre-optic luminescent oxygen sensor was used for flow-through measurements. It acts as a transducer in a new flow-cell enzyme sensor arrangement. This arrangement comprises a flow path, sample injector, microcolumn with the immobilized enzyme, oxygen membrane and fibre-optic connector joined together to form an integral unit. Laccase enzyme was used as a recognition system which provided specific oxidation of the substrates with the dissolved oxygen being monitored. The assay procedure was optimized and performance of the new system studied. The sensor was applied to the determination polyphenol content in tea, brandy, etc. (quality control test). The sensitivity to some important phenolic compounds was tested with the view of industrial wastewater control applications. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Molybdenum enzymes in higher organisms

    PubMed Central

    Hille, Russ; Nishino, Takeshi; Bittner, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress in our understanding of the structural and catalytic properties of molybdenum-containing enzymes in eukaryotes is reviewed, along with aspects of the biosynthesis of the cofactor and its insertion into apoprotein. PMID:21516203

  5. Enzyme immobilisation in permselective microcapsules.

    PubMed

    Pachariyanon, Pavadee; Barth, Ekkehard; Agar, David W

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study the permselective behaviour of calcium alginate membranes, including the modifying effects of silica additives, which were subsequently used as microcapsule shells. Diffusion experiments and HPLC were carried out to ascertain the size-exclusion property of the membranes for a mixed molecular-weight dextran solution. Hollow microcapsules containing the enzyme dextranase were prepared using double concentric nozzles and the encapsulation performance was evaluated based on an analysis of the enzyme reactivity and stability. To improve mass transport within the microcapsules, magnetic nanoparticles were introduced into the liquid core and agitated using an alternating external magnetic field. The modified membranes exhibited better size-exclusion behaviour than the unmodified membranes. The magnetic nanoparticles slightly improved mass transport inside the microcapsule. The encapsulated enzyme yielded nearly 80% of the free enzyme activity and retained about 80% of the initial catalytic activity even after being used for eight reaction cycles.

  6. Acts of Endearment

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, G. Gayle

    1992-01-01

    Legitimate and clinically useful affection between physicians and patients can be nurtured by attending to duties enjoined by traditional codes of ethics. Three acts of endearment have special importance for today's family physicians: smoothing the bed of death; keeping patients' secrets; and not abandoning patients on account of incurability. PMID:20469528

  7. Acting like a Pro

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Marlon A.

    2012-01-01

    The Saturday morning acting class in the Pearson Hall auditorium at Miles College boasts the school's highest attendance all year. The teacher, actress Robin Givens, was a lure few students--and others from surrounding areas--could resist. Some came to learn about their prospective field from a professional. Others were there for pointers to…

  8. The USA PATRIOT Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minow, Mary; Coyle, Karen; Kaufman, Paula

    2002-01-01

    Explains the USA PATRIOT (Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism) Act, passed after the September 11 terrorist attacks, and its implications for libraries and patron records. Considers past dealings with the FBI; court orders; search warrants; wiretaps; and subpoenas. Includes:…

  9. ACT against Violence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, M. Parker

    2001-01-01

    Describes how early childhood professionals can help young children avoid getting involved with violence or being exposed to violence. Presents information on the ACT [Adults and Children Together] Against Violence campaign, a national, multimedia campaign and a community-based training program developed in partnership by the National Association…

  10. Derwent's Doors: Creative Acts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillen, Julia

    2007-01-01

    Children's early word learning is not usually considered creative in the same sense as artistic productions of later life. Yet early word learning is a creative response to the intrinsic instability of word meaning. As the child acts to participate in her community, she strives for intersubjectivity, manifest in neologisms and under- and…

  11. Improving America's Schools Act

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cradler, John; Bridgforth, Elizabeth

    1995-01-01

    The Improving America's Schools ACT (IASA) emphasizes coherent systemic education reform, with Goals 2000 setting common standards for IASA and the recently authorized School-to-Work Program. IASA addresses the need to raise academic achievement, increase opportunities to learn, improve professional development, increase community involvement, utilize instructional applications of technology, and improve assessment, and allow more local flexibility in the use of funds.

  12. Enzymes: principles and biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Peter K

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are biological catalysts (also known as biocatalysts) that speed up biochemical reactions in living organisms, and which can be extracted from cells and then used to catalyse a wide range of commercially important processes. This chapter covers the basic principles of enzymology, such as classification, structure, kinetics and inhibition, and also provides an overview of industrial applications. In addition, techniques for the purification of enzymes are discussed.

  13. Enzymes: principles and biotechnological applications

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes are biological catalysts (also known as biocatalysts) that speed up biochemical reactions in living organisms, and which can be extracted from cells and then used to catalyse a wide range of commercially important processes. This chapter covers the basic principles of enzymology, such as classification, structure, kinetics and inhibition, and also provides an overview of industrial applications. In addition, techniques for the purification of enzymes are discussed. PMID:26504249

  14. MECHANISMS OF LYSOSOMAL ENZYME RELEASE FROM HUMAN LEUKOCYTES

    PubMed Central

    Zurier, Robert B.; Hoffstein, Sylvia; Weissmann, Gerald

    1973-01-01

    In order to study mechanisms underlying selective enzyme release from human leukocytes during phagocytosis, the effects were studied of compounds which affect microtubule integrity or the accumulation of cyclic nucleotides. Human leukocytes selectively extrude lysosomal enzymes (β-glucuronidase) from viable cells during phagocytosis of zymosan or immune complexes, or upon encounter with immune complexes dispersed along a non-phagocytosable surface such as a millipore filter. In each circumstance, lysosomal enzyme release was reduced by previous treatment of cells with pharmacological doses of drugs which disrupt microtubules (e.g. 10-3–10-5 M colchicine) or with agents which affect accumulation of adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) (e.g. 10-3 M cyclic nucleotides and 2.8 x 10-4–2.8 x 10-6 M prostaglandin E (PGE) and A (PGA) compounds). Preincubation of cells with 5 µg/ml cytochalasin B resulted in complete inhibition of zymosan ingestion, but not of adherence of zymosan particles to plasma membranes or selective enzyme release. In this system, in which enzyme release was independent of particle uptake, preincubation of cells with colchicine, vinblastine, dibutyryl cAMP, or PGE1 also reduced extrusion of lysosomal enzymes. When cell suspensions were incubated with membrane-lytic crystals of monosodium urate (MSU), cytoplasmic as well as lysosomal enzymes were released with subsequent death of the cells. However, enzyme release followed phagocytosis of crystals (as measured by enhanced C-1 oxidation of glucose) and was due to "perforation from within" of the lysosomal membrane, rather than lysis by crystals of the plasma membrane. Enzyme release after MSU ingestion was also reduced when cells were treated with pharmacological doses of the test agents. When cells were killed by Triton X-100, acting on the plasma membrane, C-1 oxidation of glucose was abolished and enzyme release could not be inhibited pharmacologically. These observations suggest that lysosomal

  15. ACTS of Education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Robert; Krawczyk, Richard; Gargione, Frank; Kruse, Hans; Vrotsos, Pete (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Now in its ninth year of operations, the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) program has continued, although since May 2000 in a new operations arrangement involving a university based consortium, the Ohio Consortium for Advanced Communications Technology (OCACT), While NASA has concluded its experimental intentions of ACTS, the spacecraft's ongoing viability has permitted its further operations to provide educational opportunities to engineering and communications students interested in satellite operations, as well as a Ka-band test bed for commercial interests in utilizing Kaband space communications. The consortium has reached its first year of operations. This generous opportunity by NASA has already resulted in unique educational opportunities for students in obtaining "hands-on" experience, such as, in satellite attitude control. An update is presented on the spacecraft and consortium operations.

  16. Novel cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme from Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans.

    PubMed Central

    Ingvorsen, K; Højer-Pedersen, B; Godtfredsen, S E

    1991-01-01

    A cyanide-metabolizing bacterium, strain DF3, isolated from soil was identified as Alcaligenes xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans. Whole cells and cell extracts of strain DF3 catalyzed hydrolysis of cyanide to formate and ammonia (HCN + 2H2O----HCOOH + NH3) without forming formamide as a free intermediate. The cyanide-hydrolyzing activity was inducibly produced in cells during growth in cyanide-containing media. Cyanate (OCN-) and a wide range of aliphatic and aromatic nitriles were not hydrolyzed by intact cells of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3. Strain DF3 hydrolyzed cyanide with great efficacy. Thus, by using resting induced cells at a concentration of 11.3 mg (dry weight) per ml, the cyanide concentration could be reduced from 0.97 M (approximately 25,220 ppm) to less than 77 nM (approximately 0.002 ppm) in 55 h. Enzyme purification established that cyanide hydrolysis by A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was due to a single intracellular enzyme. The soluble enzyme was purified approximately 160-fold, and the first 25 NH2-terminal amino acids were determined by automated Edman degradation. The molecular mass of the active enzyme (purity, greater than 97% as determined by amino acid sequencing) was estimated to be greater than 300,000 Da. The cyanide-hydrolyzing enzyme of A. xylosoxidans subsp. denitrificans DF3 was tentatively named cyanidase to distinguish it from known nitrilases (EC 3.5.5.1) which act on organic nitriles. Images PMID:1872607

  17. Harnessing the potential of ligninolytic enzymes for lignocellulosic biomass pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Masran, Ruqayyah; Zanirun, Zuraidah; Bahrin, Ezyana Kamal; Ibrahim, Mohamad Faizal; Lai Yee, Phang; Abd-Aziz, Suraini

    2016-06-01

    Abundant lignocellulosic biomass from various industries provides a great potential feedstock for the production of value-added products such as biofuel, animal feed, and paper pulping. However, low yield of sugar obtained from lignocellulosic hydrolysate is usually due to the presence of lignin that acts as a protective barrier for cellulose and thus restricts the accessibility of the enzyme to work on the cellulosic component. This review focuses on the significance of biological pretreatment specifically using ligninolytic enzymes as an alternative method apart from the conventional physical and chemical pretreatment. Different modes of biological pretreatment are discussed in this paper which is based on (i) fungal pretreatment where fungi mycelia colonise and directly attack the substrate by releasing ligninolytic enzymes and (ii) enzymatic pretreatment using ligninolytic enzymes to counter the drawbacks of fungal pretreatment. This review also discusses the important factors of biological pretreatment using ligninolytic enzymes such as nature of the lignocellulosic biomass, pH, temperature, presence of mediator, oxygen, and surfactant during the biodelignification process. PMID:27115758

  18. Microtubule-severing enzymes at the cutting edge

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, David J.; Ross, Jennifer L.

    2012-01-01

    ATP-dependent severing of microtubules was first reported in Xenopus laevis egg extracts in 1991. Two years later this observation led to the purification of the first known microtubule-severing enzyme, katanin. Katanin homologs have now been identified throughout the animal kingdom and in plants. Moreover, members of two closely related enzyme subfamilies, spastin and fidgetin, have been found to sever microtubules and might act alongside katanins in some contexts (Roll-Mecak and McNally, 2010; Yu et al., 2008; Zhang et al., 2007). Over the past few years, it has become clear that microtubule-severing enzymes contribute to a wide range of cellular activities including mitosis and meiosis, morphogenesis, cilia biogenesis and disassembly, and migration. Thus, this group of enzymes is revealing itself to be among the most important of the microtubule regulators. This Commentary focuses on our growing understanding of how microtubule-severing enzymes contribute to the organization and dynamics of diverse microtubule arrays, as well as the structural and biophysical characteristics that afford them the unique capacity to catalyze the removal of tubulin from the interior microtubule lattice. Our goal is to provide a broader perspective, focusing on a limited number of particularly informative, representative and/or timely findings. PMID:22595526

  19. Imaging enzymes at work: metabolic mapping by enzyme histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Van Noorden, Cornelis J F

    2010-06-01

    For the understanding of functions of proteins in biological and pathological processes, reporter molecules such as fluorescent proteins have become indispensable tools for visualizing the location of these proteins in intact animals, tissues, and cells. For enzymes, imaging their activity also provides information on their function or functions, which does not necessarily correlate with their location. Metabolic mapping enables imaging of activity of enzymes. The enzyme under study forms a reaction product that is fluorescent or colored by conversion of either a fluorogenic or chromogenic substrate or a fluorescent substrate with different spectral characteristics. Most chromogenic staining methods were developed in the latter half of the twentieth century but still find new applications in modern cell biology and pathology. Fluorescence methods have rapidly evolved during the last decade. This review critically evaluates the methods that are available at present for metabolic mapping in living animals, unfixed cryostat sections of tissues, and living cells, and refers to protocols of the methods of choice.

  20. Freedom of Information Act

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newman, D.J.

    2012-01-01

    The Freedom of Information Act( FOIA), 5 U.S.C.§ 552, as amended, generally provides that any person has a right to request access to Federal agency records. The USGS proactively promotes information disclosure as inherent to its mission of providing objective science to inform decisionmakers and the general public. USGS scientists disseminate up-to-date and historical scientific data that are critical to addressing national and global priorities.

  1. Toxic Substances Control Act

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  2. [Patients' Rights Act].

    PubMed

    Haier, A J

    2016-09-01

    The new Patients' Rights Act does not reflect rights of patients as professional obligations of physicians for the first time. It adopted common longtime jurisdiction, but in some respects it is going beyond. This law clearly extended the documentation requirements of physicians, especially concerning the extent of documentation. In surgical fields the requirements for enlightening physicians were more strongly worded than in previous jurisdiction. In medical facilities it is now mandatory to establish an internal quality management system. PMID:27626814

  3. ACTE Wing Loads Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    The Adaptive Compliant Trailing Edge (ACTE) project modified a Gulfstream III (GIII) aircraft with a new flexible flap that creates a seamless transition between the flap and the wing. As with any new modification, it is crucial to ensure that the aircraft will not become overstressed in flight. To test this, Star CCM a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software program was used to calculate aerodynamic data for the aircraft at given flight conditions.

  4. Enzyme exposure and enzyme sensitisation in the baking industry.

    PubMed Central

    Vanhanen, M; Tuomi, T; Hokkanen, H; Tupasela, O; Tuomainen, A; Holmberg, P C; Leisola, M; Nordman, H

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the exposure to enzymes and prevalence of enzyme sensitisation in the baking industry. METHODS: A cross sectional study was conducted in four bakeries, one flour mill, and one crispbread factory. Sensitisation to enzymes, flours, and storage mites was examined by skin prick and radioallergosorbent (RAST) tests. 365 workers were tested. The workers were interviewed for work related respiratory and skin symptoms. Total dust concentrations were measured by a gravimetric method, and the concentration of alpha-amylase in air was measured by a catalytic method. An immunochemical method was used for measuring cellulase and xylanase in air. RESULTS: Total measured dust concentrations were from 0.1 to 18 mg/m3, with highest values in dough making areas of bakeries. The alpha-amylase concentrations generally followed the total dust concentrations and reached the highest values < 6.6 micrograms/m3 in the same areas. Cellulase and xylanase varied with concentrations < 180 ng/m3 and < 40 ng/m3, respectively, in the flour mill and the crispbread factory. No cellulase, but concentrations of 1-200 ng/m3 xylanase, were found in the bakeries, probably indicating the natural xylanase activity of wheat. 12 workers (8%) in the bakeries, three (5%) in the flour mill, and four (3%) in the crispbread factory were skin prick positive to enzymes. The corresponding percentages of positive reactions to flours were 12%, 5%, and 8%. CONCLUSIONS: The study confirmed that industrial enzymes in baking used as additives in a powdered form pose a risk of sensitisation. The no effect air concentrations for industrial enzymes are not known. Based on present knowledge, however, lowering exposures and eliminating short and high peaks by technical measures would lower the risk of sensitisation. This would be most effectively accomplished by shifting to non-dusty products. PMID:8943831

  5. The ACTS multibeam antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Regier, Frank A.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) to be launched in 1993 introduces several new technologies including a multibeam antenna (MBA) operating at Ka-band. The satellite is introduced briefly, and then the MBA, consisting of electrically similar 30 GHz received and 20 GHz transmit offset Cassegrain systems utilizing orthogonal linear polarizations, is described. Dual polarization is achieved by using one feed assembly for each polarization in conjunction with nested front and back subreflectors, the gridded front subreflector acting as a window for one polarization and a reflector for the other. The antennas produce spot beams with approximately 0.3 deg beamwidth and gains of approximately 50 dbi. High surface accuracy and high edge taper produce low sidelobe levels and high cross-polarization isolation. A brief description is given of several Ka-band components fabricated for ACTS. These include multiflare antenna feedhorns, beam-forming networks utilizing latching ferrite waveguide switches, a 30 GHz high mobility electron transmitter (HEMT) low-noise amplifier and a 20 GHz TWT power amplifier.

  6. Enzymatic immuno-assembly of gold nanoparticles for visualized activity screening of histone-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Zhen, Zhen; Tang, Li-Juan; Long, Haoxu; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2012-04-17

    Activity screening of histone-modifying enzymes is of paramount importance for epigenetic research as well as clinical diagnostics and therapeutics. A novel biosensing strategy has been developed for sensitive and selective detection of histone-modifying enzymes as well as their inhibitors. This strategy relies on the antibody-mediated assembly of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) decorated with substrate peptides that are subjected to enzymatic modifications by the histone-modifying enzymes. This design allows a visual and homogeneous assay of the enzyme activity using antibodies without any labels, which circumvents the requirements to prefunctionalize the antibody and affords improved assay simplicity and throughput. Additionally, the use of antibody-based recognition of modified peptides could offer improved specificity as compared with existing techniques based on the enzyme coupled assay. We have demonstrated this strategy using a histone methyltransferase acting on histone H3 (Lys 4) and a histone acetyltransferase acting on histone H3 (Lys 14). The results reveal that the absorption peak characteristic for AuNPs decreases dynamically with increasing activity of the enzymes with concomitant visualizable color attenuation, and subnanomolar detection limits are readily achieved for both enzymes. The developed strategy can thus offer a robust and convenient visualized platform for screening the enzyme activities and their inhibitors with high sensitivity and selectivity.

  7. Alpha/Beta-hydrolase fold enzymes: structures, functions and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Holmquist, M

    2000-09-01

    The alpha/beta-hydrolase fold family of enzymes is rapidly becoming one of the largest group of structurally related enzymes with diverse catalytic functions. Members in this family include acetylcholinesterase, dienelactone hydrolase, lipase, thioesterase, serine carboxypeptidase, proline iminopeptidase, proline oligopeptidase, haloalkane dehalogenase, haloperoxidase, epoxide hydrolase, hydroxynitrile lyase and others. The enzymes all have a Nucleophile-His-Acid catalytic triad evolved to efficiently operate on substrates with different chemical composition or physicochemical properties and in various biological contexts. For example, acetylcholine esterase catalyzes the cleavage of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, at a rate close to the limits of diffusion of substrate to the active site of the enzyme. Dienelactone hydrolase uses substrate-assisted catalysis to degrade aromatic compounds. Lipases act adsorbed at the water/lipid interface of their neutral water-insoluble ester substrates. Most lipases have their active site buried under secondary structure elements, a flap, which must change conformation to allow substrate to access the active site. Thioesterases are involved in a multitude of biochemical processes including bioluminiscence, fatty acid- and polyketide biosynthesis and metabolism. Serine carboxypeptidases recognize the negatively charged carboxylate terminus of their peptide substrates. Haloalkane dehalogenase is a detoxifying enzyme that converts halogenated aliphatics to the corresponding alcohols, while haloperoxidase catalyzes the halogenation of organic compounds. Hydroxynitrile lyase cleaves carbon-carbon bonds in cyanohydrins with concomitant hydrogen cyanide formation as a defense mechanism in plants. This paper gives an overview of catalytic activities reported for this family of enzymes by discussing selected examples. The current state of knowledge of the molecular basis for catalysis and substrate specificity is outlined

  8. Micromotors Powered by Enzyme Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna K; Zhao, Xi; Tansi, Benjamin M; Méndez-Ortiz, Wilfredo J; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M; Golestanian, Ramin; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-12-01

    Active biocompatible systems are of great current interest for their possible applications in drug or antidote delivery at specific locations. Herein, we report the synthesis and study of self-propelled microparticles powered by enzymatic reactions and their directed movement in substrate concentration gradient. Polystyrene microparticles were functionalized with the enzymes urease and catalase using a biotin-streptavidin linkage procedure. The motion of the enzyme-coated particles was studied in the presence of the respective substrates, using optical microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis. The diffusion of the particles was found to increase in a substrate concentration dependent manner. The directed chemotactic movement of these enzyme-powered motors up the substrate gradient was studied using three-inlet microfluidic channel architecture. PMID:26587897

  9. Subcellular localization of pituitary enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    A cytochemical procedure is reported for identifying subcellular sites of enzymes hydrolyzing beta-naphthylamine substrates, and to study the sites of reaction product localization in cells of various tissues. Investigations using the substrate Leu 4-methoxy-8-naphthylamine, a capture with hexonium pararosaniline, and the final chelation of osmium have identified the hydrolyzing enzyme of rat liver cells; this enzyme localized on cell membranes with intense deposition in the areas of the parcanaliculi. The study of cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat showed the deposition of reaction product on cell membrane; and on the membranes of secretion granules contained within the cell. The deposition of reaction product on the cell membrane however showed no increase or decrease with changes in the physiological state of the gland and release of secretion granules from specific cells.

  10. Micromotors Powered by Enzyme Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Dey, Krishna K; Zhao, Xi; Tansi, Benjamin M; Méndez-Ortiz, Wilfredo J; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M; Golestanian, Ramin; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-12-01

    Active biocompatible systems are of great current interest for their possible applications in drug or antidote delivery at specific locations. Herein, we report the synthesis and study of self-propelled microparticles powered by enzymatic reactions and their directed movement in substrate concentration gradient. Polystyrene microparticles were functionalized with the enzymes urease and catalase using a biotin-streptavidin linkage procedure. The motion of the enzyme-coated particles was studied in the presence of the respective substrates, using optical microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis. The diffusion of the particles was found to increase in a substrate concentration dependent manner. The directed chemotactic movement of these enzyme-powered motors up the substrate gradient was studied using three-inlet microfluidic channel architecture.

  11. A novel 3-sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase from Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T acting as a key enzyme during catabolism of 3,3'-dithiodipropionic acid is a member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Marc; Deters, Anika; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2013-04-01

    3-Sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase (AcdDPN7) is a new desulfinase that catalyzes the sulfur abstraction from 3SP-CoA in the betaproteobacterium Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7(T). During investigation of a Tn5::mob-induced mutant defective in growth on 3,3'-dithiodipropionate (DTDP) and also 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), the transposon insertion was mapped to an open reading frame with the highest homology to an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) from Burkholderia phenoliruptrix strain BR3459a (83% identical and 91% similar amino acids). An A. mimigardefordensis Δacd mutant was generated and verified the observed phenotype of the Tn5::mob-induced mutant. For enzymatic studies, AcdDPN7 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pLysS by using pET23a::acdDPN7. The purified protein is yellow and contains a noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, as verified by high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) analyses. Size-exclusion chromatography revealed a native molecular mass of about 173 kDa, indicating a homotetrameric structure (theoretically 179 kDa), which is in accordance with other members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. In vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated that the purified enzyme converted 3SP-CoA into propionyl-CoA and sulfite (SO3(2-)). Kinetic studies of AcdDPN7 revealed a Vmax of 4.19 μmol min(-1) mg(-1), an apparent Km of 0.013 mM, and a kcat/Km of 240.8 s(-1) mM(-1) for 3SP-CoA. However, AcdDPN7 is unable to perform a dehydrogenation, which is the usual reaction catalyzed by members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Comparison to other known desulfinases showed a comparably high catalytic efficiency of AcdDPN7 and indicated a novel reaction mechanism. Hence, AcdDPN7 encodes a new desulfinase based on an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.x) scaffold. Concomitantly, we identified the gene product that is responsible for the

  12. A Novel 3-Sulfinopropionyl Coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) Desulfinase from Advenella mimigardefordensis Strain DPN7T Acting as a Key Enzyme during Catabolism of 3,3′-Dithiodipropionic Acid Is a Member of the Acyl-CoA Dehydrogenase Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Schürmann, Marc; Deters, Anika; Wübbeler, Jan Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    3-Sulfinopropionyl coenzyme A (3SP-CoA) desulfinase (AcdDPN7) is a new desulfinase that catalyzes the sulfur abstraction from 3SP-CoA in the betaproteobacterium Advenella mimigardefordensis strain DPN7T. During investigation of a Tn5::mob-induced mutant defective in growth on 3,3′-dithiodipropionate (DTDP) and also 3-sulfinopropionate (3SP), the transposon insertion was mapped to an open reading frame with the highest homology to an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (Acd) from Burkholderia phenoliruptrix strain BR3459a (83% identical and 91% similar amino acids). An A. mimigardefordensis Δacd mutant was generated and verified the observed phenotype of the Tn5::mob-induced mutant. For enzymatic studies, AcdDPN7 was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)/pLysS by using pET23a::acdDPN7. The purified protein is yellow and contains a noncovalently bound flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor, as verified by high-performance liquid chromatography–electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) analyses. Size-exclusion chromatography revealed a native molecular mass of about 173 kDa, indicating a homotetrameric structure (theoretically 179 kDa), which is in accordance with other members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. In vitro assays unequivocally demonstrated that the purified enzyme converted 3SP-CoA into propionyl-CoA and sulfite (SO32−). Kinetic studies of AcdDPN7 revealed a Vmax of 4.19 μmol min−1 mg−1, an apparent Km of 0.013 mM, and a kcat/Km of 240.8 s−1 mM−1 for 3SP-CoA. However, AcdDPN7 is unable to perform a dehydrogenation, which is the usual reaction catalyzed by members of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase superfamily. Comparison to other known desulfinases showed a comparably high catalytic efficiency of AcdDPN7 and indicated a novel reaction mechanism. Hence, AcdDPN7 encodes a new desulfinase based on an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (EC 1.3.8.x) scaffold. Concomitantly, we identified the gene product that is responsible for

  13. Immunomodulatory Effects of Chitotriosidase Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Elmonem, Mohamed A.; van den Heuvel, Lambertus P.; Levtchenko, Elena N.

    2016-01-01

    Chitotriosidase enzyme (EC: 3.2.1.14) is the major active chitinase in the human body. It is produced mainly by activated macrophages, in which its expression is regulated by multiple intrinsic and extrinsic signals. Chitotriosidase was confirmed as essential element in the innate immunity against chitin containing organisms such as fungi and protozoa; however, its immunomodulatory effects extend far beyond innate immunity. In the current review, we will try to explore the expanding spectrum of immunological roles played by chitotriosidase enzyme in human health and disease and will discuss its up-to-date clinical value. PMID:26881065

  14. Inhibiting the deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs).

    PubMed

    Ndubaku, Chudi; Tsui, Vickie

    2015-02-26

    The diverse roles of deubiquitinating enzymes, or DUBs, in determining the fate of specific proteins continue to unfold. Concurrent with the revelation of DUBs as potential therapeutic targets are publications of small molecule inhibitors of these enzymes. In this review, we summarize these molecules and their associated data and suggest additional experiments to further validate and characterize these compounds. We believe the field of drug discovery against DUBs is still in its infancy, but advances in assay development, biophysical techniques, and screening libraries hold promise for identifying suitable agents that could advance into the clinic. PMID:25364867

  15. REBASE - restriction enzymes and methylases.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, R J; Macelis, D

    1998-01-01

    REBASE is a comprehensive database of information about restriction enzymes and their associated methylases, including their recognition and cleavage sites and their commercial availability. Also included is a listing of homing endonucleases. Information from REBASE is available via monthly electronic mailings as well as via anonymous ftp and through the World Wide Web. The REBASE web site, http://www. neb.com/rebase , is where we maintain a web page for every enzyme, reference and supplier. Additionally, there is a search facility, help and NEWS pages, and a complete description of our various services. Specialized files are available that can be used directly by many software packages. PMID:9399870

  16. Taking the Mystery Out of Enzymes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeYoung, H. Garrett

    1984-01-01

    Discusses structure and function of enzymes, design of new enzymes and enzyme substitutes, and enzyme uses in industry, medicine, and wastewater treatment. The latter is a low-cost method which can remove as much as 99 percent of toxic substances found in many industrial wastewater streams. (JN)

  17. ACTS broadband aeronautical experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbe, Brian S.; Jedrey, Thomas C.; Estabrook, Polly; Agan, Martin J.

