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Sample records for alpha1 proteinase inhibitor

  1. Ozone inactivation of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.A.

    1980-06-01

    Ozone decreased the trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase inhibitory activities of human alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor both in plasma and in solutions of the pure inhibitor. The total loss of porcine elastase inhibitory activity required 18 mol of ozone/mol of pure alpha 1-PI and approximately 850 mol of ozone/mol of alpha 1-PI in plasma. A corresponding loss of the ability to inhibit human leukocyte elastase was observed. Inactivated alpha 1-PI contains four residues of methionine sulfoxide, in addition to oxidized tryosine and tryptophan. Electrophoretic analysis demonstrated that the ozone-inactivated alpha 1-PI did not form normal complexes with serine proteinases. These findings suggest that the inhalation of ozone could inactivate alpha 1-PI on the airspace side of the lung to create a localized alpha 1-PI deficiency, which might contribute to the development of emphysema.

  2. Investigation of association between alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor haplotype and endometritis in the thoroughbred mare.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, A D; John, H A; Ricketts, S W; Rossdale, P D; Scott, A M

    1994-03-01

    Failure to inhibit proteinases can lead to excessive tissue damage. The possibility that the severity of endometritis in Thoroughbred mares correlates with the haplotypes of plasma alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI) expressed was investigated in two groups of mares. In mares with pyometritis before treatment, the frequency of the N haplotype, which is already high in the Thoroughbred population, was significantly increased when compared with that in a large published population. In mares with acute endometritis which persisted after treatment followed by sexual rest, the absence of S and T haplotypes was significant, suggesting that, when present, they may have a protective function.

  3. Regulation of alpha 1 proteinase inhibitor function by rabbit alveolar macrophages. Evidence for proteolytic rather than oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed Central

    Banda, M J; Clark, E J; Werb, Z

    1985-01-01

    Rabbit alveolar macrophages were cultured in an environment conducive to the secretion of both reactive oxygen and proteinases, so that the relative importance of proteolytic and oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar macrophages could be evaluated. The inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was proportional to its proteolysis, and there was no detectable inactivation in the absence of proteolysis. Although the live macrophages were capable of secreting reactive oxygen, they did not inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by oxidation. The inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by proteolysis was proportional to the secretion of elastinolytic activity by the alveolar macrophages. The inability of the alveolar macrophages to oxidize alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was attributed to the methionine in the macrophages, in secreted proteins, and in the culture medium competing for oxidants. The data suggest that proteolytic inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor may be important in vivo and that the methionine concentration in vivo may protect alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor from significant oxidative inactivation. Images PMID:2989330

  4. Oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar epithelial type II cells.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Aerts, C; Gressier, B; Gosset, P; Voisin, C

    1993-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the ability of guinea pig alveolar epithelial type II cells to generate significant amounts of reactive oxygen species to inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI). Inactivation of alpha 1-PI was evaluated by its inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic elastase and was expressed as a percentage. The same experiments were performed in parallel with alveolar macrophages (AM) obtained from the same animals and with MRC-5 fibroblasts. Both type II cells and AM released significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide, whereas the fibroblasts did not. Unstimulated type II cells (0.5 +/- 2%), AM (1.2 +/- 1.5%), and fibroblasts (0.5 +/- 0.5%) were unable to inactivate alpha 1-PI. Addition of phorbol myristate acetate did not increase their ability to inactivate alpha 1-PI. In contrast, type II cells (79.7 +/- 7%) and AM (80.1 +/- 8%) dramatically inactivated alpha 1-PI in the presence of myeloperoxidase (25 mU/ml), whereas fibroblasts did not. Addition of catalase to the reaction significantly prevented the inactivation of alpha 1-PI. Western blot analysis of alpha 1-PI did not reveal a significant proteolysis of alpha 1-PI, which supports the hypothesis that, in the presence of neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase, type II cells may oxidatively inactivate alpha 1-PI.

  5. Inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by Cu(II) and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kwon, N S; Chan, P C; Kesner, L

    1990-03-01

    When alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor was treated with 1-5 microM CuSO4 in the presence of H2O2 (250-1000 microM), its elastase inhibitory capacity was markedly decreased. Several other metal ions tested had either very little or no effect. The Cu(II)-catalyzed decreased in the inhibition of elastase activity can also be demonstrated in dialyzed plasma. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that in several pathological conditions in which extracellular copper levels are elevated, Cu(II)-catalyzed peroxidation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor may occur at sites of inflammation where H2O2 is secreted as a major product by activated phagocytes.

  6. Synthesis and release of platelet-activating factor is inhibited by plasma alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor or alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and is stimulated by proteinases

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    TNF and IL-1 stimulate the synthesis and release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) by neutrophils and vascular endothelial cells. Serum inhibits PAF production even after inactivation of an acetylhydrolase that degrades PAF. Human plasma was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography, and two inhibitory fractions were detected, one containing PAF-acetylhydrolase activity and the other alpha 1- proteinase inhibitor. Low concentrations of this antiproteinase and of human plasma alpha 1-antichymotrypsin inhibited TNF-induced PAF synthesis in neutrophils, macrophages, and vascular endothelial cells. Both antiproteinases also inhibited PAF production stimulated by phagocytosis in macrophages and induced with IL-1 in neutrophils or with TNF in vascular endothelial cells. These results suggest that a proteinase activated on the plasma membrane or secreted by these cells is involved in promoting PAF synthesis. Indeed, addition of elastase to macrophages, neutrophils, and endothelial cells stimulated synthesis and release of PAF much faster than TNF. A similar stimulation was observed in incubations with cathepsin G. To identify a proteinase activated in TNF-treated cells, neutrophils and endothelial cells were incubated with specific chloromethyl ketone inhibitors of elastase and cathepsin G. Synthesis of PAF was significantly inhibited by low concentrations of the cathepsin G inhibitor. The finding that antiproteinases are inhibitory at concentrations 100-fold lower than those present in plasma raises questions as to the ability of TNF and IL-1 to stimulate neutrophils in circulation or endothelial cells to synthesize PAF. We propose that PAF production is limited to zones of close contact between cells, which exclude antiproteinases. PMID:3049910

  7. Comparative studies of the Spi1 proteins of three equine alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor haplotypes following isolation by affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, A D; Miller, H R; John, H A; Scudamore, C L

    1993-09-01

    1. Antiproteinase deficiency can result in excessive proteinase-induced tissue damage. The major anti-elastase (Spi1) protein of equine alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1-PI) was isolated from the plasma/serum of three common haplotypes (I, L and U). 2. The N-terminal amino acid sequences of the three inhibitors were identical, but were only approx 65-77% homologous with two other published equine Spi1 sequences. 3. All three inhibitors complexed quickly and irreversibly with equine leucocyte proteinase 2A (kass = 2 x 10(7) M-1 sec-1). They were also efficient inhibitors of chymase (rat mast cell proteinase-II; kass = 2 x 10(5) M-1 sec-1; Ki = 2 x 10(-10) M). There was therefore no evidence of deficient inhibition in the Spi1 variants of the I,L and U haplotypes.

  8. Serum concentrations of canine alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor in cobalamin-deficient Yorkshire Terrier dogs.

    PubMed

    Grützner, Niels; Heilmann, Romy M; Bridges, Cory S; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2013-05-01

    Fecal canine alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (cα1-PI) concentration has been reported to be increased in dogs with protein-losing enteropathy due to the loss of cα1-PI into the gastrointestinal tract. A chronic loss of cα1-PI may theoretically deplete serum cα1-PI, potentially altering the proteinase-to-proteinase inhibitor balance. Protein-losing enteropathy has been reported to occur frequently in certain dog breeds such as Yorkshire Terriers and to be associated with hypocobalaminemia. The objective was to compare serum cα1-PI concentrations in Yorkshire Terriers with and without cobalamin (COB) deficiency. Serum samples from 52 COB-deficient and 69 normocobalaminemic Yorkshire Terriers, which had been submitted to the Gastrointestinal Laboratory (2008-2011; College Station, TX), were included retrospectively. Serum cα1-PI concentrations were measured using an in-house radioimmunoassay and compared between Yorkshire Terriers with and without COB deficiency using a Mann-Whitney U test. A Fisher exact test was used to evaluate whether a decreased serum cα1-PI concentration is associated with COB deficiency in Yorkshire Terriers. Serum cα1-PI concentrations were significantly lower in COB-deficient Yorkshire Terriers (median: 1,016 mg/l, range: 315-3,945 mg/l) than in normocobalaminemic Yorkshire Terriers (median: 1,665 mg/l, range: 900-2,970 mg/l; P < 0.0001). One-fourth (n = 13) of the COB-deficient Yorkshire Terriers had a serum cα1-PI concentration below the lower limit of the reference interval (<732 mg/l), and COB deficiency was associated with decreased serum cα1-PI concentrations (P < 0.0001). In the current study, serum cα1-PI concentrations are significantly lower in COB-deficient Yorkshire Terriers when compared to normocobalaminemic Yorkshire Terriers. Further studies are needed to determine the functional and potential prognostic implications of serum cα1-PI concentrations in dogs with gastrointestinal disease.

  9. Oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor by alveolar macrophages from healthy smokers requires the presence of myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Wallaert, B; Gressier, B; Aerts, C; Mizon, C; Voisin, C; Mizon, J

    1991-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the ability of human alveolar macrophages (AM) of 10 healthy smokers to inactivate alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha 1PI). Purified alpha 1PI was incubated for 45 min, with human alveolar macrophages before and after stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or opsonized zymosan. As a positive control, the same experiments were performed in parallel with blood human neutrophils (PMN). Results are expressed as percentage of inactivation of alpha 1PI as evaluated from its inhibitory activity against porcine pancreatic elastase. A strong correlation (r = 0.99) was shown when inhibitory activity of alpha 1PI was evaluated against porcine pancreatic elastase or human neutrophil elastase. Unstimulated AM (1.57 +/- 0.9%) as well as stimulated AM (PMA: 1 +/- 0.4%; zymosan: 3 +/- 0.6%) were unable to inactivate alpha 1PI. Gel electrophoresis of alpha 1PI demonstrated that AM before or after stimulation induced a slight proteolysis of alpha 1PI, whereas both cleaved and complexed alpha 1PI were found when alpha 1PI was incubated with activated PMN. Both unstimulated (22 +/- 2.6%) and activated PMN (PMA: 91.7 +/- 4.7%; zymosan: 90 +/- 5.5%) were responsible for a significant inactivation of alpha 1PI. Catalase, in contrast to superoxide dismutase, was responsible for a near complete protection of alpha 1PI inactivation by PMN. To better determine the role of PMN secretory products, especially myeloperoxidase (MPO), we also investigated the effect of zymosan-activated PMN supernatants or of purified MPO on the alpha 1PI-AM reaction. MPO assay in PMN supernatants demonstrated that activated neutrophils released significant amounts of MPO (16.8 +/- 4.1 U/ml), whereas MPO was undetectable in activated AM supernatants.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitors for the treatment of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: safety, tolerability, and patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; Al-Alawi, Mazen; McEnery, Thomas; McElvaney, Noel G

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency remains an underrecognized genetic disease with predominantly pulmonary and hepatic manifestations. AAT is derived primarily from hepatocytes; however, macrophages and neutrophils are secondary sources. As the natural physiological inhibitor of several proteases, most importantly neutrophil elastase (NE), it plays a key role in maintaining pulmonary protease–antiprotease balance. In deficient states, unrestrained NE activity promotes damage to the lung matrix, causing structural defects and impairing host defenses. The commonest form of AAT deficiency results in a mutated Z AAT that is abnormally folded, polymerized, and aggregated in the liver. Consequently, systemic levels are lower, resulting in diminished pulmonary concentrations. Hepatic disease occurs due to liver aggregation of the protein, while lung destruction ensues from unopposed protease-mediated damage. In this review, we will discuss AAT deficiency, its clinical manifestations, and augmentation therapy. We will address the safety and tolerability profiles of AAT replacement in the context of patient outcomes and cost-effectiveness and outline future directions for work in this field. PMID:25673994

  11. SPARTA clinical trial design: exploring the efficacy and safety of two dose regimens of alpha1-proteinase inhibitor augmentation therapy in alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sorrells, Susan; Camprubi, Sandra; Griffin, Rhonda; Chen, Junliang; Ayguasanosa, Jaume

    2015-04-01

    Alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is an underdiagnosed genetic disorder that results in early-onset emphysema due to low serum levels of alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI), leading to increased activity of tissue-damaging neutrophil elastase. Clinical outcomes of AATD may be improved by administering alpha1-PI augmentation therapy. Here, we describe the design of the ongoing Study of ProlAstin-c Randomized Therapy with Alpha-1 augmentation (SPARTA), a phase 3 trial designed to evaluate progression of lung tissue loss in patients with severe AATD receiving human alpha1-PI (Prolastin(®)-C) versus placebo, using whole-lung computed tomography (CT) densitometry. SPARTA is a randomized, placebo-controlled trial assessing the efficacy and safety of two separate doses of Prolastin-C (60 and 120 mg/kg) administered weekly over 3 years in patients aged 18-70 years with a diagnosis of AATD and clinical evidence of pulmonary emphysema. The primary measure of efficacy (change from baseline whole-lung 15th percentile lung density [PD15]) will be determined by CT lung densitometry measured at total lung capacity. Secondary efficacy variables will be the evaluation of severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations, as defined by American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society criteria, and PD15 of the basal lung region using CT densitometry. Adverse events will be collected and documented. The SPARTA trial is designed to evaluate the long-term (3-year) efficacy of 2 separate doses of Prolastin-C for the treatment of emphysema in patients with AATD. Protocol number: GTi1201. NCT01983241. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. A feedback regulatory pathway between LDL and alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in chronic inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Bristow, Cynthia L; Modarresi, Rozbeh; Babayeva, Mariya A; LaBrunda, Michelle; Mukhtarzad, Roya; Trucy, Maylis; Franklin, Aaron; Reeves, Rudy E R; Long, Allegra; Mullen, Michael P; Cortes, Jose; Winston, Ronald

