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Sample records for alpha-particle inelastic scattering

  1. Alpha particle collective Thomson scattering in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Machuzak, J.S.; Woskov, P.P.; Rhee, D.Y.; Gilmore, J.; Bretz, N.L.; Park, H.K.; Aamodt, R.E.; Cheung, P.Y.; Russell, D.A.; Bindslev, H.

    1993-11-01

    A collective Thomson scattering diagnostic is being implemented on TFTR to measure alpha particle, energetic and thermal ion densities and velocity distributions. A 60 GHz, 0.1-1 kW gyrotron will be used as the transmitter source, and the scattering geometry will be perpendicular to the magnetic field in the extraordinary mode polarization. An enhanced scattered signal is anticipated from fluctuations in the lower hybrid frequency range with this scattering geometry. Millimeter wave collective Thomson scattering diagnostics have the advantage of larger scattering angles to decrease the amount of stray light, and long, high power, modulated pulses to obtain improved signal to noise through synchronous detection techniques.

  2. The effect of inelastic collisions on the transport of alpha particles in ITER-like plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clauser, C. F.; Farengo, R.

    2017-04-01

    The effect of charge changes on the transport of alpha particles in ITER-like plasmas is studied with a numerical code that follows the exact particle trajectories and includes the effect of elastic and inelastic collisions. It is shown that charge changing processes can produce significant changes in the transport of alpha particles in the edge-SOL region. The addition of inelastic collisions actually reduces the alpha particle loss rate below the level obtained when only elastic (Coulomb) collisions are included. This is due to the inward flux produced by the neutral density gradient. Power losses, on the other hand, remain at approximately the same level because the average energy of the lost particles is higher when inelastic collisions are included. Finally, the spatial distribution of the lost particles changes significantly when inelastic collisions are added, with a larger fraction of the lost particles reaching the wall.

  3. Inclusive inelastic scattering of heavy ions and nuclear correlations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Wilson, John W.; Khandelwal, Govind S.

    1990-01-01

    Calculations of inclusive inelastic scattering distributions for heavy ion collisions are considered within the high energy optical model. Using ground state sum rules, the inclusive projectile and complete projectile-target inelastic angular distributions are treated in both independent particle and correlated nuclear models. Comparisons between the models introduced are made for alpha particles colliding with He-4, C-12, and O-16 targets and protons colliding with O-16. Results indicate that correlations contribute significantly, at small momentum transfers, to the inelastic sum. Correlation effects are hidden, however, when total scattering distributions are considered because of the dominance of elastic scattering at small momentum transfers.

  4. Inelastic Light Scattering Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fouche, Daniel G.; Chang, Richard K.

    1973-01-01

    Five different inelastic light scattering processes will be denoted by, ordinary Raman scattering (ORS), resonance Raman scattering (RRS), off-resonance fluorescence (ORF), resonance fluorescence (RF), and broad fluorescence (BF). A distinction between fluorescence (including ORF and RF) and Raman scattering (including ORS and RRS) will be made in terms of the number of intermediate molecular states which contribute significantly to the scattered amplitude, and not in terms of excited state lifetimes or virtual versus real processes. The theory of these processes will be reviewed, including the effects of pressure, laser wavelength, and laser spectral distribution on the scattered intensity. The application of these processes to the remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants will be discussed briefly. It will be pointed out that the poor sensitivity of the ORS technique cannot be increased by going toward resonance without also compromising the advantages it has over the RF technique. Experimental results on inelastic light scattering from I(sub 2) vapor will be presented. As a single longitudinal mode 5145 A argon-ion laser line was tuned away from an I(sub 2) absorption line, the scattering was observed to change from RF to ORF. The basis, of the distinction is the different pressure dependence of the scattered intensity. Nearly three orders of magnitude enhancement of the scattered intensity was measured in going from ORF to RF. Forty-seven overtones were observed and their relative intensities measured. The ORF cross section of I(sub 2) compared to the ORS cross section of N2 was found to be 3 x 10(exp 6), with I(sub 2) at its room temperature vapor pressure.

  5. Bose-Einstein condensation of {alpha} particles and Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2004-10-01

    It is shown that the dilute density distribution of {alpha} particles in nuclei can be observed in the Airy structure in nuclear rainbow scattering. We have analyzed {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering to the 0{sub 2}{sup +} (7.65 MeV) state of {sup 12}C in a coupled-channel method with the precise wave functions for {sup 12}C. It is found that the enhanced Airy oscillations in the experimental angular distributions for the 0{sub 2}{sup +} state is caused by the dilute density distribution of this state in agreement for the idea of Bose-Einstein condensation of the three alpha particles.

  6. NEW APPROACHES: Deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allday, J.

    1998-01-01

    Feynman diagrams can be used to explain deep inelastic scattering, but it must be remembered that the emission and absorption of a photon are not independent events - the underlying field is important.

  7. Alpha particle condensation in {sup 12}C and nuclear rainbow scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, S.; Hirabayashi, Y.

    2008-05-12

    It is shown that the large radius of the Hoyle state of {sup 12}C with a dilute density distribution in an {alpha} particle condensate can be clearly seen in the shift of the rainbow angle (therefore the Airy minimum) to a larger angle in {alpha}+{sup 12}C rainbow scattering at the high energy region and prerainbow oscillations in {sup 3}He+{sup 12}C scattering at the lower energy region.

  8. Feasibility of alpha particle measurement in a magnetically confined plasma by CO/sub 2/ laser Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, R.K.; Vander Sluis, K.L.; Hutchinson, D.P.

    1987-08-01

    Fusion-product alpha particles will dominate the behavior of the next generation of ignited D-T fusion reactors. Advanced diagnostics will be required to characterize the energy deposition of these fast alpha particles in the magnetically confined plasma. For small-angle coherent Thomson scattering of a CO/sub 2/ laser beam from such a plasma, a resonance in the scattered power occurs near 90/sup 0/ with respect to the magnetic field direction. This spatial concentration permits a simplified detection of the scattered laser power from the plasma using a heterodyne system. The signal produced by the presence of fusion-product alpha particles in an ignited plasma is calculated to be well above the noise level, which results from statistical variations of the background signal produced by scattering from free electrons. 7 refs.

  9. Optical Model Potentials for {alpha}-Particles Scattering around the Coulomb Barrier on Medium-Mass Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M.; Roman, F.L.; Avrigeanu, V.

    2005-05-24

    Following a semi-microscopic and phenomenological analyses of {alpha}-particle elastic scattering on A{approx}100 nuclei at energies below 32 MeV, a regional optical potential is involved in (n,{alpha}) reaction cross-sections analysis for the stable Mo isotopes. Focus on the uncertainties in the OMP parameters found to describe the {alpha}-particle emission from excited compound residual nuclei is thus obtained, looking for understanding of the related questions on the basis of microscopic models.

  10. Deep and shallow inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Heather

    2015-05-15

    In this session we focused on the higher energy deep and shallow inelastic particle interactions, DIS and SIS. DIS interactions occur when the energy of the incident particle beam is so large that the beam is able to penetrate the nucleons inside of the target nuclei. These interactions occur at the smallest level possible, that of the quark-gluon, or parton, level. SIS interactions occur in an intermediate energy range, just below the energy required for DIS interactions. The DIS cross section formula contains structure functions that describe our understanding of the underlying parton structure of nature. The full description of DIS interactions requires three structure functions: two may be measured in charged lepton or neutrino scattering, but one can only be extracted from neutrino DIS data. There are reasons to expect that the impact of nuclear effects could be different for neutrinos engaging in the DIS interaction, vs those felt by leptons. In fact, fits by the nCTEQ collaboration have found that the neutrino-Fe structure functions appear to differ from those extracted from lepton scattering data [1]. To better understand the global picture of DIS and SIS, we chose a three-pronged attack that examined recent experimental results, data fits, and latest theory predictions. Experimental results from neutrino and lepton scattering, as well as collider experiments, were presented.

  11. Optical Model Potential Parameters for p, d, {sup 3}He and Alpha-Particle Scattering on Lithium Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Burtebayev, N.; Nassurlla, Marzhan; Nassurlla, Maulen; Kerimkulov, Zh. K.; Sakuta, S. B.

    2008-11-11

    Analysis of the p, d, {sup 3}He and {alpha}-particles elastic scattering on the {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li nuclei has been done in the framework of the optical model at the beam energies up to 72 MeV. It was shown that the account of the cluster exchange mechanism together with the potential scattering allow reproducing the experimental cross-sections in the whole angular range.

  12. A Simple Model for Inelastic Scattering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeser, J. G.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes a model for inelastic scattering obtained by suitably generalizing scattering from a square well. The generalization introduces matrices into the quantum-mechanical scattering equations, which may be solved exactly to give an explicit expression for the scattering matrix. Discusses the results it predicts for a simple example. (Author/SK)

  13. Solution of a Simple Inelastic Scattering Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knudson, Stephen K.

    1975-01-01

    Provides an analytical solution of a model representing the collision of an atom with a harmonic oscillator, interacting via a repulsive square well potential. Presents results for various energies and strengths of inelastic scattering. (Author/CP)

  14. Complementary optical-potential analysis of {alpha}-particle elastic scattering and induced reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Avrigeanu, M. Obreja, A.C.; Roman, F.L.; Avrigeanu, V.; Oertzen, W. von

    2009-07-15

    A previously derived semi-microscopic analysis based on the Double Folding Model, for {alpha}-particle elastic scattering on A{approx}100 nuclei at energies below 32 MeV, is extended to medium mass A{approx}50-120 nuclei and energies from {approx}13 to 50 MeV. The energy-dependent phenomenological imaginary part for this semi-microscopic optical model potential was obtained including the dispersive correction to the microscopic real potential, and used within a concurrent phenomenological analysis of the same data basis. A regional parameter set for low-energy {alpha}-particles entirely based on elastic scattering data analysis was also obtained for nuclei within the above mentioned mass and energy ranges. Then, an ultimate assessment of ({alpha},{gamma}), ({alpha},n), and ({alpha},p) reaction cross sections considered target nuclei from {sup 45}Sc to {sup 118}Sn and incident energies below {approx}12 MeV. The former diffuseness of the real part of optical potential as well as the surface imaginary potential depth have been found to be responsible for the actual difficulties in the description of these data, and modified in order to obtain an optical potential which describes equally well both the low-energy elastic scattering and induced reaction data for {alpha}-particles.

  15. Refinement of the Compton-Rayleigh scatter ratio method for use on the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Perrett, G. M.; Maxwell, J. A.; Nield, E.; Gellert, R.; King, P. L.; Lee, M.; O'Meara, J. M.; Pradler, I.

    2013-05-01

    Spectra from the Mars rover alpha particle X-ray spectrometers contain the elastic and inelastic scatter peaks of the plutonium L X-rays emitted by the instrument's 244Cm source. Various spectrum fitting approaches are tested using the terrestrial twin of the APXS instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover, in order to provide accurate extraction of the Lα and Lβ Compton/Rayleigh intensity ratios, which can provide information about light "invisible" constituents such as water in geological samples. A well-defined dependence of C/R ratios upon mean sample atomic number is established using a large and varied set of geochemical reference materials, and the accuracy of this calibration is examined. Detailed attention is paid to the influence of the rubidium and strontium peaks which overlap the Lα scatter peaks. Our Monte Carlo simulation code for prediction of C/R ratios from element concentrations is updated. The ratio between measured and simulated C/R ratios provides a second means of calibration.

  16. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, P.

    1994-04-01

    AA beam of polarized electrons at CEBAF with an energy of 8 GeV or more will be useful for performing precision measurements of parity violation in deep inelastic scattering. Possible applications include precision tests of the Standard Model, model-independent measurements of parton distribution functions, and studies of quark correlations.

  17. Deep inelastic scattering near the Coulomb barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, J.; Back, B.; Chan, K.

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic scattering was recently observed in heavy ion reactions at incident energies near and below the Coulomb barrier. Traditional models of this process are based on frictional forces and are designed to predict the features of deep inelastic processes at energies above the barrier. They cannot be applied at energies below the barrier where the nuclear overlap is small and friction is negligible. The presence of deep inelastic scattering at these energies requires a different explanation. The first observation of deep inelastic scattering near the barrier was in the systems {sup 124,112}Sn + {sup 58,64}Ni by Wolfs et al. We previously extended these measurements to the system {sup 136}Xe + {sup 64}Ni and currently measured the system {sup 124}Xe + {sup 58}Ni. We obtained better statistics, better mass and energy resolution, and more complete angular coverage in the Xe + Ni measurements. The cross sections and angular distributions are similar in all of the Sn + Ni and Xe + Ni systems. The data are currently being analyzed and compared with new theoretical calculations. They will be part of the thesis of J. Gehring.

  18. Diffuse inelastic scattering of atoms from surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Manson, J.R.; Celli, V.

    1989-02-15

    We consider the large-angle diffuse scattering of thermal-energy atoms by defects or adsorbates on a surface. We obtain the Debye-Waller factor for the thermal attenuation of the incoherent elastic peak. When the Debye exponent is small, the diffuse inelastic contribution is dominated by the single-phonon exchange, and is proportional to the frequency distribution function of the defect or adsorbate. We discuss its magnitude compared to the multiphonon background.

  19. Quantum Chromodynamics and Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. Keith

    2016-10-01

    This article first describes the parton model which was the precursor of the QCD description of hard scattering processes. After the discovery of QCD and asymptotic freedom, the first successful applications were to Deep Inelastic lepton-hadron scattering. The subsequent application of QCD to processes with two initial state hadrons required the understanding and proof of factorization. To take the fledgling theory and turn it into the robust calculational engine it has become today, required a number of technical and conceptual developments which will be described. Prospects for higher loop calculations are also reviewed.

  20. Inelastic scattering in the GEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temkin, A.; Shertzer, J.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1998-05-01

    The generalized exchange approximation (A.Temkin, J.Shertzer, and A.K. Bhatia, Phys. Rev. A 57, xxx (1998).)(GEA) is a generalization to all L of the Temkin-Poet(T-P) model of e-H scattering (A.Temkin, Phys. Rev. 126, 130 (1962).) (R. Poet, J. Phys. B 11, 3081 (1978).). (The T-P model only applies to S waves). Results in the elastic range, obtained by the finite element method (J.Shertzer and J.Botero, Phys. Rev. A 46, 3673 (1994).), have recently been published (Ref.1): they confirm results of previous calculations for L=0 (including a singlet S resonance (A.Temkin and R.Pohle, Phys. Rev. Lett. 10, 22 (1963).)); Ref.1 also reveals a triplet P resonance. Results for L=0 up to the n=4 threshold are in agreement with Poet (Ref.3). Higher L calculations are in progress. The main object of the GEA is as a guide to calculational theory in the ionization domain.

  1. Inelastic electron scattering from a moving nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhn, S.E.; Griffioen, K.

    1994-04-01

    The authors propose to measure inelastically scattered electrons in coincidence with spectator protons emitted backwards relative to the virtual photon direction in the reaction d(e, e{prime}p{sub s})X. In a simple spectator model, the backward proton has equal and opposite momentum to the neutron before it is struck, allowing the authors to study the dependence on kinematics and off-shell behaviour of the electron-nucleon inelastic cross section. If the photon couples to a quark in a 6-quark bag, a different dependence of the cross section on the kinematic variables (x, Q{sup 2}, and p{sub s}) can be observed. This proposed experiment requires large acceptance and beam energies above 6 GeV. It is ideally suited for the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS).

  2. Inclusive Inelastic Electron Scattering from Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Fomin, Nadia

    2007-10-26

    Inclusive electron scattering from nuclei at large x and Q{sup 2} is the result of a reaction mechanism that includes both quasi-elastic scattering from nucleons and deep inelastic scattering from the quark consitituents of the nucleons. Data in this regime can be used to study a wide variety of topics, including the extraction of nuclear momentum distributions, the infiuence of final state interactions and the approach to y-scaling, the strength of nucleon-nucleon correlations, and the approach to x-scaling, to name a few. Selected results from the recent experiment E02-019 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will be shown and their relevance discussed.

  3. A New Polyethylene Scattering Law Determined Using Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lavelle, Christopher M; Liu, C; Stone, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo neutron transport codes such as MCNP rely on accurate data for nuclear physics cross-sections to produce accurate results. At low energy, this takes the form of scattering laws based on the dynamic structure factor, S (Q, E). High density polyethylene (HDPE) is frequently employed as a neutron moderator at both high and low temperatures, however the only cross-sections available are for T =300 K, and the evaluation has not been updated in quite some time. In this paper we describe inelastic neutron scattering measurements on HDPE at 5 and 300 K which are used to improve the scattering law for HDPE. We describe the experimental methods, review some of the past HDPE scattering laws, and compare computations using these models to the measured S (Q, E). The total cross-section is compared to available data, and the treatment of the carbon secondary scatterer as a free gas is assessed. We also discuss the use of the measurement itself as a scattering law via the 1 phonon approximation. We show that a scattering law computed using a more detailed model for the Generalized Density of States (GDOS) compares more favorably to this experiment, suggesting that inelastic neutron scattering can play an important role in both the development and validation of new scattering laws for Monte Carlo work.

  4. Deep inelastic neutron scattering in condensed hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bafile, Ubaldo; Celli, Milva; Zoppi, Marco

    1996-02-01

    The neutron cross-section of molecular hydrogen that is measured by deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) is compared with two distinct models. One is a generalization of the molecular Young and Koppel model (1964) that takes into account the modification to the translational kinetic energy that is induced by quantum effects. The second model assumes a free particle wave function for the final state of the proton (C. Andreani et al., 1995). The comparison between these two models, and with the experimental results, provides information on the crossover between the molecular and atomic regime of hydrogen in DINS.

  5. Nuclear PDFs from neutrino deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    I. Schienbein; J. Y. Yu; C. Keppel; J. G. Morfin; F. Olness; J.F. Owens

    2007-11-13

    We study nuclear effects in charged current deep inelastic neutrino--iron scattering in the framework of a chi^2-analysis of parton distribution functions. We extract a set of iron PDFs and show that under reasonable assumptions it is possible to constrain the valence, light sea and strange quark distributions. We compare our results with nuclear parton distribution functions from the literature and find good agreement. Our iron PDFs are used to compute nuclear correction factors which are required in global analyses of free nucleon PDFs.

  6. Inelastic Scattering Of Electrons By Protons

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cone, A. A.; Chen, K. W.; Dunning, J. R. Jr.; Hartwig, G.; Ramsey, N. F.; Walker, J. K.; Wilson, R.

    1966-12-01

    The inelastic scattering of electrons by protons has been measured at incident electron energies up to 5 BeV/c and momentum transfers q{sup 2}=4(BeV/c){sup 2}. Excitation of known nucleon resonances at M=1238, 1512, 1688 and possibly 1920 MeV have been observed. The calculations for the resonance at M=1238 MeV have been compared with calculations by Adler based on the dispersion theory of Chew, Goldberger, Low and Nambu. The agreement is good. Qualitative models are discussed for the other resonances.

  7. Folding model analysis of pion elastic and inelastic scattering from {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C

    SciTech Connect

    Ebrahim, A. A.

    2013-04-15

    {pi}{sup {+-}}-Nucleus scattering cross sections are calculated applying the Watanabe superposition model with a phenomenological Woods-Saxon potential. The phenomenological potential parameters are searched for {pi}{sup {+-}} scattering from {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C to reproduce not only differential elastic cross sections but also inelastic and total and reaction cross sections at pion kinetic energies from 50 to 672 MeV. The optical potentials of {sup 6}Li and {sup 12}C are calculated in terms of the alpha particle and deuteron optical potentials. Inelastic scattering has been analyzed using the distorted waves from elastic-scattering data. The values of deformation lengths thus obtained compare very well with the ones reported earlier.

  8. Inelastic light scattering from correlated electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereaux, Thomas P.; Hackl, Rudi

    2007-01-01

    Inelastic light scattering is an intensively used tool in the study of electronic properties of solids. Triggered by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in the cuprates and by new developments in instrumentation, light scattering in both the visible (Raman effect) and x-ray part of the electromagnetic spectrum has become a method complementary to optical (infrared) spectroscopy while providing additional and relevant information. The main purpose of the review is to position Raman scattering with regard to single-particle methods like angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and other transport and thermodynamic measurements in correlated materials. Particular focus will be placed on photon polarizations and the role of symmetry to elucidate the dynamics of electrons in different regions of the Brillouin zone. This advantage over conventional transport (usually measuring averaged properties) provides new insights into anisotropic and complex many-body behavior of electrons in various systems. Recent developments in the theory of electronic Raman scattering in correlated systems and experimental results in paradigmatic materials such as the A15 superconductors, magnetic and paramagnetic insulators, compounds with competing orders, as well as the cuprates with high superconducting transition temperatures are reviewed. An overview of the manifestations of complexity in the Raman response due to the impact of correlations and developing competing orders is presented. In a variety of materials, observations which may be understood and a summary of important open questions that pave the way to a detailed understanding of correlated electron systems, are discussed.

  9. Inelastic electron scattering from 48Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, J. E.; McCarthy, J. S.; Altemus, R.; Norum, B. E.; Whitney, R. R.; Heisenberg, J.; Dawson, J.; Schwentker, O.

    1985-05-01

    Inelastic electron scattering from 48Ca has been performed over a momentum transfer range from 0.6 to 3.0 fm-1 in both forward and backward directions. Form factors have been obtained for 25 levels up to 10 MeV excitation. Charge and current densities for 11 low lying electric transitions and current densities for two magnetic transitions have been reconstructed in Fourier Bessel analysis. Three high spin states observed in the region of 9 MeV excitation are found to have the dominant configuration ν(1g9/2,1f-17/2)8 - but with a total strength of only 36% predicted for the first 8- in a random-phase-approximation calculation. This is interpreted as evidence for particle-phonon coupling. Comparisons of the extracted densities are made with random-phase-approximation calculations using a zero-range, density-dependent Migdal interaction.

  10. Deep inelastic scattering in conformal QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2010-03-01

    We consider the Regge limit of a CFT correlation function of two vector and two scalar operators, as appropriate to study small-x deep inelastic scattering in mathcal{N} = 4 SYM or in QCD assuming approximate conformal symmetry. After clarifying the nature of the Regge limit for a CFT correlator, we use its conformal partial wave expansion to obtain an impact parameter representation encoding the exchange of a spin j Reggeon for any value of the coupling constant. The CFT impact parameter space is the three-dimensional hyperbolic space H 3, which is the impact parameter space for high energy scattering in the dual AdS space. We determine the small-x structure functions associated to the exchange of a Reggeon. We discuss unitarization from the point of view of scattering in AdS and comment on the validity of the eikonal approximation. We then focus on the weak coupling limit of the theory where the amplitude is dominated by the exchange of the BFKL pomeron. Conformal invariance fixes the form of the vector impact factor and its decomposition in transverse spin 0 and spin 2 components. Our formalism reproduces exactly the general results predict by the Regge theory, both for a scalar target and for γ* - γ* scattering. We compute current impact factors for the specific examples of mathcal{N} = 4 SYM and QCD, obtaining very simple results. In the case of the R-current of mathcal{N} = 4 SYM, we show that the transverse spin 2 component vanishes. We conjecture that the impact factors of all chiral primary operators of mathcal{N} = 4 SYM only have components with 0 transverse spin.

  11. Visible Inelastic Light Scattering from Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Roger Allen

    In this work we studied the spectral shape of the intense continuum of light scattered inelastically from "bare" metals used in Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering. We derived cross sections, presented their spectral properties, and experimentally sought to characterize the observable spectral shape. Three scattering cross sections are derived. The development includes exposure of assumptions and limitations in the derivation. Elucidated are: contributions due to the few angstrom drastic spatial and polarization variations of the applied electromagnetic field at jellium metal surfaces; fluctuation induced light scattering, such as, spin density, charge density (plasmon and single electron), and current density fluctuations; and the light coupling operators that arise from a choice of gauge used in photoemission rather than the customary Coulomb gauge. The result is a set of matrix elements that carry the important physics of light scattering by metallic electrons, and that is more complete than is found in the Surface Enhanced Raman literature. Using one of these matrix elements in the electric dipole approximation we have developed a quantum chemistry computer algorithm to evaluate the strength of light interaction with any metal surface which can be modeled as a cluster. The algorithm uses spd Slater-type bases and can study transition and noble metals. It was tested on some model systems. A formalism is presented for further developing the algorithm to calculate adsorbed molecular vibrational Raman cross sections in the limit of the long wavelength electric dipole approximation. We further present known continuum spectral shapes from familiar light coupling operators (a subset of those we derived) and associate them with our experimentally observed spectral shapes. In the experimental study of spectral shapes we found the mechanical disorder, due to cold working smooth metals during polishing, to correlate with the strength of the continuum. Using microscopic

  12. Longitudinal and Transverse Inelastic Electron Scattering from 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, R.; Cafolla, A.; Day, D.; McCarthy, J. S.; Whitney, R. R.; Wise, J. E.

    1980-04-01

    Inelastic-electron-scattering cross sections for 56Fe have been measured in the continuum region. The longitudinal and transverse inelastic response functions have been determined for vector momentum transfers, q, from 210-410 MeV/c and for energy losses 0<ω<=220 MeV.

  13. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  14. Role of exchange effects in elastic scattering of. cap alpha. particles and /sup 3/He ions by /sup 6/Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bragin, V.N.; Burtebaev, N.T.; Dui-brevesebaev, A.D.; Ivanov, G.N.; Sakuta, S.B.; Chuev, V.I.; Chulkov, L.V.

    1986-08-01

    Measurements in the entire angular range are carried out for elastic scattering of ..cap alpha.. particles with energies 36.6 and 50.5 MeV and /sup 3/He ions with energies 34, 50, 60, and 72 MeV by /sup 6/Li nuclei. The experimental data obtained have been analyzed within the framework of the optical model. The contribution to the scattering of the mechanism of elastic transfer of clusters was calculated by the distorted-wave method with a finite interaction radius.

  15. Deep Inelastic Scattering on Ultracold Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Johannes; Zwerger, Wilhelm

    2017-01-01

    We discuss Bragg scattering on both Bose and Fermi gases with strong short-range interactions in the deep inelastic regime of large wave vector transfer q , where the dynamic structure factor is dominated by a resonance near the free-particle energy ℏω =ɛq=ℏ2q2/2 m . Using a systematic short-distance expansion, the structure factor at high momentum is shown to exhibit a nontrivial dependence on frequency characterized by two separate scaling regimes. First, for frequencies that differ from the single-particle energy by terms of order O (q ) (i.e., small deviations compared to the single-particle energy), the dynamic structure factor is described by the impulse approximation of Hohenberg and Platzman. Second, deviations of order O (q2) (i.e., of the same order or larger than the single-particle energy) are described by the operator product expansion, with a universal crossover connecting both regimes. The scaling is consistent with the leading asymptotics for a number of sum rules in the large momentum limit. Furthermore, we derive an exact expression for the shift and width of the single-particle peak at large momentum due to interactions, thus extending a result by Beliaev [J. Exp. Theor. Phys. 7, 299 (1958)] for the low-density Bose gas to arbitrary values of the scattering length a . The shift exhibits a maximum around q a ≃1 , which is connected with a maximum in the static structure factor due to strong short-range correlations. For Bose gases with moderate interaction strengths, the theoretically predicted shift is consistent with the value observed by Papp et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 135301 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.135301]. Finally, we develop a diagrammatic theory for the dynamic structure factor which accounts for the correlations beyond Bogoliubov theory. It covers the full range of momenta and frequencies and provides an explicit example for the emergence of asymptotic scaling at large momentum.

  16. Significance of matrix diagonalization in modelling inelastic electron scattering.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Hambach, R; Kaiser, U; Rose, H

    2016-11-21

    Electron scattering is always applied as one of the routines to investigate nanostructures. Nowadays the development of hardware offers more and more prospect for this technique. For example imaging nanostructures with inelastic scattered electrons may allow to produce component-sensitive images with atomic resolution. Modelling inelastic electron scattering is therefore essential for interpreting these images. The main obstacle to study inelastic scattering problem is its complexity. During inelastic scattering, incident electrons entangle with objects, and the description of this process involves a multidimensional array. Since the simulation usually involves fourdimensional Fourier transforms, the computation is highly inefficient. In this work we have offered one solution to handle the multidimensional problem. By transforming a high dimensional array into twodimensional array, we are able to perform matrix diagonalization and approximate the original multidimensional array with its twodimensional eigenvectors. Our procedure reduces the complicated multidimensional problem to a twodimensional problem. In addition, it minimizes the number of twodimensional problems. This method is very useful for studying multiple inelastic scattering.

  17. Response functions for deep inelastic scattering from 40Ca

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deady, M.; Williamson, C. F.; Wong, J.; Zimmerman, P. D.; Blatchley, C.; Finn, J. M.; Lerose, J.; Sioshansi, P.; Altemus, R.; McCarthy, J. S.; Whitney, R. R.

    1983-08-01

    Deep inelastic electron scattering cross sections have been measured from 40Ca at energies between 100 and 375 MeV and at scattering angles of 90° and 140°. Longitudinal and transverse response functions at three-vector momentum transfers of 330, 370, and 410 MeV/c were extracted from these data using a Rosenbluth separation. The integrated longitudinal response functions for the three momentum transfers are found to have, respectively, 65%, 75%, and 90% of the longitudinal strength predicted by the Fermi gas model. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Deep inelastic electron scattering from 40Ca, extracted transverse and longitudinal response functions.

  18. Halo-independent methods for inelastic dark matter scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Bozorgnia, Nassim; Schwetz, Thomas; Herrero-Garcia, Juan; Zupan, Jure E-mail: juan.a.herrero@uv.es E-mail: jure.zupan@cern.ch

    2013-07-01

    We present halo-independent methods to analyze the results of dark matter direct detection experiments assuming inelastic scattering. We focus on the annual modulation signal reported by DAMA/LIBRA and present three different halo-independent tests. First, we compare it to the upper limit on the unmodulated rate from XENON100 using (a) the trivial requirement that the amplitude of the annual modulation has to be smaller than the bound on the unmodulated rate, and (b) a bound on the annual modulation amplitude based on an expansion in the Earth's velocity. The third test uses the special predictions of the signal shape for inelastic scattering and allows for an internal consistency check of the data without referring to any astrophysics. We conclude that a strong conflict between DAMA/LIBRA and XENON100 in the framework of spin-independent inelastic scattering can be established independently of the local properties of the dark matter halo.

  19. Inelastic Neutron Scattering of Nitric Acid Hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloh, P.; Grothe, H.; Martín-Llorente, B.; Parker, S.

    2009-04-01

    The IPCC report 2007 underlines the particular importance of aerosol particles for the water cycle and the radiation balance, and thus for the global climate.[1] The contribution of aerosols and clouds to radiative forcing might be comparable to the most important greenhouse gases like CO2 but is comparatively less understood. Nitric acid hydrates are important constituents of solid cloud particles in the lower polar Stratosphere (Polar Stratospheric Clouds) and the upper Troposphere (Cirrus clouds). The exact phase composition of these particles is still a matter of controversial discussion.[2] Especially, metastable modifications have, as recent measurements show, a particular relevance for the atmosphere, which has been ignored up to now.[3] Spectroscopic data for their detection are urgently needed and can be gathered with laboratory models. Only recently we have recorded the FTIR and Raman spectra of all nitric acid hydrates, stable and metastable.[4,5] These data have been corroborated by X-ray diffraction measurements.[6] However, when interpreting the spectroscopic data it became evident that not all bands could be explained reasonably. Here, DFT calculations were extremely helpful,[7] but still the translational and librational bands were not fully understood. Hence, inelastic neutron scattering was employed in order to investigate this region. The INS measurements were carried out with the instrument TOSCA at the ISIS of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK. The samples were prepared ex-situ in an amorphous state and were transferred into a helium-bath-cryostat, where the sample has been annealed between 20 K and 220 K. Characteristic changes of translational and librational modes have been observed and have been correlated with phase transitions. [1] Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, 4th Assessment Report "Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis, Summary for Policymakers", Geneva, 2007; www.ipcc.ch [2] H. Grothe, H. Tizek and I. K

  20. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.

    1985-01-01

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A conducting coated high voltage electrode (1) and a tungsten wire grid (2) constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source (3) to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window (4) allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  1. Imaging alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.

    1980-10-29

    A method and apparatus for detecting and imaging alpha particles sources is described. A dielectric coated high voltage electrode and a tungsten wire grid constitute a diode configuration discharge generator for electrons dislodged from atoms or molecules located in between these electrodes when struck by alpha particles from a source to be quantitatively or qualitatively analyzed. A thin polyester film window allows the alpha particles to pass into the gas enclosure and the combination of the glass electrode, grid and window is light transparent such that the details of the source which is imaged with high resolution and sensitivity by the sparks produced can be observed visually as well. The source can be viewed directly, electronically counted or integrated over time using photographic methods. A significant increase in sensitivity over other alpha particle detectors is observed, and the device has very low sensitivity to gamma or beta emissions which might otherwise appear as noise on the alpha particle signal.

  2. Deep-inelastic muon scattering from nuclei with hadron detection

    SciTech Connect

    Geesaman, D.; Jackson, H.; Kaufman, S.

    1995-08-01

    Deep-inelastic lepton scattering from nuclei provides a direct look at the quark structure of nuclear matter. These reactions revealed the first convincing evidence that the structure of nucleons is modified in the nuclear medium and had profound implications on the understanding of nuclear dynamics. FNAL experiment E665, using the 490-GeV muon beams at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, provides new information on the nuclear effects on nucleon properties by studying deep-inelastic muon scattering with coincident hadron detection. The high beam energy makes the experiment particularly suited to the study of the region of x < 0.1 (where x is the fraction of the momentum of the nucleon carried by the struck quark in the infinite momentum frame), and total center-of-mass hadronic energy > 25 GeV, where hard QCD processes are expected to become evident and there are little data from other deep-inelastic measurements.

  3. In-situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In situ soil carbon analysis using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is based on the emission of 4.43 MeV gamma rays from carbon nuclei excited by fast neutrons. This in-situ method has excellent potential for easily measuring soil carbon since it does not require soil core sampling and processing ...

  4. Benchmarking the inelastic neutron scattering soil carbon method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The herein described inelastic neutron scattering (INS) method of measuring soil carbon was based on a new procedure for extracting the net carbon signal (NCS) from the measured gamma spectra and determination of the average carbon weight percent (AvgCw%) in the upper soil layer (~8 cm). The NCS ext...

  5. CHEMICAL APPLICATIONS OF INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    HAYASHI,H.; UDAGAWA,Y.; GILLET,J.M.; CALIEBE,W.A.; KAO,C.C.

    2001-08-01

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS), complementary to other more established inelastic scattering probes, such as light scattering, electron scattering, and neutron scattering, is becoming an important experimental technique in the study of elementary excitations in condensed matters. Over the past decade, IXS with total energy resolution of few meV has been achieved, and is being used routinely in the study of phonon dispersions in solids and liquids as well as dynamics in disordered and biological systems. In the study of electronic excitations, IXS with total energy resolution on the order of 100 meV to 1 eV is gaining wider applications also. For example, IXS has been used to study collective excitations of valence electrons, single electron excitations of valence electrons, as well as core electron excitations. In comparison with the alternative scattering techniques mentioned above, IXS has several advantages. First, IXS probes the full momentum transfer range of the dielectric response of the sample, whereas light scattering is limited to very small momentum transfers, and electron scattering suffers the effects of multiple scattering at large momentum transfers. Second, since IXS measures the bulk properties of the sample it is not surface sensitive, therefore it does not require special preparation of the sample. The greater flexibility in sample conditions and environments makes IXS an ideal probe in the study of liquids and samples under extreme temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Third, the tunability of synchrotron radiation sources enables IXS to exploit element specificity and resonant enhancement of scattering cross sections. Fourth, IXS is unique in the study of dynamics of liquids and amorphous solids because it can probe the particular region of energy-momentum transfer phase space, which is inaccessible to inelastic neutron scattering. On the other hand, the main disadvantages of IXS are the small cross sections and the strong absorption of

  6. Alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper will focus on the state of development of diagnostics which are expected to provide the information needed for {alpha}- physics studies in the future. Conventional measurement of detailed temporal and spatial profiles of background plasma properties in DT will be essential for such aspects as determining heating effectiveness, shaping of the plasma profiles and effects of MHD, but will not be addressed here. This paper will address (1) the measurement of the neutron source, and hence {alpha}-particle birth profile, (2) measurement of the escaping {alpha}-particles and (3) measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles over their full energy range. There will also be a brief discussion of (4) the concerns about instabilities being generated by {alpha}-particles and the methods necessary for measuring these effects. 51 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Paul

    2011-07-15

    Recent inclusive charged and neutral current scattering data from HERA are presented. Emphasis is placed on the resulting constraints on the proton parton densities and on the influence of low x proton structure on diffraction.

  8. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This program uses ab-initio and multiple scattering to study surface dynamical processes; high-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy is used in particular. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50--300 eV). The analyses have been extended to surfaces of ordered alloys. Phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross section calculations. Work on low-energy electron and positron holography is mentioned.

  9. DEEPLY INELASTIC SCATTERING OFF NUCLEI AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    VENUGOPALAN, R.

    2001-09-14

    In this talk, we discussed the physics case for an eA collider. We emphasized the novel physics that might be studied at small x. The interesting physics at intermediate x's has been discussed elsewhere [3]. Plans for an electron-ion collider include, as a major part of the program, the possibility of doing polarized electron-polarized proton/light ion scattering. A discussion of the combined case for high energy electron nucleus and polarized electron-polarized proton scattering will be published separately [66].

  10. The interpretation of polycrystalline coherent inelastic neutron scattering from aluminium

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Daniel L.; Ross, D. Keith; Gale, Julian D.; Taylor, Jon W.

    2013-01-01

    A new approach to the interpretation and analysis of coherent inelastic neutron scattering from polycrystals (poly-CINS) is presented. This article describes a simulation of the one-phonon coherent inelastic scattering from a lattice model of an arbitrary crystal system. The one-phonon component is characterized by sharp features, determined, for example, by boundaries of the (Q, ω) regions where one-phonon scattering is allowed. These features may be identified with the same features apparent in the measured total coherent inelastic cross section, the other components of which (multiphonon or multiple scattering) show no sharp features. The parameters of the model can then be relaxed to improve the fit between model and experiment. This method is of particular interest where no single crystals are available. To test the approach, the poly-CINS has been measured for polycrystalline aluminium using the MARI spectrometer (ISIS), because both lattice dynamical models and measured dispersion curves are available for this material. The models used include a simple Lennard-Jones model fitted to the elastic constants of this material plus a number of embedded atom method force fields. The agreement obtained suggests that the method demonstrated should be effective in developing models for other materials where single-crystal dispersion curves are not available. PMID:24282332

  11. Measurement of proton inelastic scattering cross sections on fluorine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiari, M.; Caciolli, A.; Calzolai, G.; Climent-Font, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.

    2016-10-01

    Differential cross-sections for proton inelastic scattering on fluorine, 19F(p,p')19F, from the first five excited levels of 19F at 110, 197, 1346, 1459 and 1554 keV were measured for beam energies from 3 to 7 MeV at a scattering angle of 150° using a LiF thin target (50 μg/cm2) evaporated on a self-supporting C thin film (30 μg/cm2). Absolute differential cross-sections were calculated with a method not dependent on the absolute values of collected beam charge and detector solid angle. The validity of the measured inelastic scattering cross sections was then tested by successfully reproducing EBS spectra collected from a thick Teflon (CF2) target. As a practical application of these measured inelastic scattering cross sections in elastic backscattering spectroscopy (EBS), the feasibility of quantitative light element (C, N and O) analysis in aerosol particulate matter samples collected on Teflon by EBS measurements and spectra simulation is demonstrated.

  12. Inelastic scattering at the B K edge of hexagonal BN

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, J.J.; Callcott, T.A.; Zhou, L.

    1997-04-01

    Many recent soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) studies have shown that inelastic scattering processes make important contributions to the observed spectra for excitation near the x-ray threshold. These effects are all attributed to a process, usually called an electronic Raman scattering (ERS) process, in which energy is lost to an electronic excitation. The theory has been described using second order perturbation theory by Tulkki and Aberg. In different materials, the detailed nature of the electronic excitation producing the energy loss may be very different. In crystalline Si, diamond and graphite, changes in spectral shape and dispersion of spectral features with variation of the excitation energy are observed, which are attributed to k conservation between the photoelectron generated in the excitation process and the valence hole remaining after the coupled emission process. Hence the process is strongly localized in k-space. In haxagonal boron nitride, which has a lattice and band structure very similar to graphite, inelastic scattering produces very different effects on the observed spectra. Here, the inelastic losses are coupled to a strong resonant elastic scattering process, in which the intermediate state is a localized core exciton and the final state is a localized valence exciton, so that the electronic excitation is strongly localized in real rather than reciprocal space.

  13. Modern Techniques for Inelastic Thermal Neutron Scattering Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawari, A. I.

    2014-04-01

    A predictive approach based on ab initio quantum mechanics and/or classical molecular dynamics simulations has been formulated to calculate the scattering law, S(κ⇀,ω), and the thermal neutron scattering cross sections of materials. In principle, these atomistic methods make it possible to generate the inelastic thermal neutron scattering cross sections of any material and to accurately reflect the physical conditions of the medium (i.e, temperature, pressure, etc.). In addition, the generated cross sections are free from assumptions such as the incoherent approximation of scattering theory and, in the case of solids, crystalline perfection. As a result, new and improved thermal neutron scattering data libraries have been generated for a variety of materials. Among these are materials used for reactor moderators and reflectors such as reactor-grade graphite and beryllium (including the coherent inelastic scattering component), silicon carbide, cold neutron media such as solid methane, and neutron beam filters such as sapphire and bismuth. Consequently, it is anticipated that the above approach will play a major role in providing the nuclear science and engineering community with its needs of thermal neutron scattering data especially when considering new materials where experimental information may be scarce or nonexistent.

  14. Inelastic scattering of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pshenichnyuk, I. A.; Berloff, N. G.

    2016-11-01

    We study inelastic interactions of particles with quantized vortices in superfluids by using a semiclassical matter wave theory that is analogous to the Landau two-fluid equations, but allows for the vortex dynamics. The research is motivated by recent experiments on xenon-doped helium nanodroplets that show clustering of the impurities along the vortex cores. We numerically simulate the dynamics of trapping and interactions of xenon atoms by quantized vortices in superfluid helium and the obtained results can be extended to scattering of other impurities by quantized vortices. Different energies and impact parameters of incident particles are considered. We show that inelastic scattering is closely linked to the generation of Kelvin waves along a quantized vortex during the interaction even if there is no capture. The capture criterion of an impurity is formulated in terms of the binding energy.

  15. Spontaneous inelastic Rayleigh scattering in optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Okusaga, Olukayode; Cahill, James P; Docherty, Andrew; Menyuk, Curtis R; Zhou, Weimin

    2013-02-15

    Rayleigh scattering (RS) adds noise to signals that are transmitted over optical fibers and other optical waveguides. This noise can be the dominant noise source in a range between 10 Hz and 100 kHz from the carrier and can seriously degrade the performance of optical systems that require low close-in noise. Using heterodyne techniques, we demonstrate that the backscattered close-in noise spectrum in optical fibers is symmetric about the carrier and grows linearly with both input power and fiber length. These results indicate that the RS is spontaneous and is due to finite-lifetime thermal fluctuations in the glass.

  16. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H.; Lefmann, K.; Lake, B.; Nielsen, K.; Skaarup, P.

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared with the experimental data. Simulating the entire experiment is an attractive alternative to the usual method of convoluting the model cross section with the resolution function, especially if the resolution function is nontrivial.

  17. Alpha inelastic scattering and cluster structures in {sup 24}Mg

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabata, T.; Ishiguro, Y.; Nozawa, Y.; Tomida, N.; Yokota, N.; Adachi, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Hatanaka, K.; Tamii, A.; Yasuda, Y.; Zenihiro, J.; Itoh, M.; Takahashi, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Maeda, Y.; Miyasako, H.; Saito, T.; Matsubara, H.; Sasamoto, Y.; Tokieda, H.

    2011-05-06

    The alpha inelastic scattering from {sup 24}Mg was measured to obtain the isoscalar natural-parity excitation strengths and to search for the {alpha}-condensed states. The multipole decomposition analysis for the measured cross sections was performed. The strength distributions for the {Delta}L = 0-3 were successfully obtained and the possible candidates for the {alpha}-condensed states around the {sup 16}O core were found.

  18. Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes

    SciTech Connect

    Clauser, C. F. Farengo, R.

    2015-12-15

    Alpha particles diffusion due to charge changes in a magnetized plasma is studied. Analytical calculations and numerical simulations are employed to show that this process can be very important in the pedestal-edge-SOL regions. This is the first study that presents clear evidence of the importance of atomic processes on the diffusion of alpha particles. A simple 1D model that includes inelastic collisions with plasma species, “cold” neutrals, and partially ionized species was employed. The code, which follows the exact particle orbits and includes the effect of inelastic collisions via a Monte Carlo type random process, runs on a graphic processor unit (GPU). The analytical and numerical results show excellent agreement when a uniform background (plasma and cold species) is assumed. The simulations also show that the gradients in the density of the plasma and cold species, which are large and opposite in the edge region, produce an inward flux of alpha particles. Calculations of the alpha particles flux reaching the walls or divertor plates should include these processes.

  19. Refinement of the Compton-Rayleigh scatter ratio method for use on the Mars Science Laboratory alpha particle X-ray spectrometer: II - Extraction of invisible element content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrett, Glynis M.; Campbell, John L.; Gellert, Ralf; King, Penelope L.; Nield, Emily; O'Meara, Joanne M.; Pradler, Irina

    2016-02-01

    The intensity ratio C/R between Compton and Rayleigh scatter peaks of the exciting Pu L X-rays in the alpha particle X-ray spectrometer (APXS) is strongly affected by the presence of very light elements such as oxygen which cannot be detected directly by the APXS. C/R values are determined along with element concentrations by fitting APXS spectra of geochemical reference materials (GRMs) with the GUAPX code. A quantity K is defined as the ratio between the C/R value determined by Monte Carlo simulation based on the measured element concentrations and the fitted C/R value from the spectrum. To ensure optimally accurate K values, the choice of appropriate GRMs is explored in detail, with attention paid to Rb and Sr, whose characteristic Kα X-ray peaks overlap the Pu Lα scatter peaks. The resulting relationship between the ratio K and the overall oxygen fraction is linear. This provides a calibration from which the concentration of additional light invisible constituents (ALICs) such as water may be estimated in unknown rock and conglomerate samples. Several GRMs are used as 'unknowns' in order to evaluate the accuracy of ALIC concentrations derived in this manner.

  20. In situ measurement of inelastic light scattering in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chuanmin

    Variation in the shape of solar absorption (Fraunhofer) lines are used to study the inelastic scattering in natural waters. In addition, oxygen absorption lines near 689nm are used to study the solar stimulated chlorophyll fluorescence. The prototype Oceanic Fraunhofer Line Discriminator (OFLD) has been further developed and improved by using a well protected fiber optic - wire conductor cable and underwater electronic housing. A Monte-Carlo code and a simple code have been modified to simulate the Raman scattering, DOM fluorescence and chlorophyll fluorescence. A series of in situ measurements have been conducted in clear ocean waters in the Florida Straits, in the turbid waters of Florida Bay, and in the vicinity of a coral reef in the Dry Tortugas. By comparing the reduced data with the model simulation results, the Raman scattering coefficient, b r with an excitation wavelength at 488nm, has been verified to be 2.6 × 10-4m-1 (Marshall and Smith, 1990), as opposed to 14.4 × 10- 4m-1 (Slusher and Derr, 1975). The wavelength dependence of b r cannot be accurately determined from the data set as the reported values (λ m-4 to λ m- 5) have an insignificant effect in the natural underwater light field. Generally, in clear water, the percentage of inelastic scattered light in the total light field at /lambda < 510nm is negligible for the whole water column, and this percentage increases with depth at /lambda > 510nm. At low concentrations (a y(/lambda = 380nm) less than 0.1m-1), DOM fluorescence plays a small role in the inelastic light field. However, chlorophyll fluorescence is much stronger than Raman scattering at 685nm. In shallow waters where a sea bottom affects the ambient light field, inelastic light is negligible for the whole visible band. Since Raman scattering is now well characterized, the new OFLD can be used to measure the solar stimulated in situ fluorescence. As a result, the fluorescence signals of various bottom surfaces, from coral to

  1. Inelastic scattering of neutrons and possible biological applications.

    PubMed

    Egelstaff, P A

    1976-05-01

    The field of neutron inelastic scattering has probably been developed to the stage where it can begin to help the biologist. Because essentially no experimental data have been obtained, it is difficult either to draw conclusions or to make forecasts except on the basis of general hypotheses. It seems likely, however, that the next stage is up to biologists. After reviewing those biological problems in which molecular dynamics might play an important role, they should suggest specimens of interest which can give inelastic peaks with existing spectrometers operating with 5 to 10-A neutrons at angles greater than 5degrees and with resolutions of approximately 50 mueV. These specimens may involve molecules slightly smaller and more mobile than some biologists would like, but a successful outcome might lead to the development of spectrometers capable of working in a more satisfactory range. In this event the return may well prove rewarding to the biologists.

  2. Summary of Alpha Particle Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Medley, S.S.; White, R.B.; Zweben, S.J.

    1998-08-19

    This paper summarizes the talks on alpha particle transport which were presented at the 5th International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Committee Meeting on "Alpha Particles in Fusion Research" held at the Joint European Torus, England in September 1997.

  3. Inelastic pion scattering to 2 1+ states of pre12C and 28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amos, K.; Berge, L.

    1983-08-01

    Large basis, microscopic models of nuclear structure have been used to specify the “collective” form factors for inelastic scattering to the 2 1+ states in 12C and 28Si. They have been used in a Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation, with π-nucleon t-matrices fixed by elastic scattering analyses, to fit inelastic pion scattering data.

  4. Elastic and inelastic scattering of neutrons on 238U nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capote, R.; Trkov, A.; Sin, M.; Herman, M. W.; Soukhovitskiĩ, E. Sh.

    2014-04-01

    Advanced modelling of neutron induced reactions on the 238U nucleus is aimed at improving our knowledge of neutron scattering. Capture and fission channels are well constrained by available experimental data and neutron standard evaluation. A focus of this contribution is on elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections. The employed nuclear reaction model includes - a new rotational-vibrational dispersive optical model potential coupling the low-lying collective bands of vibrational character observed in even-even actinides; - the Engelbrecht-Weidenmüller transformation allowing for inclusion of compound-direct interference effects; - and a multi-humped fission barrier with absorption in the secondary well described within the optical model for fission. Impact of the advanced modelling on elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections including angular distributions and emission spectra is assessed both by comparison with selected microscopic experimental data and integral criticality benchmarks including measured reaction rates (e.g. JEMIMA, FLAPTOP and BIG TEN). Benchmark calculations provided feedback to improve the reaction modelling. Improvement of existing libraries will be discussed.

  5. NLO QCD corrections to graviton induced deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stirling, W. J.; Vryonidou, E.

    2011-06-01

    We consider Next-to-Leading-Order QCD corrections to ADD graviton exchange relevant for Deep Inelastic Scattering experiments. We calculate the relevant NLO structure functions by calculating the virtual and real corrections for a set of graviton interaction diagrams, demonstrating the expected cancellation of the UV and IR divergences. We compare the NLO and LO results at the centre-of-mass energy relevant to HERA experiments as well as for the proposed higher energy lepton-proton collider, LHeC, which has a higher fundamental scale reach.

  6. Positronium formation in positron-rubidium inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Raouf, M. A.

    1988-04-01

    Eight partial cross sections of positron-rubidium ( 37Rb) inelastic scattering (corresponding to 0 ⩽ l⩽ 7, where l is the total angular momentum) are calculated at 25 values of the incident energy ranging from 0.1 to 1000 eV. The calculations are carried out using Clementi-Roetti's wavefunctions, and a combination of the coupled-static and frozen-core approximations. A comparison between the total positronium formation cross sections of the collisions of positrons with four different alkali atoms (lithium, sodium, potassium and rubidium) is presented.

  7. RESONANT INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING FROM TRANSITION METAL OXIDES.

    SciTech Connect

    HILL,J.P.

    1999-08-23

    Recent developments in hard x-ray resonant inelastic x-ray scattering as a probe of strongly correlated systems are reviewed. Particular attention is paid to studies of Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. A charge transfer excitation is observed when the incident photon energy is tuned in the vicinity of the copper K-edge. It is shown that the presence of resonant enhancements is controlled by the polarization dependence of the excitation process and by the overlap between a given intermediate state and the particular excitation being studied. This latter observation has shed light on the non-local effects present in certain intermediate states.

  8. Transition probability functions for applications of inelastic electron scattering.

    PubMed

    Löffler, Stefan; Schattschneider, Peter

    2012-09-01

    In this work, the transition matrix elements for inelastic electron scattering are investigated which are the central quantity for interpreting experiments. The angular part is given by spherical harmonics. For the weighted radial wave function overlap, analytic expressions are derived in the Slater-type and the hydrogen-like orbital models. These expressions are shown to be composed of a finite sum of polynomials and elementary trigonometric functions. Hence, they are easy to use, require little computation time, and are significantly more accurate than commonly used approximations.

  9. Resonant Inelastic Scattering Spectra of Free Molecules with Vibrational Resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Hennies, Franz; Pietzsch, Annette; Berglund, Martin; Foehlisch, Alexander; Schmitt, Thorsten; Strocov, Vladimir; Karlsson, Hans O.; Andersson, Joakim; Rubensson, Jan-Erik

    2010-05-14

    Inelastic x-ray scattering spectra excited at the 1s{sup -1{pi}}* resonance of gas phase O{sub 2} have been recorded with an overall energy resolution that allows for well-resolved vibrational progressions. The nuclear wave packet dynamics in the intermediate state is reflected in vibrational excitations of the electronic ground state, and by fine-tuning the excitation energy the dissociation dynamics in the predissociative B{sup '} {sup 3{Pi}}{sub g} final state is controlled.

  10. Deep inelastic electron scattering from iron 56 and other tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemus, R. M.

    1980-03-01

    Deep inelastic electron scattering data on iron 56 are presented for angles of 160 degrees, 140 degrees and 90 degrees and at incident energies ranging from 372 MeV to 100 MeV. Radiative contributions from real target bremsstrahlung and from the continuum are included. The data were separated into longitudinal, Sl(q, omega) and transverse, ST(q, omega) response functions. A Coulomb sum rule for constant q is formulated and compared with an independent particle model (Fermi gas). Short range correlations, finite size effects, effective momentum transfer and final state interactions are considered in an attempt to explain the observed discrepancies.

  11. Neutrino-Nucleon Deep Inelastic Scattering in MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norrick, Anne; Minerva Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Neutrino-Nucleon Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) events provide a probe into the structure of the nucleus that cannot be accessed via charged lepton-nucleon interactions. The MINERvA experiment is stationed in the Neutrinos from the Main Injector (NuMI) beam line at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The projected sensitivity of nuclear structure function analyses using MINERvA's suite of nuclear targets (C, CH, Fe and Pb) in the upgraded 6 GeV neutrino energy NuMI beam will be explored, and their impact discussed.

  12. Alpha Particle Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Ray, K.

    2009-05-13

    The study of burning plasmas is the next frontier in fusion energy research, and will be a major objective of the U.S. fusion program through U.S. collaboration with our international partners on the ITER Project. For DT magnetic fusion to be useful for energy production, it is essential that the energetic alpha particles produced by the fusion reactions be confined long enough to deposit a significant fraction of their initial ~3.5 MeV energy in the plasma before they are lost. Development of diagnostics to study the behavior of energetic confined alpha particles is a very important if not essential part of burning plasma research. Despite the clear need for these measurements, development of diagnostics to study confined the fast confined alphas to date has proven extremely difficult, and the available techniques remain for the most part unproven and with significant uncertainties. Research under this grant had the goal of developing diagnostics of fast confined alphas, primarily based on measurements of the neutron and ion tails resulting from alpha particle knock-on collisions with the plasma deuterium and tritium fuel ions. One of the strengths of this approach is the ability to measure the alphas in the hot plasma core where the interesting ignition physics will occur.

  13. Exponential time-dependent perturbation theory in rotationally inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, R. J.

    1983-08-01

    An exponential form of time-dependent perturbation theory (the Magnus approximation) is developed for rotationally inelastic scattering. A phase-shift matrix is calculated as an integral in time over the anisotropic part of the potential. The trajectory used for this integral is specified by the diagonal part of the potential matrix and the arithmetic average of the initial and final velocities and the average orbital angular momentum. The exponential of the phase-shift matrix gives the scattering matrix and the various cross sections. A special representation is used where the orbital angular momentum is either treated classically or may be frozen out to yield the orbital sudden approximation. Calculations on Ar+N2 and Ar+TIF show that the theory generally gives very good agreement with accurate calculations, even where the orbital sudden approximation (coupled-states) results are seriously in error.