    1993-01-01

    In the last decade, the demand for reliable data, voice, and video satellite communication links between aircraft and ground to improve air traffic control, airline management, and to meet the growing demand for passenger communications has increased significantly. It is expected that in the near future, the spectrum required for aeronautical communication services will grow significantly beyond that currently available at L-band. In anticipation of this, JPL is developing an experimental broadband aeronautical satellite communications system that will utilize NASA's Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as a satellite of opportunity and the technology developed under JPL's ACTS Mobile Terminal (AMT) Task to evaluate the feasibility of using K/Ka-band for these applications. The application of K/Ka-band for aeronautical satellite communications at cruise altitudes is particularly promising for several reasons: (1) the minimal amount of signal attenuation due to rain; (2) the reduced drag due to the smaller K/Ka-band antennas (as compared to the current L-band systems); and (3) the large amount of available bandwidth. The increased bandwidth available at these frequencies is expected to lead to significantly improved passenger communications - including full-duplex compressed video and multiple channel voice. A description of the proposed broadband experimental system will be presented including: (1) applications of K/Ka-band aeronautical satellite technology to U.S. industry; (2) the experiment objectives; (3) the experiment set-up; (4) experimental equipment description; and (5) industrial participation in the experiment and the benefits.

  18. Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 74 Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database (Web, free access)   The Thermodynamics of Enzyme-Catalyzed Reactions Database contains thermodynamic data on enzyme-catalyzed reactions that have been recently published in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data (JPCRD). For each reaction the following information is provided: the reference for the data, the reaction studied, the name of the enzyme used and its Enzyme Commission number, the method of measurement, the data and an evaluation thereof.

  19. The Classification and Evolution of Enzyme Function.

    PubMed

    Martínez Cuesta, Sergio; Rahman, Syed Asad; Furnham, Nicholas; Thornton, Janet M

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes are the proteins responsible for the catalysis of life. Enzymes sharing a common ancestor as defined by sequence and structure similarity are grouped into families and superfamilies. The molecular function of enzymes is defined as their ability to catalyze biochemical reactions; it is manually classified by the Enzyme Commission and robust approaches to quantitatively compare catalytic reactions are just beginning to appear. Here, we present an overview of studies at the interface of the evolution and function of enzymes.

  20. Biological abatement of enzyme inhibitors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignocellulose pretreatments release phenolic compounds that cause enzyme inhibition and deactivation. Bio-abatement, the biological removal of furfurals, acetic acid and phenolics, may utilize fungal fermentation to metabolize these compounds to CO2, water, cell mass, and heat. Our work with Coni...

  1. Insolubilized enzymes for food synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    Cellulose matrix with numerous enzyme-coated silica particles of colloidal size permanently bound at various sites within matrix was produced that has high activity and possesses requisite physical characteristics for filtration or column operations. Product also allows coupling step in synthesis of edible food to proceed under mild conditions.

  2. The enzymes associated with denitrification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstein, L. I.; Tomlinson, G. A.

    1988-01-01

    The enzymes involved in the reduction of nitrogenous oxides are thought to be intermediates in denitrification processes. This review examines the roles of nitrate reductase, nitrite reductases, nitric oxide reductase, mechanisms of N-N bond formation, and nitrous oxide reductases.

  3. Rennin--a Neglected Enzyme?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, John; Saunders, Terry

    1987-01-01

    Presents investigations to explore the substrate specificity, pH, concentration, and temperature relations of an enzyme with only inexpensive commercial rennet and basic laboratory equipment. Describes how the activities were carried out with a group of 15-year-old students. (CW)

  4. Phage lytic enzymes targeting streptococci

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Streptococcal pathogens contribute to a wide variety of human and livestock diseases. There is a need for new antimicrobials to replace over-used conventional antibiotics. Bacteriophage (viruses that infect bacteria) endolysins (enzymes that help degrade the bacterial cell wall) are ideal candidat...

  5. Rapid-Equilibrium Enzyme Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberty, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    Rapid-equilibrium rate equations for enzyme-catalyzed reactions are especially useful because if experimental data can be fit by these simpler rate equations, the Michaelis constants can be interpreted as equilibrium constants. However, for some reactions it is necessary to use the more complicated steady-state rate equations. Thermodynamics is…

  6. Enzyme-sensing chitosan hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Sadat Ebrahimi, Mir Morteza; Schönherr, Holger

    2014-07-01

    We report on a chitosan hydrogel-based platform for the detection of enzymes, which is compatible with the implementation in infection-sensing wound dressings. Thin films of the established wound dressing biopolymer chitosan were functionalized with a fluorogenic substrate, which is released upon enzymatic degradation, resulting in a pronounced increase in fluorescence emission intensity. In this first model study, the fluorogenic substrate alanyl-alanyl-phenylalanine-7-amido-4-methylcoumarin (AAP-AMC) was covalently conjugated via amide bond formation to chitosan and was shown to facilitate the detection of the serine protease α-chymotrypsin. Systematic investigations established the dependence of hydrogel thickness and substrate loading on the hydrogel preparation conditions, as well as the dependence of the rate of the reaction on the initial enzyme concentration and the loading of AAP-AMC in the hydrogel. The initial release rate of the fluorophore 7-AMC was found to be linear with enzyme concentration and substrate loading and was independent of hydrogel thickness. Under optimized conditions the hydrogel reports the presence of α-chymotrypsin in <5 min with a limit of detection of ≤10 nM. This generic approach, which can be adapted to detect different kinds of enzymes by using appropriate fluorogenic or chromogenic substrates, is highly interesting for targeting the detection of specific pathogenic bacteria, e.g., in wound dressings. PMID:24914451

  7. Biochemical remediation using plant enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfe, N.L.

    1994-06-01

    The transformation of trinitrotoluene (TNT) to environmentally acceptable compounds is achieved through a lab-developed process that uses common aquatic weeds containing a nitroreductase enzyme. This research breakthrough provides an efficient and inexpensive technology for the cleanup of soils contaminated with munitions waste at military installations and other sites.

  8. Thermolysin: a peptide forming enzyme.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A V

    1991-02-01

    Thermolysin, a thermostable endopeptidase, is recognised as a potential peptide bond forming enzyme. The importance of structural properties and its stereospecific nature towards peptide bond formation is described. Thermolysin's use in the keystep of the preparation of an artificial sweetener 'aspartame' is highlighted.

  9. Affordable Care Act and Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Privacy Policy FOIA Plain Writing Act No Fear Act Disclaimers Viewers & Players Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Room 415F U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 200 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, D.C. ...

  10. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schertler, Ronald J.; Gedney, Richard T.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the NASA ACTS program is presented. The key technologies of ACTS include spot beams, on-board baseband processing and routing, wide bandwidth (900 MHz), and Ka-band transponders. The discussion covers system description, current status of the spacecraft development, ACTS earth stations, NGS traffic terminal, USAT, land and aeronautical mobiles, high data rate and propagation receive only terminals, and ACTS experiments program.

  11. The Nurse Reinvestment Act revisited.

    PubMed

    Luther, Ann P

    2007-01-01

    The United States is in the midst of a widely recognized critical nursing shortage. In 2002 the "Nurse Reinvestment Act" was passed with overwhelming bipartisan support in an effort to address this serious public health threat. The Act is due for reauthorization of funding in 2007. This paper provides a brief overview of the programs contained within the Act and describes practical ways in which members of the nursing community can take action to insure renewed support for the Act. PMID:17691598

  12. Enzymes involved in triglyceride hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Taskinen, M R; Kuusi, T

    1987-08-01

    The lipolytic enzymes LPL and HL play important roles in the metabolism of lipoproteins and participate in lipoprotein interconversions. LPL was originally recognized to be the key enzyme in the hydrolysis of chylomicrons and triglyceride, but it also turned out to be one determinant of HDL concentration in plasma. When LPL activity is high, chylomicrons and VLDL are rapidly removed from circulation and a concomitant rise of the HDL2 occurs. In contrast, low LPL activity impedes the removal of triglyceride-rich particles, resulting in the elevation of serum triglycerides and a decrease of HDL (HDL2). Concordant changes of this kind in LPL and HDL2 are induced by many physiological and pathological perturbations. Finally, the operation of LPL is also essential for the conversion of VLDL to LDL. This apparently clear-cut role of LPL in lipoprotein interconversions is contrasted with the enigmatic actions of HL. The enzyme was originally thought to participate in the catalyses of chylomicron and VLDL remnants generated in the LPL reaction. However, substantial in vitro and in vivo data indicate that HL is a key enzyme in the degradation of plasma HDL (HDL2) in a manner which opposes LPL. A scheme is presented for the complementary actions of the two enzymes in plasma HDL metabolism. In addition, recent studies have attributed a role to HL in the catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins, particularly those containing apo E. However, this function becomes clinically important only under conditions where the capacity of the LPL-mediated removal system is exceeded. Such a situation may arise when the input of triglyceride-rich particles (chylomicrons and/or VLDL) is excessive or LPL activity is decreased or absent.

  13. Enzyme-based biosilica and biocalcite: biomaterials for the future in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-09-01

    The oldest animals on Earth, sponges, form both the calcareous and the siliceous matrices of their spicules enzymatically. Until recently, it has been neglected that enzymes play crucial roles during formation of these biominerals. This paradigm shift occurred after the discovery that the enzyme silicatein, which catalyzes the polycondensation of silica, and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which catalyzes the formation of bicarbonate (HCO3(-)/CaCO3), produce solid amorphous bioglass or biocalcite. This suggests that in mammals, biosilica and biocalcite can act anabolically during hydroxyapatite (HA) synthesis and bone formation. Biosilica and biocalcite are thus promising candidates for the fabrication of biomaterials for regenerative medicine. PMID:24908383

  14. Insulin-degrading enzyme: a link between Alzheimer's and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Haque, Rizwanul; Nazir, Aamir

    2014-03-01

    Enzymes play a very vital role in maintaining the homeostasis inside the body. Improper functioning of enzymes is associated with many diseases. Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE), a ubiquitously expressed zinc metalloprotease, is believed to act as a junction point of Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer's disease. Recent studies provide inkling for the use of IDE as a potential target hence the design of its regulators would be a viable approach towards treatment of these diseases. This review provides an overview of the IDE structure and function; a relationship is drawn between IDE, Type 2 Diabetes mellitus and Alzheimer's disease and the approaches that make IDE a potential target, are discussed.

  15. Enzyme-based biosilica and biocalcite: biomaterials for the future in regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaohong; Schröder, Heinz C; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-09-01

    The oldest animals on Earth, sponges, form both the calcareous and the siliceous matrices of their spicules enzymatically. Until recently, it has been neglected that enzymes play crucial roles during formation of these biominerals. This paradigm shift occurred after the discovery that the enzyme silicatein, which catalyzes the polycondensation of silica, and the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA), which catalyzes the formation of bicarbonate (HCO3(-)/CaCO3), produce solid amorphous bioglass or biocalcite. This suggests that in mammals, biosilica and biocalcite can act anabolically during hydroxyapatite (HA) synthesis and bone formation. Biosilica and biocalcite are thus promising candidates for the fabrication of biomaterials for regenerative medicine.

  16. FCC and the Sunshine Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Kenneth

    The Sunshine Act, designed to encourage open meetings to increase public understanding of the governmental decision-making process, went into effect in March 1977. A total of 50 agencies, including the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), are subject to the provisions of the Sunshine Act. The act lists 10 exemptions, any of which can result in…

  17. ACT/SAT College Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stafford, John E.

    1998-01-01

    Reports on findings of a survey designed to discover whether higher education institutions' admission standards accept SAT I or ACT and if there is preference for either, and whether ACT could be submitted in lieu of SAT II subject tests. Eighty-six percent of the reporting schools indicated no preference; 28 schools indicated that the ACT was an…

  18. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  19. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  20. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  1. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  2. 7 CFR 58.436 - Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rennet, pepsin, other milk clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. 58.436 Section 58.436 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... clotting enzymes and flavor enzymes. Enzyme preparations used in the manufacture of cheese shall be...

  3. Discovery of the curcumin metabolic pathway involving a unique enzyme in an intestinal microorganism.

    PubMed

    Hassaninasab, Azam; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Tomita-Yokotani, Kaori; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2011-04-19

    Polyphenol curcumin, a yellow pigment, derived from the rhizomes of a plant (Curcuma longa Linn) is a natural antioxidant exhibiting a variety of pharmacological activities and therapeutic properties. It has long been used as a traditional medicine and as a preservative and coloring agent in foods. Here, curcumin-converting microorganisms were isolated from human feces, the one exhibiting the highest activity being identified as Escherichia coli. We are thus unique in discovering that E. coli was able to act on curcumin. The curcumin-converting enzyme was purified from E. coli and characterized. The native enzyme had a molecular mass of about 82 kDa and consisted of two identical subunits. The enzyme has a narrow substrate spectrum, preferentially acting on curcumin. The microbial metabolism of curcumin by the purified enzyme was found to comprise a two-step reduction, curcumin being converted NADPH-dependently into an intermediate product, dihydrocurcumin, and then the end product, tetrahydrocurcumin. We named this enzyme "NADPH-dependent curcumin/dihydrocurcumin reductase" (CurA). The gene (curA) encoding this enzyme was also identified. A homology search with the BLAST program revealed that a unique enzyme involved in curcumin metabolism belongs to the medium-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. PMID:21467222

  4. Triple acting radial seal

    DOEpatents

    Ebert, Todd A; Carella, John A

    2012-03-13

    A triple acting radial seal used as an interstage seal assembly in a gas turbine engine, where the seal assembly includes an interstage seal support extending from a stationary inner shroud of a vane ring, the interstage seal support includes a larger annular radial inward facing groove in which an outer annular floating seal assembly is secured for radial displacement, and the outer annular floating seal assembly includes a smaller annular radial inward facing groove in which an inner annular floating seal assembly is secured also for radial displacement. A compliant seal is secured to the inner annular floating seal assembly. The outer annular floating seal assembly encapsulates the inner annular floating seal assembly which is made from a very low alpha material in order to reduce thermal stress.

  5. FAST ACTING CURRENT SWITCH

    DOEpatents

    Batzer, T.H.; Cummings, D.B.; Ryan, J.F.

    1962-05-22

    A high-current, fast-acting switch is designed for utilization as a crowbar switch in a high-current circuit such as used to generate the magnetic confinement field of a plasma-confining and heat device, e.g., Pyrotron. The device particularly comprises a cylindrical housing containing two stationary, cylindrical contacts between which a movable contact is bridged to close the switch. The movable contact is actuated by a differential-pressure, airdriven piston assembly also within the housing. To absorb the acceleration (and the shock imparted to the device by the rapidly driven, movable contact), an adjustable air buffer assembly is provided, integrally connected to the movable contact and piston assembly. Various safety locks and circuit-synchronizing means are also provided to permit proper cooperation of the invention and the high-current circuit in which it is installed. (AEC)

  6. Displacement enzyme linked aptamer assay.

    PubMed

    Baldrich, Eva; Acero, Josep Lluis; Reekmans, Gunter; Laureyn, Wim; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2005-08-01

    Immense effort has been placed on the realization of immunoassays exploiting displacement of a suboptimum target, due to the ease of use and applicability to immunochromatographic strips and immunosensors. Most of the efforts reported to date focus on the use of a suboptimal target that is displaceable by the target toward which the antibody has higher affinity. Limited success has been achieved due to difficulty in obtaining suboptimal targets to which the antibody has enough affinity to bind while at the same time having lower levels of affinity in comparison to the target to facilitate displacement. Aptamers are synthetic oligonucleotides specifically selected to bind a certain target. Thanks to their high affinity and sensitivity, aptamers appear as alternative candidates to antibodies for analytical devices and several enzyme-linked aptamer assays and aptasensors have been reported. Aptamers, in contrast to antibodies, require the formation of a three-dimensional structure for target binding and can thus be anticipated to have a much higher affinity for binding its target rather than a modified form of the target (e.g., enzyme-labeled target). This phenomenon can be exploited for the development of a displacement assay, using enzyme-labeled target as a suboptimal displaceable molecule. Here, we report the first demonstration of the exploitation of an aptamer in an extremely rapid and highly sensitive displacement assay. Surface plasmon resonance studies demonstrated the thrombin-binding aptamer to have a lower affinity for enzyme-labeled thrombin than unmodified thrombin, with respective K(D) of 1.1 x 10(-8) and 2.9 x 10(-9) M. The assay is extremely rapid, requiring only 10 min for completion, and exhibits a detection limit lower than that obtainable with competitive enzyme-linked aptamer assays and comparable to that of hybrid aptamer-antibody assays. Optimal storage conditions for precoated microtiter plates (consisting of coated aptamer and captured

  7. EzCatDB: the enzyme reaction database, 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Nozomi; Nakayama, Naoko; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Fukuie, Masaru; Yokota, Kiyonobu; Doi, Takuo; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Tomii, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    The EzCatDB database (http://ezcatdb.cbrc.jp/EzCatDB/) has emphasized manual classification of enzyme reactions from the viewpoints of enzyme active-site structures and their catalytic mechanisms based on literature information, amino acid sequences of enzymes (UniProtKB) and the corresponding tertiary structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Reaction types such as hydrolysis, transfer, addition, elimination, isomerization, hydride transfer and electron transfer have been included in the reaction classification, RLCP. This database includes information related to ligand molecules on the enzyme structures in the PDB data, classified in terms of cofactors, substrates, products and intermediates, which are also necessary to elucidate the catalytic mechanisms. Recently, the database system was updated. The 3D structures of active sites for each PDB entry can be viewed using Jmol or Rasmol software. Moreover, sequence search systems of two types were developed for the EzCatDB database: EzCat-BLAST and EzCat-FORTE. EzCat-BLAST is suitable for quick searches, adopting the BLAST algorithm, whereas EzCat-FORTE is more suitable for detecting remote homologues, adopting the algorithm for FORTE protein structure prediction software. Another system, EzMetAct, is also available to searching for major active-site structures in EzCatDB, for which PDB-formatted queries can be searched.

  8. EzCatDB: the enzyme reaction database, 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Nagano, Nozomi; Nakayama, Naoko; Ikeda, Kazuyoshi; Fukuie, Masaru; Yokota, Kiyonobu; Doi, Takuo; Kato, Tsuyoshi; Tomii, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    The EzCatDB database (http://ezcatdb.cbrc.jp/EzCatDB/) has emphasized manual classification of enzyme reactions from the viewpoints of enzyme active-site structures and their catalytic mechanisms based on literature information, amino acid sequences of enzymes (UniProtKB) and the corresponding tertiary structures from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). Reaction types such as hydrolysis, transfer, addition, elimination, isomerization, hydride transfer and electron transfer have been included in the reaction classification, RLCP. This database includes information related to ligand molecules on the enzyme structures in the PDB data, classified in terms of cofactors, substrates, products and intermediates, which are also necessary to elucidate the catalytic mechanisms. Recently, the database system was updated. The 3D structures of active sites for each PDB entry can be viewed using Jmol or Rasmol software. Moreover, sequence search systems of two types were developed for the EzCatDB database: EzCat-BLAST and EzCat-FORTE. EzCat-BLAST is suitable for quick searches, adopting the BLAST algorithm, whereas EzCat-FORTE is more suitable for detecting remote homologues, adopting the algorithm for FORTE protein structure prediction software. Another system, EzMetAct, is also available to searching for major active-site structures in EzCatDB, for which PDB-formatted queries can be searched. PMID:25324316

  9. Quantitative comparison of catalytic mechanisms and overall reactions in convergently evolved enzymes: implications for classification of enzyme function.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, Daniel E; Yera, Emmanuel R; Mitchell, John B O; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2010-03-12

    Functionally analogous enzymes are those that catalyze similar reactions on similar substrates but do not share common ancestry, providing a window on the different structural strategies nature has used to evolve required catalysts. Identification and use of this information to improve reaction classification and computational annotation of enzymes newly discovered in the genome projects would benefit from systematic determination of reaction similarities. Here, we quantified similarity in bond changes for overall reactions and catalytic mechanisms for 95 pairs of functionally analogous enzymes (non-homologous enzymes with identical first three numbers of their EC codes) from the MACiE database. Similarity of overall reactions was computed by comparing the sets of bond changes in the transformations from substrates to products. For similarity of mechanisms, sets of bond changes occurring in each mechanistic step were compared; these similarities were then used to guide global and local alignments of mechanistic steps. Using this metric, only 44% of pairs of functionally analogous enzymes in the dataset had significantly similar overall reactions. For these enzymes, convergence to the same mechanism occurred in 33% of cases, with most pairs having at least one identical mechanistic step. Using our metric, overall reaction similarity serves as an upper bound for mechanistic similarity in functional analogs. For example, the four carbon-oxygen lyases acting on phosphates (EC 4.2.3) show neither significant overall reaction similarity nor significant mechanistic similarity. By contrast, the three carboxylic-ester hydrolases (EC 3.1.1) catalyze overall reactions with identical bond changes and have converged to almost identical mechanisms. The large proportion of enzyme pairs that do not show significant overall reaction similarity (56%) suggests that at least for the functionally analogous enzymes studied here, more stringent criteria could be used to refine

  10. Patterns of diversity of citric acid cycle enzymes.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, P D

    1987-01-01

    The citric acid cycle performs a dual role in cell metabolism, acting as a source of both 'energy' and biosynthetic starting materials. The widespread occurrence of the cycle throughout Nature is an excellent example of the unity of biochemistry, but closer examination reveals that there is considerable diversity in the citric acid cycle of different organisms with respect to metabolic role, molecular enzymology and mode of regulation. Two enzymes of the cycle--citrate synthase and succinate thiokinase--have been found to exhibit particularly striking patterns of diversity in structure and catalytic and regulatory function. Some of these patterns show a correlation with the taxonomic groupings of the organisms and with their physiological characteristics. Comparative enzyme studies have a contribution to make to an ultimate understanding of the cycle and its cellular operation, and there are substantial benefits to be gained from interactive studies on both prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems.

  11. Research progress of nanoparticles as enzyme mimetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, XiaoNa; Liu, JianBo; Hou, Shuai; Wen, Tao; Liu, WenQi; Zhang, Ke; He, WeiWei; Ji, YingLu; Ren, HongXuan; Wang, Qi; Wu, XiaoChun

    2011-10-01

    Natural enzymes as biological catalysts possess remarkable advantages, especially their highly efficient and selective catalysis under mild conditions. However, most natural enzymes are proteins, thus exhibiting an inherent low durability to harsh reaction conditions. Artificial enzyme mimetics have been pursued extensively to avoid this drawback. Quite recently, some inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) have been found to exhibit unique enzyme mimetics. In addition, their much higher stability overcomes the inherent disadvantage of natural enzymes. Furthermore, easy mass-production and low cost endow them more benefits. As a new member of artificial enzyme mimetics, they have received intense attention. In this review article, major progress in this field is summarized and future perspectives are highlighted.

  12. Enzyme dynamics from NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Arthur G

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond-nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond-millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  13. Improvements of biomass deconstruction enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Sale, K. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and DSM Innovation, Inc. collaborated on the investigation of the structure and function of cellulases from thermophilic fungi. Sandia's role was to use its expertise in protein structure determination and X-ray crystallography to solve the structure of these enzymes in their native state and in their substrate and product bound states. Sandia was also tasked to work with DSM to use the newly solved structure to, using computational approaches, analyze enzyme interactions with both bound substrate and bound product; the goal being to develop approaches for rationally designing improved cellulases for biomass deconstruction. We solved the structures of five cellulases from thermophilic fungi. Several of these were also solved with bound substrate/product, which allowed us to predict mutations that might enhance activity and stability.

  14. Enzyme Dynamics from NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Conspectus Biological activities of enzymes, including regulation or coordination of mechanistic stages preceding or following the chemical step, may depend upon kinetic or equilibrium changes in protein conformations. Exchange of more open or flexible conformational states with more closed or constrained states can influence inhibition, allosteric regulation, substrate recognition, formation of the Michaelis complex, side reactions, and product release. NMR spectroscopy has long been applied to the study of conformational dynamic processes in enzymes because these phenomena can be characterized over multiple time scales with atomic site resolution. Laboratory-frame spin-relaxation measurements, sensitive to reorientational motions on picosecond–nanosecond time scales, and rotating-frame relaxation-dispersion measurements, sensitive to chemical exchange processes on microsecond–millisecond time scales, provide information on both conformational distributions and kinetics. This Account reviews NMR spin relaxation studies of the enzymes ribonuclease HI from mesophilic (Escherichia coli) and thermophilic (Thermus thermophilus) bacteria, E. coli AlkB, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae triosephosphate isomerase to illustrate the contributions of conformational flexibility and dynamics to diverse steps in enzyme mechanism. Spin relaxation measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the bacterial ribonuclease H enzymes show that the handle region, one of three loop regions that interact with substrates, interconverts between two conformations. Comparison of these conformations with the structure of the complex between Homo sapiens ribonuclease H and a DNA:RNA substrate suggests that the more closed state is inhibitory to binding. The large population of the closed conformation in T. thermophilus ribonuclease H contributes to the increased Michaelis constant compared with the E. coli enzyme. NMR spin relaxation and fluorescence spectroscopy have characterized a

  15. Inhibitory zinc sites in enzymes.

    PubMed

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Several pathways increase the concentrations of cellular free zinc(II) ions. Such fluctuations suggest that zinc(II) ions are signalling ions used for the regulation of proteins. One function is the inhibition of enzymes. It is quite common that enzymes bind zinc(II) ions with micro- or nanomolar affinities in their active sites that contain catalytic dyads or triads with a combination of glutamate (aspartate), histidine and cysteine residues, which are all typical zinc-binding ligands. However, for such binding to be physiologically significant, the binding constants must be compatible with the cellular availability of zinc(II) ions. The affinity of inhibitory zinc(II) ions for receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase β is particularly high (K i = 21 pM, pH 7.4), indicating that some enzymes bind zinc almost as strongly as zinc metalloenzymes. The competitive pattern of zinc inhibition for this phosphatase implicates its active site cysteine and nearby residues in the coordination of zinc. Quantitative biophysical data on both affinities of proteins for zinc and cellular zinc(II) ion concentrations provide the basis for examining the physiological significance of inhibitory zinc-binding sites in proteins and the role of zinc(II) ions in cellular signalling. Regulatory functions of zinc(II) ions add a significant level of complexity to biological control of metabolism and signal transduction and embody a new paradigm for the role of transition metal ions in cell biology.

  16. Immobilised enzymes in biorenewables production.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Maurice C R; Steunenberg, Peter; Scott, Elinor L; Zuilhof, Han; Sanders, Johan P M

    2013-08-01

    Oils, fats, carbohydrates, lignin, and amino acids are all important raw materials for the production of biorenewables. These compounds already play an important role in everyday life in the form of wood, fabrics, starch, paper and rubber. Enzymatic reactions do, in principle, allow the transformation of these raw materials into biorenewables under mild and sustainable conditions. There are a few examples of processes using immobilised enzymes that are already applied on an industrial scale, such as the production of High-Fructose Corn Syrup, but these are still rather rare. Fortunately, there is a rapid expansion in the research efforts that try to improve this, driven by a combination of economic and ecological reasons. This review focusses on those efforts, by looking at attempts to use fatty acids, carbohydrates, proteins and lignin (and their building blocks), as substrates in the synthesis of biorenewables using immobilised enzymes. Therefore, many examples (390 references) from the recent literature are discussed, in which we look both at the specific reactions as well as to the methods of immobilisation of the enzymes, as the latter are shown to be a crucial factor with respect to stability and reuse. The applications of the renewables produced in this way range from building blocks for the pharmaceutical and polymer industry, transport fuels, to additives for the food industry. A critical evaluation of the relevant factors that need to be improved for large-scale use of these examples is presented in the outlook of this review. PMID:23519171

  17. Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fejerskov, Betina; Zelikin, Alexander N.

    2012-01-01

    In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT) as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s) into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol), β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose – dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering. PMID:23152927

  18. Immobilised enzymes in biorenewables production.

    PubMed

    Franssen, Maurice C R; Steunenberg, Peter; Scott, Elinor L; Zuilhof, Han; Sanders, Johan P M

    2013-08-01

    Oils, fats, carbohydrates, lignin, and amino acids are all important raw materials for the production of biorenewables. These compounds already play an important role in everyday life in the form of wood, fabrics, starch, paper and rubber. Enzymatic reactions do, in principle, allow the transformation of these raw materials into biorenewables under mild and sustainable conditions. There are a few examples of processes using immobilised enzymes that are already applied on an industrial scale, such as the production of High-Fructose Corn Syrup, but these are still rather rare. Fortunately, there is a rapid expansion in the research efforts that try to improve this, driven by a combination of economic and ecological reasons. This review focusses on those efforts, by looking at attempts to use fatty acids, carbohydrates, proteins and lignin (and their building blocks), as substrates in the synthesis of biorenewables using immobilised enzymes. Therefore, many examples (390 references) from the recent literature are discussed, in which we look both at the specific reactions as well as to the methods of immobilisation of the enzymes, as the latter are shown to be a crucial factor with respect to stability and reuse. The applications of the renewables produced in this way range from building blocks for the pharmaceutical and polymer industry, transport fuels, to additives for the food industry. A critical evaluation of the relevant factors that need to be improved for large-scale use of these examples is presented in the outlook of this review.

  19. Double acting bit holder

    DOEpatents

    Morrell, Roger J.; Larson, David A.; Ruzzi, Peter L.