    2013-11-01

    Dietary lipids are transported via lymph to the liver and transformed to lipoproteins which bind to members of the low density lipoprotein receptor family (LDL-RFMs). Certain LDL-RFMs, e.g., very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDLR), are also bound by inactivated proteinase inhibitors, the most abundant being α1proteinase inhibitor (α1PI, α1antitrypsin). Inflammation/infection, including HIV-1 infection, is accompanied by low levels of CD4+ T cells and active α1PI and high levels of inactivated α1PI. By inducing LDL-RFMs-mediated cellular locomotion, active α1PI regulates the number of CD4+ T cells. We sought to investigate whether CD4+ T cells and α1PI directly impact lipoprotein levels. At the cellular level, we show that active α1PI is required for VLDLR-mediated uptake of receptor-associated cargo, specifically CD4-bound HIV-1. We show that active α1PI levels linearly correlate with LDL levels in HIV-1 infected individuals (P<0.001) and that therapeutic, weekly infusions of active α1PI elevate the number of CD4+ T cells and HDL levels while lowering LDL levels in patients on antiretroviral therapy with controlled HIV-1. Based on the unusual combination of lipodystrophy and low levels of α1PI and CD4+ T cells in HIV-1 disease, we reveal that LDL and α1PI participate in a feedback regulatory pathway. We demonstrate integral roles for sequentially acting active and inactive α1PI in the uptake and recycling of receptors and cargo aggregated with VLDLR including CD4 and chemokine receptors. Evidence supports a role for α1PI as a primary sentinel to deploy the immune system as a consequence of its role in lipoprotein transport.

  13. Intravenous administration of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor in patients of PiZ and PiM phenotype. Preliminary report

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, K.M.; Smith, R.M.; Spragg, R.G.; Tisi, G.M.

    1988-06-24

    Nine patients with moderate pulmonary emphysema, six of PiZ phenotype and three of PiM phenotype, have received a single intravenous infusion of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (human) (A1PI), in a dose of 60 mg/kg over a 30-minute period. They also received a tracer dose (300 microCi) of /sup 131/I-labeled A1PI. No active or passive immunization against hepatitis was given. No acute toxicity was observed. Compared with baseline data, significant elevations of serum A1PI (measured both antigenically and as anti-elastase activity) occurred, with a serum half-life approximating 110 hours. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, obtained 48 hours after infusion, reflected a significant increase in A1PI concentration versus baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid values. Serial gamma camera images of the lungs confirmed persistence of enhanced lung radioactivity for several days. Urinary desmosine excretion did not change following A1PI infusion. During the period of follow-up thus far, no patient has had chronic toxicity, results of liver function tests have been stable, and there has been no development of hepatitis B antigen or antibodies to hepatitis B surface or core antigens.

  14. Expression screening of bacterial libraries of recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants for candidates with thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Bhakta, Varsha; Gierczak, Richard F; Sheffield, William P

    2013-12-01

    Exhaustive mutagenesis studies of the reactive centre loop (RCL), a key structural component of proteins belonging to the serpin superfamily of protease inhibitors, are complicated by the size of the RCL, serpin conformational complexity, and, for most serpins, the lack of a serpin-dependent phenotype of expressing cells. Here, we describe a thrombin capture assay that distinguished thrombin-inhibitory recombinant human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API M358R) from non-inhibitory API variants in Escherichia coli lysates prepared from either single clones or pools. Binding of API proteins in the lysates to thrombin immobilized on microtiter plate wells was quantified via colour generated by a peroxidase-coupled anti-API antibody. Bacterial expression plasmids encoding inhibitory API M358R were mixed 1:99 with plasmids encoding non-inhibitory API T345R/M358R and the resulting library screened in pools of 10. All above-background signals arising from pools or subsequently re-probed single clones were linked to the presence of plasmids encoding API M358R. Screening of a portion of another expression library encoding hypervariable API with all possibilities at codons 352-358 also yielded only novel, thrombin-inhibitory variants. Probing a smaller library expressing all possible codons at Ala347 yielded the wild type, 6 different functional variants, one partially active variant, and two variants with no thrombin-inhibitory activity. API antigen levels varied considerably less among Ala347 variants than activity levels, and comparison of rate constants of inhibition of purified API variants to their corresponding thrombin capture assay lysate values was used to establish the sensitivity and specificity of the assay. The results indicate that the approach is sufficiently robust to correctly identify functional versus non-functional candidates in API expression libraries, and could be of value in systematically probing structure/function relationships not only in the API

  15. Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R reduces thrombin generation when displayed on the surface of cells expressing tissue factor.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Richard F; Pepler, Laura; Bhagirath, Vinai; Liaw, Patricia C; Sheffield, William P

    2014-11-01

    The M358R variant of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is a potent soluble inhibitor of thrombin. Previously we engineered AR-API M358R, a membrane-bound form of this protein and showed that it inhibited exogenous thrombin when expressed on transfected cells lacking tissue factor (TF). To determine the suitability of AR-API M358R for gene transfer to vascular cells to limit thrombogenicity, we tested the ability of AR-API M358R to inhibit endogenous thrombin generated in plasma via co-expression co-expressing it on the surface of cells expressing TF. Transfected AR-API M358R formed inhibitory complexes with thrombin following exposure of recalcified, defibrinated plasma to TF on T24/83 cells, but discontinuously monitored thrombin generation was unaffected. Similarly, AR-API M358R expression did not reduce continuously monitored thrombin generation by T24/83 cell suspensions exposed to recalcified normal plasma in a Thrombogram-Thrombinoscope-type thrombin generation assay (TGA); in contrast, 1 μM hirudin variant 3 or soluble API M358R abolished thrombin generation. Gene transfer of TF to HEK 293 conferred the ability to support TF-dependent thrombin generation on HEK 293 cells. Co-transfection of HEK 293 cells with a 9:1 excess of DNA encoding AR-API M358R to that encoding TF reduced peak thrombin generation approximately 3-fold compared to controls. These in vitro results suggest that surface display of API M358R inhibits thrombin generation when the tethered serpin is expressed in excess of TF, and suggest its potential to limit thrombosis in appropriate vascular beds in animal models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Safety and pharmacokinetics of 120 mg/kg versus 60 mg/kg weekly intravenous infusions of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, crossover study (SPARK).

    PubMed

    Campos, Michael A; Kueppers, Friedrich; Stocks, James M; Strange, Charlie; Chen, Junliang; Griffin, Rhonda; Wang-Smith, Laurene; Brantly, Mark L

    2013-12-01

    Augmentation therapy with the approved dose of 60 mg/kg weekly intravenous (IV) alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (alpha1-PI), achieves a trough serum level of 11 μM in individuals with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD), yet this is still below the level observed in healthy individuals. This study assessed the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of weekly infusions of a 120 mg/kg dose of alpha1-PI in 30 adults with AATD. Subjects with symptomatic, genetically determined (genotypes PI*ZZ, PI*Z(null), PI*(null)(null) or PI*(Z)Mmalton) AATD were randomly assigned to weekly infusions of 60 or 120 mg/kg alpha1-PI (Prolastin-C®) for 8 weeks before crossing over to the alternate dose for 8 weeks. Adverse events (AEs) (including exacerbations), vital signs, pulmonary function tests, and laboratory assessments were recorded. Pharmacokinetic measurements included AUC0-7days, Cmax, trough, tmax, and t1/2, based on serum alpha1-PI concentrations. In total for both treatments, 112 AEs were reported, with exacerbation of COPD being the most frequent, consistent with the subjects' diagnoses. Mean steady-state serum alpha1-PI concentrations following 120 mg/kg weekly IV alpha1-PI were higher than with the 60 mg/kg dose and mean trough concentrations were 27.7 versus 17.3 μM, respectively. Dose proportionality was demonstrated for AUC0-7days and Cmax, with low inter-subject variability. The 120 mg/kg alpha1-PI weekly dose was considered to be safe and well tolerated, and provided more favorable physiologic alpha1-PI serum levels than the currently recommended 60 mg/kg dose. The effect of this dosing regimen on slowing and/or preventing emphysema progression in subjects with AATD warrants further investigation.

  17. Clinical utility of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor in the management of adult patients with severe alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: a review of the current literature

    PubMed Central

    Parr, David G; Lara, Beatriz

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) functions primarily to inhibit neutrophil elastase, and its deficiency predisposes individuals to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The putative protective serum concentration is generally considered to be above a threshold of 11 μM/L, and therapeutic augmentation of AAT above this value is believed to retard the progression of emphysema. Several AAT preparations, all derived from human donor plasma, have been commercialized since approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1987. Biochemical efficacy has been demonstrated by augmentation of pulmonary antiprotease activity, but demonstration of clinical efficacy in randomized, placebo-controlled trials has been hampered by the practical difficulties of performing conventional studies in a rare disease with a relatively long natural history. Computed tomography has been applied to measure lung density as a more specific and sensitive surrogate outcome measure of emphysema than physiologic indices, such as forced expiratory volume in 1 second, and studies consistently show a therapeutic reduction in the rate of lung density decline. However, convincing evidence of benefit using traditional clinical measures remains elusive. Intravenous administration of AAT at a dose of 60 mg/kg/week is the commonest regime in use and has well-documented safety and tolerability. International and national guidelines on the management of AAT deficiency recommend intravenous augmentation therapy to supplement optimized usual COPD treatment in patients with severe deficiency and evidence of lung function impairment. PMID:28769553

  18. A study of the effects of altering the sites for N-glycosylation in alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor variants M and S.

    PubMed Central

    Samandari, T.; Brown, J. L.

    1993-01-01

    alpha-1-Proteinase inhibitor (A1Pi) is a monomeric secreted protein glycosylated at asparagines 46, 83, and 247. For this study cDNAs for M (normal) and S (Glu264-->Val) variants of A1Pi were altered by site-directed mutagenesis to produce the combinations of single, double, and triple mutants that can be generated by changing the codons normally specifying these Asn residues to encode Gln. The fates of the mutant proteins were followed in transiently transfected COS-1 cells. All variants with altered glycosylation sites are secreted at reduced rates, are partially degraded, accumulate intracellularly, and some form Nonidet P-40-insoluble aggregates. The carbohydrate attached at Asn83 seems to be of particular importance to the export of both A1PiM and A1PiS from the endoplasmic reticulum. All mutations affecting glycosylation of A1PiS notably reduce secretion, cause formation of insoluble aggregates, and influence degradation of the altered proteins. The variant of A1PiS missing all three glycosylation sites is poorly secreted, is incompletely degraded, and accumulates in unusual perinuclear vesicles. These studies show that N-linked oligosaccharides in A1Pi are vital to its efficient export from the endoplasmic reticulum and that the consequences of changing the normal pattern of glycosylation vary depending upon the sites altered and the variant of A1Pi bearing these alterations. PMID:8401226

  19. Comparison of mammalian and bacterial expression library screening to detect recombinant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor variants with enhanced thrombin inhibitory capacity.

    PubMed

    Gierczak, Richard F; Bhakta, Varsha; Xie, Michael; Sheffield, William P

    2015-08-20

    Serpins are a widely distributed family of serine proteases. A key determinant of their specificity is the reactive centre loop (RCL), a surface motif of ∼20 amino acids in length. Expression libraries of variant serpins could be rapidly probed with proteases to develop novel inhibitors if optimal systems were available. The serpin variant alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor M358R (API M358R) inhibits the coagulation protease thrombin, but at sub-maximal rates compared to other serpins. Here we compared two approaches to isolate functional API variants from serpin expression libraries, using the same small library of API randomized at residue 358 (M358X): flow cytometry of transfected HEK 293 cells expressing membrane-displayed API; and a thrombin capture assay (TCA) performed on pools of bacterial lysates expressing soluble API. No enrichment for specific P1 residues was observed when the RCL codons of the 1% of sorted transfected 293 cells with the highest fluorescent thrombin-binding signals were subcloned and sequenced. In contrast, screening of 16 pools of bacterial API-expressing transformants led to the facile identification of API M358R and M358K as functional variants. Kinetic characterization showed that API M358R inhibited thrombin 17-fold more rapidly than API M358K. Reducing the incubation time with immobilized thrombin improved the sensitivity of TCA to detect supra-active API M358R variants and was used to screen a hypervariable library of API variants expressing 16 different amino acids at residues 352-357. The most active variant isolated, with TLSATP substituted for FLEAI, inhibited thrombin 2.9-fold more rapidly than API M358R. Our results indicate that flow cytometric approaches used in protein engineering of antibodies are not appropriate for serpins, and highlight the utility of the optimized TCA for serpin protein engineering.