  14. Inelastic ultraviolet scattering from high frequency acoustic modes in glasses.

    PubMed

    Masciovecchio, C; Gessini, A; Di Fonzo, S; Comez, L; Santucci, S C; Fioretto, D

    2004-06-18

    The dynamic structure factor of vitreous silica and glycerol has been measured as a function of temperature and of the momentum transfer up to Q=0.105 nm(-1) using a novel experimental technique, the inelastic ultraviolet scattering. As in the case of Brillouin light scattering and ultrasonic measurements, the temperature dependence of the acoustic attenuation shows a plateau below the glass transition whose amplitude scales as Q2. Moreover, a slight temperature dependence of attenuation has been found in vitreous silica at about 130 K, which seems to be reminiscent of the peak measured at lower Qs. These two findings strongly support the idea that anharmonicity is responsible for sound attenuation at ultrasonic and hypersonic frequencies. Finally, we demonstrate that the attenuation mechanism should show a change of regime between 0.105 and 1 nm(-1).

  15. Inelastic X-ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; Radha, P. B.; Hu, S. X.; Boehly, T. R.; Crowley, B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O.; Gericke, D. O.; Doeppner, T.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Murphy, C. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Vorberger, J.

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. Thus, these first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5 eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023 cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  16. Inelastic X-ray Scattering from Shocked Liquid Deuterium

    DOE PAGES

    Regan, S. P.; Falk, K.; Gregori, G.; ...

    2012-12-28

    The Fermi-degenerate plasma conditions created in liquid deuterium by a laser-ablation—driven shock wave were probed with noncollective, spectrally resolved, inelastic x-ray Thomson scattering employing Cl Lyα line emission at 2.96 keV. Thus, these first x-ray Thomson scattering measurements of the microscopic properties of shocked deuterium show an inferred spatially averaged electron temperature of 8±5 eV, an electron density of 2.2(±0.5)×1023 cm-3, and an ionization of 0.8 (-0.25, +0.15). Our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using equation-of-state models suited for the extreme parameters occurring in inertial confinement fusion research and planetary interiors are consistent with the experimental results.

  17. Inelastic proton scattering of Sn isotopes studied with GRETINA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    The chain of semi-magic Sn nuclei, with many stable isotopes, has been a fertile ground for experimental and theoretical studies. Encompassing a major neutron shell from N = 50 to 82, the properties and structure of these nuclei provided important data for the development of the pairing-plus-quadrupole model. Recent experimental information on B(E2) for 106,108,110,112Sn came as a surprise as it indicated a larger collectivity than the predicted parabolic trend of quadrupole collectivity. These data, instead, show an unexpectedly flat trend even as the number of valence particles is reduced from 12 to 6. To fully understand how collectivity is evolving in these isotopes, 108,110,112Sn have been studied using thick-target, inelastic proton scattering with GRETINA tagging inelastic scattering events by detecting gamma-rays from the prompt decay of states excited in the reaction. We will present the trend of 2 + excitation cross-sections, the deduced quadrupole deformation parameters, and observations of other low-lying collective states. Comparison of these (p,p') quadrupole deformation parameters with B(E2) data will provide new insights into the relative importance of proton and neutron contributions to collectivity in these nuclei. GRETINA was funded by the US DOE - Office of Science. Operation of the array at NSCL is supported by NSF under Cooperative Agreement PHY-1102511(NSCL) and DOE under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231(LBNL).

  18. Inelastic Proton Scattering on 21Na in Inverse Kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Roby

    2009-10-01

    R.A.E. Austin, R. Kanungo, S. Reeve, Saint Mary's University; D.G. Jenkins, C.Aa.Diget, A. Robinson, A.G. Tuff, O. Roberts, University of York, UK; P.J. Woods, T. Davinson, G. J. Lotay, University of Edinburgh; C.-Y. Wu, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; H. Al Falou, G.C. Ball, M. Djongolov, A. Garnsworthy, G. Hackman, J.N. Orce, C.J. Pearson, S. Triambak, S.J. Williams, TRIUMF; C. Andreiou, D.S. Cross, N. Galinski, R. Kshetri, Simon Fraser University; C. Sumithrarachchi, M.A. Schumaker, University of Guelph; M.P. Jones, S.V. Rigby, University of Liverpool; D. Cline, A. Hayes, University of Rochester; T.E. Drake, University of Toronto; We describe an experiment and associated technique [1] to measure resonances of interest in astrophysical reactions. At the TRIUMF ISAC-II radioactive beam accelerator facility in Canada, particles inelastically scattered in inverse kinematics are detected with Bambino, a δE-E silicon telescope spanning 15-40 degrees in the lab. We use the TIGRESS to detect gamma rays in coincidence with the charged particles to cleanly select inelastic scattering events. We measured resonances above the alpha threshold in ^22Mg of relevance to the rate of break-out from the hot-CNO cycle via the reaction ^ 18Ne(α,p)^21Na. [1] PJ Woods et al. Rex-ISOLDE proposal 424 Cern (2003).

  19. The status of alpha-particle diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.M.; Johnson, D.W.

    1992-08-01

    There is a flurry of activity to complete alpha-particle diagnostics so that they can undergo some experimental testing in DT plasmas on JET or TFTR prior to implementation on ITER. Successful measurements of escaping charged fusion products have been made in DD plasmas, and the {alpha}-particle source can be well characterized by neutron profile measurement. These methods can be extrapolated to DT plasmas. Measurement of the confined {alpha}-particles requires a new technique. Collective Thomson scattering, methods involving charge-exchange interactions and nuclear reactions with impurities will be discussed. Some assessment is given of the capabilities of these techniques, bearing in mind the potential for their use in the physics phase of the ITER program.

  20. Pion Inelastic Scattering to the First Three Excited States of Lithium-6.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    extremely useful hadronic probe due to resulting theoretical simplifications in the analysis of pion- nucleus scattering data, and the ability to perform... hadronic probe such as the proton. (2) The pion possesses spin zero. As a boson, it can be absorbed by clusters of nucleons in the nucleus , and pion...treatment of pion- nucleus scattering as is the case for other hadronic probes such as protons and alpha particles. (4) Lastly, the total w+p and r-p cross

  1. Inelastic light scattering spectroscopy in Si/SiGe nanostructures: Strain, chemical composition and thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsybeskov, L.; Mala, S. A.; Wang, X.; Baribeau, J.-M.; Wu, X.; Lockwood, D. J.

    2016-11-01

    We present a review of recent studies of inelastic light scattering spectroscopy in two types of Si/SiGe nanostructures: planar superlattices and cluster (dot) multilayers including first- and second-order Raman scattering, polarized Raman scattering and low-frequency inelastic light scattering associated with folded acoustic phonons. The results are used in semi-quantitative analysis of chemical composition, strain and thermal conductivity in these technologically important materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  2. Bessel-Weighted Asymmetries in Semi Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    D. Boer, L. Gamberg, B.U. Musch, A. Prokudin

    2011-10-01

    The concept of weighted asymmetries is revisited for semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. We consider the cross section in Fourier space, conjugate to the outgoing hadron's transverse momentum, where convolutions of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and fragmentation functions become simple products. Individual asymmetric terms in the cross section can be projected out by means of a generalized set of weights involving Bessel functions. Advantages of employing these Bessel weights are that they suppress (divergent) contributions from high transverse momentum and that soft factors cancel in (Bessel-) weighted asymmetries. Also, the resulting compact expressions immediately connect to previous work on evolution equations for transverse momentum dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions and to quantities accessible in lattice QCD. Bessel weighted asymmetries are thus model independent observables that augment the description and our understanding of correlations of spin and momentum in nucleon structure.

  3. Dirac Calculations for Proton Inelastic Scattering at Intermediate Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Nohy, N. A.; El-Hammamy, M. N.; Aly, N. E.; Abdel-Moneim, A. M.; Hamza, A. F.

    2016-12-01

    Relativistic proton inelastic scattering from different targets (16O, 24Mg, 28Si, 40Ca, 54Fe, 58Ni, 90Zr, 154Sm, 176Yb, and 208Pb) at intermediate energies is analyzed in the framework of phenomenological optical potentials based on the Dirac formalism. Parameters of the Dirac phenomenological potential with Woods Saxon (WS) shape are obtained. The first order vibrational collective model with one phonon is used to calculate the transition optical potentials to the first low-lying excited state (2+) of the investigated target nuclei. Also, the variation of deformation length ( δ) with energy and mass number is studied. It is noticed that the deformation length increases slightly with energy at intermediate range.

  4. Inelastic X-ray Scattering Studies of Zeolite Collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Greaves, G. Neville; Kargl, Florian; Ward, David; Holliman, Peter; Meneau, Florian

    2009-01-29

    In situ inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) experiments have been used to probe heterogeneity and deformability in zeolte Y as this thermally collapses to a high density amorphous (HDA) aluminosilicate phase. The Landau-Placzek ratio R{sub LP} falls slowly as amorphisation advances, increasing in the later stages of collapse clearly showing how homogeneity improves non-linearly--behaviour linked closely with the decline in molar volume V{sub Molar}. The Brillouin frequency {omega}{sub Q} also decreases with amorphisation in a similar fashion, signifying a non-uniform decrease in the speed of sound v{sub l}. All of these changes with zeolite amorphisation infer formation of an intermediate low density amorphous (LDA) phase. This low entropy or 'perfect glass' has mechanical properties which are closer to the zeolite rather to the HDA glass--notably a very small value of Poisson's Ratio signifying unusually low resistance to deformation.

  5. Photon-jet cross sections in deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurenche, P.; Fontannaz, M.

    2015-02-01

    We present the complete next-to-leading order calculation of isolated prompt photon production in association with a jet in deep-inelastic scattering. The calculation involves, direct, resolved, and fragmentation contributions. It is shown that defining the transverse momenta in the proton virtual-photon frame (CM), as usually done, or in the laboratory frame, as done in some experiments, is not equivalent and leads to important differences concerning the perturbative approach. In fact, using the latter frame may preclude, under certain conditions, the calculation of the next-to-leading order correction to the important resolved component. A comparison with the latest ZEUS data is performed and good agreement is found in the perturbatively stable regions.

  6. Observation of boson peaks by inelastic neutron scattering in polyolefins

    SciTech Connect

    Annis, B.K.; Lohse, D.J.; Trouw, F.

    1999-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering was used to probe the nature of the boson peak in atactic polypropylene (aPP), head-to-head polypropylene (hhPP), polyisobutylene (PIB) and a 1/1 mass ratio hhPP/PIB blend. Atactic polypropylene is among the most {open_quotes}fragile{close_quotes} of glass formers and was found to have a shoulder rather than the distinctive peak exhibited by the other three polymers. This difference is already apparent at 15 K where relaxations are not expected to occur. The results suggest that the fragility of hhPP is intermediate between aPP and PIB. Within this group of polymers which have similar chemical structures the position of the boson peak appears to correlate with the glass transition temperature and the cohesive energy density. The possibility of a correlation with chain stiffness as expressed by the characteristic ratio is also discussed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. INELASTIC X-RAY SCATTERING AT ULTRAHIGH PRESSURES.

    SciTech Connect

    MAO, H.K.; HEMLEY, J.; KAO, C.C.

    2000-08-28

    Inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) provides high-pressure research with an arsenal of analytical capabilities for key measurements that were previously unattainable, and high pressure research provides IXS with numerous applications where the technique has unique advantages over other methods. High-pressure investigations can now be conducted using non-resonant IXS, resonant IXS, nuclear resonant IXS, and x-ray emission spectroscopy with energy resolutions of 100 meV to 1 eV for electronic transitions and 1 to 10 meV for phonon studies. By pressure-tuning materials over a wide range, we are able to investigate fundamental physics of electron gases, strongly correlated electron systems, high-energy electronic excitations, and phonons in energy and momentum space. The results will have a profound influence on materials applications as well as providing basic information for understanding the deep interior of the Earth and other planets.

  8. Large Solid Angle Spectrometer for Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Gelebart, F.; Morand, M.; Dermigny, Q.; Giura, P.; Shukla, A.; Rueff, J.-P.

    2007-01-19

    We have designed a large solid angle spectrometer mostly devoted to inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) studies of materials under extreme conditions (high pressure / temperature) in the hard x-ray range. The new IXS spectrometer is designed to optimize the photon throughput while preserving an excellent resolving power of {approx}10000 in the considered energy range. The spectrometer consists of an array of up to 4 spherically bent 0.5 m radius analyzer crystals and a solid-state detector positioned on the Rowland circle. The four analyzers can cover a solid angle more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional spectrometers. The spectrometer is to be installed on the GALAXIES beamline at SOLEIL in the near future.

  9. Fast Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections in THORIUM-232.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarcia, Christopher Albert

    Fast neutron inelastic scattering cross sections for levels between 700-1550-keV excitation energy in the actinide nucleus, ('232)Th, have been measured using the (n,n') time-of-flight technique. Two series of measurements were undertaken using neutrons with a typical energy spread of 8-10 keV, generated by the ('7)Li(p,n)('7)Be reaction. These measurments for 125(DEGREES)-differential scattering cross sections were performed over the incident neutron energy regions of (i) 0.950-1.550 MeV, in 50-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.200 -0.400-MeV scattered neutrons and (ii) 1.200-2.000 MeV, in 100-keV intervals with the time-of-flight spectrometer optimized to detect 0.400-0.800-MeV scattered neutrons. Over these scattered energy regions, an overall energy resolution of less than 15 keV was maintained. The relative neutron fluence was determined for each individual measurement, by positioning the main detector at 0(DEGREES) to view the primary neutron flux. Relative normalization was achieved by measuring the direct neutron flux from the lithium target with a fixed overhead monitor detector in both measurements. Main detector response was determined by comparison with a ('235)U fission chamber of known efficiency. Techniques for unfolding the complicated spectra obtained from these (n,n') studies were developed, employing user interactive computer codes to (i) generate simulated scattered neutron group response functions, (ii) subtract background effects from the measured spectra, (iii) approximate the background subtracted spectra in a weighted least-squares fashion by a superposition of response functions and (iv) make corrections for neutron absorption, finite scatterer size effects and multiple neutron scattering. Support codes consisting of graphics interaction packages, data file manipulation and transfer utility routines were created to assist in the spectral analysis procedure. Excitation function and angular distribution

  10. Measurements of Gamma Rays from 7 Be Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, S. L.; Ahn, T.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Caprio, M. A.; Constantinou, Ch.; Fasano, P.; Frentz, B.; Hall, M.; Jensen, L.; Kolata, J. J.; Li, X.; McCoy, A. E.; Moylan, S.; O'Malley, P.; Re, C. S.; Riggins, J.; Simon, A.; Torres-Isea, R.; Strauss, S.

    2016-09-01

    Ab-initio methods have been successful in describing the structure of light nuclei using realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions, but more experimental data is needed in the light unstable nuclei region. No-core configuration interaction calculations have made predictions for the M1 and a lower limit for the E2 electromagnetic transition strengths of the decay of the first excited state of 7Be where the latter has never before been measured. To measure the E2 transition strength, a Coulomb Excitation experiment was performed using TwinSol at the University of Notre Dame. A beam of 7Be ions were scattered off a gold target, and gamma rays from inelastically scattered ions were detected using clover Ge detectors. Preliminary results for the E2 transition strength and its comparison to the no-core configuration interaction approach will be shown. Extensions of this experimental method to other light unstable nuclei will be discussed. This work has been supported by US NSF Grant No. PHY 14-19765 and DOE Grant Number DE-FG02-95ER-40934.

  11. Compact turnkey focussing neutron guide system for inelastic scattering investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandl, G.; Georgii, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrate the performance of a compact neutron guide module which boosts the intensity in inelastic neutron scattering experiments by approximately a factor of 40. The module consists of two housings containing truly curved elliptic focussing guide elements, positioned before and after the sample. The advantage of the module lies in the ease with which it may be reproducibly mounted on a spectrometer within a few hours, on the same timescale as conventional sample environments. It is particularly well suited for samples with a volume of a few mm3, thus enabling the investigation of materials which to date would have been considered prohibitively small or samples exposed to extreme environments, where there are space constraints. We benchmark the excellent performance of the module by measurements of the structural and magnetic excitations in single crystals of model systems. In particular, we report the phonon dispersion in the simple element lead. We also determine the magnon dispersion in the spinel ZnCr2Se4 (V = 12.5 mm3), where strong magnetic diffuse scattering at low temperatures evolves into distinct helical order.

  12. Compact turnkey focussing neutron guide system for inelastic scattering investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, G.; Georgii, R.; Dunsiger, S. R.; Tsurkan, V.; Loidl, A.; Adams, T.; Pfleiderer, C.; Böni, P.

    2015-12-21

    We demonstrate the performance of a compact neutron guide module which boosts the intensity in inelastic neutron scattering experiments by approximately a factor of 40. The module consists of two housings containing truly curved elliptic focussing guide elements, positioned before and after the sample. The advantage of the module lies in the ease with which it may be reproducibly mounted on a spectrometer within a few hours, on the same timescale as conventional sample environments. It is particularly well suited for samples with a volume of a few mm{sup 3}, thus enabling the investigation of materials which to date would have been considered prohibitively small or samples exposed to extreme environments, where there are space constraints. We benchmark the excellent performance of the module by measurements of the structural and magnetic excitations in single crystals of model systems. In particular, we report the phonon dispersion in the simple element lead. We also determine the magnon dispersion in the spinel ZnCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} (V = 12.5 mm{sup 3}), where strong magnetic diffuse scattering at low temperatures evolves into distinct helical order.

  13. Self Organizing Maps for use in Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Askanazi, Evan

    2015-04-01

    Self Organizing Maps are a type of artificial neural network that has been proven to be particularly useful in solving complex problems in neural biology, engineering, robotics and physics. We are attempting to use the Self Organizing Map to solve problems and probe phenomenological patterns in subatomic physics, specifically in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS). In DIS there is a cross section in electron hadron scattering that is dependent on the momentum fraction x of the partons in the hadron and the momentum transfer of the virtual photon exchanged. There is a soft cross part of this cross section that currently can only be found through experimentation; this soft part is comprised of Structure Functions which in turn are comprised of the Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs). We aim to use the Self Organizing Process, or SOP, to take theoretical models of these PDFs and fit it to the previous, known data. The SOP will also be used to probe the behavior of the PDFs in particular at large x values, in order to observe how they congregate. The ability of the SOPto take multidimensional data and convert it into two dimensional output is anticipated to be particularly useful in achieving this aim.

  14. Density of states in solid deuterium: Inelastic neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, A.; Gutsmiedl, E.; Morkel, C.; Mueller, A. R.; Paul, S.; Urban, M.; Schober, H.; Rols, S.; Unruh, T.; Hoelzel, M.

    2009-08-01

    The dynamics of solid deuterium (sD{sub 2}) is studied by means of inelastic scattering (coherent and incoherent) of thermal and cold neutrons at different temperatures and para-ortho ratios. In this paper, the results for the generalized density of states (GDOS) are presented and discussed. The measurements were performed at the thermal neutron time-of-flight (TOF) instrument IN4 at ILL Grenoble and at the cold neutron TOF instrument TOFTOF at FRM II Garching. The GDOS comprises besides the hcp phonon excitations of the sD{sub 2} the rotational transitions J=0{yields}1 and J=1{yields}2. The intensities of these rotational excitations depend strongly on the ortho-D{sub 2} molecule concentration c{sub o} in sD{sub 2}. Above E=10 meV there are still strong excitations, which very likely may originate from higher-energy damped optical phonons and multiphonon contributions. A method for separating the one-phonon and multiphonon contributions to the density of states will be presented and discussed.

  15. Alpha-particle microdosimetry.

    PubMed

    Chouin, Nicolas; Bardies, Manuel

    2011-07-01

    With the increasing availability of alpha emitters, targeted α-particle therapy has emerged as a solution of choice to treat haematological cancers and micrometastatic and minimal residual diseases. Alpha-particles are highly cytotoxic because of their high linear energy transfer (LET) and have a short range of a few cell diameters in tissue, assuring good treatment specificity. These radiologic features make conventional dosimetry less relevant for that context. Stochastic variations in the energy deposited in cell nuclei are important because of the microscopic target size, low number of α- particle traversals, and variation in LET along the α-particle track. Microdosimetry provides a conceptual framework that aims at a systematic analysis of the stochastic distribution of energy deposits in irradiated matter. The different quantities of microdosimetry and the different methods of microdosimetric calculations were described in the early eighties. Since then, numerous models have been published through the years and applied to analyse experimental data or to model realistic therapeutic situations. Major results have been an accurate description of the high toxicity of α-particles, and the description of the predominant effect of activity distribution at the cellular scale on toxicity or efficacy of potential targeted α-particle therapies. This last factor represents a major limitation to the use of microdosimetry in vivo because determination of the source - target distribution is complicated. The future contributions of microdosimetry in targeted α-particle therapy research will certainly depend on the ability to develop high-resolution detectors and on the implementation of pharmaco-kinetic models at the tumour microenvironment scale.

  16. QCD analysis of neutrino charged current structure function F2 in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleem, M.; Aleem, F.

    1985-01-01

    An analytic expression for the neutrino charged current structure function F sub 2 (x, Q sup 2) in deep inelastic scattering, consistent with quantum chromodynamics, is proposed. The calculated results are in good agreement with experiment.

  17. Focusing polycapillary to reduce parasitic scattering for inelastic x-ray measurements at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Chow, P; Xiao, Y M; Rod, E; Bai, L G; Shen, G Y; Sinogeikin, S; Gao, N; Ding, Y; Mao, H-K

    2015-07-01

    The double-differential scattering cross-section for the inelastic scattering of x-ray photons from electrons is typically orders of magnitude smaller than that of elastic scattering. With samples 10-100 μm size in a diamond anvil cell at high pressure, the inelastic x-ray scattering signals from samples are obscured by scattering from the cell gasket and diamonds. One major experimental challenge is to measure a clean inelastic signal from the sample in a diamond anvil cell. Among the many strategies for doing this, we have used a focusing polycapillary as a post-sample optic, which allows essentially only scattered photons within its input field of view to be refocused and transmitted to the backscattering energy analyzer of the spectrometer. We describe the modified inelastic x-ray spectrometer and its alignment. With a focused incident beam which matches the sample size and the field of view of polycapillary, at relatively large scattering angles, the polycapillary effectively reduces parasitic scattering from the diamond anvil cell gasket and diamonds. Raw data collected from the helium exciton measured by x-ray inelastic scattering at high pressure using the polycapillary method are compared with those using conventional post-sample slit collimation.

  18. Inelastic X-ray scattering with very high resolution at the ESRF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krisch, M.; Sette, F.

    2017-01-01

    The investigation of phonon dispersion in crystalline materials and collective atom motions in disordered matter such as liquids and glasses by inelastic X-ray scattering has attracted a diversified user community with the advent of 3rd generation synchrotron sources. The present article provides a short historical account of the research field and discusses selected highlights of research performed on the ESRF inelastic scattering beamlines ID16 and ID28 in the past ten years.

  19. State-to-state dynamics of high-n Rydberg H-atom scattering with H2: inelastic scattering and reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengrui; Su, Shu; Dai, Dongxu; Yuan, Kaijun; Yang, Xueming

    2015-04-21

    The state-to-state dynamics of high-n Rydberg H-atom scattering with para-H2 at the collision energies of 0.45 and 1.07 eV have been studied using the H-atom Rydberg tagging time-of-flight technique. Both the inelastic scattering and reactive scattering are observed in the experimental time-of-flight spectra. The products H2(v', j' = odd) come only from reactive scattering and present clearly forward-backward asymmetric angular distributions, which differ from those of the corresponding ion-molecule reaction. The products H2(v', j' = even), however, come from both reactive scattering and inelastic scattering. Simulating the rotational distribution from reactive scattering, we found that most of the H2(v', j' = even) products come from inelastic scattering. The angular distributions of the product H2(v', j' = even) are consistent with what is predicted by the conventional textbook mechanism of inelastic scattering, and are a little different from those of the corresponding ion-molecule inelastic scattering. These results suggest that the effect of Rydberg electron could not be neglected in describing the differential cross sections of H* + para-H2 scattering. From the simulation, the branching ratios of the inelastic scattering channel were determined to be 66% and 79% at the collision energies of 0.45 and 1.07 eV, respectively.

  20. Long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Wolf, M.A.; McAtee, J.L.; Unruh, W.P.; Cucchiara, A.L.; Huchton, R.L.

    1993-02-02

    An alpha particle detector capable of detecting alpha radiation from distant sources. In one embodiment, a high voltage is generated in a first electrically conductive mesh while a fan draws air containing air molecules ionized by alpha particles through an air passage and across a second electrically conductive mesh. The current in the second electrically conductive mesh can be detected and used for measurement or alarm. The detector can be used for area, personnel and equipment monitoring.

  1. Study of rlastic and inelastic {sup 11}B +α scattering and search for cluster states of enlarged radius in {sup 11}B

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, A. N. Demyanova, A. S.; Dmitriev, S. V.; Ogloblin, A. A.; Belyaeva, T. L.; Goncharov, S. A.; Gurov, Yu. B.; Maslov, V. A.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Trzaska, W.; Khlebnikov, S. V.; Heikkinen, P.; Julin, R.; Tyurin, G. P.; Burtebaev, N.; Zholdybayev, T.

    2015-09-15

    The differential cross sections for elastic and inelastic {sup 11}B + α scattering were measured at the alpha-particle energy of 65 MeV, the inelastic-scattering processes leading to the excitation of known states of {sup 11}B up to excitation energies of about 14 MeV. Data on elastic scattering were analyzed together with those that were published earlier for lower energies. The cross sections for inelastic scattering were analyzed on the basis of the distorted-wave method. A modified diffractionmodel was used to determine the root-mean-square radii of excited states. The radii of states whose excitation energies were below about 7MeV were found to agree with radius of the ground state to within 0.1 to 0.15 fm. This result complieswith the traditional idea that the low-lying states of {sup 11}B have a shell structure. The possibility that these states belong to the predicted rotational bands, which, if any, are truncated to three states, cannot be ruled out either. The majority of the observed highly excited states are distributed among four rotational bands. The moments of inertia of these bands are close; for the band based on the 3/2{sup −} state at E* = 8.56 MeV, they are even higher than those of the Hoyle state in the {sup 12}C nucleus. The measured radii of states associated with these bands of {sup 11}B are larger than the ground-state radius by 0.7 to 1.0 fm and are also close to the radius of the Hoyle state. The results of the present study agree with the existing predictions that the cluster structure of the {sup 11}B nucleus is diverse at high excitation energies. The hypothesis that the {sup 11}B nucleus features a “giant” state of size commensurate with those in heavy nuclei was not confirmed.

  2. Intermediate resonance of inelastic 12C + 12C scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osamu, Tanimura

    1980-01-01

    The intermediate resonances observed in the inelastic 12C + 12C cross sections to the single and mutual 2 1+(4.43 MeV) excitations and the single 3 1- (9.64 MeV) excitation are studied by the coupled-channel method with the use of the coupling interaction derived by the folding procedure between 12C and 12C. It is shown that the model is successful in reproducing the gross structures of the inelastic cross sections and especially the correlated resonance energies of the inelastic channels. The inelastic resonances are shown to be due to the molecular resonances in an adiabatic potential between two 12C, which reproduces correctly the coupled channel resonances.

  3. Advanced Elastic/Inelastic Nuclear Data Development Project

    SciTech Connect

    Harmon, Frank; Chowdhury, Partha; Greife, Uwe; Fisher Hicks, Sally; Tsvetkov, Pavel; Rahn Vanhoy, Jeffrey; Hill, Tony; Kawano, Toshihiko; Slaughter, David

    2015-06-08

    The optical model is used to analyze the elastic and inelastic scattering of nucleons, deuterons, hellions, tritons, and alpha particles by the nuclei. Since this paper covers primarily neutron-nucleus scattering, the focus will be limited to only that interaction. For the sake of this model, the nucleus is described as a blob of nuclear matter with properties based upon its number of nucleons. This infers that a single potential can describe the interaction of particles with different energies with different nuclei.

  4. Inelastic scattering of electron and light ion beams in organic polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Vera, Pablo de; Abril, Isabel; Garcia-Molina, Rafael

    2011-05-01

    We have calculated the inelastic mean free path, stopping power, and energy-loss straggling of swift electron, proton, and {alpha}-particle beams in a broad incident energy range in four organic polymers: poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), Kapton, polyacetylene (PA), and poly(2-vinylpyridine) (P2VP). These calculations have been done through a suitable description of their optical properties and its extension into the whole momentum and energy transfer excitation spectrum. For electrons, we take into account the exchange effect between the projectile and the target electrons, while the charge-state fractions have been considered for ions. Our results are compared with other models and with the available experimental data. An excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained in the case of proton and {alpha}-particle beams in Kapton and a reasonably good agreement has been achieved for electron beams in PMMA, Kapton, and PA. We have parameterized by means of simple analytical expressions our results for electron beams interacting with these four polymers, which can be easily implemented in Monte Carlo calculations.

  5. Born Hartree Bethe approximation in the theory of inelastic electron molecule scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kretinin, I. Yu; Krisilov, A. V.; Zon, B. A.

    2008-11-01

    We propose a new approximation in the theory of inelastic electron atom and electron molecule scattering. Taking into account the completeness property of atomic and molecular wavefunctions, considered in the Hartree approximation, and using Bethe's parametrization for electronic excitations during inelastic collisions via the mean excitation energy, we show that the calculation of the inelastic total integral cross-sections (TICS), in the framework of the first Born approximation, involves only the ground-state wavefunction. The final analytical formula obtained for the TICS, i.e. for the sum of elastic and inelastic ones, contains no adjusting parameters. Calculated TICS for electron scattering by light atoms and molecules (He, Ne, and H2) are in good agreement within the experimental data; results show asymptotic coincidence for heavier ones (Ar, Kr, Xe and N2).

  6. Vibrational density of states of thin films measured by inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Röhlsberger, R.; Sturhahn, W.; Toellner, T. S.; Quast, K. W.; Alp, E. E.; Bernhard, A.; Metge, J.; Rüffer, R.; Burkel, E.

    1999-03-01

    Vibrational spectra of thin films were measured by inelastic nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation in grazing incidence geometry. A strong enhancement of the inelastic signal was obtained by designing the layer system as X-ray waveguide and coupling the incident beam into a guided mode. This effect opens the possibility to study vibrational excitations in thin films that were so far impossible to obtain due to flux limitations.

  7. Alpha-particle spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorenstein, P.; Bjorkholm, P.

    1972-01-01

    Mapping the radon emanation of the moon was studied to find potential areas of high activity by detection of radon isotopes and their daughter products. It was felt that based on observation of regions overflown by Apollo spacecraft and within the field of view of the alpha-particle spectrometer, a radon map could be constructed, identifying and locating lunar areas of outgassing. The basic theory of radon migration from natural concentrations of uranium and thorium is discussed in terms of radon decay and the production of alpha particles. The preliminary analysis of the results indicates no significant alpha emission.

  8. Alpha particles in effective field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Caniu, C.

    2014-11-11

    Using an effective field theory for alpha (α) particles at non-relativistic energies, we calculate the strong scattering amplitude modified by Coulomb corrections for a system of two αs. For the strong interaction, we consider a momentum-dependent interaction which, in contrast to an energy dependent interaction alone [1], could be more useful in extending the theory to systems with more than two α particles. We will present preliminary results of our EFT calculations for systems with two alpha particles.

  9. Miscibility gap and phonon thermodynamics of Fe-Au alloys studied by inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, Jorge A.; Fultz, Brent

    2015-07-01

    Recent measurements of the phonon spectra of several Au-rich alloys of face-centered-cubic Fe-Au using inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering are summarized. The Wills-Harrison model, accounting for charge transfer upon alloying, is used to explain the observed negative excess vibrational entropy of mixing, which increases the miscibility gap temperature in the system by an estimated maximum of 550 K and we adjudicate to a charge transfer from the Fe to the Au atoms that results in an increase in the electron density in the free-electron-like states and in stronger sd-hybridization. When Au is the solvent, this softens the Fe-Fe bonds but stiffens the Au-Au and Au-Fe bonds which results in a net stiffening relative to the elemental components.

  10. Miscibility gap and phonon thermodynamics of Fe-Au alloys studied by inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Muñoz, Jorge A.; Fultz, Brent

    2015-07-23

    Recent measurements of the phonon spectra of several Au-rich alloys of face-centered-cubic Fe-Au using inelastic neutron scattering and nuclear-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering are summarized. The Wills-Harrison model, accounting for charge transfer upon alloying, is used to explain the observed negative excess vibrational entropy of mixing, which increases the miscibility gap temperature in the system by an estimated maximum of 550 K and we adjudicate to a charge transfer from the Fe to the Au atoms that results in an increase in the electron density in the free-electron-like states and in stronger sd-hybridization. When Au is the solvent, this softens the Fe–Fe bonds but stiffens the Au–Au and Au–Fe bonds which results in a net stiffening relative to the elemental components.

  11. Enhanced Thermoelectric Power in Graphene: Violation of the Mott Relation by Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahari, Fereshte; Xie, Hong-Yi; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Foster, Matthew S.; Kim, Philip

    2016-04-01

    We report the enhancement of the thermoelectric power (TEP) in graphene with extremely low disorder. At high temperature we observe that the TEP is substantially larger than the prediction of the Mott relation, approaching to the hydrodynamic limit due to strong inelastic scattering among the charge carriers. However, closer to room temperature the inelastic carrier-optical-phonon scattering becomes more significant and limits the TEP below the hydrodynamic prediction. We support our observation by employing a Boltzmann theory incorporating disorder, electron interactions, and optical phonons.

  12. Inelastic scattering of 45-keV neutrons by {sup 187}Os

    SciTech Connect

    Litvinskii, L.L.; Zhigalov, Ya.A.; Libman, V.A.; Murzin, A.V.; Shkarupa, A.M.

    1995-02-01

    The cross sections of elastic and inelastic scattering of 45-keV neutrons by {sup 187}Os are measured by the technique of filtered neutron beams at the Kiev VVR-M reactor and are found to be {sigma}{sub e1} = 11.90 {+-} 0.50 b and {sigma}{sub inel} = 1.51 {+-} 0.45 b, respectively. These results confirm the existence of a nonstatistical enhancement of the inelastic-scattering channel due to a noticeable contribution of a preequilibrium state involving two particles and a hole. 8 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Rydberg-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering: dynamics at core ionization thresholds.

    PubMed

    Rubensson, J-E; Söderström, J; Binggeli, C; Gråsjö, J; Andersson, J; Såthe, C; Hennies, F; Bisogni, V; Huang, Y; Olalde, P; Schmitt, T; Strocov, V N; Föhlisch, A; Kennedy, B; Pietzsch, A

    2015-04-03

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectra excited in the immediate vicinity of the core-level ionization thresholds of N2 have been recorded. Final states of well-resolved symmetry-selected Rydberg series converging to valence-level ionization thresholds with vibrational excitations are observed. The results are well described by a quasi-two-step model which assumes that the excited electron is unaffected by the radiative decay. This threshold dynamics simplifies the interpretation of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectra considerably and facilitates characterization of low-energy excited final states in molecular systems.

  14. Conversion method of powder inelastic scattering data for one-dimensional systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tomiyasu, Dr. Keisuke; Fujita, Prof. Masaki; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Bewley, Robert I.; Bull, Dr. Martyn J.; Bennington, Dr. Stephen M.

    2009-01-01

    Extracting dispersive magnetic excitations from inelastic neutron scattering data usually requires large single crystals. We present a simple yet powerful method for extracting such information from polycrystalline or powder data for one-dimensional systems. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this data treatment by extracting dispersion curves from powder inelastic neutron scattering data on the one-dimensional spin-half systems: CuGeO3 and Rb2Cu2Mo3O12. For many such materials it is not possible to grow sufficiently large crystals and this method offers a quick and efficient way to study their magnetic excitations.

  15. High energy resolution inelastic x-ray scattering at the SRI-CAT

    SciTech Connect

    Macrander, A.T.

    1996-08-01

    This report is a combination of vugraphs and two papers. The vugraphs give information on the beamline at the APS for IXS and the science addressable by IXS. They also cover the 10 milli-eV resolution spectrometer and the 200 milli-eV resolution spectrometer. The first paper covers the performance of the focusing Ge(444) backscattering analyzers for the inelastic x-ray scattering. The second paper discusses inelastic x-ray scattering from TiC and Ti single crystals.

  16. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    The concept of informativeness of nonlinear plasma physics scenarios is explained. Natural ideas of developing highly informative models of plasma kinetics are spelled out. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves in a weakly turbulent inhomogeneous plasma is developed with consideration of possible changes in wave polarization. In addition, a new formula for wave drift in spatial positions and wave vectors is derived. New scenarios of the respective wave drift and inelastic scattering are compared with the previous visions. The results indicate the need for further revision of the traditional understanding of nonlinear plasma phenomena.

  17. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves

    SciTech Connect

    Erofeev, V. I.

    2015-09-15

    The concept of informativeness of nonlinear plasma physics scenarios is explained. Natural ideas of developing highly informative models of plasma kinetics are spelled out. A maximally informative version of inelastic scattering of electromagnetic waves by Langmuir waves in a weakly turbulent inhomogeneous plasma is developed with consideration of possible changes in wave polarization. In addition, a new formula for wave drift in spatial positions and wave vectors is derived. New scenarios of the respective wave drift and inelastic scattering are compared with the previous visions. The results indicate the need for further revision of the traditional understanding of nonlinear plasma phenomena.

  18. Monte-Carlo simulation of soil carbon measurements by inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measuring soil carbon is critical for assessing the potential impact of different land management practices on carbon sequestration. The inelastic neutron scattering (INS) of fast neutrons (with energy around 14 MeV) on carbon-12 nuclei produces gamma rays with energy of 4.43 MeV; this gamma flux ca...

  19. Hot background” of the mobile inelastic neutron scattering system for soil carbon analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The problem of gamma spectrum peaks identification arises when conducting soil carbon (and other elements) analysis using the mobile inelastic neutron scattering (MINS) system. Some gamma spectrum peaks could be associated with radioisotopes appearing due to neutron activation of both the MINS syste...

  20. Application of Geant4 simulation for analysis of soil carbon inelastic neutron scattering measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) was applied to determine soil carbon content. Due to non-uniform soil carbon depth distribution, the correlation between INS signals with some soil carbon content parameter is not obvious; however, a proportionality between INS signals and average carbon weight per...

  1. X-Ray Elastic and Inelastic Scattering Factors for Neutral Atoms Z = 2-92

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. H.; Sagar, R. P.; Schmider, H.; Smith, V. H.

    1993-03-01

    X-ray elastic and inelastic scattering factors are calculated for the ground states of the neutral atoms, helium to uranium, from the Roothaan-Hartree-Fock nonrelativistic self-consistent-field wave functions of Clementi and Roetti, (Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables 14, 177, 1974) and McLean and McLean (Atomic Data and Nuclear Data Tables 26, 197, 1981).

  2. Gate-opening effect in ZIF-8: the first experimental proof using inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Casco, M E; Cheng, Y Q; Daemen, L L; Fairen-Jimenez, D; Ramos-Fernández, E V; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Silvestre-Albero, J

    2016-03-04

    The gate-opening phenomenon in ZIFs is of paramount importance to understand their behavior in industrial molecular separations. Here we show for the first time using in situ inelastic neutron scattering (INS) the swinging of the -CH3 groups and the imidazolate linkers in the prototypical ZIF-8 and ZIF-8@AC hybrid materials upon exposure to mild N2 pressure.

  3. Gate-opening effect in ZIF-8: the first experimental proof using inelastic neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Casco, M. E.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Daemen, L. L.; ...

    2016-01-28

    In order to understand the behavior of industrial molecular separations, the gate-opening phenomenon in ZIFs are of paramount importance. We show for the first time using in situ inelastic neutron scattering (INS) the swinging of the -CH3 groups and the imidazolate linkers in the prototypical ZIF-8 and ZIF-8@AC hybrid materials upon exposure to mild N2 pressure.

  4. Open charm production in deep inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order at HERA.

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, B. W.

    1999-09-20

    An introduction and overview of charm production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA is given. The existing next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculations are then reviewed, and key results are summarized. Finally, comparisons are made with the most recent HERA data, and unresolved issues are highlighted.

  5. Resource Letter on Stimulated Inelastic X-ray Scattering at an XFEL

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, Bruce D.; /SLAC

    2010-09-02

    At sufficient X-ray intensity, stimulated effects in inelastic scattering will become important. These coherent, non-linear optical phenomena may be used to impulsively produce a high degree of collective excitation in, for example, correlated electron materials, suitable for performing ultrafast time-resolved spectroscopy. This Resource Letter collects information on fundamental aspects of stimulated X-ray scattering and evaluates the prospect for successful experiments at a present or future X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) facility.

  6. Resonances in rotationally inelastic scattering of OH(X2Π) with helium and neon.

    PubMed

    Gubbels, Koos B; Ma, Qianli; Alexander, Millard H; Dagdigian, Paul J; Tanis, Dick; Groenenboom, Gerrit C; van der Avoird, Ad; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2012-04-14

    We present detailed calculations on resonances in rotationally and spin-orbit inelastic scattering of OH (X(2)Π, j = 3/2, F(1), f) radicals with He and Ne atoms. We calculate new ab initio potential energy surfaces for OH-He, and the cross sections derived from these surfaces compare well with the recent crossed beam scattering experiment of Kirste et al. [Phys. Rev. A 82, 042717 (2010)]. We identify both shape and Feshbach resonances in the integral and differential state-to-state scattering cross sections, and we discuss the prospects for experimentally observing scattering resonances using Stark decelerated beams of OH radicals.

  7. Inelastic and reactive scattering of hyperthermal atomic oxygen from amorphous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Nelson, Christine M.; Brinza, David E.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of hyperthermal oxygen atoms with an amorphous carbon-13 surface was studied using a modified universal crossed molecular beams apparatus. Time-of-flight distributions of inelastically scattered O-atoms and reactively scattered CO-13 and CO2-13 were measured with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Two inelastic scattering channels were observed, corresponding to a direct inelastic process in which the scattered O-atoms retain 20 to 30 percent of their initial kinetic energy and to a trapping desorption process whereby O-atoms emerge from the surface at thermal velocities. Reactive scattering data imply the formation of two kinds of CO products, slow products whose translational energies are determined by the surface temperature and hyperthermal (Approx. 3 eV) products with translational energies comprising roughly 30 percent of the total available energy (E sub avl), where E sub avl is the sum of the collision energy and the reaction exothermicity. Angular data show that the hyperthermal CO is scattered preferentially in the specular direction. CO2 product was also observed, but at much lower intensities than CO and with only thermal velocities.

  8. Dynamical regimes on the Cl + H2 collisions: inelastic rainbow scattering.

    PubMed

    González-Sánchez, L; Aldegunde, J; Jambrina, P G; Aoiz, F J

    2011-08-14

    While Cl + H(2) reactive collisions have been a subject of numerous experimental and theoretical studies, inelastic collisions leading to rotational energy transfer and/or vibrational excitation have been largely ignored. In this work, extensive quantum mechanical calculations covering the 0.5-1.5 eV total energy range and various initial rovibrational states have been carried out and used to perform a joint study of inelastic and reactive Cl + H(2) collisions. Quasiclassical trajectories calculations complement the quantum mechanical results. The analysis of the inelastic transition probabilities has revealed the existence of two distinct dynamical regimes that correlate with low and high impact parameters, b, and are neatly separated by glory scattering. It has been found that while high-b collisions are mainly responsible for |Δj| = 2 transitions which dominate the inelastic scattering, they are very inefficient in promoting higher |Δj| transitions. The effectiveness of this type of collision also drops with rotational excitation of H(2). In contrast, reactive scattering, that competes with |Δj| > 2 inelastic transitions, is exclusively caused by low-b collisions, and it is greatly favored when the reactants get rotationally excited. Previous studies focusing on the reactivity of the Cl + H(2) system established that the van der Waals well located in the entrance channel play a key role in determining the mechanism of the collisions. Our results prove this to be also a case for inelastic processes, where the origin of the double dynamical regime can be traced back to the influence exerted by this well that shapes the topology of the entrance channel of the Cl-H(2) system.

  9. Inelastic Photon Scattering via the Intracavity Rydberg Blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grankin, A.; Brion, E.; Boddeda, R.; Ćuk, S.; Usmani, I.; Ourjoumtsev, A.; Grangier, P.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in a ladder system involving a Rydberg level is known to yield giant optical nonlinearities for the probe field, even in the few-photon regime. This enhancement is due to the strong dipole-dipole interactions between Rydberg atoms and the resulting excitation blockade phenomenon. In order to study such highly correlated media, ad hoc models or low-excitation assumptions are generally used to tackle their dynamical response to optical fields. Here, we study the behavior of a cavity Rydberg-EIT setup in the nonequilibrium quantum field formalism, and we obtain analytic expressions for elastic and inelastic components of the cavity transmission spectrum, valid up to higher excitation numbers than previously achieved. This allows us to identify and interpret a polaritonic resonance structure, to our knowledge unreported so far.

  10. Precise QCD Predictions for the Production of Dijet Final States in Deep Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Currie, James; Gehrmann, Thomas; Niehues, Jan

    2016-07-22

    The production of two-jet final states in deep inelastic scattering is an important QCD precision observable. We compute it for the first time to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) in perturbative QCD. Our calculation is fully differential in the lepton and jet variables and allows one to impose cuts on the jets in both the laboratory and the Breit frame. We observe that the NNLO corrections are moderate in size, except at kinematical edges, and that their inclusion leads to a substantial reduction of the scale variation uncertainty on the predictions. Our results will enable the inclusion of deep inelastic dijet data in precision phenomenology studies.

  11. On calibration of the response of liquid argon detectors to nuclear recoils using inelastic neutron scattering on 40Ar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polosatkin, S.; Grishnyaev, E.; Dolgov, A.

    2014-10-01

    A method for measuring of ionization and scintillation yields in liquid argon from recoils with particular energy—8.2 keV—is proposed. The method utilizes a process of inelastic scattering of monoenergetic neutrons produced by fusion DD neutron generator. Features of kinematics of inelastic scattering result in a sufficient (fifteen times) increase in count rate of useful events relative to a traditional scheme using elastic scattering with the same recoil energy and comparable energy resolution.

  12. Probing Spin Frustration in High-symmetry Magnetic Nanomolecules by Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Garlea, Vasile O; Nagler, Stephen E; Zarestky, Jerel L; Stassis, C.; Vaknin, D.; Kogerler, P.; McMorrow, D. F.; Niedermayer, C.; Tennant, D. A.; Lake, B.; Qiu, Y.; Exler, M.; Schnack, J.; Luban, M.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature inelastic neutron scattering studies have been performed to characterize the low energy magnetic excitation spectrum of the magnetic nanomolecule {l_brace}Mo{sub 72}Fe{sub 30}{r_brace}. This unique highly symmetric cluster features spin frustration and is one of the largest discrete magnetic molecules studied to date by inelastic neutron scattering. The 30 s=5/2 Fe{sup III} ions, embedded in a spherical polyoxomolybdate molecule, occupy the vertices of an icosidodecahedron and are coupled via nearest-neighbor antiferromagnetic interactions. The overall energy scale of the excitation and the gross features of the temperature dependence of the observed neutron scattering are explained by a quantum model of the frustrated spin cluster. However, no satisfactory theoretical explanation is yet available for the observed magnetic field dependence.

  13. Accurate Calculations of Rotationally Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections Using Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-16

    For computational treatment of rotationally inelastic scattering of molecules, we propose to use the mixed quantum/classical theory, MQCT. The old idea of treating translational motion classically, while quantum mechanics is used for rotational degrees of freedom, is developed to the new level and is applied to Na + N2 collisions in a broad range of energies. Comparison with full-quantum calculations shows that MQCT accurately reproduces all, even minor, features of energy dependence of cross sections, except scattering resonances at very low energies. The remarkable success of MQCT opens up wide opportunities for computational predictions of inelastic scattering cross sections at higher temperatures and/or for polyatomic molecules and heavier quenchers, which is computationally close to impossible within the full-quantum framework.

  14. Three-body calculation of elastic and inelastic scattering of deuterons on 24Mg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deltuva, A.

    2016-03-01

    Deuteron-nucleus scattering is described using exact three-particle equations. The theory is formulated in an extended Hilbert space allowing the excitation of the target nucleus. Alt, Grassberger, and Sandhas equations for transition operators are solved in the momentum-space framework including the Coulomb interaction via the screening and renormalization method. The calculations are performed for elastic and inelastic scattering of deuterons on 24Mg using the rotational model for the excitation potential. A reasonable agreement with the experimental data for the first excited state 2+ of 24Mg is achieved when the quadrupole deformation parameter β2 = 0.47 is used. This new value is more consistent with the inelastic proton scattering data requiring β2 ≈ 0.5 than previous determinations β2 ≈ 0.4 based on two-body deuteron-nucleus models.

  15. Inelastic scattering of hydroxyl radicals with helium and argon by velocity-map imaging.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Gautam; Marinakis, Sarantos; ter Meulen, J J; Parker, David H; McKendrick, Kenneth G

    2012-12-01

    The hydroxyl radical (OH) is one of the most interesting molecules in molecular dynamics. In particular, inelastic collisions of free radicals such as OH are profoundly important in environments ranging from combustion to astrochemistry. However, measuring the velocities of OH molecules in specific internal quantum states has proven to be very difficult. A method that can provide this important information is velocity-map imaging. Although this technique is very widely applicable in principle, it does require a sensitive and selective laser-ionization scheme. Here we show that, under the right conditions, velocity-map imaging can be applied to the study of the inelastic scattering of OH using crossed-molecular-beam methods. We measure fully quantum-state-specified product angular distributions for OH collisions with helium and argon. The agreement between exact close-coupling quantum scattering calculations on ab initio potential energy surfaces and experimental data is generally very satisfactory, except for scattering in the most forward directions.

  16. Study of Low Energy Electron Inelastic Scattering Mechanisms Using Spin Sensitive Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hongbing

    1995-01-01

    Spin sensitive electron spectroscopies were used to study low energy electron inelastic scattering from metal surfaces and thin films. In these experiments, a beam of spin polarized electrons from a GaAs source is directed on the sample surface, and the spin polarization and intensity are measured as a function of energy loss and scattering angle by a Mott electron polarimeter coupled with a concentric hemispherical energy analyzer. Systematic studies of the angular dependence of inelastically scattered electrons were conducted on a Cu(100) surface, and Mo/Cu(100), non-magnetized Fe/Cu(100), and Co/Cu(100) films. The polarization and intensity of scattered electrons were measured as function of energy loss and scattering angle. Further studies were also conducted on Ag(100) surface and amorphous Cu/Ag(100) films. From the experimental results, the angular distributions of dipole and impact scattered electrons can be determined individually and both are found to peak in the specular scattering direction. Preliminary studies were conducted on magnetized Co/Cu(100) films. The spin dependent scattering intensity asymmetry was measured, with a clearly observable peak at energy loss of ~1 eV, which coincides with the band splitting. The polarizations of secondary electrons produced by an unpolarized primary beam were also measured. The polarizations can be related to the band polarization of magnetized cobalt films.

  17. Elastic and inelastic scattering of positrons in gases and solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgowan, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    Three apparatuses were designed and built: The first, which is now operative, was designed to study the details of positron thermalization in solids and the subsequent emission of the low energy positrons from moderating foils; The second apparatus now under test is a positron bottle similar in design to an electron trap. It was built to store positrons at a fixed energy and to look at the number of stored positrons (storage time) as a function of a scattering gas in the vacuum chamber. The third apparatus is a crossed beam apparatus where positron-, alkali scattering will be studied. Much of the apparatus is now under test with electrons.

  18. Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of Positrons by Potassium Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Bakry, Salah Yaseen

    The investigations of the elastic and inelastic collisions of positrons with potassium atoms, K (1s2, 2s2, 2p6, 3s2, 3p6, 4s), are presented. The potassium target atoms are described using Clementi-Roetti wavefunctions within the framework of the one-valence-electron model. The total cross-sections which correspond to eight partial cross-sections are calculated at 34 values of the incident energy k21 (2.5 eV <= k12<= 100 eV) using the coupled-static approximation. The resulting total elastic, ground- and excited-positronium formation cross-sections are compared with experimental results and those calculated by other authors. In the vicinity of 6 eV, and consistent with the measurements of Parikh et al.,2 our total cross-section displays a pronounced peak. We support the conclusion of McAlinden et al.15 and Hewitt et al.14 that above about 4 eV, positronium formation is mainly into excited states. Good agreement is obtained with the total cross-section measurements of Kwan et al.1 and Parikh et al.2 Positronium formation is not important above about 50 eV.

  19. Toroidal silicon polarization analyzer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xuan; Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas; Li, Chengyang; Burns, Clement

    2016-08-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a powerful probe for studying electronic excitations in materials. Standard high energy RIXS measurements do not measure the polarization of the scattered x-rays, which is unfortunate since it carries information about the nature and symmetry of the excitations involved in the scattering process. Here we report the fabrication of thin Si-based polarization analyzers with a double-concave toroidal surface, useful for L-edge RIXS studies in heavier atoms such as the 5-d transition metals.

  20. Resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at double core excitations in solid LiCl

    SciTech Connect

    Agaaker, Marcus; Ahuja, Rajeev; Soederstroem, Johan; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Kaeaembre, Tanel; Glover, Chris; Schmitt, Thorsten; Mattesini, Maurizio

    2006-06-15

    Inelastic soft x-ray scattering in LiCl, resonantly enhanced at states with two Li 1s vacancies, is investigated. States in which both excited electrons are localized during the double core hole lifetime, in which one of the electrons delocalize, as well as triply excited states in which the double core excitation is accompanied by a valence-to-conduction band excitation, contribute to the scattering. The angular momentum symmetry of the involved states and the vibronic coupling during the scattering process are reflected in the angular anisotropy. The effect on the local electronic structure of multiple core holes is theoretically studied by means of supercell band calculations.

  1. CT14QED parton distribution functions from isolated photon production in deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Carl; Pumplin, Jon; Stump, Daniel; Yuan, C.-P.

    2016-06-01

    We describe the implementation of quantum electrodynamic (QED) evolution at leading order (LO) along with quantum chromodynamic (QCD) evolution at next-to-leading order (NLO) in the CTEQ-TEA global analysis package. The inelastic contribution to the photon parton distribution function (PDF) is described by a two-parameter ansatz, coming from radiation off the valence quarks, and based on the CT14 NLO PDFs. Setting the two parameters to be equal allows us to completely specify the inelastic photon PDF in terms of the inelastic momentum fraction carried by the photon, p0γ, at the initial scale Q0=1.295 GeV . We obtain constraints on the photon PDF by comparing with ZEUS data [S. Chekanov et al. (ZEUS Collaboration), Phys. Lett. B 687, 16 (2010)] on the production of isolated photons in deep inelastic scattering, e p →e γ +X . For this comparison we present a new perturbative calculation of the process that consistently combines the photon-initiated contribution with the quark-initiated contribution. Comparison with the data allows us to put a constraint at the 90% confidence level of p0γ≲0.14 % for the inelastic photon PDF at the initial scale of Q0=1.295 GeV in the one-parameter radiative ansatz. The resulting inelastic CT14QED PDFs will be made available to the public. In addition, we also provide CT14QEDinc PDFs, in which the inclusive photon PDF at the scale Q0 is defined by the sum of the inelastic photon PDF and the elastic photon distribution obtained from the equivalent photon approximation.

  2. Inelastic scattering in condensed matter with high intensity Moessbauer radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yelon, W.B.; Schupp, G.

    1993-02-01

    The QUEGS facility at MURR has produced a number of new results and demonstrated the range of potential applications of high resolution, high intensity Moessbauer scattering. This work has been carried out by both MU and Purdue researchers and includes published results on Na, W, pentadecane, polydimethylsiloxane and other systems, manuscripts submitted on alkali halides (Phys. Rev. B) and accurate Moessbauer lineshape measurements (Phys. Rev. C), and manuscripts in preparation on glycerol, NiAl and Moessbauer spectra obtained by modulating a scattering crystal. Recently, new collaborations have been initiated which will substantially enhance our efforts. These are with W. Steiner (Vienna), G. Coddens (Saclay), and R. D. Taylor (Los Alamos). Steiner is experienced with Fe-57 Moessbauer scattering, while Coddens specializes in quasielastic neutron scattering; both of these areas naturally complement our work. R. D. Taylor has pioneered Moessbauer spectroscopy from the time of its discovery and has already made important contributions to our study of lattice dynamics and superconductivity for lead alloyed with small quantities of tin. At the same time, a significant instrument upgrade is underway, funded in part by the DOE-URIP program.

  3. Reviews Book: Marie Curie and Her Daughters Resource: Cumulus Equipment: Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Equipment: 3D Magnetic Tube Equipment: National Grid Transmission Model Book: Einstein's Physics Equipment: Barton's Pendulums Equipment: Weather Station Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    WE RECOMMEND Marie Curie and Her Daughters An insightful study of a resilient and ingenious family and their achievements Cumulus Simple to install and operate and with obvious teaching applications, this weather station 'donationware' is as easy to recommend as it is to use Alpha Particle Scattering Apparatus Good design and construction make for good results National Grid Transmission Model Despite its expense, this resource offers excellent value Einstein's Physics A vivid, accurate, compelling and rigorous treatment, but requiring an investment of time and thought WORTH A LOOK 3D Magnetic Tube Magnetic fields in three dimensions at a low cost Barton's Pendulums A neat, well-made and handy variant, but not a replacement for the more traditional version Weather Station Though not as robust or substantial as hoped for, this can be put to good use with the right software WEB WATCH An online experiment and worksheet are useful for teaching motor efficiency, a glance at CERN, and NASA's interesting information on the alpha-magnetic spectrometer and climate change

  4. Polarization dependence in inelastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms in a circularly polarized laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buică, Gabriela

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically study the influence of laser polarization in inelastic scattering of electrons by hydrogen atoms in the presence of a circularly polarized laser field in the domain of field strengths below 107 V/cm and high projectile energies. A semi-perturbative approach is used in which the interaction of the projectile electrons with the laser field is described by Gordon-Volkov wave functions, while the interaction of the hydrogen atom with the laser field is described by first-order time-dependent perturbation theory. A closed analytical solution is derived in laser-assisted inelastic electron-hydrogen scattering for the 1 s → nl excitation cross section which is valid for both circular and linear polarizations. For the excitation of the n=2 levels simple analytical expressions of differential cross section are derived for laser-assisted inelastic scattering in the perturbative domain, and the differential cross sections by the circularly and linearly polarized laser fields and their ratios for one- and two-photon absorption are calculated as a function of the scattering angle. Detailed numerical results for the angular dependence and the resonance structure of the differential cross sections are discussed for the 1 s → 4 l excitations of hydrogen in a circularly polarized laser field.