    1994-01-01

    A double acting bit holder that permits bits held in it to be resharpened during cutting action to increase energy efficiency by reducing the amount of small chips produced. The holder consist of: a stationary base portion capable of being fixed to a cutter head of an excavation machine and having an integral extension therefrom with a bore hole therethrough to accommodate a pin shaft; a movable portion coextensive with the base having a pin shaft integrally extending therefrom that is insertable in the bore hole of the base member to permit the moveable portion to rotate about the axis of the pin shaft; a recess in the movable portion of the holder to accommodate a shank of a bit; and a biased spring disposed in adjoining openings in the base and moveable portions of the holder to permit the moveable portion to pivot around the pin shaft during cutting action of a bit fixed in a turret to allow front, mid and back positions of the bit during cutting to lessen creation of small chip amounts and resharpen the bit during excavation use.

  20. Acting to gain information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenchein, Stanley J.; Burns, J. Brian; Chapman, David; Kaelbling, Leslie P.; Kahn, Philip; Nishihara, H. Keith; Turk, Matthew

    1993-01-01

    This report is concerned with agents that act to gain information. In previous work, we developed agent models combining qualitative modeling with real-time control. That work, however, focused primarily on actions that affect physical states of the environment. The current study extends that work by explicitly considering problems of active information-gathering and by exploring specialized aspects of information-gathering in computational perception, learning, and language. In our theoretical investigations, we analyzed agents into their perceptual and action components and identified these with elements of a state-machine model of control. The mathematical properties of each was developed in isolation and interactions were then studied. We considered the complexity dimension and the uncertainty dimension and related these to intelligent-agent design issues. We also explored active information gathering in visual processing. Working within the active vision paradigm, we developed a concept of 'minimal meaningful measurements' suitable for demand-driven vision. We then developed and tested an architecture for ongoing recognition and interpretation of visual information. In the area of information gathering through learning, we explored techniques for coping with combinatorial complexity. We also explored information gathering through explicit linguistic action by considering the nature of conversational rules, coordination, and situated communication behavior.

  1. Enzymes and other agents that enhance cell wall extensibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Polysaccharides and proteins are secreted to the inner surface of the growing cell wall, where they assemble into a network that is mechanically strong, yet remains extensible until the cells cease growth. This review focuses on the agents that directly or indirectly enhance the extensibility properties of growing walls. The properties of expansins, endoglucanases, and xyloglucan transglycosylases are reviewed and their postulated roles in modulating wall extensibility are evaluated. A summary model for wall extension is presented, in which expansin is a primary agent of wall extension, whereas endoglucanases, xyloglucan endotransglycosylase, and other enzymes that alter wall structure act secondarily to modulate expansin action.

  2. A DNA tweezer-actuated enzyme nanoreactor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Minghui; Fu, Jinglin; Hejesen, Christian; Yang, Yuhe; Woodbury, Neal W; Gothelf, Kurt; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    The functions of regulatory enzymes are essential to modulating cellular pathways. Here we report a tweezer-like DNA nanodevice to actuate the activity of an enzyme/cofactor pair. A dehydrogenase and NAD(+) cofactor are attached to different arms of the DNA tweezer structure and actuation of enzymatic function is achieved by switching the tweezers between open and closed states. The enzyme/cofactor pair is spatially separated in the open state with inhibited enzyme function, whereas in the closed state, enzyme is activated by the close proximity of the two molecules. The conformational state of the DNA tweezer is controlled by the addition of specific oligonucleotides that serve as the thermodynamic driver (fuel) to trigger the change. Using this approach, several cycles of externally controlled enzyme inhibition and activation are successfully demonstrated. This principle of responsive enzyme nanodevices may be used to regulate other types of enzymes and to introduce feedback or feed-forward control loops.

  3. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimi...

  4. Chemistry and Flatulence: An Introductory Enzyme Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardee, John R.; Montgomery, Tina M.; Jones, Wray H.

    2000-04-01

    An inexpensive introductory-level enzyme experiment was developed using raffinose family sugars extracted from green split peas as a substrate and the enzymes alpha-galactosidase and sucrase found in Beano. The reaction studied was the hydrolysis of raffinose family sugars to galactose, glucose, and fructose, and the reaction rate was determined using a retail glucometer to measure the concentration of glucose. Results are given on the effect of substrate concentration, enzyme concentration, temperature, and heavy metals on enzyme activity.

  5. An isozyme of earthworm serine proteases acts on hydrolysis of triacylglycerol.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Nobuyoshi; Sugimoto, Manabu; Tsuboi, Sadao; Tsuji, Hideaki; Ishihara, Kohji

    2005-10-01

    An enzyme catalyzing the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol was purified from an earthworm. The N-terminal amino acid sequence and the catalytic function of the purified enzyme were identical to those of Isozyme C, an isozyme of the earthworm-serine proteases. No other lipase proteins were found in the earthworm cells. The isozyme might act on the hydrolysis of triacylglycerol as well as the protein decomposition.

  6. Structural Studies of Bacterial Enzymes and their Relation to Antibiotic Resistance Mechanisms - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect

    Maltz, Lauren

    2015-08-27

    By using protein crystallography and X-ray diffraction, structures of bacterial enzymes were solved to gain a better understanding of how enzymatic modification acts as an antibacterial resistance mechanism. Aminoglycoside phosphotransferases (APHs) are one of three aminoglycoside modifying enzymes that confer resistance to the aminoglycoside antibiotics via enzymatic modification, rendering many drugs obsolete. Specifically, the APH(2”) family vary in their substrate specificities and also in their preference for the phosphate donor (ADP versus GDP). By solving the structures of members of the APH(2”) family of enzymes, we can see how domain movements are important to their substrate specificity. Our structure of the ternary complex of APH(2”)-IIIa with GDP and kanamycin, when compared to the known structures of APH(2”)-IVa, reveals that there are real physical differences between these two enzymes, a structural finding that explains why the two enzymes differ in their preferences for certain aminoglycosides. Another important group of bacterial resistance enzymes are the Class D β- lactamases. Oxacillinase carbapenemases (OXAs) are part of this enzyme class and have begun to confer resistance to ‘last resort’ drugs, most notably carbapenems. Our structure of OXA-143 shows that the conformational flexibility of a conserved hydrophobic residue in the active site (Val130) serves to control the entry of a transient water molecule responsible for a key step in the enzyme’s mechanism. Our results provide insight into the structural mechanisms of these two different enzymes

  7. [Euthanasia and medical act].

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    Right to life -as the prohibition of intentionally and arbitrarily taking life, even with authorization of the concerned one- is an internationally recognized right. In many countries, debate regarding euthanasia is more centered in its convenience, social acceptability and how it is regulated, than in its substantial legitimacy. Some argue that euthanasia should be included as part of clinical practice of health professionals, grounded on individual's autonomy claims-everyone having the liberty to choose how to live and how to die. Against this, others sustain that life has a higher value than autonomy, exercising autonomy without respecting the right to life would become a serious moral and social problem. Likewise, euthanasia supporters some-times claim a 'right to live with dignity', which must be understood as a personal obligation, referred more to the ethical than to the strictly legal sphere. In countries where it is already legalized, euthanasia practice has extended to cases where it is not the patient who requests this but the family or some healthcare professional, or even the legal system-when they think that the patient is living in a condition which is not worthy to live. Generalization of euthanasia possibly will end in affecting those who need more care, such as elder, chronically ill or dying people, damaging severely personal basic rights. Nature, purpose and tradition of medicine rule out the practice of euthanasia, which ought not be considered a medical act or legitimately compulsory for physicians. Today's medicine counts with effective treatments for pain and suffering, such as palliative care, including sedative therapy, which best preserves persons dignity and keeps safe the ethos of the medical profession.

  8. Microorganisms detected by enzyme-catalyzed reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vango, S. P.; Weetall, H. H.; Weliky, N.

    1966-01-01

    Enzymes detect the presence of microorganisms in soils. The enzyme lysozymi is used to release the enzyme catalase from the microorganisms in a soil sample. The catalase catalyzes the decomposition of added hydrogen peroxide to produce oxygen which is detected manometrically. The partial pressure of the oxygen serves as an index of the samples bacteria content.

  9. Determining Enzyme Activity by Radial Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Bill D.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses advantages of radial diffusion assay in determining presence of enzyme and/or rough approximation of amount of enzyme activities. Procedures are included for the preparation of starch-agar plates, and the application and determination of enzyme. Techniques using plant materials (homogenates, tissues, ungerminated embryos, and seedlings)…

  10. 21 CFR 864.4400 - Enzyme preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enzyme preparations. 864.4400 Section 864.4400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4400 Enzyme preparations. (a) Identification. Enzyme preparations are products that are used in the...

  11. 21 CFR 864.4400 - Enzyme preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enzyme preparations. 864.4400 Section 864.4400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4400 Enzyme preparations. (a) Identification. Enzyme preparations are products that are used in the...

  12. 21 CFR 864.4400 - Enzyme preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enzyme preparations. 864.4400 Section 864.4400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4400 Enzyme preparations. (a) Identification. Enzyme preparations are products that are used in the...

  13. 21 CFR 864.4400 - Enzyme preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enzyme preparations. 864.4400 Section 864.4400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4400 Enzyme preparations. (a) Identification. Enzyme preparations are products that are used in the...

  14. 21 CFR 864.4400 - Enzyme preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enzyme preparations. 864.4400 Section 864.4400...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Specimen Preparation Reagents § 864.4400 Enzyme preparations. (a) Identification. Enzyme preparations are products that are used in the...

  15. Digestive Enzyme Supplementation in Gastrointestinal Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ianiro, Gianluca; Pecere, Silvia; Giorgio, Valentina; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Cammarota, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background: Digestive enzymes are able to break down proteins and carbohydrates and lipids, and their supplementation may play a role in the management of digestive disorders, from lactose intolerance to cystic fibrosis. To date, several formulations of digestive enzymes are available on the market, being different each other in terms of enzyme type, source and origin, and dosage. Methods: This review, performed through a non-systematic search of the available literature, will provide an overview of the current knowledge of digestive enzyme supplementation in gastrointestinal disorders, discussion of the use of pancreatic enzymes, lactase (β-galactosidase) and conjugated bile acids, and also exploring the future perspective of digestive enzyme supplementation. Results: Currently, the animal-derived enzymes represent an established standard of care, however the growing study of plant-based and microbe-derived enzymes offers great promise in the advancement of digestive enzyme therapy. Conclusion: New frontiers of enzyme replacement are being evaluated also in the treatment of diseases not specifically related to enzyme deficiency, whereas the combination of different enzymes might constitute an intriguing therapeutic option in the future. PMID:26806042

  16. Immobilization of Enzymes in Polymer Supports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conlon, Hugh D.; Walt, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Two experiments in which an enzyme is immobilized onto a polymeric support are described. The experiments (which also demonstrate two different polymer preparations) involve: (1) entrapping an enzyme in an acrylamide polymer; and (2) reacting the amino groups on the enzyme's (esterase) lysine residues with an activated polymer. (JN)

  17. Single-molecule enzyme kinetics in the presence of inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saha, Soma; Sinha, Antara; Dua, Arti

    2012-07-28

    Recent studies in single-molecule enzyme kinetics reveal that the turnover statistics of a single enzyme is governed by the waiting time distribution that decays as mono-exponential at low substrate concentration and multi-exponential at high substrate concentration. The multi-exponentiality arises due to protein conformational fluctuations, which act on the time scale longer than or comparable to the catalytic reaction step, thereby inducing temporal fluctuations in the catalytic rate resulting in dynamic disorder. In this work, we study the turnover statistics of a single enzyme in the presence of inhibitors to show that the multi-exponentiality in the waiting time distribution can arise even when protein conformational fluctuations do not influence the catalytic rate. From the Michaelis-Menten mechanism of inhibited enzymes, we derive exact expressions for the waiting time distribution for competitive, uncompetitive, and mixed inhibitions to quantitatively show that the presence of inhibitors can induce dynamic disorder in all three modes of inhibitions resulting in temporal fluctuations in the reaction rate. In the presence of inhibitors, dynamic disorder arises due to transitions between active and inhibited states of enzymes, which occur on time scale longer than or comparable to the catalytic step. In this limit, the randomness parameter (dimensionless variance) is greater than unity indicating the presence of dynamic disorder in all three modes of inhibitions. In the opposite limit, when the time scale of the catalytic step is longer than the time scale of transitions between active and inhibited enzymatic states, the randomness parameter is unity, implying no dynamic disorder in the reaction pathway.

  18. A DNA enzyme with Mg(2+)-Dependent RNA Phosphoesterase Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA can act as an enzyme in the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester. This is a facile reaction, with an uncatalyzed rate for a typical RNA phosphoester of approx. 10(exp -4)/ min in the presence of 1 mM Pb(OAc)2 at pH 7.0 and 23 C. The Mg(2+) - dependent reaction is more difficult, with an uncatalyzed rate of approx. 10(exp -7)/ min under comparable conditions. Mg(2+) - dependent cleavage has special relevance to biology because it is compatible with intracellular conditions. Using in vitro selection, we sought to develop a family of phosphoester-cleaving DNA enzymes that operate in the presence of various divalent metals, focusing particularly on the Mg(2+) - dependent reaction. Results: We generated a population of greater than 10(exp 13) DNAs containing 40 random nucleotides and carried out repeated rounds of selective amplification, enriching for molecules that cleave a target RNA phosphoester in the presence of 1 mM Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+) or Pb(2+). Examination of individual clones from the Mg(2+) lineage after the sixth round revealed a catalytic motif comprised of a three-stem junction.This motif was partially randomized and subjected to seven additional rounds of selective amplification, yielding catalysts with a rate of 0.01/ min. The optimized DNA catalyst was divided into separate substrate and enzyme domains and shown to have a similar level of activity under multiple turnover conditions. Conclusions: We have generated a Mg(2+) - dependent DNA enzyme that cleaves a target RNA phosphoester with a catalytic rate approx. 10(exp 5) - fold greater than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. This activity is compatible with intracellular conditions, raising the possibility that DNA enzymes might be made to operate in vivo.

  19. 75 FR 63703 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act Regulation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Federal Register, 73 FR 25594, May 7, 2008. The proposed amendments: (1) Waived all copying fees in..., 73 FR 54595, September 22, 2008, certain portions of BGFRS-37 (Electronic Applications) may be exempt... CFR Part 261a Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act Regulation AGENCY: Board of Governors of the...

  20. Antioxidative capacity and enzyme activity in Haematococcus pluvialis cells exposed to superoxide free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianguo; Zhang, Xiaoli; Sun, Yanhong; Lin, Wei

    2010-01-01

    The antioxidative capacity of astaxanthin and enzyme activity of reactive oxygen eliminating enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) were studied in three cell types of Haematococcus pluvialis exposed to high concentrations of a superoxide anion radical (O{2/-}). The results show that defensive enzymes and astaxanthin-related mechanisms were both active in H. pluvialis during exposure to reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as O{2/-}. Astaxanthin reacted with ROS much faster than did the protective enzymes, and had the strongest antioxidative capacity to protect against lipid peroxidation. The defensive mechanisms varied significantly between the three cell types and were related to the level of astaxanthin that had accumulated in those cells. Astaxanthin-enriched red cells had the strongest antioxidative capacity, followed by brown cells, and astaxanthin-deficient green cells. Although there was no significant increase in expression of protective enzymes, the malondialdehyde (MDA) content in red cells was sustained at a low level because of the antioxidative effect of astaxanthin, which quenched O{2/-} before the protective enzymes could act. In green cells, astaxanthin is very low or absent; therefore, scavenging of ROS is inevitably reliant on antioxidative enzymes. Accordingly, in green cells, these enzymes play the leading role in scavenging ROS, and the expression of these enzymes is rapidly increased to reduce excessive ROS. However, because ROS were constantly increased in this study, the enhance enzyme activity in the green cells was not able to repair the ROS damage, leading to elevated MDA content. Of the four defensive enzymes measured in astaxanthin-deficient green cells, SOD eliminates O{2/-}, POD eliminates H2O2, which is a by-product of SOD activity, and APX and CAT are then initiated to scavenge excessive ROS.

  1. Serum enzyme activities after cardioversion

    PubMed Central

    Mandecki, Tadeusz; Giec, Leszek; Kargul, Włodzimierz

    1970-01-01

    Serum aspartate aminotransferase (SGOT), alanine aminotransferase (SGPT), creatinine phosphokinase (CPK), and butyric acid dehydrogenase (BDH) were determined in 94 patients before, 1½ hours, and 24 hours after cardioversion. An increase in SGOT and CPK activity was observed 24 hours after cardioversion in the group of patients treated with two or more DC shocks. The importance of this enzyme activity increase is discussed. It originates in the skeletal muscles and probably has no clinical significance, as no other signs of myocardial damage were observed simultaneously in a large group of patients. PMID:5470040

  2. Stabilization of enzymes through encapsulation in liposomes.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid vesicle (liposome) offers an aqueous compartment surrounded by lipid bilayer membranes. Various enzyme molecules were reported to be encapsulated in liposomes. The liposomal enzyme shows peculiar catalytic activity and selectivity to the substrate in the bulk liquid, which are predominantly derived from the substrate permeation resistance through the membrane. We reported that the quaternary structure of bovine liver catalase and alcohol dehydrogenase was stabilized in liposomes through their interaction with lipid membranes. The method and condition for preparing the enzyme-containing liposomes with well-defined size, lipid composition, and enzyme content are of particular importance, because these properties dominate the catalytic performance and stability of the liposomal enzymes. PMID:20865384

  3. Laboratory evolution of catabolic enzymes and pathways.

    PubMed

    Parales, Rebecca E; Ditty, Jayna L

    2005-06-01

    The laboratory evolution of environmentally relevant enzymes and proteins has resulted in the generation of optimized and stabilized enzymes, as well as enzymes with activity against new substrates. Numerous methods, including random mutagenesis, site-directed mutagenesis and DNA shuffling, have been widely used to generate variants of existing enzymes. These evolved catabolic enzymes have application for improving biodegradation pathways, generating engineered pathways for the degradation of particularly recalcitrant compounds, and for the development of biocatalytic processes to produce useful compounds. Regulatory proteins associated with catabolic pathways have been utilized to generate biosensors for the detection of bioavailable concentrations of environmentally relevant chemicals.

  4. Enzyme Analysis to Determine Glucose Content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, Charles; Ward, Robert E.

    Enzyme analysis is used for many purposes in food science and technology. Enzyme activity is used to indicate adequate processing, to assess enzyme preparations, and to measure constituents of foods that are enzyme substrates. In this experiment, the glucose content of corn syrup solids is determined using the enzymes, glucose oxidase and peroxidase. Glucose oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of glucose to form hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which then reacts with a dye in the presence of peroxidase to give a stable colored product.

  5. Direct Electron Transfer of Enzymes in a Biologically Assembled Conductive Nanomesh Enzyme Platform.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Ki-Young; Song, Yong-Won; Choi, Won Kook; Chang, Joonyeon; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-02-24

    Nondestructive assembly of a nanostructured enzyme platform is developed in combination of the specific biomolecular attraction and electrostatic coupling for highly efficient direct electron transfer (DET) of enzymes with unprecedented applicability and versatility. The biologically assembled conductive nanomesh enzyme platform enables DET-based flexible integrated biosensors and DET of eight different enzyme with various catalytic activities.

  6. 7 CFR 1170.2 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.2 Act. Act means the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, 7 U.S.C. 1621 et seq., as amended by the Dairy Market Enhancement Act...

  7. 7 CFR 1170.2 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.2 Act. Act means the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, 7 U.S.C. 1621 et seq., as amended by the Dairy Market Enhancement Act...

  8. 7 CFR 1170.2 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.2 Act. Act means the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, 7 U.S.C. 1621 et seq., as amended by the Dairy Market Enhancement Act...

  9. Implementing the Amended FOI Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClain, Wallis

    The Freedom of Information Act amendments, which became effective in February 1975, have so far yielded mixed results. This report provides an account of how different federal agencies are implementing this amended statute. Among the topics discussed are modifications of the original 1966 Freedom of Information Act, which were made in the attempt…

  10. Online Challenge versus Offline ACT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peckham, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    This article compares essays written in response to the ACT Essay prompt and a locally developed prompt used for placement. The two writing situations differ by time and genre: the ACT Essay is timed and argumentative; the locally developed is untimed and explanatory. The article analyzes the differences in student performance and predictive…

  11. Education Leaders Applaud ATTAIN Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article talks about Achievement Through Technology and Innovation (ATTAIN) Act, a bill introduced by Senators Bingaman (D-NM), Burr (R-NC), and Murray (D-WA) and applauded by a coalition of education and industry groups. The proposed ATTAIN Act is similar to its companion in the House (HR 2449), and builds upon the Enhancing Education Through…

  12. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  13. Act of 13 March 1989.

    PubMed

    1989-01-01

    This document contains the text of a 1989 Act of Utah prohibiting surrogate parenthood agreements of any type. Surrogate mothers are the legal mothers of their children, and their husbands are the legal fathers. This Act has no impact on adoption laws. PMID:12344464

  14. 76 FR 59073 - Privacy Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 32 CFR Part 1901 Privacy Act AGENCY: Central Intelligence Agency. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: Consistent with the Privacy Act (PA), the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has undertaken and completed...

  15. Biomass Program Recovery Act Factsheet

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    The Biomass Program has awarded about $718 million in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (Recovery Act) funds. The projects the Program is supporting are intended to: Accelerate advanced biofuels research, development, and demonstration; Speed the deployment and commercialization of advanced biofuels and bioproducts; Further the U.S. bioindustry through market transformation and creating or saving a range of jobs.

  16. Virulence-Associated Enzymes of Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Fausto; Wolf, Julie M.

    2015-01-01

    Enzymes play key roles in fungal pathogenesis. Manipulation of enzyme expression or activity can significantly alter the infection process, and enzyme expression profiles can be a hallmark of disease. Hence, enzymes are worthy targets for better understanding pathogenesis and identifying new options for combatting fungal infections. Advances in genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, and mass spectrometry have enabled the identification and characterization of new fungal enzymes. This review focuses on recent developments in the virulence-associated enzymes from Cryptococcus neoformans. The enzymatic suite of C. neoformans has evolved for environmental survival, but several of these enzymes play a dual role in colonizing the mammalian host. We also discuss new therapeutic and diagnostic strategies that could be based on the underlying enzymology. PMID:26453651

  17. Direct-acting fibrinolytic enzymes in shark cartilage extract: potential therapeutic role in vascular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ratel, David; Glazier, Geneviève; Provençal, Mathieu; Boivin, Dominique; Beaulieu, Edith; Gingras, Denis; Béliveau, Richard

    2005-01-01

    Fibrinogen and fibrin are molecules with overlapping roles in blood clotting, fibrinolysis, wound healing, inflammation, matrix and cellular interactions and neoplasia. There is currently much interest in the possible use of fibrinolytic agents in human therapeutics. In this study, we report the presence of fibrinolytic activities in shark cartilage extract (SCE). In vitro, SCE at 100 microg/ml completely degraded fibrin gel in an aprotinin-insensitive manner, suggesting a non-plasmin molecular nature. SCE was able to cleave all chains of fibrinogen and fibrin and the cleavage was completely inhibited by 1,10-phenanthroline, suggesting an essential role for metalloprotease(s) in this process. Using fibrinogen zymography, we show that SCE contains two plasmin-independent fibrinolytic activities and that these activities are correlated with the presence of 58 and 62 kDa proteases in the extract. SCE-fibrinolytic activities are inhibited by dithiothreitol, suggesting that disulfide bonds are necessary for the protease structure. Finally, using thromboelastography, SCE markedly induced retraction of human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) clot, this process being completely abolished by 1,10-phenanthroline. These data suggest the presence of novel non-plasmin fibrinolytic activities within SCE. This extract may thus represent a potential source of new therapeutic molecules to prevent and treat vaso-occlusive and thromboembolic disorders. PMID:15567466

  18. Acting to let someone die.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2015-02-01

    This paper examines the recent prominent view in medical ethics that withdrawing life-sustaining treatment (LST) is an act of killing. I trace this view to the rejection of the traditional claim that withdrawing LST is an omission rather than an act. Although that traditional claim is not as problematic as this recent prominent view suggests, my main claim is that even if we accepted that withdrawing LST should be classified as an act rather than as an omission, it could still be classified as letting die rather than killing. Even though omissions are contrasted with acts, letting die need not be, for one can let die by means of acts. The remainder of the paper is devoted to establishing this claim and addresses certain objections to it.

  19. Extracellular functions of glycolytic enzymes of parasites: unpredicted use of ancient proteins.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Arreaza, Amaranta; Acosta, Hector; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Concepción, Juan Luis; Michels, Paul A M; Avilán, Luisana

    2014-02-01

    In addition of their usual intracellular localization where they are involved in catalyzing reactions of carbohydrate and energy metabolism by glycolysis, multiple studies have shown that glycolytic enzymes of many organisms, but notably pathogens, can also be present extracellularly. In the case of parasitic protists and helminths, they can be found either secreted or attached to the surface of the parasites. At these extracellular localizations, these enzymes have been shown to perform additional, very different so-called "moonlighting" functions, such as acting as ligands for a variety of components of the host. Due to this recognition, different extracellular glycolytic enzymes participate in various important parasite-host interactions such as adherence and invasion of parasites, modulation of the host's immune and haemostatic systems, promotion of angiogenesis, and acquisition of specific nutrients by the parasites. Accordingly, extracellular glycolytic enzymes are important for the invasion of the parasites and their establishment in the host, and in determining their virulence.

  20. Discovery of a novel enzyme, isonitrile hydratase, involved in nitrogen-carbon triple bond cleavage.

    PubMed

    Goda, M; Hashimoto, Y; Shimizu, S; Kobayashi, M

    2001-06-29

    Isonitrile containing an N triple bond C triple bond was degraded by microorganism sp. N19-2, which was isolated from soil through a 2-month acclimatization culture in the presence of this compound. The isonitrile-degrading microorganism was identified as Pseudomonas putida. The microbial degradation was found to proceed through an enzymatic reaction, the isonitrile being hydrated to the corresponding N-substituted formamide. The enzyme, named isonitrile hydratase, was purified and characterized. The native enzyme had a molecular mass of about 59 kDa and consisted of two identical subunits. The enzyme stoichiometrically catalyzed the hydration of cyclohexyl isocyanide (an isonitrile) to N-cyclohexylformamide, but no formation of other compounds was detected. The apparent K(m) value for cyclohexyl isocyanide was 16.2 mm. Although the enzyme acted on various isonitriles, no nitriles or amides were accepted as substrates.

  1. 76 FR 14439 - No FEAR Act Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ... TRANSPARENCY BOARD No FEAR Act Notice AGENCY: Recovery Accountability and Transparency Board. ACTION: Notice... and Retaliation Act (No FEAR Act or Act), as implemented by Office of Personnel Management (OPM... No FEAR Act. See Public Law 107-174, codified at 5 U.S.C. 2301 note. One purpose of the Act is...

  2. 3D imaging of enzymes working in situ.

    PubMed

    Jamme, F; Bourquin, D; Tawil, G; Viksø-Nielsen, A; Buléon, A; Réfrégiers, M

    2014-06-01

    Today, development of slowly digestible food with positive health impact and production of biofuels is a matter of intense research. The latter is achieved via enzymatic hydrolysis of starch or biomass such as lignocellulose. Free label imaging, using UV autofluorescence, provides a great tool to follow one single enzyme when acting on a non-UV-fluorescent substrate. In this article, we report synchrotron DUV fluorescence in 3-dimensional imaging to visualize in situ the diffusion of enzymes on solid substrate. The degradation pathway of single starch granules by two amylases optimized for biofuel production and industrial starch hydrolysis was followed by tryptophan autofluorescence (excitation at 280 nm, emission filter at 350 nm). The new setup has been specially designed and developed for a 3D representation of the enzyme-substrate interaction during hydrolysis. Thus, this tool is particularly effective for improving knowledge and understanding of enzymatic hydrolysis of solid substrates such as starch and lignocellulosic biomass. It could open up the way to new routes in the field of green chemistry and sustainable development, that is, in biotechnology, biorefining, or biofuels. PMID:24796213

  3. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  4. Enzymes, detergents and skin: facts and fantasies.

    PubMed

    Basketter, D A; English, J S C; Wakelin, S H; White, I R

    2008-06-01

    In their raw state, enzymes of bacterial/fungal origin cause allergic reactions in the lung. Proteolytic enzymes also cause irritation to skin, eyes and the respiratory tract. For 40 years, encapsulated enzymes have been used worldwide in detergent products, especially laundry formulations, and have increasing importance due to biodegradability and functionality at low temperatures, offering environmental benefits. Uniquely to the U.K., for years it has been suggested that the inclusion of enzymes in such products leads to adverse skin reactions, including erythema, pruritus and exacerbation of eczema. In this review, we look at the facts, asking whether there is evidence that the hazards identified for enzymes translate into any risk for consumer health. By considering the actual exposures in consumer use and exaggerated product usage, it is concluded that the irritating and allergenic hazards of enzyme raw materials do not translate into a risk of skin reactions, either irritant or allergic. Investigations of numerous individuals with skin complaints attributed to laundry products demonstrate convincingly that enzymes were not responsible. Indeed, enzyme-containing laundry products have an extensive history of safe use. Thus, the supposed adverse effects of enzymes on skin seem to be a consequence of a mythology. The important practical lesson is that when primary or secondary care practitioners are presented with a skin complaint, it should not be dismissed as a result of using an enzyme-containing laundry product as the diagnosis will certainly lie elsewhere. Education for healthcare professionals could usefully be enhanced to take this on board.