  20. Phage Display of the Serpin Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor Randomized at Consecutive Residues in the Reactive Centre Loop and Biopanned with or without Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Benjamin M.; Matochko, Wadim L.; Gierczak, Richard F.; Bhakta, Varsha; Derda, Ratmir; Sheffield, William P.

    2014-01-01

    In spite of the power of phage display technology to identify variant proteins with novel properties in large libraries, it has only been previously applied to one member of the serpin superfamily. Here we describe phage display of human alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API) in a T7 bacteriophage system. API M358R fused to the C-terminus of T7 capsid protein 10B was directly shown to form denaturation-resistant complexes with thrombin by electrophoresis and immunoblotting following exposure of intact phages to thrombin. We therefore developed a biopanning protocol in which thrombin-reactive phages were selected using biotinylated anti-thrombin antibodies and streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. A library consisting of displayed API randomized at residues 357 and 358 (P2–P1) yielded predominantly Pro-Arg at these positions after five rounds of thrombin selection; in contrast the same degree of mock selection yielded only non-functional variants. A more diverse library of API M358R randomized at residues 352–356 (P7–P3) was also probed, yielding numerous variants fitting a loose consensus of DLTVS as judged by sequencing of the inserts of plaque-purified phages. The thrombin-selected sequences were transferred en masse into bacterial expression plasmids, and lysates from individual colonies were screening for API-thrombin complexing. The most active candidates from this sixth round of screening contained DITMA and AAFVS at P7–P3 and inhibited thrombin 2.1-fold more rapidly than API M358R with no change in reaction stoichiometry. Deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent platform confirmed that over 800 sequences were significantly enriched in the thrombin-panned versus naïve phage display library, including some detected using the combined phage display/bacterial lysate screening approach. Our results show that API joins Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) as a serpin amenable to phage display and suggest the utility of this approach for the selection of

  1. Fusion of the C-terminal triskaidecapeptide of hirudin variant 3 to alpha1-proteinase inhibitor M358R increases the serpin-mediated rate of thrombin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Roddick, Leigh Ann; Bhakta, Varsha; Sheffield, William P

    2013-11-11

    Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API) is a plasma serpin superfamily member that inhibits neutrophil elastase; variant API M358R inhibits thrombin and activated protein C (APC). Fusing residues 1-75 of another serpin, heparin cofactor II (HCII), to API M358R (in HAPI M358R) was previously shown to accelerate thrombin inhibition over API M358R by conferring thrombin exosite 1 binding properties. We hypothesized that replacing HCII 1-75 region with the 13 C-terminal residues (triskaidecapeptide) of hirudin variant 3 (HV354-66) would further enhance the inhibitory potency of API M358R fusion proteins. We therefore expressed HV3API M358R (HV354-66 fused to API M358R) and HV3API RCL5 (HV354-66 fused to API F352A/L353V/E354V/A355I/I356A/I460L/M358R) API M358R) as N-terminally hexahistidine-tagged polypeptides in E. coli. HV3API M358R inhibited thrombin 3.3-fold more rapidly than API M358R; for HV3API RCL5 the rate enhancement was 1.9-fold versus API RCL5; neither protein inhibited thrombin as rapidly as HAPI M358R. While the thrombin/Activated Protein C rate constant ratio was 77-fold higher for HV3API RCL5 than for HV3API M358R, most of the increased specificity derived from the API F352A/L353V/E354V/A355I/I356A/I460L API RCL 5 mutations, since API RCL5 remained 3-fold more specific than HV3API RCL5. An HV3 54-66 peptide doubled the Thrombin Clotting Time (TCT) and halved the binding of thrombin to immobilized HCII 1-75 at lower concentrations than free HCII 1-75. HV3API RCL5 bound active site-inhibited FPR-chloromethyl ketone-thrombin more effectively than HAPI RCL5. Transferring the position of the fused HV3 triskaidecapeptide to the C-terminus of API M358R decreased the rate of thrombin inhibition relative to that mediated by HV3API M358R by 11-to 14-fold. Fusing the C-terminal triskaidecapeptide of HV3 to API M358R-containing serpins significantly increased their effectiveness as thrombin inhibitors, but the enhancement was less than that seen in HCII 1-75-API M358R

  2. Fusion of the C-terminal triskaidecapeptide of hirudin variant 3 to alpha1-proteinase inhibitor M358R increases the serpin-mediated rate of thrombin inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (API) is a plasma serpin superfamily member that inhibits neutrophil elastase; variant API M358R inhibits thrombin and activated protein C (APC). Fusing residues 1-75 of another serpin, heparin cofactor II (HCII), to API M358R (in HAPI M358R) was previously shown to accelerate thrombin inhibition over API M358R by conferring thrombin exosite 1 binding properties. We hypothesized that replacing HCII 1-75 region with the 13 C-terminal residues (triskaidecapeptide) of hirudin variant 3 (HV354-66) would further enhance the inhibitory potency of API M358R fusion proteins. We therefore expressed HV3API M358R (HV354-66 fused to API M358R) and HV3API RCL5 (HV354-66 fused to API F352A/L353V/E354V/A355I/I356A/I460L/M358R) API M358R) as N-terminally hexahistidine-tagged polypeptides in E. coli. Results HV3API M358R inhibited thrombin 3.3-fold more rapidly than API M358R; for HV3API RCL5 the rate enhancement was 1.9-fold versus API RCL5; neither protein inhibited thrombin as rapidly as HAPI M358R. While the thrombin/Activated Protein C rate constant ratio was 77-fold higher for HV3API RCL5 than for HV3API M358R, most of the increased specificity derived from the API F352A/L353V/E354V/A355I/I356A/I460L API RCL 5 mutations, since API RCL5 remained 3-fold more specific than HV3API RCL5. An HV3 54-66 peptide doubled the Thrombin Clotting Time (TCT) and halved the binding of thrombin to immobilized HCII 1-75 at lower concentrations than free HCII 1-75. HV3API RCL5 bound active site-inhibited FPR-chloromethyl ketone-thrombin more effectively than HAPI RCL5. Transferring the position of the fused HV3 triskaidecapeptide to the C-terminus of API M358R decreased the rate of thrombin inhibition relative to that mediated by HV3API M358R by 11-to 14-fold. Conclusions Fusing the C-terminal triskaidecapeptide of HV3 to API M358R-containing serpins significantly increased their effectiveness as thrombin inhibitors, but the enhancement was less than that

  3. Fast increase of proteinase inhibitors in necrotic collagenous tissue.

    PubMed

    Oehmichen, M

    1989-01-01

    Using the PAP immunohistochemical technique, accumulation of two proteinase inhibitors, alpha-1-antichymotrypsin and alpha-2-macroglobulin, can be detected at the edges of collagenous fibers in the corium after slash wounds of the skin. This accumulation was observed within a survival time of 10-30 min. It, however, is not detectable in postmortally inflicted trauma.

  4. Evolutionary mechanisms acting on proteinase inhibitor variability.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T

    2005-11-01

    The interaction of proteinase inhibitors produced, in most cases, by host organisms and the invasive proteinases of pathogens or parasites or the dietary proteinases of predators, results in an evolutionary 'arms race' of rapid and ongoing change in both interacting proteins. The importance of these interactions in pathogenicity and predation is indicated by the high level and diversity of observable evolutionary activity that has been found. At the initial level of evolutionary change, recruitment of other functional protein-folding families has occurred, with the more recent evolution of one class of proteinase inhibitor from another, using the same mechanism and proteinase contact residues. The combination of different inhibitor domains into a single molecule is also observed. The basis from which variation is possible is shown by the high rate of retention of gene duplication events and by the associated process of inhibitory domain multiplication. At this level of reorganization, mutually exclusive splicing is also observed. Finally, the major mechanism by which variation is achieved rapidly is hypervariation of contact residues, an almost ubiquitous feature of proteinase inhibitors. The diversity of evolutionary mechanisms in a single class of proteins is unlikely to be common, because few systems are under similar pressure to create variation. Proteinase inhibitors are therefore a potential model system in which to study basic evolutionary process such as functional diversification.

  5. Novel proteinase inhibitor promotes resistance to insects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) and its protein are identified in response to insect feeding on B. vulgaris seedlings. BvSTI is cloned into an expression vector with constitutive promoter and transformed into Nicotiana benthamiana plants to assess BvSTI’s ability to ...

  6. Effect of the oxidizing agents chloramine-T and cigarette smoke on dog serum proteinase inhibitor(s)

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, W.R.; Eliraz, A.; Kimbel, P.; Weinbaum, G.

    1980-08-01

    Dog serum treated with the oxidant chloramine-T is rapidly and selectively depleted of its ability to inhibit porcine pancreatic elastase or dog neutrophil elastase. Trypsin inhibitory capacity of serum is not affected. Purified dog alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (alpha-1-PI) is similarly oxidized with an apparent rate constant of 1.1 x 10(3) M-1 sec-1. Reversal of the oxidative inactivation using dithiothreitol was demonstrated. Cigarette smoke also directly affects the inhibitory capacity of both serum and pure alpha-1-PI. These studies form a basis for developing a model of functionally deficient alpha-1-PI by taking advantage of oxidative inactivation of normal proteinase inhibitor levels.

  7. Proteinase inhibitors from the medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis.

    PubMed

    Baskova, I P; Zavalova, L L

    2001-07-01

    The medicinal leech Hirudo medicinalis produces various types of proteinase inhibitors: bdellins (inhibitors of trypsin, plasmin, and acrosin), hirustasin (inhibitor of tissue kallikrein, trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, and granulocyte cathepsin G), tryptase inhibitor, eglins (inhibitors of alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin, and chymasin and the granulocyte proteinases elastase and cathepsin G), inhibitor of factor Xa, hirudin (thrombin inhibitor), inhibitor of carboxypeptidase, and inhibitor of complement component C1s. This review summarizes data on their primary and tertiary structures, action mechanisms, and biological activities.

  8. Granzyme M is a regulatory protease that inactivates proteinase inhibitor 9, an endogenous inhibitor of granzyme B.

    PubMed

    Mahrus, Sami; Kisiel, Walter; Craik, Charles S

    2004-12-24

    Granzyme M is a trypsin-fold serine protease that is specifically found in the granules of natural killer cells. This enzyme has been implicated recently in the induction of target cell death by cytotoxic lymphocytes, but unlike granzymes A and B, the molecular mechanism of action of granzyme M is unknown. We have characterized the extended substrate specificity of human granzyme M by using purified recombinant enzyme, several positional scanning libraries of coumarin substrates, and a panel of individual p-nitroanilide and coumarin substrates. In contrast to previous studies conducted using thiobenzyl ester substrates (Smyth, M. J., O'Connor, M. D., Trapani, J. A., Kershaw, M. H., and Brinkworth, R. I. (1996) J. Immunol. 156, 4174-4181), a strong preference for leucine at P1 over methionine was demonstrated. The extended substrate specificity was determined to be lysine = norleucine at P4, broad at P3, proline > alanine at P2, and leucine > norleucine > methionine at P1. The enzyme activity was found to be highly dependent on the length and sequence of substrates, indicative of a regulatory function for human granzyme M. Finally, the interaction between granzyme M and the serpins alpha(1)-antichymotrypsin, alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor, and proteinase inhibitor 9 was characterized by using a candidate-based approach to identify potential endogenous inhibitors. Proteinase inhibitor 9 was effectively hydrolyzed and inactivated by human granzyme M, raising the possibility that this orphan granzyme bypasses proteinase inhibitor 9 inhibition of granzyme B.

  9. Relationship of proteinases and proteinase inhibitors with microbial presence in chronic lung disease of prematurity.

    PubMed

    Davies, Philip L; Spiller, O Brad; Beeton, Michael L; Maxwell, Nicola C; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2010-03-01

    A proteolytic imbalance has been implicated in the development of "classical" chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD). However, in "new" CLD this pattern has changed. This study examines the longitudinal relationship between neutrophil proteinases and their inhibitors in ventilated preterm infants and their relationship to microbial colonisation. Serial bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was obtained from ventilated newborn preterm infants. Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity, cell counts, metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-9/TIMP-1 complex, SerpinB1 concentration and percentage of SerpinB1 and alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) in complex with elastase were measured. The presence of microbial genes was examined using PCR for 16S rRNA genes. Statistically more infants who developed CLD had NE activity in at least one sample (10/20) compared with infants with resolved respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (2/17). However, NE activity was present in a minority of samples, occurring as episodic peaks. Peak levels of MMP-9, MMP-9/TIMP-1 complex, percentage of AAT and SerpinB1 in complex and cell counts were all statistically greater in infants developing CLD than in infants with resolved RDS. Peak values frequently occurred as episodic spikes and strong temporal relationships were noted between all markers. The peak values for all variables were significantly correlated to each other. The presence of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was associated with the development of CLD and with elevated elastase and MMP-9. NE activity and MMP-9 appear to be important in the development of "new" CLD with both proteinase and inhibitor concentrations increasing episodically, possibly in response to postnatal infection.