  5. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Rotationally Inelastic Scattering of Quantum-State-Selected ND3 with Ar.

    PubMed

    Tkáč, Ondřej; Saha, Ashim K; Loreau, Jérôme; Parker, David H; van der Avoird, Ad; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2015-06-11

    Rotationally inelastic scattering of ND3 with Ar is studied at mean collision energies of 410 and 310 cm(–1). In the experimental component of the study, ND3 molecules are prepared by supersonic expansion and subsequent hexapole state selection in the ground electronic and vibrational levels and in the jk(±) = 1(1) rotational level. A beam of state-selected ND3 molecules is crossed with a beam of Ar, and scattered ND3 molecules are detected in single final j′k′(±) quantum states using resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization spectroscopy. State-to-state differential cross sections for rotational-level changing collisions are obtained by velocity map imaging. The experimental measurements are compared with close-coupling quantum-mechanical scattering calculations performed using an ab initio potential energy surface. The computed DCSs agree well with the experimental measurements, confirming the high quality of the potential energy surface. The angular distributions are dominated by forward scattering for all measured final rotational and vibrational inversion symmetry states. This outcome is in contrast to our recent results for inelastic scattering of ND3 with He, where we observed significant amount of sideways and backward scattering for some final rotational levels of ND3. The differences between He and Ar collision partners are explained by differences in the potential energy surfaces that govern the scattering dynamics.

  7. Temporal Quantum Correlations in Inelastic Light Scattering from Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasperczyk, Mark; de Aguiar Júnior, Filomeno S.; Rabelo, Cassiano; Saraiva, Andre; Santos, Marcelo F.; Novotny, Lukas; Jorio, Ado

    2016-12-01

    Water is one of the most prevalent chemicals on our planet, an integral part of both our environment and our existence as a species. Yet it is also rich in anomalous behaviors. Here we reveal that water is a novel—yet ubiquitous—source for quantum correlated photon pairs at ambient conditions. The photon pairs are produced through Raman scattering, and the correlations arise from the shared quantum of a vibrational mode between the Stokes and anti-Stokes scattering events. We confirm the nonclassical nature of the produced photon pairs by showing that the cross-correlation and autocorrelations of the signals violate a Cauchy-Schwarz inequality by over 5 orders of magnitude. The unprecedented degree of violating the inequality in pure water, as well as the well-defined polarization properties of the photon pairs, points to its usefulness in quantum information.

  8. Controlling Inelastic Light Scattering Quantum Pathways in Graphene

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-31

    applications. METHODS SUMMARY In this study we use large area graphene grown by chemical vapour deposition30. Graphene is grown on copper films using...the copper film by FeCl3. The PMMA support is dissolved in acetone solution. Subsequently, Ti (10 nm) and Au (40nm) were deposited in vacuum through...change of wave-length in light scattering.Nature 121, 619 (1928). 2. Landsberg, G. & Mandelstam, L. Eine neue Erscheinung bei der Lichtzerstreuung in

  9. Producing a compound Nucleus via Inelastic Scattering: The 90Zr(alpha,alpha')90Zr* Case

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, J E; Dietrich, F S

    2008-05-23

    In a Surrogate reaction a compound nucleus is produced via a direct reaction (pickup, stripping, or inelastic scattering). For a proper application of the Surrogate approach it is necessary to predict the resulting angular momentum and parity distribution in the compound nucleus. A model for determining these distributions is developed for the case of inelastic alpha scattering off a spherical nucleus. The focus is on obtaining a first, simple description of the direct-reaction process that produces the compound nucleus and on providing the basis for a more complete treatment of the problem. The approximations employed in the present description are discussed and the extensions required for a more rigorous treatment of the problem are outlined. To illustrate the formalism, an application to {sup 90}Zr({alpha},{alpha}{prime}){sup 90}Zr* is presented.

  10. Two Photon Exchange in Quasi-elastic and Deep-inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Averett, Todd D.; Katich, Joseph; Zhao Bo

    2011-10-24

    In this paper, I present an overview and preliminary results from three experiments at Jefferson Lab that were recently completed using a {sup 3}He gas target with polarization oriented normal to the scattering plane of unpolarized incident electrons. A target single spin asymmetry was formed by periodically flipping the direction of the target spin. In the reaction {up_arrow}{sup 3}He(e,e'), the Born contribution is expected to be zero, giving direct sensitivity to two photon exchange. This asymmetry was measured in the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic regimes with 0.1 < Q{sup 2} < 1.0 GeV{sup 2}. The asymmetry is predicted to decrease by two-orders of magnitude for deep-inelastic versus quasi-elastic scattering. Preliminary results from these experiments will be presented.

  11. Elastic and inelastic scattering of 50-MeV pions from 28Si and 30Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wienands, U.; Hessey, N.; Barnett, B. M.; Rozon, F. M.; Roser, H. W.; Altman, A.; Johnson, R. R.; Gill, D. R.; Smith, G. R.; Wiedner, C. A.; Manley, D. M.; Berman, B. L.; Crawford, H. J.; Grion, N.

    1987-02-01

    Angular distributions of the differential cross section for elastic and inelastic scattering of 50-MeV π+ and π- on 28Si and 30Si have been measured to a relative accuracy of 5-10 We fitted the cross section of elastic π+ and π- scattering from 28Si simultaneously with an optical model using a second-order potential of the Michigan State University form. Our best-fit parameters differ from those given previously. The ratio of the neutron and proton transition-matrix elements for the first Jπ=2+ state in 28Si is found from the inelastic cross section to be 1.13+/-0.09. For 30Si, the ratio is found to be 0.93+/-0.09, which differs significantly from the value derived from lifetime measurements on mirror nuclei.

  12. D^* production in deep-inelastic scattering at low Q^2

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Andreas W.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Inclusive production of D* mesons in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA is studied in the range 5 < Q{sup 2} < 100 GeV{sup 2} of the photon virtuality and 0.02 < y < 0.70 of the inelasticity of the scattering process. The visible range for the D* meson is p{sub T} (D*) > 1.25 GeV and |{eta}(D*)| < 1.8. The data were taken with the H1 detector in the years 2004 to 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 347 pb{sup -1}. Single and double differential cross sections are measured. The results are compared to QCD predictions.

  13. Production of Ξ- in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, N. Mohammad; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ- has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  14. Production of Ξ{sup −} in deep inelastic scattering with ZEUS detector at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Nasir, N. Mohammad Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.

    2016-01-22

    In this paper, we discussed about the possible mechanism on how strange baryon are being produced. The discovery of strange quarks in cosmic rays before the quarks model being proposed makes the searches become more interesting, as it has long lifetimes. The inclusive deep inelastic scattering of Ξ{sup −} has been studied in electron-proton collisions with ZEUS detector at HERA. We also studied HERA kinematics and phase space.

  15. Measurements of transverse momentum in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    K.A. Griffioen

    2012-12-01

    With mounting experimental evidence that only a small fraction of the proton's spin comes from the spins of its quarks and gluons, the quest for orbital angular momentum has begun. The parton distributions relevant to this depend on transverse quark momenta. Recent CLAS semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering measurements probe these new transverse-momentum-dependent parton distributions using longitudinally polarized beams and targets and detecting {pi}{sup +},{pi}{sup -} and {pi}{sup 0} in the final state.

  16. Differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hnizdo, V. )

    1994-08-01

    The differences between the deformed-potential and folding-model descriptions of inelastic nuclear scattering, attention to which has been called recently by Beene, Horen, and Satchler [Phys. Rev. C 48, 3128 (1993)], were pointed out already some time ago by contrasting the rules of equal deformation lengths and equal normalized multipole moments for the optical potential and the underlying nucleon distribution of the excited nucleus.

  17. MCNP benchmarking of an inelastic neutron scattering system for soil carbon analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doron, Oded; Wielopolski, Lucian; Mitra, Sudeep; Biegalski, Steven

    2014-01-01

    We benchmark here a Monte Carlo model simulating an inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system for quantitative analysis of carbon in soil. Specifically, we compare the simulations with experimental results of copper foils activations, INS system calibration, INS system optimization of the height above the ground and comparing pulse height distributions due to 137Cs and 60Co sources. Most of the simulations and the measurements agree better than 10%, although some of them registered discrepancies larger than 20%.

  18. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, [ital y][sub [ital cut

  19. Toward a QCD analysis of jet rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-08-01

    Measurements of multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic Muon-Proton scattering at Fermilab-E665 are presented. Jet rates defined by the JADE clustering algorithm are compared to perturbative Quantum chromodynamics (PQCD) and different Monte Carlo model predictions. The applicability of the jet-parton duality hypothesis is studied. We obtain hadronic jet rates which are approximately a factor of two higher than PQCD predictions at the parton level. Possible causes for this discrepancy are discussed.

  20. "Hot background" of the mobile inelastic neutron scattering system for soil carbon analysis.

    PubMed

    Kavetskiy, Aleksandr; Yakubova, Galina; Prior, Stephen A; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-01-01

    The problem of gamma spectrum peak identification arises when conducting soil carbon analysis using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) system. Some spectral peaks could be associated with radioisotopes appearing due to neutron activation of both the measurement system and soil samples. The investigation of "hot background" gamma spectra from the construction materials, whole measurement system, and soil samples over time showed that activation of (28)Al isotope can contribute noticeable additions to the soil neutron stimulated gamma spectra.

  1. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide as studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthes, Mariette; Eckert, Juegen; Johnson, Susanna W.; Moret, Jacques; Swanson, Basil I.; Unkefer, Clifford J.

    1992-10-01

    A study of the anomalous modes in acetanilide and five deuterated derivatives by incoherent inelastic neutron scattering is reported. These data show that the dynamics of the amide and methyl groups influence each other. In addition, the anomalous temperature behaviour of the NH out-of-plane bending mode is confirmed. These observations suggest that the self-trapping mechanism in ACN may be more complex than hitherto assumed.

  2. Gate-opening effect in ZIF-8: the first experimental proof using inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Casco, M. E.; Cheng, Y. Q.; Daemen, L. L.; Fairen-Jimenez, D.; Ramos-Fernández, E. V.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Silvestre-Albero, J.

    2016-01-28

    In order to understand the behavior of industrial molecular separations, the gate-opening phenomenon in ZIFs are of paramount importance. We show for the first time using in situ inelastic neutron scattering (INS) the swinging of the -CH3 groups and the imidazolate linkers in the prototypical ZIF-8 and ZIF-8@AC hybrid materials upon exposure to mild N2 pressure.

  3. Test of factorization in diffractive deep inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Polifka, Richard

    2015-04-10

    The QCD factorization theorem in diffraction is tested by comparing diffractive jet production data to QCD predictions based on fits to inclusive diffractive cross section data. H1 measured dijet production with a leading proton detected in the Very Forward Proton Spectrometer (VFPS), both in deep-inelastic scattering and in photoproduction. The DIS measurements are complemented by measurements of dijet production with an associated rapidity gap and in a data sample selected with a leading proton in the Forward Proton Spectrometer (FPS)

  4. Transverse response functions in deep inelastic electron scattering for 40Ca, 48Ca, and 56Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meziani, Z. E.; Barreau, P.; Bernheim, M.; Morgenstern, J.; Turck-Chieze, S.; Altemus, R.; McCarthy, J.; Orphanos, L. J.; Whitney, R. R.; Capitani, G. P.; de Sanctis, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.

    1985-03-01

    Deep-inelastic inclusive electron-scattering cross sections from 40Ca, 48Ca, and 56Fe have been measured at 60°, 90°, and 140° and at energy transfers including the Δ(3,3) region. The transverse response function in the momentum interval 300 MeV/c<||q-->||<600 MeV/c was extracted by the Rosenbluth prescription. Different theoretical approaches to the quasielastic region are compared to the data. A mass-number scaling is observed.

  5. InN Thin Film Lattice Dynamics by Grazing Incidence Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, J.; Bosak, A.; Krisch, M.; Manjón, F. J.; Romero, A. H.; Garro, N.; Wang, X.; Yoshikawa, A.; Kuball, M.

    2011-05-01

    Achieving comprehensive information on thin film lattice dynamics so far has eluded well established spectroscopic techniques. We demonstrate here the novel application of grazing incidence inelastic x-ray scattering combined with ab initio calculations to determine the complete elastic stiffness tensor, the acoustic and low-energy optic phonon dispersion relations of thin wurtzite indium nitride films. Indium nitride is an especially relevant example, due to the technological interest for optoelectronic and solar cell applications in combination with other group III nitrides.

  6. High Resolution Inelastic Electron Scattering from LEAD-208.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connelly, James Patrick

    Inclusive electron scattering differential cross sections from ^{208}Pb have been measured with energy resolutions better than 20 keV for over 120 discrete states with excitation energies less than 7.3 MeV. The momentum-transfer dependence of these cross sections has been mapped over a range of 0.5 to 2.8 fm^{-1} in the forward direction and 1.0 to 2.9 fm^{ -1} in the backward scattering direction. Over fifty excitations have been analyzed in the Distorted Wave Born Approximation to yield transition charge, current and magnetization densities. The nuclear structure of discrete excitations are interpreted in the framework of 1p-1h transition. The nuclear structure of levels in the excitation region below 4.8 MeV is studied in detail. Above 4.8 MeV, multiplets from single particle-hole configurations coupling to high spin states (J >=q 7) are investigated. Experimental transition densities are compared to Tamm-Dancoff calculations from a correlated ground state.

  7. Dynamics of water studied by coherent and incoherent inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissent-Funel, M.-C.; Teixeira, J.

    1991-11-01

    This paper reviews the more recent results obtained on the dynamics of water by neutron scattering and shows that some information can be obtained by this technique at the microscopic level of the hydrogen bond. It also accounts for some very recent results obtained with the hydrated protein C-phycocyanin. Incoherent quasi-elastic and inelastic neutron scattering by water has been performed in a temperature range extending to the supercooled state. The analysis of the quasi-elastic spectrum separates two main components and gives two characteristic times, one of them being related to the hydrogen-bond lifetime. The inelastic spectra extend until 600 meV, i.e. covering the intramolecular vibration region, showing for the first time the stretching band. Collective excitations propagating at 3310 m s -1 have been observed by coherent inelastic neutron scattering. This result was predicted by previous computer molecular dynamics simulations of water. The data are interpreted as a manifestation of short wavelength collective modes propagating within patches of highly bonded water molecules, and distinct from the ordinary sound wave.

  8. Theory of inelastic neutron scattering in a field-induced spin-nematic state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smerald, Andrew; Ueda, Hiroaki T.; Shannon, Nic

    2015-05-01

    We develop a theory of spin excitations in a field-induced spin-nematic state, and use it to show how a spin-nematic order can be indentified using inelastic neutron scattering. We concentrate on two-dimensional frustrated ferromagnets, for which a two-sublattice, bond-centered spin-nematic state is predicted to exist over a wide range of parameters. First, to clarify the nature of spin-excitations, we introduce a soluble spin-1 model, and use this to derive a continuum field theory, applicable to any two-sublattice spin-nematic state. We then parameterize this field theory, using diagrammatic calculations for a realistic microscopic model of a spin-1/2 frustrated ferromagnet, and show how it can be used to make predictions for inelastic neutron scattering. As an example, we show quantitative predictions for inelastic scattering of neutrons from BaCdVO(PO 4)2 , a promising candidate to realize a spin-nematic state at an achievable h ˜4 T. We show that in this material it is realistic to expect a ghostly Goldstone mode, signalling spin-nematic order, to be visible in experiment.

  9. Inelastic cross sections for positron scattering from atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, M.; Hofmann, A.; Raith, W.; Sperber, W.; Jacobsen, F.; Lynn, K.G.

    1994-12-31

    Positronium formation (Ps) cross sections for positrons impinging on atomic hydrogen were measured in the impact energy range from 13eV to 255eV at the High Intensity Positron (HIP) beam at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The Ps-formation cross section was found to rise rapidly from the threshold at 6.8eV to a maximum value of (2.98 {plus_minus} 0.18) {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} for {approx} 15eV positrons. By 75eV it drops below the detection limit of 0.17 {times} 10{sup {minus}16} cm{sup 2} which is the present level of statistical uncertainty. The experiment was modified to enable the measurement of doubly differential scattering cross sections.

  10. Excitation of 0/sup -/ states by /sup 16/O(pp')/sup 16/O inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, K.; Fujiwara, M.; Hatanaka, K.; Ikegami, H.; Kondo, M.; Matsuoka, N.; Saito, T.; Matsuki, S.; Ogino, K.; Kato, S.

    1984-08-01

    Differential cross sections and analyzing powers for 0/sup -/ states in /sup 16/O have been measured in inelastic scattering of 65 MeV polarized protons. This is the first observation of both isovector and isoscalar 0/sup +/..-->..0/sup -/ transitions in proton scattering on a particular isotope. Microscopic distorted-wave Born approximations and distorted-wave impulse approximation calculations do not describe very well either experimental cross sections or analyzing powers. It is suggested that more complicated reaction mechanisms and wave functions may be needed to describe these transitions.

  11. AdS Black Disk Model for Small-x Deep Inelastic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornalba, Lorenzo; Costa, Miguel S.; Penedones, João

    2010-08-01

    Using the approximate conformal invariance of QCD at high energies we consider a simple anti-de Sitter black disk model to describe saturation in deep inelastic scattering. Deep inside saturation the structure functions have the same power law scaling, FT˜FL˜x-ω, where ω is related to the expansion rate of the black disk with energy. Furthermore, the ratio FL/FT is given by the universal value (1+ω)/(3+ω), independently of the target. For γ*-γ* scattering at high energies we obtain explicit expressions and ratios for the total cross sections of transverse and longitudinal photons in terms of the single parameter ω.

  12. Measurement of the dynamic response of compressed hydrogen by inelastic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Crowley, B. J. B.; Fäustlin, R. R.; Fortmann, C.; Y Khattak, F.; Kleppe, A. K.; Riley, D.; Toleikis, S.; Wark, J.; Wilhelm, H.; Gregori, G.

    2010-08-01

    Measurement of the dynamic properties of hydrogen and helium under extreme pressures is a key to understanding the physics of planetary interiors. The inelastic scattering signal from statically compressed hydrogen inside diamond anvil cells at 2.8 GPa and 6.4 GPa was measured at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron facility in the UK. The first direct measurement of the local field correction to the Coulomb interactions in degenerate plasmas was obtained from spectral shifts in the scattering data and compared to predictions by the Utsumi-Ichimaru theory for degenerate electron liquids.

  13. Stimulated Light Emission and Inelastic Scattering by a Classical Linear System of Rotating Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo-Garcia, Ana; Manjavacas, Alejandro; Garcia de Abajo, F. Javier

    2011-05-27

    The rotational dynamics of particles subject to external illumination is found to produce light amplification and inelastic scattering at high rotation velocities. Light emission at frequencies shifted with respect to the incident light by twice the rotation frequency dominates over elastic scattering within a wide range of light and rotation frequencies. Remarkably, net amplification of the incident light is produced in this classical linear system via stimulated emission. Large optically induced acceleration rates are predicted in vacuum accompanied by moderate heating of the particle, thus supporting the possibility of observing these effects under extreme rotation conditions.

  14. Cold-collision-shift Cancellation and Inelastic Scattering in a Yb Optical Lattice Clock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-10

    inelastic two-body loss rates for 3P0-3PO and 1S0-3PO scattering. VVe also measm e interaction shifts in an unpolarized atomic sample. Collision...SUBJECT TERMS atomic frequency standards, atom collisions, optical atomic clocks 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF a. REPORT b...rates for 3P0-3P0 and 1S0-3P0 scattering. We also measure interaction shifts in an unpolarized atomic sample. Collision measurements for this spin-1/2

  15. On the fine structure of spectra of the inelastic-electron-scattering cross section and the Si surface parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Parshin, A. S. Igumenov, A. Yu.; Mikhlin, Yu. L.; Pchelyakov, O. P.; Nikiforov, A. I.; Timofeev, V. A.

    2015-04-15

    Reflection electron-energy loss spectra are obtained for a series of Si samples with different crystallographic orientations, prepared under different technological conditions. Using the experimental spectra, the electron energy loss dependences of the product of the mean inelastic free path and differential inelastic electron scattering cross section are calculated. A new technique is suggested for analyzing the spectra of inelastic electron scattering cross section by simulating experimental spectra with the use of the three-parameter Tougaard universal cross section functions. The results of the simulation are used to determine the nature of loss peaks and to calculate the surface parameter.

  16. Study of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce via inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzysiek, M.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Fornal, B.; Grȩbosz, J.; Mazurek, K.; Mȩczyński, W.; Ziȩbliński, M.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Leoni, S.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Pellegri, L.; Riboldi, S.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; De Angelis, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Valiente-Dobon, J. J.; Bazzacco, D.; Farnea, E.; Gottardo, A.; Lenzi, S.; Lunardi, S.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Recchia, F.; Ur, C.; Gadea, A.; Huyuk, T.; Barrientos, D.; Birkenbach, B.; Geibel, K.; Hess, H.; Reiter, P.; Steinbach, T.; Wiens, A.; Bürger, A.; Görgen, A.; Guttormsen, M.; Larsen, A. C.; Siem, S.

    2014-05-01

    The main aim of this study was a deeper understanding of the nuclear structure properties of the soft dipole modes in 140Ce, excited via inelastic scattering of weakly bound 17O projectiles. An important aim was to investigate the ‘splitting’ of the PDR into two parts: a low-energy isoscalar component dominated by neutron-skin oscillations and a higher-energy component lying on the tail of the giant dipole resonance of a rather isovector character. This was already observed for this nucleus, investigated in (α, α‧) and (γ, γ‧) experiments. The experiment was performed at Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Italy. Inelastic scattering of 17O ion beam at 20 MeV A-1 was used to excite the resonance modes in the 140Ce target. Gamma-rays were registered by five triple clusters of AGATA-Demonstrator and nine large volume scintillators (LaBr3). The scattered 17O ions were identified by two ΔE - E Si telescopes of the TRACE array mounted inside the scattering chamber. The telescopes consisted of two segmented Si-pad detectors, each of 60 pixels. Very preliminary data have shown a strong domination of the E1 transitions in the ‘pygmy’ region with a character more similar to the one obtained in alpha scattering experiment.

  17. [Inelastic electron scattering from surfaces]. [Annual] progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This program is aimed at the quantitative study of surface dynamical processes (vibrational, magnetic excitations) in crystalline slabs, ultrathin-layered materials, and chemisorbed systems on substrates, and of the geometric structure connected to these dynamical excitations. High-resolution electron-energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is a powerful probe. Off-specular excitation cross sections are much larger if electron energies are in the LEED range (50-300 eV). The analyses has been used to study surfaces of ordered alloys (NiAl). Ab-initio surface lattice dynamical results were combined with phonon-loss cross sections to achieve a more accurate microscopic description. First-principles phonon eigenvectors and eigenfrequencies were used as inputs to electron-energy-loss multiple scattering cross-section calculations. The combined microscopic approach was used to analyze EELS data of Cu(0001) and Ag(001) at two points. Positron diffraction is discussed as a structural and imaging tool. The relation between geometric structure of a film and its local magnetic properties will be studied in the future, along with other things.

  18. Inelastic Scattering of NO by Kr: Rotational Polarization over a Rainbow.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Helen; Nichols, Bethan; Gordon, Sean D S; Hornung, Balazs; Squires, Eleanor; Brouard, Mark; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H; Aoiz, F Javier; Stolte, Steven

    2014-10-02

    We use molecular beams and ion imaging to determine quantum state resolved angular distributions of NO radicals after inelastic collision with Kr. We also determine both the sense and the plane of rotation (the rotational orientation and alignment, respectively) of the scattered NO. By full selection and then detection of the quantum parity of the NO molecule, our experiment is uniquely sensitive to quantum interference. For forward-scattered NO, we report hitherto unseen changes in the plane and sense of rotation with scattering angle and show, remarkably, that the rotation of the NO molecule after collision can be near-maximally oriented for certain transitions and scattering angles. These effects are enhanced by the full parity selection in the experiment and result from the interplay between attractive and repulsive forces.

  19. Pygmy dipole resonance in 124Sn populated by inelastic scattering of 17O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegri, L.; Bracco, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Leoni, S.; Camera, F.; Lanza, E. G.; Kmiecik, M.; Maj, A.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Nicolini, R.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bazzacco, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; Ciemala, M.; De Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grebosz, J.; Hess, H.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Judson, D.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Krzysiek, M.; Litvinova, E.; Lunardi, S.; Mazurek, K.; Mengoni, D.; Michelagnoli, C.; Menegazzo, R.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Simpson, J.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente Dobon, J. J.; Zieblinski, M.

    2014-11-01

    The γ decay from the high-lying states of 124Sn was measured using the inelastic scattering of 17O at 340 MeV. The emitted γ rays were detected with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array and the scattered ions were detected in two segmented ΔE- E silicon telescopes. The angular distribution was measured both for the γ rays and the scattered 17O ions. An accumulation of E1 strength below the particle threshold was found and compared with previous data obtained with (γ ,γ‧) and (α ,α‧ γ) reactions. The present results of elastic scattering, and excitation of E2 and E1 states were analysed using the DWBA approach. From this comprehensive description the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states was extracted. The obtained values are based on the comparison of the data with DWBA calculations including a form factor deduced using a microscopic transition density.

  20. Inelastic electron scattering from a helical potential: transverse polarization and the structure factor in the single scattering approximation.

    PubMed

    Varela, Solmar; Medina, Ernesto; López, Floralba; Mujica, Vladimiro

    2014-01-08

    We analyze single scattering of unpolarized photoelectrons through a monolayer of chiral molecules modeled by a continuous hardcore helix and spin-orbit coupling. The molecular helix is represented by an optical contact potential containing a non-hermitian component describing inelastic events. Transmitted photoelectrons are transversely polarized at optimal angles, and separated into up and down spin with up to 20% efficiency. Such a process involves the interference of both spin-orbit and inelastic strengths, that are parameterized quantitatively to recent experiments in chiral self-assembled monolayers (SAMs). The structure factor of the model chiral molecule shows the energy dependence of the differential cross section which decays strongly as energy increases. Larger incident momenta reduce axial deviations from the forward direction and the spin-orbit interaction becomes less effective. Transverse electron polarization is then restricted to a characteristic energy window.

  1. Recent Advances in Development and Applications of the Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Inelastic Scattering.

    PubMed

    Babikov, Dmitri; Semenov, Alexander

    2016-01-28

    A mixed quantum/classical approach to inelastic scattering (MQCT) is developed in which the relative motion of two collision partners is treated classically, and the rotational and vibrational motion of each molecule is treated quantum mechanically. The cases of molecule + atom and molecule + molecule are considered including diatomics, symmetric-top rotors, and asymmetric-top rotor molecules. Phase information is taken into consideration, permitting calculations of elastic and inelastic, total and differential cross sections for excitation and quenching. The method is numerically efficient and intrinsically parallel. The scaling law of MQCT is favorable, which enables calculations at high collision energies and for complicated molecules. Benchmark studies are carried out for several quite different molecular systems (N2 + Na, H2 + He, CO + He, CH3 + He, H2O + He, HCOOCH3 + He, and H2 + N2) in a broad range of collision energies, which demonstrates that MQCT is a viable approach to inelastic scattering. At higher collision energies it can confidently replace the computationally expensive full-quantum calculations. At low collision energies and for low-mass systems results of MQCT are less accurate but are still reasonable. A proposal is made for blending MQCT calculations at higher energies with full-quantum calculations at low energies.

  2. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; ...

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were publishedmore » earlier, but are presented here in more detail.« less

  3. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; Fassi, L. El; Erler, J.; Flay, D.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Golge, S.; Grimm, K.; Hafidi, K.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C. E.; Jen, C. M.; Jones, D.; Kang, Hoyoung; King, P. M.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; LeRose, J. J.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; McNulty, D.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meddi, F.; Meekins, D. G.; Mercado, L.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Muangma, N.; Mesick, K. E.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Nuruzzaman, none; Oh, Y.; Parno, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Phillips, S. K.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Quinn, B.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Rider, K.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Rubin, J.; Russo, G.; Saenboonruang, K.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Silwal, R.; Sirca, S.; Souder, P. A.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Sutera, C. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, L.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

  4. Measurement of D ± production in deep inelastic ep scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Corso, F. Dal; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Idris, F. Mohamad; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Abdullah, W. A. T. Wan; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-05-01

    Charm production in deep inelastic ep scattering was measured with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 354 pb-1. Charm quarks were identified by reconstructing D ± mesons in the D ± → K ∓π±π± decay channel. Lifetime information was used to reduce combinatorial background substantially. Differential cross sections were measured in the kinematic region 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2, 0 .02 < y < 0 .7, 1 .5 < p T ( D ±) < 15 GeV and | η( D ±)| < 1 .6, where Q 2 is the photon virtuality, y is the inelasticity, and p T ( D ±) and η( D ±) are the transverse momentum and the pseudorapidity of the D ± meson, respectively. Next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the data. The charm contribution, F_2^{{coverline{c}}} , to the proton structure-function F 2 was extracted.

  5. High resolution measurement of neutron inelastic scattering cross-sections for 23Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouki, C.; Archier, P.; Borcea, C.; De Saint Jean, C.; Drohé, J. C.; Kopecky, S.; Moens, A.; Nankov, N.; Negret, A.; Noguère, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Stanoiu, M.

    2012-04-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross-section of 23Na has been measured in response to the relevant request of the OECD-NEA High Priority Request List, which requires a target uncertainty of 4% in the energy range up to 1.35 MeV for the development of sodium-cooled fast reactors. The measurement was performed at the GELINA facility with the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS), featuring eight high purity germanium detectors. The setup is installed at a 200 m flight path from the neutron source and provides high resolution measurements using the (n,n'γ)-technique. The sample was an 80 mm diameter metallic sodium disk prepared at IRMM. Transitions up to the seventh excited state were observed and the differential gamma cross-sections at 110° and 150° were measured, showing mostly isotropic gamma emission. From these the gamma production, level and inelastic cross-sections were determined for neutron energies up to 3838.9 keV. The results agree well with the existing data and the evaluated nuclear data libraries in the low energies, and provide new experimental points in the little studied region above 2 MeV. Following a detailed review of the methodology used for the gamma efficiency calibrations and flux normalization of GAINS data, an estimated total uncertainty of 2.2% was achieved for the inelastic cross-section integrals over the energy ranges 0.498-1.35 MeV and 1.35-2.23 MeV, meeting the required targets.

  6. Experimental measurements with Monte Carlo corrections and theoretical calculations of neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Xiao, Jun; Luo, Xiaobing

    2016-10-01

    The neutron inelastic scattering cross section of 115In has been measured by the activation technique at neutron energies of 2.95, 3.94, and 5.24 MeV with the neutron capture cross sections of 197Au as an internal standard. The effects of multiple scattering and flux attenuation were corrected using the Monte Carlo code GEANT4. Based on the experimental values, the 115In neutron inelastic scattering cross sections data were theoretically calculated between the 1 and 15 MeV with the TALYS software code, the theoretical results of this study are in reasonable agreement with the available experimental results.

  7. Monte Carlo Calculation of Thermal Neutron Inelastic Scattering Cross Section Uncertainties by Sampling Perturbed Phonon Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jesse Curtis

    Nuclear data libraries provide fundamental reaction information required by nuclear system simulation codes. The inclusion of data covariances in these libraries allows the user to assess uncertainties in system response parameters as a function of uncertainties in the nuclear data. Formats and procedures are currently established for representing covariances for various types of reaction data in ENDF libraries. This covariance data is typically generated utilizing experimental measurements and empirical models, consistent with the method of parent data production. However, ENDF File 7 thermal neutron scattering library data is, by convention, produced theoretically through fundamental scattering physics model calculations. Currently, there is no published covariance data for ENDF File 7 thermal libraries. Furthermore, no accepted methodology exists for quantifying or representing uncertainty information associated with this thermal library data. The quality of thermal neutron inelastic scattering cross section data can be of high importance in reactor analysis and criticality safety applications. These cross sections depend on the material's structure and dynamics. The double-differential scattering law, S(alpha, beta), tabulated in ENDF File 7 libraries contains this information. For crystalline solids, S(alpha, beta) is primarily a function of the material's phonon density of states (DOS). Published ENDF File 7 libraries are commonly produced by calculation and processing codes, such as the LEAPR module of NJOY, which utilize the phonon DOS as the fundamental input for inelastic scattering calculations to directly output an S(alpha, beta) matrix. To determine covariances for the S(alpha, beta) data generated by this process, information about uncertainties in the DOS is required. The phonon DOS may be viewed as a probability density function of atomic vibrational energy states that exist in a material. Probable variation in the shape of this spectrum may be

  8. Final-state interactions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the Deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Wim Cosyn, Misak Sargsian

    2011-07-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the Deuteron with production of a slow nucleon in recoil kinematics is studied in the virtual nucleon approximation, in which the final state interaction (FSI) is calculated within general eikonal approximation. The cross section is derived in a factorized approach, with a factor describing the virtual photon interaction with the off-shell nucleon and a distorted spectral function accounting for the final-state interactions. One of the main goals of the study is to understand how much the general features of the diffractive high energy soft rescattering accounts for the observed features of FSI in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Comparison with the Jefferson Lab data shows good agreement in the covered range of kinematics. Most importantly, our calculation correctly reproduces the rise of the FSI in the forward direction of the slow nucleon production angle. By fitting our calculation to the data we extracted the W and Q{sup 2} dependences of the total cross section and slope factor of the interaction of DIS products, X, off the spectator nucleon. This analysis shows the XN scattering cross section rising with W and decreasing with an increase of Q{sup 2}. Finally, our analysis points at a largely suppressed off-shell part of the rescattering amplitude.

  9. Interference structures in the differential cross-sections for inelastic scattering of NO by Ar.

    PubMed

    Eyles, C J; Brouard, M; Yang, C-H; Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Gijsbertsen, A; Wiskerke, A E; Stolte, S

    2011-06-12

    Inelastic scattering is a fundamental collisional process that plays an important role in many areas of chemistry, and its detailed study can provide valuable insight into more complex chemical systems. Here, we report the measurement of differential cross-sections for the rotationally inelastic scattering of NO(X2Π1/2, v=0, j=0.5, f) by Ar at a collision energy of 530 cm(-1) in unprecedented detail, with full Λ-doublet (hence total NO parity) resolution in both the initial and final rotational quantum states. The observed differential cross-sections depend sensitively on the change in total NO parity on collision. Differential cross-sections for total parity-conserving and changing collisions have distinct, novel quantum-mechanical interference structures, reflecting different sensitivities to specific homonuclear and heteronuclear terms in the interaction potential. The experimental data agree remarkably well with rigorous quantum-mechanical scattering calculations, and reveal the role played by total parity in acting as a potential energy landscape filter.

  10. Final-state interactions in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosyn, W.; Sargsian, M.

    2011-07-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off the deuteron with production of a slow nucleon in recoil kinematics is studied in the virtual nucleon approximation, in which the final-state interaction (FSI) is calculated within generalized eikonal approximation. The cross section is derived in a factorized approach, with a factor describing the virtual photon interaction with the off-shell nucleon and a distorted spectral function accounting for the final-state interactions. One of the main goals of the study is to understand how much the general features of the diffractive high-energy soft rescattering accounts for the observed features of FSI in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). Comparison with the Jefferson Lab data shows good agreement in the covered range of kinematics. Most importantly, our calculation correctly reproduces the rise of the FSI in the forward direction of the slow nucleon production angle. By fitting our calculation to the data we extracted the W and Q2 dependencies of the total cross section and slope factor of the interaction of DIS products, X, off the spectator nucleon. This analysis shows the XN-scattering cross section rising with W and decreasing with an increase of Q2. Finally, our analysis points at a largely suppressed off-shell part of the rescattering amplitude.

  11. The SEXTANTS beamline at SOLEIL: a new facility for elastic, inelastic and coherent scattering of soft X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sacchi, M.; Jaouen, N.; Popescu, H.; Gaudemer, R.; Tonnerre, J. M.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Hague, C. F.; Delmotte, A.; Dubuisson, J. M.; Cauchon, G.; Lagarde, B.; Polack, F.

    2013-03-01

    SEXTANTS is a new SOLEIL beamline dedicated to soft X-ray scattering techniques. The beamline, covering the 50-1700 eV energy range, features two Apple-II undulators for polarization control and a fixed-deviation monochromator. Two branch-lines host three end-stations for elastic, inelastic and coherent scattering experiments.

  12. Deep Inelastic Scattering results from the first year of HERA operation

    SciTech Connect

    Magill, S.R.

    1993-12-31

    The first year of operation of the HERA electron-proton collider has resulted in Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS) Physics results from both the H1 and ZEUS experiments. Reported here are the H1 and ZEUS measurements of the proton structure function F{sub 2} at higher Q{sup 2} and lower x than previously reported from fixed target experiments. Also included are the results of QCD studies on hadronic final states and jets, and the observation of high Q{sup 2} charged current events from both experiments. Finally, the observation of events with large rapidity gaps by the ZEUS collaboration is also reported.

  13. Paramagnon excitations' theory for resonant inelastic X-ray scattering in doped plane copper oxide superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, I. A.

    2015-04-01

    A relaxation function theory with paramagnon excitations for doped S = 1 / 2 two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnetic system in the paramagnetic state is given in view of magnetic response of high-Tc copper oxide superconductors as obtained by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). The results of the theory on Nd(La)-Ba(Sr)-Cu-O and Y-Ba-Cu-O family compounds give fair agreement without especially adjusted parameters to RIXS data. It is shown that RIXS data analysis depends on paramagnon damping and thus affected by approximations made for dynamic spin susceptibility.

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering study of light-induced dynamics of a photosynthetic membrane system

    SciTech Connect

    Furrer, A.; Stoeckli, A.

    2010-01-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering was employed to study photoeffects on the molecular dynamics of membranes of the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis. The main photoactive parts of this biomolecular system are the chlorophyll molecules whose dynamics were found to be affected under illumination by visible light in a twofold manner. First, vibrational modes are excited at energies of 12(2) and 88(21) cm{sup -1}. Second, a partial 'freezing' of rotational modes is observed at energies of 1.2(3) and 2.9(5) cm{sup -1}. These results are attributed to a possible coupling between molecular motions and particular mechanisms in the photosynthetic process.

  15. Nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering study of cubic boron nitride

    SciTech Connect

    Galambosi, S.; Soininen, J. A.; Haemaelaeinen, K.; Shirley, Eric L.; Kao, C.-C.

    2001-07-01

    The dynamic structure factor of cubic boron nitride has been measured using nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The experimental data are compared with the results of a recently developed ab initio calculation scheme, which takes into account the interaction between the excited electron and the hole. The agreement between the experiment and theory is good over an extended momentum transfer range, which emphasizes the importance of proper inclusion of the electron-hole interaction. The results are also compared with a reflectance measurement that represents the zero-momentum-transfer limit. The complementary nature of these different experimental methods is discussed in view of the ab initio calculations.

  16. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering at the limit of subfemtosecond natural lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Marchenko, T.; Journel, L.; Marin, T.; Guillemin, R.; Carniato, S.; Simon, M.; Zitnik, M.; Kavcic, M.; Bucar, K.; Mihelic, A.; Hoszowska, J.; Cao, W.

    2011-04-14

    We present measurements of the resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra of the CH{sub 3}I molecule in the hard-x-ray region near the iodine L{sub 2} and L{sub 3} absorption edges. We show that dispersive RIXS spectral features that were recognized as a fingerprint of dissociative molecular states can be interpreted in terms of ultrashort natural lifetime of {approx}200 attoseconds in the case of the iodine L-shell core-hole. Our results demonstrate the capacity of the RIXS technique to reveal subtle dynamical effects in molecules with sensitivity to nuclear rearrangement on a subfemtosecond time scale.

  17. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting [alpha][sub s]. Results on the Q[sup 2] dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant [alpha][sub s]. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x[sub B[sub j

  18. Application of Geant4 simulation for analysis of soil carbon inelastic neutron scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Yakubova, Galina; Kavetskiy, Aleksandr; Prior, Stephen A; Torbert, H Allen

    2016-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) was applied to determine soil carbon content. Due to non-uniform soil carbon depth distribution, the correlation between INS signals with some soil carbon content parameter is not obvious; however, a proportionality between INS signals and average carbon weight percent in ~10cm layer for any carbon depth profile is demonstrated using Monte-Carlo simulation (Geant4). Comparison of INS and dry combustion measurements confirms this conclusion. Thus, INS measurements give the value of this soil carbon parameter.

  19. Study of Σ(1385) and Ξ(1321) hyperon and antihyperon production in deep inelastic muon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Y.; Alexandrov, Y.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Y.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, C.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanshin, Y.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Y. A.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Y. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Morreale, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Y.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2013-10-01

    Large samples of Λ, Σ(1385) and Ξ(1321) hyperons produced in the deep-inelastic muon scattering off a 6LiD target were collected with the COMPASS experimental setup at CERN. The relative yields of Σ(1385)+, Σ(1385)-, , , Ξ(1321)-, and hyperons decaying into were measured. The ratios of heavy-hyperon to Λ and heavy-antihyperon to were found to be in the range 3.8 % to 5.6 % with a relative uncertainty of about 10 %. They were used to tune the parameters relevant for strange particle production of the LEPTO Monte Carlo generator.

  20. Hadron transverse momentum distributions in muon deep inelastic scattering at 160 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Alekseev, M. G.; Alexakhin, V. Yu.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Heß, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Morreale, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.-F.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmitt, L.; Schmïden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2013-08-01

    Multiplicities of charged hadrons produced in deep inelastic muon scattering off a 6LiD target have been measured as a function of the DIS variables x Bj , Q 2, W 2 and the final state hadron variables p T and z. The distributions are fitted with a single exponential function at low values of to determine the dependence of on x Bj , Q 2, W 2 and z. The z-dependence of is shown to be a potential tool to extract the average intrinsic transverse momentum squared of partons, , as a function of x Bj and Q 2 in a leading order QCD parton model.

  1. Collins effect in semiinclusive deeply inelastic scattering and in electron-positron-annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Efremov, A.V.; Goeke, K.; Schweitzer, P.

    2006-05-01

    The Collins fragmentation function is extracted from HERMES data on azimuthal single spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering, and BELLE data on azimuthal asymmetries in e{sup +}e{sup -}-annihilations. A Gaussian model is assumed for the distribution of transverse parton momenta and predictions are used from the chiral quark-soliton model for the transversity distribution function. We find that the HERMES and BELLE data yield a consistent picture of the Collins fragmentation function which is compatible with COMPASS data and the information previously obtained from an analysis of DELPHI data. Estimates for future experiments are made.

  2. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments on B[subscript 4]C under high static pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ravhi S.; Dandekar, Dattatraya; Leithe-Jasper, Andres; Tanaka, Takaho; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Nicol, Malcolm F.; Cornelius, Andrew L.

    2010-05-04

    Boron K-edge inelastic X-ray scattering experiments were performed on clean B{sub 4}C and shock impact recovered boron carbide up to 30 GPa and at ambient temperature to understand the pressure induced bonding changes. The spectral features corresponding to the boron site in the interlinking chain remained unchanged up to 30 GPa. The results of our experiments indicate that pressure induces less distortion to the boron sites and the local amorphization observed in the previous reports are due to the rearrangement of carbon atoms under extreme conditions without affecting the boron environment.

  3. Inelastic X-ray scattering measurement of electronic order in Bi2212

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnoit, Craig; Gardner, Dillong; Said, Ayman; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John; Lee, Young

    2013-03-01

    We present inelastic x-ray scattering measurements on superconducting Bi2212, showing evidence for a phonon anomaly associated with an underlying electronic density-wave state. We observe an broadening of the longitudinal acoustic phonon at a wavevector comparable to the antinodal nesting wavevector, near (1/4,1/4,0) in orthorhombic notation. An observed asymmetry between phonon creation and annihilation processes indicates breaking of time reversal and inversion symmetry as temperature is lowered. These measurements are consistent with prior work on single layer Bi2201, indicating universality of these features in the family of Bi-based high-Tc materials.

  4. Elastic modulus of supercooled liquid and hot solid silicon measured by inelastic X-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alatas, A.; Said, A. H.; Sinn, H.; Alp, E. E.; Kodituwakku, C. N.; Reinhart, B.; Saboungi, M. -L.; Price, D. L.

    2005-12-01

    We measured the dynamical structure factors of supercooled-liquid and hot-solid silicon by inelastic X-ray scattering at the same temperature, 1620 K. Two significant changes in the averaged longitudinal sound velocities and in the longitudinal modulus are observed. We, first observe a different longitudinal modulus in the polycrystalline hot-solid silicon compared to the extrapolated value obtained from the single-crystal measurement. Furthermore, this reduction of the modulus may be a precursor of the semiconductor-to-metal transition. Second, the increase in the longitudinal modulus in the liquid upon supercooling is consistent with an increase in the degree of the directional bonding.

  5. Atom-triatom rigid rotor inelastic scattering with the MultiConfiguration Time Dependent Hartree approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndengué, Steve; Dawes, Richard; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2017-01-01

    The inelastic scattering between a rigid rotor triatomic molecule and an atom is described within the frame of the MultiConfiguration Time dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method. Sample calculations are done on the H2O-Ar system for which a flexible 6D PES (used here in the rigid rotor approximation) has been recently computed in our group and will be presented separately. The results are compared with corresponding time independent calculations using the Arthurs and Dalgarno approach and confirm as expected the equivalence of the two methods.

  6. Bent crystal analyzer without grooves for inelastic scattering -- first experimental results

    SciTech Connect

    Kushnir, V.I.; Macrander, A.T.

    1996-11-01

    A new design of a bent crystal analyzer for high energy resolution inelastic X-ray scattering has been recently proposed. It has been theoretically predicted that an analyzer with reflecting planes at a certain angle with respect to a crystal surface, bent with two different radii of curvature, will have the same energy resolution as a perfect crystal. The first experimental measurement obtained at the Advanced Photon Source of a bandwidth of such an analyzer is presented. The overall energy resolution of the analyzer and monochromator observed with a narrow beam is equal to 16.4 meV (FWHM) at 13.84 KeV.

  7. Nuclear dependence of structure functions in the shadowing region of deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, E.L.; Qiu, Jianwei

    1988-07-27

    A discussion of nuclear shadowing in deep inelastic lepton scattering is presented. We show that the parton recombination model suggests that shadowing should begin to occur at larger values of Bjorken x as A increases. This expectation as well as that of weak dependence on Q/sup 2/, and the trend of the x dependence of the shadowing phenomenon are consistent with recent data. Shadowing at small x is combined with nuclear bound state effects, responsible for nuclear dependence at larger x, to provide description of the A dependence of the structure function for the entire range of x. 21 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Inelastic neutrino scattering off stable even-even Mo isotopes at low and intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasi, K. G.; Kosmas, T. S.; Divari, P. C.

    2010-04-01

    Inelastic neutrino scattering cross sections for the even-even Mo isotopes (contents of the MOON detector at Japan), at low and intermediate electron neutrino energies ( ɛi≤100 MeV), are calculated. MOON is a next-generation double beta and neutrino-less double-beta-decay experiment which is also a promising facility for low-energy neutrino detection. The nuclear wave functions required in this work have been constructed in the context of the quasi-particle random phase approximation (QRPA) and the results presented refer to 92Mo, 94Mo, 96Mo, 98Mo and 100Mo isotopes.

  9. Enhanced charge excitations in electron-doped cuprates by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tohyama, Takami; Tsutsui, Kenji; Mori, Michiyasu; Sota, Shigetoshi; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) tuned for the Cu L edge is a possible tool to detect charge excitations in cuprate superconductors. We theoretically investigate the possibility for observing a collective charge excitation by the RIXS. The RIXS process via the intermediate state inevitably makes the spectral weight of charge excitation stronger in electron doping than in hole doping. Electron-hole asymmetry also appears in the dynamical charge structure factor, showing a new enhanced small-momentum low-energy mode in electron doping. These facts indicate a possibility of detecting the new charge mode by RIXS in electron-doped systems.

  10. Numerical study of Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for cuprates and transition-metal oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chunjing; Wang, Yao; Chen, Cheng-Chien; Moritz, Brian; Devereaux, Thomas

    A theoretical understanding of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements on cuprates and other transition-metal oxides remains an important yet challenging topic, especially for its ability to resolve the momentum and photon-polarization dependence of low energy elementary excitations. Here we present our exact diagonalization studies for RIXS spectra at the Cu L-edge for cuprates, with a focus on the dependence of both incoming and outgoing photon polarization and incoming photon energy. A more general method for calculating RIXS on other transition-metal oxides (such as NiO), which includes the multiplet and charge-transfer effects, will also be discussed.

  11. Revisit the spin-FET: Multiple reflection, inelastic scattering, and lateral size effects

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Luting; Li, Xin-Qi; Sun, Qing-feng

    2014-01-01

    We revisit the spin-injected field effect transistor (spin-FET) in a framework of the lattice model by applying the recursive lattice Green's function approach. In the one-dimensional case the results of simulations in coherent regime reveal noticeable differences from the celebrated Datta-Das model, which lead us to an improved treatment with generalized result. The simulations also allow us to address inelastic scattering and lateral confinement effects in the control of spins. These issues are very important in the spin-FET device. PMID:25516433

  12. Measurement of D*± production in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bold, T.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlanski, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Plucinski, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycien, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2013-05-01

    The production of D *± mesons in deep inelastic ep scattering has been measured for exchanged photon virtualities 5 < Q 2 < 1000 GeV2, using an integrated luminosity of 363 pb-1 with the ZEUS detector at HERA. Differential cross sections have been measured and compared to next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The cross-sections are used to extract the charm contribution to the proton structure functions, expressed in terms of the reduced charm cross section, σ_{red}^{{coverline{c}}} . Theoretical calculations based on fits to inclusive HERA data are compared to the results.

  13. Prospects for alpha particle studies on TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Zweben, S.J.

    1987-05-01

    TFTR is expected to produce approximately 5 MW of alpha heating during the D/T Q approx. = 1 phase of operation in 1990. At that point the collective confinement properties and the heating effects of alpha particles become accessible for study for the first time. This paper outlines the potential performance of TFTR with respect to alpha particle production, the diagnostics which will be available for alpha particle measurements, and the physics issues which can be studied both before and during D/T operation.

  14. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, L.R.; Post, D.E. Jr.; Dawson, J.M.

    1983-11-23

    This invention relates generally to high energy confined plasmas and more particularly is directed to measuring the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a confined energetic plasma.

  15. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle emitting radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Zalutsky, M R; Pozzi, O R

    2004-12-01

    An important consideration in the development of effective strategies for radioimmunotherapy is the nature of the radiation emitted by the radionuclide. Radionuclides decaying by the emission of alpha-particles offer the possibility of matching the cell specific reactivity of monoclonal antibodies with radiation with a range of only a few cell diameters. Furthermore, alpha-particles have important biological advantages compared with external beam radiation and beta-particles including a higher biological effectiveness, which is nearly independent of oxygen concentration, dose rate and cell cycle position. In this review, the clinical settings most likely to benefit from alpha-particle radioimmunotherapy will be discussed. The current status of preclinical and clinical research with antibodies labeled with 3 promising alpha-particle emitting radionuclides - (213)Bi, (225)Ac, and (211)At - also will be summarized.

  16. Selectivity in the inelastic rotational scattering of hydrogen molecules from graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutigliano, Maria; Pirani, Fernando

    2016-11-01

    The inelastic scattering of hydrogen molecules in well-defined roto-vibrational states, impinging a graphite surface from sub-thermal up to hyper-thermal collision energies, has been investigated by using a new Potential Energy Surface, formulated in terms of a recently proposed Improved Lennard Jones model, suitable to describe non-covalent interactions in the full space of the configurations. The collision dynamics is studied by a semiclassical method. The focus has been on behaviour of molecules initially in low-medium lying roto-vibrational states, for which, under the assumed conditions, initial vibrational state is in general preserved during the collision. For the rotational relaxation, some selectivities in the final state formation have been characterized. They are emerging especially at low collision energies, where the scattering is manly driven by the attractive forces controlling the physical adsorption. The rotational and vibrational accommodation coefficients have been evaluated and found to be in agreement with those reported in literature.

  17. Collective Nature of Spin Excitations in Superconducting Cuprates Probed by Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Gretarsson, H.; Peng, Y. Y.; Lu, Y.; Porras, J.; Loew, T.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B.; Huang, Y. B.; Pelliciari, J.; Schmitt, T.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Keimer, B.; Braicovich, L.; Le Tacon, M.

    2015-05-01

    We used resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) with and without analysis of the scattered photon polarization, to study dispersive spin excitations in the high temperature superconductor YBa2Cu3O6 +x over a wide range of doping levels (0.1 ≤x ≤1 ). The excitation profiles were carefully monitored as the incident photon energy was detuned from the resonant condition, and the spin excitation energy was found to be independent of detuning for all x . These findings demonstrate that the largest fraction of the spin-flip RIXS profiles in doped cuprates arises from magnetic collective modes, rather than from incoherent particle-hole excitations as recently suggested theoretically [Benjamin et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 247002 (2014)]. Implications for the theoretical description of the electron system in the cuprates are discussed.

  18. New measurement of inclusive deep inelastic scattering cross sections at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picuric, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    A combined measurement is presented of all inclusive deep inelastic cross sections measured by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations in neutral and charged current unpolarised e±p scattering at HERA. The H1 and ZEUS collaborations collected total integrated luminosities of approximately 500 pb-1 each, divided about equally between e+p and e-p scattering. They include data taken at electron (positron) beam energy of 27.5 GeV and proton beam energies of 920, 820, 575 and 460 GeV corresponding to centre-of-mass energy of 320, 300, 251 and 225 GeV respectively. This enabled the two collaborations to explore a large phase space in Bjorken x and negative four-momentum-transfer squared, Q2. The combination method takes the correlations of the systematic uncertainties into account, resulting in improved accuracy.

  19. Resonances in rotationally inelastic scattering of NH3 and ND3 with H2.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qianli; van der Avoird, Ad; Loreau, Jérôme; Alexander, Millard H; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T; Dagdigian, Paul J

    2015-07-28

    We present theoretical studies on the scattering resonances in rotationally inelastic collisions of NH3 and ND3 molecules with H2 molecules. We use the quantum close-coupling method to compute state-to-state integral and differential cross sections for the NH3/ND3-H2 system for collision energies between 5 and 70 cm(-1), using a previously reported potential energy surface [Maret et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 399, 425 (2009)]. We identify the resonances as shape or Feshbach resonances. To analyze these, we use an adiabatic bender model, as well as examination at the scattering wave functions and lifetimes. The strength and width of the resonance peaks suggest that they could be observed in a crossed molecular beam experiment involving a Stark-decelerated NH3 beam.

  20. Inelastic x-ray scattering studies on dynamic structure factor of polymeric liquid Se under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Masanori; Kajihara, Yukio; Kimura, Koji; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Ohara, Koji; Tsutsui, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Daisuke

    2015-08-17

    Inelastic X-ray scattering measurements at 25 MPa using synchrotron radiation were carried out for semiconducting liquid Se at high temperatures up to 1673 K. The excitation energy of the acoustic mode disperses approximately 10-50 % faster than the ultrasonic sound velocity in the observed temperature range while the ultrasonic sound rapidly slows down with increasing temperature. We carried out X-ray scattering measurements and found that the average coordination number at 1673 K is 1.3, indicating that the high temperature liquid consists of short chain molecules. These results suggest that weakening of the interatomic interaction is correlated with breaking of polymeric chain molecules.

  1. Semi-Empirical Effective Interactions for Inelastic Scattering Derived from the Reid Potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiase, J. O.; Sharma, L. K.; Winkoun, D. P.; Hosaka, A.

    2001-09-01

    An effective local interaction suitable for inelastic scattering is constructed from the Reid soft - core potential. We proceed in two stages: We first calculated a set of relative two - body matrix elements in a variational approach using the Reid soft-core potential folded with two-body correlation functions. In the second stage we constructed a potential for inelastic scattering by fitting the matrix elements to a sum of Yukawa central, tensor and spin-orbit terms to the set of relative two - body matrix elements obtained in the first stage by a least squares fitting procedure. The ranges of the new potential were selected to ensure the OPEP tails in the relevant channels as well as the short - range part of the interaction. It is found that the results of our variational techniques are very similar to the G - matrix calculations of Bertsch and co - workers in the singlet - even, triplet - even, tensor - even and spin-orbit odd channels thus putting our calculations of two - body matrix elements of nuclear forces in these channels on a sound footing. However, there exist major differences in the singlet - odd, triplet - odd, tensor - odd and spin - orbit even channels which casts some doubt on our understanding of nuclear forces in these channels.