  5. High-Throughput Enzyme Kinetics Using Microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guoxin Lu; Edward S. Yeung

    2007-11-01

    We report a microanalytical method to study enzyme kinetics. The technique involves immobilizing horseradish peroxidase on a poly-L-lysine (PLL)- coated glass slide in a microarray format, followed by applying substrate solution onto the enzyme microarray. Enzyme molecules are immobilized on the PLL-coated glass slide through electrostatic interactions, and no further modification of the enzyme or glass slide is needed. In situ detection of the products generated on the enzyme spots is made possible by monitoring the light intensity of each spot using a scientific-grade charged-coupled device (CCD). Reactions of substrate solutions of various types and concentrations can be carried out sequentially on one enzyme microarray. To account for the loss of enzyme from washing in between runs, a standard substrate solution is used for calibration. Substantially reduced amounts of substrate solution are consumed for each reaction on each enzyme spot. The Michaelis constant K{sub m} obtained by using this method is comparable to the result for homogeneous solutions. Absorbance detection allows universal monitoring, and no chemical modification of the substrate is needed. High-throughput studies of native enzyme kinetics for multiple enzymes are therefore possible in a simple, rapid, and low-cost manner.

  6. Immobilization of enzymes: a literature survey.

    PubMed

    Brena, Beatriz; González-Pombo, Paula; Batista-Viera, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    The term immobilized enzymes refers to "enzymes physically confined or localized in a certain defined region of space with retention of their catalytic activities, and which can be used repeatedly and continuously." Immobilized enzymes are currently the subject of considerable interest because of their advantages over soluble enzymes. In addition to their use in industrial processes, the immobilization techniques are the basis for making a number of biotechnology products with application in diagnostics, bioaffinity chromatography, and biosensors. At the beginning, only immobilized single enzymes were used, after 1970s more complex systems including two-enzyme reactions with cofactor regeneration and living cells were developed. The enzymes can be attached to the support by interactions ranging from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages to stable covalent bonds. Although the choice of the most appropriate immobilization technique depends on the nature of the enzyme and the carrier, in the last years the immobilization technology has increasingly become a matter of rational design. As a consequence of enzyme immobilization, some properties such as catalytic activity or thermal stability become altered. These effects have been demonstrated and exploited. The concept of stabilization has been an important driving force for immobilizing enzymes. Moreover, true stabilization at the molecular level has been demonstrated, e.g., proteins immobilized through multipoint covalent binding. PMID:23934795

  7. Cysteine cathepsins as digestive enzymes in the spider Nephilengys cruentata.

    PubMed

    Fuzita, Felipe J; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Lopes, Adriana R

    2015-05-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are widely spread on living organisms associated to protein degradation in lysosomes, but some groups of Arthropoda (Heteroptera, Coleoptera, Crustacea and Acari) present these enzymes related to digestion of the meal proteins. Although spiders combine a mechanism of extra-oral with intracellular digestion, the sporadic studies on this subject were mainly concerned with the digestive fluid (DF) analysis. Thus, a more complete scenario of the digestive process in spiders is still lacking in the literature. In this paper we describe the identification and characterization of cysteine cathepsins in the midgut diverticula (MD) and DF of the spider Nephilengys cruentata by using enzymological assays. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative data from transcriptomic followed by proteomic experiments were used together with biochemical assays for results interpretation. Five cathepsins L, one cathepsin F and one cathepsin B were identified by mass spectrometry, with cathepsins L1 (NcCTSL1) and 2 (NcCTSL2) as the most abundant enzymes. The native cysteine cathepsins presented acidic characteristics such as pH optima of 5.5, pH stability in acidic range and zymogen conversion to the mature form after in vitro acidification. NcCTSL1 seems to be a lysosomal enzyme with its recombinant form displaying acidic characteristics as the native ones and being inhibited by pepstatin. Evolutionarily, arachnid cathepsin L may have acquired different roles but its use for digestion is a common feature to studied taxa. Now a more elucidative picture of the digestive process in spiders can be depicted, with trypsins and astacins acting extra-orally under alkaline conditions whereas cysteine cathepsins will act in an acidic environment, likely in the digestive vacuoles or lysosome-like vesicles. PMID:25818482

  8. Cysteine cathepsins as digestive enzymes in the spider Nephilengys cruentata.

    PubMed

    Fuzita, Felipe J; Pinkse, Martijn W H; Verhaert, Peter D E M; Lopes, Adriana R

    2015-05-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are widely spread on living organisms associated to protein degradation in lysosomes, but some groups of Arthropoda (Heteroptera, Coleoptera, Crustacea and Acari) present these enzymes related to digestion of the meal proteins. Although spiders combine a mechanism of extra-oral with intracellular digestion, the sporadic studies on this subject were mainly concerned with the digestive fluid (DF) analysis. Thus, a more complete scenario of the digestive process in spiders is still lacking in the literature. In this paper we describe the identification and characterization of cysteine cathepsins in the midgut diverticula (MD) and DF of the spider Nephilengys cruentata by using enzymological assays. Furthermore, qualitative and quantitative data from transcriptomic followed by proteomic experiments were used together with biochemical assays for results interpretation. Five cathepsins L, one cathepsin F and one cathepsin B were identified by mass spectrometry, with cathepsins L1 (NcCTSL1) and 2 (NcCTSL2) as the most abundant enzymes. The native cysteine cathepsins presented acidic characteristics such as pH optima of 5.5, pH stability in acidic range and zymogen conversion to the mature form after in vitro acidification. NcCTSL1 seems to be a lysosomal enzyme with its recombinant form displaying acidic characteristics as the native ones and being inhibited by pepstatin. Evolutionarily, arachnid cathepsin L may have acquired different roles but its use for digestion is a common feature to studied taxa. Now a more elucidative picture of the digestive process in spiders can be depicted, with trypsins and astacins acting extra-orally under alkaline conditions whereas cysteine cathepsins will act in an acidic environment, likely in the digestive vacuoles or lysosome-like vesicles.

  9. Ribonucleotide Reductase-- a Radical Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichard, Peter; Ehrenberg, Anders

    1983-08-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases catalyze the enzymatic formation of deoxyribonucleotides, an obligatory step in DNA synthesis. The native form of the enzyme from Escherichia coli or from mammalian sources contains as part of its polypeptide structure a free tyrosyl radical, stabilized by an iron center. The radical participates in all probability in the catalytic process during the substitution of the hydroxyl group at C-2 of ribose by a hydrogen atom. A second, inactive form of the E. coli reductase lacks the tyrosyl radical. Extracts from E. coli contain activities that interconvert the two forms. The tyrosyl radical is introduced in the presence of oxygen, while anaerobiosis favors its removal, suggesting a regulatory role in DNA synthesis for oxygen.

  10. Enzyme analysis of Schistosoma haematobium*

    PubMed Central

    Wright, C. A.; Ross, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    Results are reported of enzyme analyses, by isoelectric focusing in polyacrylamide gels, of adult Schistosoma haematobium worms derived from 22 isolates originating from 13 countries. Polymorphisms have been identified in the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and phosphoglucomutase (PGM) systems. Certain forms appear to be restricted in their geographical distribution and their occurrence outside their usual areas suggests human population movements resulting in mixing of parasite strains. The possible implications of minor variations in some PGM patterns and the apparent absence of heteropolymer fractions in presumed G6PD heterozygotes are discussed. The use of the technique to detect natural multiple miracidial infections in snails is reported and discussed. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:6222843

  11. Encapsulation of Enzymes and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meesters, Gabrie M. H.

    A large part of formulated peptides and proteins, e.g., enzymes used as food ingredients, are formulated in a liquid form. Often, they are dissolved in water to which glycerol or sorbitol is added to reduce the water activity of the liquid, thus reducing the change of microbial growth. Still, there are reasons to formulate them in a solid form. Often, these reasons are stability, since a dry formulation is often much better than liquid formulations, and less transportation cost, since less mass is transported if one gets rid of the liquid; however, most of the times, the reason is that the product is mixed with a solid powder. Here, a liquid addition would lead to lump formation.

  12. Ethanologenic Enzymes of Zymomonas mobilis

    SciTech Connect

    Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    1999-03-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a unique microorganism in being both obligately fermentative and utilizing a Entner-Doudoroff pathway for glycolysis. Glycolytic flux in this organism is readily measured as evolved carbon dioxide, ethanol, or glucose consumed and exceeds 1 {micro}mole glucose/min per mg cell protein. To support this rapid glycolysis, approximately 50% of cytoplasmic protein is devoted to the 13 glycolytic and fermentative enzymes which constitute this central catabolic pathway. Only 1 ATP (net) is produced from each glucose metabolized. During the past grant period, we have completed the characterization of 11 of the 13 glycolytic genes from Z. mobilis together with complementary but separate DOE-fimded research by a former post-dot and collaborator, Dr. Tyrrell Conway. Research funded in my lab by DOE, Division of Energy Biosciences can be divided into three sections: A. Fundamental studies; B. Applied studies and utility; and C. Miscellaneous investigations.

  13. Quantum dot based enzyme activity sensors present deviations from Michaelis-Menten kinetic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Sebastián. A.; Brown, Carl W.; Malanoski, Anthony P.; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L.

    2016-03-01

    Nanosensors employing quantum dots (QDs) and enzyme substrates with fluorescent moieties offer tremendous promise for disease surveillance/diagnostics and as high-throughput co-factor assays. Advantages of QDs over other nanoscaffolds include their small size and inherent photochemical properties such as size tunable fluorescence, ease in attaching functional moieties, and resistance to photobleaching. These properties make QDs excellent Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) donors; well-suited for rapid, optical measurement applications. We report enzyme sensors designed with a single FRET donor, the QD donor acting as a scaffold to multiple substrates or acceptors. The QD-sensor follows the concrete activity of the enzyme, as compared to the most common methodologies that quantify the enzyme amount or its mRNA precursor. As the sensor reports on the enzyme activity in real-time we can actively follow the kinetics of the enzyme. Though classic Michaelis-Menten (MM) parameters can be obtained to describe the activity. In the course of these experiments deviations, both decreasing and increasing the kinetics, from the common MM model were observed upon close examinations. From these observations additional experiments were undertaken to understand the varying mechanisms. Different enzymes can present different deviations depending on the chosen target, e.g. trypsin appears to present a positive hopping mechanism while collagenase demonstrates a QD caused reversible inhibition.

  14. Production and optimization of L-glutaminase enzyme from Hypocrea jecorina pure culture.

    PubMed

    Bülbül, Dilara; Karakuş, Emine

    2013-01-01

    L-Glutaminase (L-glutamine amidohydrolase, EC 3.5.1.2) is the important enzyme that catalyzes the deamination of L-glutamine to L-glutamic acid and ammonium ions. Recently, L-glutaminase has received much attention with respect to its therapeutic and industrial applications. It acts as a potent antileukemic agent and shows flavor-enhancing capacity in the production of fermented foods. Glutaminase activity is widely distributed in plants, animal tissues, and microorganisms, including bacteria, yeasts, and fungi. This study presents microbial production of glutaminase enzyme from Hypocrea jecorina pure culture and determination of optimum conditions and calculation of kinetic parameters of the produced enzyme. The optimum values were determined by using sa Nesslerization reaction for our produced glutaminase enzyme. The optimum pH value was determined as 8.0 and optimum temperature as 50°C for the glutaminase enzyme. The Km and Vmax values, the kinetic parameters, of enzyme produced from Hypocrea jecorina, pure culture were determined as 0.491 mM for Km and 13.86 U/L for Vmax by plotted Lineweaver-Burk graphing, respectively. The glutaminase enzyme from H. jecorina microorganism has very high thermal and storage stability.

  15. Uroporphyrinogen decarboxylation as a benchmark for the catalytic proficiency of enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Charles A.; Wolfenden, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The magnitude of an enzyme's affinity for the altered substrate in the transition state exceeds its affinity for the substrate in the ground state by a factor matching the rate enhancement that the enzyme produces. Particularly remarkable are those enzymes that act as simple protein catalysts, without the assistance of metals or other cofactors. To determine the extent to which one such enzyme, human uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase, enhances the rate of substrate decarboxylation, we examined the rate of spontaneous decarboxylation of pyrrolyl-3-acetate. Extrapolation of first-order rate constants measured at elevated temperatures indicates that this reaction proceeds with a half-life of 2.3 × 109 years at 25 °C in the absence of enzyme. This enzyme shows no significant homology with orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase), another cofactorless enzyme that catalyzes a very slow reaction. It is proposed that, in both cases, a protonated basic residue (Arg-37 in the case of human UroD; Lys-93 in the case of yeast ODCase) furnishes a counterion that helps the scissile carboxylate group of the substrate leave water and enter a relatively nonpolar environment, stabilizes the incipient carbanion generated by the departure of CO2, and supplies the proton that takes its place. PMID:18988736

  16. Simplified assays of lipolysis enzymes for drug discovery and specificity assessment of known inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, Jose; Lamontagne, Julien; Erb, Heidi; Gezzar, Sari; Zhao, Shangang; Joly, Erik; Truong, Vouy Linh; Skorey, Kathryn; Crane, Sheldon; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Lipids are used as cellular building blocks and condensed energy stores and also act as signaling molecules. The glycerolipid/ fatty acid cycle, encompassing lipolysis and lipogenesis, generates many lipid signals. Reliable procedures are not available for measuring activities of several lipolytic enzymes for the purposes of drug screening, and this resulted in questionable selectivity of various known lipase inhibitors. We now describe simple assays for lipolytic enzymes, including adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL), hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), sn-1-diacylglycerol lipase (DAGL), monoacylglycerol lipase, α/β-hydrolase domain 6, and carboxylesterase 1 (CES1) using recombinant human and mouse enzymes either in cell extracts or using purified enzymes. We observed that many of the reported inhibitors lack specificity. Thus, Cay10499 (HSL inhibitor) and RHC20867 (DAGL inhibitor) also inhibit other lipases. Marked differences in the inhibitor sensitivities of human ATGL and HSL compared with the corresponding mouse enzymes was noticed. Thus, ATGListatin inhibited mouse ATGL but not human ATGL, and the HSL inhibitors WWL11 and Compound 13f were effective against mouse enzyme but much less potent against human enzyme. Many of these lipase inhibitors also inhibited human CES1. Results describe reliable assays for measuring lipase activities that are amenable for drug screening and also caution about the specificity of the many earlier described lipase inhibitors.

  17. Enzyme/indicator optrodes for detection of heavy metal ions and pesticides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabok, Alexei V.; Ray, Asim K.; Starodub, Nickolaj F.; Dowker, Kenneth P.

    2000-12-01

    Composite films containing enzyme and indicator molecules were produced by means of polyelectrolyte self-assembly. These membranes provide two functions: (i) molecular recognition of the substratum by respective enzyme, and (ii) optrode transducing, when the products o the substratum decomposition affect optical spectra of indicator molecules. Apart from direct registration of enzyme reactions, inhibition reactions can also be monitored with this method. Particularly, heavy metal salts and phosphor organic pesticides acting as inhibitors for Urease and Cholinesterase, respectively, were registered. Composite PESA films were deposited onto glass slides and consisted of several layers of poly(alylamine) hydrochloride (PAA) alternated with indicator molecules, either Cyclo-tetra- chromotropylene or Thymol Blue, both containing SO3- Na+ groups. Then a few layers of PAA/enzyme were deposited on top. A typical structure of the samples was (PAA/Indicator)n/(PAA/Enzyme)m/PAA with n equals 1-5. The obtained films were characterized with UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. The effect of the substrate decomposition on the UV-vis spectra of respective indicator molecules was studied. The inhibition of enzymes Urease and Cholinesterase by heavy metal ions and phosphor organic pesticide, respectively was found. The results obtained show the prospects towards development of optical enzyme sensor arrays.

  18. Enzymes in cleaning products: an overview of toxicological properties and risk assessment/management.

    PubMed

    Basketter, David; Berg, Ninna; Broekhuizen, Cees; Fieldsend, Mark; Kirkwood, Sheila; Kluin, Cornelia; Mathieu, Sophie; Rodriguez, Carlos

    2012-10-01

    Enzymes used in cleaning products have an excellent safety profile, with little ability to cause adverse responses in humans. For acute toxicity, genotoxicity, sub-acute and repeated dose toxicity, enzymes are unremarkable. Reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity are also not endpoints of concern. Exceptions are the ability of some proteases to produce irritating effects at high concentrations and more importantly, the intrinsic potential of these bacterial/fungal proteins to act as respiratory sensitizers. It is a reasonable assumption that the majority of enzyme proteins possess this hazard. However, methods for characterising the respiratory sensitisation hazard of enzymes are lacking and the information required for risk assessment and risk management, although sufficient, remains limited. Previously, most data was generated in animal models and in in vitro immunoassays that assess immunological cross-reactivity. Nevertheless, by the establishment of strict limits on airborne exposure (based on a defined minimal effect limit of 60ng active enzyme protein/m(3)) and air and health monitoring, occupational safety can be assured. Similarly, by ensuring that airborne exposure is kept similarly low, coupled with knowledge of the fate of these enzymes on skin and fabrics, it has proven possible to establish a long history of safe consumer use of enzyme containing products.

  19. Assessment & Commitment Tracking System (ACTS)

    2004-12-20

    The ACTS computer code provides a centralized tool for planning and scheduling assessments, tracking and managing actions associated with assessments or that result from an event or condition, and "mining" data for reporting and analyzing information for improving performance. The ACTS application is designed to work with the MS SQL database management system. All database interfaces are written in SQL. The following software is used to develop and support the ACTS application: Cold Fusion HTMLmore » JavaScript Quest TOAD Microsoft Visual Source Safe (VSS) HTML Mailer for sending email Microsoft SQL Microsoft Internet Information Server« less

  20. Assessment & Commitment Tracking System (ACTS)

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, Robert A.; Childs, Teresa A.; Miller, Michael A.; Sellars, Kevin J.

    2004-12-20

    The ACTS computer code provides a centralized tool for planning and scheduling assessments, tracking and managing actions associated with assessments or that result from an event or condition, and "mining" data for reporting and analyzing information for improving performance. The ACTS application is designed to work with the MS SQL database management system. All database interfaces are written in SQL. The following software is used to develop and support the ACTS application: Cold Fusion HTML JavaScript Quest TOAD Microsoft Visual Source Safe (VSS) HTML Mailer for sending email Microsoft SQL Microsoft Internet Information Server

  1. A new conceptual framework for enzyme catalysis. Hydrogen tunnelling coupled to enzyme dynamics in flavoprotein and quinoprotein enzymes.

    PubMed

    Sutcliffe, Michael J; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2002-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed high levels of activity in identifying enzyme systems that catalyse H-transfer by quantum tunneling. Rather than being restricted to a small number of specific enzymes as perceived initially, it has now become an accepted mechanism for H-transfer in a growing number of enzymes. Furthermore, H-tunneling is driven by the thermally induced dynamics of the enzyme. In some of those enzymes that break stable C-H bonds the reaction proceeds purely by quantum tunneling, without the need to partially ascend the barrier. Enzymes studied that fall into this category include the flavoprotein and quinoprotein amine dehydrogenases, which have proved to be excellent model systems. These enzymes have enabled us to study the relationship between barrier shape and reaction kinetics. This has involved studies with "slow" and "fast" substrates and enzymes impaired by mutagenesis. A number of key questions now remain, including the nature of the coupling between protein dynamics and quantum tunneling. The wide-ranging implications of quantum tunneling introduce a paradigm shift in the conceptual framework for enzyme catalysis, inhibition and design.

  2. The Exiguobacterium sibiricum 255-15 GtfC Enzyme Represents a Novel Glycoside Hydrolase 70 Subfamily of 4,6-α-Glucanotransferase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gangoiti, Joana; Pijning, Tjaard; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2015-11-20

    The glycoside hydrolase 70 (GH70) family originally was established for glucansucrase enzymes found solely in lactic acid bacteria synthesizing α-glucan polysaccharides from sucrose (e.g., GtfA). In recent years, we have characterized GtfB and related Lactobacillus enzymes as 4,6-α-glucanotransferase enzymes. These GtfB-type enzymes constitute the first GH70 subfamily of enzymes that are unable to act on sucrose as a substrate but are active with maltodextrins and starch, cleave α1→4 linkages, and synthesize linear α1→6-glucan chains. The GtfB disproportionating type of activity results in the conversion of malto-oligosaccharides into isomalto/malto-polysaccharides with a relatively high percentage of α1→6 linkages. This paper reports the identification of the members of a second GH70 subfamily (designated GtfC enzymes) and the characterization of the Exiguobacterium sibiricum 255-15 GtfC enzyme, which is also inactive with sucrose and displays 4,6-α-glucanotransferase activity with malto-oligosaccharides. GtfC differs from GtfB in synthesizing isomalto/malto-oligosaccharides. Biochemically, the GtfB- and GtfC-type enzymes are related, but phylogenetically, they clearly constitute different GH70 subfamilies, displaying only 30% sequence identity. Whereas the GtfB-type enzyme largely has the same domain order as glucansucrases (with α-amylase domains A, B, and C plus domains IV and V), this GtfC-type enzyme differs in the order of these domains and completely lacks domain V. In GtfC, the sequence of conserved regions I to IV of clan GH-H is identical to that in GH13 (I-II-III-IV) but different from that in GH70 (II-III-IV-I because of a circular permutation of the (β/α)8 barrel. The GtfC 4,6-α-glucanotransferase enzymes thus represent structurally and functionally very interesting evolutionary intermediates between α-amylase and glucansucrase enzymes.

  3. Functional Metagenomics: Construction and High-Throughput Screening of Fosmid Libraries for Discovery of Novel Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ufarté, Lisa; Bozonnet, Sophie; Laville, Elisabeth; Cecchini, Davide A; Pizzut-Serin, Sandra; Jacquiod, Samuel; Demanèche, Sandrine; Simonet, Pascal; Franqueville, Laure; Veronese, Gabrielle Potocki

    2016-01-01

    Activity-based metagenomics is one of the most efficient approaches to boost the discovery of novel biocatalysts from the huge reservoir of uncultivated bacteria. In this chapter, we describe a highly generic procedure of metagenomic library construction and high-throughput screening for carbohydrate-active enzymes. Applicable to any bacterial ecosystem, it enables the swift identification of functional enzymes that are highly efficient, alone or acting in synergy, to break down polysaccharides and oligosaccharides.

  4. Enzymes in Fish and Seafood Processing.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes have been used for the production and processing of fish and seafood for several centuries in an empirical manner. In recent decades, a growing trend toward a rational and controlled application of enzymes for such goals has emerged. Underlying such pattern are, among others, the increasingly wider array of enzyme activities and enzyme sources, improved enzyme formulations, and enhanced requirements for cost-effective and environmentally friendly processes. The better use of enzyme action in fish- and seafood-related application has had a significant impact on fish-related industry. Thus, new products have surfaced, product quality has improved, more sustainable processes have been developed, and innovative and reliable analytical techniques have been implemented. Recent development in these fields are presented and discussed, and prospective developments are suggested. PMID:27458583

  5. Production of Enzymes from Marine Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X Q; Xu, X N; Chen, L Y

    2016-01-01

    Marine actinobacteria are well recognized for their capabilities to produce valuable natural products, which have great potential for applications in medical, agricultural, and fine chemical industries. In addition to producing unique enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of natural products, many marine actinobacteria also produce hydrolytic enzymes which are able to degrade various biopolymers, such as cellulose, xylan, and chitin. These enzymes are important to produce biofuels and biochemicals of interest from renewable biomass. In this chapter, the recent reports of novel enzymes produced by marine actinobacteria are reviewed, and advanced technologies that can be applied to search for novel marine enzymes as well as for improved enzyme production by marine actinobacteria are summarized, which include ribosome engineering, genome mining, as well as synthetic biology studies. PMID:27452169

  6. Enzymes in Fish and Seafood Processing

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes have been used for the production and processing of fish and seafood for several centuries in an empirical manner. In recent decades, a growing trend toward a rational and controlled application of enzymes for such goals has emerged. Underlying such pattern are, among others, the increasingly wider array of enzyme activities and enzyme sources, improved enzyme formulations, and enhanced requirements for cost-effective and environmentally friendly processes. The better use of enzyme action in fish- and seafood-related application has had a significant impact on fish-related industry. Thus, new products have surfaced, product quality has improved, more sustainable processes have been developed, and innovative and reliable analytical techniques have been implemented. Recent development in these fields are presented and discussed, and prospective developments are suggested. PMID:27458583

  7. Industrial Fungal Enzymes: An Occupational Allergen Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Green, Brett J.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2011-01-01

    Occupational exposure to high-molecular-weight allergens is a risk factor for the development and pathogenesis of IgE-mediated respiratory disease. In some occupational environments, workers are at an increased risk of exposure to fungal enzymes used in industrial production. Fungal enzymes have been associated with adverse health effects in the work place, in particular in baking occupations. Exposure-response relationships have been demonstrated, and atopic workers directly handling fungal enzymes are at an increased risk for IgE-mediated disease and occupational asthma. The utilization of new and emerging fungal enzymes in industrial production will present new occupational exposures. The production of antibody-based immunoassays is necessary for the assessment of occupational exposure and the development of threshold limit values. Allergen avoidance strategies including personal protective equipment, engineering controls, protein encapsulation, and reduction of airborne enzyme concentrations are required to mitigate occupational exposure to fungal enzymes. PMID:21747869

  8. Production of Enzymes from Marine Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X Q; Xu, X N; Chen, L Y

    2016-01-01

    Marine actinobacteria are well recognized for their capabilities to produce valuable natural products, which have great potential for applications in medical, agricultural, and fine chemical industries. In addition to producing unique enzymes responsible for biosynthesis of natural products, many marine actinobacteria also produce hydrolytic enzymes which are able to degrade various biopolymers, such as cellulose, xylan, and chitin. These enzymes are important to produce biofuels and biochemicals of interest from renewable biomass. In this chapter, the recent reports of novel enzymes produced by marine actinobacteria are reviewed, and advanced technologies that can be applied to search for novel marine enzymes as well as for improved enzyme production by marine actinobacteria are summarized, which include ribosome engineering, genome mining, as well as synthetic biology studies.

  9. Prelinguistic Vocalizations Distinguish Pointing Acts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grunloh, Thomas; Liszkowski, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated whether point-accompanying characteristics, like vocalizations and hand shape, differentiate infants' underlying motives of prelinguistic pointing. We elicited imperative (requestive) and declarative (expressive and informative) pointing acts in experimentally controlled situations, and analyzed accompanying…

  10. Monitoring EERE's Recovery Act Portfolio

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Performance monitoring of Recovery Act projects within EERE has been an ongoing effort. Project recipients have been reporting technical and financial progress to project officers on a quarterly basis.

  11. Characterisation of three starch degrading enzymes: thermostable β-amylase, maltotetraogenic and maltogenic α-amylases.

    PubMed

    Derde, L J; Gomand, S V; Courtin, C M; Delcour, J A

    2012-11-15

    Maltogenic α-amylase from Bacillus stearothermophilus (BStA) is widely used as bread crumb anti-firming enzyme. A maltotetraose-forming α-amylase from Pseudomonas saccharophila (PSA) was recently proposed as alternative, hence the need to compare both exo-acting enzymes with some endo-action component. A purely exo-acting thermostable β-amylase from Clostridium thermosulfurogenes (CTB) was included for reference purposes. Under the experimental conditions used, temperature optima of the enzymes are rather similar (60-65 °C), but temperature stability decreased in the order BStA, PSA and CTB. The action of the enzymes on different substrates and their impact on the rheological behaviour of maize starch suspensions demonstrated that, while CTB acts exclusively through an exo-action mechanism, BStA displayed limited endo-action which became more pronounced at higher temperatures. PSA has more substantial endo-action than BStA, which is rather temperature independent. This is important for their impact in processes such as breadmaking, where temperature is gradually increased.

  12. Advanced development of immobilized enzyme reactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Clifford D.; Schussel, Leonard J.; Carter, Layne

    1991-01-01

    Fixed-bed reactors have been used at NASA-Marshall to purify wastewater generated by an end-use equipment facility, on the basis of a combination of multifiltration unibeds and enzyme unibeds. The enzyme beds were found to effectively remove such targeted organics as urea, alcohols, and aldehydes, down to levels lying below detection limits. The enzyme beds were also found to remove organic contaminants not specifically targeted.