  10. Immunological Similarities of Proteinase Inhibitors from Potatoes 1

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Clarence A.; Santarius, Karlheinz

    1976-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors, purified independently from Japanese, United States, and German potato varieties, and having different physicochemical and inhibitory properties, are shown to be immunochemically similar. These results indicate that the heterogeneity found among proteinase inhibitors from potato tubers is apparently due both to intervarietal, as well as intravarietal, variations in isoinhibitor components. Images PMID:16659744

  11. Proteinase Inhibitor-inducing Factor in Plant Leaves

    PubMed Central

    McFarland, Douglas; Ryan, Clarence A.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty-nine plant species representing 20 families from the four major divisions of plants were surveyed for the presence of proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor activity in leaves or other tissues. Tissue juices were assayed for their capacity to induce accumulation of proteinase inhibitor I in excised tomato (Lycopersico esculentum) leaves. In tissues of only 2 of the 39 species was proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor-like activity not found. The activity was absent in cabbage leaves and celery stalks. Fruiting bodies from one of three fungi genera assayed contained exceptionally large quantities of proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor-like activity. Extracts from Agraricus campestris fruiting bodies contained over 20 times more activity than tomato leaf juice. The survey confirms that substances with proteinase inhibitor-inducing factor-like activity are widespread in the plant kingdom. PMID:16658956

  12. Inhibition of the 20S proteosome by a protein proteinase inhibitor: evidence that a natural serine proteinase inhibitor can inhibit a threonine proteinase.

    PubMed

    Yabe, Kimihiko; Koide, Takehiko

    2009-02-01

    The 20S proteasome (20S) is an intracellular threonine proteinase (Mr 750,000) that plays important roles in many cellular regulations. Several synthetic peptide inhibitors and bacteria-derived inhibitors such as lactacystin and epoxomicin have been identified as potent proteasome inhibitors. However, essentially no protein proteinase inhibitor has been characterized. By examining several small size protein proteinase inhibitors, we found that a well-known serine proteinase inhibitor from bovine pancreas, basic pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI), inhibits the 20S in vitro and ex vivo. Inhibition of the 20S by BPTI was time- and concentration-dependent, and stoichiometric. To inhibit the 20S activity, BPTI needs to enter into the interior of the 20S molecule. The molar ratio of BPTI to the 20S in the complex was estimated as approximately six BPTI to one 20S, thereby two sets of three peptidase activities (trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like) of the 20S were all inhibited. These results indicate that an entrance hole to the 20S formed by seven alpha-subunits is sufficiently large for BPTI to enter. This report is essentially the initial description of the inhibition of a threonine proteinase by a protein serine proteinase inhibitor, suggesting a common mechanism of inhibition between serine and threonine proteinases by a natural protein proteinase inhibitor.

  13. Proteinase activity in human and murine saliva as a biomarker for proteinase inhibitor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Fingleton, Barbara; Menon, Ramkumar; Carter, Kathy J; Overstreet, P Dawn; Hachey, David L; Matrisian, Lynn M; McIntyre, J Oliver

    2004-12-01

    As molecularly targeted agents reach the clinic, there is a need for assays to detect their presence and effectiveness against target molecules in vivo. Proteinase inhibitors are one example of a class of therapeutic agent for which satisfactory methods of identifying successful target modulation in vivo are lacking. This is of particular importance while these drugs are in clinical trials because standard maximum-tolerated dose-finding studies often are not suitable due to lack of toxicity. Saliva represents a readily accessible bodily fluid that can be repeatedly sampled and used for assaying in vivo effects of systemic drugs. Here we show the development of a simple assay that can be used to measure proteinase activity in saliva and proteinase inhibition after systemic treatment with three different proteinase inhibitors. A variety of gelatinolytic activities present in human and murine saliva have been assayed with a fluorescent dye-labeled substrate and assigned to different proteinase categories by inclusion of specific classes of inhibitors. Treatment of mice with either matrix metalloproteinase inhibitors or a urokinase inhibitor for a period as short as 48 hours results in levels of the drugs that can be detected in saliva by mass spectrometry and concomitant decreases in salivary proteinase activity, thus demonstrating that these inhibitors successfully modulate their targets in vivo.

  14. A low molecular weight proteinase inhibitor produced by T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Ganea, D; Teodorescu, M; Dray, S

    1986-01-01

    A low molecular weight (MW) proteinase inhibitor, between 6500 and 21,500 MW, appeared in the supernatant of rabbit spleen cells cultured at high density for 24 hr. The inhibitor inhibited the enzymatic activity of trypsin for both a high MW natural substrate, fibrinogen, and for a low MW artificial substrate, Chromozym TRY. The low MW proteinase inhibitor is protein in nature and is different, in terms of specificity for enzymes, MW and sensitivity to different physical or chemical treatments, from aprotinin, a low MW proteinase inhibitor (6500 MW) of bovine origin, and from the soybean trypsin inhibitor, a relatively high MW proteinase inhibitor (21,500 MW). The inhibitor was found in the supernatant of purified T cells but not B cells, and its production was increased in the presence of an optimal concentration of Con A. The possibility that this proteinase inhibitor has a role in the regulation of trypsin-like proteinases involved to the immune response remains to be investigated. Images Figure 4 PMID:2417942

  15. Molecular dynamic and docking interaction study of Heterodera glycines serine proteinase with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Prasad, C V S Siva; Gupta, Saurabh; Gaponenko, Alex; Tiwari, Murlidhar

    2013-08-01

    Many plants do produce various defense proteins like proteinase inhibitors (PIs) to protect them against various pests. PIs function as pseudosubstrates of digestive proteinase, which inhibits proteolysis in pests and leads to amino acid deficiency-based mortality. This work reports the structural interaction studies of serine proteinase of Heterodera glycines (SPHG) with Vigna mungo proteinase inhibitor (VMPI). 3D protein structure modeling, validation of SPHG and VMPI, and their putative protein-protein binding sites were predicted. Protein-protein docking followed by molecular dynamic simulation was performed to find the reliable confirmation of SPHG-VMPI complex. Trajectory analysis of each successive conformation concludes better interaction of first loop in comparison with second loop. Lysine residues of first loop were actively participating in complex formation. Overall, this study discloses the structural aspects and interaction mechanisms of VMPI with SPHG, and it would be helpful in the development of pest-resistant genetically modified crops.

  16. Peptide aldehyde inhibitors of hepatitis A virus 3C proteinase.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, B A; Lowe, C; Shechosky, S; McKay, R T; Yang, C C; Shah, V J; Simon, R J; Vederas, J C; Santi, D V

    1995-06-27

    Picornaviral 3C proteinases are a group of closely related thiol proteinases responsible for processing of the viral polyprotein into its component proteins. These proteinases adopt a chymotrypsin-like fold [Allaire et al. (1994) Nature 369, 72-77; Matthews et al. (1994) Cell 77, 761-771] and a display an active-site configuration like those of the serine proteinases. Peptide-aldehydes based on the preferred peptide substrates for hepatitis A virus (HAV) 3C proteinase were synthesized by reduction of a thioester precursor. Acetyl-Leu-Ala-Ala-(N,N'-dimethylglutaminal) was found to be a reversible, slow-binding inhibitor for HAV 3C with a Ki* of (4.2 +/- 0.8) x 10(-8) M. This inhibitor showed 50-fold less activity against the highly homologous human rhinovirus (strain 14) 3C proteinase, whose peptide substrate specificity is slightly different, suggesting a high degree of selectivity. NMR spectrometry of the adduct of the 13C-labeled inhibitor with the HAV-3C proteinase indicate that a thiohemiacetal is formed between the enzyme and the aldehyde carbon as previously noted for peptide-aldehyde inhibitors of papain [Lewis & Wolfenden (1977) Biochemistry 16,4890-4894; Gamcsik et al. (1983) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 105, 6324-6325]. The adduct can also be observed by electrospray mass spectrometry.

  17. Action of plant proteinase inhibitors on enzymes of physiopathological importance.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Maria Luiza V; Sampaio, Misako U

    2009-09-01

    Obtained from leguminous seeds, various plant proteins inhibit animal proteinases, including human, and can be considered for the development of compounds with biological activity. Inhibitors from the Bowman-Birk and plant Kunitz-type family have been characterized by proteinase specificity, primary structure and reactive site. Our group mostly studies the genus Bauhinia, mainly the species bauhinioides, rufa, ungulata and variegata. In some species, more than one inhibitor was characterized, exhibiting different properties. Although proteins from this group share high structural similarity, they present differences in proteinase inhibition, explored in studies using diverse biological models.

  18. Effects of HIV aspartyl-proteinase inhibitors on Leishmania sp.

    PubMed

    Valdivieso, Elizabeth; Rangel, Ariadne; Moreno, Javier; Saugar, Jose María; Cañavate, Carmen; Alvar, Jorge; Dagger, Francehuli

    2010-12-01

    In this work, we have found an antiproliferative effect on Leishmania sp. promastigotes and axenic amastigotes by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) aspartyl-proteinase inhibitors, Ac-Leu-Val-Phenylalaninal, Saquinavir mesylate and Nelfinavir, the latter two being used as part of antiretroviral therapy. This effect appears to be the result of cell division blockage. In addition, these drugs induced in culture a decrease in the percentage of co-infected HIV/Leishmania monocytes and amastigotes of Leishmania per macrophage. The finding of a dose-dependent inhibition of Leishmania promastigotes aspartyl-proteinase activity by these drugs allows us to propose this activity as the drug parasite target. A direct action of these HIV aspartyl-proteinase inhibitors on the parasite, would be correlated with the effect that highly active antiretroviral therapy have had in the decrease of HIV/Leishmania coinfection, opening an interesting perspective for new drugs research development based on this novel parasite proteinase family.

  19. A serine proteinase inhibitor from frog eggs with bacteriostatic activity.

    PubMed

    Han, Yaoping; Yu, Haining; Yang, Xinbo; Rees, Huw H; Liu, Jingze; Lai, Ren

    2008-01-01

    By Sephadex G-50 gel filtration, Resource Q anionic exchange and C4 reversed phase liquid high performance liquid chromatography, a proteinase inhibitor protein (Ranaserpin) was identified and purified from the eggs of the odour frog, Rana grahami. The protein displayed a single band adjacent to the molecular weight marker of 14.4 kDa analyzed by SDS-PAGE. The inhibitor protein homogeneity and its molecular weight were confirmed again by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The MALDI-TOF mass spectrum analysis gave this inhibitor protein an m/z of 14422.26 that was matched well with the result from SDS-PAGE. This protein is a serine proteinase inhibitor targeting multiple proteinases including trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. Ranaserpin inhibited the proteolytic activities of trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin. It has an inhibitory constant (K(i)) of 6.2 x 10(-8) M, 2.7 x 10(-7) M and 2.2 x 10(-8) M for trypsin, elastase, and subtilisin, respectively. This serine proteinase inhibitor exhibited bacteriostatic effect on Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis (ATCC 6633). It was suggested that ranaserpin might act as a defensive role in resistance to invasion of pests or pathogens. This is the first report of serine proteinase inhibitor and its direct defensive role from amphibian eggs.

  20. Characterization of a Human Serum Inhibitor of Clostridium histolyticum Proteinase(s)1

    PubMed Central

    Luzzati, Alma; Goldlust, Marvin B.; Levine, Lawrence

    1968-01-01

    Normal animal sera inhibit at least one Clostridium histolyticum proteinase. An assay procedure based on immune hemolysis was developed for the estimation of this inhibition. This inhibitory activity occurs in various levels in the sera of different animal species. The highest titers have been obtained with rat sera. The inhibitory activity from human serum was isolated and purified 16- to 27-fold by Sephadex G-200 gel filtration and diethylaminoethyl cellulose or hydroxylapatite chromatography. The properties of the human serum inhibitor of the clostridial proteinase were compared with a trypsin inhibiting factor found in the partially purified preparations. Identical behavior of the two inhibitory factors was observed when measured by heat inactivation, β-mercaptoethanol sensitivity, pH stability, and sucrose gradient centrifugation. The inhibitory factor has an approximate sedimentation coefficient (S20,w) of 17. Goat anti–α-2-macroglobulin specifically precipitated the clostridial proteinase inhibitor from a partially purified preparation. PMID:5303620

  1. Antiviral cytokines induce hepatic expression of the granzyme B inhibitors, proteinase inhibitor 9 and serine proteinase inhibitor 6.

    PubMed

    Barrie, Mahmoud B; Stout, Heather W; Abougergi, Marwan S; Miller, Bonnie C; Thiele, Dwain L

    2004-05-15

    Expression of the granzyme B inhibitors, human proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9), or the murine orthologue, serine proteinase inhibitor 6 (SPI-6), confers resistance to CTL or NK killing by perforin- and granzyme-dependent effector mechanisms. In light of prior studies indicating that virally infected hepatocytes are selectively resistant to this CTL effector mechanism, the present studies investigated PI-9 and SPI-6 expression in hepatocytes and hepatoma cells in response to adenoviral infection and to cytokines produced during antiviral immune responses. Neither PI-9 nor SPI-6 expression was detected by immunoblotting in uninfected murine or human hepatocytes. Similarly, human Huh-7 hepatoma cells were found to express only very low levels of PI-9 relative to levels detected in perforin- and granzyme-resistant CTL or lymphokine-activated killer cells. Following in vivo adenoviral infection or in vitro culture with IFN-alphabeta or IFN-gamma, SPI-6 expression was induced in murine hepatocytes. Similarly, after culture with IFN-alpha, induction of PI-9 mRNA and protein expression was observed in human hepatocytes and Huh-7 cells. IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha also induced 4- to 10-fold higher levels of PI-9 mRNA expression in Huh-7 cells, whereas levels of mRNA encoding a related serine proteinase inhibitor, proteinase inhibitor 8, were unaffected by culture of Huh-7 cells with IFN-alpha, IFN-gamma, or TNF-alpha. These findings indicate that cytokines that promote antiviral cytopathic responses also regulate expression of the cytoprotective molecules, PI-9 and SPI-6, in hepatocytes that are potential targets of CTL and NK effector mechanisms.