  2. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  3. Fast imaging with inelastically scattered electrons by off-axis chromatic confocal electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Changlin; Zhu, Ye; Lazar, Sorin; Etheridge, Joanne

    2014-04-25

    We introduce off-axis chromatic scanning confocal electron microscopy, a technique for fast mapping of inelastically scattered electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope without a spectrometer. The off-axis confocal mode enables the inelastically scattered electrons to be chromatically dispersed both parallel and perpendicular to the optic axis. This enables electrons with different energy losses to be separated and detected in the image plane, enabling efficient energy filtering in a confocal mode with an integrating detector. We describe the experimental configuration and demonstrate the method with nanoscale core-loss chemical mapping of silver (M4,5) in an aluminium-silver alloy and atomic scale imaging of the low intensity core-loss La (M4,5@840  eV) signal in LaB6. Scan rates up to 2 orders of magnitude faster than conventional methods were used, enabling a corresponding reduction in radiation dose and increase in the field of view. If coupled with the enhanced depth and lateral resolution of the incoherent confocal configuration, this offers an approach for nanoscale three-dimensional chemical mapping.

  4. Multiferroic phase of doped delafossite CuFeO2 identified using inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Haraldsen, Jason T; Ye, Feng; Fishman, Randy Scott; Fernandez-Baca, Jaime A; Yamaguchi, Y.; Kimura, K.; Kimura, T.

    2010-01-01

    Multiferroic materials allow the electric polarization to be controlled by switching the direction of magnetic ordering and consequently offer prospects for many new technological applications [1 4]. Because multiferroic behavior has been found in materials that exhibit complex (non-collinear and incommensurate) magnetic order, it is essential to know the spin arrangement of the ground states in these materials [4 9]. In many cases, elastic neutron scattering measurements alone are not sufficient to distinguish among several potential complex magnetic states. We report inelastic neutron scattering (INS) measurements that provide a distinct dynamical fingerprint for the multiferroic ground state of 3.5% Ga-doped CuFeO2. The complex ground state is stabilized by the displacement of the oxygen atoms [10], which are also responsible for the multiferroic coupling predicted by Arima [8]. By comparing the observed and calculated spectrum of spin excitations, we conclude that the magnetic ground state is a distorted screwtype spin configuration. The exchange interactions that stabilize this structure are consistent with those obtained from inelastic measurements [11, 12] on undoped CuFeO2.

  5. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials' functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future.

  6. Kinematics of current region fragmentation in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boglione, M.; Collins, J.; Gamberg, L.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J. O.; Rogers, T. C.; Sato, N.

    2017-03-01

    Different kinematical regions of semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering (SIDIS) processes correspond to different underlying partonic pictures, and it is important to understand the transition between them. We find criteria in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic scattering (SIDIS) for identifying the current fragmentation region - the kinematical region where a factorization picture with fragmentation functions is appropriate, especially for studies of transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) functions. This region is distinguished from the central (soft) and target fragmentation regions. The basis of our argument is in the errors in approximations used in deriving factorization. As compared with previous work, we show that it is essential to take account of the transverse momentum of the detected hadron, and we find a much more restricted range for genuine current fragmentation. We show that it is important to develop an extended factorization formulation to treat hadronization in the central region, as well as the current and target fragmentation regions, and to obtain a unified formalism spanning all rapidities for the detected hadron.

  7. Single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering and Drell-Yan processes

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hwang, Dae Sung; Kovchegov, Yuri V.; Schmidt, Ivan; Sievert, Matthew D.

    2013-07-01

    We examine in detail the diagrammatic mechanisms which provide the change of sign between the single transverse spin asymmetries measured in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) and in the Drell-Yan process (DY). This asymmetry is known to arise due to the transverse spin dependence of the target proton combined with a T-odd complex phase. Using the discrete symmetry properties of transverse spinors, we show that the required complex phase originates in the denominators of rescattering diagrams and their respective cuts. For simplicity, we work in a model where the proton consists of a valence quark and a scalar diquark. We then show that the phases generated in SIDIS and in DY originate from distinctly different cuts in the amplitudes, which at first appears to obscure the relationship between the single-spin asymmetries in the two processes. Nevertheless, further analysis demonstrates that the contributions of these cuts are identical in the leading-twist Bjorken kinematics considered, resulting in the standard sign-flip relation between the Sivers functions in SIDIS and DY. Physically, this fundamental, but yet untested, prediction occurs because the Sivers effect in the Drell-Yan reaction is modified by the initial-state “lensing” interactions of the annihilating antiquark, in contrast to the final-state lensing which produces the Sivers effect in deep inelastic scattering.

  8. Ground state potential energy surfaces around selected atoms from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    PubMed Central

    Schreck, Simon; Pietzsch, Annette; Kennedy, Brian; Såthe, Conny; Miedema, Piter S.; Techert, Simone; Strocov, Vladimir N.; Schmitt, Thorsten; Hennies, Franz; Rubensson, Jan-Erik; Föhlisch, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Thermally driven chemistry as well as materials’ functionality are determined by the potential energy surface of a systems electronic ground state. This makes the potential energy surface a central and powerful concept in physics, chemistry and materials science. However, direct experimental access to the potential energy surface locally around atomic centers and to its long-range structure are lacking. Here we demonstrate how sub-natural linewidth resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering at vibrational resolution is utilized to determine ground state potential energy surfaces locally and detect long-range changes of the potentials that are driven by local modifications. We show how the general concept is applicable not only to small isolated molecules such as O2 but also to strongly interacting systems such as the hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The weak perturbation to the potential energy surface through hydrogen bonding is observed as a trend towards softening of the ground state potential around the coordinating atom. The instrumental developments in high resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering are currently accelerating and will enable broad application of the presented approach. With this multidimensional potential energy surfaces that characterize collective phenomena such as (bio)molecular function or high-temperature superconductivity will become accessible in near future. PMID:26821751

  9. Alpha-particles for targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, George

    2008-09-01

    Alpha-particles are helium nuclei that deposit DNA damaging energy along their track that is 100 to 1000 times greater than that of conventionally used beta-particle emitting radionuclides for targeted therapy; the damage caused by alpha-particles is predominately double-stranded DNA breaks severe enough so as to be almost completely irreparable. This means that a small number of tracks through a cell nucleus can sterilize a cell and that, because the damage is largely irreparable, alpha-particle radiation is not susceptible to resistance as seen with external radiotherapy (e.g., in hypoxic tissue). The ability of a single track to influence biological outcome and the stochastic nature of alpha-particle decay require statistical or microdosimetric techniques to properly reflect likely biological outcome when the biologically relevant target is small or when a low number of radionuclide decays have occurred. In therapeutic implementations, microdosimetry is typically not required and the average absorbed dose over a target volume is typically calculated. Animal and cell culture studies have shown that, per unit absorbed dose, the acute biological effects of alpha-particles are 3 to 7 times greater than the damage caused by external beam or beta-particle radiation. Over the past ten to 15 years, alpha-particle emitting radionuclides have been investigated as a possible new class of radionuclides for targeted therapy. Results from the small number of clinical trials reported to date have shown efficacy without significant toxicity.

  10. Inelastic scattering from glyoxal: collision kinematics rather than the interaction potential dominates rotational channel selection.

    PubMed

    Clegg, Samuel M; Parmenter, Charles S

    2006-10-07

    Relative cross sections have been obtained for the rotationally and rovibrationally inelastic scattering of S1 trans-glyoxal (CHO-CHO) in its zero point level with K' = 0 from the target gases H2, D2, and He. Emphasis is placed on using crossed molecular beam conditions that provide several choices of collision kinematics (center-of-mass collision energy, relative velocity, center-of-mass collision momentum) for each collision pair. The cross sections define the state-to-state competition among numerous rotational channels involving destination states with DeltaK' ranging from 1 to >15 for collisions with each target gas and under every kinematic condition. They also resolve a similar rotational competition among rovibrational channels where the torsion nu7' is collisionally excited. The cross section sets also allow the relative overall magnitudes of the two types of scattering to be compared. The primary motivation of these experiments concerns the rotationally inelastic scattering. Earlier studies with rare gases and fixed kinematics demonstrated that the distribution of rotational cross sections is remarkably similar from one collision pair to another. The new data show that the competition among rotational channels actually has a small but distinct dependence on kinematic conditions. Data analysis shows that the dependence is a systematic function of the available collision momentum and entirely unrelated to the identity of the target gases, including the heavier rare gases used in earlier studies. The competition among the rotational energy transfer channels and its kinematic heritage is discussed in the context of a classical hard ellipse model of linear momentum to angular momentum conversion much used with room temperature systems. When adapted to our beam conditions, the resulting account of the rotational scattering is accurate and provides insight into the collisional details.

  11. Integral steric asymmetry in the inelastic scattering of NO(X(2)Π).

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Gordon, S D S; Hackett Boyle, A; Heid, C G; Nichols, B; Walpole, V; Aoiz, F J; Stolte, S

    2017-01-07

    The integral steric asymmetry for the inelastic scattering of NO(X) by a variety of collision partners was recorded using a crossed molecular beam apparatus. The initial state of the NO(X, v = 0, j = 1/2, Ω=1/2, ϵ=-1,f) molecule was selected using a hexapole electric field, before the NO bond axis was oriented in a static electric field, allowing probing of the scattering of the collision partner at either the N- or O-end of the molecule. Scattered NO molecules were state selectively probed using (1 + 1') resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionisation, coupled with velocity-map ion imaging. Experimental integral steric asymmetries are presented for NO(X) + Ar, for both spin-orbit manifolds, and Kr, for the spin-orbit conserving manifold. The integral steric asymmetry for spin-orbit conserving and changing transitions of the NO(X) + O2 system is also presented. Close-coupled quantum mechanical scattering calculations employing well-tested ab initio potential energy surfaces were able to reproduce the steric asymmetry observed for the NO-rare gas systems. Quantum mechanical scattering and quasi-classical trajectory calculations were further used to help interpret the integral steric asymmetry for NO + O2. Whilst the main features of the integral steric asymmetry of NO with the rare gases are also observed for the O2 collision partner, some subtle differences provide insight into the form of the underlying potentials for the more complex system.

  12. Res-Parity: Parity Violation in Inelastic scattering at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Paul; Bosted, Peter; Arrington, John; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2006-05-16

    Parity violating electron scattering has become a well established tool which has been used, for example, to probe the Standard Model and the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon. While much of this work has focused on elastic scattering, the RES-Parity experiment, which has been proposed to take place at Jefferson Laboratory, would focus on inelastic scattering in the low-Q2, low-W domain. RES-Parity would search for evidence of quark-hadron duality and resonance structure with parity violation in the resonance region. In terms of parity violation, this region is essentially unexplored, but the interpretation of other high-precision electron scattering experiments will rely on a reasonable understanding of scattering at lower energy and low-W through the effects of radiative corrections. RES-Parity would also study nuclear effects with the weak current. Because of the intrinsic broad band energy spectrum of neutrino beams, neutrino experiments are necessarily dependent on an untested, implicit assumption that these effects are identical to electromagnetic nuclear effects. RES-Parity is a relatively straight forward experiment. With a large expected asymmetry (~ 0.5 × 10-4) these studies may be completed with in a relatively brief period.

  13. Study of Electronic Structures and Dynamics at High Pressures by Inelastic X-ray Scattering Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, H.; Eng, P.; Trainor, T.; Newville, M.; Shen, G.; Kao, C.; Schwoerer-Bohning, M.; Macrander, A.; Meng, Y.; Hu, M.; Hemley, R. J.

    2002-05-01

    Due to experimental limitations, electronic structures and dynamics have seldom been probed at high pressure. High-pressure apparati are opaque to photons between 5 eV and 4 keV where most electronic transitions occur, and incompatible with electron spectroscopy which requires high vacuum. Inelastic x-ray scattering provides new access in this area. We conducted reconnaissance experiments using the monochromatic x-ray at the undulator beamline 13-ID of the Advanced Photon Source to irradiate the sample in a Be gasket in a diamond anvil cell. With the new beamline mirrors at GSECARS capable of focusing the entire undulator beam to a spot of 16 mm (vertical) x 60 mm (horizontal), sufficient photons are delivered to the small sample area at high pressures for probing the extremely weak signals of inelastic electronic scattering. The scattered radiation is collected by a spherically bent Si [555] crystal analyzer (10 cm diameter collection area) on 1-m radius, diffracted back at 87.0o, and focused to the detector slit, constraining the photon energy to 9899.2 eV. We studied the high-pressure behavior of the plasmon of elemental Na, an archetypal free-electron system, and observed the increase of Na plasmon energy with increasing compression, the dispersion of plasmon from 6 to 10 eV in the momentum (Q) range of 0.3 - 1.2 {Å}-1, and the spreading of the plasmon above QC. Over a wider range, we observed the inelastic K-edge scattering of Be (111 eV), B (188 eV), C (284 eV), N (410 eV), and O (543 eV) at high pressures. In an experiment starting with graphitic h-BN, the near edge peaks corresponding to the p* and s* bonding of B and N are observed at low pressures. At increasing pressures, the p* of both B and N become aligned with the diamond axis, indicating the development of preferred orientation with the soft c-axis aligned to the compression. Above 12 GPa, the s* grows at the expense of diminishing p*, indicating a transition to a superhard material. In conclusion

  14. First Search for the EMC Effect and Nuclear Shadowing in Neutrino Nucleus Deep Inelastic Scattering at MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, Joel A.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of research in electron-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS) have provided a clear picture of nuclear physics at high momentum transfer. While these effects have been clearly demonstrated by experiment, the theoretical explanation of their origin in some kinematic regions has been lacking. Particularly, the effects in the intermediate regions of Bjorken-x, anti-shadowing and the EMC effect have no universally accepted quantum mechanical explanation. In addition, these effects have not been measured systematically with neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering, due to experiments lacking multiple heavy targets.

  15. Electron-phonon relaxation in weakly disordered AuPd wires due to inelastic scattering from defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Juhn-Jong; Zhong, Yuan-Liang; Chen, Chii-Dong; Sergeev, Andrei

    2010-03-01

    To identify and investigate mechanisms of the electron-phonon relaxation in weakly disordered metallic conductors, we study the relaxation in a series of suspended and supported 15-nm thick AuPd wires. In a wide temperature range, from 8 K up to above 20 K, the measured relaxation rate reveals quadratic temperature dependence. Our observations are shown to be in agreement with the theory, which predicts that inelastic electron scattering from vibrating impurities and defects strongly dominates over ordinary electron-phonon interaction even in weakly disordered metallic conductors. Due to inelastic electron-boundary scattering this mechanism plays a leading role in the electron relaxation in nanosctructures with metallic components.

  16. Alpha-particle fluence in radiobiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Nikezic, Dragoslav; Yu, Kwan Ngok

    2016-11-03

    Two methods were proposed for determining alpha-particle fluence for radiobiological experiments. The first involved calculating the probabilities of hitting the target for alpha particles emitted from a source through Monte Carlo simulations, which when multiplied by the activity of the source gave the fluence at the target. The second relied on the number of chemically etched alpha-particle tracks developed on a solid-state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) that was irradiated by an alpha-particle source. The etching efficiencies (defined as percentages of latent tracks created by alpha particles from the source that could develop to become visible tracks upon chemical etching) were computed through Monte Carlo simulations, which when multiplied by the experimentally counted number of visible tracks would also give the fluence at the target. We studied alpha particles with an energy of 5.486 MeV emitted from an (241)Am source, and considered the alpha-particle tracks developed on polyallyldiglycol carbonate film, which is a common SSNTD. Our results showed that the etching efficiencies were equal to one for source-film distances of from 0.6 to 3.5 cm for a circular film of radius of 1 cm, and for source-film distances of from 1 to 3 cm for circular film of radius of 2 cm. For circular film with a radius of 3 cm, the etching efficiencies never reached 1. On the other hand, the hit probability decreased monotonically with increase in the source-target distance, and fell to zero when the source-target distance was larger than the particle range in air.

  17. Density functional simulation of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering experiments in liquids: acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Niskanen, Johannes; Kooser, Kuno; Koskelo, Jaakko; Käämbre, Tanel; Kunnus, Kristjan; Pietzsch, Annette; Quevedo, Wilson; Hakala, Mikko; Föhlisch, Alexander; Huotari, Simo; Kukk, Edwin

    2016-09-21

    In this paper we report an experimental and computational study of liquid acetonitrile (H3C-C[triple bond, length as m-dash]N) by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the N K-edge. The experimental spectra exhibit clear signatures of the electronic structure of the valence states at the N site and incident-beam-polarization dependence is observed as well. Moreover, we find fine structure in the quasielastic line that is assigned to finite scattering duration and nuclear relaxation. We present a simple and light-to-evaluate model for the RIXS maps and analyze the experimental data using this model combined with ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. In addition to polarization-dependence and scattering-duration effects, we pinpoint the effects of different types of chemical bonding to the RIXS spectrum and conclude that the H2C-C[double bond, length as m-dash]NH isomer, suggested in the literature, does not exist in detectable quantities. We study solution effects on the scattering spectra with simulations in liquid and in vacuum. The presented model for RIXS proved to be light enough to allow phase-space-sampling and still accurate enough for identification of transition lines in physical chemistry research by RIXS.

  18. Rotationally inelastic scattering of methyl radicals with Ar and N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Tkáč, Ondřej; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J.; Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Stei, Martin

    2015-01-07

    The rotationally inelastic scattering of methyl radical with Ar and N{sub 2} is examined at collision energies of 330 ± 25 cm{sup −1} and 425 ± 50 cm{sup −1}, respectively. Differential cross sections (DCSs) were measured for different final n′ rotational levels (up to n′ = 5) of the methyl radicals, averaged over k′ sub-levels, using a crossed molecular beam machine with velocity map imaging. For Ar as a collision partner, we present a newly constructed ab initio potential energy surface and quantum mechanical scattering calculations of state-resolved DCSs. These computed DCSs agree well with the measurements. The DCSs for both Ar and N{sub 2} collision partners are strongly forward peaked for all spectroscopic lines measured. For scattering angles below 60°, the theoretical CD{sub 3}–Ar DCSs show diffraction oscillations that become less pronounced as n′ increases, but these oscillations are not resolved experimentally. Comparisons are drawn with our recently reported DCSs for scattering of methyl radicals with He atoms.

  19. Elastic and inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for fission reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, S. F.; Chakraborty, A.; Combs, B.; Crider, B. P.; Downes, L.; Girgis, J.; Kersting, L. J.; Kumar, A.; Lueck, C. J.; McDonough, P. J.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Peters, E. E.; Prados-Estevz, F. M.; Schniederjan, J.; Sidwell, L.; Sigillito, A. J.; Vanhoy, J. R.; Watts, D.; Yates, S. W.

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear data important for the design and development of the next generation of light-water reactors and future fast reactors include neutron elastic and inelastic scattering cross sections on important structural materials, such as Fe, and on coolant materials, such as Na. These reaction probabilities are needed since neutron reactions impact fuel performance during irradiations and the overall efficiency of reactors. While neutron scattering cross sections from these materials are available for certain incident neutron energies, the fast neutron region, particularly above 2 MeV, has large gaps for which no measurements exist, or the existing uncertainties are large. Measurements have been made at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory to measure neutron scattering cross sections on both Fe and Na in the region where these gaps occur and to reduce the uncertainties on scattering from the ground state and first excited state of these nuclei. Results from measurements on Fe at incident neutron energies between 2 and 4 MeV will be presented and comparisons will be made to model calculations available from data evaluators.

  20. Inelastic scattering measurements of low energy x-ray photons by organics, soil, water, wood, and metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paki Amouzou, P.; Gertsenshteyn, M.; Jannson, T.; Shnitser, P.; Savant, G.

    2006-08-01

    The angular distribution of the inelastic scattering of photons at low energies (<=80 KeV) has been measured in organic material, soil, rocks, wood, steel sheet, and water. The measurements have been performed under air inside an X-ray shield cabinet using X-rays tube as a photon source and a thermoelectrically cooled CdTe detector. Measurements have been taken for both single and combined materials. The contributions of inelastic scattering of photons for the lower Z material in a given configuration have been extracted. The measured signal is primarily Compton scattering. The measured inelastic scattering contributions were compared with the calculated inelastic scattering cross sections according to the Klein-Nishina theory, updated to include a practical energy distribution of an X-ray tube beam. Relatively good agreement was found for all targets under investigation. The slight discrepancy is attributed to photoelectric effect and sample configuration. Present results may act as a guide for optimization of X-ray imaging sensors and in particular of those based on lobster eye X-ray optics suitable for cargo inspection, improvised explosives detection, non-destructive evaluation, and medical imaging.

  1. Are quantum spin Hall edge modes more resilient to disorder, sample geometry and inelastic scattering than quantum Hall edge modes?

    PubMed

    Mani, Arjun; Benjamin, Colin

    2016-04-13

    On the surface of 2D topological insulators, 1D quantum spin Hall (QSH) edge modes occur with Dirac-like dispersion. Unlike quantum Hall (QH) edge modes, which occur at high magnetic fields in 2D electron gases, the occurrence of QSH edge modes is due to spin-orbit scattering in the bulk of the material. These QSH edge modes are spin-dependent, and chiral-opposite spins move in opposing directions. Electronic spin has a larger decoherence and relaxation time than charge. In view of this, it is expected that QSH edge modes will be more robust to disorder and inelastic scattering than QH edge modes, which are charge-dependent and spin-unpolarized. However, we notice no such advantage accrues in QSH edge modes when subjected to the same degree of contact disorder and/or inelastic scattering in similar setups as QH edge modes. In fact we observe that QSH edge modes are more susceptible to inelastic scattering and contact disorder than QH edge modes. Furthermore, while a single disordered contact has no effect on QH edge modes, it leads to a finite charge Hall current in the case of QSH edge modes, and thus a vanishing of the pure QSH effect. For more than a single disordered contact while QH states continue to remain immune to disorder, QSH edge modes become more susceptible--the Hall resistance for the QSH effect changes sign with increasing disorder. In the case of many disordered contacts with inelastic scattering included, while quantization of Hall edge modes holds, for QSH edge modes a finite charge Hall current still flows. For QSH edge modes in the inelastic scattering regime we distinguish between two cases: with spin-flip and without spin-flip scattering. Finally, while asymmetry in sample geometry can have a deleterious effect in the QSH case, it has no impact in the QH case.

  2. Are quantum spin Hall edge modes more resilient to disorder, sample geometry and inelastic scattering than quantum Hall edge modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Arjun; Benjamin, Colin

    2016-04-01

    On the surface of 2D topological insulators, 1D quantum spin Hall (QSH) edge modes occur with Dirac-like dispersion. Unlike quantum Hall (QH) edge modes, which occur at high magnetic fields in 2D electron gases, the occurrence of QSH edge modes is due to spin-orbit scattering in the bulk of the material. These QSH edge modes are spin-dependent, and chiral-opposite spins move in opposing directions. Electronic spin has a larger decoherence and relaxation time than charge. In view of this, it is expected that QSH edge modes will be more robust to disorder and inelastic scattering than QH edge modes, which are charge-dependent and spin-unpolarized. However, we notice no such advantage accrues in QSH edge modes when subjected to the same degree of contact disorder and/or inelastic scattering in similar setups as QH edge modes. In fact we observe that QSH edge modes are more susceptible to inelastic scattering and contact disorder than QH edge modes. Furthermore, while a single disordered contact has no effect on QH edge modes, it leads to a finite charge Hall current in the case of QSH edge modes, and thus a vanishing of the pure QSH effect. For more than a single disordered contact while QH states continue to remain immune to disorder, QSH edge modes become more susceptible—the Hall resistance for the QSH effect changes sign with increasing disorder. In the case of many disordered contacts with inelastic scattering included, while quantization of Hall edge modes holds, for QSH edge modes a finite charge Hall current still flows. For QSH edge modes in the inelastic scattering regime we distinguish between two cases: with spin-flip and without spin-flip scattering. Finally, while asymmetry in sample geometry can have a deleterious effect in the QSH case, it has no impact in the QH case.

  3. FIRE HOSE INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY

    SciTech Connect

    Matteini, L.; Schwartz, S. J.; Hellinger, P.; Landi, S.

    2015-10-10

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma, including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, can also be triggered when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies, both of them can drive the instability, and we observe the generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in the direction of the drift associated with the unstable species. The generated waves scatter particles and reduce their temperature anisotropy to a marginally stable state, and, moreover, they significantly reduce the relative drift between the two ion populations. The coexistence of modes excited by both species leads to saturation of the plasma in distinct regions of the beta/anisotropy parameter space for protons and alpha particles, in good agreement with in situ solar wind observations. Our results confirm that fire hose instabilities are likely at work in the solar wind and limit the anisotropy of different ion species in the plasma.

  4. Alpha-particle sensitive test SRAMs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, M. G.; Blaes, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    A bench-level test is being developed to evaluate memory-cell upsets in a test SRAM designed with a cell offset voltage. This offset voltage controls the critical charge needed to upset the cell. The effect is demonstrated using a specially designed 2-micron n-well CMOS 4-kb test SRAM and a Po-208 5.1-MeV 0.61-LET alpha-particle source. This test SRAM has been made sensitive to alpha particles through the use of a cell offset voltage, and this has allowed a bench-level characterization in a laboratory setting. The experimental data are linked to a alpha-particle interaction physics and to SPICE circuit simulations through the alpha-particle collection depth. The collection depth is determined by two methods and found to be about 7 micron. In addition, alpha particles that struck outside the bloated drain were able to flip the SRAM cells. This lateral charge collection was observed to be more than 6 micron.

  5. Lattice dynamics and molecular rotations in solid hydrogen deuteride: Inelastic neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colognesi, D.; Formisano, F.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Ulivi, L.

    2009-04-01

    In the present paper we report inelastic neutron scattering measurements on solid low-pressure hydrogen deuteride at three different temperatures (between 4.5 and 15.6 K) using the time-of-flight spectrometers BRISP at ILL (France) and TOSCA-II at ISIS, RAL (UK). The measured double-differential cross sections give access to the proton component of the HD self-inelastic structure factor. Processed BRISP data were employed to verify the applicability of the generalized Young and Koppel model to solid HD in our kinematic range and to obtain the mean-square displacement of the molecular centers of mass. In addition, a large broadening of the first two rotational peaks was observed. A reasonable result for the density of phonon states from TOSCA-II data has been obtained, although a rigorous extraction was not possible, due to the overlap among the various spectral components. The intensity loss in the extracted density of phonon states was interpreted as the effect the phonon-roton resonance in solid hydrogen deuteride. Finally the two Bose-corrected moments of the HD phonon spectrum, related to the molecular mean-square displacement and mean kinetic energy, were simulated through a path integral Monte Carlo code. The former quantity was compared to the mentioned experimental estimates.

  6. 121Sb and 125Te nuclear inelastic scattering in Sb2Te3 under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, R. E.; Sergueev, I.; Kantor, I.; Kantor, A.; Perßon, J.; Hermann, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the lattice dynamics of Sb2Te3 under high pressure using 121Sb and 125Te nuclear inelastic scattering of synchrotron radiation. We measured the room temperature 121Sb and 125Te inelastic spectra at 15(1) GPa and 77(3) GPa and extracted the Te and Sb element specific density of phonon states of δ-Sb2Te3 at 77(3) GPa. X-ray diffraction confirms the sample to be in the cubic δ-Sb2Te3 phase with space group Im\\bar{3}m and lattice constant a=3.268(4) \\overset{\\circ}{A} . The total density of phonon states of δ-Sb2Te3 strongly resembles the one of amorphous GeSb2Te4, suggesting the presence of covalent bonding in contrast to the resonance bonding in α-Sb2Te3. From the density of phonon states of δ-Sb2Te3 a mean speed of sound of 2.61(6) km {{s}-1} and Debye temperatures of 278(10) K for Te and 296(10) K for Sb were determined.

  7. Polarized Electron - Polarized Deuteron Deep-Inelastic Scattering in Electron-Ion Collider with Tagging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsian, Misak; Cosyn, Wim; Weiss, Christian

    2015-10-01

    For the past several years there have been an intensive research and development for the possible electron-ion collider that will be able to probe deep inelastic processes at unprecedentedly high energies in eA channel. One of the important advantages of the collider kinematics in DIS processes is the possibility for an unambiguous separation of hadrons emerging from DIS and hadrons fragmenting from the target nucleus. This creates a unique possibility for tagging the interacting nucleon with the recoil slow fragments in the DIS process. The situation is most clean for the deuteron target in which case the recoil particle is a nucleon. In addition, the possibility of having polarized deuteron beams will create unprecedented opportunities in probing polarization degrees of freedom for parton distributions in the interacting bound nucleon. In this work we develop a theoretical framework for the polarized electron-polarized deuteron deep inelastic scattering in which the recoil nucleon is detected in the target fragmentation region. Two main contributions for which theoretical models are developed are the plane-wave impulse approximation, in which no reinteractions are taking place between the final state products of DIS and the recoil nucleon.

  8. Observation of Localized Vibrational Modes of Graphene Nanodomes by Inelastic Atom Scattering.

    PubMed

    Maccariello, D; Al Taleb, A; Calleja, F; Vázquez de Parga, A L; Perna, P; Camarero, J; Gnecco, E; Farías, D; Miranda, R

    2016-01-13

    Inelastic helium atom scattering (HAS) is suitable to determine low-energy (few meV) vibrations spatially localized on structures in the nanometer range. This is illustrated for the nanodomes that appear often on graphene (Gr) epitaxially grown on single crystal metal surfaces. The nature of the inelastic losses observed in Gr/Ru(0001) and Gr/Cu/Ru(0001) has been clarified by intercalation of Cu below the Gr monolayer, which decouples the Gr layer from the Ru substrate and changes substantially the out-of-plane, flexural phonon dispersion of epitaxial Gr, while maintaining the nanodomes and their localized vibrations. He diffraction proves that the Cu-intercalated Gr layer is well ordered structurally, while scanning tunneling microscopy reveals the persistence of the (slightly modified) periodic array of Gr nanodomes. A simple model explains the order of magnitude of the energy losses associated with the Gr nanodomes and their size dependence. The dispersionless, low-energy phonon branches may radically alter the transport of heat in intercalated Gr.

  9. The simultaneous measurement of energy and linear polarization of the scattered radiation in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Braicovich, L. Minola, M.; Dellea, G.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Le Tacon, M.; Moretti Sala, M.; Morawe, C.; Peffen, J.-Ch.; Yakhou, F.; Brookes, N. B.; Supruangnet, R.

    2014-11-15

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) in the soft x-ray range is an element-specific energy-loss spectroscopy used to probe the electronic and magnetic excitations in strongly correlated solids. In the recent years, RIXS has been progressing very quickly in terms of energy resolution and understanding of the experimental results, but the interpretation of spectra could further improve, sometimes decisively, from a full knowledge of the polarization of incident and scattered photons. Here we present the first implementation, in a high resolution soft-RIXS spectrometer used to analyze the scattered radiation, of a device allowing the measurement of the degree of linear polarization. The system, based on a graded W/B{sub 4}C multilayer mirror installed in proximity of the CCD detector, has been installed on the AXES spectrometer at the ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility); it has been fully characterized and it has been used for a demonstration experiment at the Cu L{sub 3} edge on a high-T{sub c} superconducting cuprate. The loss in efficiency suffered by the spectrometer equipped with this test facility was a factor 17.5. We propose also a more advanced version, suitable for a routine use on the next generation of RIXS spectrometers and with an overall efficiency up to 10%.

  10. Acoustic phonons in chrysotile asbestos probed by high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; Vakhrushev, S. B.; Kumzerov, Yu. A,; Alatas, A.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic phonons in an individual, oriented fiber of chrysotile asbestos (chemical formula Mg{sub 3}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH){sub 4}) were observed at room temperature in the inelastic x-ray measurement with a very high (meV) resolution. The x-ray scattering vector was aligned along [1 0 0] direction of the reciprocal lattice, nearly parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The latter coincides with [1 0 0] direction of the direct lattice and the axes of the nano-channels. The data were analyzed using a damped harmonic oscillator model. Analysis of the phonon dispersion in the first Brillouin zone yielded the longitudinal sound velocity of (9200 {+-} 600) m/s.

  11. Measurement of collective excitations in VO2 by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    He, Haowei; Gray, A. X.; Granitzka, P.; ...

    2016-10-15

    Vanadium dioxide is of broad interest as a spin-1/2 electron system that realizes a metal-insulator transition near room temperature, due to a combination of strongly correlated and itinerant electron physics. Here, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering is used to measure the excitation spectrum of charge and spin degrees of freedom at the vanadium L edge under different polarization and temperature conditions, revealing excitations that differ greatly from those seen in optical measurements. Furthermore, these spectra encode the evolution of short-range energetics across the metal-insulator transition, including the low-temperature appearance of a strong candidate for the singlet-triplet excitation of a vanadium dimer.

  12. Some notes on data analysis for nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Michael Y.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (NRIXS) is a spectroscopy method to study atomic vibrations and dynamics, currently done with synchrotron radiation at a few high energy third generation facilities. It finds a wide range of applications in condensed matter physics, materials science, chemistry, biophysics, geosciences, and high-pressure researches. Many atomic dynamics and lattice thermodynamics information can be derived from NRIXS measurements. Phonon Density of States (DOS) characterizes lattice dynamics of a material and can be derived under the quasi-harmonic approximation. Combined with modeling and simulations, results from NRIXS can provide unique and clarifying insights into many fields of research. As for a spectroscopic technique, in order to be able to provide reliable information, close attention should be paid to many issues during experiments and data analysis afterwards. Here we discuss several issues relevant to its data analysis, namely, those of multiple sites, background treatments, and error estimates for some derived quantities.

  13. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dynamics in URu2Si2

    DOE PAGES

    Gardner, D. R.; Bonnoit, C. J.; Chisnell, R.; ...

    2016-02-11

    In this paper, we study high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the acoustic phonons of URu2Si2. At all temperatures, the longitudinal acoustic phonon linewidths are anomalously broad at small wave vectors revealing a previously unknown anharmonicity. The phonon modes do not change significantly upon cooling into the hidden order phase. In addition, our data suggest that the increase in thermal conductivity in the hidden order phase cannot be driven by a change in phonon dispersions or lifetimes. Hence, the phonon contribution to the thermal conductivity is likely much less significant compared to that of the magnetic excitations in the lowmore » temperature phase.« less

  14. Portraying entanglement between molecular qubits with four-dimensional inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garlatti, E.; Guidi, T.; Ansbro, S.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.; Ollivier, J.; Mutka, H.; Timco, G.; Vitorica-Yrezabal, I. J.; Whitehead, G. F. S.; Winpenny, R. E. P.; Carretta, S.

    2017-02-01

    Entanglement is a crucial resource for quantum information processing and its detection and quantification is of paramount importance in many areas of current research. Weakly coupled molecular nanomagnets provide an ideal test bed for investigating entanglement between complex spin systems. However, entanglement in these systems has only been experimentally demonstrated rather indirectly by macroscopic techniques or by fitting trial model Hamiltonians to experimental data. Here we show that four-dimensional inelastic neutron scattering enables us to portray entanglement in weakly coupled molecular qubits and to quantify it. We exploit a prototype (Cr7Ni)2 supramolecular dimer as a benchmark to demonstrate the potential of this approach, which allows one to extract the concurrence in eigenstates of a dimer of molecular qubits without diagonalizing its full Hamiltonian.

  15. Single and Double Spin Asymmetries for Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering on Proton and Deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koirala, Suman; Kuhn, Sebastian

    2013-04-01

    Transverse momentum dependent (TMD) parton distribution functions encode information on the transverse motion of quarks and gluons inside the nucleon, and may help us understand their orbital angular momentum. The TMDs can be accessed from the target and double spin asymmetries of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SIDIS) reactions, where the asymmetries, AUL and ALL are convolutions of the fragmentation functions and the TMDs. The EG1-DVCS experiment with CLAS at Jefferson Lab measured semi-inclusive pion production on longitudinally polarized proton and deuteron targets with polarized electrons of 6 GeV. We will show preliminary results on target single spin asymmetries and target-beam double spin asymmetries for these reactions.

  16. The exclusive production of Rho mesons in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulmahn, Jeffrey W.

    1997-11-01

    The exclusive production of ρ0 mesons in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) was studied using data obtained with the ZEUS detector from the 1994 HERA run. The cross section for this process has been determined in the range 3 < Q2 < 30 [ GeV2] and 42 < W < 141 [ GeV], subject to the restrictions pT2 < 0.6 [ GeV2] and 0.4 < M/piπ/

  17. Persistent spin excitations in doped antiferromagnets revealed by resonant inelastic light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, C. J.; Nowadnick, E. A.; Wohlfeld, K.; Kung, Y. F.; Chen, C.-C.; Johnston, S.; Tohyama, T.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2014-02-01

    How coherent quasiparticles emerge by doping quantum antiferromagnets is a key question in correlated electron systems, whose resolution is needed to elucidate the phase diagram of copper oxides. Recent resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) experiments in hole-doped cuprates have purported to measure high-energy collective spin excitations that persist well into the overdoped regime and bear a striking resemblance to those found in the parent compound, challenging the perception that spin excitations should weaken with doping and have a diminishing effect on superconductivity. Here we show that RIXS at the Cu L3-edge indeed provides access to the spin dynamical structure factor once one considers the full influence of light polarization. Further we demonstrate that high-energy spin excitations do not correlate with the doping dependence of Tc, while low-energy excitations depend sensitively on doping and show ferromagnetic correlations. This suggests that high-energy spin excitations are marginal to pairing in cuprate superconductors.

  18. Boron arsenide phonon dispersion from inelastic x-ray scattering: Potential for ultrahigh thermal conductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hao; Li, Chen; Tang, Shixiong; Yan, Jiaqiang; Alatas, Ahmet; Lindsay, Lucas; Sales, Brian C.; Tian, Zhiting

    2016-12-01

    Cubic boron arsenide (BAs) was predicted to have an exceptionally high thermal conductivity (k ) ˜2000 W m-1K-1 at room temperature, comparable to that of diamond, based on first-principles calculations. Subsequent experimental measurements, however, only obtained a k of ˜200 W m-1K-1 . To gain insight into this discrepancy, we measured phonon dispersion of single-crystal BAs along high symmetry directions using inelastic x-ray scattering and compared these with first-principles calculations. Based on the measured phonon dispersion, we have validated the theoretical prediction of a large frequency gap between acoustic and optical modes and bunching of acoustic branches, which were considered the main reasons for the predicted ultrahigh k . This supports its potential to be a super thermal conductor if very-high-quality single-crystal samples can be synthesized.

  19. Boron arsenide phonon dispersion from inelastic x-ray scattering: Potential for ultrahigh thermal conductivity

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Hao; Li, Chen; Tang, Shixiong; ...

    2016-12-14

    Cubic boron arsenide (BAs) was predicted to have an exceptionally high thermal conductivity (k) ~2000 Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, comparable to that of diamond, based on first-principles calculations. Subsequent experimental measurements, however, only obtained a k of ~200 Wm-1K-1. To gain insight into this discrepancy, we measured phonon dispersion of single crystal BAs along high symmetry directions using inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) and compared these with first-principles calculations. Based on the measured phonon dispersion, we have validated the theoretical prediction of a large frequency gap between acoustic and optical modes and bunching of acoustic branches, which were considered the mainmore » reasons for the predicted ultrahigh k. This supports its potential to be a super thermal conductor if very high-quality single crystal samples can be synthesized.« less

  20. Effects of Inelastic Neutrino-Nucleus Scattering on Supernova Dynamics and Radiated Neutrino Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Langanke, K.; Martinez-Pinedo, G.; Mueller, B.; Janka, H.-Th.; Marek, A.; Hix, W. R.; Juodagalvis, A.; Sampaio, J. M.

    2008-01-11

    Based on the shell model for Gamow-Teller and the random phase approximation for forbidden transitions, we calculate cross sections for inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (INNS) under supernova (SN) conditions, assuming a matter composition given by nuclear statistical equilibrium. The cross sections are incorporated into state-of-the-art stellar core-collapse simulations with detailed energy-dependent neutrino transport. While no significant effect on the SN dynamics is observed, INNS increases the neutrino opacities noticeably and strongly reduces the high-energy tail of the neutrino spectrum emitted in the neutrino burst at shock breakout. Relatedly the expected event rates for the observation of such neutrinos by earthbound detectors are reduced by up to about 60%.

  1. Nitric oxide heme interactions in nitrophorin 7 investigated by nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auerbach, H.; Faus, I.; Rackwitz, S.; Wolny, J. A.; Walker, F. A.; Chumakov, A. I.; Ogata, H.; Knipp, M.; Schünemann, V.

    2014-04-01

    Nitrophorins (NPs) occur in the blood-sucking insect Rhodnius prolixus. These proteins use ferric heme to store nitric oxide (NO) in the salivary glands of the insects and transport it to the victim's tissues, resulting in vasodilation and reduced blood coagulation. In this work we present a nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) study in order to characterize the iron-NO interaction in the isoform nitrophorin 7 (NP7). The NIS data obtained for NP7 complexed with NO show a strong band at ˜589 cm-1 which is due to modes with significant Fe-NO stretching and bending character. Another conspicuous feature is a significant peak at ˜280 cm-1 in the region where the heme modes occur. Based on a hybrid calculation method, which uses density functional theory and molecular mechanics, the band at ˜280 cm-1 is assigned to heme modes with substantial doming character.

  2. Inelastic neutron scattering study of spin-wave from single crystal BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guangyong; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Stone, Matthew; Gu, Genda; Shapiro, Stephen; Birgeneau, R. J.; Stock, Chris; Gehring, Peter

    2012-02-01

    BiFeO3 is one of the most promising multiferroic materials for device applications in spintronics and memory devices. There have been a number of studies on electric field tuning of antiferromagnetic domains, as well as possible E-field control of spin-waves in this material. The potential of controlling spin dynamics using electric field is extremely appealing. However, so far there have been very limited work on the direct measurements of spin-waves in BiFeO3, mostly due to lack of large size single crystals. We will present our recent inelastic neutron scattering studies on a single crystal BiFeO3, showing the full spin-wave spectrum in three-dimensions. A classical spin-wave model can be used to describe the results in details. The coupling parameters and spin-wave velocities have been obtained, and are in good agreements with those obtained in Raman measurements.

  3. Relativistic convergent close-coupling calculation of inelastic scattering of electrons from cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostock, Christopher J.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2014-03-01

    We present fully relativistic convergent close-coupling calculations of differential cross sections, spin-asymmetries, and Stokes parameters for inelastic electron-cesium scattering at intermediate energies. Comparison is made with the differential cross section and spin asymmetry measurements of Baum et al. [Phys. Rev. A 70, 012707 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevA.70.012707] and the Stokes parameter measurements of Slaughter et al. [Phys. Rev. A 75, 062717 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.062717]. Comparison is also made with previous semirelativistic and nonrelativistic theories. With a relatively high atomic number for cesium (Z =55) we find surprisingly excellent agreement between the relativistic, semirelativistic, and nonrelativistic theories for most observables. The overall agreement with the measurements is very good, with isolated discrepancies for some observables.

  4. Towards semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering at next-to-next-to-leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderle, Daniele; de Florian, Daniel; Rotstein Habarnau, Yamila

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we compute the first set of O (αs2) corrections to semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering structure functions. We start by studying the impact of the contribution of the partonic subprocesses that open at this order for the longitudinal structure function. We perform the full calculation analytically, and obtain the expression of the factorized cross section at this order. Special care is given to the study of their flavor decomposition structure. We analyze the phenomenological effect of the corrections finding that, even though expected to be small a priori, it turns out to be sizable with respect to the previous order known, calling for a full next-to-next-to-leading order calculation.

  5. Transverse momentum broadening in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Zhong-Bo; Wang, Enke; Wang, Xin-Nian; Xing, Hongxi

    2016-12-01

    Within the framework of higher-twist collinear factorization, transverse momentum broadening for the final hadrons in semi-inclusive deeply inelastic e +A collisions is studied at the next-to-leading order (NLO) in perturbative QCD. Through explicit calculations of real and virtual corrections at twist 4, the transverse-momentum-weighted differential cross section due to double scattering is shown to factorize at NLO and can be expressed as a convolution of twist-4 nuclear parton correlation functions, the usual twist-2 fragmentation functions and hard parts which are finite and free of any divergences. A QCD evolution equation is also derived for the renormalized twist-4 quark-gluon correlation function which can be applied to future phenomenological studies of transverse momentum broadening and jet quenching at NLO.

  6. Jet production in deep-inelastic muon scattering at 490 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Melanson, H.L.; E665 Collaboration

    1993-06-01

    Measurements of jet rates in deep-inelastic muon scattering are presented. The JADE algorithm is used to define jets in the kinematic region 9 < W < 33 GeV. Data taken on a proton target are analyzed within the QCD framework, with the goal of extracting {alpha}{sub s}. Results on the Q{sup 2} dependence of the average transverse momentum of jets are used to demonstrate the running of the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. In addition, first measurements of the production of jets from heavy nuclei in the region x{sub B{sub j}} > 0.001 are discussed. Initial results indicate a suppression in the rate of two forward jets in carbon, calcium and lead as compared to deuterium. All results presented are preliminary.

  7. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y[sub cut], in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W [approx equal] 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x [approx equal] 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of [alpha][sub s], are studied.

  8. Multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muon-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.W.; E665 Collaboration

    1992-10-01

    Measurements of forward multi-jet production rates in deep-inelastic muonproton scattering are presented. Data were taken with a 490 GeV muon beam incident on a hydrogen target. Jets were defined using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The measured rates are presented as function of W, the hadronic center-of-mass energy and the jet resolution parameter, y{sub cut}, in energies up to W=33 GeV. Good agreement is found in comparisons with predictions of the QCD-inspired Lund Monte Carlo models. Non-perturbative QCD production mechanisms, inside the Lund Model, can not reproduce the results for energies greater than W {approx_equal} 20 GeV. Sensitivities of the jet rate measurements to the low x (x {approx_equal} 0.02) gluon content of the nucleon and the evolution of {alpha}{sub s}, are studied.

  9. Measurement of azimuthal hadron asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering off unpolarised nucleons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bicker, K.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Filin, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Guskov, A.; Guthörl, T.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Höppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Joerg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuß, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kral, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nunes, A. S.; Orlov, I.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesek, M.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Reicherz, G.; Rocco, E.; Rodionov, V.; Rondio, E.; Rychter, A.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schlüter, T.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szableski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wiślicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.

    2014-09-01

    Spin-averaged asymmetries in the azimuthal distributions of positive and negative hadrons produced in deep inelastic scattering were measured using the CERN SPS longitudinally polarised muon beam at 160 GeV/c and a 6LiD target. The amplitudes of the three azimuthal modulations cos⁡ϕh, cos⁡2ϕh and sin⁡ϕh were obtained binning the data separately in each of the relevant kinematic variables x, z or pTh and binning in a three-dimensional grid of these three variables. The amplitudes of the cos⁡ϕh and cos⁡2ϕh modulations show strong kinematic dependencies both for positive and negative hadrons.

  10. Neutron Inelastic Scattering Measurements for Na, Ge, Zr, Mo and U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacquias, A.; Dessagne, Ph.; Kerveno, M.; Rudolf, G.; Plompen, A. J. M.; Drohé, J. C.; Rouki, C.; Nankov, N.; Nyman, M.; Borcea, C.; Negret, A.; Archier, P.; De Saint Jean, C.; Noguère, G.; Vaglio-Gaudard, C.; Koning, A.; Domula, A.; Zuber, K.; Leal, L. C.

    2014-05-01

    Studies for advanced reactor systems such as sodium-cooled fast reactors designed for recycling of high level waste, accelerator driven systems for transmutation, and systems envisioning the use of the Th/U fuel cycle impose tight requirements on nuclear data for accurate predictions of their operation and safety characteristics. Among the identified needs established by sensitivity studies, neutron inelastic scattering on the main structural materials and actinides and some (n,xn) cross sections for actinides feature prominently. Prompt-gamma spectroscopy and time-of-flight techniques were used to measure (n,xnγ) cross-sections of interest. Experiments were performed at the GELINA neutron time-of-flight facility of IRMM. Results for 235U and 23Na are briefly recalled; pertaining theoretical discussions are mentioned to explain observations concerning 238U. The status of studies on 76Ge, Zr and Mo is also reported.

  11. Cold-collision-shift cancellation and inelastic scattering in a Yb optical lattice clock

    SciTech Connect

    Ludlow, A. D.; Lemke, N. D.; Sherman, J. A.; Oates, C. W.; Quemener, G.; Stecher, J. von; Rey, A. M.

    2011-11-15

    Recently, p-wave cold collisions were shown to dominate the density-dependent shift of the clock transition frequency in a {sup 171}Yb optical lattice clock. Here we demonstrate that by operating such a system at the proper excitation fraction, the cold-collision shift is canceled below the 5x10{sup -18} fractional frequency level. We report inelastic two-body loss rates for {sup 3} P{sub 0} -{sup 3} P{sub 0} and {sup 1} S{sub 0} -{sup 3} P{sub 0} scattering. We also measure interaction shifts in an unpolarized atomic sample. Collision measurements for this spin-1/2 {sup 171}Yb system are relevant for high-performance optical clocks as well as strongly interacting systems for quantum information and quantum simulation applications.

  12. Portraying entanglement between molecular qubits with four-dimensional inelastic neutron scattering

    PubMed Central

    Garlatti, E.; Guidi, T.; Ansbro, S.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.; Ollivier, J.; Mutka, H.; Timco, G.; Vitorica-Yrezabal, I. J.; Whitehead, G. F. S.; Winpenny, R. E. P.; Carretta, S.

    2017-01-01

    Entanglement is a crucial resource for quantum information processing and its detection and quantification is of paramount importance in many areas of current research. Weakly coupled molecular nanomagnets provide an ideal test bed for investigating entanglement between complex spin systems. However, entanglement in these systems has only been experimentally demonstrated rather indirectly by macroscopic techniques or by fitting trial model Hamiltonians to experimental data. Here we show that four-dimensional inelastic neutron scattering enables us to portray entanglement in weakly coupled molecular qubits and to quantify it. We exploit a prototype (Cr7Ni)2 supramolecular dimer as a benchmark to demonstrate the potential of this approach, which allows one to extract the concurrence in eigenstates of a dimer of molecular qubits without diagonalizing its full Hamiltonian. PMID:28216631

  13. Fully microscopic description of elastic and inelastic scattering at intermediate incident energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minomo, Kosho; Kohno, Michio; Toyokawa, Masakazu; Yahiro, Masanobu; Ogata, Kazuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We aim for fully microscopic understanding of many-body nuclear reactions starting from two- and three-nucleon forces based on chiral effective field theory (Ch-EFT). We first construct a g-matrix with the nuclear forces based on Ch-EFT using Brueckner-Hartree-Fock theory, in which the three-nucleon force effects are represented through the density dependence of the g-matrix. Then, the folding model and microscopic coupled-channels method with the g-matrix are applied to nucleon-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus scattering at intermediate incident energies. This new microscopic framework well describes the elastic and inelastic cross sections with no ad-hoc parameters. In addition, the three-nucleon force and coupled-channels effects on many-body nuclear reactions are clarified.

  14. Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Magnetisation Investigation of an Exchange-Coupled Dy2 SMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael L.; Zhang, Qing; Sarachik, Myriam P.; Kent, Andrew D.; Chen, Yizhang; Butch, Nicholas; Pineda, Eufemio M.; McInnes, Eric

    The strong spin orbit coupling and weak crystal field energies of simple exchange-coupled rare earth SMMs makes the precise evaluation of their magnetic properties nontrivial. Here we report a detailed investigation of the single molecule magnet hqH2Dy2(hq)4(NO3)3MeOH. Inelastic neutron scattering is used to obtain direct access to several low energy crystal field excitations. The INS results display several features that are not found in earlier FIR absorption experiments, while other features found in the latter are absent. Based on the effective point charge model, numerical calculations are currently underway to resolve these apparent discrepancies using complementary magnetisation measurements to resolve the exchange between Dy ions. Work supported by ARO W911NF-13-1-1025 (CCNY) and NSF-DMR-1309202 (NYU).

  15. Effects of inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering on supernova dynamics and radiated neutrino spectra.

    PubMed

    Langanke, K; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Müller, B; Janka, H-Th; Marek, A; Hix, W R; Juodagalvis, A; Sampaio, J M

    2008-01-11

    Based on the shell model for Gamow-Teller and the random phase approximation for forbidden transitions, we calculate cross sections for inelastic neutrino-nucleus scattering (INNS) under supernova (SN) conditions, assuming a matter composition given by nuclear statistical equilibrium. The cross sections are incorporated into state-of-the-art stellar core-collapse simulations with detailed energy-dependent neutrino transport. While no significant effect on the SN dynamics is observed, INNS increases the neutrino opacities noticeably and strongly reduces the high-energy tail of the neutrino spectrum emitted in the neutrino burst at shock breakout. Relatedly the expected event rates for the observation of such neutrinos by earthbound detectors are reduced by up to about 60%.

  16. Agreement of neutrino deep inelastic scattering data with global fits of parton distributions.

    PubMed

    Paukkunen, Hannu; Salgado, Carlos A

    2013-05-24

    The compatibility of neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering data within the universal, factorizable nuclear parton distribution functions has been studied independently by several groups in the past few years. The conclusions are contradictory, ranging from a violation of the universality up to a good agreement, most of the controversy originating from the use of the neutrino-nucleus data from the NuTeV Collaboration. Here, we pay attention to non-negligible differences in the absolute normalization between different neutrino data sets. We find that such variations are large enough to prevent a tensionless fit to all data simultaneously and could therefore misleadingly point towards nonuniversal nuclear effects. We propose a concrete method to deal with the absolute normalization and show that an agreement between independent neutrino data sets is established.

  17. Anomalous vibrational modes in acetanilide: A F. D. S. incoherent inelastic neutron scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Barthes, M.; Moret, J. ); Eckert, J.; Johnson, S.W.; Swanson, B.I.; Unkefer, C.J. )

    1991-01-01

    The origin of the anomalous infra-red and Raman modes in acetanilide (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}NHCOCH{sub 3}, or ACN), remains a subject of considerable controversy. One family of theoretical models involves Davydov-like solitons nonlinear vibrational coupling, or polaronic'' localized modes. An alternative interpretation of the extra-bands in terms of a Fermi resonance was proposed and recently the existence of slightly non-degenerate hydrogen atom configurations in the H-bond was suggested as an explanation for the anomalies. In this paper we report some new results on the anomalous vibrational modes in ACN that were obtained by inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (INS).

  18. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung-Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    A new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technical development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability. PMID:25931094

  19. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    DOE PAGES

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung -Fu; ...

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technicalmore » development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability.« less

  20. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature.

    PubMed

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung-Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E Ercan

    2015-05-01

    A new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal-insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technical development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu(57)Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability.

  1. Boron arsenide phonon dispersion from inelastic x-ray scattering: Potential for ultrahigh thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Hao; Li, Chen; Tang, Shixiong; Yan, Jiaqiang; Alatas, Ahmet; Lindsay, Lucas; Sales, Brian C.; Tian, Zhiting

    2016-12-14

    Cubic boron arsenide (BAs) was predicted to have an exceptionally high thermal conductivity (k) ~2000 Wm-1K-1 at room temperature, comparable to that of diamond, based on first-principles calculations. Subsequent experimental measurements, however, only obtained a k of ~200 Wm-1K-1. To gain insight into this discrepancy, we measured phonon dispersion of single crystal BAs along high symmetry directions using inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) and compared these with first-principles calculations. Based on the measured phonon dispersion, we have validated the theoretical prediction of a large frequency gap between acoustic and optical modes and bunching of acoustic branches, which were considered the main reasons for the predicted ultrahigh k. This supports its potential to be a super thermal conductor if very high-quality single crystal samples can be synthesized.

  2. Structural and microscopic relaxations in glycerol: An inelastic x-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo, A.; Leu, B. M.; Said, A. H.; Cai, Y. Q.

    2011-05-10

    The THz dynamics of liquid glycerol has been probed by inelastic x-ray scattering at different pressure spanning the 0.66-3 Kbar range. A comparison with ultrasound absorption results available in literature leads us to identify the presence of two different relaxations, a structural (slow) relaxation and a microscopic (fast) one. Although the former has been already thoroughly studied in glycerol by lower frequency spectroscopic techniques, no hints on the latter are so far available in literature. We observe that the characteristic timescale of this fast relaxation ranges in the sub-picosecond, tends to decrease with increasing the wave-vector and seems rather insensitive to pressure changes. Finally, the timescale and strength of the fast relaxation have a direct link revealing the microscopic, single particle, nature of the involved process.

  3. High-efficiency high-energy-resolution spectrometer for inelastic X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Q.; Tyson, T. A.; Caliebe, W. A.; Kao, C.-C.

    2005-12-01

    A nine-element analyzer system for inelastic X-ray scattering has been designed and constructed. Each individual analyzer crystal is carefully aligned with an inverse joystick goniometer. For the analyzers silicon wafers with 100 mm diameter are spherically bent to 1 or 0.85 m radius, respectively. Additionally, an analyzer with an extra small radius of 0.182 m and diameter of 100 mm was constructed for X-ray absorption spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. All analyzer crystals with large radius have highly uniform focusing property. The total energy resolution is approximately 0.5 eV at backscattering for the 1 m radius Si(440) analyzer array and approximately 4 eV for the 0.182 m radius Si(440) analyzer at 6493 eV.