  13. Purification of prosomatostatin-converting enzymes.

    PubMed

    Mackin, R B; Noe, B D; Spiess, J

    1990-09-01

    The enzymes responsible for performing cleavage of propeptides at basic amino acids have proven difficult to characterize. Using the processing of anglerfish islet prosomatostatin (PSS) as a model system, we are pursuing the characterization of both a single basic amino acid-specific and a dibasic amino acid-specific converting enzyme. We describe here the model system and protein isolation methods that have allowed significant progress toward complete characterization of the somatostatin-generating propeptide converting enzymes (PCEs). PMID:1976216

  14. Inhibiting the Function of an Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    2015-06-17

    In order to stop bacteria from reproducing and causing a disease like tuberculosis, researchers must first block its enzymes' ability to bind with certain molecules. A research team from Brandeis University worked with the Advanced Protein Characterization Facility at Argonne National Laboratory to define 13 different bacterial structures and uncover the mechanism by which their enzymes form and break bonds with molecules. This animation depicts how an enzyme may be inhibited using this knowledge.

  15. [Advances on enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices].

    PubMed

    Hou, Feng-Hua; Ye, Jian-Qing; Chen, Zuan-Guang; Cheng, Zhi-Yi

    2010-06-01

    With the continuous development in microfluidic fabrication technology, microfluidic analysis has evolved from a concept to one of research frontiers in last twenty years. The research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors based on microfluidic devices has also made great progress. Microfluidic technology improved greatly the analytical performance of the research of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors by reducing the consumption of reagents, decreasing the analysis time, and developing automation. This review focuses on the development and classification of enzymes and enzyme inhibitors research based on microfluidic devices.

  16. Self-acting shaft seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1980-01-01

    Report reviews operating principles and design of self-acting seals. Influences of adverse operating conditions are considered also. Elements of analysis used in seal performance predictions are described and evaluated. Mathematical models for obtaining seal force balance and equilibrium film thickness are outlined. Self-acting seals are nonrubbing, have lower leakage rates than labyrinth seals, and are well suited for advanced aircraft engines.

  17. Reconstitution of Heme Enzymes with Artificial Metalloporphyrinoids.

    PubMed

    Oohora, K; Hayashi, T

    2016-01-01

    An important strategy used in engineering of hemoproteins to generate artificial enzymes involves replacement of heme with an artificial cofactor after removal of the native heme cofactor under acidic conditions. Replacement of heme in an enzyme with a nonnatural metalloporphyrinoid can significantly alter the reactivity of the enzyme. This chapter describes the design and synthesis of three types of artificial metalloporphyrinoid cofactors consisting of mono-, di-, and tri-anionic ligands (tetradehydrocorrin, porphycene, and corrole, respectively). In addition, practical procedures for the preparation of apo-hemoproteins, incorporation of artificial cofactors, and characterization techniques are presented. Furthermore, the representative catalytic activities of artificial enzymes generated by reconstitution of hemoproteins are summarized. PMID:27586344

  18. Bicontinuous Nanoporous Frameworks: Caged Longevity for Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jae-Sung; Jeon, Eunkyung; Moon, Su-Young; Oh, Wangsuk; Han, Sun-Young; Lee, Jeong Hun; Yang, Sung Yun; Kim, Dong-Myung; Park, Ji-Woong

    2016-09-12

    The preparation of bicontinuous nanoporous covalent frameworks, which are promising for caging active enzymes, is demonstrated. The frameworks have three- dimensionally continuous, hydrophilic pores with widths varying between 5 and 30 nm. Enzymes were infiltrated into the bicontinuous pore by applying a pressured enzyme solution. The new materials and methods allowed the amount of caged proteins to be controlled precisely. The resulting enzyme-loaded framework films could be recycled many times with nearly no loss of catalytic activity. Entropic trapping of proteins by a bicontinuous pore with the right size distribution is an unprecedented strategy toward facile in vitro utilization of biocatalysts. PMID:27513827

  19. Modified kinetics of enzymes interacting with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Sebastián. A.; Breger, Joyce C.; Malanoski, Anthony; Claussen, Jonathan C.; Walper, Scott A.; Ancona, Mario G.; Brown, Carl W.; Stewart, Michael H.; Oh, Eunkeu; Susumu, Kimihiro; Medintz, Igor L.

    2015-08-01

    Enzymes are important players in multiple applications, be it bioremediation, biosynthesis, or as reporters. The business of catalysis and inhibition of enzymes is a multibillion dollar industry and understanding the kinetics of commercial enzymes can have a large impact on how these systems are optimized. Recent advances in nanotechnology have opened up the field of nanoparticle (NP) and enzyme conjugates and two principal architectures for NP conjugate systems have been developed. In the first example the enzyme is bound to the NP in a persistent manner, here we find that key factors such as directed enzyme conjugation allow for enhanced kinetics. Through controlled comparative experiments we begin to tease out specific mechanisms that may account for the enhancement. The second system is based on dynamic interactions of the enzymes with the NP. The enzyme substrate is bound to the NP and the enzyme is free in solution. Here again we find that there are many variables , such as substrate positioning and NP selection, that modify the kinetics.

  20. Designing Artificial Enzymes by Intuition and Computation

    PubMed Central

    Nanda, Vikas; Koder, Ronald L.

    2012-01-01

    The rational design of artificial enzymes either by applying physio-chemical intuition of protein structure and function or with the aid of computation methods is a promising area of research with the potential to tremendously impact medicine, industrial chemistry and energy production. Designed proteins also provide a powerful platform for dissecting enzyme mechanisms of natural systems. Artificial enzymes have come a long way, from simple α-helical peptide catalysts to proteins that facilitate multi-step chemical reactions designed by state-of-the-art computational methods. Looking forward, we examine strategies employed by natural enzymes which could be used to improve the speed and selectivity of artificial catalysts. PMID:21124375

  1. "Subversive" substrates for the enzyme trypanothione disulfide reductase: alternative approach to chemotherapy of Chagas disease.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, G B; Ulrich, P; Fairlamb, A H; Rosenberg, I; Pereira, M; Sela, M; Cerami, A

    1988-01-01

    The trypanosomatid flavoprotein disulfide reductase, trypanothione reductase, is shown to catalyze one-electron reduction of suitably substituted naphthoquinone and nitrofuran derivatives. A number of such compounds have been chemically synthesized, and a structure-activity relationship has been established; the enzyme is most active with compounds that contain basic functional groups in side-chain residues. The reduced products are readily reoxidized by molecular oxygen and thus undergo classical enzyme-catalyzed redox cycling. In addition to their ability to act as substrates for trypanothione reductase, the compounds are also shown to effectively inhibit enzymatic reduction of the enzyme's physiological substrate, trypanothione disulfide. Under aerobic conditions, trypanothione reductase is not inactivated by these redox-cycling substrates, whereas under anaerobic conditions the nitrofuran compounds cause irreversible inactivation of the enzyme. When tested for biological activity against Trypanosoma cruzi trypomastigotes, many of the test compounds were trypanocidal, and this activity correlated with their relative ability to act as substrates for trypanothione reductase. The activity of the enzyme with these redox-cycling derivatives constitutes a subversion of its normal antioxidant role within the cell. For this reason these compounds may be termed "subversive" substrates for trypanothione reductase. PMID:3135548

  2. CO2-fixing enzymes and phosphoenolpyruvate metabolism in the fish parasite Hysterothylacium aduncum (Ascaridoidea, Anisakidae).

    PubMed

    Malagón, David; Benítez, Rocio; Valero, Adela; Adroher, Francisco Javier

    2009-07-23

    CO2 stimulates the development of many of the intestinal helminths that are able to fix CO2 by means of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), such as Hysterothylacium aduncum. We determined the activity of CO2-fixing enzymes such as PEPCK and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC), although no significant activity was detected for pyruvate carboxylase or carboxylating-malic enzyme. The former act on phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to yield oxalacetate. In the helminths studied, PEP has a vital role in glucidic metabolism. Consequently, we determined the activity of other enzymes involved in the crossroad of PEP, such as pyruvate kinase (PK), lactate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase. All enzymes detected showed significant variations in activity during the in vitro development of the parasite from the third larval stage to mature adult. Fixing of CO2 by PEPCK decreased during development (from 228 to 115 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), while that by PEPC increased (from 19 to 46 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein). This enzyme, which is rare in animals, could play a part in detecting levels of free phosphate, releasing it from PEP when required for processes such as glycogenolysis, glycolysis and adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) synthesis. PK, which showed increasing activity during development up to immature adult (from 56 to 82 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) protein), could act in combination with PEPC to obtain energy in the cytosol (in the form of ATP) and in the mitochondria (possible destination of the pyruvate formed), compensating for the decrease in activity of PEPCK. PMID:19750810

  3. Microbial community composition shapes enzyme patterns in topsoil and subsoil horizons along a latitudinal transect in Western Siberia

    PubMed Central

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Takriti, Mounir; Eloy Alves, Ricardo J.; Gentsch, Norman; Gittel, Antje; Hofer, Angelika; Klaus, Karoline; Knoltsch, Anna; Lashchinskiy, Nikolay; Mikutta, Robert; Richter, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    , suggests that microbial community composition shapes enzyme patterns and might act as a modifier for the usual dependency of decomposition rates on SOM content or C/N ratios. PMID:25859057

  4. Enzyme engineering by targeted libraries.

    PubMed

    Goldsmith, Moshe; Tawfik, Dan S

    2013-01-01

    This review outlines the strategies we apply for directed enzyme evolution using targeted libraries, namely, libraries that diversify specific residues with predefined mutational compositions. The theoretical grounds underlining the design of such libraries are described, including the mutational load, the ratio of beneficial versus deleterious mutations, and screening capacity. We point out the advantage of using mutational spiking strategies for "hedging the bets," exploring a large number of potentially beneficial mutations, and tuning the library's mutational load. Also highlighted are the merits of low-throughput screens that measure multiple parameters at high accuracy, and of using the desired substrate and reaction conditions rather than surrogates. We subsequently describe library construction strategies (rational and analytical) based on structure and sequence analyses, including ancestral libraries, which are particularly suitable for low-throughput screens. We also discuss the critical role of including compensatory, stabilizing mutations during library construction. Finally, the design efficiency and the optimal mutational loads of libraries are assessed by comparing targeted mutational libraries versus libraries of random mutations.

  5. Substrate analogues for isoprenoid enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stremler, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    Diphosphonate analogues of geranyl diphosphate, resistant to degradation by phosphatases, were found to be alternate substrates for the reaction with farnesyl diphosphate synthetase isolated from avian liver. The difluoromethane analogue was shown to be the better alternate substrate, in agreement with solvolysis results which indicate that the electronegativity of the difluoromethylene unit more closely approximates that of the normal bridging oxygen. The usefulness of the C/sub 10/ difluoro analogue, for detecting low levels of isoprenoid enzymes in the presence of high levels of phosphatase activity, was demonstrated with a cell-free preparation from lemon peel. A series of C/sub 5/ through C/sub 15/ homoallylic and allylic diphosphonates, as well as two 5'-nucleotide diphosphonates, was prepared in high overall yield using the activation-displacement sequence. Radiolabeled samples of several of the allylic diphosphonates were prepared with tritium located at C1. A series of geraniols, stereospecifically deuterated at C1, was prepared. The enantiomeric purities and absolute configurations were determined by derivatization as the mandelate esters for analysis by /sup 1/H NMR. The stereochemistry of the activation-displacement sequence was examined using C1-deuterated substrates.

  6. 7 CFR 33.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.1 Act. Act and Export Apple Act are synonymous and mean “An act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in apples to protect the reputation of American-grown apples in foreign markets, to prevent deception or misrepresentation as to the quality...

  7. 7 CFR 33.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.1 Act. Act and Export Apple Act are synonymous and mean “An act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in apples to protect the reputation of American-grown apples in foreign markets, to prevent deception or misrepresentation as to the quality...

  8. 7 CFR 33.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.1 Act. Act and Export Apple Act are synonymous and mean “An act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in apples to protect the reputation of American-grown apples in foreign markets, to prevent deception or misrepresentation as to the quality...

  9. 7 CFR 33.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.1 Act. Act and Export Apple Act are synonymous and mean “An act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in apples to protect the reputation of American-grown apples in foreign markets, to prevent deception or misrepresentation as to the quality...

  10. 7 CFR 33.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.1 Act. Act and Export Apple Act are synonymous and mean “An act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in apples to protect the reputation of American-grown apples in foreign markets, to prevent deception or misrepresentation as to the quality...

  11. Multi-substrate-activity space and quasi-species in enzyme evolution: Ohno's dilemma, promiscuity and functional orthogonality.

    PubMed

    Mannervik, Bengt; Runarsdottir, Arna; Kurtovic, Sanela

    2009-08-01

    A functional enzyme displays activity with at least one substrate and can be represented by a vector in substrate-activity space. Many enzymes, including GSTs (glutathione transferases), are promiscuous in the sense that they act on alternative substrates, and the corresponding vectors operate in multidimensional space. The direction of the vector is governed by the relative activities of the diverse substrates. Stochastic mutations of already existing enzymes generate populations of variants, and clusters of functionally similar mutants can serve as parents for subsequent generations of enzymes. The proper evolving unit is a functional quasi-species, which may not be identical with the 'best' variant in its generation. The manifestation of the quasi-species is dependent on the substrate matrix used to explore catalytic activities. Multivariate analysis is an approach to identifying quasi-species and to investigate evolutionary trajectories in the directed evolution of enzymes for novel functions.

  12. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Marritt, Sophie J.; Kemp, Gemma L.; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes. PMID:24634538

  13. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Duncan G G; Marritt, Sophie J; Kemp, Gemma L; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N; Jeuken, Lars J C

    2013-11-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes.

  14. Cobalamin- and Corrinoid-Dependent Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Rowena G.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter will review the literature on cobalamin- and corrinoid-containing enzymes. These enzymes fall into two broad classes, those using methylcobalamin or related methylcorrinoids as prosthetic groups and catalyzing methyltransfer reactions, and those using adenosylcobalamin as the prosthetic group and catalyzing the generation of substrate radicals that in turn undergo rearrangements and/or eliminations. PMID:20877792

  15. Illustrating Enzyme Inhibition Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2012-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles have great utility as teaching and learning tools because they present students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis. Unfortunately, most textbooks divorce discussions of traditional kinetic topics, such as enzyme inhibition, from discussions of these same topics in terms of…

  16. Orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Watschinger, Katrin; Werner, Ernst R

    2013-01-01

    Ether lipids are an emerging class of lipids which have so far not been investigated and understood in every detail. They have important roles as membrane components of e.g. lens, brain and testis, and as mediators such as platelet-activating factor. The metabolic enzymes for biosynthesis and degradation have been investigated to some extent. As most involved enzymes are integral membrane proteins they are tricky to handle in biochemical protocols. The sequence of some ether lipid metabolising enzymes has only recently been reported and other sequences still remain obscure. Defined enzymes without assigned sequence are known as orphan enzymes. One of these enzymes with uncharacterised sequence is plasmanylethanolamine desaturase, a key enzyme for the biosynthesis of one of the most abundant phospholipids in our body, the plasmalogens. This review aims to briefly summarise known functions of ether lipids, give an overview on their metabolism including the most prominent members, platelet-activating factor and the plasmalogens. A special focus is set on the description of orphan enzymes in ether lipid metabolism and on the successful strategies how four previous orphans have recently been assigned a sequence. Only one of these four was characterised by classical protein purification and sequencing, whereas the other three required alternative strategies such as bioinformatic candidate gene selection and recombinant expression or development of an inhibitor and multidimensional metabolic profiling.

  17. Enzyme Catalysis and the Gibbs Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2009-01-01

    Gibbs-energy profiles are often introduced during the first semester of organic chemistry, but are less often presented in connection with enzyme-catalyzed reactions. In this article I show how the Gibbs-energy profile corresponds to the characteristic kinetics of a simple enzyme-catalyzed reaction. (Contains 1 figure and 1 note.)

  18. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  19. Restriction Enzyme Mapping: A Simple Student Practical.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Stephen J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    An experiment that uses the recombinant plasmid pX1108 to illustrate restriction mapping is described. The experiment involves three restriction enzymes and employs single and double restriction enzyme digestions. A list of needed materials, procedures, safety precautions, results, and discussion are included. (KR)

  20. Biocatalytic material comprising multilayer enzyme coated fiber

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jungbae [Richland, WA; Kwak, Ja Hun [Richland, WA; Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA

    2009-11-03

    The present invention relates generally to high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials and processes for using the same. The materials comprise enzyme aggregate coatings having high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environment. These new materials provide a new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  1. A DNA enzyme that cleaves RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Hoyce, G. F. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several types of RNA enzymes (ribozymes) have been identified in biological systems and generated in the laboratory. Considering the variety of known RNA enzymes and the similarity of DNA and RNA, it is reasonable to imagine that DNA might be able to function as an enzyme as well. No such DNA enzyme has been found in nature, however. We set out to identify a metal-dependent DNA enzyme using in vitro selection methodology. RESULTS: Beginning with a population of 10(14) DNAs containing 50 random nucleotides, we carried out five successive rounds of selective amplification, enriching for individuals that best promote the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of a target ribonucleoside 3'-O-P bond embedded within an otherwise all-DNA sequence. By the fifth round, the population as a whole carried out this reaction at a rate of 0.2 min-1. Based on the sequence of 20 individuals isolated from this population, we designed a simplified version of the catalytic domain that operates in an intermolecular context with a turnover rate of 1 min-1. This rate is about 10(5)-fold increased compared to the uncatalyzed reaction. CONCLUSIONS: Using in vitro selection techniques, we obtained a DNA enzyme that catalyzes the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester in a reaction that proceeds with rapid turnover. The catalytic rate compares favorably to that of known RNA enzymes. We expect that other examples of DNA enzymes will soon be forthcoming.

  2. KINEXP: Computer Simulation in Enzyme Kinetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelpi, Josep Lluis; Domenech, Carlos

    1988-01-01

    Describes a program which allows students to identify and characterize several kinetic inhibitory mechanisms. Uses the generic model of reversible inhibition of a monosubstrate enzyme but can be easily modified to run other models such as bisubstrate enzymes. Uses MS-DOS BASIC. (MVL)

  3. Tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes - party of three.

    PubMed

    Ball, Helen J; Jusof, Felicita F; Bakmiwewa, Supun M; Hunt, Nicholas H; Yuasa, Hajime J

    2014-01-01

    Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) are tryptophan-degrading enzymes that have independently evolved to catalyze the first step in tryptophan catabolism via the kynurenine pathway (KP). The depletion of tryptophan and formation of KP metabolites modulates the activity of the mammalian immune, reproductive, and central nervous systems. IDO and TDO enzymes can have overlapping or distinct functions depending on their expression patterns. The expression of TDO and IDO enzymes in mammals differs not only by tissue/cellular localization but also by their induction by distinct stimuli. To add to the complexity, these genes also have undergone duplications in some organisms leading to multiple isoforms of IDO or TDO. For example, many vertebrates, including all mammals, have acquired two IDO genes via gene duplication, although the IDO1-like gene has been lost in some lower vertebrate lineages. Gene duplications can allow the homologs to diverge and acquire different properties to the original gene. There is evidence for IDO enzymes having differing enzymatic characteristics, signaling properties, and biological functions. This review analyzes the evolutionary convergence of IDO and TDO enzymes as tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes and the divergent evolution of IDO homologs to generate an enzyme family with diverse characteristics not possessed by TDO enzymes, with an emphasis on the immune system. PMID:25346733

  4. Enzyme Reactions and Acceptability of Plant Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, James K.

    1984-01-01

    Provides an overview of enzyme reactions which contribute to the character and acceptability of plant foods. A detailed discussion of polyphenoloxidase is also provided as an example of an enzyme which can markedly affect the character and acceptability of such foods. (JN)

  5. Enzymes: A Workshop for Secondary School Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bering, C. Larry

    1994-01-01

    Describes the weekend science workshop on enzymes and includes several projects that involve students directly, parts of which can be incorporated into a traditional chemistry, biology, or physical science course at the secondary level. Subjects include catalysts and catalytic converters in cars, enzymes as consumer products and in industrial…

  6. Characterization of Soil Samples of Enzyme Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeland, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    Described are nine enzyme essays for distinguishing soil samples. Colorimetric methods are used to compare enzyme levels in soils from different sites. Each soil tested had its own spectrum of activity. Attention is drawn to applications of this technique in forensic science and in studies of soil fertility. (Author/AJ)

  7. Malic enzymes of Trichomonas vaginalis: two enzyme families, two distinct origins.

    PubMed

    Dolezal, Pavel; Vanácová, Stepánka; Tachezy, Jan; Hrdý, Ivan

    2004-03-31

    The cytosolic malic enzyme of the amitochondriate protist Trichomonas vaginalis was purified to homogeneity and characterized. The corresponding gene was sequenced and compared with its hydrogenosomal homologue from the same organism. The enzymes were found to differ in coenzyme specificity, molecular mass and physiological role. The cytosolic malic enzyme is a dimer consisting of two 42-kDa subunits with strict specificity for nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)), and has a presumed function of pyruvate and NADPH production. The hydrogenosomal malic enzyme is a tetramer of 60-kDa subunits that preferentially utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to NADP(+). The hydrogenosomal enzyme supplies the hydrogenosome with pyruvate for further catabolic processes linked with substrate-level phosphorylation. Phylogenetic analysis of malic enzymes showed the existence of two distinct families of these enzymes in nature, which differ in subunit size. The trichomonad cytosolic malic enzyme belongs to the small subunit-type family that occurs almost exclusively in prokaryotes. In contrast, the hydrogenosomal malic enzyme displays a close relationship with the large subunit-type family of the enzyme, which is found in mitochondria, plastids and the cytosol of eukaryotes. The eubacterial origin of trichomonad cytosolic malic enzyme suggests an occurrence of horizontal gene transfer from a eubacterium to the ancestor of T. vaginalis. The presence of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic type of malic enzyme in different compartments of a single eukaryotic cell appears to be unique in nature. PMID:15033531

  8. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    PubMed

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  9. Highly Efficient Self-Replicating RNA Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Michael P.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY An RNA enzyme has been developed that catalyzes the joining of oligonucleotide substrates to form additional copies of itself, undergoing self-replication with exponential growth. The enzyme also can cross-replicate with a partner enzyme, resulting in their mutual exponential growth and enabling self-sustained Darwinian evolution. The opportunity for inventive evolution within this synthetic genetic system depends on the diversity of the evolving population, which is limited by the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Directed evolution was used to improve the efficiency of the enzyme and increase its exponential growth rate to 0.14 min−1, corresponding to a doubling time of 5 min. This is close to the limit of 0.21 min−1 imposed by the rate of product release, but sufficient to enable more than 80 logs of growth per day. PMID:24388759

  10. Practical steady-state enzyme kinetics.

    PubMed

    Lorsch, Jon R

    2014-01-01

    Enzymes are key components of most biological processes. Characterization of enzymes is therefore frequently required during the study of biological systems. Steady-state kinetics provides a simple and rapid means of assessing the substrate specificity of an enzyme. When combined with site-directed mutagenesis (see Site-Directed Mutagenesis), it can be used to probe the roles of particular amino acids in the enzyme in substrate recognition and catalysis. Effects of interaction partners and posttranslational modifications can also be assessed using steady-state kinetics. This overview explains the general principles of steady-state enzyme kinetics experiments in a practical, rather than theoretical, way. Any biochemistry textbook will have a section on the theory of Michaelis-Menten kinetics, including derivations of the relevant equations. No specific enzymatic assay is described here, although a method for monitoring product formation or substrate consumption over time (an assay) is required to perform the experiments described.

  11. Nedd8 processing enzymes in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Conjugation of the ubiquitin-like modifier Nedd8 to cullins is critical for the function of SCF-type ubiquitin ligases and thus facilitates ubiquitin conjugation and ultimately degradation of SCF substrates, including several cell cycle regulators. Like ubiquitin, Nedd8 is produced as a precursor that must first be processed before it becomes active. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae this is carried out exclusively by the enzyme Yuh1. Results Here we show that in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the Yuh1 orthologue, Uch1, is not the sole Nedd8 processing enzyme. Instead it appears that deubiquitylating enzymes can efficiently process the Nedd8 precursor in vivo. Conclusions Several enzymes contribute to Nedd8 precursor processing including a number of deubiquitylating enzymes. PMID:23496905

  12. Biotechnological uses of enzymes from psychrophiles

    PubMed Central

    Cavicchioli, R.; Charlton, T.; Ertan, H.; Omar, S. Mohd; Siddiqui, K. S.; Williams, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The bulk of the Earth's biosphere is cold (e.g. 90% of the ocean's waters are ≤ 5°C), sustaining a broad diversity of microbial life. The permanently cold environments vary from the deep ocean to alpine reaches and to polar regions. Commensurate with the extent and diversity of the ecosystems that harbour psychrophilic life, the functional capacity of the microorganisms that inhabitat the cold biosphere are equally diverse. As a result, indigenous psychrophilic microorganisms provide an enormous natural resource of enzymes that function effectively in the cold, and these cold‐adapted enzymes have been targeted for their biotechnological potential. In this review we describe the main properties of enzymes from psychrophiles and describe some of their known biotechnological applications and ways to potentially improve their value for biotechnology. The review also covers the use of metagenomics for enzyme screening, the development of psychrophilic gene expression systems and the use of enzymes for cleaning. PMID:21733127

  13. Evaluation of selected enzymes for thiamine determination.

    PubMed

    Defibaugh, P W

    1987-01-01

    Seven commercially available enzymes were studied for suitability as substitutes in the AOAC thiamine determination, because the enzyme Takadiastase used in the method has not been available since 1976, and alternative enzymes were likewise unavailable or unsuitable for releasing thiamine from its phosphate esters. Four factors (substrate ester, enzyme level, time/temperature, and pH) at 2 levels were studied in a 2(4) factorial arrangement of treatments. Data were expressed in terms of mean percentage conversion (MPC) and were statistically evaluated by analysis of variance. Significant main effects and any interactions among treatments were calculated. Takadiastase and alpha-amylase (Miles) with MPCs of 101 and 102, respectively, appeared effective in dephosphorylation within method parameters. Potato phosphatase appeared marginally suitable. Wheat germ phosphatase, alpha-amylase (Sigma), Mylase 100, and Clarase 40,000 were judged unacceptable as enzyme substitutes. PMID:3610965

  14. Directed Evolution of Enzymes for Industrial Biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Joanne L; Rusli, Rukhairul A; Ollis, David L

    2016-02-01

    Enzymes have the potential to catalyse a wide variety of chemical reactions. They are increasingly being sought as environmentally friendly and cost-effective alternatives to conventional catalysts used in industries ranging from bioremediation to applications in medicine and pharmaceutics. Despite the benefits, they are not without their limitations. Many naturally occurring enzymes are not suitable for use outside of their native cellular environments. However, protein engineering can be used to generate enzymes tailored for specific industrial applications. Directed evolution is particularly useful and can be employed even when lack of structural information impedes the use of rational design. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of current industrial applications of enzyme technology and to show how directed evolution can be used to modify and to enhance enzyme properties. This includes a brief discussion on library generation and a more detailed focus on library screening methods, which are critical to any directed evolution experiment.

  15. Directed Evolution of Enzymes for Industrial Biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Porter, Joanne L; Rusli, Rukhairul A; Ollis, David L

    2016-02-01

    Enzymes have the potential to catalyse a wide variety of chemical reactions. They are increasingly being sought as environmentally friendly and cost-effective alternatives to conventional catalysts used in industries ranging from bioremediation to applications in medicine and pharmaceutics. Despite the benefits, they are not without their limitations. Many naturally occurring enzymes are not suitable for use outside of their native cellular environments. However, protein engineering can be used to generate enzymes tailored for specific industrial applications. Directed evolution is particularly useful and can be employed even when lack of structural information impedes the use of rational design. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of current industrial applications of enzyme technology and to show how directed evolution can be used to modify and to enhance enzyme properties. This includes a brief discussion on library generation and a more detailed focus on library screening methods, which are critical to any directed evolution experiment. PMID:26661585

  16. 7 CFR 1150.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1150.101 Act. Act means Title I, Subtitle B, of the Dairy and Tobacco Adjustment Act of...

  17. 7 CFR 1150.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MILK), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1150.101 Act. Act means Title I, Subtitle B, of the Dairy and Tobacco Adjustment Act of...

  18. 7 CFR 1150.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1150.101 Act. Act means Title I, Subtitle B, of the Dairy and Tobacco Adjustment Act of...

  19. 7 CFR 1150.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1150.101 Act. Act means Title I, Subtitle B, of the Dairy and Tobacco Adjustment Act of...

  20. 7 CFR 1150.101 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PROMOTION PROGRAM Dairy Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1150.101 Act. Act means Title I, Subtitle B, of the Dairy and Tobacco Adjustment Act of...