  2. Proteinase Inhibitor I Accumulation in Tomato Suspension Cultures 1

    PubMed Central

    Walker-Simmons, Mary; Ryan, Clarence A.

    1986-01-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of tomato accumulate proteinase Inhibitor I as the sucrose is depleted from 1% to less than 0.1% in the culture medium. Inhibitor I can be prematurely induced to accumulate in the cells by the addition to the medium of the proteinase inhibitor inducing factor, trigalacturonic acid, ethylene glycol chitin, or chitosan. In cultures grown in 0.6% initial sucrose with no inducers added, a uronic acid-rich extracellular polysaccharide appears in the medium during growth of the cells. This extracellular polysaccharide apparently contains an `endogenous inducer' of Inhibitor I synthesis. When the partially purified polysaccharide is added to the culture medium, Inhibitor I accumulation is induced. Proteinase inhibitors also accumulate in tobacco and alfalfa suspension-cultured cells as the cell cultures age. As with the tomato cultures, a uronic acid-rich component(s) appears in the media prior to inhibitor accumulation. These data suggest that an endogenous inducer may be activating proteinase inhibitor genes through a similar mechanism in all three types of cells. PMID:16664609

  3. Identification and characterization of alpha-I-proteinase inhibitor from common carp sarcoplasmic proteins.

    PubMed

    Siriangkanakun, Siriphon; Li-Chan, Eunice C Y; Yongsawadigul, Jirawat

    2016-02-01

    Purification of proteinase inhibitor from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) sarcoplasmic proteins resulted in 2.8% yield with purification fold of 111. Two inhibitors, namely inhibitor I and II, exhibited molecular mass of 47 and 52 kDa, respectively, based on non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Both inhibitors I and II were identified to be alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) based on LC-MS/MS. They were glycoproteins and molecular mass after peptide-N-glycosidase F treatment was 38 and 45 kDa, respectively. The N-glycosylation sites of both inhibitors were determined to be at N214 and N226. The inhibitors specifically inhibited trypsin. The common carp α1-PI showed high thermal stability with denaturation temperatures of 65.43 and 73.31 °C, which were slightly less than those of ovomucoid. High stability toward NaCl was also evident up to 3M. The common carp α1-PI effectively reduced autolytic degradation of bigeye snapper surimi at the concentration as low as 0.025%.

  4. Identification of monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, and purification and characterization of a monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, D S; Thøgersen, I B; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1993-01-01

    characterized by steric protection of the proteinase active site and by sensitivity to small primary amines. The frog monomeric alpha-macroglobulin is structurally and functionally similar to the well-characterized monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor rat alpha 1-inhibitor-3. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:7679897

  5. Identification of monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitors in birds, reptiles, amphibians and mammals, and purification and characterization of a monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the American bullfrog Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, D S; Thøgersen, I B; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1993-02-15

    characterized by steric protection of the proteinase active site and by sensitivity to small primary amines. The frog monomeric alpha-macroglobulin is structurally and functionally similar to the well-characterized monomeric alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor rat alpha 1-inhibitor-3.

  6. [Isolation of a specific inhibitor of microbial serine proteinase from kidney bean seeds].

    PubMed

    Mosolov, V V; Malova, E L; Cheban, A N

    1983-10-01

    A protein acting as a specific inhibitor of microbial serine proteinases was isolated from kidney bean seeds. The purification procedure included complex formation between the inhibitor and Aspergillus oryzae proteinase. The protein with a Mr approximately 10 000 inhibits subtilisin and Asp. oryzae proteinase but does not affect trypsin and chymotrypsin. The inhibitor molecule contains no half-cystine residues.

  7. Silk gland-specific proteinase inhibitor serpin16 from the Bombyx mori shows cysteine proteinase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Peng-Chao; Dong, Zhaoming; Xiao, Li; Li, Tao; Zhang, Yan; He, Huawei; Xia, Qingyou; Zhao, Ping

    2015-01-30

    Serpins (serine proteinase inhibitors) are widely distributed in different species and are well known for their inhibitory activities towards serine proteinases. Here, we report the functional characterization of Bombyx mori serpin16. Expression analysis showed that serpin16 was specifically expressed at high levels in the silk gland at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Moreover, homology modeling and multi-sequence alignment suggested that serpin16 had a canonical serpin fold, but it contained a unique reactive center loop, which was obviously shorter than that of typical serpins. Inhibitory activity analyses revealed that the target proteinase of serpin18 is a cysteine proteinase, rather than a serine proteinase. Furthermore, a Michaelis complex model of serpin16 with its target proteinase was constructed to explain the structural basis of how serpin16 recognizes the cysteine proteinase and its target specificity.

  8. Wound-induced Proteinase Inhibitor in Tomato Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Green, T. R.; Ryan, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    Wounding of single leaflets of young tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum var. Bonnie Best) plants causes the release of a proteinase inhibitor inducing factor. This factor is rapidly transported throughout the plant where it causes accumulation of inhibitor I, a potent inhibitor of several serine proteinases from both animals and microorganisms. The wound-induced accumulation of inhibitor I is both light- and temperature-dependent. In total darkness no accumulation results from wounding. The accumulation exhibits a linear dependence upon light up to 300 foot candles. At 600 foot candles and above, the response is maximal. In light the wound response possesses an unusual temperature dependence with an optimum rate of accumulation near 36 C. Below 20 C no accumulation occurs. The over-all process contains two light- and temperature-dependent steps, one involving wounding and transport, the other involving accumulation. PMID:16658283

  9. Biochemical characterization of Acacia schweinfurthii serine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Odei-Addo, Frank; Frost, Carminita; Smith, Nanette; Ogawa, Tomohisa; Muramoto, Koji; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Gráf, László; Naude, Ryno

    2014-10-01

    One of the many control mechanisms of serine proteinases is their specific inhibition by protein proteinase inhibitors. An extract of Acacia schweinfurthii was screened for potential serine proteinase inhibition. It was successfully purified to homogeneity by precipitating with 80% (v/v) acetone and sequential chromatographic steps, including ion-exchange, affinity purification and reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. Reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis conditions revealed an inhibitor (ASTI) consisting of two polypeptide chains A and B of approximate molecular weights of 16 and 10 kDa, respectively, and under non-reducing conditions, 26 kDa was observed. The inhibitor was shown to inhibit bovine trypsin (Ki of 3.45 nM) at an approximate molar ratio of inhibitor:trypsin (1:1). The A- and B-chains revealed complete sequences of 140 and 40 amino acid residues, respectively. Sequence similarity (70%) was reported between ASTI A-chain and ACTI A-chain (Acacia confusa) using ClustalW. The B-chain produced a 76% sequence similarity between ASTI and Leucaena leucocephala trypsin inhibitor.

  10. Coevolution between pathogen-derived proteinases and proteinase inhibitors of host insects.

    PubMed

    Vilcinskas, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Virulence is thought to coevolve as a result of reciprocal selection between pathogens and their hosts. This paper focuses on coevolution between microbial proteinases operating as virulence factors and host defense molecules of insects. Owing to shorter generation times and smaller genomes, microbes exhibit a high evolutionary adaptability in comparison with their hosts. Indeed, the latter can only compete with pathogens if they evolve mechanisms providing a comparable genetic plasticity. Gene or domain duplication and shuffling by recombination is the driving force behind the countermeasures in host defense effectors. Recent literature provides evidence for both diversifications of fungal proteinases involved in pathogenesis and expansion host proteinase inhibitors subsets contributing to insect innate immunity. For example, the pathogen-associated spectrum of proteolytic enzymes encompasses thermolysin-like metalloproteinases that putatively promoted the evolution of corresponding host inhibitors of these virulence factors which complement the insect repertoire of antimicrobial defense molecules. Beyond mutual diversification of effector molecules coevolution resulted also in sophisticated molecular adaptations of host insects such as sensing and feedback-loop regulation of microbial metalloproteinases and corresponding countermeasures of pathogens providing evasion of host immunity induced by these virulence factors.

  11. Regulation of factor XIa activity by platelets and alpha 1-protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, P N; Sinha, D; Kueppers, F; Seaman, F S; Blankstein, K B

    1987-01-01

    We have studied the complex interrelationships between platelets, Factor XIa, alpha 1-protease inhibitor and Factor IX activation. Platelets were shown to secrete an inhibitor of Factor XIa, and to protect Factor XIa from inactivation in the presence of alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the secreted platelet inhibitor. This protection of Factor XIa did not arise from the binding of Factor XIa to platelets, the presence of high molecular weight kininogen, or the inactivation of alpha 1-protease inhibitor by platelets. The formation of a complex between alpha 1-protease inhibitor and the active-site-containing light chain of Factor XIa was inhibited by activated platelets and by platelet releasates, but not by high molecular weight kininogen. These results support the hypothesis that platelets can regulate Factor XIa-catalyzed Factor IX activation by secreting an inhibitor of Factor XIa that may act primarily outside the platelet microenvironment and by protecting Factor XIa from inhibition, thereby localizing Factor IX activation to the platelet plug. Images PMID:3500185

  12. Caprine plasma proteinase inhibitors--II. Genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Vankan, D M; Bell, K

    1993-01-01

    1. Analysis of the inheritances of the variants of five caprine plasma proteinase inhibitor systems in families demonstrated a genetic control of codominant alleles at five loci. 2. The PIA, B, C, D and E proteins are controlled by four (PIA1,2,3,4), three (PIB1,4,0), three (PIC2,3,0), five (PID1,2,3,4,0) and two (PIE1,2) alleles respectively. Null alleles were postulated for the PIB, PIC and PID systems. 3. The frequencies of the alleles differed substantially between the Australian and Texan Angoras and Cashmere breeds of goats. 4. The combined exclusion probability for the five PI systems was as high as 0.82 in the Cashmere breed, indicating the potential of the proteinase inhibitor proteins for parentage control purposes.

  13. Characterization of a novel Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Pariani, Sebastián; Contreras, Marisol; Rossi, Franco R; Sander, Valeria; Corigliano, Mariana G; Simón, Francisco; Busi, María V; Gomez-Casati, Diego F; Pieckenstain, Fernando L; Duschak, Vilma G; Clemente, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Many different types of serine proteinase inhibitors have been involved in several kinds of plant physiological processes, including defense mechanisms against phytopathogens. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which are included in the serine proteinase inhibitor family, are present in several organisms. These proteins play a regulatory role in processes that involve serine proteinases like trypsin, chymotrypsin, thrombin, elastase and/or subtilisin. In the present work, we characterized two putative Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, which have a single putative Kazal-type domain. The expression of these inhibitors is transiently induced in response to leaf infection by Botrytis cinerea, suggesting that they play some role in defense against pathogens. We also evaluated the inhibitory specificity of one of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors, which resulted to be induced during the local response to B. cinerea infection. The recombinant Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor displayed high specificity for elastase and subtilisin, but low specificity for trypsin, suggesting differences in its selectivity. In addition, this inhibitor exhibited a strong antifungal activity inhibiting the germination rate of B. cinerea conidia in vitro. Due to the important role of proteinase inhibitors in plant protection against pathogens and pests, the information about Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors described in the present work could contribute to improving current methods for plant protection against pathogens.

  14. Proteinase inhibitor homologues as potassium channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Lancelin, J M; Foray, M F; Poncin, M; Hollecker, M; Marion, D

    1994-04-01

    We report here the NMR structure of dendrotoxin I, a powerful potassium channel blocker from the venom of the African Elapidae snake Dendroaspis polylepis polylepis (black mamba), calculated from an experimentally-derived set of 719 geometric restraints. The backbone of the toxin superimposes on bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) with a root-mean-square deviation of < 1.7 A. The surface electrostatic potential calculated for dendrotoxin I and BPTI, reveal an important difference which might account for the differences in function of the two proteins. These proteins may provide examples of adaptation for specific and diverse biological functions while at the same time maintaining the overall three-dimensional structure of a common ancestor.

  15. Bitter gourd proteinase inhibitors: potential growth inhibitors of Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura.