  4. Measurement of isolated photons accompanied by jets in deep inelastic ep scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZEUS Collaboration; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bołd, T.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Brümmer, N.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylsma, B.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Chekanov, S.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; D'Agostini, G.; Dal Corso, F.; del Peso, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; De Pasquale, S.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dobur, D.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Fazio, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Hilger, E.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Hüttmann, A.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jüngst, M.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Lee, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Nigro, A.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pluciński, P.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Raval, A.; Reeder, D. D.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Robertson, A.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Samson, U.; Sartorelli, G.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schönberg, V.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Son, D.; Sosnovtsev, V.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stopa, P.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trusov, V.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2012-08-01

    The production of isolated high-energy photons accompanied by jets has been measured in deep inelastic ep scattering with the ZEUS detector at HERA, using an integrated luminosity of 326 pb. Measurements were made for exchanged photon virtualities, Q2, in the range 10 to 350 GeV. The photons were measured in the transverse-energy and pseudorapidity ranges 4

  5. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Figiel, J.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Hain, W.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Trofymov, A.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-01-01

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e^± p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 372 pb^{-1}. The measurement was performed for γ ^{*}- p centre-of-mass energies in the range 90< W < {250} {GeV} and for photon virtualities Q^2 > {25} {GeV2}. Energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ , where β =x/x_IP, x is the Bjorken variable and x_IP is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ ^{*}-dijet plane and the γ ^{*}-e^± plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β . The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  6. Nucleon-nucleon correlations and multiquark cluster effects in semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton scattering off

    SciTech Connect

    Simula, S.

    1994-04-01

    Semi-inclusive deep inelastic lepton scattering off nuclei is investigated assuming that virtual boson absorption occurs on a hadronic cluster which can be either a two-nucleon correlated pair or a six-quark bag. The differences in the energy distribution of nucleons produced in backward and forward directions are analyzed both at x<1 and x>1.

  7. Jet rates from deep inelastic muon scattering in the W range of 15 to 35 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, C.

    1991-08-01

    Production rates of forward jets in deep inelastic muon scattering are studied using the JADE jet finding algorithm. The evolution of di-jet rates with W is compared to QCD first order predictions in the W range of 15 to 25 GeV. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; McAtee, James L.

    1993-01-01

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, whcih is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  9. Alternating current long range alpha particle detector

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; McAtee, J.L.

    1993-02-16

    An alpha particle detector, utilizing alternating currents, which is capable of detecting alpha particles from distinct sources. The use of alternating currents allows use of simpler ac circuits which, in turn, are not susceptible to dc error components. It also allows the benefit of gas gain, if desired. In the invention, a voltage source creates an electric field between two conductive grids, and between the grids and a conductive enclosure. Air containing air ions created by collision with alpha particles is drawn into the enclosure and detected. In some embodiments, the air flow into the enclosure is interrupted, creating an alternating flow of ions. In another embodiment, a modulated voltage is applied to the grid, also modulating the detection of ions.

  10. Structure of 8B from elastic and inelastic 7Be+p scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, J. P.; Rogachev, G. V.; Johnson, E. D.; Baby, L. T.; Kemper, K. W.; Moro, A. M.; Peplowski, P.; Volya, A. S.; Wiedenhöver, I.

    2013-05-01

    Background: Detailed experimental knowledge of the level structure of light weakly bound nuclei is necessary to guide the development of new theoretical approaches that combine nuclear structure with reaction dynamics.Purpose: The resonant structure of 8B is studied in this work.Method: Excitation functions for elastic and inelastic 7Be+p scattering were measured using a 7Be rare isotope beam. Excitation energies ranging between 1.6 and 3.4 MeV were investigated. An R-matrix analysis of the excitation functions was performed.Results: New low-lying resonances at 1.9, 2.54, and 3.3 MeV in 8B are reported with spin-parity assignment 0+, 2+, and 1+, respectively. Comparison to the time-dependent continuum shell (TDCSM) model and ab initio no-core shell model/resonating-group method (NCSM/RGM) calculations is performed. This work is a more detailed analysis of the data first published as a Rapid Communication. J. P. Mitchell, G. V. Rogachev, E. D. Johnson, L. T. Baby, K. W. Kemper , [Phys. Rev. CPRVCAN0556-281310.1103/PhysRevC.82.011601 82, 011601(R) (2010)].Conclusions: Identification of the 0+, 2+, 1+ states that were predicted by some models at relatively low energy but never observed experimentally is an important step toward understanding the structure of 8B. Their identification was aided by having both elastic and inelastic scattering data. Direct comparison of the cross sections and phase shifts predicted by the TDCSM and ab initio no-core shell model coupled with the resonating group method is of particular interest and provides a good test for these theoretical approaches.

  11. Diffusive and inelastic scattering in ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy and ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.; Turner, B.R.; Schowalter, L.J.

    1993-07-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) of Au/Si(001) n type was done to study whether elastic scattering in the Au overlayer is dominant. It was found that there is no dependence of the BEEM current on the relative gradient of the Au surface with respect to the Si interface, and this demonstrates that significant elastic scattering must occur in the Au overlayer. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES) was also done, and, rather than using the conventional direct-current BEES, alternating-current (ac) BEES was done on Au/Si and also on Au/PtSi/Si(001) n type. The technique of ac BEES was found to give linear threshold for the Schottky barrier, and it also clearly showed the onset of electron-hole pair creation and other inelastic scattering events. The study of device quality PtSi in Au/PtSi/Si(001) yielded an attenuation length of 4 nm for electrons of energy 1 eV above the PtSi Fermi energy. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  12. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    DOE PAGES

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy.more » However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.« less

  13. Inelastic neutron- and Raman-scattering studies of muscovite and vermiculite layered silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Wada, N. ); Kamitakahara, W.A. University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland National Institute of Standards and Technology, Building 235, E-151, Gaithersburg, Maryland )

    1991-01-15

    Investigations on the lattice dynamics of muscovite and vermiculite have been carried out by inelastic neutron scattering and Raman scattering. In the neutron measurements, dispersion curves for the out-of-plane and in-plane LA and TA phonons were fully obtained for muscovite, while more limited data were obtained for Mg vermiculite. Sound velocities were estimated from the slopes of the dispersion curves. Raman-scattering experiments revealed an interlayer shearing mode in Na and Sr vermiculites in the 0-water-layer hydration state. The intercalated water molecules in Na and Sr vermiculites exhibited a broad Raman feature (OH stretching vibrations) at 3450 cm{sup {minus}1} with a full width at half maximum of {similar to}300 cm{sup {minus}1}. In addition, relatively sharp Raman peaks from the inner-layer hydroxyls in the host octahedral layers were found at {similar to}3700 cm{sup {minus}1}. These peaks were sensitive to the hydration state or charge in the intercalated layer.

  14. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    SciTech Connect

    Mousseau, J.

    2016-04-19

    Here, the MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5–50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x < 0.1. This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  15. Measurement of partonic nuclear effects in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering using MINERvA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, J.; Wospakrik, M.; Aliaga, L.; Altinok, O.; Bellantoni, L.; Bercellie, A.; Betancourt, M.; Bodek, A.; Bravar, A.; Budd, H.; Cai, T.; Carneiro, M. F.; Christy, M. E.; Chvojka, J.; da Motta, H.; Devan, J.; Dytman, S. A.; Díaz, G. A.; Eberly, B.; Felix, J.; Fields, L.; Fine, R.; Gago, A. M.; Galindo, R.; Gallagher, H.; Ghosh, A.; Golan, T.; Gran, R.; Harris, D. A.; Higuera, A.; Hurtado, K.; Kiveni, M.; Kleykamp, J.; Kordosky, M.; Le, T.; Maher, E.; Manly, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshall, C. M.; Martinez Caicedo, D. A.; McFarland, K. S.; McGivern, C. L.; McGowan, A. M.; Messerly, B.; Miller, J.; Mislivec, A.; Morfín, J. G.; Naples, D.; Nelson, J. K.; Norrick, A.; Nuruzzaman; Osta, J.; Paolone, V.; Park, J.; Patrick, C. E.; Perdue, G. N.; Rakotondravohitra, L.; Ramirez, M. A.; Ransome, R. D.; Ray, H.; Ren, L.; Rimal, D.; Rodrigues, P. A.; Ruterbories, D.; Schellman, H.; Schmitz, D. W.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Tagg, N.; Tice, B. G.; Valencia, E.; Walton, T.; Wolcott, J.; Zavala, G.; Zhang, D.; Minerν A Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The MINERvA Collaboration reports a novel study of neutrino-nucleus charged-current deep inelastic scattering (DIS) using the same neutrino beam incident on targets of polystyrene, graphite, iron, and lead. Results are presented as ratios of C, Fe, and Pb to CH. The ratios of total DIS cross sections as a function of neutrino energy and flux-integrated differential cross sections as a function of the Bjorken scaling variable x are presented in the neutrino-energy range of 5-50 GeV. Based on the predictions of charged-lepton scattering ratios, good agreement is found between the data and prediction at medium x and low neutrino energy. However, the ratios appear to be below predictions in the vicinity of the nuclear shadowing region, x <0.1 . This apparent deficit, reflected in the DIS cross-section ratio at high Eν, is consistent with previous MINERvA observations [B. Tice et al. (MINERvA Collaboration), Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 231801 (2014).] and with the predicted onset of nuclear shadowing with the axial-vector current in neutrino scattering.

  16. Study of M1 and E1 excitations by high-resolution proton inelastic scattering measurement at forward angles

    SciTech Connect

    Tamii, A.; Adachi, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kaneda, T.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Yosoi, M.; Carter, J.; Dozono, M.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Itoh, M.; Kawabata, T.; Nakanishi, K.; Sasamoto, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von

    2007-06-13

    Experimental technique for measuring proton inelastic scattering with high-resolution at 295 MeV and at forward angles including zero degrees is described. The method is useful for extracting spin part of the M1 strength via nuclear excitation as well as E1 strength via Coulomb excitation. An excitation energy resolution of 20 keV, good scattering angle resolution, and low background condition have been achieved. The experimental technique was applied for several sd and pf shell nuclei.

  17. Lunar surface outgassing and alpha particle measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, Richard D.; Binder, Alan B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particle?; produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-2 18 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238.

  18. Analytic expressions for the inelastic scattering and energy loss of electron and proton beams in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Kyriakou, I.; Garcia-Molina, R.; Abril, I.; Kostarelos, K.

    2010-09-15

    We have determined ''effective'' Bethe coefficients and the mean excitation energy of stopping theory (I-value) for multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) bundles based on a sum-rule constrained optical-data model energy loss function with improved asymptotic properties. Noticeable differences between MWCNTs, SWCNT bundles, and the three allotropes of carbon (diamond, graphite, glassy carbon) are found. By means of Bethe's asymptotic approximation, the inelastic scattering cross section, the electronic stopping power, and the average energy transfer to target electrons in a single inelastic collision, are calculated analytically for a broad range of electron and proton beam energies using realistic excitation parameters.

  19. Differential cross-sections for elastic and inelastic electron scattering from fundamental polyatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakoo, Murtadha A.

    2011-10-01

    The near-threshold scattering of electrons from polyatomic molecules of fundamental interest, e.g. water, primary alcohols and ring molecules e.g. furan, benzene are important in plasma fuel processes, plasmas used in biological processes e.g. in the treatment of skin diseases, astrophysical plasmas, etc. The determination of cross-sections for such molecules has gathered impetus because of the increasing number of applications industrial plasma and biomedical processes and the need to understand and model these complex processes. It is now possible to determine accurate differential cross-sections for electron scattering from these polyatomic molecules. We will present recent normalized, absolute low energy electron scattering differential cross-sections for near-threshold elastic and inelastic scattering from water, primary alcohols, furan and benzene using a well-tested electron spectrometer apparatus. We will also compare our results with those of other experiments and available theoretical models, which show an encouragingly overall improved picture in terms of agreement between the different research groups. Funded by the National Science Foundation Research in an Undergraduate Institution Grant #s 0653452 and 1135203. This work was done collaboratively with Drs. V. Mckoy and C. Winstead, Caltech, USA (National Science Foundation Grant # 0653396 and Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US DOE Grant) and Dr. M. C. A. Lopes, U. Fed. de Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais, Brazil; Dr. M. H. F. Bettega, U. Fed. do Parana, Curitiba, Brazil Drs. R. F. da Costa and M. A. P. Lima, Universidade Estadual de Campinas UNICAMP and CTBE, Campinas, Brazil (CNPq, FAPESP, FAPEMG, Finep, CENAPAD-SP and CAPES grants). Funded by US-NSF Grant #s 0653452 and 1135203.

  20. Alpha particle spectrometry using superconducting microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horansky, Robert; Ullom, Joel; Beall, James; Hilton, Gene; Stiehl, Gregory; Irwin, Kent; Plionis, Alexander; Lamont, Stephen; Rudy, Clifford; Rabin, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Alpha spectrometry is the preferred technique for analyzing trace samples of radioactive material because the alpha particle flux can be significantly higher than the gamma-ray flux from nuclear materials of interest. Traditionally, alpha spectrometry is performed with Si detectors whose resolution is at best 8 keV FWHM. Here, we describe the design and operation of a microcalorimeter alpha detector with an energy resolution of 1.06 keV FWHM at 5 MeV. We demonstrate the ability of the microcalorimeter to clearly resolve the alpha particles from Pu-239 and Pu-240, whose ratio differentiates reactor-grade Pu from weapons-grade. We also show the first direct observation of the decay of Po-209 to the ground state of Pb-205 which has traditionally been obscured by a much stronger alpha line 2 keV away. Finally, the 1.06 keV resolution observed for alpha particles is far worse than the 0.12 keV resolution predicted from thermal fluctuations and measurement of gamma-rays. The cause of the resolution degradation may be ion damage in the tin. Hence, alpha particle microcalorimeters may provide a novel tool for studying ion damage and lattice displacement energies in bulk materials.

  1. Parity Violation Inelastic Scattering Experiments at 6 GeV and 12 GeV Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent A.; et. al.,

    2015-03-01

    We report on the measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the deep inelastic scattering and nucleon resonance regions using inclusive scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized deuterium target. The effective weak couplings C$_{2q}$ are accessible through the deep-inelastic scattering measurements. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry, which yields a determination of 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ with an improved precision of a factor of five relative to the previous result. This result indicates evidence with 95% confidence that the 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ is non-zero. This experiment also provides the first parity-violation data covering the whole resonance region, which provide constraints on nucleon resonance models. Finally, the program to extend these measurements at Jefferson Lab in the 12 GeV era using the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device was also discussed.

  2. The design of the inelastic neutron scattering mode for the Extreme Environment Diffractometer with the 26 T High Field Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowiak, Maciej; Stüßer, Norbert; Prokhnenko, Oleksandr

    2015-10-01

    The Extreme Environment Diffractometer is a neutron time-of-flight instrument, designed to work with a constant-field hybrid magnet capable of reaching fields over 26 T, unprecedented in neutron science; however, the presence of the magnet imposes both spatial and technical limitations on the surrounding instrument components. In addition to the existing diffraction and small-angle neutron scattering modes, the instrument will operate also in an inelastic scattering mode, as a direct time-of-flight spectrometer. In this paper we present the Monte Carlo ray-tracing simulations, the results of which illustrate the performance of the instrument in the inelastic-scattering mode. We describe the focussing neutron guide and the chopper system of the existing instrument and the planned design for the instrument upgrade. The neutron flux, neutron spatial distribution, divergence distribution and energy resolution are calculated for standard instrument configurations.

  3. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2013-04-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m)-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) [or quantum wire(s) for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport) phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES) and the inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of intrasubband and

  4. Multiplicities of charged kaons from deep-inelastic muon scattering off an isoscalar target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, M. G.; Alexeev, G. D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlak, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O. M.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G. V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Thiel, A.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-04-01

    Precise measurements of charged-kaon multiplicities in deep inelastic scattering were performed. The results are presented in three-dimensional bins of the Bjorken scaling variable x, the relative virtual-photon energy y, and the fraction z of the virtual-photon energy carried by the produced hadron. The data were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration by scattering 160 GeV muons off an isoscalar 6LiD target. They cover the kinematic domain 1(GeV / c) 2 5 GeV /c2 in the invariant mass of the hadronic system. The results from the sum of the z-integrated K+ and K- multiplicities at high x point to a value of the non-strange quark fragmentation function larger than obtained by the earlier DSS fit.

  5. Effective inelastic scattering cross-sections for background analysis in HAXPES of deeply buried layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risterucci, P.; Renault, O.; Zborowski, C.; Bertrand, D.; Torres, A.; Rueff, J.-P.; Ceolin, D.; Grenet, G.; Tougaard, S.

    2017-04-01

    Inelastic background analysis of HAXPES spectra was recently introduced as a powerful method to get access to the elemental distribution in deeply buried layers or interfaces, at depth up to 60 nm below the surface. However the accuracy of the analysis highly relies on suitable scattering cross-sections able to describe effectively the transport of photoelectrons through overlayer structures consisting of individual layers with potentially very different scattering properties. Here, we show that within Tougaard's practical framework as implemented in the Quases-Analyze software, the photoelectron transport through thick (25-40 nm) multi-layer structures with widely different cross-sections can be reliably described with an effective cross-section in the form of a weighted sum of the individual cross-section of each layer. The high-resolution core-level analysis partly provides a guide for determining the nature of the individual cross-sections to be used. We illustrate this novel approach with the practical case of a top Al/Ti bilayer structure in an AlGaN/GaN power transistor device stack before and after sucessive annealing treatments. The analysis provides reliable insights on the Ti and Ga depth distributions up to nearly 50 nm below the surface.

  6. Effective orbital symmetry of CuO: Examination by nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, W. B.; Hiraoka, N.; Huang, D. J.; Huang, S. W.; Tsuei, K. D.; van Veenendaal, Michel; van den Brink, Jeroen; Sekio, Y.; Kimura, T.

    2013-11-01

    We report on measurements of nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NIXS) to unravel the effective symmetry of Cu 3d orbitals in the ground state of CuO. A clear feature of energy loss at about 2 eV exists in the NIXS spectrum, arising from dd excitations; the intensities of these excitations display a pronounced anisotropy. The comparison between the measured angular distributions of scattering and those from theoretical predictions by the tesseral harmonics indicates that, in terms of a hole picture, the lowest-energy dd excitation is the orbital transition x2-y2 → xy. In addition, the transition x2-y2 → 3z2-r2 has an energy higher than x2-y2 → yz/zx, in contrast to a previous interpretation. Our results imply a large Jahn-Teller-like splitting between x2-y2 and 3z2-r2 orbitals. The theory assuming a C4h symmetry explains the angular dependence of the NIXS spectra fairly well, implying that this symmetry is a reasonable approximation. This demonstrates that NIXS can provide important information for modeling of the electronic structure of d ions embedded in a complicated crystal field.

  7. Ordered analysis of heavy flavor production in deep-inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorne, R. S.; Roberts, R. G.

    1998-06-01

    At low Q2, charm production in deep-inelastic scattering is adequately described by assuming generation in electroweak boson-light parton scattering (dominantly boson-gluon fusion), which naturally incorporates the correct threshold behavior. At high Q2 this description is inadequate, since it does not sum logs in Q2/m2c, and is replaced by the treatment of the charm quark as a light parton. We show how the problem of going from one description to the other can be solved in a satisfactory manner to all orders. The key ingredient is the constraint of matching the evolution of the physical structure function F2 order by order in αs(Q2), in addition, to the matching of the value of F2 itself. This leads to new expressions for the coefficient functions associated with the charm parton, which are unique in incorporating both the correct threshold and asymptotic behaviors at each order in perturbation theory. The use of these improved coefficients leads to an improvement in global fits and an excellent description of the observed F2,charm.

  8. Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron

    DOE PAGES

    Cosyn, Wim; Melnitchouk, Wally; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2014-01-16

    We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~<2 GeV and a continuum contribution for larger W as the relevant set of effective hadron states entering the final-state interaction amplitude. The results show sizeable on-shell FSI contributions for Bjorken x ~> 0.6 andmore » Q2 < 10 GeV2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.« less

  9. Diffractive deep inelastic scattering in an AdS/CFT inspired model: A phenomenological study

    SciTech Connect

    Betemps, M. A.; Goncalves, V. P.; Santana Amaral, J. T. de

    2010-05-01

    The analytical treatment of the nonperturbative QCD dynamics is one of the main open questions of the strong interactions. Currently, it is only possible to get some qualitative information about this regime considering other QCD-like theories, as, for example, the N=4 super Yang-Mills theory, where one can perform calculations in the nonperturbative limit of large 't Hooft coupling using the anti-de Sitter space/conformal field theory (AdS/CFT). Recently, the high energy scattering amplitude was calculated in the AdS/CFT approach, applied to deep-inelastic scattering and confronted with the F{sub 2} HERA data. In this work we extend the nonperturbative AdS/CFT inspired model for diffractive processes and compare its predictions with a perturbative approach based on the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation. We demonstrate that the AdS/CFT inspired model is not able to describe the current F{sub 2}{sup D(3)} HERA data and predicts a similar behavior to that from the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation in the range 10{sup -7} < or approx. x{sub P} < or approx. 10{sup -4}. At smaller values of x{sub P} the diffractive structure function is predicted to be energy independent.

  10. Evidence of hydroxyl-ion deficiency in bone apatites: an inelastic neutron-scattering study.

    PubMed

    Loong, C K; Rey, C; Kuhn, L T; Combes, C; Wu, Y; Chen, S; Glimcher, M J

    2000-06-01

    The novelty of very large neutron-scattering intensity from the nuclear-spin incoherence in hydrogen has permitted the determination of atomic motion of hydrogen in synthetic hydroxyapatite and in deproteinated isolated apatite crystals of bovine and rat bone without the interference of vibrational modes from other structural units. From an inelastic neutron-scattering experiment, we found no sharp excitations characteristic of the vibrational mode and stretch vibrations of OH ions around 80 and 450 meV (645 and 3630 cm(-1)), respectively, in the isolated, deproteinated crystals of bone apatites; such salient features were clearly seen in micron- and nanometer-size crystals of pure hydroxyapatite powders. Thus, the data provide additional definitive evidence for the lack of OH(-) ions in the crystals of bone apatite. Weak features at 160-180 and 376 meV, which are clearly observed in the apatite crystals of rat bone and possibly in adult mature bovine bone, but to a much lesser degree, but not in the synthetic hydroxyapatite, are assigned to the deformation and stretch modes of OH ions belonging to HPO(4)-like species.

  11. The total, elastic and inelastic scattering fast neutron cross sections of natural chromium

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, P.T.; Smith, J.F.; Whalen, A.B.

    1982-12-01

    The present experimental results comprise a comprehensive intermediate resolution neutron total and scattering cross-section data base for elemental chromium over the energy range from 1.5 to 4.0 MeV. Nonetheless, due to the fluctuating nature of the cross sections involved, the definition of energy-averaged cross sections is uncertain. The consequences of these energy-dependent fluctuations and attendant complications influence the data analysis and interpretation. All finite sample total crosssection measurements result in effective cross sections that have to be corrected to yield the true energyaveraged cross sections. This was accomplished by concurrent multiple sample thickness measurements the results of which were then linearly extrapolated to the zero thickness cross section. It was noted that the resulting sample thickness correction showed marked local fluctuations necessitating an energy by energy treatment. Furthermore, the cross sections, even after averaging over wide energy intervals, retained undulations that complicated comparisons with model calculations. Quantitative comparisons of the present elastic and inelastic scattering results with those obtained at isolated energies by other authors were difficult, if not deceptive, due to persistent fluctuations.

  12. Electromagnon dispersion probed by inelastic X-ray scattering in LiCrO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Sándor; Wehinger, Björn; Rolfs, Katharina; Birol, Turan; Stuhr, Uwe; Takatsu, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kenta; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Rønnow, Henrik M.; Rüegg, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering with meV energy resolution (IXS) is an ideal tool to measure collective excitations in solids and liquids. In non-resonant scattering condition, the cross-section is strongly dominated by lattice vibrations (phonons). However, it is possible to probe additional degrees of freedom such as magnetic fluctuations that are strongly coupled to the phonons. The IXS spectrum of the coupled system contains not only the phonon dispersion but also the so far undetected magnetic correlation function. Here we report the observation of strong magnon-phonon coupling in LiCrO2 that enables the measurement of magnetic correlations throughout the Brillouin zone via IXS. We find electromagnon excitations and electric dipole active two-magnon excitations in the magnetically ordered phase and heavily damped electromagnons in the paramagnetic phase of LiCrO2. We predict that several (frustrated) magnets with dominant direct exchange and non-collinear magnetism show surprisingly large IXS cross-section for magnons and multi-magnon processes.

  13. Magnetic Excitations in Transition-metal Oxides Studied by Inelastic Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braden, M.

    2008-03-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering using a triple axis spectrometer is a very efficient tool to analyze magnetic excitations. We will discuss several recent experiments on transition-metal oxides where orbital degrees of freedom play an important role. Different kinds of experimental techniques including longitudinal and spherical polarization analysis were used in order to determine not only magnon frequencies but also polarization vectors. In layered ruthenates bands of different orbital character contribute to the magnetic excitations which are of both, ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic, character. The orbital dependent magnetic excitations seem to play different roles in the superconducting pairing as well as in the metamagnetism . In manganates the analysis of the magnon dispersion in the charge and orbital ordered phase yields direct insight into the microscopic coupling of orbital and magnetic degrees of freedom and helps understanding, how the switching between metallic and insulating phases in manganates may occur. In multiferroic TbMnO3 the combination of our polarized neutron scattering results with the infrared measurements identifies a soft collective excitation of hybridized magnon-phonon character.

  14. The boson peak of amyloid fibrils: probing the softness of protein aggregates by inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Schirò, G; Vetri, V; Andersen, C B; Natali, F; Koza, M M; Leone, M; Cupane, A

    2014-03-20

    Proteins and polypeptides are characterized by low-frequency vibrations in the terahertz regime responsible for the so-called "boson peak". The shape and position of this peak are related to the mechanical properties of peptide chains. Amyloid fibrils are ordered macromolecular assemblies, spontaneously formed in nature, characterized by unique biological and nanomechanical properties. In this work, we investigate the effects of the amyloid state and its polymorphism on the boson peak. We used inelastic neutron scattering to probe low-frequency vibrations of the glucagon polypeptide in the native state and in two different amyloid morphologies in both dry and hydrated sample states. The data show that amyloid fibril formation and hydration state affect the softness of the polypeptide not only by changing the distribution of vibrational modes but also, and most significantly, the dissipative mechanisms of collective low-frequency vibrations provided by water-protein and protein-protein interactions. We show how the morphology of the fibril is able to tune these effects. Atomic fluctuations were also measured by elastic neutron scattering. The data confirm that any effect of protein aggregation on fluctuation amplitudes is essentially due to changes in surface exposure to hydration water. The results demonstrate the importance of protein-protein and protein-water interactions in the dynamics and mechanics of amyloid fibrils.

  15. Electromagnon dispersion probed by inelastic X-ray scattering in LiCrO2

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Sándor; Wehinger, Björn; Rolfs, Katharina; Birol, Turan; Stuhr, Uwe; Takatsu, Hiroshi; Kimura, Kenta; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Rønnow, Henrik M.; Rüegg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Inelastic X-ray scattering with meV energy resolution (IXS) is an ideal tool to measure collective excitations in solids and liquids. In non-resonant scattering condition, the cross-section is strongly dominated by lattice vibrations (phonons). However, it is possible to probe additional degrees of freedom such as magnetic fluctuations that are strongly coupled to the phonons. The IXS spectrum of the coupled system contains not only the phonon dispersion but also the so far undetected magnetic correlation function. Here we report the observation of strong magnon–phonon coupling in LiCrO2 that enables the measurement of magnetic correlations throughout the Brillouin zone via IXS. We find electromagnon excitations and electric dipole active two-magnon excitations in the magnetically ordered phase and heavily damped electromagnons in the paramagnetic phase of LiCrO2. We predict that several (frustrated) magnets with dominant direct exchange and non-collinear magnetism show surprisingly large IXS cross-section for magnons and multi-magnon processes. PMID:27882928

  16. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    DOE PAGES

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; ...

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to comparemore » the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.« less

  17. Inelastic neutron scattering and molecular simulation of the dynamics of interlayer water in smectite clay minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Cygan, Randall T.; Daemen, Luke L.; Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Krumhansl, James L.; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-11-16

    The study of mineral–water interfaces is of great importance to a variety of applications including oil and gas extraction, gas subsurface storage, environmental contaminant treatment, and nuclear waste repositories. Understanding the fundamentals of that interface is key to the success of those applications. Confinement of water in the interlayer of smectite clay minerals provides a unique environment to examine the interactions among water molecules, interlayer cations, and clay mineral surfaces. Smectite minerals are characterized by a relatively low layer charge that allows the clay to swell with increasing water content. Montmorillonite and beidellite varieties of smectite were investigated to compare the impact of the location of layer charge on the interlayer structure and dynamics. Inelastic neutron scattering of hydrated and dehydrated cation-exchanged smectites was used to probe the dynamics of the interlayer water (200–900 cm–1 spectral region) and identify the shift in the librational edge as a function of the interlayer cation. Molecular dynamics simulations of equivalent phases and power spectra, derived from the resulting molecular trajectories, indicate a general shift in the librational behavior with interlayer cation that is generally consistent with the neutron scattering results for the monolayer hydrates. Both neutron scattering and power spectra exhibit librational structures affected by the location of layer charge and by the charge of the interlayer cation. Furthermore, divalent cations (Ba2+ and Mg2+) characterized by large hydration enthalpies typically exhibit multiple broad librational peaks compared to monovalent cations (Cs+ and Na+), which have relatively small hydration enthalpies.

  18. Radioimmunotherapy with alpha-particle-emitting immunoconjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Macklis, R.M.; Kinsey, B.M.; Kassis, A.L.; Ferrara, J.L.M.; Atcher, R.W.; Hines, J.J.; Coleman, C.N.; Adelstein, S.J.; Burakoff, S.J.

    1988-05-20

    Alpha particles are energetic short-range ions whose higher linear energy transfer produces extreme cytotoxicity. An ..cap alpha..-particle-emitting radioimmunoconjugate consisting of a bismuth-212-labeled monoclonal immunoglobulin M specific for the murine T cell/neuroectodermal surface antigen Thy 1.2 was prepared. Analysis in vitro showed that the radioimmunoconjugate was selectively cytotoxic to a Thy 1.2/sup +/ EL-4 murine tumor cell line. Approximately three bismuth-212-labeled immunoconjugates per target cell reduced the uptake of (/sup 3/H)thymidine by the EL-4 target cells to background levels. Mice inoculated intraperitoneally with EL-4 cells were cured of their ascites after intraperitoneal injection of 150 microcuries of the antigen-specific radioimmunoconjugate, suggesting a possible role for such conjugates in intracavitary cancer therapy. 18 references, 3 figures.

  19. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-06-03

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  20. Nuclear diagnostic for fast alpha particles

    DOEpatents

    Grisham, Larry R.; Post, Jr., Douglass E.; Dawson, John M.

    1986-01-01

    Measurement of the velocity distribution of confined energetic alpha particles resulting from deuterium-tritium fusion reactions in a magnetically contained plasma is provided. The fusion plasma is seeded with energetic boron neutrals for producing, by means of the reaction .sup.10 B (.alpha.,n) .sup.13 N reaction, radioactive nitrogen nuclei which are then collected by a probe. The radioactivity of the probe is then measured by conventional techniques in determining the energy distribution of the alpha particles in the plasma. In a preferred embodiment, diborane gas (B.sub.2 H.sub.6) is the source of the boron neutrals to produce .sup.13 N which decays almost exclusively by positron emission with a convenient half-life of 10 minutes.

  1. Inelastic neutron scattering cross section measurements for Xe,136134 of relevance to neutrinoless double-β decay searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, E. E.; Ross, T. J.; Liu, S. H.; McEllistrem, M. T.; Yates, S. W.

    2017-01-01

    Neutrinoless double-β decay (0 ν β β ) searches typically involve large-scale experiments for which backgrounds can be complex. One possible source of background near the 0 ν β β signature in the observed spectra is γ rays arising from inelastic neutron scattering from the materials composing or surrounding the detector. In relation to searches for the 0 ν β β of 136Xe to 136Ba, such as the EXO-200 and KamLAND-Zen projects, inelastic neutron scattering γ -ray production cross sections for 136Xe and 134Xe are of importance for characterizing such γ rays that may inhibit the unambiguous identification of this yet-to-be-observed process. These cross sections have been measured at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory at neutron energies from 2.5 to 4.5 MeV.

  2. An alternative scheme of angular-dispersion analyzers for high-resolution medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xian Rong

    2011-11-01

    The development of medium-energy inelastic X-ray scattering optics with meV and sub-meV resolution has attracted considerable efforts in recent years. Meanwhile, there are also concerns or debates about the fundamental and feasibility of the involved schemes. Here the central optical component, the back-reflection angular-dispersion monochromator or analyzer, is analyzed. The results show that the multiple-beam diffraction effect together with transmission-induced absorption can noticeably reduce the diffraction efficiency, although it may not be a fatal threat. In order to improve the efficiency, a simple four-bounce analyzer is proposed that completely avoids these two adverse effects. The new scheme is illustrated to be a feasible alternative approach for developing meV- to sub-meV-resolution inelastic X-ray scattering spectroscopy.

  3. Observation of isoscalar multipole strengths in exotic doubly-magic 56Ni in inelastic α scattering in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagchi, S.; Gibelin, J.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Achouri, N. L.; Akimune, H.; Bastin, B.; Boretzky, K.; Bouzomita, H.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Damoy, S.; Delaunay, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Fujiwara, M.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Kamalou, O.; Khan, E.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Lhoutellier, G.; Libin, J. F.; Lukyanov, S.; Mazurek, K.; Najafi, M. A.; Pancin, J.; Penionzhkevich, Y.; Perrot, L.; Raabe, R.; Rigollet, C.; Roger, T.; Sambi, S.; Savajols, H.; Senoville, M.; Stodel, C.; Suen, L.; Thomas, J. C.; Vandebrouck, M.; Van de Walle, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Isoscalar Giant Monopole Resonance (ISGMR) and the Isoscalar Giant Dipole Resonance (ISGDR) compression modes have been studied in the doubly-magic unstable nucleus 56Ni. They were measured by inelastic α-particle scattering in inverse kinematics at 50 MeV/u with the MAYA active target at the GANIL facility. The centroid of the ISGMR has been obtained at Ex = 19.1 ± 0.5 MeV. Evidence for the low-lying part of the ISGDR has been found at Ex = 17.4 ± 0.7 MeV. The strength distribution for the dipole mode shows similarity with the prediction from the Hartree-Fock (HF) based random-phase approximation (RPA) [1]. These measurements confirm inelastic α-particle scattering as a suitable probe for exciting the ISGMR and the ISGDR modes in radioactive isotopes in inverse kinematics.

  4. Phonon modes at the 2H-NbSe2 surface observed by grazing incidence inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Murphy, B M; Requardt, H; Stettner, J; Serrano, J; Krisch, M; Müller, M; Press, W

    2005-12-16

    We have determined the dispersion of acoustic and optical surface phonon modes 2H-NbSe2 at the by inelastic x-ray scattering under grazing incidence conditions. Already, at room temperature, an anomaly is observed close to the charge density wave -vector position located at about one-third along the Gamma-M direction of the Brillouin zone. Our results indicate that the anomaly for the surface mode occurs at a lower energy than that measured in bulk sensitive geometry in the same experiment, showing evidence of a modified behavior in the uppermost layers. We demonstrate that inelastic x-ray scattering in grazing incidence conditions provides a unique tool to selectively study either surface or bulk lattice dynamics in a single experiment.

  5. Diamond detector for alpha-particle spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dueñas, J A; de la Torre Pérez, J; Martín Sánchez, A; Martel, I

    2014-08-01

    An artificially grown high purity diamond was used as a detector for alpha-particle spectrometry. Diamond detectors can match the performance of silicon detectors employed in standard continuous air monitoring systems. Its radiation hardness and electronic properties make them ideal to work under extreme condition such as high temperature and ambient lights. A 50 μm thickness single-crystal diamond detector has been compared with a 300 μm passivated implanted planar silicon detector, under ambient conditions.

  6. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering as a probe of band structure effects in cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanász-Nagy, M.; Shi, Y.; Klich, I.; Demler, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    We analyze within quasiparticle theory a recent resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experiment on YBa2Cu3O6+x with the incoming photon energy detuned at several values from the resonance maximum [Minola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 217003 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.114.217003]. Surprisingly, the data show a much weaker dependence on detuning than expected from recent measurements on a different cuprate superconductor, Bi2Sr2CuO6+x [Guarise et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 5760 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms6760]. We demonstrate here that this discrepancy, originally attributed to collective magnetic excitations, can be understood in terms of the differences between the band structures of these materials. We find good agreement between theory and experiment over a large range of dopings, both in the underdoped and overdoped regimes. Moreover, we demonstrate that the RIXS signal depends sensitively on excitations at energies well above the Fermi surface that are inaccessible to traditionally used band structure probes, such as angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. This makes RIXS a powerful probe of band structure, not suffering from surface preparation problems and small sample sizes, making it potentially applicable to a number of cuprate materials.

  7. Signatures of strong correlation effects in resonant inelastic x-ray scattering studies on cuprates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wan-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Ju; Lee, Ting-Kuo

    2016-08-01

    Recently, spin excitations in doped cuprates have been measured using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The paramagnon dispersions show the large hardening effect in the electron-doped systems and seemingly doping independence in the hole-doped systems, with the energy scales comparable to that of the antiferromagnetic (AFM) magnons. This anomalous hardening effect and the lack of softening were partially explained by using the strong-coupling t -J model but with a three-site term [Nat. Commun. 5, 3314 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms4314], although the hardening effect is already present even without the latter. By considering the t -t'-t''-J model and using the slave-boson mean-field theory, we obtain, via the spin-spin susceptibility, the spin excitations in qualitative agreement with the experiments. The doping-dependent bandwidth due to the strong correlation physics is the origin of the hardening effect. We also show that dispersions in the AFM regime, different from those in the paramagnetic (PM) regime, hardly vary with dopant density. These excitations are mainly collective in nature instead of particle-hole-like. We further discuss the interplay and different contributions of these two kinds of excitations in the PM phase and show that the dominance of the collective excitation increases with decreasing dopant concentrations.

  8. Hydrogen dynamics in Ce2Fe17H5: inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripov, A. V.; Mushnikov, N. V.; Terent'ev, P. B.; Gaviko, V. S.; Udovic, T. J.; Rush, J. J.

    2011-10-01

    The vibrational spectrum of hydrogen and the parameters of H jump motion in the rhombohedral Th2Zn17-type compound Ce2Fe17H5 have been studied by means of inelastic and quasielastic neutron scattering. It is found that hydrogen atoms occupying interstitial Ce2Fe2 sites participate in the fast localized jump motion over the hexagons formed by these tetrahedral sites. The H jump rate τ-1 of this localized motion is found to change from 3.9 × 109 s-1 at T = 140 K to 4.9 × 1011 s-1 at T = 350 K, and the temperature dependence of τ-1 in the range 140-350 K is well described by the Arrhenius law with the activation energy of 103±3 meV. Our results suggest that the hydrogen jump rate in Th2Zn17-type compounds strongly increases with decreasing nearest-neighbor distance between the tetrahedral sites within the hexagons. Since each such hexagon in Ce2Fe17H5 is populated by two hydrogen atoms, the jump motions of H atoms on the same hexagon should be correlated.

  9. Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering from the Deuteron at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kai

    2013-02-01

    An experiment that measured the parity violating (PV) asymmetry Ad in e-2H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at Q2 ~ 1.10 and 1.90 (GeV/c)2 and xB ~ 0.3 was completed in experimental Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The asymmetry can be used to extract the neutral weak coupling combination (2C2u-C2d), providing a factor of five to six improvement over the current world data. To achieve this precision, asymmetries of the 10-4 level needed to be measured at event rates up to 500 kHz with high electron detection efficiency and high pion background rejection capability. A specialized scaler-based counting data acquisition system (DAQ) with hardware-based particle identification was successfully implemented. The statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes and the experimental goal of 3-4% statistical uncertainty was achieved. The design and performance of the new DAQ system is presented with the preliminary asymmetry results given in the end.

  10. Structural and dynamical properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons studied with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Bohinc, R; Žitnik, M; Bučar, K; Kavčič, M; Carniato, S; Journel, L; Guillemin, R; Marchenko, T; Kawerk, E; Simon, M; Cao, W

    2016-04-07

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on a large group of chlorinated hydrocarbons: CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, CH3CH2Cl, ClCH2CH2Cl, CH3CHCl2, CH3CCl3, C2H2Cl2-iso, C2H2Cl2-cis, C2H2Cl2-trans, and C6H5Cl. Differences in structural and dynamical properties of the molecules generated by diverse chemical environments are observed in the measured Cl(K(α)) spectral maps as well as in the Cl(K) total fluorescence yield spectra. The energy position, relative intensity, and the width of the Franck-Condon distribution of low-lying σ* and π* resonances are extracted by a fitting procedure taking into account the experimental broadening. The theoretical values obtained with the transition potential and Δ Kohn-Sham methods are in good agreement with the experimental parameters indicating subtle differences due to variations in the molecular structure.

  11. Hydrogen self-dynamics in liquid H2-D2 mixtures studied through inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colognesi, Daniele; Bafile, Ubaldo; Celli, Milva; Neumann, Martin; Orecchini, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    We have measured the dynamic structure factor of liquid para-hydrogen mixed with normal deuterium (T =20 K ) at two different concentration levels using incoherent inelastic neutron scattering. This choice has been made since the presence of D2 modifies the self-dynamics of H2 in a highly nontrivial way, acting both on its pseudophononic and its diffusive parts in a tunable way. After an accurate data reduction, recorded neutron spectra were studied through the modified Young and Koppel model and the H2 center-of-mass self-dynamics structure factor was finally extracted for the two mixtures. Some physical quantities (i.e., self-diffusion coefficient and mean kinetic energy) were determined and compared with accurate quantum calculations, which, in addition, also provided estimates of the velocity autocorrelation function for the H2 centers of mass. These estimates, in conjunction with the Gaussian approximation, were used to simulate the H2 center-of-mass self-dynamics structure factor in the same range as the experimental one. The agreement between measured and calculated spectra was globally good, but some discrepancies proved the unquestionable breakdown of the Gaussian approximation in these semiquantum systems at a level comparable to that already observed in pure liquid para-hydrogen.

  12. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    PubMed Central

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; He, Y.; Shen, Z. X.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Mou, C. Y.; Chen, C. T.; Huang, D. J.

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors. PMID:26794437

  13. Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering as a band structure probe of high-temperature superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanasz-Nagy, Marton; Shi, Yifei; Klich, Israel; Demler, Eugene

    I will analyze recent resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) experimental data on YBa2Cu3O6 + x [Minola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 217003 (2015)] within quasi-particle theory. This measurement has been performed with the incoming photon energy detuned at several values from the resonance maximum, and, surprisingly, the data shows much weaker dependence on detuning than expected from recent measurements on a different cuprate superconductor, Bi2Sr2CuO6 + x [Guarise et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 5760 (2014)]. I will demonstrate, that this discrepancy, originally attributed to collective magnetic excitations, can be understood in terms of the differences between the band structures of these materials. We found good agreement between theory and experiment over a large range of dopings [M. Kanasz-Nagy et al., arXiv:1508.06639]. Moreover, I will demonstrate that the RIXS signal depends sensitively on excitations at energies well above the Fermi surface, that are inaccessible to traditionally used band structure probes, such as angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. This makes RIXS a powerful probe of band structure, not suffering from surface preparation problems and small sample sizes, making it potentially applicable to a wide range of materials. The work of M. K.-N. was supported by the Harvard-MIT CUA, NSF Grant No. DMR-1308435, AFOSR Quantum Simulation MURI, the ARO-MURI on Atomtronics, and ARO MURI Quism program.

  14. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; He, Y.; Shen, Z. X.; Yoshida, Y.; Eisaki, H.; Mou, C. Y.; Chen, C. T.; Huang, D. J.

    2016-01-22

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast, the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors.

  15. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; ...

    2016-01-22

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast,more » the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors.« less

  16. Measurement and {ital ab initio} modeling of the inelastic neutron scattering of solid N-methylformamide

    SciTech Connect

    Bour, P.; Tam, C.N.; Sopkova, J.; Trouw, F.R.

    1998-01-01

    Vibrational motions of solid N-methylformamide (NMF) and its N-deuterated analogue are investigated using the inelastic neutron scattering (INS) technique at 15 K. The force field for obtaining the normal vibrational modes of the crystal is based on a quantum chemical calculation and a subsequent transfer of a harmonic force field of a smaller pentameric segment to a fragment of 11 NMF molecules. Two types of hydrogen bonds present in crystalline NMF are also modeled with dimers. The distinct bonding leads to a splitting of the N-hydrogen wagging mode in the spectrum. Although the hydrogen bonding has a profound effect on vibrational frequencies, the results indicate that an occurrence of a double-well potential for bonded hydrogen proposed previously is unlikely. Instead, a limited electronic conjugation along the hydrogen bonds in crystalline NMF is observed. Unlike in previous models, we simulate the relative INS intensity of each vibrational transition separately, which leads to a substantial improvement of the overall profile of the intensity pattern. The modeling allows one to assign most of observed INS bands to vibrational modes and the overall spectral profile that reproduced by the simulation compares well with the experiment. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Simulator for the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering experiment in the Solenoidal Large Intensity Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jack; Hall A SoLID Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Solenoid Large Intensity Detector (SoLID) particle detector is the main detector that will be used for high energy particle experiments in Hall A that will be used with the 12 GeV electron beam at the Jefferson Lab. SoLID geometries were writen to be implemented in Geant4 using openGL as the visualization tool. This will allow us to test how the calorimeter, a specific yet integral part of the SoLID detector, detects the particles that result from electron beams colliding with targets. The goal is to simulate the approved experiments for the SoLID detector, starting with the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment. This will provide critical information regarding the effectiveness of the calorimeter's design for such experiments. The expectation is that a Shashlik calorimeter will prove effective for the experiments approved for the SoLID detector. The ideal number of layers, or types of material for said layers, is an aspect of the calorimeter that will require testing through the simulations.The geometry files allow an easily-packaged program that can be shared amongst any collaborators interested in the SoLID experiments. NSF Grant No. 714001.

  18. Probing orbitons in YTiO3 with Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ament, Lucas; Khaliullin, Giniyat; van den Brink, Jeroen

    2009-03-01

    In YTiO3, a strongly correlated electron system with degenerate orbitals, orbitons are predicted to exist [1]. The hallmark of collective excitations is dispersion. To observe the orbiton dispersion, the rapidly developing technique of Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is especially well suited. We analyze recent experimental RIXS data on YTiO3 in the Ultrashort Core hole Lifetime framework [2]. The Ti ions in this material have a 3d^1 configuration, and the electron occupies one of the three degenerate t2g orbitals. Many of this compound's ground state properties are explained by assuming that the orbitals on these Ti ions talk to each other through a superexchange mechanism [1]. RIXS could couple to the orbital excitations (orbitons) in these kind of materials in two ways: via modulation of the superexchange interactions [3] and via a shakeup process. We compare our theoretical RIXS spectra to experimental ones, giving strong evidence for the existence of orbitons. // [1] G. Khaliullin and S. Okamoto, Phys. Rev. B 68, 205109 (2003) // [2] J. van den Brink and M. van Veenendaal, Europhys. Lett. 73, 121 (2006); L. J. P. Ament, F. Forte and J. van den Brink, Phys. Rev. B 75, 115118 (2007) // [3] compare F. Forte, L. J. P. Ament and J. van den Brink, PRL (2008)

  19. Collective Chain Dynamics in Lipid Bilayers by Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Weiss, Thomas M.; Chen, Poe-Jou; Sinn, Harald; Alp, Ercan E.; Chen, Sow-Hsin; Huang, Huey W.

    2003-06-01

    We investigated the application of inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) to lipid bilayers. This technique directly measures the dynamic structure factor S(q,{omega}) which is the space-time Fourier transform of the electron density correlation function of the measured system. For a multiatomic system, the analysis of S(q,{omega}) is usually complicated. But for multiple bilayers of lipid, S(q,{omega}) is dominated by chain-chain correlations within individual bilayers. Thus IXS provides a unique probe for the collective dynamics of lipid chains in a bilayer that cannot be obtained by any other method. IXS of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine + cholesterol at two different concentrations were measured. S(q,{omega}) was analyzed by three-mode hydrodynamic equations, including a thermal diffusive mode and two propagating acoustic modes. We obtained the dispersion curves for the phonons that represent the collective in-plane excitations of lipid chains. The effect of cholesterol on chain dynamics was detected. Our analysis shows the importance of having a high instrument resolution as well as the requirement of sufficient signal-to-noise ratio to obtain meaningful results from such an IXS experiment. The requirement on signal-to-noise also applies to molecular dynamics simulations.

  20. A new method to derive electronegativity from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Piancastelli, M. N.; Simon, M.; Stolte, W. C.; Lindle, D. W.

    2012-10-14

    Electronegativity is a well-known property of atoms and substituent groups. Because there is no direct way to measure it, establishing a useful scale for electronegativity often entails correlating it to another chemical parameter; a wide variety of methods have been proposed over the past 80 years to do just that. This work reports a new approach that connects electronegativity to a spectroscopic parameter derived from resonant inelastic x-ray scattering. The new method is demonstrated using a series of chlorine-containing compounds, focusing on the Cl 2p{sup -1}LUMO{sup 1} electronic states reached after Cl 1s{yields} LUMO core excitation and subsequent KL radiative decay. Based on an electron-density analysis of the LUMOs, the relative weights of the Cl 2p{sub z} atomic orbital contributing to the Cl 2p{sub 3/2} molecular spin-orbit components are shown to yield a linear electronegativity scale consistent with previous approaches.

  1. Rotationally inelastic scattering of OH by molecular hydrogen: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schewe, H. Christian Meijer, Gerard; Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Vanhaecke, Nicolas; Wang, Xingan; Kłos, Jacek; Alexander, Millard H.; Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Avoird, Ad van der

    2015-05-28

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of rotationally inelastic transitions of OH, prepared in the X{sup 2}Π, v = 0, j = 3/2 F{sub 1}f level, in collisions with molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}). In a crossed beam experiment, the OH radicals were state selected and velocity tuned over the collision energy range 75–155 cm{sup −1} using a Stark decelerator. Relative parity-resolved state-to-state integral cross sections were determined for collisions with normal and para converted H{sub 2}. These cross sections, as well as previous OH–H{sub 2} measurements at 595 cm{sup −1} collision energy by Schreel and ter Meulen [J. Chem. Phys. 105, 4522 (1996)], and OH–D{sub 2} measurements for collision energies 100–500 cm{sup −1} by Kirste et al. [Phys. Rev. A 82, 042717 (2010)], were compared with the results of quantum scattering calculations using recently determined ab initio potential energy surfaces [Ma et al., J. Chem. Phys. 141, 174309 (2014)]. Good agreement between the experimental and computed relative cross sections was found, although some structure seen in the OH(j = 3/2 F{sub 1}f → j = 5/2 F{sub 1}e) + H{sub 2}(j = 0) cross section is not understood.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at a seeded free-electron laser

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Angela, M.; Hieke, F.; Malvestuto, M.; Sturari, L.; Bajt, S.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Ratanapreechachai, J.; Caretta, A.; Casarin, B.; Glerean, F.; Kalashnikova, A. M.; Pisarev, R. V.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Manzoni, G.; Cilento, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Simoncig, A.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.; Raimondi, L.; Mahne, N.; Svetina, C.; Zangrando, M.; Passuello, R.; Gaio, G.; Prica, M.; Scarcia, M.; Kourousias, G.; Borghes, R.; Giannessi, L.; Wurth, W.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, we have been witnessing an increased interest for studying materials properties under non-equilibrium conditions. Several well established spectroscopies for experiments in the energy domain have been successfully adapted to the time domain with sub-picosecond time resolution. Here we show the realization of high resolution resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) with a stable ultrashort X-ray source such as an externally seeded free electron laser (FEL). We have designed and constructed a RIXS experimental endstation that allowed us to successfully measure the d-d excitations in KCoF3 single crystals at the cobalt M2,3-edge at FERMI FEL (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). The FEL-RIXS spectra show an excellent agreement with the ones obtained from the same samples at the MERIXS endstation of the MERLIN beamline at the Advanced Light Source storage ring (Berkeley, USA). We established experimental protocols for performing time resolved RIXS experiments at a FEL source to avoid X ray-induced sample damage, while retaining comparable acquisition time to the synchrotron based measurements. Finally, we measured and modelled the influence of the FEL mixed electromagnetic modes, also present in externally seeded FELs, and the beam transport with ~120 meV experimental resolution achieved in the presented RIXS setup. PMID:27941842

  3. Reaction intermediates in the catalytic Gif-type oxidation from nuclear inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajagopalan, S.; Asthalter, T.; Rabe, V.; Laschat, S.

    2016-12-01

    Nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS) of synchrotron radiation, also known as nuclear resonant vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), has been shown to provide valuable insights into metal-centered vibrations at Mössbauer-active nuclei. We present a study of the iron-centered vibrational density of states (VDOS) during the first step of the Gif-type oxidation of cyclohexene with a novel trinuclear Fe3(μ 3-O) complex as catalyst precursor. The experiments were carried out on shock-frozen solutions for different combinations of reactants: Fe3(μ 3-O) in pyridine solution, Fe3(μ 3-O) plus Zn/acetic acid in pyridine without and with addition of either oxygen or cyclohexene, and Fe3(μ 3-O)/Zn/acetic acid/pyridine/cyclohexene (reaction mixture) for reaction times of 1 min, 5 min, and 30 min. The projected VDOS of the Fe atoms was calculated on the basis of pseudopotential density functional calculations. Two possible reaction intermediates were identified as [Fe(III)(C5H5N)2(O2CCH3)2]+ and Fe(II)(C5H5N)4(O2CCH3)2, yielding evidence that NIS (NRVS) allows to identify the presence of iron-centered intermediates also in complex reaction mixtures.

  4. Inelastic Neutron Scattering studies of pure and Mo doped VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Arnab; Granroth, Garrett E.; Yiu, Yuen; Aczel, Adam A.; Koleshnikov, Alexander I.; Luo, Huxia; Cava, Robert J.; Nagler, Stephen E.; Princeton University Collaboration; Sequoia Team

    2014-03-01

    For the last half-century VO2 has been viewed as an archetypal system for studying the metal-insulator transition (MIT). Moreover, there is currently intense interest in this material arising from its promising use in fast energy efficient electronic devices. There are key unresolved issues connected with the origin of the MIT, including the role of magnetism arising from the S =1/2 V4+ ions. It is known that below 340 K in undoped VO2 the V ions form structural dimers in the insulating M1 monoclinic phase. Here we report the results of new inelastic neutron scattering measurements of VO2 and V0.75Mo0.25O2. Using the SEQUOIA chopper spectrometer at the SNS possible lattice and magnetic excitations for energies up to 600 meV were investigated. We discuss the results in the context of current ideas concerning the MIT in VO2. The research at ORNL is supported by the DOE BES, Division of Scientific User Facilities. Work at Princeton University is supported by the DOE grant number DE-FG02-98ER45706.

  5. Crystal electric field excitations in quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pinaki; Flint, R.; Kong, T.; Canfield, P. C.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.; de Boissieu, M.; Lory, P.-F.; Beutier, G.; Hiroto, T.

    All of the known quasicrystals with local moments exhibit frustration and spin glass-like behavior at low temperature. The onset of the spin freezing temperature is believed to be affected by the crystal electric field (CEF) splitting of the local moments. The quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 and its related icosahedral quasicrystal phase, i-Tb-Cd, form a set of model systems to explore how magnetism evolves from a conventional lattice (approximant phase) to an aperiodic quasicrystal. Though TbCd6 shows long-range antiferromagnetic ordering (TN = 24 K), only spin glass like behavior is observed in i-Tb-Cd with a spin freezing temperature of TF = 6 K. To investigate further, we have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of TbCd6 and observed two distinct CEF excitations at low energies which points to a high degeneracy of the CEF levels related to the Tb surrounding with almost icosahedral symmetry. Work at Ames Laboratory was supported by the DOE, BES, Division of Materials Sciences & Engineering, under Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358. This research used resources at Institut Laue-Langevin, France.

  6. Longitudinal-Transverse Separation of Deep-Inelastic Scattering at Low Q² on Nucleons and Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Tvaskis, Vladas

    2004-12-06

    Since the early experiments at SLAC, which discovered the nucleon substructure and led to the development of the quark parton model, deep inelastic scattering (DIS) has been the most powerful tool to investigate the partonic substructure of the nucleon. After about 30 years of experiments with electron and muon beams the nucleon structure function F2(x,Q2) is known with high precision over about four orders of magnitude in x and Q2. In the region of Q2 > 1 (GeV/c)2 the results of the DIS measurements are interpreted in terms of partons (quarks and gluons). The theoretical framework is provided in this case by perturbative Quantum Chromo Dynamics (pQCD), which includes scaling violations, as described by the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equations. The description starts to fail when Q2 becomes of the order of 1 (GeV/c)2, where non-perturbative effects (higher-twist effects), which are still not fully understood, become important (non-pQCD). The sensitivity for order-n twist effects increases with decreasing Q2, since they include a factor 1/(Q2n) (n ≥ 1).