  1. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists.

    PubMed

    Melani, Andrea S

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major cause of death and disability worldwide. Inhaled bronchodilators are the mainstay of COPD pharmacological treatment. Long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs) are a major class of inhaled bronchodilators. Some LAMA/device systems with different characteristics and dosing schedules are currently approved for maintenance therapy of COPD and a range of other products are being developed. They improve lung function and patient-reported outcomes and reduce acute bronchial exacerbations with good safety. LAMAs are used either alone or associated with long-acting β₂-agonists, eventually in fixed dose combinations. Long-acting β₂-agonist/LAMA combinations assure additional benefits over the individual components alone. The reader will obtain a view of the safety and efficacy of the different LAMA/device systems in COPD patients. PMID:26109098

  2. Enhanced Clean Air Act enforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Faletto, J.S.

    1997-09-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 added new enforcement authorities which will change the way the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the States and environmental groups litigate enforcement actions. EPA, the States and ordinary citizens now have at their disposal an extensive array of enforcement options to deter or penalize those who violate requirements of the Clean Air Act or State Implementation Plans (SIPs). These new enforcement authorities take on even greater significance for major sources covered by the Title V Operating Permit Program.

  3. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gedney, Richard T.; Schertler, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) was conceived to help maintain U.S. leadership in the world's communications-satellite market. This experimental satellite is expected to be launched by NASA in 1992 and to furnish the technology necessary for establishing very small aperture terminal digital networks which provide on-demand full-mesh connectivity, and 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop. Utilizing on-board switching and processing, each individual voice or data circuit can be separately routed to any location in the network. This paper provides an overview of the ACTS and discusses the value of the technology for future communications systems.

  4. Self-acting shaft seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Self-acting seals are described in detail. The mathematical models for obtaining a seal force balance and the equilibrium operating film thickness are outlined. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis reveals three different vibration models with secondary seal friction being an important parameter. Leakage flow inlet pressure drop and affects of axisymmetric sealing face deformations are discussed. Experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given. Also a spiral groove seal design operated to 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) is described.

  5. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic.

    PubMed

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J M; van Hest, Jan C M

    2016-08-14

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. PMID:27407020

  6. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic.

    PubMed

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J M; van Hest, Jan C M

    2016-08-14

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions.

  7. 7 CFR 1216.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.1 Act. Act means...

  8. 7 CFR 1216.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.1 Act. Act means...

  9. 7 CFR 1221.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.1 Act. Act means...

  10. 7 CFR 1221.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.1 Act. Act means...

  11. 7 CFR 1221.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.1 Act. Act means...

  12. 7 CFR 1221.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.1 Act. Act means...

  13. 7 CFR 1221.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.1 Act. Act means...

  14. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the...

  15. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the...

  16. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the...

  17. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOYBEAN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the...

  18. 7 CFR 1218.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.1 Act. Act means...

  19. 7 CFR 1218.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.1 Act. Act means...

  20. 7 CFR 1218.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.1 Act. Act means...

  1. 7 CFR 1218.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.1 Act. Act means...

  2. 7 CFR 1218.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.1 Act. Act means...

  3. 7 CFR 1216.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.1 Act. Act means...

  4. 7 CFR 1216.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.1 Act. Act means...

  5. 7 CFR 1216.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.1 Act. Act means...

  6. 7 CFR 65.100 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF, PORK, LAMB, CHICKEN, GOAT MEAT, PERISHABLE AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, MACADAMIA NUTS, PECANS,...

  7. 7 CFR 1207.302 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.302 Act. Act means the Potato Research...

  8. 7 CFR 1207.302 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.302 Act. Act means the Potato Research...

  9. 7 CFR 1207.302 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.302 Act. Act means the Potato Research...

  10. 7 CFR 1207.302 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.302 Act. Act means the Potato Research...

  11. 7 CFR 1207.302 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.302 Act. Act means the Potato Research...

  12. 7 CFR 1206.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.1 Act. Act means the...

  13. 7 CFR 1206.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.1 Act. Act means the...

  14. 7 CFR 1206.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.1 Act. Act means the...

  15. 7 CFR 1206.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.1 Act. Act means the...

  16. 7 CFR 1206.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.1 Act. Act means the...

  17. Beta-lactamase-free penicillin amidase from Alcaligenes sp.: isolation strategy, strain characteristics, and enzyme immobilization.

    PubMed

    Pal, A; Samanta, T B

    1999-11-01

    Isolation and characterization of a beta-lactamase (EC 3.5.2.6)-free, penicillin amidase (penicillin amidohydrolase, EC 3.5.1. 11)-producing organism is reported. The test strain was isolated by an enrichment technique with a substrate other than penicillins. The isolated strain belongs to the genus Alcaligenes. Phenylacetic acid was found to be the inducer of penicillin amidase. The amidase has a broad substrate spectrum. It is very active against penicillin G and semisynthetic cephalosporins, whereas penicillin V and semisynthetic penicillins acted moderately as a substrate. Immobilized cells of Alcaligenes sp. were shown to act as a reversible enzyme. PMID:10489431

  18. Phase II enzyme induction by a carotenoid, lutein, in a PC12D neuronal cell line.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Seiji; Kobayashi, Saori; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ozawa, Yoko

    2014-04-01

    The mechanism by which lutein, a carotenoid, acts as an antioxidant in retinal cells is still not fully understood. Here, lutein treatment of a neuronal cell line (PC12D) immediately resulted in reduced intracellular ROS levels, implying that it has a direct role in ROS scavenging. Significantly, lutein treatment also induced phase II antioxidative enzyme expression, probably via a nuclear factor-like 2 (Nrf2) independent pathway. This latter mechanism could explain why lutein acts diversely to protect against oxidative/cytotoxic stress, and why it is physiologically involved in the human neural tissue, such as the retina.

  19. An overview of technologies for immobilization of enzymes and surface analysis techniques for immobilized enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Mohamad, Nur Royhaila; Marzuki, Nur Haziqah Che; Buang, Nor Aziah; Huyop, Fahrul; Wahab, Roswanira Abdul

    2015-01-01

    The current demands of sustainable green methodologies have increased the use of enzymatic technology in industrial processes. Employment of enzyme as biocatalysts offers the benefits of mild reaction conditions, biodegradability and catalytic efficiency. The harsh conditions of industrial processes, however, increase propensity of enzyme destabilization, shortening their industrial lifespan. Consequently, the technology of enzyme immobilization provides an effective means to circumvent these concerns by enhancing enzyme catalytic properties and also simplify downstream processing and improve operational stability. There are several techniques used to immobilize the enzymes onto supports which range from reversible physical adsorption and ionic linkages, to the irreversible stable covalent bonds. Such techniques produce immobilized enzymes of varying stability due to changes in the surface microenvironment and degree of multipoint attachment. Hence, it is mandatory to obtain information about the structure of the enzyme protein following interaction with the support surface as well as interactions of the enzymes with other proteins. Characterization technologies at the nanoscale level to study enzymes immobilized on surfaces are crucial to obtain valuable qualitative and quantitative information, including morphological visualization of the immobilized enzymes. These technologies are pertinent to assess efficacy of an immobilization technique and development of future enzyme immobilization strategies. PMID:26019635

  20. Expanding the Halohydrin Dehalogenase Enzyme Family: Identification of Novel Enzymes by Database Mining

    PubMed Central

    Schallmey, Marcus; Koopmeiners, Julia; Wells, Elizabeth; Wardenga, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenases are very rare enzymes that are naturally involved in the mineralization of halogenated xenobiotics. Due to their catalytic potential and promiscuity, many biocatalytic reactions have been described that have led to several interesting and industrially important applications. Nevertheless, only a few of these enzymes have been made available through recombinant techniques; hence, it is of general interest to expand the repertoire of these enzymes so as to enable novel biocatalytic applications. After the identification of specific sequence motifs, 37 novel enzyme sequences were readily identified in public sequence databases. All enzymes that could be heterologously expressed also catalyzed typical halohydrin dehalogenase reactions. Phylogenetic inference for enzymes of the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family confirmed that all enzymes form a distinct monophyletic clade within the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. In addition, the majority of novel enzymes are substantially different from previously known phylogenetic subtypes. Consequently, four additional phylogenetic subtypes were defined, greatly expanding the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family. We show that the enormous wealth of environmental and genome sequences present in public databases can be tapped for in silico identification of very rare but biotechnologically important biocatalysts. Our findings help to readily identify halohydrin dehalogenases in ever-growing sequence databases and, as a consequence, make even more members of this interesting enzyme family available to the scientific and industrial community. PMID:25239895

  1. Expanding the Halohydrin Dehalogenase Enzyme Family: Identification of Novel Enzymes by Database Mining.

    PubMed

    Schallmey, Marcus; Koopmeiners, Julia; Wells, Elizabeth; Wardenga, Rainer; Schallmey, Anett

    2014-12-01

    Halohydrin dehalogenases are very rare enzymes that are naturally involved in the mineralization of halogenated xenobiotics. Due to their catalytic potential and promiscuity, many biocatalytic reactions have been described that have led to several interesting and industrially important applications. Nevertheless, only a few of these enzymes have been made available through recombinant techniques; hence, it is of general interest to expand the repertoire of these enzymes so as to enable novel biocatalytic applications. After the identification of specific sequence motifs, 37 novel enzyme sequences were readily identified in public sequence databases. All enzymes that could be heterologously expressed also catalyzed typical halohydrin dehalogenase reactions. Phylogenetic inference for enzymes of the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family confirmed that all enzymes form a distinct monophyletic clade within the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily. In addition, the majority of novel enzymes are substantially different from previously known phylogenetic subtypes. Consequently, four additional phylogenetic subtypes were defined, greatly expanding the halohydrin dehalogenase enzyme family. We show that the enormous wealth of environmental and genome sequences present in public databases can be tapped for in silico identification of very rare but biotechnologically important biocatalysts. Our findings help to readily identify halohydrin dehalogenases in ever-growing sequence databases and, as a consequence, make even more members of this interesting enzyme family available to the scientific and industrial community.

  2. Stabilization of enzymes in ionic liquids via modification of enzyme charge.

    PubMed

    Nordwald, Erik M; Kaar, Joel L

    2013-09-01

    Due to the propensity of ionic liquids (ILs) to inactivate enzymes, the development of strategies to improve enzyme utility in these solvents is critical to fully exploit ILs for biocatalysis. We have developed a strategy to broadly improve enzyme utility in ILs based on elucidating the effect of charge modifications on the function of enzymes in IL environments. Results of stability studies in aqueous-IL mixtures indicated a clear connection between the ratio of enzyme-containing positive-to-negative sites and enzyme stability in ILs. Stability studies of the effect of [BMIM][Cl] and [EMIM][EtSO4 ] on chymotrypsin specifically found an optimum ratio of positively-charged amine-to-negatively-charged acid groups (0.39). At this ratio, the half-life of chymotrypsin was increased 1.6- and 4.3-fold relative to wild-type chymotrypsin in [BMIM][Cl] and [EMIM][EtSO4 ], respectively. The half-lives of lipase and papain were similarly increased as much as 4.0 and 2.4-fold, respectively, in [BMIM][Cl] by modifying the ratio of positive-to-negative sites of each enzyme. More generally, the results of stability studies found that modifications that reduce the ratio of enzyme-containing positive-to-negative sites improve enzyme stability in ILs. Understanding the impact of charge modification on enzyme stability in ILs may ultimately be exploited to rationally engineer enzymes for improved function in IL environments.

  3. Metagenomics as a Tool for Enzyme Discovery: Hydrolytic Enzymes from Marine-Related Metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Ana; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Tran, Hai; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses metagenomics and its application for enzyme discovery, with a focus on hydrolytic enzymes from marine metagenomic libraries. With less than one percent of culturable microorganisms in the environment, metagenomics, or the collective study of community genetics, has opened up a rich pool of uncharacterized metabolic pathways, enzymes, and adaptations. This great untapped pool of genes provides the particularly exciting potential to mine for new biochemical activities or novel enzymes with activities tailored to peculiar sets of environmental conditions. Metagenomes also represent a huge reservoir of novel enzymes for applications in biocatalysis, biofuels, and bioremediation. Here we present the results of enzyme discovery for four enzyme activities, of particular industrial or environmental interest, including esterase/lipase, glycosyl hydrolase, protease and dehalogenase. PMID:26621459

  4. Metagenomics as a Tool for Enzyme Discovery: Hydrolytic Enzymes from Marine-Related Metagenomes.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Ana; Tchigvintsev, Anatoly; Tran, Hai; Chernikova, Tatyana N; Golyshina, Olga V; Yakimov, Michail M; Golyshin, Peter N; Yakunin, Alexander F

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses metagenomics and its application for enzyme discovery, with a focus on hydrolytic enzymes from marine metagenomic libraries. With less than one percent of culturable microorganisms in the environment, metagenomics, or the collective study of community genetics, has opened up a rich pool of uncharacterized metabolic pathways, enzymes, and adaptations. This great untapped pool of genes provides the particularly exciting potential to mine for new biochemical activities or novel enzymes with activities tailored to peculiar sets of environmental conditions. Metagenomes also represent a huge reservoir of novel enzymes for applications in biocatalysis, biofuels, and bioremediation. Here we present the results of enzyme discovery for four enzyme activities, of particular industrial or environmental interest, including esterase/lipase, glycosyl hydrolase, protease and dehalogenase.

  5. Nutritional significance of lectins and enzyme inhibitors from legumes.

    PubMed

    Lajolo, Franco M; Genovese, Maria Inés

    2002-10-23

    Legumes have natural components, such as lectins, amylase, and trypsin inhibitors, that may adversely affect their nutritional properties. Much information has already been obtained on their antinutritional significance and how to inactivate them by proper processing. Chronic ingestion of residual levels is unlikely to pose risks to human health. On the other hand, the ability of these molecules to inhibit some enzymes such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, disaccharidases, and alpha-amylases, to selectively bind to glycoconjugates, and to enter the circulatory system may be a useful tool in nutrition and pharmacology. Trypsin inhibitors have also been studied as cancer risk reducing factors. These components seem to act as plant defense substances. However, increased contents may represent an impairment of the nutritional quality of legumes because these glycoproteins and the sulfur-rich protease inhibitors have been shown to be poorly digested and to participate in chemical reactions during processing reducing protein digestibility, a still unsolved question. PMID:12381157

  6. Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Gaidutšik, Ilja; Sedman, Tiina; Sillamaa, Sirelin; Sedman, Juhan

    2016-01-01

    Integrity of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is essential for cellular energy metabolism. In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a large number of nuclear genes influence the stability of mitochondrial genome; however, most corresponding gene products act indirectly and the actual molecular mechanisms of mtDNA inheritance remain poorly characterized. Recently, we found that a Superfamily II helicase Irc3 is required for the maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. Here we show that Irc3 is a mitochondrial DNA branch migration enzyme. Irc3 modulates mtDNA metabolic intermediates by preferential binding and unwinding Holliday junctions and replication fork structures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the loss of Irc3 can be complemented with mitochondrially targeted RecG of Escherichia coli. We suggest that Irc3 could support the stability of mtDNA by stimulating fork regression and branch migration or by inhibiting the formation of irregular branched molecules. PMID:27194389

  7. Biochemical enzyme analysis in acute leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, H G; Gaedicke, G; Minowada, J

    1985-01-01

    This report summarises the current knowledge regarding the clinical utility of biochemical enzyme markers for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in acute leukaemia. The enzymes studied most extensively in this field are terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase, adenosine deaminase, 5'-nucleotidase, purine nucleoside phosphorylase, and acid phosphatase, esterase, hexosaminidase isoenzymes. For each enzyme, the quantitative and qualitative characteristics in various immunologically defined subclasses of acute leukaemia are described. The quantitative evaluation of enzyme activities represents an adjunctive classification technique which should be incorporated into the multivariate analysis, the "multiple marker analysis." By qualitative characterisation pronounced heterogeneity of leukaemia subsets is uncovered. The application of 2'-deoxycoformycin, a specific inhibitor of adenosine deaminase, and the potential usefulness of two other enzymes as targets for treatment with selective agents is discussed. The concept that gene products expressed at certain developmental stages of normal cells can similarly be detected in leukaemic cells (which therefore seem to be "frozen" or "arrested" at this particular maturation/differentiation stage) is supported by the results obtained in enzyme studies. Besides their practical clinical importance for classification and treatment of acute leukaemias, biochemical enzyme markers constitute a valuable research tool to disclose biological properties of leukaemic cells. PMID:2981904

  8. Enzyme reaction annotation using cloud techniques.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chuan-Ching; Lin, Chun-Yuan; Chang, Cheng-Wen; Tang, Chuan Yi

    2013-01-01

    An understanding of the activities of enzymes could help to elucidate the metabolic pathways of thousands of chemical reactions that are catalyzed by enzymes in living systems. Sophisticated applications such as drug design and metabolic reconstruction could be developed using accurate enzyme reaction annotation. Because accurate enzyme reaction annotation methods create potential for enhanced production capacity in these applications, they have received greater attention in the global market. We propose the enzyme reaction prediction (ERP) method as a novel tool to deduce enzyme reactions from domain architecture. We used several frequency relationships between architectures and reactions to enhance the annotation rates for single and multiple catalyzed reactions. The deluge of information which arose from high-throughput techniques in the postgenomic era has improved our understanding of biological data, although it presents obstacles in the data-processing stage. The high computational capacity provided by cloud computing has resulted in an exponential growth in the volume of incoming data. Cloud services also relieve the requirement for large-scale memory space required by this approach to analyze enzyme kinetic data. Our tool is designed as a single execution file; thus, it could be applied to any cloud platform in which multiple queries are supported.

  9. Extracorporeal delivery of a therapeutic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chun; Pu, Jun; Yang, Xiaolan; Feng, Tao; Liu, Fang; Wang, Deqiang; Hu, Xiaolei; Gao, Ang; Liu, Hongbo; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Liao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    To remove circulating harmful small biochemical(s)/substrates causing/deteriorating certain chronic disease, therapeutic enzyme(s) delivered via vein injection/infusion suffer(s) from immunoresponse after repeated administration at proper intervals for a long time and short half-lives since delivery. Accordingly, a novel, generally-applicable extracorporeal delivery of a therapeutic enzyme is proposed, by refitting a conventional hemodialysis device bearing a dialyzer, two pumps and connecting tubes, to build a routine extracorporeal blood circuit but a minimal dialysate circuit closed to circulate the therapeutic enzyme in dialysate. A special quantitative index was derived to reflect pharmacological action and thus pharmacodynamics of the delivered enzyme. With hyperuricemic blood in vitro and hyperuricemic geese, a native uricase via extracorporeal delivery was active in the dialysate for periods much longer than that in vivo through vein injection, and exhibited the expected pharmacodynamics to remove uric acid in hyperuricemic blood in vitro and multiple forms of uric acid in hyperuricemic geese. Therefore, the extracorporeal delivery approach of therapeutic enzymes was effective to remove unwanted circulating small biochemical(s)/substrates, and was expected to avoid immunogenicity problems of therapeutic enzymes after repeated administration at proper intervals for a long time due to no contacts with macromolecules and cells in the body. PMID:27477538

  10. Extracorporeal delivery of a therapeutic enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun; Pu, Jun; Yang, Xiaolan; Feng, Tao; Liu, Fang; Wang, Deqiang; Hu, Xiaolei; Gao, Ang; Liu, Hongbo; Zhan, Chang-Guo; Liao, Fei

    2016-01-01

    To remove circulating harmful small biochemical(s)/substrates causing/deteriorating certain chronic disease, therapeutic enzyme(s) delivered via vein injection/infusion suffer(s) from immunoresponse after repeated administration at proper intervals for a long time and short half-lives since delivery. Accordingly, a novel, generally-applicable extracorporeal delivery of a therapeutic enzyme is proposed, by refitting a conventional hemodialysis device bearing a dialyzer, two pumps and connecting tubes, to build a routine extracorporeal blood circuit but a minimal dialysate circuit closed to circulate the therapeutic enzyme in dialysate. A special quantitative index was derived to reflect pharmacological action and thus pharmacodynamics of the delivered enzyme. With hyperuricemic blood in vitro and hyperuricemic geese, a native uricase via extracorporeal delivery was active in the dialysate for periods much longer than that in vivo through vein injection, and exhibited the expected pharmacodynamics to remove uric acid in hyperuricemic blood in vitro and multiple forms of uric acid in hyperuricemic geese. Therefore, the extracorporeal delivery approach of therapeutic enzymes was effective to remove unwanted circulating small biochemical(s)/substrates, and was expected to avoid immunogenicity problems of therapeutic enzymes after repeated administration at proper intervals for a long time due to no contacts with macromolecules and cells in the body. PMID:27477538

  11. Main factors providing specificity of repair enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nevinsky, G A

    2011-01-01

    Specific and nonspecific DNA complex formation with human uracil-DNA glycosylase, 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase, and apurine/apyrimidine endonuclease, as well as with E. coli 8-oxoguanine-DNA glycosylase and RecA protein was analyzed using the method of stepwise increase in DNA-ligand complexity. It is shown that high affinity of these enzymes to any DNA (10(-4)-10(-8) M) is provided by a large number of weak additive contacts mainly with DNA internucleoside phosphate groups and in a less degree with bases of nucleotide links "covered" by protein globules. Enzyme interactions with specific DNA links are comparable in efficiency with weak unspecific contacts and provide only for one-two orders of affinity (10(-1)-10(-2) M), but these contacts are extremely important at stages of DNA and enzyme structural adaptation and catalysis proper. Only in the case of specific DNA individual for each enzyme alterations in DNA structure provide for efficient adjustment of reacting enzyme atoms and DNA orbitals with accuracy up to 10-15° and, as a result, for high reaction rate. Upon transition from nonspecific to specific DNA, reaction rate (k(cat)) increases by 4-8 orders of magnitude. Thus, stages of DNA and enzyme structural adaptation as well as catalysis proper are the basis of specificity of repair enzymes. PMID:21568843

  12. Enzyme activity down to -100 degrees C.

    PubMed

    Bragger, J M; Dunn, R V; Daniel, R M

    2000-07-14

    The activities of two enzymes, beef liver catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) and calf intestine alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1), have been measured down to -97 degrees C and -100 degrees C, respectively. Enzyme activity has not previously been measured at such low temperatures. For catalase, the cryosolvents used were methanol:ethylene glycol:water (70:10:20) and DMSO:ethylene glycol:water (60:20:20). For alkaline phosphatase, methanol:ethylene glycol:water (70:10:20) was used. All of the Arrhenius plots were linear over the whole of the temperature range examined. Since the lowest temperatures at which activity was measured are well below the dynamic transition observed for proteins, the results indicate that the motions which cease below the dynamic transition are not essential for enzyme activity. In all cases the use of cryosolvent led to substantial increases in Arrhenius activation energies, and this imposed practical limitations on the measurement of enzyme activity below -100 degrees C. At even lower temperatures, enzyme activity may be limited by the effect of solvent fluidity on substrate/product diffusion, but overall there is no evidence that any intrinsic enzyme property imposes a lower temperature limit for enzyme activity. PMID:10899628

  13. 13 CFR 107.115 - 1940 Act and 1980 Act Companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 1940 Act and 1980 Act Companies... INVESTMENT COMPANIES Qualifying for an SBIC License Organizing An Sbic § 107.115 1940 Act and 1980 Act Companies. A 1940 Act or 1980 Act Company is eligible to apply for an SBIC license, and an existing...

  14. ACT and General Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Katherine A.; Frey, Meredith C.; Detterman, Douglas K.

    2008-01-01

    Research on the SAT has shown a substantial correlation with measures of "g" such as the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB). Another widely administered test for college admission is the American College Test (ACT). Using the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, measures of "g" were derived from the ASVAB and correlated with…

  15. 78 FR 46256 - Privacy Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION 11 CFR Part 1 Privacy Act CFR Correction In Title 11 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 1, 2012, on page 5, in Sec. 1.2, the words ``95 and 96 of the Internal Revenue Code...

  16. Clean Water Act amendments debated

    SciTech Connect

    Deland, M.R.

    1982-08-01

    A short discussion of the debate taking place between Congress, industry and environmental groups with respect to the amendments to the Clean Water Act is presented. The discussion considers the EPA proposal, the reaction to it, and the prognosis for passage. (KRM)

  17. The Indian Child Welfare Act.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Katy Jo

    The Indian Child Welfare Act of 1978 (I.C.W.A.) is federal legislation which preempts state law whenever Indian children may be removed from their families. The I.C.W.A. permits Indian tribal courts to decide the future of Indian children, establishes minimum federal standards for removal of Indian children from their families, requires that…

  18. Clery Act: Road to Compliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeal, Laura R.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore what factors served as impediments to institutional efforts to comply with Clery Act guidelines through the perceptions of campus law administrators. Statistical analyses were performed on data collected from an online survey, which was distributed to members of the International Association of Campus Law…

  19. FDA Food Safety Modernization Act

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Sutton, Betty [D-OH-13

    2009-06-08

    01/04/2011 Became Public Law No: 111-353. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: H.R.2751 was introduced and first passed the House as the Consumer Assistance to Recycle and Save Act. Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. The Mismetallation of Enzymes during Oxidative Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Mononuclear iron enzymes can tightly bind non-activating metals. How do cells avoid mismetallation? The model bacterium Escherichia coli may control its metal pools so that thermodynamics favor the correct metallation of each enzyme. This system is disrupted, however, by superoxide and hydrogen peroxide. These species oxidize ferrous iron and thereby displace it from many iron-dependent mononuclear enzymes. Ultimately, zinc binds in its place, confers little activity, and imposes metabolic bottlenecks. Data suggest that E. coli compensates by using thiols to extract the zinc and by importing manganese to replace the catalytic iron atom. Manganese resists oxidants and provides substantial activity. PMID:25160623

  1. Visualizing enzyme infusion into apple tissue.

    PubMed

    Culver, C A; Bjurlin, M A; Fulcher, R G

    2000-12-01

    Enzymes traditionally used in food processing are applied to ground or macerated tissue with little or no retention of cellular structure. More recently developed applications use enzymes to selectively alter tissue properties while retaining some structure. Process development has been hindered by the lack of conclusive evidence showing that enzyme infusion into plant tissue pieces is possible. This study provides direct evidence that such infusion is possible by using fluorescence microscopy to monitor vacuum infusion of fluorescein-labeled alpha-amylase into apple cubes. This method is generally applicable to any plant or animal tissue and to any macromolecule capable of derivatization. PMID:11141264

  2. MILK-CLOTTING ENZYMES FROM MICROORGANISMS.

    PubMed

    SRINIVASAN, R A; IYENGAR, M K; BABBAR, I J; CHAKRAVORTY, S C; DUDANI, A T; IYA, K K

    1964-11-01

    A total of 230 cultures of fungi and 43 cultures of bacteria, isolated from such sources as soil, butter, and milk, were screened for their milk-clotting activity. The fungi were cultivated on semisolid media, and the bacteria were grown in milk media in shake culture. Phytic acid, added as calcium phytate, was found to stimulate production of the enzyme in most of the bacterial isolates. Proteolytic activity was invariably found to be associated with the milk-clotting enzyme in bacterial isolates. There was considerable variation in the ratio of the two enzymes from strain to strain.

  3. Process for preparing multilayer enzyme coating on a fiber

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Jungbae; Kwak, Ja Hun; Grate, Jay W.

    2009-11-03

    A process for preparing high stability, high activity biocatalytic materials is disclosed and processes for using the same. The process involves coating of a material or fiber with enzymes and enzyme aggregate providing a material or fiber with high biocatalytic activity and stability useful in heterogeneous environments. In one illustrative approach, enzyme "seeds" are covalently attached to polymer nanofibers followed by treatment with a reagent that crosslinks additional enzyme molecules to the seed enzymes forming enzyme aggregates thereby improving biocatalytic activity due to increased enzyme loading and enzyme stability. This approach creates a useful new biocatalytic immobilized enzyme system with potential applications in bioconversion, bioremediation, biosensors, and biofuel cells.

  4. Immobilized enzymes in organic media: Determinants of water dependence. Progress statement

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, S.; DeFilippi, I.; Bedwell, B.; Zemel, H.

    1994-08-01

    The overall goals of this project are to investigate the critical factors that limit commercial scale applications of enzymes in organic solvents, and to scale-up a process for the production of a precursor to a specialty polymer. The overall performance of an immobilized enzyme can be influenced by its intrinsic structure and by external factors such as water content, support, pH, etc.. We have investigated the interrelation between support morphology and water content, and its effect on overall enzyme performance. Using a lipase catalyzed inter-esterification reaction as a model, we studied the controlling factors when water content in the organic solvent is such that a micro-aqueous phase is formed. In such an environment it was found that support particle aggregation is the major cause for decline in enzyme activity. We have shown that particle porosity, as well as the use of a particular non-woven fabric as an enzyme support, could alleviate this problem. These findings are being translated into a bioreactor design. We have also studied two {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} non-aqueous systems, where a water phase is not formed since the water content is below its solubility in the organic solvent. In one of the systems, Subtilisin catalyzed trans-esterification of vinyl acrylate with a chiral alcohol, we have demonstrated that the use of a proprietary fabric support provides a significant boost in enzyme activity. We suggest that this particular fabric with its hydrophilic fibers acts as a lyoprotectant in the process of drying the enzyme. The benefits of this material as an enzyme support and its use in a lab scale bioreactor are being studied. Preliminary experiments have also been performed with a second {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} reaction. This is the lipase catalyzed synthesis of AlliedSignal`s new product, VEctomer 4010.