    PubMed

    Telang, Manasi; Srinivasan, Ajay; Patankar, Aparna; Harsulkar, Abhay; Joshi, Vijay; Damle, Archana; Deshpande, Vasanti; Sainani, Mohini; Ranjekar, Prabhakar; Gupta, Gorakh; Birah, Ajanta; Rani, Seema; Kachole, Manavendra; Giri, Ashok; Gupta, Vidya

    2003-07-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) from the seeds of bitter gourd (Momordica charantia L.) were identified as strong inhibitors of Helicoverpa armigera gut proteinases (HGP). Biochemical investigations showed that bitter gourd PIs (BGPIs) inhibited more than 80% HGP activity. Electrophoretic analysis revealed the presence of two major proteins (BGPI-1 and-2) and two minor proteins (BGPI-3 and-4) having inhibitory activity against both trypsin and HGP. The major isoforms BGPI-1 and BGPI-2 have molecular mass of 3.5 and 3.0 kDa, respectively. BGPIs inhibited HGP activity of larvae fed on different host plants, on artificial diet with or without added PIs and proteinases excreted in fecal matter. Degradation of BGPI-1 by HGP showed direct correlation with accumulation of BGPI-2-like peptide, which remained stable and active against high concentrations of HGP up to 3 h. Chemical inhibitors of serine proteinases offered partial protection to BGPI-1 from degradation by HGP, suggesting that trypsin and chymotrypsin like proteinases are involved in degradation of BGPI-1. In larval feeding studies, BGPIs were found to retard growth and development of two lepidopteran pests namely Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura. This is the first report showing that BGPIs mediated inhibition of insect gut proteinases directly affects fertility and fecundity of both H. armigera and S. litura. The results advocate use of BGPIs to introduce insect resistance in otherwise susceptible plants.

  16. Plasmodium falciparum: effects of proteinase inhibitors on globin hydrolysis by cultured malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, P J

    1995-03-01

    The effects of peptide proteinase inhibitors on globin hydrolysis by cultured malaria parasites were studied. All of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitors evaluated blocked globin hydrolysis, as documented by the development of a morphological abnormality in which parasite food vacuoles filled with undegraded globin and by SDS-PAGE showing that the cysteine proteinase inhibitor-treated parasites accumulated large quantities of globin. The aspartic proteinase inhibitor pepstatin did not block globin hydrolysis by cultured parasites. None of seven antimalarial drugs tested elicited the food vacuole abnormality caused by cysteine proteinase inhibitors, indicating that this morphological alteration was not simply a sign of nonspecific parasite toxicity. Our results indicate that a trophozoite cysteine proteinase is required for initial cleavages of globin by intact malaria parasites.

  17. Inhibition of neutrophil elastase by recombinant human proteinase inhibitor 9.

    PubMed

    Dahlen, J R; Foster, D C; Kisiel, W

    1999-09-21

    Proteinase inhibitor PI9 (PI9) is an intracellular 42-kDa member of the ovalbumin family of serpins that is found primarily in placenta, lung and lymphocytes. PI9 has been shown to be a fast-acting inhibitor of granzyme B in vitro, presumably through the utilization of Glu(340) as the P(1) inhibitory residue in its reactive site loop. In this report, we describe the inhibition of human neutrophil elastase by recombinant human PI9. Inhibition occurred with an overall K(i)' of 221 pM and a second-order association rate constant of 1.5 x 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), indicating that PI9 is a potent inhibitor of this serine proteinase in vitro. In addition, incubation of recombinant PI9 with native neutrophil elastase resulted in the formation of an SDS-resistant 62-kDa complex. Amino-terminal sequence analyses provided evidence that inhibition of elastase occurred through the use of Cys(342) as the reactive P(1) amino acid residue in the PI9 reactive site loop. Thus, PI9 joins its close relatives PI6 and PI8 as having the ability to utilize multiple reactive site loop residues as the inhibitory P(1) residue to expand its inhibitory spectrum.

  18. Relationship of proteinases and proteinase inhibitors with microbial presence in chronic lung disease of prematurity

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Philip L; Beeton, Michael L; Maxwell, Nicola C; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen; Kotecha, Sailesh

    2010-01-01

    Background A proteolytic imbalance has been implicated in the development of “classical” chronic lung disease of prematurity (CLD). However, in “new” CLD this pattern has changed. This study examines the longitudinal relationship between neutrophil proteinases and their inhibitors in ventilated preterm infants and their relationship to microbial colonisation. Methods Serial bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was obtained from ventilated newborn preterm infants. Neutrophil elastase (NE) activity, cell counts, metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, MMP-9/TIMP-1 complex, SerpinB1 concentration and percentage of SerpinB1 and α1-antitrypsin (AAT) in complex with elastase were measured. The presence of microbial genes was examined using PCR for 16S rRNA genes. Results Statistically more infants who developed CLD had NE activity in at least one sample (10/20) compared with infants with resolved respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (2/17). However, NE activity was present in a minority of samples, occurring as episodic peaks. Peak levels of MMP-9, MMP-9/TIMP-1 complex, percentage of AAT and SerpinB1 in complex and cell counts were all statistically greater in infants developing CLD than in infants with resolved RDS. Peak values frequently occurred as episodic spikes and strong temporal relationships were noted between all markers. The peak values for all variables were significantly correlated to each other. The presence of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was associated with the development of CLD and with elevated elastase and MMP-9. Conclusion NE activity and MMP-9 appear to be important in the development of “new” CLD with both proteinase and inhibitor concentrations increasing episodically, possibly in response to postnatal infection. PMID:20335295

  19. Pest protection conferred by A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Indep...

  20. Novel distribution of the secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor in kidney.

    PubMed Central

    Ohlsson, S; Ljungkrantz, I; Ohlsson, K; Segelmark, M; Wieslander, J

    2001-01-01

    The secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) is a low molecular weight, tissue-specific inhibitor of, for example, elastase and cathepsin G, which also have antimicrobial capacity. SLPI has been localised to the respiratory, gastrointestinal and genital tracts, but so far not to the kidney. The presence of SLPI in renal tubuli cells was demonstrated using immunohistochemistry and, by means of in situ hybridisation on human renal biopsies, we were able to demonstrate SLPI production. In various inflammatory conditions in the kidneys, the protease-antiprotease balance is disturbed. For this reason, as well as the possible role in the defence against ascending urinary tract infections, it is interesting to establish a source of SLPI in renal tubuli cells. PMID:11817677

  1. Alpha-2-macroglobulin functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in sepsis: studies using a baboon model.

    PubMed Central

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Abbink, J J; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-01-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) may function as a proteinase inhibitor in vivo. Levels of this protein are decreased in sepsis, but the reason these levels are low is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the behavior of alpha 2M in a baboon model for sepsis. Upon challenge with a lethal (4 baboons) or a sublethal (10 baboons) dose of Escherichia coli, levels of inactivated alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) steadily increased, the changes being more pronounced in the animals that received the lethal dose. The rise in i alpha 2M significantly correlated with the increase of thrombin-antithrombin III, plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin, and, to a lesser extent, with that of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, raising the question of involvement of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in the inactivation of alpha 2M. Experiments with chromogenic substrates confirmed that thrombin, plasmin, elastase, and cathepsin G indeed had formed complexes with alpha 2M. Changes in alpha 2M similar to those observed in the animals that received E. coli occurred in baboons challenged with Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that alpha 2M formed complexes with the proteinases just mentioned in gram-positive sepsis as well. We conclude that alpha 2M in this baboon model for sepsis is inactivated by formation of complexes with proteinases, derived from activated neutrophils and from fibrinolytic and coagulation cascades. We suggest that similar mechanisms may account for the decreased alpha 2M levels in clinical sepsis. PMID:7693593

  2. Alpha-2-macroglobulin functions as an inhibitor of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in sepsis: studies using a baboon model.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J P; Creasey, A A; Chang, A; Abbink, J J; Roem, D; Eerenberg, A J; Hack, C E; Taylor, F B

    1993-12-01

    Alpha-2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) may function as a proteinase inhibitor in vivo. Levels of this protein are decreased in sepsis, but the reason these levels are low is unknown. Therefore, we analyzed the behavior of alpha 2M in a baboon model for sepsis. Upon challenge with a lethal (4 baboons) or a sublethal (10 baboons) dose of Escherichia coli, levels of inactivated alpha 2M (i alpha 2M) steadily increased, the changes being more pronounced in the animals that received the lethal dose. The rise in i alpha 2M significantly correlated with the increase of thrombin-antithrombin III, plasmin-alpha 2-antiplasmin, and, to a lesser extent, with that of elastase-alpha 1-antitrypsin complexes, raising the question of involvement of fibrinolytic, clotting, and neutrophilic proteinases in the inactivation of alpha 2M. Experiments with chromogenic substrates confirmed that thrombin, plasmin, elastase, and cathepsin G indeed had formed complexes with alpha 2M. Changes in alpha 2M similar to those observed in the animals that received E. coli occurred in baboons challenged with Staphylococcus aureus, indicating that alpha 2M formed complexes with the proteinases just mentioned in gram-positive sepsis as well. We conclude that alpha 2M in this baboon model for sepsis is inactivated by formation of complexes with proteinases, derived from activated neutrophils and from fibrinolytic and coagulation cascades. We suggest that similar mechanisms may account for the decreased alpha 2M levels in clinical sepsis.

  3. Serine proteinase inhibitors in the Compositae: distribution, polymorphism and properties.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Alexander V; Anisimova, Irina N; Gavrilova, V A; Vachrusheva, T E; Konechnaya, G Yu; Lewis, Mervyn; Shewry, Peter R

    2002-02-01

    Multiple molecular forms of inhibitors of trypsin (TI) and chymotrypsin (CI), which are typical digestive enzymes of insects, mammals and micro-organisms, and subtilisin (SI), a proteinase of many bacteria and phytopathogenic fungi, were identified in seeds and vegetative organs of the majority of 128 wild and cultivated species representing 65 genera of three of the subfamilies of the Compositae. Inhibitors with M(r) ranging from 7450 to 7800 and combining activities towards subtilisin and trypsin and/or chymotrypsin (T/C/SI) had the widest distribution and may be involved in plant defense mechanisms. They were found in many species of the subfamilies Carduoideae (genera Carthamus, Centaurea, Cirsium), Cichorioideae (Lactuca, Taraxacum) and Asteroideae (Helianthus, Cosmos, Bidens). Partial amino acid sequencing showed that the safflower (Carthamus tinctorius) T/C/SI and Cosmos bipinnatus T/C/SI, T/SI and C/SI belonged to the potato I inhibitor family. The most active, variable and heterogeneous inhibitors were found in species of the tribe Heliantheae, which is placed in the evolutionary advanced subfamily Asteroideae. Seeds of Helianthus species, Eclipta prostrata, Gailardia aristata, Zinnia elegans and Silphium perfoliatum contained various TI with M(r) ranging from 1500 to 14,750, with some also containing SI. H. annuus seeds contain a unique cyclic TI of M(r) 1514 and similar TI were also present in other Helianthus spp. and the related species Tithonia diversifolia. Zinnia elegans contained a TI with M(r) 11,350 which appeared to represent a novel type of inhibitor distantly related to the cereal subgroup of Bowman-Birk inhibitors. TI and T/SI varied widely in H. annuus lines and wild Helianthus species in their presence or absence and composition. Similar T/SI components were found in the cultivated diploid H. annuus and annual diploid species with the B genome but not in perennials with the A genome. Some T/SI, SI and TI were detected in vegetative organs

  4. Early Access Program Using Alpha 1 Antitrypsin Infusion for Patients With Steroid Refractory Acute GvHD After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-29

    SR aGvHD; Acute-graft-versus-host Disease; Steroid Refractory Acute Graft Versus Host Disease; Graft-versus-host-disease; Graft Vs Host Disease; Alpha 1-Antitrypsin Deficiency; Alpha-1 Proteinase Inhibitor; Alpha-1 Protease Inhibitor Deficiency; Acute Graft-Versus-Host Reaction Following Bone Marrow Transplant

  5. Purification and characterization of an alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the mollusc Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed Central

    Thøgersen, I B; Salvesen, G; Brucato, F H; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1992-01-01

    The cell-free haemolymph of the mollusc Octopus vulgaris inhibited the proteolytic activity of the thermolysin against the high-molecular-mass substrate hide powder azure. The purified inhibitor was a glycoprotein composed of two identical 180 kDa disulphide-linked subunits. In addition to the inhibition of the metalloproteinase thermolysin, the protein inhibited the serine proteinases human neutrophil elastase, pig pancreatic elastase, bovine chymotrypsin, bovine trypsin and the cysteine proteinase papain. A fraction of the proteinase-inhibitor complex resisted dissociation after denaturation indicating that some of the proteinase molecules became covalently bound. The nucleophile beta-aminopropionitrile decreased the covalent binding of proteinases to the Octopus vulgaris protein, suggesting that this interaction is mediated by an internal thiol ester; the reactivity and the amino acid sequence flanking the reactive residues of the putative thiol ester were consistent with this hypothesis. Bound trypsin remained active against the low-molecular-mass chromatogenic substrate H-D-Pro-Phe-Arg p-nitroanilide and was protected from inhibition by active-site-directed protein inhibitors of trypsin; however, the bound trypsin was readily inhibited by small synthetic inhibitors. This indicates that the inhibition of proteinases is accomplished by steric hindrance. The proteinase-inhibitory activity of this protein is characteristic of inhibition by mammalian alpha-macroglobulins and the presence of a putative thiol ester suggests that the Octopus vulgaris proteinase inhibitor is a homologue of human alpha 2-macroglobulin. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 5. PMID:1379044

  6. Purification and characterization of an alpha-macroglobulin proteinase inhibitor from the mollusc Octopus vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Thøgersen, I B; Salvesen, G; Brucato, F H; Pizzo, S V; Enghild, J J

    1992-07-15

    The cell-free haemolymph of the mollusc Octopus vulgaris inhibited the proteolytic activity of the thermolysin against the high-molecular-mass substrate hide powder azure. The purified inhibitor was a glycoprotein composed of two identical 180 kDa disulphide-linked subunits. In addition to the inhibition of the metalloproteinase thermolysin, the protein inhibited the serine proteinases human neutrophil elastase, pig pancreatic elastase, bovine chymotrypsin, bovine trypsin and the cysteine proteinase papain. A fraction of the proteinase-inhibitor complex resisted dissociation after denaturation indicating that some of the proteinase molecules became covalently bound. The nucleophile beta-aminopropionitrile decreased the covalent binding of proteinases to the Octopus vulgaris protein, suggesting that this interaction is mediated by an internal thiol ester; the reactivity and the amino acid sequence flanking the reactive residues of the putative thiol ester were consistent with this hypothesis. Bound trypsin remained active against the low-molecular-mass chromatogenic substrate H-D-Pro-Phe-Arg p-nitroanilide and was protected from inhibition by active-site-directed protein inhibitors of trypsin; however, the bound trypsin was readily inhibited by small synthetic inhibitors. This indicates that the inhibition of proteinases is accomplished by steric hindrance. The proteinase-inhibitory activity of this protein is characteristic of inhibition by mammalian alpha-macroglobulins and the presence of a putative thiol ester suggests that the Octopus vulgaris proteinase inhibitor is a homologue of human alpha 2-macroglobulin.