  7. The surface temperature dependence of the inelastic scattering and dissociation of hydrogen molecules from metal surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z S; Darling, G R; Holloway, S

    2004-02-08

    High-dimensional, wave packet calculations have been carried out to model the surface temperature dependence of rovibrationally inelastic scattering and dissociation of hydrogen molecules from the Cu(111) surface. Both the molecule and the vibrating surface are treated fully quantum-mechanically. It is found, in agreement with experimental data, that the surface temperature dependence of a variety of dynamical processes has an Arrhenius form with an activation energy dependent on molecular translational energy and on the initial and final molecular states. The activation energy increases linearly with decreasing translational energy below the threshold energy. Above threshold the behavior is more complex. A quasianalytical model is proposed that faithfully reproduces the Arrhenius law and the translational energy dependence of the activation energy. In this model, it is essential to include quantized energy transfer between the surface and the molecule. It further predicts that for any process characterized by a large energy barrier and multiphonon excitation, the linear change in activation energy up to threshold has slope-1. This explains successfully the universal nature of the unit slope found experimentally for H2 and D2 dissociation on Cu.

  8. Excitations in a thin liquid {sup 4}He film from inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, B.E. |; Godfrin, H.; Krotscheck, E. |; Lauter, H.J.; Leiderer, P.; Passiouk, V. |; Tymczak, C.J.

    1996-05-01

    We perform a thorough analysis of the experimental dynamic structure function measured by inelastic neutron scattering for a low-temperature ({ital T}=0.65 K) four-layer liquid {sup 4}He film. The results are interpreted in light of recent theoretical calculations of the (nonvortex) excitations in thin liquid Bose films. The experimental system consists of four outer liquid layers, adsorbed to two solid inner {sup 4}He layers, which are themselves adsorbed to a graphite substrate. Relatively intense surface (ripplon) and bulklike modes are observed. The analysis of the experimental data gives strong evidence for still other modes and supports the long-standing theoretical predictions of layerlike modes (layer phonons) associated with excitations propagating primarily within the liquid layers comprising the film. The results of the analysis are consistent with the occurrence of level crossings between modes, and the existence of a layer modes for which the theory predicts will propagate in the vicinity of the solid-liquid interface. The theory and experiment agree on the detailed nature of the ripplon; its dispersion at low momenta, its fall off in intensity at intermediate momenta, and the level crossings at high momentum. Similar to experiment, the theory yields an intense mode in the maxon-roton region which is intrepreted as the formation of the bulklike excitation. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  9. Nuclear inelastic scattering study of a dinuclear iron(II) complex showing a direct spin transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolny, J. A.; Garcia, Y.; Faus, I.; Rackwitz, S.; Schlage, K.; Wille, H.-C.; Schünemann, V.

    2016-12-01

    The results of the nuclear inelastic scattering (NIS)/nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the powder spectra of dimeric [Fe 2 L 5(NCS) 4] (L = N-salicylidene-4-amino-1,2,4-triazole) complex are presented. This system is spin crossover (SCO) material tagged with a fluorophore that can sense or "feel" the SCO signal ripping through the molecular network and thereby providing an opportunity to register the SCO transition. The spectra have been measured for the low-spin and high-spin phases of the complex. The high-spin isomer reveals one broad band above 200 cm -1, while the low-spin one displays two intense bands in the range from 390 to 430 cm -1, accompanied by a number of weaker bands below this area and one at ca. 490 cm -1. A normal coordinate analysis based on density functional calculations yields the assignment of the spin marker bands to particular molecular modes. In addition the vibrational contribution to the spin transition has been estimated

  10. Nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering: Methodology and extraction of vibrational properties of minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, M. Y.; Alp, E. E.; Bi, W.; Sturhahn, W.; Toellner, T. S.; Zhao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Nuclear resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (NRIXS) is a synchrotron radiation based experimental method [1]. Since its introduction almost 20 years ago [2], NRIXS has found an expanding range of applications of studying lattice dynamics in condensed matter physics, materials science, high-pressure research, geosciences, and biophysics. After the first high pressure application in geophysics of measuring sound velocity of iron up to 153 GPa [3], it has become a widely used method to investigate deep earth compositions through sound velocity measurements [4,5]. Thermodynamic properties are also explored, in particular Grueneisen parameters [6]. Later, it was realized that isotope fractionaton factors can be derived from NRIXS measurements [7,8]. Sum rules and moments of NRIXS is a critical part of this methodology [9,10]. We will discuss this and in general the data analysis of NRIXS which enables the above mentioned applications. [1] Alp et al. Hyperfine Interactions 144/145, 3 (2002) [2] Sturhahn et al., PRL 74, 3832 (1995) [3] Mao et al., Science 292, 914 (2001) [4] Hu et al., PRB 67, 094304 (2003) [5] Sturhahn & Jackson, GSA special paper 421 (2007) [6] Murphy et al., Geophys. Res. Lett. 38, L24306 (2011) [7] Polyakov, Science 323, 912 (2009) [8] Dauphas et al., Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta 94, 254 (2012) [9] Lipkin, PRB 52, 10073 (1995) [10] Hu et al., PRB 87, 064301 (2013)

  11. Electroweak higher-order effects and theoretical uncertainties in deep-inelastic neutrino scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, K.-P.O.; Dittmaier, S.; Hollik, W.

    2005-11-01

    A previous calculation of electroweak O({alpha}) corrections to deep-inelastic neutrino scattering, as e.g. measured by NuTeV and NOMAD, is supplemented by higher-order effects. In detail, we take into account universal two-loop effects from {delta}{alpha} and {delta}{rho} as well as higher-order final-state photon radiation off muons in the structure function approach. Moreover, we make use of the recently released O({alpha})-improved parton distributions MRST2004QED and identify the relevant QED factorization scheme, which is DIS-like. As a technical by-product, we describe slicing and subtraction techniques for an efficient calculation of a new type of real corrections that are induced by the generated photon distribution. A numerical discussion of the higher-order effects suggests that the remaining theoretical uncertainty from unknown electroweak corrections is dominated by nonuniversal two-loop effects and is of the order 0.0003 when translated into a shift in sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}=1-M{sub W}{sup 2}/M{sub Z}{sup 2}. The O({alpha}) corrections implicitly included in the parton distributions lead to a shift of about 0.0004.

  12. The k-j-j' vector correlation in inelastic and reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brouard, M.; Chadwick, H.; Eyles, C. J.; Aoiz, F. J.; Kłos, J.

    2011-08-01

    Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) methods are presented which allow characterization of the angular momentum depolarization of the products of inelastic and reactive scattering. The particular emphasis of the theory is on three-vector correlations, and on the connection with the two-vector correlation between the initial and final angular momenta, j and j^' }, which is amenable to experimental measurement. The formal classical theory is presented, and computational results for NO(A) + He are used to illustrate the type of mechanistic information provided by analysis of the two- and three-vector correlations. The classical j-j^' } two-vector correlation results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations, and are shown to be in good agreement. The data for NO(A) + He support previous conclusions [M. Brouard, H. Chadwick, Y.-P. Chang, R. Cireasa, C. J. Eyles, A. O. L. Via, N. Screen, F. J. Aoiz, and J. Kłos, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 104307 (2009)], 10.1063/1.3212608 that this system is only weakly depolarizing. Furthermore, it is shown that the projection of j along the kinematic apse is nearly conserved for this system under thermal collision energy conditions.

  13. The k-j-j' vector correlation in inelastic and reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Eyles, C J; Aoiz, F J; Kłos, J

    2011-08-28

    Quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) methods are presented which allow characterization of the angular momentum depolarization of the products of inelastic and reactive scattering. The particular emphasis of the theory is on three-vector correlations, and on the connection with the two-vector correlation between the initial and final angular momenta, j and j', which is amenable to experimental measurement. The formal classical theory is presented, and computational results for NO(A) + He are used to illustrate the type of mechanistic information provided by analysis of the two- and three-vector correlations. The classical j-j' two-vector correlation results are compared with quantum mechanical calculations, and are shown to be in good agreement. The data for NO(A) + He support previous conclusions [M. Brouard, H. Chadwick, Y.-P. Chang, R. Cireasa, C. J. Eyles, A. O. L. Via, N. Screen, F. J. Aoiz, and J. Kłos, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 104307 (2009)] that this system is only weakly depolarizing. Furthermore, it is shown that the projection of j along the kinematic apse is nearly conserved for this system under thermal collision energy conditions.

  14. Inelastic neutron scattering study on boson peaks of imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kofu, Maiko; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; Ehlers, Georg; Yamamuro, Osamu; Moriya, Yosuke

    2015-07-26

    Low energy excitations of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated by means of neutron spectroscopy. In the spectra of inelastic scattering, a broad excitation peak referred to as a “boson peak” appeared at 1–3 meV in all of the ILs measured. The intensity of the boson peak was enhanced at the Q positions corresponding to the diffraction peaks, reflecting the in-phase vibrational nature of the boson peak. Furthermore the boson peak energy (EBP) was insensitive to the length of the alkyl-chain but changed depending on the radius of the anion. From the correlation among EBP, the anion radius, and the glass transition temperature Tg, we conclude that both EBP and Tg in ILs are predominantly governed by the inter-ionic Coulomb interaction which is less influenced by the alkyl-chain length. Furthermore, we also found that the EBP is proportional to the inverse square root of the molecular weight as observed in molecular glasses.

  15. ''Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Periodic Density Functional Studies of Hydrogen Bonded Structures''

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce S. Hudson

    2004-10-27

    This project is directed at a fundamental understanding of hydrogen bonding, the primary reversible interaction leading to defined geometries, networks and supramolecular aggregates formed by organic molecules. Hydrogen bonding is still not sufficiently well understood that the geometry of such supramolecular aggregates can be predicted. In the approach taken existing quantum chemical methods capable of treating periodic solids have been applied to hydrogen bonded systems of known structure. The equilibrium geometry for the given space group and packing arrangement were computed and compared to that observed. The second derivatives and normal modes of vibration will then be computed and from this inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectra were computed using the normal mode eigenvectors to compute spectral intensities. Appropriate inclusion of spectrometer line width and shape was made in the simulation and overtones, combinations and phonon wings were be included. These computed spectra were then compared with experimental results obtained for low-temperature polycrystalline samples at INS spectrometers at several facilities. This procedure validates the computational methodology for describing these systems including both static and dynamic aspects of the material. The resulting description can be used to evaluate the relative free energies of two or more proposed structures and so ultimately to be able to predict which structure will be most stable for a given building block.

  16. Extreme ultraviolet resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at a seeded free-electron laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell’Angela, M.; Hieke, F.; Malvestuto, M.; Sturari, L.; Bajt, S.; Kozhevnikov, I. V.; Ratanapreechachai, J.; Caretta, A.; Casarin, B.; Glerean, F.; Kalashnikova, A. M.; Pisarev, R. V.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Manzoni, G.; Cilento, F.; Mincigrucci, R.; Simoncig, A.; Principi, E.; Masciovecchio, C.; Raimondi, L.; Mahne, N.; Svetina, C.; Zangrando, M.; Passuello, R.; Gaio, G.; Prica, M.; Scarcia, M.; Kourousias, G.; Borghes, R.; Giannessi, L.; Wurth, W.; Parmigiani, F.

    2016-12-01

    In the past few years, we have been witnessing an increased interest for studying materials properties under non-equilibrium conditions. Several well established spectroscopies for experiments in the energy domain have been successfully adapted to the time domain with sub-picosecond time resolution. Here we show the realization of high resolution resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) with a stable ultrashort X-ray source such as an externally seeded free electron laser (FEL). We have designed and constructed a RIXS experimental endstation that allowed us to successfully measure the d-d excitations in KCoF3 single crystals at the cobalt M2,3-edge at FERMI FEL (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). The FEL-RIXS spectra show an excellent agreement with the ones obtained from the same samples at the MERIXS endstation of the MERLIN beamline at the Advanced Light Source storage ring (Berkeley, USA). We established experimental protocols for performing time resolved RIXS experiments at a FEL source to avoid X ray-induced sample damage, while retaining comparable acquisition time to the synchrotron based measurements. Finally, we measured and modelled the influence of the FEL mixed electromagnetic modes, also present in externally seeded FELs, and the beam transport with ~120 meV experimental resolution achieved in the presented RIXS setup.

  17. Magnetic Modes in Rare Earth Perovskites: A Magnetic-Field-Dependent Inelastic Light Scattering study.

    PubMed

    Saha, Surajit; Cao, Bing-Chen; Motapothula, M; Cong, Chun-Xiao; Sarkar, Tarapada; Srivastava, Amar; Sarkar, Soumya; Patra, Abhijeet; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Ariando; Coey, J M D; Yu, Ting; Venkatesan, T

    2016-11-15

    Here, we report the presence of defect-related states with magnetic degrees of freedom in crystals of LaAlO3 and several other rare-earth based perovskite oxides using inelastic light scattering (Raman spectroscopy) at low temperatures in applied magnetic fields of up to 9 T. Some of these states are at about 140 meV above the valence band maximum while others are mid-gap states at about 2.3 eV. No magnetic impurity could be detected in LaAlO3 by Proton-Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy. We, therefore, attribute the angular momentum-like states in LaAlO3 to cationic/anionic vacancies or anti-site defects. Comparison with the other rare earth perovskites leads to the empirical rule that the magnetic-field-sensitive transitions require planes of heavy elements (e.g. lanthanum) and oxygen without any other light cations in the same plane. These magnetic degrees of freedom in rare earth perovskites with useful dielectric properties may be tunable by appropriate defect engineering for magneto-optic applications.

  18. Magnetic Modes in Rare Earth Perovskites: A Magnetic-Field-Dependent Inelastic Light Scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Surajit; Cao, Bing-Chen; Motapothula, M.; Cong, Chun-Xiao; Sarkar, Tarapada; Srivastava, Amar; Sarkar, Soumya; Patra, Abhijeet; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Ariando; Coey, J. M. D.; Yu, Ting; Venkatesan, T.

    2016-11-01

    Here, we report the presence of defect-related states with magnetic degrees of freedom in crystals of LaAlO3 and several other rare-earth based perovskite oxides using inelastic light scattering (Raman spectroscopy) at low temperatures in applied magnetic fields of up to 9 T. Some of these states are at about 140 meV above the valence band maximum while others are mid-gap states at about 2.3 eV. No magnetic impurity could be detected in LaAlO3 by Proton-Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy. We, therefore, attribute the angular momentum-like states in LaAlO3 to cationic/anionic vacancies or anti-site defects. Comparison with the other rare earth perovskites leads to the empirical rule that the magnetic-field-sensitive transitions require planes of heavy elements (e.g. lanthanum) and oxygen without any other light cations in the same plane. These magnetic degrees of freedom in rare earth perovskites with useful dielectric properties may be tunable by appropriate defect engineering for magneto-optic applications.

  19. Measurement of the diffractive structure function in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Hartmann, H.; Heinloth, H.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J. S.; Norman, D. J. P.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Capua, M.; Garfagnini, A.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarębska, E.; Suszycki, L.; Zając, J.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Große-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Haas, T.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Heßling, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mainusch, J.; Mańczak, O.; Monteiro, T.; Ng, J. S. T.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Surrow, B.; Voß, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zhou, J. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Leich, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Freidhof, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, J. I.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. Y. H.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P. O.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Fernandez, J. P.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; Martinez, M.; Del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Tickner, J. R.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Waters, D. S.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; Dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Seifert, R. J.; Schwarzer, O.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchula, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Ali, I.; Badgett, W. F.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1995-12-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the inclusive properties of diffractive deep inelastic scattering events produced in ep interactions at HERA. The events are characterised by a rapidity gap between the outgoing proton system and the remaining hadronic system. Inclusive distributions are presented and compared with Monte Carlo models for diffractive processes. The data are consistent with models where the pomeron structure function has a hard and a soft contribution. The diffractive structure function is measured as a function of x ℙ, the momentum fraction lost by the proton, of β, the momentum fraction of the struck quark with respect to x ℙ, and of Q 2 in the range 6.3·10-4< x ℙ <10-2, 0.1<β<0.8 and 8< Q 2<100 GeV2. The dependence is consistent with the form x ℙ where a=1.30±0.08(stat) {-0.14/+0.08} (sys) in all bins of β and Q 2. In the measured Q 2 range, the diffractive structure function approximately scales with Q 2 at fixed β. In an Ingelman-Schlein type model, where commonly used pomeron flux factor normalisations are assumed, it is found that the quarks within the pomeron do not saturate the momentum sum rule.

  20. Momentum space saturation model for deep inelastic scattering and single inclusive hadron production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, E. A. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; de Oliveira, E. G.

    2011-08-01

    We show how the Santana Amaral-Gay Ducati-Betemps-Soyez (AGBS) model, originally developed for deep inelastic scattering applied to HERA data on the proton structure function, can also describe the RHIC data on single inclusive hadron yield for d+Au and p+p collisions through a new simultaneous fit. The single inclusive hadron production is modeled through the color glass condensate, which uses the quark (and gluon) condensate amplitudes in momentum space. The AGBS model is also a momentum space model based on the asymptotic solutions of the Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, although a different definition of the Fourier transform is used. This aspect is overcome, and a description entirely in transverse momentum of both processes arises for the first time. The small difference between the simultaneous fit and the one for HERA data alone suggests that the AGBS model describes very well both kinds of processes and thus emerges as a good tool to investigate the inclusive hadron production data. We use this model for predictions at LHC energies, which agrees very well with available experimental data.

  1. Partially coherent wavefront propagation simulations for inelastic x-ray scattering beamline including crystal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suvorov, Alexey; Cai, Yong Q.; Sutter, John P.; Chubar, Oleg

    2014-09-01

    Up to now simulation of perfect crystal optics in the "Synchrotron Radiation Workshop" (SRW) wave-optics computer code was not available, thus hindering the accurate modelling of synchrotron radiation beamlines containing optical components with multiple-crystal arrangements, such as double-crystal monochromators and high-energy-resolution monochromators. A new module has been developed for SRW for calculating dynamical diffraction from a perfect crystal in the Bragg case. We demonstrate its successful application to the modelling of partially-coherent undulator radiation propagating through the Inelastic X-ray Scattering (IXS) beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The IXS beamline contains a double-crystal and a multiple-crystal highenergy- resolution monochromator, as well as complex optics such as compound refractive lenses and Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors for the X-ray beam transport and shaping, which makes it an excellent case for benchmarking the new functionalities of the updated SRW codes. As a photon-hungry experimental technique, this case study for the IXS beamline is particularly valuable as it provides an accurate evaluation of the photon flux at the sample position, using the most advanced simulation methods and taking into account parameters of the electron beam, details of undulator source, and the crystal optics.

  2. Inelastic neutron scattering study on boson peaks of imidazolium-based ionic liquids

    DOE PAGES

    Kofu, Maiko; Inamura, Yasuhiro; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; ...

    2015-07-26

    Low energy excitations of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) have been investigated by means of neutron spectroscopy. In the spectra of inelastic scattering, a broad excitation peak referred to as a “boson peak” appeared at 1–3 meV in all of the ILs measured. The intensity of the boson peak was enhanced at the Q positions corresponding to the diffraction peaks, reflecting the in-phase vibrational nature of the boson peak. Furthermore the boson peak energy (EBP) was insensitive to the length of the alkyl-chain but changed depending on the radius of the anion. From the correlation among EBP, the anion radius, andmore » the glass transition temperature Tg, we conclude that both EBP and Tg in ILs are predominantly governed by the inter-ionic Coulomb interaction which is less influenced by the alkyl-chain length. Furthermore, we also found that the EBP is proportional to the inverse square root of the molecular weight as observed in molecular glasses.« less

  3. ''Fraunhofer theory'' of rotational inelastic scattering of He on small molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Faubel, M.

    1984-12-15

    The well-known Fraunhofer approximation provides a simple and direct qualitative physical explanation for the diffraction oscillations and the oscillation phase shift phenomena observed in differential rotational state to state scattering cross sections for He on a number of small molecules. This approximation has been further developed to yield a simple analytical expression for the angular dependence of the inelastic cross sections. For the experimentally and theoretically well investigated systems He--N/sub 2/ and He--CH/sub 4/ the Fraunhofer formula is found to reproduce the measured cross sections to within better than a factor of 2. For the investigated collision energy E/sub cm/ roughly-equal30 meV (roughly-equal3 kJ/mol) the deformed sphere interaction potential model used in the Fraunhofer approximation appears to be closely related to the zero crossing equipotential line of the full interaction potential. The relationship to the cluster model of molecules composed of atomic hard spheres is discussed. The dependence of the rotational excitation on the interaction potential is shown to be primarily a dependence on the equilibrium positions of the atoms in the molecule.

  4. Structural and dynamical properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons studied with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohinc, R.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Kavčič, M.; Carniato, S.; Journel, L.; Guillemin, R.; Marchenko, T.; Kawerk, E.; Simon, M.; Cao, W.

    2016-04-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental study of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering on a large group of chlorinated hydrocarbons: CH3Cl, CH2Cl2, CHCl3, CCl4, CH3CH2Cl, ClCH2CH2Cl, CH3CHCl2, CH3CCl3, C2H2Cl2-iso, C2H2Cl2-cis, C2H2Cl2-trans, and C6H5Cl. Differences in structural and dynamical properties of the molecules generated by diverse chemical environments are observed in the measured Cl(Kα) spectral maps as well as in the Cl(K) total fluorescence yield spectra. The energy position, relative intensity, and the width of the Franck-Condon distribution of low-lying σ∗ and π∗ resonances are extracted by a fitting procedure taking into account the experimental broadening. The theoretical values obtained with the transition potential and Δ Kohn-Sham methods are in good agreement with the experimental parameters indicating subtle differences due to variations in the molecular structure.

  5. Final-State Interactions and Single-Spin Asymmetries in Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Hwang, Dae Sung; Schmidt, Ivan; /Santa Maria U., Valparaiso

    2007-11-14

    Recent measurements from the HERMES and SMC collaborations show a remarkably large azimuthal single-spin asymmetries A{sub UL} and A{sub UT} of the proton in semi-inclusive pion leptoproduction {gamma}*(q)p {yields} {pi}X. We show that final-state interactions from gluon exchange between the outgoing quark and the target spectator system leads to single-spin asymmetries in deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering at leading twist in perturbative QCD; i.e., the rescattering corrections are not power-law suppressed at large photon virtuality q{sup 2} at fixed x{sub bj}. The existence of such single-spin asymmetries requires a phase difference between two amplitudes coupling the proton target with J{sup z}{sub p} = {+-}1/2 to the same final-state, the same amplitudes which are necessary to produce a nonzero proton anomalous magnetic moment. We show that the exchange of gauge particles between the outgoing quark and the proton spectators produces a Coulomb-like complex phase which depends on the angular momentum L{sup z} of the proton's constituents and thus is distinct for different proton spin amplitudes. The single-spin asymmetry which arises from such final-state interactions does not factorize into a product of structure function and fragmentation function, and it is not related to the transversity distribution {delta}q(x;Q) which correlates transversely polarized quarks with the spin of the transversely polarized target nucleon.

  6. Dynamical reconstruction of the exciton in LiF with inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Abbamonte, Peter; Graber, Tim; Reed, James P.; Smadici, Serban; Yeh, Chen-Lin; Shukla, Abhay; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Ku, Wei

    2008-11-03

    The absorption of light by materials proceeds through the formation of excitons, which are states in which an excited electron is bound to the valence hole it vacated. Understanding the structure and dynamics of excitons is important, for example, for developing technologies for light-emitting diodes or solar energy conversion. However, there has never been an experimental means to study the time-dependent structure of excitons directly. Here, we use causality-inverted inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) to image the charge-transfer exciton in the prototype insulator LiF, with resolutions {Delta}t = 20.67 as (2.067 x 10{sup -17} s) in time and {Delta}x = 0.533 {angstrom} (5.33 x 10{sup -11} m) in space. Our results show that the exciton has a modulated internal structure and is coherently delocalized over two unit cells of the LiF crystal ({approx}8 {angstrom}). This structure changes only modestly during the course of its life, which establishes it unambiguously as a Frenkel exciton and thus amenable to a simplified theoretical description. Our results resolve an old controversy about excitons in the alkali halides and demonstrate the utility of IXS for imaging attosecond electron dynamics in condensed matter.

  7. Nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering at high pressure and low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Wenli; Zhao, Jiyong; Lin, Jung -Fu; Jia, Quanjie; Hu, Michael Y.; Jin, Changqing; Ferry, Richard; Yang, Wenge; Struzhkin, Viktor; Alp, E. Ercan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a new synchrotron radiation experimental capability of coupling nuclear resonant inelastic X-ray scattering with the cryogenically cooled high-pressure diamond anvil cell technique is presented. The new technique permits measurements of phonon density of states at low temperature and high pressure simultaneously, and can be applied to studies of phonon contribution to pressure- and temperature-induced magnetic, superconducting and metal–insulator transitions in resonant isotope-bearing materials. In this report, a pnictide sample, EuFe2As2, is used as an example to demonstrate this new capability at beamline 3-ID of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. A detailed description of the technical development is given. The Fe-specific phonon density of states and magnetism from the Fe sublattice in Eu57Fe2As2 at high pressure and low temperature were derived by using this new capability.

  8. Triple gluon coupling, Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly, and polarized deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, C.S.; Li, B.A.

    1980-05-01

    An unusual effect of triple gluon coupling and the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly on the flavor singlet part of the polaried deep inelastic scattering structure function ..nu..G/sub 1/(Q/sup 2/,x) are discussed. Namely, the x-integral I/sub S/(Q/sup 2/) of this function is Q/sup 2/-independent both in parton model and leading logarithm calculations, but the first order nonleading logarithm calculation produces a term growing like (-lnlnQ/sup 2/), dominating over the parton model contributions at large Q/sup 2/. The detection of this unusual term will amount to an experimental confirmation of the existence of triple gluon coupling and the Adler-Bell-Jackiw anomaly. Technically, this term comes from a new axial vector gluon operator which is introduced in the Wilson expansion. Other results of this paper include a discussion of mass-sensitive and mass-insensitive structure functions and the derivation of the expression for, and the relations between, some of these structure functions.

  9. Magnetic Modes in Rare Earth Perovskites: A Magnetic-Field-Dependent Inelastic Light Scattering study

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Surajit; Cao, Bing-Chen; Motapothula, M.; Cong, Chun-Xiao; Sarkar, Tarapada; Srivastava, Amar; Sarkar, Soumya; Patra, Abhijeet; Ghosh, Siddhartha; Ariando; Coey, J. M. D.; Yu, Ting; Venkatesan, T.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report the presence of defect-related states with magnetic degrees of freedom in crystals of LaAlO3 and several other rare-earth based perovskite oxides using inelastic light scattering (Raman spectroscopy) at low temperatures in applied magnetic fields of up to 9 T. Some of these states are at about 140 meV above the valence band maximum while others are mid-gap states at about 2.3 eV. No magnetic impurity could be detected in LaAlO3 by Proton-Induced X-ray Emission Spectroscopy. We, therefore, attribute the angular momentum-like states in LaAlO3 to cationic/anionic vacancies or anti-site defects. Comparison with the other rare earth perovskites leads to the empirical rule that the magnetic-field-sensitive transitions require planes of heavy elements (e.g. lanthanum) and oxygen without any other light cations in the same plane. These magnetic degrees of freedom in rare earth perovskites with useful dielectric properties may be tunable by appropriate defect engineering for magneto-optic applications. PMID:27845368

  10. Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons and Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropy in Deep Inelastic Scattering Dijet Production at High Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-12-17

    In this study, we determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small x by solving the Balitsky–Jalilian-Marian–Iancu–McLerran–Weigert–Leonidov–Kovner rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions, we estimate the amplitude of cos2Φ azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering dijet production at high energies. We find sizable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of v2=~10%.

  11. Distribution of Linearly Polarized Gluons and Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropy in Deep Inelastic Scattering Dijet Production at High Energy

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Skokov, Vladimir

    2015-12-17

    In this study, we determine the distribution of linearly polarized gluons of a dense target at small x by solving the Balitsky–Jalilian-Marian–Iancu–McLerran–Weigert–Leonidov–Kovner rapidity evolution equations. From these solutions, we estimate the amplitude of cos2Φ azimuthal asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering dijet production at high energies. We find sizable long-range in rapidity azimuthal asymmetries with a magnitude in the range of v2=~10%.

  12. Lunar Surface Outgassing and Alpha Particle Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; Moore, K. R.; Elphic, R. C.; Maurice, S.; Belian, R. D.; Binder, A. B.

    2002-01-01

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) searched for lunar surface gas release events and mapped their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life), solid polonium-218 (6.0 MeV, 3 minute half-life), and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but held up in production by the 21 year half-life of lead-210). These three nuclides are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon reaches the lunar surface either at areas of high soil porosity or where fissures release the trapped gases in which radon is entrained. Once released, the radon spreads out by "bouncing" across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a randomwalk process. The half-life of radon-222 allows the gas to spread out by several 100 km before it decays (depositing approximately half of the polonium-218 recoil nuclides on the lunar surface) and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to several days after they occur. The long residence time of the lead-210 precursor to polonium-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 60 years. Because radon and polonium are daughter products of the decay of uranium, the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution.

  13. Crystal electric field excitations in the quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Pinaki; Lory, P. -F.; Flint, R.; ...

    2017-02-07

    Here, we have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of the quasicrystal approximant, TbCd6, grown using isotopically enriched 112Cd. Both quasielastic scattering and distinct inelastic excitations were observed below 3 meV. The intensity of the quasielastic scattering measured in the paramag- netic phase diverges as TN ~ 22 K is approached from above. The inelastic excitations, and their evolution with temperature, are well characterized by the leading term, Bmore » $$0\\atop{2}$$O$$0\\atop{2}$$, of the crystalline electric field (CEF) level scheme for local pentagonal symmetry for the rare-earth ions [1] indicating that the Tb moment is directed primarily along the unique local pseudo-five-fold axis of the Tsai-type clusters. We also find good agreement between the inverse susceptibility determined from magnetization measurements using a magnetically diluted Tb0.05Y0.95Cd6 sample and that calculated using the CEF level scheme determined from the neutron measurements.« less

  14. Crystal electric field excitations in the quasicrystal approximant TbCd6 studied by inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Pinaki; Lory, P.-F.; Flint, R.; Kong, T.; Hiroto, T.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; de Boissieu, M.; Kreyssig, A.; Goldman, A. I.

    2017-02-01

    We have performed inelastic neutron scattering measurements on powder samples of the quasicrystal approximant, TbCd6, grown using isotopically enriched 112Cd. Both quasielastic scattering and distinct inelastic excitations were observed below 3 meV. The intensity of the quasielastic scattering measured in the paramagnetic phase diverges as TN˜22 K is approached from above. The inelastic excitations, and their evolution with temperature, are well characterized by the leading term, B20O20 , of the crystal electric field (CEF) level scheme for local pentagonal symmetry for the rare-earth ions [S. Jazbec et al., Phys. Rev. B 93, 054208 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.054208] indicating that the Tb moment is directed primarily along the unique local pseudofivefold axis of the Tsai-type clusters. We also find good agreement between the inverse susceptibility determined from magnetization measurements using a magnetically diluted Tb0.05Y0.95Cd6 sample and that calculated using the CEF level scheme determined from the neutron measurements.

  15. Charm-Quark Production in Deep-Inelastic Neutrino Scattering at Next-to-Next-to-Leading Order in QCD.

    PubMed

    Berger, Edmond L; Gao, Jun; Li, Chong Sheng; Liu, Ze Long; Zhu, Hua Xing

    2016-05-27

    We present a fully differential next-to-next-to-leading order calculation of charm-quark production in charged-current deep-inelastic scattering, with full charm-quark mass dependence. The next-to-next-to-leading order corrections in perturbative quantum chromodynamics are found to be comparable in size to the next-to-leading order corrections in certain kinematic regions. We compare our predictions with data on dimuon production in (anti)neutrino scattering from a heavy nucleus. Our results can be used to improve the extraction of the parton distribution function of a strange quark in the nucleon.

  16. Quantum State-Resolved Reactive and Inelastic Scattering at Gas-Liquid and Gas-Solid Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grütter, Monika; Nelson, Daniel J.; Nesbitt, David J.

    2012-06-01

    Quantum state-resolved reactive and inelastic scattering at gas-liquid and gas-solid interfaces has become a research field of considerable interest in recent years. The collision and reaction dynamics of internally cold gas beams from liquid or solid surfaces is governed by two main processes, impulsive scattering (IS), where the incident particles scatter in a few-collisions environment from the surface, and trapping-desorption (TD), where full equilibration to the surface temperature (T{TD}≈ T{s}) occurs prior to the particles' return to the gas phase. Impulsive scattering events, on the other hand, result in significant rotational, and to a lesser extent vibrational, excitation of the scattered molecules, which can be well-described by a Boltzmann-distribution at a temperature (T{IS}>>T{s}). The quantum-state resolved detection used here allows the disentanglement of the rotational, vibrational, and translational degrees of freedom of the scattered molecules. The two examples discussed are (i) reactive scattering of monoatomic fluorine from room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) and (ii) inelastic scattering of benzene from a heated (˜500 K) gold surface. In the former experiment, rovibrational states of the nascent HF beam are detected using direct infrared absorption spectroscopy, and in the latter, a resonace-enhanced multi-photon-ionization (REMPI) scheme is employed in combination with a velocity-map imaging (VMI) device, which allows the detection of different vibrational states of benzene excited during the scattering process. M. E. Saecker, S. T. Govoni, D. V. Kowalski, M. E. King and G. M. Nathanson Science 252, 1421, 1991. A. M. Zolot, W. W. Harper, B. G. Perkins, P. J. Dagdigian and D. J. Nesbitt J. Chem. Phys 125, 021101, 2006. J. R. Roscioli and D. J. Nesbitt Faraday Disc. 150, 471, 2011.

  17. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: differential cross sections and product rotational alignment.

    PubMed

    Brouard, M; Chadwick, H; Gordon, S D S; Hornung, B; Nichols, B; Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Stolte, S

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm(-1) for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system.

  18. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) + Kr: Differential cross sections and product rotational alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Brouard, M. Chadwick, H.; Gordon, S. D. S.; Hornung, B.; Nichols, B.; Kłos, J.; Aoiz, F. J.; Stolte, S.

    2014-10-28

    Fully quantum state selected and resolved inelastic scattering of NO(X) by krypton has been investigated. Initial Λ-doublet state selection is achieved using an inhomogeneous hexapole electric field. Differential cross sections and even-moment polarization dependent differential cross sections have been obtained at a collision energy of 514 cm{sup −1} for both spin-orbit and parity conserving and changing collisions. Experimental results are compared with those obtained from quantum scattering calculations and are shown to be in very good agreement. Hard shell quantum scattering calculations are also performed to determine the effects of the different parts of the potential on the scattering dynamics. Comparisons are also made with the NO(X) + Ar system.

  19. Beyond-mean-field study of elastic and inelastic electron scattering off nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, J. M.; Bender, M.; Heenen, P.-H.

    2015-02-01

    Background: Electron scattering provides a powerful tool to determine charge distributions and transition densities of nuclei. This tool will soon be available for short-lived neutron-rich nuclei. Purpose: Beyond-mean-field methods have been successfully applied to the study of excitation spectra of nuclei in the whole nuclear chart. These methods permit determination of energies and transition probabilities starting from an effective in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction but without other phenomenological ingredients. Such a method has recently been extended to calculate the charge density of nuclei deformed at the mean-field level of approximation [J. M. Yao et al., Phys. Rev. C 86, 014310 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.014310]. The aim of this work is to further extend the method to the determination of transition densities between low-lying excited states. Method: The starting point of our method is a set of Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave functions generated with a constraint on the axial quadrupole moment and using a Skyrme energy density functional. Correlations beyond the mean field are introduced by projecting mean-field wave functions on angular momentum and particle number and by mixing the symmetry-restored wave functions. Results: We give in this paper detailed formulas derived for the calculation of densities and form factors. These formulas are rather easy to obtain when both initial and final states are 0+ states but are far from being trivial when one of the states has a finite J value. Illustrative applications to 24Mg and to the even-mass Ni-6858 have permitted an analysis of the main features of our method, in particular the effect of deformation on densities and form factors. An illustrative calculation of both elastic and inelastic scattering form factors is presented. Conclusions: We present a very general framework to calculate densities of and transition densities between low-lying states that can be applied to any nucleus. Achieving better

  20. Peripheral elastic and inelastic scattering of {sup 17,18}O on light targets at 12 MeV/nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Carstoiu, F.; Al-Abdullah, T.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Trache, L.

    2015-02-24

    The elastic and inelastic scattering of {sup 17,18}O with light targets has been undertaken at 12 MeV/nucleon in order to determine the optical potentials needed for the transfer reaction {sup 13}C({sup 17}O,{sup 18}O){sup 12}C. Optical potentials in both incoming and outgoing channels have been determined in a single experiment. This transfer reaction was used to infer the direct capture rate to the {sup 17}F(p,γ){sup 18}Ne which is essential to estimate the production of {sup 18}F at stellar energies in ONe novae. We demonstrate the stability of the ANC method and OMP results using good quality elastic and inelastic scattering data with stable beams. The peripherality of our reaction is inferred from a semiclassical decomposition of the total scattering amplitude into barrier and internal barrier components. Comparison between elastic scattering of {sup 17}O, {sup 18}O and {sup 16}O projectiles is made.

  1. Transverse dynamics of water across the melting point: A parallel neutron and x-ray inelastic scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Cunsolo A.; Kodituwakku C.; Bencivenga, F.; Frontzek, M.; Leu, b.M.; Said, A.H.

    2012-05-29

    Joint inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering measurements have been performed on heavy water across the melting point. The spectra bear clear evidence of low- and high-frequency inelastic shoulders related to transverse and longitudinal modes, respectively. Upon increasing the momentum transfer, the spectral shape evolves from a viscoelastic regime, where the low-frequency mode is clearly over-damped, toward an elastic one where its propagation becomes instead allowed. The crossover between the two regimes occurs whenever both the characteristic frequency and the linewidth of the low-frequency mode match the inverse of the structural relaxation time. Furthermore, we observe that the frequency of the transverse mode undergoes a discontinuity across the melting, whose extent reduces upon increasing the exchanged momentum.

  2. Combination of differential D∗± cross-section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Belousov, A.; Bertolin, A.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Buniatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Avila, K. B. Cantun; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dolinska, G.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Figiel, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hladky, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Iudin, A.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Kiesling, C.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Korol, Ie.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotanski, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Morozov, A.; Muhammad Nasir, N.; Müller, K.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, R. J.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Perez, E.; Perlanski, W.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Przybycien, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shushkevich, S.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Slominski, W.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Stanco, L.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Szuba, J.; Tassi, E.; Thompson, P. D.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Traynor, D.; Trofymov, A.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Wolf, G.; Wünsch, E.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Žáček, J.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2015-09-01

    H1 and ZEUS have published single-differential cross sections for inclusive D ∗±-meson production in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from their respective final data sets. These cross sections are combined in the common visible phase-space region of photon virtuality Q 2 > 5 GeV2, electron inelasticity 0 .02 < y < 0 .7 and the D ∗± meson's transverse momentum p T( D ∗) > 1 .5 GeV and pseudorapidity | η( D ∗)| < 1 .5. The combination procedure takes into account all correlations, yielding significantly reduced experimental uncertainties. Double-differential cross sections d2 σ/d Q 2d y are combined with earlier D ∗± data, extending the kinematic range down to Q 2 > 1 .5 GeV2. Perturbative next-to-leading-order QCD predictions are compared to the results.

  3. Vibrational dynamics of plant light-harvesting complex LHC II investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golub, Maksym; Irrgang, Klaus-Dieter; Rusevich, Leonid; Pieper, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Vibrational dynamics of the light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) from spinach was investigated by quasi- and inelastic neutron scattering (QENS and INS) at three different temperatures of 80, 160, and 285 K. QENS/INS spectra of solubilised LHC II and of the corresponding buffer solution were obtained separately and exhibit characteristic inelastic features. After subtraction of the buffer contribution, the INS spectrum of LHC II reveals a distinct Boson peak at ˜ 2.5 meV at 80 K that shifts towards lower energies if the temperature is increased to 285 K. This effect is interpreted in terms of a "softening" of the protein matrix along with the dynamical transition at ˜ 240 K. Our findings indicate that INS is a valuable method to obtain the density of vibrational states not only at cryogenic, but also at physiological temperatures.

  4. Theory of inelastic multiphonon scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors: Application to capture cross sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmparis, Georgios D.; Puzyrev, Yevgeniy S.; Zhang, X.-G.; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-12-01

    Inelastic scattering and carrier capture by defects in semiconductors are the primary causes of hot-electron-mediated degradation of power devices, which holds up their commercial development. At the same time, carrier capture is a major issue in the performance of solar cells and light-emitting diodes. A theory of nonradiative (multiphonon) inelastic scattering by defects, however, is nonexistent, while the theory for carrier capture by defects has had a long and arduous history. Here we report the construction of a comprehensive theory of inelastic scattering by defects, with carrier capture being a special case. We distinguish between capture under thermal equilibrium conditions and capture under nonequilibrium conditions, e.g., in the presence of an electrical current or hot carriers where carriers undergo scattering by defects and are described by a mean free path. In the thermal-equilibrium case, capture is mediated by a nonadiabatic perturbation Hamiltonian, originally identified by Huang and Rhys and by Kubo, which is equal to linear electron-phonon coupling to first order. In the nonequilibrium case, we demonstrate that the primary capture mechanism is within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation (adiabatic transitions), with coupling to the defect potential inducing Franck-Condon electronic transitions, followed by multiphonon dissipation of the transition energy, while the nonadiabatic terms are of secondary importance (they scale with the inverse of the mass of typical atoms in the defect complex). We report first-principles density-functional-theory calculations of the capture cross section for a prototype defect using the projector-augmented wave, which allows us to employ all-electron wave functions. We adopt a Monte Carlo scheme to sample multiphonon configurations and obtain converged results. The theory and the results represent a foundation upon which to build engineering-level models for hot-electron degradation of power devices and the performance

  5. Thulium-169 neutron inelastic scattering cross section measurements via the (169)Tm(n,n'gamma) reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Young June

    1999-11-01

    A neutron inelastic scattering study for low-lying states of thulium-169 below 1 MeV has been pursued by the detection of gamma rays from the 169Tm(n,n'γ) reaction. The inelastic level cross sections, which are important to obtain nuclear potential parameters and to understand reaction mechanisms, were obtained in this study. Incident neutrons were generated by bombarding a metallic lithium target with protons from the Lowell Van de Graaff accelerator. A germanium detector was used for gamma-ray observation. Excitation functions were measured from 0.2 to 1 MeV in 50 keV intervals at a scattering angle of 125°. Gamma-ray production cross sections were obtained for 37 observed transitions from 16 levels. Gamma-ray angular distributions from 35° to 135°, in 10° steps were measured at a neutron energy of 750 keV. The angular distributions were fitted with Legendre polynomials of even (up to fourth) order. Neutron inelastic level cross sections were inferred from the excitation functions and the angular distributions. Because cross-section data from previous experimental or theoretical work were not available, no direct comparison with previous work was made. A comparison of the magnitude and behavior of the (n,inelastic) cross section for thulium with those of neighboring odd-A nuclei indicated reasonable agreement. A classical model for angular momentum transfer indicates that states with spin >=/(+) may be excited only through the compound nucleus process, but for states with spin <=/(-) compound nucleus and direct interaction processes may both participate in the excitation.

  6. Validity of generalized scattering equations and corresponding inelastic-cross-section expressions for comprehensive electron diffraction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, L. J.; Josefsson, T. W.

    1996-05-01

    Generalized scattering equations for electron diffraction in a crystalline environment have recently been derived with the assumption that the zeroth-order Laue zone (ZOLZ) lies parallel to the crystal surface (or alternatively that the zone axis is parallel to the crystal surface normal) [L. J. Allen and T. W. Josefsson, Phys. Rev. B 52, 3184 (1995)]. The contribution from higher-order Laue zones (HOLZ's) was not considered. We show that these scattering equations are in fact valid for general orientations of the ZOLZ with respect to the crystal surface, except for the specific case where the ZOLZ lies perpendicular to the surface. Furthermore, a widely applicable expression for the cross section for any type of inelastic scattering in a crystal is shown to be valid for any orientation of the ZOLZ and allows the inclusion of reflections in the HOLZ's.

  7. Measurement of the A-dependence of the EMC effect and R in deep-inelastic electron scattering from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Rock, S.E.

    1984-08-01

    Significant differences in the inelastic structure functions of Fe, Al, and deuterium nuclei have recently been observed in muon and electron scattering experiments. This has been interpreted as a distortion of the quark momentum distributions in bound nucleons. To study the A-dependence of this effect, we have measured differential cross sections for the inelastic scattering of electrons from deuterium, He, Be, C, Al, Ca, Fe, Ag, and Au over a large kinematic range (x values between 0.09 and 0.9 and Q/sup 2/ values of 2, 5, 10, and 15 (GeV/c)/sup 2/). The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) provided electrons with incident energies (E) ranging from 8 to 24.5 GeV. The SLAC 8-GeV/c spectrometer was used at 23 settings to detect electrons with energies (E') from 3.1 to 8.4 GeV scattered at angles (theta) between 11 and 23/sup 0/.

  8. Inelastic electron scattering off a quantum dot in the cotunneling regime: The signature of mesoscopic Stoner instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Repin, E. V.; Burmistrov, I. S.

    2016-04-01

    We explore the inelastic electron-scattering cross section off a metallic quantum dot close to the Stoner instability. We focus on the regime of strong Coulomb blockade in which the scattering cross section is dominated by the cotunneling processes. For large enough exchange interaction, the quantum dot acquires a finite total spin in the ground state. In this so-called mesoscopic Stoner instability regime, we find that at low enough temperatures, the inelastic scattering cross section (including the contribution due to an elastic electron spin flip) for an electron with an energy close to the chemical potential is different from the case of a magnetic impurity with the same spin. This difference stems from (i) the presence of low-lying many-body states of a quantum dot and (ii) the correlations of the tunneling amplitudes. Our results provide a possible explanation for the absence of the dephasing rate saturation at low temperatures in a recent experiment [N. Teneh, A. Yu. Kuntsevich, V. M. Pudalov, and M. Reznikov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 226403 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.226403] in which the existence of local spin droplets in disordered electron liquid has been unraveled.

  9. Inelastic neutron scattering study of hydrogen in d(8)-THFD(2)O ice clathrate.

    PubMed

    Tait, Kimberly T; Trouw, Frans; Zhao, Yusheng; Brown, Craig M; Downs, Robert T

    2007-10-07

    In situ neutron inelastic scattering experiments on hydrogen adsorbed into a fully deutrated tetrahydrofuran-water ice clathrate show that the adsorbed hydrogen has three rotational excitations (transitions between J=0 and 1 states) at approximately 14 meV in both energy gain and loss. These transitions could be unequivocally assigned since there was residual orthohydrogen at low temperatures (slow conversion to the ground state) resulting in an observable J=1-->0 transition at 5 K (kT=0.48 meV). A doublet in neutron energy loss at approximately 28.5 meV is interpreted as J=1-->2 transitions. In addition to the transitions between rotational states, there are a series of peaks that arise from transitions between center-of-mass translational quantum states of the confined hydrogen molecule. A band at approximately 9 meV can be unequivocally interpreted as a transition between translational states, while broad features at 20, 25, 35, and 50-60 meV are also interpreted to as transitions between translational quantum states. A detailed comparison is made with a recent five-dimensional quantum treatment of hydrogen in the smaller dodecahedral cage in the SII ice-clathrate structure. Although there is broad agreement regarding the features such as the splitting of the J=1 degeneracy, the magnitude of the external potential is overestimated. The numerous transitions between translational states predicted by this model are in poor agreement with the experimental data. Comparisons are also made with three simple exactly solved models, namely, a particle in a box, a particle in a sphere, and a particle on the surface of a sphere. Again, there are too many predicted features by the first two models, but there is reasonable agreement with the particle on a sphere model. This is consistent with published quantum chemistry results for hydrogen in the dodecahedral 5(12) cage, where the center of the cage is found to be energetically unfavorable, resulting in a shell

  10. Ab initio calculations as a quantitative tool in the inelastic neutron scattering study of a single-molecule magnet analogue.

    PubMed

    Vonci, Michele; Giansiracusa, Marcus J; Gable, Robert W; Van den Heuvel, Willem; Latham, Kay; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S; Yu, Dehong; Mole, Richard A; Soncini, Alessandro; Boskovic, Colette

    2016-02-04

    Ab initio calculations carried out on the Tb analogue of the single-molecule magnet family Na9[Ln(W5O18)2] (Ln = Nd, Gd, Ho and Er) have allowed interpretation of the inelastic neutron scattering spectra. The combined experimental and theoretical approach sheds new light on the sensitivity of the electronic structure of the Tb(III) ground and excited states to small structural distortions from axial symmetry, thus revealing the subtle relationship between molecular geometry and magnetic properties of the two isostructural species that comprise the sample.

  11. Contribution of twist-3 multigluon correlation functions to single spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beppu, Hiroo; Yoshida, Shinsuke; Koike, Yuji; Tanaka, Kazuhiro

    2010-09-01

    As a possible source of the single transverse-spin asymmetry, we study the contribution from purely gluonic correlation represented by the twist-3 ''three-gluon correlation'' functions in the transversely polarized nucleon. We first define a complete set of the relevant three-gluon correlation functions, and then derive its contribution to the twist-3 single-spin-dependent cross section for the D-meson production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, which is relevant to determine the three-gluon correlations. Our cross-section formula differs from the corresponding result in the literature, and the origin of the discrepancy is clarified.

  12. Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering spectrometer with 25meV resolution at the Cu K -edge

    DOE PAGES

    Ketenoglu, Didem; Harder, Manuel; Klementiev, Konstantin; ...

    2015-06-27

    An unparalleled resolution is reported with an inelastic X-ray scattering instrument at the CuK-edge. Based on a segmented concave analyzer, featuring single-crystal quartz (SiO2) pixels, the spectrometer delivers a resolution near 25meV (FWHM) at 8981eV. Besides the quartz analyzer, the performance of the spectrometer relies on a four-bounce Si(553) high-resolution monochromator and focusing Kirkpatrick–Baez optics. The measured resolution agrees with the ray-tracing simulation of an ideal spectrometer. The performance of the spectrometer is demonstrated by reproducing the phonon dispersion curve of a beryllium single-crystal.

  13. Influence of magnetism on phonons in CaFe2As2 as seen via inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, S.E.; Lee, Y.; Ni, N.; Canfield, P.C.; Goldman, A.I.; McQueeney, R.J.; Harmon, B.N.; Alatas, A.; Leu, B.M.; Alp, E.E.; Chung, D.Y.; Todorov, I.S.; Kanatzidis, M.G.

    2009-06-19

    In the iron pnictides, the strong sensitivity of the iron magnetic moment to the arsenic position suggests a significant relationship between phonons and magnetism. We measured the phonon dispersion of several branches in the high-temperature tetragonal phase of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} using inelastic x-ray scattering on single-crystal samples. These measurements were compared to ab initio calculations of the phonons. Spin-polarized calculations imposing the antiferromagnetic order present in the low-temperature orthorhombic phase dramatically improve agreement between theory and experiment. This is discussed in terms of the strong antiferromagnetic correlations that are known to persist in the tetragonal phase.

  14. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism of CeFe2 by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaouen, N.; Chiuzbăian, S. G.; Hague, C. F.; Delaunay, R.; Baumier, C.; Lüning, J.; Rogalev, A.; Schmerber, G.; Kappler, J.-P.

    2010-05-01

    We have measured the CeL x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) in ferromagnetic CeFe2 using the partial fluorescence yield given by the Ce2p3d resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) spectrum. The lifetime broadening of the 3d core hole is four times smaller than that of the Ce2p core hole providing improved resolution over earlier experiments. Clear evidence for a 4f2 , 4f1 , 4f0 strongly mixed-valent ground state is observed confirming, by and large, impurity Anderson model predictions which take into account the RIXS XMCD geometrical dependence.

  15. The single particle dynamics of iodine in the Sachs-Teller regime: An inelastic x-ray scattering study

    SciTech Connect

    Izzo, M. G.; Bencivenga, F.; Di Fonzo, S.; Cunsolo, A.; Verbeni, R.; De Lorenzo, R. Gimenez

    2010-09-28

    The high frequency dynamics of liquid iodine has been investigated by deep inelastic x-ray scattering at exchanged wave-vectors (q) ranging from 2.5 to 15 A{sup -1}. The experimental data have been analyzed in the frame of the Sachs-Teller theory of the molecular spectrum while accounting for final state corrections to the lineshape. The performed data analysis carries insights on physical quantities as relevant as the mean rototranslational kinetic energy and the mean square Laplacian of the intermolecular potential. In both cases the measured values are consistent with corresponding theoretical expectations.