  5. Enzyme stabilization by glass-derived silicates in glass-exposed aqueous solutions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ives, J.A.; Moffett, J.R.; Arun, P.; Lam, D.; Todorov, T.I.; Brothers, A.B.; Anick, D.J.; Centeno, J.; Namboodiri, M.A.A.; Jonas, W.B.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the solutes leaching from glass containers into aqueous solutions, and to show that these solutes have enzyme activity stabilizing effects in very dilute solutions. Methods: Enzyme assays with acetylcholine esterase were used to analyze serially succussed and diluted (SSD) solutions prepared in glass and plastic containers. Aqueous SSD preparations starting with various solutes, or water alone, were prepared under several conditions, and tested for their solute content and their ability to affect enzyme stability in dilute solution. Results: We confirm that water acts to dissolve constituents from glass vials, and show that the solutes derived from the glass have effects on enzymes in the resultant solutions. Enzyme assays demonstrated that enzyme stability in purified and deionized water was enhanced in SSD solutions that were prepared in glass containers, but not those prepared in plastic. The increased enzyme stability could be mimicked in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of silicates to the purified, deionized water that enzymes were dissolved in. Elemental analyses of SSD water preparations made in glass vials showed that boron, silicon, and sodium were present at micromolar concentrations. Conclusions: These results show that silicates and other solutes are present at micromolar levels in all glass-exposed solutions, whether pharmaceutical or homeopathic in nature. Even though silicates are known to have biological activity at higher concentrations, the silicate concentrations we measured in homeopathic preparations were too low to account for any purported in vivo efficacy, but could potentially influence in vitro biological assays reporting homeopathic effects. ?? 2009 The Faculty of Homeopathy.

  6. ADAR2 editing enzyme is a novel human immunodeficiency virus-1 proviral factor.

    PubMed

    Doria, Margherita; Tomaselli, Sara; Neri, Francesca; Ciafrè, Silvia Anna; Farace, Maria Giulia; Michienzi, Alessandro; Gallo, Angela

    2011-05-01

    The adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) enzymes catalyse conversion of adenosine to inosine in dsRNA. A positive effect of ADAR1 on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication has recently been reported. Here, we show that another ADAR enzyme, ADAR2, positively affects the replication process of HIV-1. We found that, analogously to ADAR1, ADAR2 enhances the release of progeny virions by an editing-dependent mechanism. However, differently from the ADAR1 enzyme, ADAR2 does not increase the infectious potential of the virus. Importantly, downregulation of ADAR2 in Jurkat cells significantly impairs viral replication. Therefore, ADAR2 shares some but not all proviral functions of ADAR1. These results suggest a novel role of ADAR2 as a viral regulator. PMID:21289159

  7. Substrate tunnels in enzymes: structure-function relationships and computational methodology.

    PubMed

    Kingsley, Laura J; Lill, Markus A

    2015-04-01

    In enzymes, the active site is the location where incoming substrates are chemically converted to products. In some enzymes, this site is deeply buried within the core of the protein, and, in order to access the active site, substrates must pass through the body of the protein via a tunnel. In many systems, these tunnels act as filters and have been found to influence both substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism. Identifying and understanding how these tunnels exert such control has been of growing interest over the past several years because of implications in fields such as protein engineering and drug design. This growing interest has spurred the development of several computational methods to identify and analyze tunnels and how ligands migrate through these tunnels. The goal of this review is to outline how tunnels influence substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency in enzymes with buried active sites and to provide a brief summary of the computational tools used to identify and evaluate these tunnels.

  8. Structure-based repurposing of FDA-approved drugs as inhibitors of NEDD8-activating enzyme.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hai-Jing; Liu, Li-Juan; Chan, Daniel Shiu-Hin; Wang, Hui-Min; Chan, Philip Wai Hong; Ma, Dik-Lung; Leung, Chung-Hang

    2014-07-01

    We report the discovery of an inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) by an integrated virtual screening approach. Piperacillin 1 inhibited NAE activity in cell-free and cell-based systems with high selectivity. Furthermore, piperacillin 1 was able to inhibit the degradation of the NAE downstream protein substrate p27(kip1). Our molecular modeling and kinetic studies suggested that this compound may act as a non-covalent ATP-competitive inhibitor of NAE.

  9. Invariants reveal multiple forms of robustness in bifunctional enzyme systems.

    PubMed

    Dexter, Joseph P; Dasgupta, Tathagata; Gunawardena, Jeremy

    2015-08-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies have suggested that bifunctional enzymes catalyzing opposing modification and demodification reactions can confer steady-state concentration robustness to their substrates. However, the types of robustness and the biochemical basis for them have remained elusive. Here we report a systematic study of the most general biochemical reaction network for a bifunctional enzyme acting on a substrate with one modification site, along with eleven sub-networks with more specialized biochemical assumptions. We exploit ideas from computational algebraic geometry, introduced in previous work, to find a polynomial expression (an invariant) between the steady state concentrations of the modified and unmodified substrate for each network. We use these invariants to identify five classes of robust behavior: robust upper bounds on concentration, robust two-sided bounds on concentration ratio, hybrid robustness, absolute concentration robustness (ACR), and robust concentration ratio. This analysis demonstrates that robustness can take a variety of forms and that the type of robustness is sensitive to many biochemical details, with small changes in biochemistry leading to very different steady-state behaviors. In particular, we find that the widely-studied ACR requires highly specialized assumptions in addition to bifunctionality. An unexpected result is that the robust bounds derived from invariants are strictly tighter than those derived by ad hoc manipulation of the underlying differential equations, confirming the value of invariants as a tool to gain insight into biochemical reaction networks. Furthermore, invariants yield multiple experimentally testable predictions and illuminate new strategies for inferring enzymatic mechanisms from steady-state measurements.

  10. 21 CFR 184.1287 - Enzyme-modified fats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enzyme-modified fats. 184.1287 Section 184.1287... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1287 Enzyme-modified fats. (a) Enzyme-modified refined beef fat, enzyme-modified butterfat, and enzyme-modified steam-rendered chicken fat are...

  11. 21 CFR 184.1287 - Enzyme-modified fats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Enzyme-modified fats. 184.1287 Section 184.1287... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1287 Enzyme-modified fats. (a) Enzyme-modified refined beef fat, enzyme-modified butterfat, and enzyme-modified steam-rendered chicken fat are...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1287 - Enzyme-modified fats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enzyme-modified fats. 184.1287 Section 184.1287... GRAS § 184.1287 Enzyme-modified fats. (a) Enzyme-modified refined beef fat, enzyme-modified butterfat, and enzyme-modified steam-rendered chicken fat are prepared from refined beef fat; butterfat...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1287 - Enzyme-modified fats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Enzyme-modified fats. 184.1287 Section 184.1287... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1287 Enzyme-modified fats. (a) Enzyme-modified refined beef fat, enzyme-modified butterfat, and enzyme-modified steam-rendered chicken fat are...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1287 - Enzyme-modified fats.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enzyme-modified fats. 184.1287 Section 184.1287... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1287 Enzyme-modified fats. (a) Enzyme-modified refined beef fat, enzyme-modified butterfat, and enzyme-modified steam-rendered chicken fat are...

  15. Potato Peroxidase for the Study of Enzyme Properties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shamaefsky, Brian R.

    1993-01-01

    Explains how the surface of a freshly sliced potato can be used for a variety of enzyme action experiments including the influence of pH on enzyme action, the enzyme denaturation potential of boiling water, the inhibition of enzymes by heavy metals, and the effects of salt concentration on enzyme effectiveness. (PR)

  16. Dietary modulation of thymic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Susana, Feliu María; Paula, Perris; Slobodianik, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Malnutrition is a complex syndrome caused by an inadequate intake of energy, protein, minerals and vitamins which affects the immune system. Nutritional imbalances, present in children with energy-protein malnutrition and infections, make defining the specific effects of each of them on the thymus difficult. For this reason, it is necessary to design an experimental model in animals that could define a single variable. As the thymus atrophy described in humans is similar to that observed in murines, a rat experimental model makes the extrapolation to man possible. Some authors suggest that the activity of Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) and Purine Nucleoside Phosphorylase (PNP)--involved in purine metabolism--have an influence on T lymphocyte development and the immune system, due to intracellular accumulation of toxic levels of deoxynucleotides. Studies in our group, performed in an experimental model on Wistar growing rats, have demonstrated that protein deficiency or imbalance in the profile of essential amino acids in the diet, produce loss of thymus weight, reduction in the number of thymocytes, a diminished proportion of T cells presenting the W3/13 antigenic determinant and DNA content with concomitant increase in cell size, and the proportion of immature T cells and activity of ADA and PNP, without modifying the activity of 5´Nucleotidase in the thymus. It is important to point out that there were neither differences in energy intake between experimental groups and their controls, nor clinical symptoms of deficiency of other nutrients. The increase in these thymic enzyme activities was an alternative mechanism to avoid the accumulation of high levels of deoxynucleotides, which would be toxic for T lymphocytes. On the other hand, the administration of a recovery diet, with a high amount of high quality protein, was able to reverse the mentioned effects. The quick reply of Adenosine Deaminase to nutritional disorders and the following nutritional recovery, points

  17. Purification and Properties of an Enzyme Capable of Degrading the Sheath of Sphaerotilus natans

    PubMed Central

    Takeda, Minoru; Iohara, Keishi; Shinmaru, Sachie; Suzuki, Ichiro; Koizumi, Jun-Ichi

    2000-01-01

    Microorganisms which can degrade and grow on the purified sheath of a sheathed bacterium Sphaerotilus natans were collected from soil and river water. Two bacterial strains were isolated from the soil and designated strains TB and TK. Both strains are rod shaped, negatively stained by gram staining, facultatively anaerobic, and formed ellipsoidal endospores. These characteristics suggested that the isolates belong to the genus Paenibacillus, according to Ash et al. (C. Ash, F. G. Priest, and M. D. Collins, Antonie Leeuwenhoek 64:253–260, 1993). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rDNA supported this possibility. Purification of the sheath-degrading enzyme was carried out from the culture broth of strain TB. The molecular weight of the enzyme was calculated to be 78,000 and 50,000 by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis and gel filtration chromatography, respectively. Enzyme activity was optimized at pH 6.5 to 7.0 and 30 to 40°C. The reaction was accelerated by the addition of Mg2+, Ca2+, Fe3+, and iodoacetamide, whereas it was inhibited by the addition of Cu2+, Mn2+, and dithiothreitol. The enzyme acted on the polysaccharide moiety of the sheath, producing an oligosaccharide the size of which was between the sizes of maltopentaose and maltohexaose. As the reaction proceeded, the absorbance at 235 nm of the reaction mixture increased, suggesting the generation of unsaturated sugars. Incorporation of unsaturated sugars was also suggested by the thiobarbituric acid reaction. It is possible that the enzyme is not a hydrolytic enzyme but a kind of polysaccharide eliminase which acts on the basic polysaccharide. PMID:11055955

  18. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions.The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the cloning, expression, and purification of all proteins, as well as supplementary figures and calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04181g

  19. Impact of enzyme loading on the efficacy and recovery of cellulolytic enzymes immobilized on enzymogel nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Samaratunga, Ashani; Kudina, Olena; Nahar, Nurun; Zakharchenko, Andrey; Minko, Sergiy; Voronov, Andriy; Pryor, Scott W

    2015-03-01

    Cellulase and β-glucosidase were adsorbed on a polyacrylic acid polymer brush grafted on silica nanoparticles to produce enzymogels as a form of enzyme immobilization. Enzyme loading on the enzymogels was increased to a saturation level of approximately 110 μg (protein) mg(-1) (particle) for each enzyme. Enzymogels with varied enzyme loadings were then used to determine the impact on hydrolysis rate and enzyme recovery. Soluble sugar concentrations during the hydrolysis of filter paper and Solka-Floc with the enzymogels were 45 and 53%, respectively, of concentrations when using free cellulase. β-Glucosidase enzymogels showed lower performance; hydrolyzate glucose concentrations were just 38% of those using free enzymes. Increasing enzyme loading on the enzymogels did not reduce net efficacy for cellulase and improved efficacy for β-glucosidase. The use of free cellulases and cellulase enzymogels resulted in hydrolyzates with different proportions of cellobiose and glucose, suggesting differential attachment or efficacy of endoglucanases, exoglucanases, and β-glucosidases present in cellulase mixtures. When loading β-glucosidase individually, higher enzyme loadings on the enzymogels produced higher hydrolyzate glucose concentrations. Approximately 96% of cellulase and 66 % of β-glucosidase were recovered on the enzymogels, while enzyme loading level did not impact recovery for either enzyme.

  20. 34 CFR 300.4 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Definitions Used in This Part § 300.4 Act. Act means the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 300.4 Section 300.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE...

  1. 7 CFR 35.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Definitions § 35.1 Act. Act or Export Grape and Plum Act means “An Act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in grapes and plums, to protect the reputation of American-grown grapes and plums...

  2. 7 CFR 35.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Definitions § 35.1 Act. Act or Export Grape and Plum Act means “An Act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in grapes and plums, to protect the reputation of American-grown grapes and plums...

  3. 7 CFR 35.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Definitions § 35.1 Act. Act or Export Grape and Plum Act means “An Act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in grapes and plums, to protect the reputation of American-grown grapes and plums...

  4. 7 CFR 35.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Definitions § 35.1 Act. Act or Export Grape and Plum Act means “An Act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in grapes and plums, to protect the reputation of American-grown grapes and plums...

  5. 7 CFR 35.1 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Definitions § 35.1 Act. Act or Export Grape and Plum Act means “An Act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in grapes and plums, to protect the reputation of American-grown grapes and plums...

  6. 7 CFR 1205.10 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.10 Act. The term Act means the Cotton Research and Promotion Act, as amended . ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Act. 1205.10 Section 1205.10 Agriculture...

  7. 7 CFR 1205.10 - Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.10 Act. The term Act means the Cotton Research and Promotion Act, as amended . ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Act. 1205.10 Section 1205.10 Agriculture...

  8. 40 CFR 791.105 - Prohibited acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prohibited acts. 791.105 Section 791.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Prohibited Acts § 791.105 Prohibited acts. Failure to provide...

  9. 40 CFR 791.105 - Prohibited acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prohibited acts. 791.105 Section 791.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Prohibited Acts § 791.105 Prohibited acts. Failure to provide...

  10. 40 CFR 791.105 - Prohibited acts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Prohibited acts. 791.105 Section 791.105 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT (CONTINUED) DATA REIMBURSEMENT Prohibited Acts § 791.105 Prohibited acts. Failure to provide...

  11. Acting Out; Theoretical and Clinical Aspects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abt, Lawrence Edwin, Ed.; Weissman, Stuart L.

    The beneficial and harmful effects of acting out are studied in a series of short essays by numerous authors. Included are four articles on the theoretical and dynamic considerations of acting out, along with five clinical manifestations of acting out involving suicide and criminality in adolescents and adults. Special forms of harmful acting out…

  12. 76 FR 25665 - No Fear Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-05

    ... COMMISSION No Fear Act AGENCY: American Battle Monuments Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The American... FEAR Act), as implemented by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) regulations at 5 CFR part 724... Retaliation Act of 2002,'' which is now known as the No FEAR Act. See Public Law 107-174, codified at 5...

  13. Practical Enzyme Kinetics: A Biochemical Laboratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, H. Alan; Brown, Morris

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment that provides a fundamental understanding of the kinetics of the enzyme papain. Discusses background, materials, procedures and results. Mentions analogous experiments that can be conducted with enzymatic contact-lens cleaning solutions. (CW)

  14. Ribonucleotide reductases: essential enzymes for bacterial life

    PubMed Central

    Torrents, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme that mediates the synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the DNA precursors, for DNA synthesis in every living cell. This enzyme converts ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA replication, and repair. Clearly, RNR enzymes have contributed to the appearance of genetic material that exists today, being essential for the evolution of all organisms on Earth. The strict control of RNR activity and dNTP pool sizes is important, as pool imbalances increase mutation rates, replication anomalies, and genome instability. Thus, RNR activity should be finely regulated allosterically and at the transcriptional level. In this review we examine the distribution, the evolution, and the genetic regulation of bacterial RNRs. Moreover, this enzyme can be considered an ideal target for anti-proliferative compounds designed to inhibit cell replication in eukaryotic cells (cancer cells), parasites, viruses, and bacteria. PMID:24809024

  15. Ribonucleotide reductases: essential enzymes for bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Torrents, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme that mediates the synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the DNA precursors, for DNA synthesis in every living cell. This enzyme converts ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA replication, and repair. Clearly, RNR enzymes have contributed to the appearance of genetic material that exists today, being essential for the evolution of all organisms on Earth. The strict control of RNR activity and dNTP pool sizes is important, as pool imbalances increase mutation rates, replication anomalies, and genome instability. Thus, RNR activity should be finely regulated allosterically and at the transcriptional level. In this review we examine the distribution, the evolution, and the genetic regulation of bacterial RNRs. Moreover, this enzyme can be considered an ideal target for anti-proliferative compounds designed to inhibit cell replication in eukaryotic cells (cancer cells), parasites, viruses, and bacteria. PMID:24809024

  16. Biotechnological relevance of starch-degrading enzymes

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    Traditional enzymes, such as the amylases and the proteases, have been improved, novel applications have been found and new and valuable products have been marketed. The enzymatic hydrolysis of starch is described in some detail. (Refs. 8).

  17. Microbial enzymes: tools for biotechnological processes.

    PubMed

    Adrio, Jose L; Demain, Arnold L

    2014-01-16

    Microbial enzymes are of great importance in the development of industrial bioprocesses. Current applications are focused on many different markets including pulp and paper, leather, detergents and textiles, pharmaceuticals, chemical, food and beverages, biofuels, animal feed and personal care, among others. Today there is a need for new, improved or/and more versatile enzymes in order to develop more novel, sustainable and economically competitive production processes. Microbial diversity and modern molecular techniques, such as metagenomics and genomics, are being used to discover new microbial enzymes whose catalytic properties can be improved/modified by different strategies based on rational, semi-rational and random directed evolution. Most industrial enzymes are recombinant forms produced in bacteria and fungi.

  18. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Littlechild, Jennifer A

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in "extreme" conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches.

  19. Ribonucleotide reductases: essential enzymes for bacterial life.

    PubMed

    Torrents, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is a key enzyme that mediates the synthesis of deoxyribonucleotides, the DNA precursors, for DNA synthesis in every living cell. This enzyme converts ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides, the building blocks for DNA replication, and repair. Clearly, RNR enzymes have contributed to the appearance of genetic material that exists today, being essential for the evolution of all organisms on Earth. The strict control of RNR activity and dNTP pool sizes is important, as pool imbalances increase mutation rates, replication anomalies, and genome instability. Thus, RNR activity should be finely regulated allosterically and at the transcriptional level. In this review we examine the distribution, the evolution, and the genetic regulation of bacterial RNRs. Moreover, this enzyme can be considered an ideal target for anti-proliferative compounds designed to inhibit cell replication in eukaryotic cells (cancer cells), parasites, viruses, and bacteria.

  20. Enzyme mechanisms: Flexibility leads to function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Rubinstein, John L.

    2014-03-01

    ATP synthase is an important enzyme for the storage and release of energy in cells. Ion-mobility mass spectrometry has now been used to study its structure, revealing important mechanistic details about its operation and regulation.

  1. Impulsive Enzymes: A New Force in Mechanobiology

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Peter J.; Dey, Krishna K.; Sen, Ayusman

    2015-01-01

    We review studies that quantify newly discovered forces from single enzymatic reactions. These forces arise from the conversion of chemical energy to kinetic energy, which can be harnessed to direct diffusion of the enzyme up a concentration gradient of substrate, a novel phenomenon of molecular chemotaxis. When immobilized, enzymes can move fluid around them and perform directional pumping in microfluidic chambers. Because of the extensive array of enzymes in biological cells, we also develop three new hypotheses: that enzymatic self diffusion can assist in organizing signaling pathways in cells, can assist in pumping of fluid in cells, and can impose biologically significant forces on organelles, which will be manifested as stochastic motion not explained by thermal forces or myosin II. Such mechanochemical phenomena open up new directions in research in mechanobiology in which all enzymes, in addition to their primary function as catalysts for reactions, may have secondary functions as initiators of mechanosensitive transduction pathways. PMID:26019728

  2. An enzyme immunoassay for plasma betamethasone

    SciTech Connect

    Kominami, G.; Yamauchi, A.; Ishihara, S.; Kono, M.

    1981-03-01

    A sensitive enzyme immunoassay for plasma betamethasone was developed using betamethasone-3-(O-carboxymethyl)oxime-beta-D-galactosidase conjugate as a labelled antigen and 4-methylumbelliferyl-beta-D-galactoside as a fluorescence substrate. The performances of the enzyme immunoassay were compared with that of a radioimmunoassay using /sup 3/H-betamethasone and the same antiserum. The minimal detectable level for the enzyme immunoassay was 0.15 pg/tube or 0.15 ng/ml of plasma, which was remarkably more sensitive than the radioimmunoassay level of 10 pg/tube or 2 ng/ml of plasma. The specificity was sufficient, in particular, the cross reactivity of cortisol as 0.008%. However, the precision of the enzyme immunoassay was inferior to that of the radioimmunoassay.

  3. Imaging enzyme kinetics at atomic resolution.

    PubMed

    Spence, John; Lattman, Eaton

    2016-07-01

    Serial crystallography at a synchrotron has been used to obtain time-resolved atomic resolution density maps of enzyme catalysis in copper nitrite reductase. Similar XFEL studies, intended to out-run radiation damage, will also soon appear. PMID:27437108

  4. On the hydrodynamics of swimming enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Xiaoyu; Wolynes, Peter G.

    2015-10-01

    Several recent experiments suggest that rather generally the diffusion of enzymes may be augmented through their activity. We demonstrate that such swimming motility can emerge from the interplay between the enzyme energy landscape and the hydrodynamic coupling of the enzyme to its environment. Swimming thus occurs during the transit time of a transient allosteric change. We estimate the velocity during the transition. The analysis of such a swimming motion suggests the final stroke size is limited by the hydrodynamic size of the enzyme. This limit is quite a bit smaller than the values that can be inferred from the recent experiments. We also show that one proposed explanation of the experiments based on reaction heat effects can be ruled out using an extended hydrodynamic analysis. These results lead us to propose an alternate explanation of the fluorescence correlation measurements.

  5. Enzyme Reactions in Nanoporous, Picoliter Volume Containers

    SciTech Connect

    Siuti, Piro; Retterer, Scott T; Choi, Chang Kyoung; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2012-01-01

    Advancements in nanoscale fabrication allow creation of small volume reaction containers that can facilitate the screening and characterization of enzymes. A porous, ~19 pL volume vessel has been used in this work to carry out enzyme reactions under varying substrate concentrations. Glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase can be contained in these structures and diffusively fed with a solution containing glucose and the fluorogenic substrate Amplex Red through the engineered nanoscale pore structure. Fluorescent microscopy was used to monitor the reaction, which was carried out under microfluidic control. Kinetic characteristics of the enzyme were evaluated and compared with results from conventional scale reactions. These picoliter, nanoporous containers can facilitate quick determination of enzyme kinetics in microfluidic systems without the requirement of surface tethering and can be used for applications in drug discovery, clinical diagnostics and high-throughput screening.

  6. Microbial Enzymes: Tools for Biotechnological Processes

    PubMed Central

    Adrio, Jose L.; Demain, Arnold L.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial enzymes are of great importance in the development of industrial bioprocesses. Current applications are focused on many different markets including pulp and paper, leather, detergents and textiles, pharmaceuticals, chemical, food and beverages, biofuels, animal feed and personal care, among others. Today there is a need for new, improved or/and more versatile enzymes in order to develop more novel, sustainable and economically competitive production processes. Microbial diversity and modern molecular techniques, such as metagenomics and genomics, are being used to discover new microbial enzymes whose catalytic properties can be improved/modified by different strategies based on rational, semi-rational and random directed evolution. Most industrial enzymes are recombinant forms produced in bacteria and fungi. PMID:24970208

  7. Archaeal Enzymes and Applications in Industrial Biocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Littlechild, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Archaeal enzymes are playing an important role in industrial biotechnology. Many representatives of organisms living in “extreme” conditions, the so-called Extremophiles, belong to the archaeal kingdom of life. This paper will review studies carried by the Exeter group and others regarding archaeal enzymes that have important applications in commercial biocatalysis. Some of these biocatalysts are already being used in large scale industrial processes for the production of optically pure drug intermediates and amino acids and their analogues. Other enzymes have been characterised at laboratory scale regarding their substrate specificity and properties for potential industrial application. The increasing availability of DNA sequences from new archaeal species and metagenomes will provide a continuing resource to identify new enzymes of commercial interest using both bioinformatics and screening approaches. PMID:26494981

  8. Enzymes as useful tools for environmental purposes.

    PubMed

    Rao, M A; Scelza, R; Acevedo, F; Diez, M C; Gianfreda, L

    2014-07-01

    In the environment enzymes may play important and different roles at least in three cases: as main agents (as isolated, cell-bound or immobilized enzymes) in charge of either the transformation and/or degradation of compounds polluting the environment and the restoration of the polluted environment; as reliable and sensitive tools to detect and measure the amount and concentration of pollutants before, during and after the restoration process; as reliable, easy and sensitive indicators of quality and health status of the environment subjected to the restoration process. To our knowledge papers or reviews integrating findings on these three functions of enzymes are missing in literature. Therefore the main scope of the present paper is to briefly encompass general and specific concepts about roles of enzymes as decontaminating agents, pollutant assaying agents and indicators of environment safety. Examples chosen among those published very recently, supporting and confirming peculiarities, features, and performance of enzymatic agents will be illustrated.

  9. Deciphering enzyme function using peptide arrays.

    PubMed

    Thiele, Alexandra; Stangl, Gabriele I; Schutkowski, Mike

    2011-11-01

    Enzymes are key molecules in signal-transduction pathways. However, only a small fraction of more than 500 human kinases, 300 human proteases and 200 human phosphatases is characterised so far. Peptide microarray based technologies for extremely efficient profiling of enzyme substrate specificity emerged in the last years. This technology reduces set-up time for HTS assays and allows the identification of downstream targets. Moreover, peptide microarrays enable optimisation of enzyme substrates. Focus of this review is on assay principles for measuring activities of kinases, phosphatases or proteases and on substrate identification/optimisation for kinases. Additionally, several examples for reliable identification of substrates for lysine methyl-transferases, histone deacetylases and SUMO-transferases are given. Finally, use of high-density peptide microarrays for the simultaneous profiling of kinase activities in complex biological samples like cell lysates or lysates of complete organisms is described. All published examples of peptide arrays used for enzyme profiling are summarised comprehensively.

  10. Enzyme clustering can induce metabolic channeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellana, Michele

    2015-03-01

    Direct channeling of intermediates via a physical tunnel between enzyme active sites is an established mechanism to improve metabolic efficiency. In this talk, I will present a theoretical model that demonstrates that coclustering multiple enzymes into proximity can yield the full efficiency benefits of direct channeling. The model predicts the separation and size of coclusters that maximize metabolic efficiency, and this prediction is in agreement with the spacing between coclusters in yeast and mammalian cells. The model also predicts that enzyme agglomerates can regulate steady-state flux division at metabolic branch points: we experimentally test this prediction for a fundamental branch point in Escherichia coli, and the results confirm that enzyme colocalization within an agglomerate can accelerate the processing of a shared intermediate by one branch. Our studies establish a quantitative framework to understand coclustering-mediated metabolic channeling and its application to both efficiency improvement and metabolic regulation.