  7. Triacontanol negatively modulates the jasmonic acid-stimulated proteinase inhibitors in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum).

    PubMed

    Ramanarayan, Krishnamurthy; Swamy, Gangadharamurthy Sivakumar

    2004-04-01

    Triacontanol (TRIA), a long chain aliphatic alcohol (C30H61OH) reverses the effect of jasmonic acid (JA) in inducing proteinase inhibitors (PIs) in tomato leaves. Porcine pancreas trypsin and Spodoptera litura gut proteinases were inhibited in the presence of leaf proteins treated with JA, and TRIA partially reverses this effect. Spodoptera litura larvae fed with tomato leaves treated with JA were reduced in body weight and TRIA is able to partially reverse this JA-induced effect. These results reflect the partial reversal effect of TRIA in down regulating the JA-induced production of proteinase inhibitors.

  8. Substrate and inhibitor studies with human gastric aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, A; Campbell, C J; Grinham, C J; Keane, R M; Lawton, B C; Pendlebury, J E

    1990-01-01

    The separation of pepsin isoenzymes 1, 2, 3 and 5 (gastricsin) in human gastric juice was effected by chromatography on Mono Q ion-exchanger, and slow-moving proteinase was purified to homogeneity by using a modified procedure incorporating a novel affinity-chromatography step. The pH-activity profiles of these enzymes with mucus glycoprotein and basement-membrane substrates were determined; the profiles for pepsin 2 were noticeably different, and, in general, the pH optima for the hydrolysis of basement membrane were more acidic. Pepsin 1 expressed larger specificity constants (kcat./Km) than pepsin 3 with a series of synthetic peptide substrates, reflecting greater binding (smaller Km) by pepsin 1. Inhibitor studies at pH 1.7 and 4.5 with a series of P2-substituted lactoyl-pepstatins implied that valine at position P2 was optimal for inhibiting pepsins 1, 2 and 3 but detrimental for pepsin 5, whereas lysine at position P2 was tolerated well by pepsin 5 but not by pepsins 1, 2 and 3. The potency of lactoyl-pepstatin with lysine at position P2 did not increase as a function of pH. P2-substituted lactoyl-pepstatins failed to show any inhibitory selectivity among pepsins 1, 2 and 3. PMID:2111133

  9. Effect of retroviral proteinase inhibitors on Mason-Pfizer monkey virus maturation and transmembrane glycoprotein cleavage.

    PubMed Central

    Sommerfelt, M A; Petteway, S R; Dreyer, G B; Hunter, E

    1992-01-01

    Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) is the prototype type D retrovirus which preassembles immature intracytoplasmic type A particles within the infected cell cytoplasm. Intracytoplasmic type A particles are composed of uncleaved polyprotein precursors which upon release are cleaved by the viral proteinase to their constituent mature proteins. This results in a morphological change in the virion described as maturation. We have investigated the role of the viral proteinase in virus maturation and infectivity by inhibiting the function of the enzyme through mutagenesis of the proteinase gene and by using peptide inhibitors originally designed to block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase activity. Mutation of the active-site aspartic acid, Asp-26, to asparagine abrogated the activity of the M-PMV proteinase but did not affect the assembly of noninfectious, immature virus particles. In mutant virions, the transmembrane glycoprotein (TM) of M-PMV, initially synthesized as a cell-associated gp22, is not cleaved to gp20, as is observed with wild-type virions. This demonstrates that the viral proteinase is responsible for this cleavage event. Hydroxyethylene isostere human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteinase inhibitors were shown to block M-PMV proteinase cleavage of the TM glycoprotein and Gag-containing precursors in a dose-dependent manner. The TM cleavage event was more sensitive than cleavage of the Gag precursors to inhibition. The infectivity of treated particles was reduced significantly, but experiments showed that inhibition of precursor and TM cleavage may be at least partially reversible. These results demonstrate that the M-PMV aspartyl proteinase is activated in released virions and that the hydroxyethylene isostere proteinase inhibitors used in this study exhibit a broad spectrum of antiretroviral activity. Images PMID:1602542

  10. Purification and partial characterization of α1-proteinase inhibitor in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Parambeth, Joseph Cyrus; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2015-04-01

    Fecal alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) concentration has been to diagnose enteric protein loss in dogs and cats. Chronic lymphocytic enteritis is commonly seen in the marmoset (Callithrix jaccus) and is characterized by hypoalbuminemia. As a prelude to immunoassay development for detecting enteric protein loss, marmoset serum α1-PI was purified using immunoaffinity chromatography and ceramic hydroxyapatite chromatography. Partial characterization was performed by reducing gel electrophoresis and enzyme inhibitory assays. Protein identity was confirmed with peptide mass fingerprinting and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Molecular mass, relative molecular mass, and isoelectric point for marmoset α1-PI were 54 kDa, 51,677, and 4.8-5.4, respectively. Trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase inhibitory activity were observed. N-terminal amino acid sequence for marmoset α1-PI was EDPQGDAAQKMDTSHH. In conclusion, marmoset α1-PI was successfully purified from serum with an overall yield of 12% using a rapid and efficient method. Purified marmoset α1-PI has characteristics similar to those of α1-PI reported for other species.

  11. Purification and partial characterization of α1-proteinase inhibitor in the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)

    PubMed Central

    Parambeth, Joseph Cyrus; Suchodolski, Jan S.; Steiner, Jörg M.

    2015-01-01

    Fecal alpha1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI) concentration has been to diagnose enteric protein loss in dogs and cats. Chronic lymphocytic enteritis is commonly seen in the marmoset (C. jaccus) and is characterized by hypoalbuminemia. As a prelude to immunoassay development for detecting enteric protein loss, marmoset serum α1-PI was purified using immunoaffinity chromatography and ceramic hydroxyapatite chromatography. Partial characterization was performed by reducing gel electrophoresis and enzyme inhibitory assays. Protein identity was confirmed with peptide mass fingerprinting and N-terminal amino acid sequencing. Molecular mass, relative molecular mass, and isoelectric point for marmoset α1-PI were 54 kDa, 51677, and 4.8-5.4, respectively. Trypsin, chymotrypsin, and elastase inhibitory activity were observed. N-terminal amino acid sequence for marmoset α1-PI was EDPQGDAAQKMDTSHH. In conclusion, marmoset α1-PI was successfully purified from serum with an overall yield of 12% using a rapid and efficient method. Purified marmoset α1-PI has characteristics similar to those of α1-PI reported for other species. PMID:25745866

  12. [Progresses in the structure and function of Kazal-type proteinase inhibitors].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qing-Liang; Sheng, Qing; Zhang, Yao-Zhou

    2006-09-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are widely distributed in many living organisms and play crucial roles in many biological processes, particularly in regulating the proteinase activity spatially and temporally. However, The Kazal family of serine protease inhibitors is one of the most important and extensively studied protease inhibitor families. This type of protease inhibitor normally consists of one or several domains. Every domain has a highly conserved sequence structure and molecular conformation. It is found that contact residues are hyper variable, which are responsible for the interaction of inhibitors and proteinases. Most of them are in the solvent exposed loop. But P1 residue is the key active site of the interaction between inhibitor and enzyme. The types of the amino acid at P1 site likely play an important role in causing different inhibitory activity. The substitutions at the contact residues cause significant effects on the association constant. By using the Laskowski algorithm, the Ki values of a Kazal domain against six serine proteinases can be predicted from the domain' s sequence alone. At present there are many Kazal proteinase inhibitors found in the organisms, which show important biological functions. This article gives a comprehensive review of the newer developments in the characters and the interaction of the Kazal-type inhibitors.

  13. Discovery of an Inhibitor of Z-Alpha1 Antitrypsin Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Berthelier, Valerie; Harris, Jason Brett; Estenson, Kasey Noel; Baudry, Jerome; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-05-11

    Polymerization of the Z variant alpha-1-antitrypsin (Z-α1AT) results in the most common and severe form of α1AT deficiency (α1ATD), a debilitating genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to fatal liver and/or lung disease. As the altered conformation of Z-α1AT and its attendant aggregation are responsible for pathogenesis, the polymerization process per se has become a major target for the development of therapeutics. Based on the ability of Z-alpha 1AT to aggregate by recruiting the reactive center loop (RCL) of another Z-α1AT into its s4A cavity, we developed a high-throughput screening assay that uses a modified 6-mer peptide mimicking the RCL to screen for inhibitors of Z-α1AT polymer growth. We used a subset of compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) with molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da, to evaluate the assay's capabilities. The inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine was identified as a lead compound and its ability to prevent Z-α1AT polymerization confirmed by secondary assays. In order to further investigate the binding location of S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine, an in silico strategy was pursued and the intermediate alpha 1AT M* state modeled to allow molecular docking simulations and explore various potential binding sites. Docking results predict that S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine can bind at the s4A cavity and at the edge of beta-sheet A. The former binding site would directly block RCL insertion whereas the latter site would prevent beta-sheet A from expanding between s3A/s5A, and thus indirectly impede RCL insertion. Our investigations have revealed a novel compound that inhibits the formation of Z-α1AT polymers, as well as in vitro and in silico strategies for identifying and characterizing additional blocking molecules of Z-α1AT polymerization.

  14. Discovery of an Inhibitor of Z-Alpha1 Antitrypsin Polymerization

    DOE PAGES

    Berthelier, Valerie; Harris, Jason Brett; Estenson, Kasey Noel; ...

    2015-05-11

    Polymerization of the Z variant alpha-1-antitrypsin (Z-α1AT) results in the most common and severe form of α1AT deficiency (α1ATD), a debilitating genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to fatal liver and/or lung disease. As the altered conformation of Z-α1AT and its attendant aggregation are responsible for pathogenesis, the polymerization process per se has become a major target for the development of therapeutics. Based on the ability of Z-alpha 1AT to aggregate by recruiting the reactive center loop (RCL) of another Z-α1AT into its s4A cavity, we developed a high-throughput screening assay that uses a modified 6-mer peptide mimickingmore » the RCL to screen for inhibitors of Z-α1AT polymer growth. We used a subset of compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) with molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da, to evaluate the assay's capabilities. The inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine was identified as a lead compound and its ability to prevent Z-α1AT polymerization confirmed by secondary assays. In order to further investigate the binding location of S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine, an in silico strategy was pursued and the intermediate alpha 1AT M* state modeled to allow molecular docking simulations and explore various potential binding sites. Docking results predict that S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine can bind at the s4A cavity and at the edge of beta-sheet A. The former binding site would directly block RCL insertion whereas the latter site would prevent beta-sheet A from expanding between s3A/s5A, and thus indirectly impede RCL insertion. Our investigations have revealed a novel compound that inhibits the formation of Z-α1AT polymers, as well as in vitro and in silico strategies for identifying and characterizing additional blocking molecules of Z-α1AT polymerization.« less

  15. General up regulation of Spodoptera frugiperda trypsins and chymotrypsins allows its adaptation to soybean proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Brioschi, Daniela; Nadalini, Larissa D; Bengtson, Mario H; Sogayar, Mari Cleide; Moura, Daniel S; Silva-Filho, Marcio C

    2007-12-01

    The existence of a diverse serine proteinase gene family in lepidopteran insects suggests they play a significant role in the insect adaptation to plant proteinase inhibitors. These proteinases have been shown to be involved in the process of proteolytic digestion in insect larvae. We carried out a selective transcriptome study of midguts from Spodoptera frugiperda larvae fed on a diet supplemented with soybean proteinase inhibitor (SPI). Using subtracted cDNA libraries made of gut-expressed transcripts, a total of 2100 partial sequences were obtained, of those 38% were related to digestive process. Two large and diverse groups of chymotrypsins and trypsins were obtained, and some of these proteinase-encoding genes were further characterized by quantitative RT-PCR. The transcription analyses revealed two groups: one group of genes constitutively expressed in the control larvae that is up regulated by introducing SPI to the diet, and a second group that is absent in the control but is induced by the SPI-rich diet. This observation suggests that adaptation of S. frugiperda to SPI involves de novo synthesis and also up regulation of existing enzymes. Proteases from intestines of larvae reared on a diet with SPI showed insensitivity to the inhibitor. The proteases were also insensitive to a broad-spectrum potato proteinase inhibitor preparation. We propose that adaptation of S. frugiperda to SPI follows a "shotgun" approach, based on a general up regulation of a large set of endoproteinases.