  16. Measurement of Charged and Neutral Current e-p Deep Inelastic Scattering Cross Sections at High Q2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derrick, M.; Krakauer, D.; Magill, S.; Mikunas, D.; Musgrave, B.; Repond, J.; Stanek, R.; Talaga, R. L.; Zhang, H.; Ayad, R.; Bari, G.; Basile, M.; Bellagamba, L.; Boscherini, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruni, P.; Cara Romeo, G.; Castellini, G.; Chiarini, M.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Corradi, M.; Gialas, I.; Giusti, P.; Iacobucci, G.; Laurenti, G.; Levi, G.; Margotti, A.; Massam, T.; Nania, R.; Nemoz, C.; Palmonari, F.; Polini, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Timellini, R.; Zamora Garcia, Y.; Zichichi, A.; Bargende, A.; Crittenden, J.; Desch, K.; Diekmann, B.; Doeker, T.; Eckert, M.; Feld, L.; Frey, A.; Geerts, M.; Geitz, G.; Grothe, M.; Haas, T.; Hartmann, H.; Haun, D.; Heinloth, K.; Hilger, E.; Jakob, H.-P.; Katz, U. F.; Mari, S. M.; Mass, A.; Mengel, S.; Mollen, J.; Paul, E.; Rembser, Ch.; Schattevoy, R.; Schramm, D.; Stamm, J.; Wedemeyer, R.; Campbell-Robson, S.; Cassidy, A.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; George, S.; Gilmore, R.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Llewellyn, T. J.; Morgado, C. J.; Norman, D. J.; O'Mara, J. A.; Tapper, R. J.; Wilson, S. S.; Yoshida, R.; Rau, R. R.; Arneodo, M.; Iannotti, L.; Schioppa, M.; Susinno, G.; Bernstein, A.; Caldwell, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Parsons, J. A.; Ritz, S.; Sciulli, F.; Straub, P. B.; Wai, L.; Yang, S.; Zhu, Q.; Borzemski, P.; Chwastowski, J.; Eskreys, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Zachara, M.; Zawiejski, L.; Adamczyk, L.; Bednarek, B.; Jeleń, K.; Kisielewska, D.; Kowalski, T.; Rulikowska-Zarȩbska, E.; Suszycki, L.; ZajaÇ, J.; Kotański, A.; Przybycień, M.; Bauerdick, L. A.; Behrens, U.; Beier, H.; Bienlein, J. K.; Coldewey, C.; Deppe, O.; Desler, K.; Drews, G.; Flasiński, M.; Gilkinson, D. J.; Glasman, C.; Göttlicher, P.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Gutjahr, B.; Hain, W.; Hasell, D.; Hessling, H.; Hultschig, H.; Iga, Y.; Joos, P.; Kasemann, M.; Klanner, R.; Koch, W.; Köpke, L.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Labs, J.; Ladage, A.; Löhr, B.; Löwe, M.; Lüke, D.; Mańczak, O.; Ng, J. S.; Nickel, S.; Notz, D.; Ohrenberg, K.; Roco, M.; Rohde, M.; Roldán, J.; Schneekloth, U.; Schulz, W.; Selonke, F.; Stiliaris, E.; Surrow, B.; Voss, T.; Westphal, D.; Wolf, G.; Youngman, C.; Zhou, J. F.; Grabosch, H. J.; Kharchilava, A.; Leich, A.; Mattingly, M.; Meyer, A.; Schlenstedt, S.; Wulff, N.; Barbagli, G.; Pelfer, P.; Anzivino, G.; Maccarrone, G.; de Pasquale, S.; Votano, L.; Bamberger, A.; Eisenhardt, S.; Freidhof, A.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Schroeder, J.; Trefzger, T.; Brook, N. H.; Bussey, P. J.; Doyle, A. T.; Fleck, J. I.; Saxon, D. H.; Utley, M. L.; Wilson, A. S.; Dannemann, A.; Holm, U.; Horstmann, D.; Neumann, T.; Sinkus, R.; Wick, K.; Badura, E.; Burow, B. D.; Hagge, L.; Lohrmann, E.; Mainusch, J.; Milewski, J.; Nakahata, M.; Pavel, N.; Poelz, G.; Schott, W.; Zetsche, F.; Bacon, T. C.; Butterworth, I.; Gallo, E.; Harris, V. L.; Hung, B. Y.; Long, K. R.; Miller, D. B.; Morawitz, P. P.; Prinias, A.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Whitfield, A. F.; Mallik, U.; McCliment, E.; Wang, M. Z.; Wang, S. M.; Wu, J. T.; Zhang, Y.; Cloth, P.; Filges, D.; An, S. H.; Hong, S. M.; Nam, S. W.; Park, S. K.; Suh, M. H.; Yon, S. H.; Imlay, R.; Kartik, S.; Kim, H.-J.; McNeil, R. R.; Metcalf, W.; Nadendla, V. K.; Barreiro, F.; Cases, G.; Graciani, R.; Hernández, J. M.; Hervás, L.; Labarga, L.; del Peso, J.; Puga, J.; Terron, J.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Smith, G. R.; Corriveau, F.; Hanna, D. S.; Hartmann, J.; Hung, L. W.; Lim, J. N.; Matthews, C. G.; Patel, P. M.; Sinclair, L. E.; Stairs, D. G.; St. Laurent, M.; Ullmann, R.; Zacek, G.; Bashkirov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Stifutkin, A.; Bashindzhagyan, G. L.; Ermolov, P. F.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Kobrin, V. D.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Savin, A. A.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Solomin, A. N.; Zotov, N. P.; Botje, M.; Chlebana, F.; Dake, A.; Engelen, J.; de Kamps, M.; Kooijman, P.; Kruse, A.; Tiecke, H.; Verkerke, W.; Vreeswijk, M.; Wiggers, L.; de Wolf, E.; van Woudenberg, R.; Acosta, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Honscheid, K.; Li, C.; Ling, T. Y.; McLean, K. W.; Murray, W. N.; Park, I. H.; Romanowski, T. A.; Seidlein, R.; Bailey, D. S.; Blair, G. A.; Byrne, A.; Cashmore, R. J.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Daniels, D.; Devenish, R. C.; Harnew, N.; Lancaster, M.; Luffman, P. E.; Lindemann, L.; McFall, J. D.; Nath, C.; Noyes, V. A.; Quadt, A.; Uijterwaal, H.; Walczak, R.; Wilson, F. F.; Yip, T.; Abbiendi, G.; Bertolin, A.; Brugnera, R.; Carlin, R.; dal Corso, F.; de Giorgi, M.; Dosselli, U.; Limentani, S.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Stanco, L.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Bulmahn, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Feild, R. G.; Oh, B. Y.; Whitmore, J. J.; D'Agostini, G.; Marini, G.; Nigro, A.; Tassi, E.; Hart, J. C.; McCubbin, N. A.; Prytz, K.; Shah, T. P.; Short, T. L.; Barberis, E.; Dubbs, T.; Heusch, C.; van Hook, M.; Hubbard, B.; Lockman, W.; Rahn, J. T.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Biltzinger, J.; Schwarzer, O.; Seifert, R. J.; Walenta, A. H.; Zech, G.; Abramowicz, H.; Briskin, G.; Dagan, S.; Levy, A.; Hasegawa, T.; Hazumi, M.; Ishii, T.; Kuze, M.; Mine, S.; Nagasawa, Y.; Nakao, M.; Suzuki, I.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Chiba, M.; Hamatsu, R.; Hirose, T.; Homma, K.; Kitamura, S.; Nakamitsu, Y.; Yamauchi, K.; Cirio, R.; Costa, M.; Ferrero, M. I.; Lamberti, L.; Maselli, S.; Peroni, C.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Dardo, M.; Bailey, D. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Benard, F.; Brkic, M.; Crombie, M. B.; Gingrich, D. M.; Hartner, G. F.; Joo, K. K.; Levman, G. M.; Martin, J. F.; Orr, R. S.; Sampson, C. R.; Teuscher, R. J.; Catterall, C. D.; Jones, T. W.; Kaziewicz, P. B.; Lane, J. B.; Saunders, R. L.; Shulman, J.; Blankenship, K.; Kochocki, J.; Lu, B.; Mo, L. W.; Bogusz, W.; Charchuła, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gajewski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Kasprzak, M.; Krzyżanowski, M.; Muchorowski, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Pawlak, J. M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Wróblewski, A. K.; Zakrzewski, J. A.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Adamus, M.; Eisenberg, Y.; Karshon, U.; Revel, D.; Zer-Zion, D.; Ali, I.; Badgett, W. F.; Behrens, B.; Dasu, S.; Fordham, C.; Foudas, C.; Goussiou, A.; Loveless, R. J.; Reeder, D. D.; Silverstein, S.; Smith, W. H.; Vaiciulis, A.; Wodarczyk, M.; Tsurugai, T.; Bhadra, S.; Cardy, M. L.; Fagerstroem, C.-P.; Frisken, W. R.; Furutani, K. M.; Khakzad, M.; Schmidke, W. B.

    1995-08-01

    Deep inelastic e-p scattering has been studied in both the charged current (CC) and neutral current (NC) reactions at momentum transfers squared Q2 above 400 GeV2 using the ZEUS detector at the HERA ep collider. The CC and NC total cross sections, the NC to CC cross section ratio, and the differential cross sections dσ/dQ2 are presented. From the Q2 dependence of the CC cross section, the mass term in the CC propagator is determined to be MW = 76+/-16+/-13 GeV.

  17. A setup for resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering on liquids at free electron laser light sources

    SciTech Connect

    Kunnus, Kristjan; Schreck, Simon; Foehlisch, Alexander; Eckert, Sebastian; Beye, Martin; Suljoti, Edlira; Weniger, Christian; Wernet, Philippe; Kalus, Christian; Nordlund, Dennis; Zhang, Wenkai; Hartsock, Robert W.; Gaffney, Kelly J.; Schlotter, William F.; Turner, Joshua J.; Kennedy, Brian; and others

    2012-12-15

    We present a flexible and compact experimental setup that combines an in vacuum liquid jet with an x-ray emission spectrometer to enable static and femtosecond time-resolved resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) measurements from liquids at free electron laser (FEL) light sources. We demonstrate the feasibility of this type of experiments with the measurements performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source FEL facility. At the FEL we observed changes in the RIXS spectra at high peak fluences which currently sets a limit to maximum attainable count rate at FELs. The setup presented here opens up new possibilities to study the structure and dynamics in liquids.

  18. Theory of inelastic ion-atom scattering at low and intermediate energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, G. B.; Garcia, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are presented of inelastic energy loss and ionization phenomena associated with Ar(+)-Ar collisions at small distances of closest approach and for laboratory collision energies ranging from several keV to several hundred keV. Outer-shell excitations are handled statistically; inner-shell excitations are calculated from the viewpoint of quasidiabatic molecular orbital promotion. Auger electron yield, average state of ionization, and average inelastic energy loss are calculated per collision as a function of distance of closest approach of the collision partners for several laboratory collision energies. Average charge-state probabilities per collision partner are calculated as a function of the average inelastic energy loss per atom. It is shown that the structure in the data is due to the underlying structure in the inner-shell independent-electron quasimolecular promotion probabilities.

  19. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  20. Quantum state resolved inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics in molecular systems via high resolution IR laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, William Brewster

    This thesis describes a series of experiments undertaken to investigate inelastic and reactive molecular collision dynamics at the quantum-state resolved level of detail. First, time- and frequency-resolved infrared laser absorption is used to probe state-resolved collisional energy transfer in scattering of fast C1(2P3/2) radicals with room temperature HCl molecules. Final state distributions of HCl are monitored via transient infrared laser absorption yielding absolute integral collisional cross sections for energy transfer into final rotational states. Analysis of translational distributions inferred from high-resolution infrared Dopplerimetry leads to state-resolved differential scattering cross sections, which exhibit forward scattering into all observed levels. Results are compared with quasiclassical trajectory calculations on a recently proposed potential surface. Second, absolute state-to-state cross sections are reported for rotationally inelastic scattering of HF, CH4, and H2O with rare gases in crossed supersonic jets. Column-integrated densities of HF, CH4, and H2O in initial and final scattering states are probed in the jet intersection region via direct infrared laser absorption. Total inelastic cross sections for loss out of rotational ground states and excitation into higher states are determined in absolute units from the dependence of infrared absorption signals on collider gas concentration. Comparison is made with close coupling calculations performed on best available potential energy surfaces for each of the scattering systems. Finally, fluorine radicals from a pulsed discharge source are crossed with supersonically cooled hydrogen molecules to study the F + H2 /to HF(v,J) + H reaction under single collision conditions. HF(v,J) product states are probed with complete rovibrational state resolution via direct infrared laser absorption. The nascent HF(v,J) state distribution is measured for all populated vibrational manifolds at a collision

  1. Advanced in-situ measurement of soil carbon content using inelastic neutron scattering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement and mapping of natural and anthropogenic variations in soil carbon stores is a critical component of any soil resource evaluation process. Emerging modalities for soil carbon analysis in the field is the registration of gamma rays from soil under neutron irradiation. The inelastic neutro...

  2. The application of inelastic neutron scattering to investigate the steam reforming of methane over an alumina-supported nickel catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McFarlane, Andrew R.; Silverwood, Ian P.; Norris, Elizabeth L.; Ormerod, R. Mark; Frost, Christopher D.; Parker, Stewart F.; Lennon, David

    2013-12-01

    An alumina-supported nickel catalyst, previously used in methane reforming experiments employing CO2 as the oxidant, is applied here in the steam reforming variant of the process. Micro-reactor experiments are used to discern an operational window compatible with sample cells designed for inelastic neutron scattering (INS) experiments. INS spectra are recorded after 6 h reaction of a 1:1 mixture of CH4 and H2O at 898 K. Weak INS spectra are observed, indicating minimal hydrogen retention by the catalyst in this operational regime. Post-reaction, the catalyst is further characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and Raman scattering. In a comparable fashion to that seen for the ‘dry’ reforming experiments, the catalyst retains substantial quantities of carbon in the form of filamentous coke. The role for hydrogen incorporation by the catalyst is briefly considered.

  3. Measurement of 56Fe activity produced in inelastic scattering of neutrons created by cosmic muons in an iron shield.

    PubMed

    Krmar, M; Jovančević, N; Nikolić, D

    2012-01-01

    We report on the study of the intensities of several gamma lines emitted after the inelastic scattering of neutrons in (56)Fe. Neutrons were produced via nuclear processes induced by cosmic muons in the 20tons massive iron cube placed at the Earth's surface and used as a passive shield for the HPGe detector. Relative intensities of detected gamma lines are compared with the results collected in the same iron shield by the use of the (252)Cf neutrons. Assessment against the published data from neutron scattering experiments at energies up to 14MeV is also provided. It allowed us to infer the qualitative information about the average energy of muon-created neutrons in the iron shield.

  4. Isospin character of low-lying pygmy dipole states in 208Pb via inelastic scattering of 17O ions.

    PubMed

    Crespi, F C L; Bracco, A; Nicolini, R; Mengoni, D; Pellegri, L; Lanza, E G; Leoni, S; Maj, A; Kmiecik, M; Avigo, R; Benzoni, G; Blasi, N; Boiano, C; Bottoni, S; Brambilla, S; Camera, F; Ceruti, S; Giaz, A; Million, B; Morales, A I; Vandone, V; Wieland, O; Bednarczyk, P; Ciemała, M; Grebosz, J; Krzysiek, M; Mazurek, K; Zieblinski, M; Bazzacco, D; Bellato, M; Birkenbach, B; Bortolato, D; Calore, E; Cederwall, B; Charles, L; de Angelis, G; Désesquelles, P; Eberth, J; Farnea, E; Gadea, A; Görgen, A; Gottardo, A; Isocrate, R; Jolie, J; Jungclaus, A; Karkour, N; Korten, W; Menegazzo, R; Michelagnoli, C; Molini, P; Napoli, D R; Pullia, A; Recchia, F; Reiter, P; Rosso, D; Sahin, E; Salsac, M D; Siebeck, B; Siem, S; Simpson, J; Söderström, P-A; Stezowski, O; Theisen, Ch; Ur, C; Valiente-Dobón, J J

    2014-07-04

    The properties of pygmy dipole states in 208Pb were investigated using the 208Pb(17O, 17O'γ) reaction at 340 MeV and measuring the γ decay with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array. Cross sections and angular distributions of the emitted γ rays and of the scattered particles were measured. The results are compared with (γ, γ') and (p, p') data. The data analysis with the distorted wave Born approximation approach gives a good description of the elastic scattering and of the inelastic excitation of the 2+ and 3- states. For the dipole transitions a form factor obtained by folding a microscopically calculated transition density was used for the first time. This has allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states from 4 to 8 MeV.

  5. Isospin Character of Low-Lying Pygmy Dipole States in Pb208 via Inelastic Scattering of O17 Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, F. C. L.; Bracco, A.; Nicolini, R.; Mengoni, D.; Pellegri, L.; Lanza, E. G.; Leoni, S.; Maj, A.; Kmiecik, M.; Avigo, R.; Benzoni, G.; Blasi, N.; Boiano, C.; Bottoni, S.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Ceruti, S.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Morales, A. I.; Vandone, V.; Wieland, O.; Bednarczyk, P.; Ciemała, M.; Grebosz, J.; Krzysiek, M.; Mazurek, K.; Zieblinski, M.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Birkenbach, B.; Bortolato, D.; Calore, E.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; de Angelis, G.; Désesquelles, P.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Gadea, A.; Görgen, A.; Gottardo, A.; Isocrate, R.; Jolie, J.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Korten, W.; Menegazzo, R.; Michelagnoli, C.; Molini, P.; Napoli, D. R.; Pullia, A.; Recchia, F.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M. D.; Siebeck, B.; Siem, S.; Simpson, J.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stezowski, O.; Theisen, Ch.; Ur, C.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.

    2014-07-01

    The properties of pygmy dipole states in Pb208 were investigated using the Pb208(O17, O17'γ) reaction at 340 MeV and measuring the γ decay with high resolution with the AGATA demonstrator array. Cross sections and angular distributions of the emitted γ rays and of the scattered particles were measured. The results are compared with (γ, γ') and (p, p') data. The data analysis with the distorted wave Born approximation approach gives a good description of the elastic scattering and of the inelastic excitation of the 2+ and 3- states. For the dipole transitions a form factor obtained by folding a microscopically calculated transition density was used for the first time. This has allowed us to extract the isoscalar component of the 1- excited states from 4 to 8 MeV.

  6. Resonances in rotationally inelastic scattering of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} with H{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Qianli; Dagdigian, Paul J.; Avoird, Ad van der Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T. van de; Loreau, Jérôme

    2015-07-28

    We present theoretical studies on the scattering resonances in rotationally inelastic collisions of NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} molecules with H{sub 2} molecules. We use the quantum close-coupling method to compute state-to-state integral and differential cross sections for the NH{sub 3}/ND{sub 3}–H{sub 2} system for collision energies between 5 and 70 cm{sup −1}, using a previously reported potential energy surface [Maret et al., Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 399, 425 (2009)]. We identify the resonances as shape or Feshbach resonances. To analyze these, we use an adiabatic bender model, as well as examination at the scattering wave functions and lifetimes. The strength and width of the resonance peaks suggest that they could be observed in a crossed molecular beam experiment involving a Stark-decelerated NH{sub 3} beam.

  7. /sup 74,76,78,80,82/Se by inelastic scattering of 64. 8 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Ogino, K.

    1986-01-01

    The inelastic scattering of 64.8 MeV protons has been studied on the stable even XU YSSe isotopes. The inelastically scattered protons were momentum analyzed in a magnetic spectrograph with a resulting energy resolution of approximately 20 keV. Levels up to the excitation energy of about 5 MeV were investigated. Many new levels were observed for the isotopes studied. The angular distributions obtained were compared with the predictions of distorted-wave Born approximation and coupled-channels calculations and a number of new spin assignments were proposed. Several 4 states with comparable strengths were found at about E/sub x/ = 2.0--5.0 MeV, showing large fragmentation of octupole and hexadecapole transition strengths, in contrast to the case of Zn isotopes. The distributions of the transition strengths for the 2 , 3 , and 4 states were compared with the theoretical calculations based on the random-phase-approximation model for spherical nuclei.

  8. Role of Inelastic Electron–Phonon Scattering in Electron Transport through Ultra-Scaled Amorphous Phase Change Material Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Xu, Xu; Anantram, M.P.

    2014-09-01

    The electron transport through ultra-scaled amorphous phase change material (PCM) GeTe is investigated by using ab initio molecular dynamics, density functional theory, and non-equilibrium Green’s function, and the inelastic electron–phonon scattering is accounted for by using the Born approximation. It is shown that, in ultra-scaled PCM device with 6 nm channel length, < 4 % of the energy carried by the incident electrons from the source is transferred to the atomic lattice before reaching the drain, indicating that the electron transport is largely elastic. Our simulation results show that the inelastic electron–phonon scattering, which plays an important role to excite trapped electrons in bulk PCM devices, exerts very limited influence on the current density value and the shape of current–voltage curve of ultra-scaled PCM devices. The analysis reveals that the Poole–Frenkel law and the Ohm’s law, which are the governing physical mechanisms of the bulk PCM devices, cease to be valid in the ultra-scaled PCM devices.

  9. Combination and QCD analysis of charm production cross section measurements in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bołd, T.; Brümmer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hüttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jönsson, L.; Jüngst, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Kötz, U.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kowalski, H.; Krämer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Löhr, B.; Lohmann, W.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O. Y.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Müller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Y.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pluciński, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Šálek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schönberg, V.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wünsch, E.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zichichi, A.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2013-02-01

    Measurements of open charm production cross sections in deep-inelastic ep scattering at HERA from the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations are combined. Reduced cross sections σ_red^{cbar{c}} for charm production are obtained in the kinematic range of photon virtuality 2.5≤ Q 2≤2000 GeV2 and Bjorken scaling variable 3ṡ10-5≤ x≤5ṡ10-2. The combination method accounts for the correlations of the systematic uncertainties among the different data sets. The combined charm data together with the combined inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from HERA are used as input for a detailed NLO QCD analysis to study the influence of different heavy flavour schemes on the parton distribution functions. The optimal values of the charm mass as a parameter in these different schemes are obtained. The implications on the NLO predictions for W ± and Z production cross sections at the LHC are investigated. Using the fixed flavour number scheme, the running mass of the charm quark is determined.

  10. Energy loss of proton, alpha particle, and electron beams in hafnium dioxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Behar, Moni; Fadanelli, Raul C.; Nagamine, Luiz C. C. M.; Abril, Isabel; Denton, Cristian D.; Garcia-Molina, Rafael; Arista, Nestor R.

    2009-12-15

    The electronic stopping power, S, of HfO{sub 2} films for proton and alpha particle beams has been measured and calculated. The experimental data have been obtained by the Rutherford backscattering technique and cover the range of 120-900 and 120-3000 keV for proton and alpha particle beams, respectively. Theoretical calculations of the energy loss for the same projectiles have been done by means of the dielectric formalism using the Mermin energy loss function--generalized oscillator strength (MELF-GOS) model for a proper description of the HfO{sub 2} target on the whole momentum-energy excitation spectrum. At low projectile energies, a nonlinear theory based on the extended Friedel sum rule has been employed. The calculations and experimental measurements show good agreement for protons and a quite good one for alpha particles. In particular, the experimental maximums of both stopping curves (around 120 and 800 keV, respectively) are well reproduced. On the basis of this good agreement, we have also calculated the inelastic mean-free path (IMFP) and the stopping power for electrons in HfO{sub 2} films. Our results predict a minimum value of the IMFP and a maximum value of the S for electrons with energies around 120 and 190 eV, respectively.

  11. Temperature dependence of the low frequency dynamics of myoglobin. Measurement of the vibrational frequency distribution by inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, S; Doster, W

    1990-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering spectra of myoglobin hydrated to 0.33 g water (D2O)/g protein have been measured in the low frequency range (1-150 cm-1) at various temperatures between 100 and 350 K. The spectra at low temperatures show a well-resolved maximum in the incoherent dynamic structure factor Sinc(q, omega) at approximately 25 cm-1 and no elastic broadening. This maximum becomes gradually less distinct above 180 K due to the increasing amplitude of quasielastic scattering which extends out to 30 cm-1. The vibrational frequency distribution derived independently at 100 and 180 K are very similar, suggesting harmonic behavior at these temperatures. This result has been used to separate the vibrational motion from the quasielastic motion at temperatures above 180 K. The form of the density of states of myoglobin is discussed in relation to that of other amorphous systems, to theoretical calculations of low frequency modes in proteins, and to previous observations by electron-spin relaxation of fractal-like spectral properties of proteins. The onset of quasielastic scattering above 180 K is indicative of a dynamic transition of the system and correlates with an anomalous increase in the atomic mean-squared displacements observed by Mössbauer spectroscopy (Parak, F., E. W. Knapp, and D. Kucheida. 1982. J. Mol. Biol. 161: 177-194.) and inelastic neutron scattering (Doster, W., S. Cusack, and W. Petry, 1989. Nature [Lond.]. 337: 754-756.) Similar behavior is observed for a hydrated powder of lysozyme suggesting that the low frequency dynamics of globular proteins have common features. PMID:2166599

  12. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Diancheng

    2013-12-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) offers us a useful tool to study the weak neutral couplings and the hadronic structure of the nucleon, and provides high precision tests on the Standard Model. During the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the parity-violating asymmetries A{sub PV} of a polarized electron beam scattering off an unpolarized deuteron target in the deep inelastic scattering region were precisely measured at two Q2 values of 1.1 and 1.9 (GeV/c)2. The asymmetry at Q2=1.9 (GeV/c)2 can be used to extract the weak coupling combination 2C2u - C2d, assuming the higher twist effect is small. The extracted result from this measurement is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and improves the precision by a factor of five over previous data. In addition, combining the asymmetries at both Q2 values provides us extra knowledge on the higher twist effects. The parity violation asymmetries in the resonance region were also measured during this experiment. These results are the first APV data in the resonance region beyond the Δ (1232). They provide evidence that the quark hadron duality works for APV at the (10-15)% level, and set constraints on nucleon resonance models that are commonly used for background calculations to other parity-violating electron scattering measurements.

  13. Directly Characterizing the Relative Strength and Momentum Dependence of Electron-Phonon Coupling Using Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Devereaux, T. P.; Shvaika, A. M.; Wu, K.; Wohlfeld, K.; Jia, C. J.; Wang, Y.; Moritz, B.; Chaix, L.; Lee, W. -S.; Shen, Z. -X.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    2016-10-25

    The coupling between lattice and charge degrees of freedom in condensed matter materials is ubiquitous and can often result in interesting properties and ordered phases, including conventional superconductivity, charge-density wave order, and metal-insulator transitions. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering serve as effective probes for determining the behavior of appropriate, individual degrees of freedom—the electronic structure and lattice excitation, or phonon dispersion, respectively. However, each provides less direct information about the mutual coupling between the degrees of freedom, usually through self-energy effects, which tend to renormalize and broaden spectral features precisely where the coupling is strong, impacting one’s ability to quantitatively characterize the coupling. Here, we demonstrate that resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, or RIXS, can be an effective tool to directly determine the relative strength and momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling in condensed matter systems. Using a diagrammatic approach for an eight-band model of copper oxides, we study the contributions from the lowest-order diagrams to the full RIXS intensity for a realistic scattering geometry, accounting for matrix element effects in the scattering cross section, as well as the momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling vertex. A detailed examination of these maps offers a unique perspective into the characteristics of electron-phonon coupling, which complements both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering, as well as Raman and infrared conductivity.

  14. Directly Characterizing the Relative Strength and Momentum Dependence of Electron-Phonon Coupling Using Resonant Inelastic X-Ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devereaux, T. P.; Shvaika, A. M.; Wu, K.; Wohlfeld, K.; Jia, C. J.; Wang, Y.; Moritz, B.; Chaix, L.; Lee, W.-S.; Shen, Z.-X.; Ghiringhelli, G.; Braicovich, L.

    2016-10-01

    The coupling between lattice and charge degrees of freedom in condensed matter materials is ubiquitous and can often result in interesting properties and ordered phases, including conventional superconductivity, charge-density wave order, and metal-insulator transitions. Angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering serve as effective probes for determining the behavior of appropriate, individual degrees of freedom—the electronic structure and lattice excitation, or phonon dispersion, respectively. However, each provides less direct information about the mutual coupling between the degrees of freedom, usually through self-energy effects, which tend to renormalize and broaden spectral features precisely where the coupling is strong, impacting one's ability to quantitatively characterize the coupling. Here, we demonstrate that resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, or RIXS, can be an effective tool to directly determine the relative strength and momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling in condensed matter systems. Using a diagrammatic approach for an eight-band model of copper oxides, we study the contributions from the lowest-order diagrams to the full RIXS intensity for a realistic scattering geometry, accounting for matrix element effects in the scattering cross section, as well as the momentum dependence of the electron-phonon coupling vertex. A detailed examination of these maps offers a unique perspective into the characteristics of electron-phonon coupling, which complements both neutron and nonresonant x-ray scattering, as well as Raman and infrared conductivity.

  15. Energy dissipation in heavy systems: the transition from quasi-elastic to deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.E.; van den Berg, A.; Kolata, J.J.; Kovar, D.G.; Kutschera, W.; Rosner, G.; Stephans, G.S.F.; Yntema, J.L.; Lee, L.L.

    1984-01-01

    The interaction of medium mass projectiles (A = 28 - 64) with /sup 208/Pb has been studied using a split-pole spectrograph which allows single mass and charge identification. The reaction process in all systems studied so far is dominated by quasi-elastic neutron transfer reactions, especially at incident energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier. In addition to the quasi-elastic component deep inelastic contributions are present in all reaction channels. The good mass and charge separation allows to generate Wilczynski plots for individual channels; for the system /sup 48/Ti + /sup 208/Pb we observe that the transition between the quasi-elastic and deep-inelastic reactions occurs around Q = -(30 to 35) MeV.

  16. Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.; Strniste, G.F.; Tokita, N.

    1984-11-01

    Cell inactivation and induced mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus have been measured in cultured human fibroblasts (GM10) exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 238/ Pu and 250 kVp X rays. The survival curves resulting from exposure to ..cap alpha.. particles are exponential. The mean lethal dose, D/sub 0/, is approximately 1.3 Gy for X rays and 0.25 Gy for ..cap alpha.. particles. As a function of radiation dose, mutation induction at the HGPRT locus was linear for ..cap alpha.. particles whereas the X-ray-induced mutation data were better fitted by a quadratic function. When mutation frequencies were plotted against the log of survival, mutation frequency at a given survival level was greater in cells exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles than to X rays.

  17. [alpha]-particle transport-driven current in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Heikkinen, J.A. ); Sipilae, S.K. )

    1995-03-01

    It is shown that the radial transport of fusion-born energetic [alpha] particles, induced by electrostatic waves traveling in one poloidal direction, is directly connected to a net momentum of [alpha] particles in the toroidal direction in tokamaks. Because the momentum change is almost independent of toroidal velocity, the energy required for the momentum generation remains small on an [alpha]-particle population sustained by an isotropic time-independent source. By numerical toroidal Monte Carlo calculations it is shown that the current carried by [alpha] particles in the presence of intense well penetrated waves can reach several mega-amperes in reactor-sized tokamaks. The current obtained can greatly exceed the neoclassical bootstrap current of the [alpha] particles.

  18. Distorted spin dependent spectral function of {sup 3}He and semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering processes

    SciTech Connect

    Kaptari, Leonya P.; Del Dotto, Alessio; Pace, Emanuele; Salme, Giovanni; Scopetta, Sergio

    2014-03-01

    The spin dependent spectral function, relevant to describe polarized electron scattering off polarized {sup 3}He, is studied, within the Plane Wave Impulse Approximation and taking into account final state interaction effects (FSI). In particular, the case of semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering (SiDIS) is considered, evaluating the FSI of the hadronizing quark with the nuclear remnants. It is shown that particular kinematical regions can be selected to minimize the latter effects, so that parton distributions in the neutron can be accessed. On the other side, in the regions where FSI dominates, the considered reactions can elucidate the mechanism of hadronization of quarks during the propagation in the nuclear medium. It is shown that the obtained spin dependent spectral function can be directly applied to investigate the SiDIS reaction e-vector + {sup 3}He-vector to h+X, where the hadron h originates from the current fragmentation. Experiments of this type are being performed at JLab to extract neutron transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. As a case study, a different SiDIS process, with detection of slow (A-1) systems in the final state, is considered in more details, in order to establish when nuclear structure effects and FSI can be distinguished from elementary reactions on quasi-free nucleons. It is argued that, by a proper choice of kinematics, the origin of nuclear effects in polarized DIS phenomena and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which is not reachable in inclusive deep inelastic scattering.

  19. Folding model analysis of 240 MeV {sup 6}Li elastic scattering on {sup 116}Sn and inelastic scattering to low-lying states of {sup 116}Sn

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, X.; Lui, Y.-W.; Clark, H. L.; Tokimoto, Y.; Youngblood, D. H.

    2007-11-15

    Elastic scattering of 240 MeV {sup 6}Li ions from {sup 116}Sn was measured from 4 deg.{<=}{theta}{sub c.m.}{<=}32 deg. The data were fitted with a Woods-Saxon phenomenological potential and with double folding models using the M3Y NN effective interaction with and without density dependence. DWBA calculations with the fitted parameters were used to calculate cross sections for inelastic scattering to low-lying 2{sup +}and 3{sup -} states. B(E2) and B(E3) values were extracted and compared with electromagnetic values and those obtained from {alpha} inelastic scattering.

  20. Microscopic dynamics of AC{sub 60} compounds in the plastic, polymer, and dimer phases investigated by inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Schober, H.; Toelle, A.; Renker, B.; Heid, R.; Gompf, F.

    1997-09-01

    We present inelastic neutron-scattering results for AC{sub 60} (A=K,Rb,Cs) compounds. The spectra of the high-temperature fcc phases strongly resemble the ones of pristine C{sub 60} in the plastic phase. At equal temperatures we find identical rotational diffusion constants for pristine C{sub 60} and Rb{sub 1}C{sub 60} (D{sub r}=2.4 10{sup 10} s{sup {minus}1} at 400 K). The changes taking place in the inelastic part of the spectra on cooling AC{sub 60} indicate the formation of strong intermolecular bonds. The buildup of intensities in the gap region separating internal and external vibrations in pure C{sub 60} is the most prominent signature of this transition. The spectra of the low-temperature phases depend on their thermal history. The differences can be explained by the formation of a polymer phase (upon slow cooling from the fcc phase) and a dimer phase (upon fast cooling), respectively. The experimental data are analyzed on the basis of lattice dynamical calculations. The density-of-states are well modeled assuming a [2+2] bond for the polymer and a single intercage bond for the dimer. Indications for different intercage bonding are also found in the internal mode spectra, which, on the other hand, react only weakly to the charge transfer. The dimer phase is metastable and converts into the polymer phase with a strongly temperature-dependent time constant. The transition from the polymer to the fcc phase is accompanied by inelastic precursor effects which are interpreted as the signature of inhomogeneities arising from plastic monomer regions embedded in the polymer phase. In the polymer phase AC{sub 60} compounds show strong anharmonic behavior in the low-temperature region. The possible connection with the metal-to-insulator transition is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  1. Lattice vibrations of para-hydrogen impurities in a solid deuterium matrix: An inelastic neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colognesi, D.; Celli, M.; Ramirez-Cuesta, A. J.; Zoppi, M.

    2007-11-01

    In the present study, we report inelastic neutron scattering measurements from para-hydrogen defects in solid normal deuterium at three different concentrations (between 3% and 11%) using the time-of-flight spectrometer TOSCA-II. The measured double-differential cross sections give access to the self-inelastic structure factors for the H2 centers of mass. Corrected experimental data, analyzed through the Young-Koppel model and the Gaussian approximation, are transformed into defect densities of phonon states, which come out to be broad, structured, and nearly concentration independent. Two experimentally determined Bose-corrected spectral moments are found to be in agreement with independent estimates, providing a strong validation of our data reduction procedure. Subsequently, experimental phonon spectra are compared to three calculations, namely, a simple harmonic model at infinite dilution, a more advanced harmonic model with concentration effects, and finally a lattice dynamics simulation based on self-consistent phonon and coherent potential approximations. However, while the first part of the defect spectral density, attributed to the propagating modes, turns out to be roughly explained, the localized part is properly described by none of these models, except for its mean frequency position. The large overall width appears so far impossible to be reproduced, representing a challenge for the physicists involved in quantum dynamics simulations.

  2. Cross section measurements for neutron inelastic scattering and the (n, 2nγ) reaction on Pb206

    DOE PAGES

    Negret, A.; Mihailescu, L. C.; Borcea, C.; ...

    2015-06-30

    We measured excitation functions for γ production associated with the neutron inelastic scattering and the (n, 2n) reactions on 206Pb from threshold up to 18 MeV for about 40 transitions. Two independent measurements were performed using different samples and acquisition systems to check consistency of the results. Moreover, the neutron flux was determined with a 235U fission chamber and a procedure that were validated against a fluence standard. For incident energy higher than the threshold for the first excited level and up to 3.5 MeV, estimates are provided for the total inelastic and level cross sections by combining the presentmore » γ production cross sections with the level and decay data of 206Pb reported in the literature. The uncertainty common to all incident energies is 3.0% allowing overall uncertainties from 3.3% to 30% depending on transition and neutron energy. Finally, the present data agree well with earlier work, but significantly expand the experimental database while comparisons with model calculations using the talys reaction code show good agreement over the full energy range.« less

  3. Crystal field excitations in CeCu2Ge2: Revisited employing a single crystal and inelastic neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewenhaupt, Michael; Faulhaber, Enrico; Schneidewind, Astrid; Deppe, Micha; Hradil, Klaudia

    2012-04-01

    The intermetallic compound, CeCu2Ge2, is the counterpart of the heavy-fermion superconductor CeCu2Si2. CeCu2Ge2 is a magnetically ordering (TN = 4.1K) Kondo lattice with a moderate Sommerfeld coefficient of 140 mJ/ molK2. Earlier inelastic neutron measurements on a polycrystalline sample revealed a doublet ground state and a quasi-quartet excited state at 16.5 meV, although a splitting of the 4f1 (J = 5/2) ground state multiplet into 3 doublets is expected from the point symmetry of the Ce3+ ions. We performed detailed inelastic neutron scattering experiments on a single crystal at the thermal triple-axis spectrometer PUMA at FRM II for different crystallographic directions. From our results we infer that the quasi-quartet, in fact, consists of two doublets at 17.0 and 18.3 meV which exhibit a strong directional dependence of their transition matrix elements to the ground state doublet. Finally, we will present a new set of crystal field parameters.

  4. Inelastic and Reactive Scattering Dynamics of Hyperthermal Oxygen Atoms on Ionic Liquid Surfaces: [emim][NTf{sub 2}] and [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Bohan; Zhang Jianming; Minton, Timothy K.; McKendrick, Kenneth G.; Slattery, John M.; Yockel, Scott; Schatz, George C.

    2011-05-20

    Collisions of hyperthermal oxygen atoms, with an average translational energy of 520 kJ mol{sup -1}, on continuously refreshed ionic liquids, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([emim][NTf{sub 2}]) and 1-dodecyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide ([C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}]), were studied with the use of a beam-surface scattering technique. Time-of-flight and angular distributions of inelastically scattered O and reactively scattered OH and H{sub 2}O were collected for various angles of incidence with the use of a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. For both O and OH, two distinct scattering processes were identified, which can be empirically categorized as thermal and non-thermal. Non-thermal scattering is more probable for both O and OH products. The observation of OH confirms that at least some reactive sites, presumably alkyl groups, must be exposed at the surface. The ionic liquid with the longer alkyl chain, [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}], is substantially more reactive than the liquid with the shorter alkyl chain, [emim][NTf{sub 2}], and proportionately much more so than would be predicted simply from stoichiometry based on the number of abstractable hydrogen atoms. Molecular dynamics models of these surfaces shed light on this change in reactivity. The scattering behavior of O is distinctly different from that of OH. However, no such differences between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics have been seen in previous work on pure hydrocarbon liquids, in particular the benchmark, partially branched hydrocarbon, squalane (C{sub 30}H{sub 62}). The comparison between inelastic and reactive scattering dynamics indicates that inelastic scattering from the ionic liquid surfaces takes place predominantly at non-reactive sites that are effectively stiffer than the reactive alkyl chains, with a higher proportion of collisions sampling such sites for [emim][NTf{sub 2}] than for [C{sub 12}mim][NTf{sub 2}].

  5. Numerical simulation of scattering of acoustic waves by inelastic bodies using hypersingular boundary integral equation

    SciTech Connect

    Daeva, S.G.; Setukha, A.V.

    2015-03-10

    A numerical method for solving a problem of diffraction of acoustic waves by system of solid and thin objects based on the reduction the problem to a boundary integral equation in which the integral is understood in the sense of finite Hadamard value is proposed. To solve this equation we applied piecewise constant approximations and collocation methods numerical scheme. The difference between the constructed scheme and earlier known is in obtaining approximate analytical expressions to appearing system of linear equations coefficients by separating the main part of the kernel integral operator. The proposed numerical scheme is tested on the solution of the model problem of diffraction of an acoustic wave by inelastic sphere.

  6. Contemporary Issues in Ultra-Low Alpha Particle Counting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michael

    Single-Event Upsets (SEU) in CMOS devices are caused by the passage of ionizing radiation either from terrestrial neutrons or from the natural alpha particle radiation within the materials surrounding the transistors. Interactions of the neutrons with the silicon cause spallation reactions which emit energetic highly ionizing elements. Alpha particles, on the other hand, can upset the devices through direct ionization rather than through a nuclear reaction as in the case of the neutrons. In order to minimize the alpha-particle component of SEU, the radiation from the materials within a distance 100 μm of the transistors, currently needs to have an alpha particle emissivity of less than 2 alpha particles per khr per square centimeter. Many alpha particle detectors have background levels that are larger than this, which can make these measurements inaccurate and time consuming. This talk will discuss what is involved in making alpha particle emissivity measurements of materials used in the semiconductor industry using an ultra-low background commercially-available ionization detector. Detector calibration and efficiency, radon adsorption on the samples, and the effect of surface charge on electrically insulating samples will be discussed.

  7. Targeted alpha particle immunotherapy for myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G; Larson, Steven M; Sgouros, George; McDevitt, Michael R; Finn, Ronald D; Divgi, Chaitanya R; Ballangrud, Ase M; Hamacher, Klaus A; Ma, Dangshe; Humm, John L; Brechbiel, Martin W; Molinet, Roger; Scheinberg, David A

    2002-08-15

    Unlike beta particle-emitting isotopes, alpha emitters can selectively kill individual cancer cells with a single atomic decay. HuM195, a humanized anti-CD33 monoclonal antibody, specifically targets myeloid leukemia cells and has activity against minimal disease. When labeled with the beta-emitters (131)I and (90)Y, HuM195 can eliminate large leukemic burdens in patients, but it produces prolonged myelosuppression requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at high doses. To enhance the potency of native HuM195 yet avoid the nonspecific cytotoxicity of beta-emitting constructs, the alpha-emitting isotope (213)Bi was conjugated to HuM195. Eighteen patients with relapsed and refractory acute myelogenous leukemia or chronic myelomonocytic leukemia were treated with 10.36 to 37.0 MBq/kg (213)Bi-HuM195. No significant extramedullary toxicity was seen. All 17 evaluable patients developed myelosuppression, with a median time to recovery of 22 days. Nearly all the (213)Bi-HuM195 rapidly localized to and was retained in areas of leukemic involvement, including the bone marrow, liver, and spleen. Absorbed dose ratios between these sites and the whole body were 1000-fold greater than those seen with beta-emitting constructs in this antigen system and patient population. Fourteen (93%) of 15 evaluable patients had reductions in circulating blasts, and 14 (78%) of 18 patients had reductions in the percentage of bone marrow blasts. This study demonstrates the safety, feasibility, and antileukemic effects of (213)Bi-HuM195, and it is the first proof-of-concept for systemic targeted alpha particle immunotherapy in humans.

  8. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-10-01

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped {alpha}-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the {alpha}-particle birth speed v{sub {alpha}} {ge} v{sub A}/2{vert bar}m-nq{vert bar}, where v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the {alpha}-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the {alpha}-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the {alpha}-particle beta {beta}{sub {alpha}}, {alpha}-particle pressure gradient parameter ({omega}{sub {asterisk}}/{omega}{sub A}) ({omega}{sub {asterisk}} is the {alpha}-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (v{sub {alpha}}/v{sub A}) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged {alpha}-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10{sup {minus}4}. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10{sup {minus}2}{omega}{sub A}, where {omega}{sub A}=v{sub A}/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects.

  9. Thermally activated charge transfer in a Prussian blue derivative probed by resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jarrige, I.; Cai, Y. Q.; Ishii, H.; Hiraoka, N.; Bleuzen, A.

    2008-08-01

    Charge-transfer excitation is at the source of the photoinduced magnetism observed in several Prussian blue molecule-based magnets. Using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy, we probe directly the thermally activated charge transfer in a photomagnetic Fe-Co cyanide, Cs0.7Co4[Fe(CN)6]2.9[◻]1.1.16H2O, where [◻] represents [Fe(CN)6] vacancies. The temperature dependence of both Co and Fe valence ratios is estimated for the first time in one cooling run, thus yielding a more complete picture of the temperature-induced cooperative electronic modifications. This novel approach, benefiting from relatively short acquisition times, opens the possibility for realtime characterization of the photoinduced magnetism in molecule-based magnets.

  10. Revealing the insulating gap in α'-NaV (2)O(5) with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    PubMed

    Bondino, F; Barla, A; Schmitt, T; Strocov, V N; Henry, J-Y; Sanchez, J-P

    2012-08-15

    We measured the low energy excitation spectrum of α'-NaV (2)O(5) across its charge ordering and crystallographic phase transition with resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) at the V L(3) edge. Exploiting the polarization dependence of the RIXS signal and the high resolution of the data, we reveal the excitation across the insulating gap at 1 eV and identify the excitations from occupied 3d(xy) bonding orbitals to unoccupied bonding 3d(xy) and 3d(yz)/3d(xz) orbitals. Furthermore we observe a progressive change of the electronic structure of α'-NaV (2)O(5) induced by soft x-ray irradiation, with the appearance of features characteristic of sodium deficient Na(x)V (2)O(5) (x < 1).

  11. Multiplicities of charged pions and charged hadrons from deep-inelastic scattering of muons off an isoscalar target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adolph, C.; Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alexeev, M. G.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C. D. R.; Badełek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Capozza, L.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S.-U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M. L.; Curiel, Q.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P. D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmüller, S.; Grasso, A.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; Hahne, D.; von Harrach, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F. H.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Y.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Joosten, R.; Jörg, P.; Kabuß, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O. M.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kuhn, R.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Lednev, A. A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marchand, C.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G. V.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Montuenga, P.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V. I.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W.-D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A. S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Roskot, M.; Rossiyskaya, N. S.; Ryabchikov, D. I.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salac, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolik, J.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vondra, J.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Zavada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2017-01-01

    Multiplicities of charged pions and charged hadrons produced in deep-inelastic scattering were measured in three-dimensional bins of the Bjorken scaling variable x, the relative virtual-photon energy y and the relative hadron energy z. Data were obtained by the COMPASS Collaboration using a 160GeV muon beam and an isoscalar target (6LiD). They cover the kinematic domain in the photon virtuality Q2 > 1(GeV / c) 2, 0.004 < x < 0.4, 0.2 < z < 0.85 and 0.1 < y < 0.7. In addition, a leading-order pQCD analysis was performed using the pion multiplicity results to extract quark fragmentation functions.

  12. Fingerprints of the anisotropic spin-split hole dispersion in resonant inelastic light scattering in two-dimensional hole systems.

    PubMed

    Hirmer, M; Hirmer, M; Schuh, D; Wegscheider, W; Korn, T; Winkler, R; Schüller, C

    2011-11-18

    In resonant inelastic light scattering experiments on two-dimensional hole systems in GaAs-Al(x)Ga(1-x)As single quantum wells we find evidence for the strongly anisotropic spin-split hole dispersion at finite in-plane momenta. In all our samples we detect a low-energy spin-density excitation of a few meV, stemming from excitation of holes of the spin-split ground state. The detailed spectral shape of the excitation depends sensitively on the orientations of the linear light polarizations with respect to the in-plane crystal axes. In particular, we observe a doublet structure, which is most pronounced if the polarization of the incident light is parallel to the [110] in-plane direction. Theoretical calculations of the Raman spectra based on a multiband k · p approach confirm that the observed doublet structure is due to the anisotropic spin-split hole dispersion.

  13. Nuclear dynamics and spectator effects in resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering of gas-phase water molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Weinhardt, Lothar; Benkert, Andreas; Meyer, Frank; Blum, Monika; Wilks, Regan G.; Yang, Wanli; Baer, Marcus; Reinert, Friedrich; and others

    2012-04-14

    The electronic structure of gas-phase H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O molecules has been investigated using resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS). We observe spectator shifts for all valence orbitals when exciting into the lowest three absorption resonances. Strong changes of the relative valence orbital emission intensities are found when exciting into the different absorption resonances, which can be related to the angular anisotropy of the RIXS process. Furthermore, excitation into the 4a{sub 1} resonance leads to nuclear dynamics on the time scale of the RIXS process; we find evidence for vibrational coupling and molecular dissociation in both, the spectator and the participant emission.

  14. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dynamics in URu2Si2

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, D. R.; Bonnoit, C. J.; Chisnell, R.; Said, A. H.; Leu, B. M.; Williams, Travis J.; Luke, G. M.; Lee, Y. S.

    2016-02-11

    In this paper, we study high-resolution inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of the acoustic phonons of URu2Si2. At all temperatures, the longitudinal acoustic phonon linewidths are anomalously broad at small wave vectors revealing a previously unknown anharmonicity. The phonon modes do not change significantly upon cooling into the hidden order phase. In addition, our data suggest that the increase in thermal conductivity in the hidden order phase cannot be driven by a change in phonon dispersions or lifetimes. Hence, the phonon contribution to the thermal conductivity is likely much less significant compared to that of the magnetic excitations in the low temperature phase.

  15. First measurement of unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering cross sections from a 3He target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, X.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Bradshaw, P. C.; Bosted, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chen, W.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Cornejo, J. C.; Cusanno, F.; Dalton, M. M.; Deconinck, W.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Ding, H.; Dolph, P. A. M.; Dutta, C.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Frullani, S.; Gao, H.; Garibaldi, F.; Gaskell, D.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Guo, L.; Hamilton, D.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Huang, M.; Ibrahim, H. F.; Iodice, M.; Jiang, X.; Jin, G.; Jones, M. K.; Katich, J.; Kelleher, A.; Kim, W.; Kolarkar, A.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J. J.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Lindgren, R.; Liu, T.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; Lu, H.-J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; McNulty, D.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Norum, B.; Oh, Y.; Osipenko, M.; Parno, D.; Peng, J.-C.; Phillips, S. K.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Rakhman, A.; Ransome, R.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Schulte, E.; Shahinyan, A.; Shabestari, M. H.; Širca, S.; Stepanyan, S.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tang, L.-G.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vilardi, I.; Wang, K.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wang, Y.; Yan, X.; Yao, H.; Ye, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yuan, L.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Zhao, B.; Zhao, Y. X.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.; Zhu, X.; Zong, X.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    The unpolarized semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering (SIDIS) differential cross sections in 3He(e ,e'π±)X have been measured for the first time in Jefferson Lab experiment E06-010 with a 5.9 GeV e- beam on a 3He gas target. The experiment focuses on the valence quark region, covering a kinematic range 0.12

  16. Inelastic X-ray scattering investigations of lattice dynamics in SmFeAsO1-xFysuperconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Tacon, Mathieu; Forrest, T. R.; Rüegg, Ch.; Bosak, A.; Noffsinger, J.; Walters, A. C.; Toulemonde, P.; Palenzona, A.; Zhigadlo, N. D.; Karpinski, J.; Hill, J. P.; Krisch, M.; McMorrow, D. F.

    2011-05-01

    We report measurements of the phonon density of states as probed with inelastic X-ray scattering in SmFeAsO1-xFy powders. An unexpected strong renormalization of phonon branches around 23 meV is observed as fluorine is substituted for oxygen. Phonon dispersion measurements on SmFeAsO1-xFy single crystals allow us to identify the 21 meV A1g in-phase (Sm,As) and the 26 meV B1g (Fe,O) modes to be responsible for this renormalization, and may reveal unusual electron-phonon coupling through the spin channel in iron-based superconductors.

  17. Inelastic neutron scattering study of phonon density of states in nanostructured Si1 xGex thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Dhital, Chetan; Abernathy, Douglas L; Zhu, Gaohua; Ren, Zhifeng; Broido, D.; Wilson, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements are utilized to explore relative changes in the generalized phonon density of states of nanocrystalline Si1 xGex thermoelectric materials prepared via ball-milling and hot-pressing techniques. Dynamic signatures of Ge clustering can be inferred from the data by referencing the resulting spectra to a density functional theoretical model assuming homogeneous alloying via the virtual-crystal approximation. Comparisons are also presented between as-milled Si nanopowder and bulk, polycrystalline Si where a preferential low-energy enhancement and lifetime broadening of the phonon density of states appear in the nanopowder. Negligible differences are however observed between the phonon spectra of bulk Si andhot-pressed, nanostructured Si samples suggesting that changes to the single-phonon dynamics above 4 meV play only a secondary role in the modified heat conduction of this compound.

  18. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dispersion and lifetimes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhiting; Li, Mingda; Ren, Zhensong; Ma, Hao; Alatas, Ahmet; Wilson, Stephen D.; Li, Ju

    2015-09-01

    PbTe1-x Se x alloys are of special interest to thermoelectric applications. Inelastic x-ray scattering determination of phonon dispersion and lifetimes along the high symmetry directions for PbTe1-x Se x alloys are presented. By comparing with calculated results based on the virtual crystal model calculations combined with ab initio density functional theory, the validity of virtual crystal model is evaluated. The results indicate that the virtual crystal model is overall a good assumption for phonon frequencies and group velocities despite the softening of transverse acoustic phonon modes along [1 1 1] direction, while the treatment of lifetimes warrants caution. In addition, phonons remain a good description of vibrational modes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys.

  19. Inelastic neutron scattering, lattice dynamics, and high-pressure phase stability of zircon-structured lanthanide orthophosphates

    SciTech Connect

    Bose, Preyoshi P.; Mittal, R; Chaplot, S L; Loong, C. K.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2010-01-01

    Inelastic neutron-scattering experiments and lattice-dynamical calculations are reported on a series of rareearth orthophosphates RPO4 R=Tm, Er, Ho, and Tb. The experimental phonon spectra for the compounds are in good agreement with our model calculations. The lattice-dynamical model is found useful for the calculation of various thermodynamic properties such as the lattice specific heat, thermal expansion, and equation of state of these compounds. The RPO4 compounds are known to transform to the scheelite body-centered tetragonal, I41 /a or monoclinic phase P21 /n at high pressures. Our calculations show that while the scheelite phase stabilizes at high pressure due to its lower volume, the monoclinic phase may occur as an intermediate phase depending on the ionic size of the R atom. The latter phase is stabilized at higher temperature at high pressure due to its high vibrational entropy. A pressure-temperature phase diagram is proposed.

  20. Inelastic x-ray scattering measurements of phonon dispersion and lifetimes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhiting; Li, Mingda; Ren, Zhensong; Ma, Hao; Alatas, Ahmet; Wilson, Stephen D; Li, Ju

    2015-09-23

    PbTe1-x Se x alloys are of special interest to thermoelectric applications. Inelastic x-ray scattering determination of phonon dispersion and lifetimes along the high symmetry directions for PbTe1-x Se x alloys are presented. By comparing with calculated results based on the virtual crystal model calculations combined with ab initio density functional theory, the validity of virtual crystal model is evaluated. The results indicate that the virtual crystal model is overall a good assumption for phonon frequencies and group velocities despite the softening of transverse acoustic phonon modes along [1 1 1] direction, while the treatment of lifetimes warrants caution. In addition, phonons remain a good description of vibrational modes in PbTe1-x Se x alloys.

  1. Quantifying covalent interactions with resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering: Case study of Ni2+ aqua complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnus, K.; Josefsson, I.; Schreck, S.; Quevedo, W.; Miedema, P. S.; Techert, S.; de Groot, F. M. F.; Föhlisch, A.; Odelius, M.; Wernet, Ph.

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the effects of covalent interactions in Ni 2p3d resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra from aqueous Ni2+ ions and find that the relative RIXS intensities of ligand-to-metal charge-transfer final states with respect to the ligand-field final states reflect the covalent mixing between Ni 3d and water orbitals. Specifically, the experimental intensity ratio at the Ni L3-edge allows to determine that the Ni 3d orbitals have on average 5.5% of water character. We propose that 2p3d RIXS at the Ni L3-edge can be utilized to quantify covalency in Ni complexes without the use of external references or simulations.

  2. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; ...

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr₂IrO₄, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edgemore » RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.« less

  3. Probing single magnon excitations in Sr₂IrO₄ using O K-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Dean, M. P. M.; Liu, J.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Jaouen, N.; Nicolaou, A.; Yin, W. G.; Rayan Serrao, C.; Ramesh, R.; Ding, H.; Hill, J. P.

    2015-04-28

    Resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) at the L-edge of transition metal elements is now commonly used to probe single magnon excitations. Here we show that single magnon excitations can also be measured with RIXS at the K-edge of the surrounding ligand atoms when the center heavy metal elements have strong spin-orbit coupling. This is demonstrated with oxygen K-edge RIXS experiments on the perovskite Sr₂IrO₄, where low energy peaks from single magnon excitations were observed. This new application of RIXS has excellent potential to be applied to a wide range of magnetic systems based on heavy elements, for which the L-edge RIXS energy resolutions in the hard X-ray region is usually poor.

  4. Communication: The H{sub 2}@C{sub 60} inelastic neutron scattering selection rule: Expanded and explained

    SciTech Connect

    Poirier, Bill

    2015-09-14

    Recently [M. Xu et al., J. Chem. Phys. 139, 064309 (2013)], an unexpected selection rule was discovered for the title system, contradicting the previously held belief that inelastic neutron scattering (INS) is not subject to any selection rules. Moreover, the newly predicted forbidden transitions, which emerge only in the context of coupled H{sub 2} translation-rotation (TR) dynamics, have been confirmed experimentally. However, a simple physical understanding, e.g., based on group theory, has been heretofore lacking. This is provided in the present paper, in which we (1) derive the correct symmetry group for the H{sub 2}@C{sub 60} TR Hamiltonian and eigenstates; (2) complete the INS selection rule, and show that the set of forbidden transitions is actually much larger than previously believed; and (3) evaluate previous theoretical and experimental results, in light of the new findings.

  5. Quantifying covalent interactions with resonant inelastic soft X-ray scattering: Case study of Ni2+ aqua complex

    DOE PAGES

    Kunnus, K.; Josefsson, I.; Schreck, S.; ...

    2016-12-23

    We analyze the effects of covalent interactions in Ni 2p3d resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) spectra from aqueous Ni2+ ions and find that the relative RIXS intensities of ligand-to-metal charge-transfer final states with respect to the ligand-field final states reflect the covalent mixing between Ni 3d and water orbitals. Specifically, the experimental intensity ratio at the Ni L3-edge allows to determine that the Ni 3d orbitals have on average 5.5% of water character. Here, we propose that 2p3d RIXS at the Ni L3-edge can be utilized to quantify covalency in Ni complexes without the use of external references or simulations.

  6. Precision mechanical structure of an ultra-high-resolution spectrometer for inelastic X-ray scattering instrument

    DOEpatents

    Shu, Deming; Shvydko, Yuri; Stoupin, Stanislav A.; Khachatryan, Ruben; Goetze, Kurt A.; Roberts, Timothy

    2015-04-14

    A method and an ultrahigh-resolution spectrometer including a precision mechanical structure for positioning inelastic X-ray scattering optics are provided. The spectrometer includes an X-ray monochromator and an X-ray analyzer, each including X-ray optics of a collimating (C) crystal, a pair of dispersing (D) element crystals, anomalous transmission filter (F) and a wavelength (W) selector crystal. A respective precision mechanical structure is provided with the X-ray monochromator and the X-ray analyzer. The precision mechanical structure includes a base plate, such as an aluminum base plate; positioning stages for D-crystal alignment; positioning stages with an incline sensor for C/F/W-crystal alignment, and the positioning stages including flexure-based high-stiffness structure.

  7. Assignment of the Internal Vibrational Modes of C70 by Inelastic Neutron Scattering Spectroscopy and Periodic-DFT.

    PubMed

    Refson, Keith; Parker, Stewart F

    2015-10-01

    The fullerene C70 may be considered as the shortest possible nanotube capped by a hemisphere of C60 at each end. Vibrational spectroscopy is a key tool in characterising fullerenes, and C70 has been studied several times and spectral assignments proposed. Unfortunately, many of the modes are either forbidden or have very low infrared or Raman intensity, even if allowed. Inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy is not subject to selection rules, and all the modes are allowed. We have obtained a new INS spectrum from a large sample recorded at the highest resolution available. An advantage of INS spectroscopy is that it is straightforward to calculate the spectral intensity from a model. We demonstrate that all previous assignments are incorrect in at least some respects and propose a new assignment based on periodic density functional theory (DFT) that successfully reproduces the INS, infrared, and Raman spectra.