  11. Five enzymes of the glycolytic pathway serve as substrates for purified epidermal-growth-factor-receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Reiss, N; Kanety, H; Schlessinger, J

    1986-01-01

    Several enzymes of the glycolytic pathway are phosphorylated in vitro and in vivo by retroviral transforming protein kinases. These substrates include the enzymes phosphoglycerate mutase (PGM), enolase and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Here we show that purified EGF (epidermal growth factor)-receptor kinase phosphorylates the enzymes PGM and enolase and also the key regulatory enzymes of the glycolytic pathway, phosphofructokinase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), in an EGF-dependent manner. Stoichiometry of phosphate incorporation into GAPDH (calculated from native Mr) is the highest, reaching approximately 1. LDH and other enzymes of the glycolytic pathway are not phosphorylated by the purified EGF-receptor kinase. These enzymes are phosphorylated under native conditions, and the Km values of EGF-receptor kinase for their phosphorylation are close to the physiological concentrations of these enzymes in the cell. EGF stimulates the reaction by 2-5-fold by increasing the Vmax. without affecting the Km of this process. Phosphorylation is rapid at 22 degrees C and at higher temperatures. However, unlike the self-phosphorylation of EGF-receptor, which occurs at 4 degrees C, the glycolytic enzymes are poorly phosphorylated at this temperature. Some enzymes, in particular enolase, increase the receptor Km for ATP in the autophosphorylation process and thus may act as competitive inhibitors of EGF-receptor self-phosphorylation. On the basis of the Km values of EGF receptor for the substrate enzymes and for ATP in the phosphorylation reaction, these enzymes may also be substrates in vivo for the EGF-receptor kinase. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. Fig. 6. PMID:3030270

  12. Evidence for Independent Genetic Control of the Multiple Forms of Maize Endosperm Branching Enzymes and Starch Synthases 12

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, Charles D.; Preiss, Jack

    1981-01-01

    Soluble starch synthase and starch-branching enzymes in extracts from kernels of four maize genotypes were compared. Extracts from normal (nonmutant) maize were found to contain two starch synthases and three branching enzyme fractions. The different fractions could be distinguished by chromatographic properties and kinetic properties under various assay conditions. Kernels homozygous for the recessive amylose-extender (ae) allele were missing branching enzyme IIb. In addition, the citrate-stimulated activity of starch synthase I was reduced. This activity could be regenerated by the addition of branching enzyme to this fraction. No other starch synthase fractions were different from normal enzymes. Extracts from kernels homozygous for the recessive dull (du) allele were found to contain lower branching enzyme IIa and starch synthase II activities. Other fractions were not different from the normal enzymes. Analysis of extracts from kernels of the double mutant ae du indicated that the two mutants act independently. Branching enzyme IIb was absent and the citrate-stimulated reaction of starch synthase I was reduced but could be regenerated by the addition of branching enzyme (ae properties) and both branching enzyme IIa and starch synthase II were greatly reduced (du properties). Starch from ae and du endosperms contains higher amylose (66 and 42%, respectively) than normal endosperm (26%). In addition, the amylopectin fraction of ae starch is less highly branched than amylopectin from normal or du starch. The above observations suggest that the alterations of the starch may be accounted for by changes in the soluble synthase and branching enzyme fractions. PMID:16661824

  13. Rhamnogalacturonan I modifying enzymes: an update.

    PubMed

    Silva, Inês R; Jers, Carsten; Meyer, Anne S; Mikkelsen, Jørn Dalgaard

    2016-01-25

    Rhamnogalacturonan I (RGI) modifying enzymes catalyse the degradation of the RGI backbone and encompass enzymes specific for either the α1,2-bond linking galacturonic acid to rhamnose or the α1,4-bond linking rhamnose to galacturonic acid in the RGI backbone. The first microbial enzyme found to be able to catalyse the degradation of the RGI backbone, an endo-hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.171) derived from Aspergillus aculeatus, was discovered 25 years ago. Today the group of RGI modifying enzymes encompasses endo- and exo-hydrolases as well as lyases. The RGI hydrolases, EC 3.2.1.171-EC 3.2.1.174, have been described to be produced by Aspergillus spp. and Bacillus subtilis and are categorized in glycosyl hydrolase families 28 and 105. The RGI lyases, EC 4.2.2.23-EC 4.2.2.24, have been isolated from different fungi and bacterial species and are categorized in polysaccharide lyase families 4 and 11. This review brings together the available knowledge of the RGI modifying enzymes and provides a detailed overview of biocatalytic reaction characteristics, classification, structure-function traits, and analyses the protein properties of these enzymes by multiple sequence alignments in neighbour-joining phylogenetic trees. Some recently detected unique structural features and dependence of calcium for activity of some of these enzymes (notably the lyases) are discussed and newly published results regarding improvement of their thermostability by protein engineering are highlighted. Knowledge of these enzymes is important for understanding microbial plant cell wall degradation and for advancing enzymatic processing and biorefining of pectinaceous plant biomass.

  14. Building proficient enzymes with foldamer prostheses.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Clemens; Müller, Manuel M; Gellman, Samuel H; Hilvert, Donald

    2014-07-01

    Foldamers are non-natural oligomers that adopt stable conformations reminiscent of those found in proteins. To evaluate the potential of foldameric subunits for catalysis, semisynthetic enzymes containing foldamer fragments constructed from α- and β-amino acid residues were designed and characterized. Systematic variation of the α→β substitution pattern and types of β-residue afforded highly proficient hybrid catalysts, thus demonstrating the feasibility of expanding the enzyme-engineering toolkit with non-natural backbones.

  15. Tissue enzyme studies in Macaca nemestrina monkeys.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, R. W.; Hoffman, R. A.; Jenkins, D.

    1971-01-01

    Total enzyme activities in fresh tissue specimens from major organs of Macaca nemestrina were analyzed for lactic dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine phosphokinase (CPK), and aldolase. The concentration of these enzymes varied among the different tissue with skeletal muscle, heart, and brain having the highest activities. LDH isozymes determinations for the various tissues were also made. The spectrum of LDH isozyme distribution appears to be quite specific and characteristic for at least some of the tissues analyzed.

  16. Dry-Enzyme Test For Gaseous Chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barzana, Eduardo; Karel, Marcus; Klibanov, Alexander

    1990-01-01

    Simple, dry-chemical test detects ethanol in human breath. Method of test also adapted to detection of such toxic chemicals as formaldehyde in airstreams. Used qualitatively to detect chemical compounds above present level; for example, ethanol above legal level for driving. Also used to indicate quantitatively concentrations of compounds. Involves dry enzyme and color indicator. Adapted to detect any gaseous compound transformed by enzymes to produce change evident to human eye or to instrument.

  17. Enzyme Evolution by Yeast Cell Surface Engineering.

    PubMed

    Miura, Natsuko; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Artificial evolution of proteins with the aim of acquiring novel or improved functionality is important for practical applications of the proteins. We have developed yeast cell surface engineering methods (or arming technology) for evolving enzymes. Here, we have described yeast cell surface engineering coupled with in vivo homologous recombination and library screening as a method for the artificial evolution of enzymes such as firefly luciferases. Using this method, novel luciferases with improved substrate specificity and substrate reactivity were engineered. PMID:26060078

  18. Extracellular enzyme kinetics scale with resource availability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Findlay, Stuart G.; Follstad Shah, Jennifer J.; Hill, Brian H.; Kuehn, Kevin A.; Kuske, Cheryl; Litvak, Marcy E.; Martinez, Noelle G.; Moorhead, Daryl L.; Warnock, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial community metabolism relies on external digestion, mediated by extracellular enzymes that break down complex organic matter into molecules small enough for cells to assimilate. We analyzed the kinetics of 40 extracellular enzymes that mediate the degradation and assimilation of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus by diverse aquatic and terrestrial microbial communities (1160 cases). Regression analyses were conducted by habitat (aquatic and terrestrial), enzyme class (hydrolases and oxidoreductases) and assay methodology (low affinity and high affinity substrates) to relate potential reaction rates to substrate availability. Across enzyme classes and habitats, the scaling relationships between apparent Vmax and apparent Km followed similar power laws with exponents of 0.44 to 0.67. These exponents, called elasticities, were not statistically distinct from a central value of 0.50, which occurs when the Km of an enzyme equals substrate concentration, a condition optimal for maintenance of steady state. We also conducted an ecosystem scale analysis of ten extracellular hydrolase activities in relation to soil and sediment organic carbon (2,000–5,000 cases/enzyme) that yielded elasticities near 1.0 (0.9 ± 0.2, n = 36). At the metabolomic scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions is the proportionality constant that connects the C:N:P stoichiometries of organic matter and ecoenzymatic activities. At the ecosystem scale, the elasticity of extracellular enzymatic reactions shows that organic matter ultimately limits effective enzyme binding sites. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which microbial communities maintain homeostasis is regulating extracellular enzyme expression to optimize the short-term responsiveness of substrate acquisition. The analyses also show that, like elemental stoichiometry, the fundamental attributes of enzymatic reactions can be extrapolated from biochemical to community and ecosystem scales.

  19. Immobilization of enzyme on a polymer surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Lei; Cheng, Kenneth Chun Kuen; Schroeder, McKenna; Yang, Pei; Marsh, E. Neil G.; Lahann, Joerg; Chen, Zhan

    2016-06-01

    We successfully immobilized enzymes onto polymer surfaces via covalent bonds between cysteine groups of the enzyme and dibromomaleimide functionalities present at the polymer surface. In this work, we used nitroreductase (NfsB) as a model enzyme molecule. The polymers were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) polymerization, resulting in surfaces with dibromomaleimide groups. NfsB variants were engineered so that each NfsB molecule only has one cysteine group on the enzyme surface. Two different NfsB constructs were studied, with cysteines at the positions of H360 and V424, respectively. A combination of sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopies were used to deduce the orientation of the immobilized enzymes on the surface. It was found that the orientation of the immobilized enzymes is controlled by the position of the cysteine residue in the protein. The NfsB H360C construct exhibited a similar orientational behavior on the polymer surface as compared to that on the self-assembled monolayer surface, but the NsfB V424C construct showed markedly different orientations on the two surfaces.

  20. Catalytic efficiency of enzymes: a theoretical analysis.

    PubMed

    Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2013-03-26

    This brief review analyzes the underlying physical principles of enzyme catalysis, with an emphasis on the role of equilibrium enzyme motions and conformational sampling. The concepts are developed in the context of three representative systems, namely, dihydrofolate reductase, ketosteroid isomerase, and soybean lipoxygenase. All of these reactions involve hydrogen transfer, but many of the concepts discussed are more generally applicable. The factors that are analyzed in this review include hydrogen tunneling, proton donor-acceptor motion, hydrogen bonding, pKa shifting, electrostatics, preorganization, reorganization, and conformational motions. The rate constant for the chemical step is determined primarily by the free energy barrier, which is related to the probability of sampling configurations conducive to the chemical reaction. According to this perspective, stochastic thermal motions lead to equilibrium conformational changes in the enzyme and ligands that result in configurations favorable for the breaking and forming of chemical bonds. For proton, hydride, and proton-coupled electron transfer reactions, typically the donor and acceptor become closer to facilitate the transfer. The impact of mutations on the catalytic rate constants can be explained in terms of the factors enumerated above. In particular, distal mutations can alter the conformational motions of the enzyme and therefore the probability of sampling configurations conducive to the chemical reaction. Methods such as vibrational Stark spectroscopy, in which environmentally sensitive probes are introduced site-specifically into the enzyme, provide further insight into these aspects of enzyme catalysis through a combination of experiments and theoretical calculations.

  1. Activity assessment of microbial fibrinolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kotb, Essam

    2013-08-01

    Conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin inside blood vessels results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In general, there are four therapy options: surgical operation, intake of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or fibrinolytic enzymes. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases. There are several assay methods for these enzymes; this may due to the insolubility of substrate, fibrin. Existing assay methods can be divided into three major groups. The first group consists of assay of fibrinolytic activity with natural proteins as substrates, e.g., fibrin plate methods. The second and third groups of assays are suitable for kinetic studies and are based on the determination of hydrolysis of synthetic peptide esters. This review will deal primarily with the microorganisms that have been reported in literature to produce fibrinolytic enzymes and the first review discussing the methods used to assay the fibrinolytic activity.

  2. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm pores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoang, Duyen; Razavi, Bahar S.

    2015-04-01

    In extremely dynamic microhabitats as bio-pores made by earthworm, the in situ enzyme activities are assumed as a footprint of complex biotic interactions. Our study focused on the effect of earthworm on the enzyme activities inside bio-pores and visualizing the differences between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil by zymography technique (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013). For the first time, we aimed at quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in bio-pores. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworms, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine-aminopeptidase, and phosphatase. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. However, the differences in activity of cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase between bio-pore and bulk soil were less pronounced. This demonstrated an applicability of zymography approach to monitor and to distinguish the in situ activity of hydrolytic enzymes in soil biopores.

  3. Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Proctor, A R; Kloos, W E

    1973-04-01

    Tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes were assayed in various tryptophan mutants of Staphylococcus aureus strain 655 and the wild-type parent. All mutants, except trpB mutants, lacked only the activity corresponding to the particular biosynthetic block, as suggested previously by analysis of accumulated intermediates and auxonography. Tryptophan synthetase A was not detected in extracts of either trpA or trpB mutants but appeared normal in other mutants. Mutants in certain other classes exhibited partial loss of another particular tryptophan enzyme activity. Tryptophan synthetase B activity was not detected in cell extract preparations but was detected in whole cells. The original map order proposed for the S. aureus tryptophan gene cluster was clarified by the definition of trpD (phosphoribosyl transferase(-)) and trpF (phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase(-)) mutants. These mutants were previously unresolved and designated as trp(DF) mutants (anthranilate accumulators). Phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase enzymes were separable by molecular sieve chromatography, suggesting that these functions are coded by separate loci. Molecular sieve chromatography failed to reveal aggregates involving anthranilate synthetase, phosphoribosyl transferase, phosphoribosyl anthranilate isomerase, and indole-3-glycerol phosphate synthetase, and this procedure provided an estimate of the molecular weights of these enzymes. Tryptophan was shown to repress synthesis of all six tryptophan biosynthetic enzymes, and derepression of all six activities was incident upon tryptophan starvation. Tryptophan inhibited the activity of anthranilate synthetase, the first enzyme of the pathway. PMID:4698207

  4. Crystal structure of methane oxidation enzyme determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1994-01-10

    A team of chemists has determined to 2.2-[angstrom] resolution the crystal structure of the hydroxylase protein of methane monooxygenase, the enzyme system responsible for the biological oxidation of methane. The hydroxylase, at a molecular weight of 251,000 daltons, if by far the largest component of methane monooxygenase. Although the crystal structure of the hydroxylase did not reveal any startling surprises about the enzyme-many features of the hydroxylase had been inferred previously from modeling and spectroscopic studies -- obtaining it is a significant achievement. For one thing, the crystal structure unambiguously confirms aspects of the enzyme structure that been at least somewhat speculative. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme, the chemist say, also provides important insight into biological methane oxidation, including how methane, a relatively inert gas, might diffuse to and bind near the active site of the enzyme. The structure points to particular amino acid residues that are likely to participate in catalysis, and clarifies the structure of the dinuclear iron core of the enzyme.

  5. BRENDA, enzyme data and metabolic information.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Ida; Chang, Antje; Schomburg, Dietmar

    2002-01-01

    BRENDA is a comprehensive relational database on functional and molecular information of enzymes, based on primary literature. The database contains information extracted and evaluated from approximately 46 000 references, holding data of at least 40 000 different enzymes from more than 6900 different organisms, classified in approximately 3900 EC numbers. BRENDA is an important tool for biochemical and medical research covering information on properties of all classified enzymes, including data on the occurrence, catalyzed reaction, kinetics, substrates/products, inhibitors, cofactors, activators, structure and stability. All data are connected to literature references which in turn are linked to PubMed. The data and information provide a fundamental tool for research of enzyme mechanisms, metabolic pathways, the evolution of metabolism and, furthermore, for medicinal diagnostics and pharmaceutical research. The database is a resource for data of enzymes, classified according to the EC system of the IUBMB Enzyme Nomenclature Committee, and the entries are cross-referenced to other databases, i.e. organism classification, protein sequence, protein structure and literature references. BRENDA provides an academic web access at http://www.brenda.uni-koeln.de.

  6. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plecity, Mark S.; Nall, Mark E.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) provides high risk technologies having the potential to dramatically enhance the capabilities of the satellite communications industry. This experimental satellite, which will be launched by NASA in 1993, will furnish the technology necessary for providing a range of services. Utilizing the ACTS very-high-gain-hopping spot-beam antennas with on-board routing and processing, Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) digital networks which provide on-demand, full-mesh-convectivity 1.544-MBPS services with only a single hop can be established. The high-gain spot-beam antenna at Ka-band permits wide area, flexible networks providing high data rate services between modest-size earth terminals.

  7. Self-acting shaft seals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Self-acting seals are described in detail. The mathematical models for obtaining a seal force balance and the equilibrium operating film thickness are outlined. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis reveals three different vibration modes, with secondary seal friction being an important parameter. Leakage flow inlet pressure drop and effects of axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric sealing face deformations are discussed. Experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given; these data show the feasibility of operating the seal at conditions of 345 N/sq cm and 152 m/sec sliding speed. Also a spiral groove seal design operated to 244 m/sec is described.

  8. Long-acting hormonal contraception.

    PubMed

    Benagiano, Giuseppe; Gabelnick, Henry; Brosens, Ivo

    2015-11-01

    Today, a new category of fertility-regulating agents has been created: long-acting, reversible hormonal contraceptives; they minimize compliance, while maximize effectiveness. They comprise subdermal implants and intrauterine devices. Other long-acting agents exist, such as Depo Provera and Noristerat. Use of Depo Provera and Noristerat carries great effectiveness, good clinical safety and usefulness in developing countries. They cause no significant increase in breast cancer risk, but they may carry an increased risk of HIV. Subcutaneous delivery systems have two common features: prolongation of effect is obtained by a drug reservoir and for most of their duration of action they provide a continuous, sustained release of the active hormone. Finally, the intrauterine system Mirena represents both a very effective contraceptive and a specific treatment for menorrhagia.

  9. The False Claims Act and clinical laboratories.

    PubMed

    Vogel, R L

    1993-01-01

    In its efforts to fight fraud, the government has turned increasingly to the civil False Claims Act. The Act imposes triple damages plus monetary penalties against those who defraud the federal government. The Act also encourages whistleblowers to report fraud by offering the prospect of large bounties. This article describes the False Claims Act, its qui tam provision dealing with whistleblowers, and the application of the Act to clinical laboratories.

  10. SCADA Application for ACTS Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairbanks, Barry

    1992-01-01

    The results of a system level study done by Hughes Network Systems for NASA are presented. For the supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) application, use of Ka-band spot beam satellite technology associated with NASA's Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) offers a reduction in Earth station antenna size and transmitter power that may translate into lower system costs. The approaches taken to determine commercial potential of the system are described.

  11. The new Clean Air Act

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabha, A.P. ); Olem, H. )

    1991-05-01

    This article is a title by title review of the new Clean Air Act and how it affects water quality and wastewater treatment. The bill provides for restoring and protecting lakes and rivers by reducing acid-rain-causing emissions and toxics from nonpoint-source runoff. Topics covered include urban smog, mobile sources, air toxics, acid rain, permits, ozone-depleting chemicals, enforcement, and the law's socio-economic impacts.

  12. Elder Justice Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Rangel, Charles B. [D-NY-15

    2009-09-17

    03/23/2010 Became Public Law No: 111-148. (TXT | PDF) (All Actions) Notes: H.R.4872 makes a number of health-related financing and revenue changes to this bill. Read together, this bill and the health care-related provisions of H.R.4872 are commonly referred to as the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Tracker: This bill has the status Became LawHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  13. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-02-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  14. Engineering Enzymes in Energy Crops: Conditionally Activated Enzymes Expressed in Cellulosic Energy Crops

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-15

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Enzymes are required to break plant biomass down into the fermentable sugars that are used to create biofuel. Currently, costly enzymes must be added to the biofuel production process. Engineering crops to already contain these enzymes will reduce costs and produce biomass that is more easily digested. In fact, enzyme costs alone account for $0.50-$0.75/gallon of the cost of a biomass-derived biofuel like ethanol. Agrivida is genetically engineering plants to contain high concentrations of enzymes that break down cell walls. These enzymes can be “switched on” after harvest so they won’t damage the plant while it’s growing.

  15. Dual control mechanism for heme oxygenase: tin(IV)-protoporphyrin potently inhibits enzyme activity while markedly increasing content of enzyme protein in liver.

    PubMed Central

    Sardana, M K; Kappas, A

    1987-01-01

    Tin(IV)-protoporphyrin (Sn-protoporphyrin) potently inhibits heme degradation to bile pigments in vitro and in vivo, a property that confers upon this synthetic compound the ability to suppress a variety of experimentally induced and naturally occurring forms of jaundice in animals and humans. Utilizing rat liver heme oxygenase purified to homogeneity together with appropriate immunoquantitation techniques, we have demonstrated that Sn-protoporphyrin possesses the additional property of potently inducing the synthesis of heme oxygenase protein in liver cells while, concurrently, completely inhibiting the activity of the newly formed enzyme. Substitution of tin for the central iron atom of heme thus leads to the formation of a synthetic heme analogue that regulates heme oxygenase by a dual mechanism, which involves competitive inhibition of the enzyme for the natural substrate heme and simultaneous enhancement of new enzyme synthesis. Cobaltic(III)-protoporphyrin (Co-protoporphyrin) also inhibits heme oxygenase activity in vitro, but unlike Sn-protoporphyrin it greatly enhances the activity of the enzyme in the whole animal. Co-protoporphyrin also acts as an in vivo inhibitor of heme oxygenase; however, its inducing effect on heme oxygenase synthesis is so pronounced as to prevail in vivo over its inhibitory effect on the enzyme. These studies show that certain synthetic heme analogues possess the ability to simultaneously inhibit as well as induce the enzyme heme oxygenase in liver. The net balance between these two actions, as reflected in the rate of heme oxidation activity in the whole animal, appears to be influenced by the nature of the central metal atom of the synthetic metalloporphyrin. Images PMID:3470805

  16. Nature's inordinate fondness for metabolic enzymes: why metabolic enzyme loci are so frequently targets of selection.

    PubMed

    Marden, James H

    2013-12-01

    Metabolic enzyme loci were some of the first genes accessible for molecular evolution and ecology research. New technologies now make the whole genome, transcriptome or proteome readily accessible, allowing unbiased scans for loci exhibiting significant differences in allele frequency or expression level and associated with phenotypes and/or responses to natural selection. With surprising frequency and in many cases in proportions greater than chance relative to other genes, glycolysis and TCA cycle enzyme loci appear among the genes with significant associations in these studies. Hence, there is an ongoing need to understand the basis for fitness effects of metabolic enzyme polymorphisms. Allele-specific effects on the binding affinity and catalytic rate of individual enzymes are well known, but often of uncertain significance because metabolic control theory and in vivo studies indicate that many individual metabolic enzymes do not affect pathway flux rate. I review research, so far little used in evolutionary biology, showing that metabolic enzyme substrates affect signalling pathways that regulate cell and organismal biology, and that these enzymes have moonlighting functions. To date there is little knowledge of how alleles in natural populations affect these phenotypes. I discuss an example in which alleles of a TCA enzyme locus associate with differences in a signalling pathway and development, organismal performance, and ecological dynamics. Ultimately, understanding how metabolic enzyme polymorphisms map to phenotypes and fitness remains a compelling and ongoing need for gaining robust knowledge of ecological and evolutionary processes.

  17. Cytochrome P450 enzyme mediated herbal drug interactions (Part 1)

    PubMed Central

    Wanwimolruk, Sompon; Prachayasittikul, Virapong

    2014-01-01

    It is well recognized that herbal supplements or herbal medicines are now commonly used. As many patients taking prescription medications are concomitantly using herbal supplements, there is considerable risk for adverse herbal drug interactions. Such interactions can enhance the risk for an individual patient, especially with regard to drugs with a narrow therapeutic index such as warfarin, cyclosporine A and digoxin. Herbal drug interactions can alter pharmacokinetic or/and pharmacodynamic properties of administered drugs. The most common pharmacokinetic interactions usually involve either the inhibition or induction of the metabolism of drugs catalyzed by the important enzymes, cytochrome P450 (CYP). The aim of the present article is to provide an updated review of clinically relevant metabolic CYP-mediated drug interactions between selected herbal supplements and prescription drugs. The commonly used herbal supplements selected include Echinacea, Ginkgo biloba, garlic, St. John's wort, goldenseal, and milk thistle. To date, several significant herbal drug interactions have their origins in the alteration of CYP enzyme activity by various phytochemicals. Numerous herbal drug interactions have been reported. Although the significance of many interactions is uncertain but several interactions, especially those with St. John’s wort, may have critical clinical consequences. St. John’s wort is a source of hyperforin, an active ingredient that has a strong affinity for the pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR). As a PXR ligand, hyperforin promotes expression of CYP3A4 enzymes in the small intestine and liver. This in turn causes induction of CYP3A4 and can reduce the oral bioavailability of many drugs making them less effective. The available evidence indicates that, at commonly recommended doses, other selected herbs including Echinacea, Ginkgo biloba, garlic, goldenseal and milk thistle do not act as potent or moderate inhibitors or inducers of CYP enzymes. A good

  18. Heterologous Expression of a Bioactive β-Hexosyltransferase, an Enzyme Producer of Prebiotics, from Sporobolomyces singularis

    PubMed Central

    Dagher, Suzanne F.; Azcarate-Peril, M. Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Galacto-oligosaccharides (GOS) are indigestible dietary fibers that are able to reach the lower gastrointestinal tract to be selectively fermented by health-promoting bacteria. In this report, we describe the heterologous expression of an optimized synthetically produced version of the β-hexosyltransferase gene (Bht) from Sporobolomyces singularis. The Bht gene encodes a glycosyl hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.21) that acts as galactosyltransferase, able to catalyze a one-step conversion of lactose to GOS. Expression of the enzyme in Escherichia coli yielded an inactive insoluble protein, while the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris GS115 produced a bioactive β-hexosyltransferase (rBHT). The enzyme exhibited faster kinetics at pHs between 3.5 and 6 and at temperatures between 40 and 50°C. Enzyme stability improved at temperatures lower than 40°C, and glucose was found to be a competitive inhibitor of enzymatic activity. P. pastoris secreted a fraction of the bioactive rBHT into the fermentation broth, while the majority of the enzyme remained associated with the outer membrane. Both the secreted and the membrane-associated forms were able to efficiently convert lactose to GOS. Additionally, resting cells with membrane-bound enzyme converted 90% of the initial lactose into GOS at 68% yield (g/g) (the maximum theoretical is 75%) with no secondary residual (glucose or galactose) products. This is the first report of a bioactive BHT from S. singularis that has been heterologously expressed. PMID:23241974

  19. Generation of in vivo activating factors in the ischemic intestine by pancreatic enzymes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Kistler, Erik B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2000-02-01

    One of the early events in physiological shock is the generation of activators for leukocytes, endothelial cells, and other cells in the cardiovascular system. The mechanism by which these activators are produced has remained unresolved. We examine here the hypothesis that pancreatic digestive enzymes in the ischemic intestine may be involved in the generation of activators during intestinal ischemia. The lumen of the small intestine of rats was continuously perfused with saline containing a broadly acting pancreatic enzyme inhibitor (6-amidino-2-naphthyl p-guanidinobenzoate dimethanesulfate, 0.37 mM) before and during ischemia of the small intestine by splanchnic artery occlusion. This procedure inhibited activation of circulating leukocytes during occlusion and reperfusion. It also prevented the appearance of activators in portal venous and systemic artery plasma and attenuated initiating symptoms of multiple organ injury in shock. Intestinal tissue produces only low levels of activators in the absence of pancreatic enzymes, whereas in the presence of enzymes, activators are produced in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The results indicate that pancreatic digestive enzymes in the ischemic intestine serve as an important source for cell activation and inflammation, as well as multiple organ failure.

  20. Concomitant production of detergent compatible enzymes by Bacillus flexus XJU-1.

    PubMed

    Niyonzima, Francois N; More, Sunil S

    2014-01-01

    A soil screened Bacillus flexus XJU-1 was induced to simultaneously produce alkaline amylase, alkaline lipase and alkaline protease at their optimum levels on a common medium under submerged fermentation. The basal cultivation medium consisted of 0.5% casein, 0.5% starch and 0.5% cottonseed oil as an inducer for protease, amylase, and lipase, respectively. The casein also served as nitrogen source for all 3 enzymes. The starch was also found to act as carbon source additive for both lipase and protease. Maximum enzyme production occurred on fermentation medium with 1.5% casein, 1.5% soluble starch, 2% cottonseed oil, 2% inoculum size, initial pH of 11.0, incubation temperature of 37 °C and 1% soybean meal as a nitrogen source supplement. The analysis of time course study showed that 24 h was optimum incubation time for amylase whereas 48 h was the best time for both lipase and protease. After optimization, a 3.36-, 18.64-, and 27.33-fold increase in protease, amylase and lipase, respectively was recorded. The lipase was produced in higher amounts (37.72 U/mL) than amylase and protease about 1.27 and 5.85 times, respectively. As the 3 enzymes are used in detergent formulations, the bacterium can be commercially exploited to secrete the alkaline enzymes for use in detergent industry. This is the first report for concomitant production of 3 alkaline enzymes by a bacterium. PMID:25477924