  8. Complete assignment of the vibrational modes of C60 by inelastic neutron scattering spectroscopy and periodic-DFT.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stewart F; Bennington, Stephen M; Taylor, Jon W; Herman, Henryk; Silverwood, Ian; Albers, Peter; Refson, Keith

    2011-05-07

    In this paper we exploit the complementarity of inelastic neutron scattering (INS), infrared and Raman spectroscopies with ab initio calculations to generate an updated assignment of the vibrational modes of C(60). We have carried out periodic-DFT calculations of the high temperature face centred cubic phase modelled as the standard structure and also of the low temperature simple cubic phase, the latter for the first time. Our assignment differs from all previous work, however, it is the only one that is able to successfully reproduce the INS spectrum in terms of both transition energies and intensities. In addition to the INS spectrum we are also able to quantitatively simulate the major features of the infrared and Raman spectra in the high temperature phase and the infrared spectrum in the low temperature phase.

  9. Neutron inelastic scattering measurements of low-energy phonons in the multiferroic BiFeO3

    SciTech Connect

    Schneeloch, John A.; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; Gehring, P. M.; Stock, C.; Matsuda, Masaaki; Winn, Barry L.; Gu, Genda; Shapiro, Stephen M.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Ushiyama, T.; Yanagisawa, Y.; Tomioka, Y.; Ito, T.; Xu, Guangyong

    2015-02-10

    In this study, we present neutron inelastic scattering measurements of the low-energy phonons in single crystal BiFeO3. The dispersions of the three acoustic phonon modes (LA along [100], TA1 along [010], and TA2 along [110]) and two low-energy optic phonon modes (LO and TO1) have been mapped out between 300 and 700 K. Elastic constants are extracted from the phonon measurements. The energy linewidths of both TA phonons at the zone boundary clearly broaden when the system is warmed toward the magnetic ordering temperature TN=640 K. In conclusion, this suggests that the magnetic order and low-energy lattice dynamics in this multiferroic material are coupled.

  10. Neutron inelastic scattering measurements of low-energy phonons in the multiferroic BiFeO3

    DOE PAGES

    Schneeloch, John A.; Xu, Zhijun; Wen, Jinsheng; ...

    2015-02-10

    In this study, we present neutron inelastic scattering measurements of the low-energy phonons in single crystal BiFeO3. The dispersions of the three acoustic phonon modes (LA along [100], TA1 along [010], and TA2 along [110]) and two low-energy optic phonon modes (LO and TO1) have been mapped out between 300 and 700 K. Elastic constants are extracted from the phonon measurements. The energy linewidths of both TA phonons at the zone boundary clearly broaden when the system is warmed toward the magnetic ordering temperature TN=640 K. In conclusion, this suggests that the magnetic order and low-energy lattice dynamics in thismore » multiferroic material are coupled.« less

  11. Combined inclusive diffractive cross sections measured with forward proton spectrometers in deep inelastic ep scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, F. D.; Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Aggarwal, R.; Alexa, C.; Andreev, V.; Antonelli, S.; Antonioli, P.; Antonov, A.; Arneodo, M.; Arslan, O.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Bachynska, O.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Bamberger, A.; Barakbaev, A. N.; Barbagli, G.; Bari, G.; Barreiro, F.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bartosik, N.; Bartsch, D.; Basile, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behr, J.; Behrens, U.; Bellagamba, L.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bindi, M.; Bizot, J. C.; Blohm, C.; Bokhonov, V.; Bondarenko, K.; Boos, E. G.; Borras, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bot, D.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bołd, T.; Brümmer, N.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Brock, I.; Brownson, E.; Brugnera, R.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brzozowska, B.; Bunyatyan, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Bylinkin, A.; Bylsma, B.; Bystritskaya, L.; Caldwell, A.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Capua, M.; Carlin, R.; Catterall, C. D.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekanov, S.; Chekelian, V.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Contin, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Coppola, N.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Costa, M.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cvach, J.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J. B.; Dal Corso, F.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Delvax, J.; Dementiev, R. K.; Derrick, M.; Devenish, R. C. E.; De Pasquale, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; del Peso, J.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dobur, D.; Dodonov, V.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Dolinska, G.; Dossanov, A.; Doyle, A. T.; Drugakov, V.; Dubak, A.; Durkin, L. S.; Dusini, S.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Eisenberg, Y.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Ermolov, P. F.; Eskreys, A.; Fang, S.; Favart, L.; Fazio, S.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrero, M. I.; Figiel, J.; Fischer, D.-J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Forrest, M.; Foster, B.; Gabathuler, E.; Gach, G.; Galas, A.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Gayler, J.; Geiser, A.; Ghazaryan, S.; Gialas, I.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Gladkov, D.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gogota, O.; Golubkov, Y. A.; Göttlicher, P.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grabowska-Bołd, I.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregor, I.; Grigorescu, G.; Grindhammer, G.; Grzelak, G.; Gueta, O.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hüttmann, A.; Haas, T.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hain, W.; Hamatsu, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hartmann, H.; Hartner, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hennekemper, E.; Henschel, H.; Herbst, M.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilger, E.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Hochman, D.; Hoffmann, D.; Hori, R.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ingbir, R.; Ishitsuka, M.; Jacquet, M.; Jakob, H.-P.; Janssen, X.; Januschek, F.; Jones, T. W.; Jönsson, L.; Jüngst, M.; Jung, H.; Kadenko, I.; Kahle, B.; Kananov, S.; Kanno, T.; Kapichine, M.; Karshon, U.; Karstens, F.; Katkov, I. I.; Kaur, P.; Kaur, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Keramidas, A.; Khein, L. A.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, J. Y.; Kisielewska, D.; Kitamura, S.; Klanner, R.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinwort, C.; Koffeman, E.; Kogler, R.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Kooijman, P.; Korol, I.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kostka, P.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Krämer, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, A.; Lendermann, V.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levonian, S.; Levy, A.; Libov, V.; Limentani, S.; Ling, T. Y.; Lipka, K.; Lisovyi, M.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Lohmann, W.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Long, K. R.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lukina, O. Y.; Maeda, J.; Magill, S.; Makarenko, I.; Malinovski, E.; Malka, J.; Mankel, R.; Margotti, A.; Marini, G.; Martin, J. F.; Martyn, H.-U.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mattingly, M. C. K.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Monaco, V.; Montanari, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Morris, J. D.; Mujkic, K.; Müller, K.; Musgrave, B.; Nagano, K.; Namsoo, T.; Nania, R.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nigro, A.; Nikitin, D.; Ning, Y.; Nobe, T.; Notz, D.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nowak, R. J.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A. E.; Oh, B. Y.; Okazaki, N.; Olkiewicz, K.; Olsson, J. E.; Onishchuk, Y.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Palichik, V.; Pandurovic, M.; Papageorgiu, K.; Parenti, A.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Paul, E.; Pawlak, J. M.; Pawlik, B.; Pelfer, P. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Perez, E.; Perlański, W.; Perrey, H.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Pluciński, P.; Pokorny, B.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Povh, B.; Proskuryakov, A. S.; Przybycień, M.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Raval, A.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reeder, D. D.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Ren, Z.; Repond, J.; Ri, Y. D.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, A.; Robmann, P.; Roloff, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rubinsky, I.; Ruiz Tabasco, J. E.; Rusakov, S.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Šálek, D.; Samson, U.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sartorelli, G.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Savin, A. A.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schleper, P.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitt, S.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schönberg, V.; Schöning, A.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwartz, J.; Sciulli, F.; Sefkow, F.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shehzadi, R.; Shimizu, S.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Shushkevich, S.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Sloan, T.; Smith, W. H.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Soloviev, Y.; Son, D.; Sopicki, P.; Sosnovtsev, V.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spiridonov, A.; Stadie, H.; Stanco, L.; Staykova, Z.; Steder, M.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stella, B.; Stern, A.; Stewart, T. P.; Stifutkin, A.; Stoicea, G.; Stopa, P.; Straumann, U.; Suchkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Suszycki, L.; Sykora, T.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, J.; Szuba, D.; Tapper, A. D.; Tassi, E.; Terrón, J.; Theedt, T.; Thompson, P. D.; Tiecke, H.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tran, T. H.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Trusov, V.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Turnau, J.; Tymieniecka, T.; Vázquez, M.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Verbytskyi, A.; Viazlo, O.; Vlasov, N. N.; Walczak, R.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wegener, D.; Whitmore, J. J.; Wichmann, K.; Wiggers, L.; Wing, M.; Wlasenko, M.; Wolf, G.; Wolfe, H.; Wrona, K.; Wünsch, E.; Yagües-Molina, A. G.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yoshida, R.; Youngman, C.; Zabiegalov, O.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zeuner, W.; Zhang, Z.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zhmak, N.; Zhokin, A.; Zichichi, A.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zolkapli, Z.; Zomer, F.; Zotkin, D. S.; Żarnecki, A. F.

    2012-10-01

    A combination of the inclusive diffractive cross section measurements made by the H1 and ZEUS Collaborations at HERA is presented. The analysis uses samples of diffractive deep inelastic ep scattering data at a centre-of-mass energy sqrt{s}=318 GeV where leading protons are detected by dedicated spectrometers. Correlations of systematic uncertainties are taken into account, resulting in an improved precision of the cross section measurement which reaches 6 % for the most precise points. The combined data cover the range 2.5< Q 2<200 GeV2 in photon virtuality, 0.00035 < {x_{{P}}}< 0.09 in proton fractional momentum loss, 0.09<| t|<0.55 GeV2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 0.0018< β<0.816 in β=x/{x_{{P}}}, where x is the Bjorken scaling variable.

  12. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Specific Features of the Phase Transitions in (NH4)2WO2F4

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Lev S; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Flerov, I. N.; Laptash, N. M.

    2009-01-01

    Oxyfluoride (NH4)2WO2F4 has been studied by the inelastic neutron scattering method over a wide temperature range 10 300 K at two initial neutron energies of 15 and 60 meV. The role of tetrahedral ammonium groups in the mechanism of sequential phase transitions at T1 = 201 K and T2 = 160 K has been discussed.

  13. Effect of alpha particles on Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-11-01

    An overview is given of the analytic structure for the linear theory of the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE), where multiple gap structures occur. A discussion is given of the alpha particle drive and the various dissipation mechanisms that can stabilize the system. A self-consistent calculation of the TAE mode, for a low-beta high-aspect-ratio plasma, indicates that though the alpha particle drive is comparable to the dissipation mechanisms, overall stability is still achieved for ignited ITER-like plasma. A brief discussion is given of the nonlinear theory for the TAE mode and how nonlinear alpha particle dynamics can be treated by mapping methods.

  14. Surface Structure of Bi(111) from Helium Atom Scattering Measurements. Inelastic Close-Coupling Formalism

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Elastic and inelastic close-coupling (CC) calculations have been used to extract information about the corrugation amplitude and the surface vibrational atomic displacement by fitting to several experimental diffraction patterns. To model the three-dimensional interaction between the He atom and the Bi(111) surface under investigation, a corrugated Morse potential has been assumed. Two different types of calculations are used to obtain theoretical diffraction intensities at three surface temperatures along the two symmetry directions. Type one consists of solving the elastic CC (eCC) and attenuating the corresponding diffraction intensities by a global Debye–Waller (DW) factor. The second one, within a unitary theory, is derived from merely solving the inelastic CC (iCC) equations, where no DW factor is necessary to include. While both methods arrive at similar predictions for the peak-to-peak corrugation value, the variance of the value obtained by the iCC method is much better. Furthermore, the more extensive calculation is better suited to model the temperature induced signal asymmetries and renders the inclusion for a second Debye temperature for the diffraction peaks futile. PMID:26257838

  15. Surface Structure of Bi(111) from Helium Atom Scattering Measurements. Inelastic Close-Coupling Formalism.

    PubMed

    Kraus, P; Tamtögl, A; Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, M; Apolloner, F; Gösweiner, Ch; Miret-Artés, S; Ernst, W E

    2015-07-30

    Elastic and inelastic close-coupling (CC) calculations have been used to extract information about the corrugation amplitude and the surface vibrational atomic displacement by fitting to several experimental diffraction patterns. To model the three-dimensional interaction between the He atom and the Bi(111) surface under investigation, a corrugated Morse potential has been assumed. Two different types of calculations are used to obtain theoretical diffraction intensities at three surface temperatures along the two symmetry directions. Type one consists of solving the elastic CC (eCC) and attenuating the corresponding diffraction intensities by a global Debye-Waller (DW) factor. The second one, within a unitary theory, is derived from merely solving the inelastic CC (iCC) equations, where no DW factor is necessary to include. While both methods arrive at similar predictions for the peak-to-peak corrugation value, the variance of the value obtained by the iCC method is much better. Furthermore, the more extensive calculation is better suited to model the temperature induced signal asymmetries and renders the inclusion for a second Debye temperature for the diffraction peaks futile.

  16. Inelastic scattering of 65 MeV protons from /sup 12/C, /sup 24/Mg, /sup 28/Si, and /sup 32/S

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, S.; Okada, K.; Kondo, M.; Hosono, K.; Saito, T.; Matsuoka, N.; Hatanaka, K.; Noro, T.; Nagamachi, S.; Shimizu, H.; Ogino, K.; Kadota, Y.; Matsuki, S.; Wakai, M.

    1985-05-01

    Measurements of angular distributions of the cross sections and analyzing powers for the elastic and inelastic scatterings of 65 MeV polarized protons from /sup 12/C, /sup 24/Mg, /sup 28/Si, and /sup 32/S are reported. Coupled channels analyses of the scattering data are presented assuming the 0/sub 1//sup +/, 2/sub 1//sup +/, and 4/sub 1//sup +/ states to be members of the ground band, the 0/sub 2//sup +/ state to begin the

  17. Interrelation of Resistivity and Inelastic Electron-Phonon Scattering Rate in Impure NbC Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Il'in, K. S.; Ptitsina, N. G.; Sergeev, A. V.; Goltsman, G. N.; Gershenzon, E. M.; Karasik, B. S.; Pechen, E. V.; Krasnosvobodtsev, S. I.

    1998-01-01

    A complex study of the electron-phonon interaction in thin NbC films with electron mean free path l=2-13 nm gives strong evidence that electron scattering is significantly modified due to the interference between electron-phonon and elastic electron scattering from impurities.

  18. {sup {bold 6}}Li(vector)+{sup {bold 12}}C inelastic scattering at 30 and 50 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Kerr, P.L.; Kemper, K.W.; Green, P.V.; Mohajeri, K.; Myers, E.G.; Schmidt, B.G.; Hnizdo, V.

    1996-09-01

    A complete set of analyzing powers (AP`s), {ital iT}{sub 11}, {ital T}{sub 20}, {ital T}{sub 21}, and {ital T}{sub 22}, for 50 MeV {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li(vector),{sup 6}Li) elastic scattering and inelastic scattering to the {sup 12}C(2{sup +}, 4.44 MeV), {sup 12}C(0{sup +}, 7.65 MeV), and {sup 12}C(3{sup {minus}}, 9.64 MeV) states over the center-of-mass (c.m.) angular range 10{degree}{endash}115{degree} is reported. In addition, cross sections for the excited states 3{sup +}(2.18 MeV), 2{sup +}(4.31 MeV), and 1{sup +}(5.65 MeV) of {sup 6}Li were measured by using the inverse-kinematics reaction {sup 6}Li({sup 12}C,{sup 12}C) at 100 MeV. A combined analysis of the new 50 MeV data and previous 30 MeV data has been carried out using the coupled-channels (CC) code FRESCO. The CC calculations use an optical potential with double-folded (DF) real central, Woods-Saxon imaginary central, and Thomas real spin-orbit (SO) potentials. Calculations include reorientation terms and coupling to the first three excited states of {sup 6}Li and the first two nonzerospin states of {sup 12}C. The {sup 6}Li coupling strengths were fixed by the measured {sup 6}Li excited-state cross sections. The elastic-scattering cross sections and A.P.`s are described well. The need for an explicit SO potential is apparent in the elastic and inelastic-scattering AP`s {ital iT}{sub 11}, more so at 30 MeV than at 50 MeV. The rank-2 AP`s up to 50{degree} c.m. arise mainly from ground-state reorientation effects. The DF potential normalization constant {ital N} approaches unity for the 50 MeV data. At both energies, the {sup 12}C(2{sup +}) cross sections are underestimated at large angles, and the description of the {sup 12}C(3{sup {minus}}) cross sections is poor in detail. The {sup 12}C(3{sup {minus}}) AP`s and the {sup 12}C(2{sup +}) {ital iT}{sub 11} are not reproduced at either energy. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Preliminary Results from the Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, S. L.; Feldman, W. C.; Moore, K. R.; Lawrence, D. J.; Maurice, S.; Belian, R. D.; Binder, A. B.

    2001-03-01

    Data measured using the Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer were surveyed to search for surface deposits of polonium-210. Preliminary results show that a marginal, yet statistically-significant signal was indeed detected on the lunar front side.

  20. Alpha particle nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jun, Insoo; Xapsos, Michael A.; Messenger, Scott R.; Burke, Edward A.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoff; Jordan, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    A method developed for the proton NIEL calculation previously is extended to incident alpha particles in this study: ZBL screened potential for Coulomb interactions and MCNPX 'thin target approximation' for nuclear interactions.

  1. Turbulent transport of alpha particles in reactor plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Estrada-Mila, C.; Candy, J.; Waltz, R. E.

    2006-11-15

    A systematic study of the behavior of energetic ions in reactor plasmas is presented. Using self-consistent gyrokinetic simulations, in concert with an analytic asymptotic theory, it is found that alpha particles can interact significantly with core ion-temperature-gradient turbulence. Specifically, the per-particle flux of energetic alphas is comparable to the per-particle flux of thermal species (deuterium or helium ash). This finding opposes the conventional wisdom that energetic ions, because of their large gyroradii, do not interact with the turbulence. For the parameters studied, a turbulent modification of the alpha-particle density profile appears to be stronger than turbulent modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile. Crude estimates indicate that the alpha density modification, which is directly proportional to the core turbulence intensity, could be in the range of 15% at midradius in a reactor. The corresponding modification of the alpha-particle pressure profile is predicted to be smaller (in the 1% range)

  2. Alpha-particle effects on ballooning flute modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchenko, Z.N.; Bijko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper a more accurate dispersion equation for ideal ballooning flute modes in a plasma with alpha particles is obtained. It is shown that circulating and trapped alpha particles generate the eigenbranches of the mode oscillations with frequencies {omega} {approx lt} {omega}{sub *i}, where {omega}{sub *i}, is the ion drift frequency. The relevant growth rates and frequencies are found. It is ascertained that in the frequency range {omega}{sub *i} {lt} {omega} {lt} {bar {omega}{sub Db}}, where {bar {omega}{sub Db}} is the magnetic drift frequency average over a bounce period, trapped alpha particles may generate forced oscillations that influence the ideal ballooning flute mode stability boundary. It is shown that the stability may be improved for certain plasma parameters and trapped alpha-particle pressures.

  3. Fully quantum state-resolved inelastic scattering between He and NO(X (2)Pi).

    PubMed

    Kłos, J; Aoiz, F J; Verdasco, J E; Brouard, M; Marinakis, S; Stolte, S

    2007-07-21

    Quantum mechanical close-coupling calculations have been used to obtain fully quantum state-resolved differential cross sections and opacity functions for the rotationally inelastic collisions of NO(X (2)Pi) with He at collision energies of 63 and 147 meV using the most recent ab initio potential energy surfaces of Kłos et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 2195 (2000)]. Double peaks observed in the Lambda-doublet resolved differential cross sections are shown to be related to the presence of analogous peaks in the corresponding opacity functions. These structures can be linked directly to a specific expansion term in the potential, and reflect the fact that NO is not quite homonuclear.

  4. Optical and THz investigations of mid-IR materials exposed to alpha particle irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sporea, Dan; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Adelina; Vâţã, Ion

    2017-01-01

    The paper is the first comprehensive study on alpha particle irradiation effects on four mid-IR materials: CaF2, BaF2, Al2O3 (sapphire) and ZnSe. The measurements of the optical spectral transmittance, spectral diffuse reflectance, radioluminescent emission, terahertz (THz) spectral response, transmittance, absorbance, refractive index, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant and THz imaging are used as complementary investigations to evaluate these effects. The simulations were run to estimate: (i) the penetration depth, (ii) the scattering of alpha particle beam, (iii) the amount of material affected by this interaction, and (iv) the number of vacancies produced by the radiation exposure for each type of material. The simulation results are compared to the off-line measurement outcomes. The delay and spectral composition change of the reflected THz signal highlight the modification induced in the tested materials by the irradiation process.

  5. Variation of the track etch rates of alpha-particle trajectory in PADC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaki, M. F.; Hegazy, T. M.; Seddik, U.; Morsy, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    The formation of etched tracks in solid-state nuclear track detectors is usually described by assuming an unequivocal correlation of the etch-rate ratio with the energy loss of charged particles. For alpha particles, this assumption could be verified within the scatter of the experimental data. In this article, the dependence of the depth (x) on the track etch rate (V-T) was determined experimentally by track length measurement. It is found that the track etch rate as a function of the depth within the detector follows the Bragg curve. The track etch rate has been found to be described by a generalization of the restricted energy loss, in good approximation along the trajectories of alpha particles.

  6. Optical and THz investigations of mid-IR materials exposed to alpha particle irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sporea, Dan; Mihai, Laura; Sporea, Adelina; Vâţã, Ion

    2017-01-01

    The paper is the first comprehensive study on alpha particle irradiation effects on four mid-IR materials: CaF2, BaF2, Al2O3 (sapphire) and ZnSe. The measurements of the optical spectral transmittance, spectral diffuse reflectance, radioluminescent emission, terahertz (THz) spectral response, transmittance, absorbance, refractive index, real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constant and THz imaging are used as complementary investigations to evaluate these effects. The simulations were run to estimate: (i) the penetration depth, (ii) the scattering of alpha particle beam, (iii) the amount of material affected by this interaction, and (iv) the number of vacancies produced by the radiation exposure for each type of material. The simulation results are compared to the off-line measurement outcomes. The delay and spectral composition change of the reflected THz signal highlight the modification induced in the tested materials by the irradiation process. PMID:28067289

  7. Preferential Heating and Acceleration of {alpha} Particles by Alfven-Cyclotron Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Araneda, J. A.; Maneva, Y.; Marsch, E.

    2009-05-01

    Preferential heating and acceleration of heavy ions in the solar wind and corona represent a long-standing theoretical problem in space physics, and are distinct experimental signatures of kinetic processes occurring in collisionless plasmas. We show that fast and slow ion-acoustic waves (IAW) and transverse waves, driven by Alfven-cyclotron wave parametric instabilities can selectively destroy the coherent fluid motion of different ion species and, in this way lead to their differential heating and acceleration. Trapping of the more abundant protons by the fast IAW generates a proton beam with drift speed of about the Alfven speed. Because of their larger mass, {alpha} particles do not become significantly trapped and start, by conservation of total ion momentum, drifting relative to the receding bulk protons. Thus the resulting core protons and the {alpha} particles are differentially heated via pitch-angle scattering.

  8. Shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alsmiller, R. G., Jr.; Santoro, R. T.; Barish, J.; Claiborne, H. C.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the shielding of manned space vehicles against protons and alpha particles is summarized. The emphasis is placed on shielding against Van Allen belt protons and against solar-flare protons and alpha particles, but information on shielding against galactic cosmic rays is also presented. The approximation methods for use by nonexperts in the space shielding field are those that are standard in the space shielding literature.

  9. Alpha particle effects on the internal kink and fishbone modes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; White, R.B. )

    1994-10-01

    The effects of alpha particles on the internal kink and fishbone modes are studied analytically. The nonadiabatic contribution from untrapped alpha particles is negligible. Finite inverse aspect ratio, plasma [beta], and plasma shaping effects can significantly enhance the trapped particle drift reversal domain in the pitch angle space and reduce the bounce-averaged magnetic drift frequency. The decrease of the drift magnitude and drift reversal effects on the ideal kink mode is small, but the [beta][sub [alpha

  10. Investigation of the elastic and inelastic scattering of α-particles from 13C in the energy range 26.6-65MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burtebayev, N.; Sakhiyev, S. K.; Janseitov, D. M.; Kerimkulov, Zh.; Alimov, D.; Danilov, A. N.

    2016-09-01

    We have measured the differential cross-sections for the elastic and inelastic scattering of α-particles on 13C target at the isochronous cyclotron U-150 M INP Republic of Kazakhstan. The beam energies of α-particles were 29MeV and 50MeV. As a result of research we obtained new experimental data for the α + 13C elastic scattering and inelastic one leading to the 3.68 (3/2-), 6.86 (5/2+) and 7.5 (5/2-)MeV excited states of 13C nucleus. The experimental results on elastic scattering were analyzed within the framework of the optical model using Woods-Saxon potential and the double folding one. The theoretical calculations for the concerned excited states were performed using the coupled channel (CC) method. The optimal deformation parameters for the excited states of 13C nucleus were extracted.

  11. Inelastic and Quasielastic Neutron Scattering in PbMg1/3Nb2/3O3 Above the Burns Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Burkovsky, R.; Shapiro, S.; Vakhrushev, S.B.; Ivanov, A.; Hirota, K.; Matsuura, M.

    2010-12-01

    We present here the results of the study of the true paraelectric phase of PMN via neutron inelastic and quasielastic scattering. Inelastic data for two different Brillouin Zones were treated simultaneously in terms of the 2-mode approach for the lowest TO mode. We have confirmed that 2-mode description allows removing the contradictions between the temperature dependences of the soft-mode frequency and the dielectric susceptibility existing in the single mode model. The diffuse scattering was mapped in three Brillouin zones and substantial anisotropy of the 2-d intensity distribution was found that was not reported before. Treatment of data in terms of Huang scattering produced satisfactory description of the experimental data. It is shown that broad satellite peaks close to the main Bragg reflections in our case can be described in terms of instrumental resolution.

  12. Cross sections and partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic neutron scattering from nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at En = 21.6 MeV.

    PubMed

    Olsson, N; Ramström, E; Trostell, B

    1990-09-01

    The Studsvik high-resolution, low-background time-of-flight facility has been used to measure differential neutron scattering cross sections for nitrogen, oxygen and calcium at a neutron energy of 21.6 MeV. Angular distributions in the range 10 degrees-160 degrees have been measured for both elastic and inelastic scattering from some low-lying levels in the three nuclei. Angle-integrated cross sections have been determined by fitting Legendre polynomial expansions to the differential data. Partial kerma factors for elastic and inelastic scattering have been deduced from these fits. Analyses in terms of the spherical optical model and the distorted-wave Born approximation have provided information on potential parameters and deformations, which have been used to calculate cross sections and partial kerma factors. Comparisons have been made with other recent data sets and model predictions, as well as with the evaluated neutron data file ENDF/B-V.

  13. First search for the EMC effect and nuclear shadowing in neutrino nucleus deep inelastic scattering at MINERVA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousseau, Joel A.

    Decades of research in electron-nucleus deep inelastic scattering (DIS) have provided a clear picture of nuclear physics at high momentum transfer. While these effects have been clearly demonstrated by experiment, the theoretical explanation of their origin in some kinematic regions has been lacking. Particularly, the effects in the intermediate regions of Bjorken-x, anti-shadowing and the EMC effect have no universally accepted quantum mechanical explanation. In addition, these effects have not been measured systematically with neutrino-nucleus deep inelastic scattering, due to experiments lacking multiple heavy targets. The MINERνA (Main Injector Experiment ν-A) experiment, located in the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) facility at Fermilab, is designed explicitly to measure these kind of effects with neutrinos. MINEνA is equipped with solid targets of graphite, iron, lead and plastic scintillator. The plastic scintillator region provides excellent particle tracking capabilities, and the MINOS (Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search) near detector is used as a downstream muon spectrometer. The exposure of multiple nuclear targets to an identical neutrino beam allows for a systematic study of these nuclear effects. An analysis of the MINERνA DIS data on carbon, iron, lead and plastic scintillator has been conducted in the energy region 5 ≤ E ν < 50 GeV and thetamu < 17°. The data are presented as ratios of the total cross section (sigma(E ν)) as well as the differential cross section with respect to Bjorken-x (dsigma/dxbj) of carbon, iron and lead to scintillator. The total cross section data is useful for deciphering gross nuclear effects which effect neutrino energy reconstruction. No significant differences between simulation and MINνA DIS data are observed in the total cross section. The ratios of the xbj differential ratios however, may provide clues for decoding long standing questions about the EMC effect. The MINERνA data tend to

  14. Interplay of the elastic and inelastic channels in the 16O+27Al scattering at Elab = 280 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Nicolosi, D.; Linares, R.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Lubian, J.; Agodi, C.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; de Faria, P. N.; Foti, A.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.

    2016-06-01

    Recent data indicated a nuclear rainbow-like pattern in the elastic scattering of 16O + 27Al at E_{lab}=100 MeV that arises from couplings of the ground to the low-lying states of the 27Al nucleus. Similar effect was identified in the elastic angular distribution of 16O + 12C at E_{lab}=281 and 330 MeV. These experiments show a crucial role of microscopic details of nuclear structure in the elastic scattering of heavy ions at energies well above the Coulomb barrier. In this work we investigate the 16O + 27Al system at E_{lab}=280 MeV for which a coupled channel calculation predicts a pronounced nuclear rainbow-like structure. Obtained experimental data show evidences of an important coupling of the elastic channel to the inelastic. Coupled channel calculations reproduce the experimental angular distributions when a re-normalization factor on the real part of the optical potential is introduced. A proper theoretical approach still requires a high degree of accuracy for the nuclear structure models and new tools to deal with collective excitations.

  15. Prompt and Delayed Inelastic Scattering Reactions from Fission Neutron PGAA - First Results of FaNGaS

    SciTech Connect

    Rossbach, M.; Randriamalala, T.; Revay, Zs.; Kudejova, P.; Soelradel, S.; Wagner, F.

    2015-07-01

    The new instrument Fast Neutron Gamma Spectroscopy (FaNGaS) has been installed at the SR10 beam line of the FRM II Research Reactor in Garching and tested successfully. Complimentary to cold neutron PGAA, with FaNGaS inelastic scattering reactions induced by fission neutrons can be studied. Gamma lines from (n,n'γ) reactions up to now have been rarely studied and no adequate compilation of the emitted gamma energies exist. In developing nondestructive analytical techniques using neutron generator based PGAA such data are badly needed for quantification of heavy metals and actinides in e.g. nuclear waste or safeguards samples. A number of elements and relevant actinides have been irradiated in the fast neutron beam SR10 at the FRM II reactor in Garching, Germany. A heavily shielded 50% eff. HPGe detector perpendicular to the beam is looking at the samples exposed to 2.3 E8 cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} fission neutrons. Prompt gamma spectra have been taken and evaluated using the available data in scattered sources. Additional gamma lines have been detected and are being compiled to create a data base for (n,n') reactions. Particular emphasis is given on actinides including {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 237}Np, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 241}Am. Some examples will be given and first results will be discussed in this contribution. (authors)

  16. Inelastic neutron scattering studies of Ge-76 and Se-76: relevance to neutrinoless double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Crider, Ben; Peters, Erin; Ross, T.J.; McEllistrem, M; Prados-Estevez, F.; Allmond, James M; Vanhoy, J.R.; Yates, S.W.

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements were performed at the University of Kentucky Accelerator Laboratory on enriched Ge-76 and Se-76 scattering samples. From measurements at incident neutron energies from 2.0 to 4.0 MeV, many new levels were identified and characterized in each nucleus; level lifetimes, transition probabilities, multipole mixing ratios, and other properties were determined. In addition, gamma-ray cross sections for the Ge-76(n,n'gamma) reaction were measured at neutron energies up to 5.0 MeV, with the goal of determining the cross sections of gamma rays in 2040-keV region, which corresponds to the region of interest in the neutrinoless double beta decay of Ge-76. Gamma rays from the three strongest branches from the 3952-keV level were observed, but the previously reported 2041-keV gamma ray was not. Population cross sections across the range of incident neutron energies were determined for the 3952-keV level, resulting in a cross section of similar to 0.1 mb for the 2041-keV branch using the previously determined branching ratios. Beyond this, the data from these experiments indicate that previously unreported gamma rays from levels in Ge-76 can be found in the 2039-keV region.

  17. STUDY MAGNETIC EXCITATIONS IN DOPED TRANSITION METAL OXIDES USING INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Pengcheng

    2014-02-18

    Understanding the interplay between magnetism and superconductivity continues to be a “hot” topic in modern condensed matter physics. The discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in iron-based materials in 2008 provided an unique opportunity to compare and contrast these materials with traditional high-Tc copper oxide superconductors. Neutron scattering plays an important role in determining the dynamical spin properties in these materials. This proposal is a continuation of previous DOE supported proposal. This report summarizes the final progress we have made over from May 2005 till Aug. 2013. Overall, we continue to carry out extensive neutron scattering experiments on Fe-based materials, focusing on understanding their magnetic properties. In addition, we have established a materials laboratory at UT that has allowed us to grow these superconductors. Because neutron scattering typically demands a large amount of samples, by growing these materials in our own laboratory, we can now pursuit neutron scattering experiments over the entire electronic phase diagram, focusing on regions of interests. The material synthesis laboratory at UT was established entirely with the support of DOE funding. This not only allowed us to carry out neutron scattering experiments, but also permit us to provide samples to other US/International collaborators for studying these materials.

  18. Study of effective atomic number of breast tissues determined using the elastic to inelastic scattering ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoniassi, M.; Conceição, A. L. C.; Poletti, M. E.

    2011-10-01

    In this work we have measured Compton and Rayleigh scattering radiation from normal (adipose and fibroglandular), benign (fibroadenoma) and malignant (ductal carcinoma) breast tissues using a monoenergetic beam of 17.44 keV and a scattering angle of 90° ( x=0.99 Å -1). A practical method using the area of Rayleigh and Compton scattering was used for determining the effective atomic number ( Zeff) of the samples, being validated through measurements of several reference materials. The results show that there are differences in the distributions of Zeff of breast tissues, which are mainly related to the elemental composition of carbon ( Z=6) and oxygen ( Z=8) of each tissue type. The results suggest that is possible to use the method to characterize the breast tissues permitting study histological features of the breast tissues related to their elemental composition.

  19. Techniques for inelastic x-ray scattering with {mu}eV resolution.

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlsberger, R.

    1998-10-23

    We introduce a novel type of spectrometer that provides a {micro}eV bandpass together with a tunability over a few meV. The technique relies on nuclear resonant scattering (Moessbauer effect) of synchrotrons radiation at the 14.4-keV resonance of {sup 57}Fe. Energy tuning is achieved by the Doppler effect in high speed rotary motion. The resonantly scattered monochromatic radiation is extracted by a polarization filtering technique or by spatial separation due to the ''nuclear lighthouse effect''.

  20. Numerical simulations for width fluctuations in compound elastic and inelastic scattering at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Kawano, Toshihiko; Talou, Patrick

    2012-09-18

    The statistical theories - the Hauser-Feshbach model with the width fluctuation correction - play a central role in studying nuclear reactions in the fast energy region, hence the statistical model codes are essential for the nuclear data evaluations nowadays. In this paper, we revisit issues regarding the statistical model calculations in the fast energy range, such as the inclusion of the direct channels, and the energy averaged cross sections using different statistical assumptions. Although they have been discussed for a long time, we need more precise quantitative investigations to understand uncertainties coming from the models deficiencies in the fast energy range. For example, the partition of compound formation cross section into the elastic and inelastic channels depends on the elastic enhancement factor calculated from the statistical models. In addition, unitarity of S-matrix constrains this partition when the direct reactions are involved. Practically some simple assumptions, which many nuclear reaction model codes adopt, may work reasonably for the nuclear data evaluations. However, the uncertainties on the evaluated cross sections cannot go lower than the model uncertainty itself. We perform numerical simulations by generating the resonances using the R-matrix theory, and compare the energy (ensemble) averaged cross sections with the statistical theories, such as the theories of Moldauer, HRTW (Hofmann, Richert, Tepel, and Weidenmueller), KKM (Kawai-Kerman-McVoy), and GOE (Gaussian orthogonal ensemble).

  1. Formation of hydrogen atom in 2s state in proton-sodium inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabbah, A. Elkilany

    2015-03-01

    The inelastic collision of protons with sodium atoms are treated for the first time within the framework of the coupled-static and frozen core approximations. The method is used for calculating partial and total cross-sections with the assumption that only two channels (elastic and hydrogen formation in 2s state) are open. In each case, the calculations are carried out for seven values of the total angular momentum ℓ(0 ≤ ℓ ≤ 6). The target is described using the Clementi Roetti wave functions within the framework of the one valence electron model. We use Lipmann-Swinger equation to solve the derived equations of the problem, then apply an iterative numerical method to obtain the code of computer to calculate iterative partial cross-sections. This can be done through calculating the reactance matrix at different values of considered energies to obtain the transition matrix that gives partial and total cross sections. The present results for total hydrogen (2s state) formation cross sections are in agreement with results of other available ones in wide range of incident energy.

  2. Polarized gluon distributions from high-pT pair hadron productions in polarized deep inelastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanishi, Teruya; Yu-Bing, Dong; Morii, Toshiyuki

    2001-06-01

    To study the polarized gluon density Δg(x) in the nucleon, we propose the high-pT pair charmed hadron production process in polarized lp scattering. The double spin asymmetry ALL for this process is a good observable for testing the models of Δg(x). .

  3. Magnetic Transitions in Iron Porphyrin Halides by Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Ab-initio Studies of Zero-Field Splittings

    DOE PAGES

    Stavretis, Shelby E.; Atanasov, Mihail; Podlesnyak, Andrey A.; ...

    2015-10-02

    Zero-field splitting (ZFS) parameters of nondeuterated metalloporphyrins [Fe(TPP)X] (X = F, Br, I; H2TPP = tetraphenylporphyrin) are determined by inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The ZFS values are D = 4.49(9) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)F], and D = 8.8(2) cm–1, E = 0.1(2) cm–1 and D = 13.4(6) cm–1, E = 0.3(6) cm–1 for monoclinic polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Br] and [Fe(TPP)I], respectively. Along with our recent report of the ZFS value of D = 6.33(8) cm–1 for tetragonal polycrystalline [Fe(TPP)Cl], these data provide a rare, complete determination of ZFS parameters in a metalloporphyrin halide series. The electronic structure of [Fe(TPP)X] (X =more » F, Cl, Br, I) has been studied by multireference ab initio methods: the complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and the N-electron valence perturbation theory (NEVPT2) with the aim of exploring the origin of the large and positive zero-field splitting D of the 6A1 ground state. D was calculated from wave functions of the electronic multiplets spanned by the d5 configuration of Fe(III) along with spin–orbit coupling accounted for by quasi degenerate perturbation theory. Results reproduce trends of D from inelastic neutron scattering data increasing in the order from F, Cl, Br, to I. A mapping of energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the S = 3/2 excited states on ligand field theory was used to characterize the σ- and π-antibonding effects decreasing from F to I. This is in agreement with similar results deduced from ab initio calculations on CrX63- complexes and also with the spectrochemical series showing a decrease of the ligand field in the same directions. A correlation is found between the increase of D and decrease of the π- and σ-antibonding energies eλX (λ = σ, π) in the series from X = F to I. Analysis of this correlation using second-order perturbation theory expressions in terms of angular overlap parameters rationalizes the experimentally deduced trend

  4. Bulk GaN alpha-particle detector with large depletion region and improved energy resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang; Mulligan, Padhraic; Wang, Jinghui; Chuirazzi, William; Cao, Lei

    2017-03-01

    An alpha-particle detector was fabricated using a freestanding n-type bulk GaN wafer with a Au/Ni/GaN sandwich Schottky structure. Current-voltage measurements at room temperature revealed a Schottky contact with a leakage current of 7.53±0.3 nA at a reverse bias of 200 V. The detector had a large depletion depth that can capture much of the energy from 5.486 MeV alpha particles emitted from a 241Am source. The resolution of its alpha-particle energy spectrum was improved to 2.2±0.2% at 5.486 MeV under a bias of 550 V. This superior resolution was attributed to the shortening of the carrier transit time and the large energy deposition within the large depletion depth, i.e., 27 μm at -550 V, which all resulted in a more complete charge collection. A model developed using the ATLAS simulation framework from Silvaco Inc. was employed to study the charge collection process. The simulation results were found to agree closely with the experimental results. This detector will be beneficial for research at neutron scattering facilities, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, and the Large Hadron Collider, among other institutions, where the Si-based charged particle detectors could be quickly degraded in an intense radiation field.

  5. The temperature dependence of inelastic light scattering from small particles for use in combustion diagnostic instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cloud, Stanley D.

    1987-01-01

    A computer calculation of the expected angular distribution of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) from micrometer size polystyrene spheres based on a Mie-type model, and a pilot experiment to test the feasibility of measuring CARS angular distributions from micrometer size polystyrene spheres by simply suspending them in water are discussed. The computer calculations predict a very interesting structure in the angular distributions that depends strongly on the size and relative refractive index of the spheres.

  6. Contrasts in electron correlations and inelastic scattering between LiFeP and LiFeAs revealed by charge transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, S.; Hashimoto, K.; Ikeda, H.; Terashima, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Shibauchi, T.

    2012-02-01

    By using high-quality single crystals, we quantitatively compare the transport properties between LiFeP and LiFeAs superconductors with compensated electron and hole carriers. The low-temperature resistivity follows the Fermi-liquid AT2 dependence with a factor of ˜3 difference in the coefficient A. This highlights weaker electron correlations in LiFeP, which is consistent with its ˜70 times lower upper critical field than that of LiFeAs. Our analysis of the magnetotransport data indicates that in LiFeP, the electron carriers with lighter masses exhibit stronger temperature dependence of inelastic scattering rate than the holes, which is the opposite to the LiFeAs case. This stark difference in the band-dependent inelastic scattering may be relevant to the recently reported contrasting superconducting gap structures in these two superconductors.

  7. Inelastic p{sup 9}Be scattering and halo structure of the J{sup π} = 1/2{sup +} excited state of the {sup 9}Be nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Zhusupov, M. A.; Ibraeva, E. T. Krassovitskiy, P. M.

    2015-01-15

    Differential cross sections for inelastic p{sup 9}Be scattering (to the J{sup α} = 1/2{sup +} level) were calculated on the basis of Glauber’s diffraction theory. The wave function for the {sup 9}Be nucleus in the three-particle 2αn model was used in this calculation. An expansion of this wave function in a series in Gaussian functions and the representation of the Glauber operator Ω in the form conjugate to the three-particle wave function make it possible to calculate analytically inelastic-scattering matrix elements. The differential cross section calculated by using the 2αn wave functions agrees well with available experimental data at E = 180 MeV.

  8. Analysis of 12C+12C Elastic and Inelastic Scatterings in the Framework of the Cluster Double Folding Model and Coupled-Channels Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanain, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    A double folding cluster (DFC) model is proposed for the analysis of (12) C+(12) C elastic and inelastic scatterings. The DFC procedure is performed using the alpha-clusters structure of (12) C nucleus. Angular distributions of the (12) C+(12) C elastic and inelastic scatterings in the energy range 70.7-126 MeV were analyzed using the derived DFC potentials in the framework of the coupled-channels (CC) mechanism. Successful descriptions of the data are obtained over the full measured angular range without the need to normalize the DFC potentials. Furthermore, the deduced deformation length and the quadrupole deformation parameter are quite consistent with the corresponding electromagnetic measurements.

  9. Structure of Alkali Borate Glasses at High Pressure: B and Li K-Edge Inelastic X-Ray Scattering Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sung Keun; Eng, Peter J.; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Shu, Jinfu

    2008-06-16

    We report the first in situ boron K-edge inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) spectra for alkali borate glasses (Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7}) at high pressure up to 30 GPa where pressure-induced coordination transformation from three-coordinated to four-coordinated boron was directly probed. Coordination transformation (reversible upon decompression) begins around 5 GPa and the fraction of four-coordinated boron increases with pressure from about 50% (at 1 atm) to more than 95% (at 30 GPa) with multiple densification mechanisms, evidenced by three distinct pressure ranges for (d{sup [4]}B/dP){sub T}. The lithium K-edge IXS spectrum for Li-borate glasses at 5 GPa shows IXS features similar to that at 1 atm, suggesting that the Li environment does not change much with pressure up to 5 GPa. These results provide improved understanding of the structure of low-z glass at high pressure.

  10. High-efficiency in situ resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (iRIXS) endstation at the Advanced Light Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ruimin; Li, Qinghao; Zhuo, Zengqing; Sallis, Shawn; Fuchs, Oliver; Blum, Monika; Weinhardt, Lothar; Heske, Clemens; Pepper, John; Jones, Michael; Brown, Adam; Spucces, Adrian; Chow, Ken; Smith, Brian; Glans, Per-Anders; Chen, Yanxue; Yan, Shishen; Pan, Feng; Piper, Louis F. J.; Denlinger, Jonathan; Guo, Jinghua; Hussain, Zahid; Chuang, Yi-De; Yang, Wanli

    2017-03-01

    An endstation with two high-efficiency soft x-ray spectrographs was developed at Beamline 8.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The endstation is capable of performing soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy, emission spectroscopy, and, in particular, resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS). Two slit-less variable line-spacing grating spectrographs are installed at different detection geometries. The endstation covers the photon energy range from 80 to 1500 eV. For studying transition-metal oxides, the large detection energy window allows a simultaneous collection of x-ray emission spectra with energies ranging from the O K-edge to the Ni L-edge without moving any mechanical components. The record-high efficiency enables the recording of comprehensive two-dimensional RIXS maps with good statistics within a short acquisition time. By virtue of the large energy window and high throughput of the spectrographs, partial fluorescence yield and inverse partial fluorescence yield signals could be obtained for all transition metal L-edges including Mn. Moreover, the different geometries of these two spectrographs (parallel and perpendicular to the horizontal polarization of the beamline) provide contrasts in RIXS features with two different momentum transfers.

  11. Medical applications of in vivo neutron inelastic scattering and neutron activation analysis: Technical similarities to detection of explosives and contraband

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, J. J.

    2001-07-01

    Nutritional status of patients can be evaluated by monitoring changes in elemental body composition. Fast neutron activation (for N and P) and neutron inelastic scattering (for C and O) are used in vivo to assess elements characteristic of specific body compartments. There are similarities between the body composition techniques and the detection of hidden explosives and narcotics. All samples have to be examined in depth and the ratio of elements provides a "signature" of the chemical of interest. The N/H and C/O ratios measure protein and fat content in the body. Similarly, a high C/O ratio is characteristic of narcotics and a low C/O together with a strong presence of N is a signature of some explosives. The available time for medical applications is about 20 min—compared to a few seconds for the detection of explosives—but the permitted radiation exposure is limited. In vivo neutron analysis is used to measure H, O, C, N, P, Na, Cl, and Ca for the study of the mechanisms of lean tissue depletion with aging and wasting diseases, and to investigate methods of preserving function and quality of life in the elderly.

  12. Evaluation of the Doppler-Broadening of Gamma-Ray Spectra from Neutron Inelastic Scattering on Light Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Womble, Phillip C.; Barzilov, Alexander; Novikov, Ivan; Howard, Joseph; Musser, Jason

    2009-03-10

    Neutron-induced gamma-ray reactions are extensively used in the nondestructive analysis of materials and other areas where the information about the chemical composition of a substance is crucial. The common technique to find the intensity of the gamma ray is to fit gamma-ray line shape with an analytical function, for example, a Gaussian. However, the Gaussian fitting may fail if the gamma-ray peak is Doppler-broadened since this leads to the miscalculation of the area of the peak and, therefore, to misidentification of the material. Due to momentum considerations, Doppler-broadening occurs primarily with gamma rays from neutron-induced inelastic scattering reactions with light nuclei. The recoiling nucleus of interest must have excited states whose lifetimes are much smaller than the time of flight in the material. We have examined various light nuclei bombarded by 14 MeV neutrons to predict when the peak shape of a neutron-induced gamma ray emitted from these nuclei will be Doppler-broadened. We have found that nearly all the gamma rays from neutron-induced gamma-ray reactions on light elements (A<20) are Doppler-broadened with only a few exceptions. This means that utilization of resolution curves derived from isotopic sources or thermal neutron capture reactions have little value in the analysis.

  13. An inelastic neutron scattering and NIR-FT Raman spectroscopy study of chloroform and trichloroethylene in faujasites

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, A.M.; Mellot, C.F.; Eckert, J.; Cheetham, A.K.

    2000-01-27

    Molecular information about the nature and the strength of the interactions between chloroform and trichloroethylene (TCE) sorbates and siliceous FAU, NaY, and NaX zeolites was obtained by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and Raman spectroscopies. The spectral features of the two sorbates differ in terms of their frequencies, splittings, and line widths from the ones of chloroform and TCE molecules in the gas phase. In conjunction with the authors simulation results, these differences are rationalized by assuming that, in siliceous FAU, the two sorbates undergo a nondissociative adsorption involving the formation of an H{sub sorbate}{hor{underscore}ellipsis}O{sub framework} hydrogen bond and Cl{sub sorbate}{hor{underscore}ellipsis}O{sub framework} van der Waals interactions, whereas in NaY and NaX, additional Cl{sub sorbate}{hor{underscore}ellipsis}Na{sup +} electrostatic interactions are involved. Interestingly, no {pi}/Na{sup +} interaction takes place for TCE. These findings, which are in agreement with previous calorimetric and simulation results, confirm that the strength of the sorbate/zeolite interactions is correlated to the basicity of the zeolite and therefore increases in the sequence siliceous FAU < NaY < NaX, following the sequence of the heats of adsorption.

  14. Unconventional superconductivity in Ba(0.6)K(0.4)Fe2As2 from inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Christianson, A D; Goremychkin, E A; Osborn, R; Rosenkranz, S; Lumsden, M D; Malliakas, C D; Todorov, I S; Claus, H; Chung, D Y; Kanatzidis, M G; Bewley, R I; Guidi, T

    2008-12-18

    A new family of superconductors containing layers of iron arsenide has attracted considerable interest because of their high transition temperatures (T(c)), some of which are >50 K, and because of similarities with the high-T(c) copper oxide superconductors. In both the iron arsenides and the copper oxides, superconductivity arises when an antiferromagnetically ordered phase has been suppressed by chemical doping. A universal feature of the copper oxide superconductors is the existence of a resonant magnetic excitation, localized in both energy and wavevector, within the superconducting phase. This resonance, which has also been observed in several heavy-fermion superconductors, is predicted to occur when the sign of the superconducting energy gap takes opposite values on different parts of the Fermi surface, an unusual gap symmetry which implies that the electron pairing interaction is repulsive at short range. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy shows no evidence of gap anisotropy in the iron arsenides, but such measurements are insensitive to the phase of the gap on separate parts of the Fermi surface. Here we report inelastic neutron scattering observations of a magnetic resonance below T(c) in Ba(0.6)K(0.4)Fe(2)As(2), a phase-sensitive measurement demonstrating that the superconducting energy gap has unconventional symmetry in the iron arsenide superconductors.

  15. Electronic structure of lithium battery interphase compounds: Comparison between inelastic x-ray scattering measurements and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fister, Tim T.; Schmidt, Moritz; Fenter, Paul; Johnson, Chris S.; Slater, Michael D.; Chan, Maria K. Y.; Shirley, Eric L.

    2011-12-01

    In lithium ion batteries, decomposition of the electrolyte and its associated passivation of the electrode surface occurs at low potentials, resulting in an electronically insulating, but Li-ion conducting, solid electrolyte interphase (SEI). The products of the SEI and their chemical constituents/properties play an important role in the long-term stability and performance of the battery. Reactivity and the sub-keV core binding energies of lithium, carbon, oxygen, and fluorine species in the SEI present technical challenges in the spectroscopy of these compounds. Using an alternative approach, nonresonant inelastic x-ray scattering, we examine the near-edge spectra of bulk specimens of common SEI compounds, including LiF, Li2CO3, LiOH, LiOH.H2O, and Li2O. By working at hard x-ray energies, we also experimentally differentiate the s- and p-symmetry components of lithium's unoccupied states using the evolution of its K edge with momentum transfer. We find good agreement with theoretical spectra calculated using a Bethe-Salpeter approach in all cases. These results provide an analytical and diagnostic foundation for better understanding of the makeup of SEIs and the mechanism of their formation.

  16. Inelastic neutron scattering cross sections for Ge76 relevant to background in neutrinoless double- β decay experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Crider, B. P.; Peters, E. E.; Allmond, J. M.; ...

    2015-09-11

    The experimental signature in searches for the neutrinoless double- decay of 76Ge is a peak near 2039 keV in the spectrum. Given the low probability of the process, it is important that the background in this region be well understood. Moreover, inelastic scattering reactions with neutrons from muon-induced interactions and ( ,n) reactions in the surrounding materials or in the detector can provide contributions to the background. We also measured the production cross sections for rays from the 76Ge(n,n ) reaction in the 2039-keV region at incident neutron energies up to 4.9 MeV. In addition to determining that the crossmore » sections of a previously known 2040.7-keV ray from the 3952-keV level in 76 Ge are rather small, we find that a larger contribution arises from a 2037.5-keV ray which is attributed to a newly identified level at 3147 keV in 76Ge. Finally, a third contribution is also possible from another new level at 3577 keV. These results indicate that the 2039-keV region in 76Ge neutrinoless double- decay searches is more complex than was previously thought.« less

  17. Mapping the deformation in the "island of inversion": Inelastic scattering of 30Ne and 36Mg at intermediate energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornenbal, P.; Scheit, H.; Takeuchi, S.; Aoi, N.; Li, K.; Matsushita, M.; Steppenbeck, D.; Wang, H.; Baba, H.; Ideguchi, E.; Kobayashi, N.; Kondo, Y.; Lee, J.; Michimasa, S.; Motobayashi, T.; Poves, A.; Sakurai, H.; Takechi, M.; Togano, Y.; Yoneda, K.

    2016-04-01

    The transition strengths of the first-excited 2+ states and deformation lengths of the nuclei 30Ne and 36Mg were determined via Coulomb- and nuclear-force-dominated inelastic scattering at intermediate energies. Beams of these exotic nuclei were produced at the RIKEN Radioactive Isotope Beam Factory and were incident on lead and carbon targets at energies above 200 MeV/u . Absolute excitation cross sections on the lead target yielded reduced transition probabilities of 0.0277(79) and 0.0528(121) e2b2 , while the measurements with the carbon target revealed nuclear deformation lengths of δN=1.98 (11) and 1.93(11) fm for 30Ne and 36Mg, respectively. Corresponding quadrupole deformation parameters of β2˜0.5 from the two probes were found comparable in magnitude, showing no indication for a reduction in deformation along isotopic and isotonic chains from 32Mg towards the neutron drip-line. Comparisons to shell-model calculations illustrate the importance of neutron excitations across the N =20 shell for 30Ne and suggest that shallow maximums of collectivity may occur around N =22 and 24 along the neon and magnesium isotopic chains, respectively.

  18. Structure of kaolinite and influence of stacking faults: reconciling theory and experiment using inelastic neutron scattering analysis.

    PubMed

    White, Claire E; Kearley, Gordon J; Provis, John L; Riley, Daniel P

    2013-05-21

    The structure of kaolinite at the atomic level, including the effect of stacking faults, is investigated using inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The vibrational dynamics of the standard crystal structure of kaolinite, calculated using DFT (VASP) with normal mode analysis, gives good agreement with the experimental INS data except for distinct discrepancies, especially for the low frequency modes (200-400 cm(-1)). By generating several types of stacking faults (shifts in the a,b plane for one kaolinite layer relative to the adjacent layer), it is seen that these low frequency modes are affected, specifically through the emergence of longer hydrogen bonds (O-H⋯O) in one of the models corresponding to a stacking fault of -0.3151a - 0.3151b. The small residual disagreement between observed and calculated INS is assigned to quantum effects (which are not taken into account in the DFT calculations), in the form of translational tunneling of the proton in the hydrogen bonds, which lead to a softening of the low frequency modes. DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations show that anharmonicity does not play an important role in the structural dynamics of kaolinite.

  19. Hadron mass corrections in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero Teran, Juan Vicente; Ethier, James J.; Accardi, Alberto; Casper, Steven W.; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2015-09-24

    We found that the spin-dependent cross sections for semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon scattering are derived in the framework of collinear factorization, including the effects of masses of the target and produced hadron at finite Q2. At leading order the cross sections factorize into products of parton distribution and fragmentation functions evaluated in terms of new, mass-dependent scaling variables. Furthermore, the size of the hadron mass corrections is estimated at kinematics relevant for current and future experiments, and the implications for the extraction of parton distributions from semi-inclusive measurements are discussed.

  20. Hadron mass corrections in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Guerrero Teran, Juan Vicente; Ethier, James J.; Accardi, Alberto; ...

    2015-09-24

    We found that the spin-dependent cross sections for semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon scattering are derived in the framework of collinear factorization, including the effects of masses of the target and produced hadron at finite Q2. At leading order the cross sections factorize into products of parton distribution and fragmentation functions evaluated in terms of new, mass-dependent scaling variables. Furthermore, the size of the hadron mass corrections is estimated at kinematics relevant for current and future experiments, and the implications for the extraction of parton distributions from semi-inclusive measurements are discussed.