  16. Prospects for using proteinase inhibitors to protect transgenic plants against attack by herbivorous insects.

    PubMed

    Gatehouse, John A

    2011-08-01

    Proteinase inhibitors which act on the digestive enzymes of insect herbivores are a basic mechanism of plant defence. Attempts to exploit this defence mechanism in plant genetic engineering have used over-expression of both endogenous and exogenous inhibitors. While significant protection against insect pests has been routinely achieved, the engineered plants do not show levels of resistance considered commercially viable. As a result of selective pressures, insect herbivores have developed multiple mechanisms of adaptation to overcome the defensive effects of plant proteinase inhibitors. Common polyphagous crop pests are well adapted to deal with a range of different inhibitors, which have only limited effects on fitness as a result. A range of strategies have been attempted to improve effectiveness of proteinase inhibitors as antimetabolites towards insects, including selection for inhibitory activity against insect digestive enzymes, mutagenesis for novel inhibitory activity, and engineering inhibitors with multiple functions. However, proteinase inhibitor genes have only been used in transgenic crops in combination with other insecticidal genes. In Chinese genetically engineered cotton varieties which express Bt toxins as an insecticidal protein against lepidopteran larvae, the CpTI (cowpea trypsin inhibitor) gene has been employed as a second transgene to improve protection. This gene combination represents the only commercial deployment of a proteinase inhibitor transgene to date, with Bt/CpTI cotton grown on over 0.5 million hectares in 2005. Future prospects for using proteinase inhibitor genes to enhance insect resistance in transgenic crops will require reassessment of their mechanisms of action, particularly in affecting processes other than digestion, as exemplified by effects on sap-feeding hemipteran pests.

  17. Structural and functional properties of kunitz proteinase inhibitors from leguminosae: a mini review.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Ferreira, Rodrigo da Silva; Ferreira, Joana Gasperazzo; de Paula, Cláudia Alessandra Andrade; Salas, Carlos E; Sampaio, Misako Uemura

    2011-08-01

    Seed proteins that inhibit proteinases are classified in families based on amino acid sequence similarity, nature of reactive site and mechanism of action, and are used as tools for investigating proteinases in physiological and pathological events. More recently, the plant Kunitz family of inhibitors with two disulphide bridges was enlarged with members containing variable number of cysteine residues, ranging from no cysteine at all to more than four residues. The characteristic of these proteins, as well the interactions with their target proteinases, are briefly discussed.

  18. Pacifastin, a novel 155-kDa heterodimeric proteinase inhibitor containing a unique transferrin chain

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Zicai; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Aspán, Anna; Hall, Martin; Söderhäll, Kenneth

    1997-01-01

    A 155-kDa proteinase inhibitor, pacifastin, from plasma of the freshwater crayfish, Pacifastacus leniusculus, was found to be composed of two covalently linked subunits. The two subunits are encoded by two different mRNAs, which were cloned and sequenced. The heavy chain of pacifastin (105 kDa) is related to transferrins, containing three transferrin lobes, two of which seem to be active for iron binding. The light chain of pacifastin (44 kDa) is the inhibitory subunit, and has nine cysteine-rich inhibitory domains that are homologous to each other and to low molecular weight proteinase inhibitors isolated from the grasshopper, Locusta migratoria. The nine light chain domains and the Locusta inhibitors share a characteristic cysteine array (Cys-Xaa9–12-Cys-Xaa2-Cys-Xaa-Cys-Xaa6–8-Cys-Xaa4-Cys) distinct from any described proteinase inhibitor family, suggesting that they constitute a new family of proteinase inhibitors. Pacifastin is the first known protein that has combined properties of a transferrin-like molecule and a proteinase inhibitor. PMID:9192625

  19. The M358R variant of α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor inhibits coagulation factor VIIa

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, William P.; Bhakta, Varsha

    2016-02-12

    The naturally occurring M358R mutation of the plasma serpin α{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor (API) changes both its cleavable reactive centre bond to Arg–Ser and the efficacy with which it inhibits different proteases, reducing the rate of inhibition of neutrophil elastase, and enhancing that of thrombin, factor XIa, and kallikrein, by several orders of magnitude. Although another plasma serpin with an Arg–Ser reactive centre, antithrombin (AT), has been shown to inhibit factor VIIa (FVIIa), no published data are available with respect to FVIIa inhibition by API M358R. Recombinant bacterially-expressed API M358R and plasma-derived AT were therefore compared using gel-based and kinetic assays of FVIIa integrity and activity. Under pseudo-first order conditions of excess serpin over protease, both AT and API M358R formed denaturation-resistant inhibitory complexes with FVIIa in reactions accelerated by TF; AT, but not API M358R, also required heparin for maximal activity. The second order rate constant for heparin-independent API M358R-mediated FVIIa inhibition was determined to be 7.8 ± 0.8 × 10{sup 2} M{sup −1}sec{sup −1}. We conclude that API M358R inhibits FVIIa by forming inhibitory complexes of the serpin type more rapidly than AT in the absence of heparin. The likely 20-fold excess of API M358R over AT in patient plasma during inflammation raises the possibility that it could contribute to the hemorrhagic tendencies manifested by rare individuals expressing this mutant serpin. - Highlights: • The inhibitory specificity of the serpin alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor (API) is sharply altered in the M358R variant. • API M358R forms denaturation-resistant complexes with coagulation factor VIIa at a rate accelerated by tissue factor but unaffected by heparin. • Complex formation was shown by gel-based assays and quantified kinetically by inhibition of FVIIa-dependent amidolysis.

  20. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Results Two cysteine proteinase (CP) and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Conclusions Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is likely to play a strong role

  1. Coffee cysteine proteinases and related inhibitors with high expression during grain maturation and germination.

    PubMed

    Lepelley, Maud; Amor, Mohamed Ben; Martineau, Nelly; Cheminade, Gerald; Caillet, Victoria; McCarthy, James

    2012-03-01

    Cysteine proteinases perform multiple functions in seeds, including participation in remodelling polypeptides and recycling amino acids during maturation and germination. Currently, few details exist concerning these genes and proteins in coffee. Furthermore, there is limited information on the cysteine proteinase inhibitors which influence the activities of these proteinases. Two cysteine proteinase (CP) and four cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) gene sequences have been identified in coffee with significant expression during the maturation and germination of coffee grain. Detailed expression analysis of the cysteine proteinase genes CcCP1 and CcCP4 in Robusta using quantitative RT-PCR showed that these transcripts accumulate primarily during grain maturation and germination/post germination. The corresponding proteins were expressed in E. coli and purified, but only one, CcCP4, which has a KDDL/KDEL C-terminal sequence, was found to be active after a short acid treatment. QRT-PCR expression analysis of the four cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes in Robusta showed that CcCPI-1 is primarily expressed in developing and germinating grain and CcCPI-4 is very highly expressed during the late post germination period, as well as in mature, but not immature leaves. Transcripts corresponding to CcCPI-2 and CcCPI-3 were detected in most tissues examined at relatively similar, but generally low levels. Several cysteine proteinase and cysteine proteinase inhibitor genes with strong, relatively specific expression during coffee grain maturation and germination are presented. The temporal expression of the CcCP1 gene suggests it is involved in modifying proteins during late grain maturation and germination. The expression pattern of CcCP4, and its close identity with KDEL containing CP proteins, implies this proteinase may play a role in protein and/or cell remodelling during late grain germination, and that it is likely to play a strong role in the programmed cell death

  2. Effects of chymostatin and other proteinase inhibitors on protein breakdown and proteolytic activities in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Peter; Goldberg, Alfred L.

    1980-01-01

    To learn more about the enzymes involved in protein catabolism in skeletal and cardiac muscle and to identify selective inhibitors of this process, we studied the effects of proteinase inhibitors on protein turnover in isolated muscles and on proteolytic activities in muscle homogenates. Chymostatin (20μm) decreased protein breakdown by 20–40% in leg muscles from normal rodents and also in denervated and dystrophic muscles. These results are similar to our previous findings with leupeptin. The related inhibitors pepstatin, bestatin, and elastatinal did not decrease protein breakdown; antipain slowed this process in rat hind-limb muscles but not in diaphragm. Chymostatin did not decrease protein synthesis and thus probably retards proteolysis by a specific effect on cell proteinase(s). In homogenates of rat muscle, chymostatin, in common with leupeptin and antipain, inhibits the lysosomal proteinase cathepsin B, and the soluble Ca2+-activated proteinase. In addition, chymostatin, but not leupeptin, inhibits the chymotrypsin-like proteinase apparent in muscle homogenates. In muscles depleted of most of this activity by treatment with the mast-cell-degranulating agent 48/80, chymostatin still decreased protein breakdown. Therefore inhibition of this alkaline activity probably does not account for the decrease in protein breakdown. These results are consistent with a lysosomal site of action for chymostatin. Because of its lack of toxicity, chymostatin may be useful in maintaining tissues in vitro and perhaps in decreasing muscle atrophy in vivo. PMID:7406880

  3. HIV proteinase inhibitors target the Ddi1-like protein of Leishmania parasites

    PubMed Central

    White, Rhian E.; Powell, David J.; Berry, Colin

    2011-01-01

    HIV proteinase inhibitors reduce the levels of Leishmania parasites in vivo and in vitro, but their biochemical target is unknown. We have identified an ortholog of the yeast Ddi1 protein as the only member of the aspartic proteinase family in Leishmania parasites, and in this study we investigate this protein as a potential target for the drugs. To date, no enzyme assay has been developed for the Ddi1 proteins, but Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking the DDI1 gene secrete high levels of protein into the medium. We developed an assay in which these knockout yeast were functionally complemented to low secretion by introduction of genes encoding Ddi1 orthologs from Leishmania major or humans. Plasmid alone controls gave no complementation. Treatment of the Ddi1 transformants with HIV proteinase inhibitors showed differential effects dependent on the origin of the Ddi1. Dose responses allowed calculation of IC50 values; e.g., for nelfinavir, of 3.4 μM (human Ddi1) and 0.44 μM (Leishmania Ddi1). IC50 values with Leishmania constructs mirror the potency of inhibitors against parasites. Our results show that Ddi1 proteins are targets of HIV proteinase inhibitors and indicates the Leishmania Ddi1 as the likely target for these drugs and a potential target for antiparasitic therapy.—White, R. E., Powell, D. J., Berry, C. HIV proteinase inhibitors target the Ddi1-Like protein of Leishmania parasites. PMID:21266539

  4. Effect of a Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor from Phaseolus coccineus on Hypothenemus hampei gut proteinases in vitro.

    PubMed

    de Azevedo Pereira, Railene; Valencia-Jiménez, Arnubio; Magalhães, Cláudio Picanço; Prates, Maura Vianna; Melo, Jorge Alex Taquita; de Lima, Liziane Maria; de Sales, Maurício Pereira; Tempel Nakasu, Erich Yukio; da Silva, Maria Cristina Mattar; Grossi-de-Sá, Maria Fátima

    2007-12-26

    The coffee berry borer, Hypothenemus hampei (Ferrari), is an important devastating coffee pest worldwide. Both trypsin and chymotrypsin enzyme activities from H. hampei larval midgut can be inactivated by proteinaceous enzyme-inhibitors. A serine proteinase inhibitor belonging to the Bowman-Birk class was purified from a wild accession of Phaseolus coccineus L. seeds. The inhibitor (PcBBI1) is a cysteine-rich protein that is heat-stable at alkaline pH. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis showed that PcBBI1 occurs in seeds as a monomer (8689 Da) or dimer (17,378 Da). Using in vitro inhibition assays, it was found that PcBBI1 has a high inhibitory activity against H. hampei trypsin-like enzymes, bovine pancreatic chymotrypsin, and trypsin. According to this, PcBBI1 could be a promising tool to make genetically modified coffee with resistance to coffee berry borer.

  5. Limited proteolysis by macrophage elastase inactivities human. cap alpha. /sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Banda, M.J.; Clark, E.J.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Ever since the initial description of ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor (..cap alpha../sub 1/PI), the role of this plasma glycoprotein and its allelic polymorphism in disease and in healthy physiology has been the subject of much investigation, ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI inactivates a number of serine proteinases, including granulocyte elastase, and thus affords protection from the connective tissue degradation mediated by this class of proteinases. Because an imbalance in the ratio between ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI and proteinase may contribute to the development of destructive lung diseases, proteinases have been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary emphysema. Both macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes have been implicated in disruption of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance. In this report, a new mechanism for alteration of the ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI-proteinase balance is demonstrated. It was found that the purified form of macrophage elastase catalytically degrades and inactivates ..cap alpha../sub 1/PI so that it no longer inhibits the elastinolytic activity of granulocyte elastase.

  6. Purification and partial characterization of proteinase inhibitors of equine seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, André Belico; Santos, Alexandre Martins Costa; Oliveira, Jamil Silvano; Lagares, Monique de Albuquerque; Santoro, Marcelo Matos

    2009-07-01

    The aims of the study were: 1/ to isolate and identify equine seminal plasma proteinase inhibitors, 2/ to evaluate their inhibitory potential, and 3/ to test a correlation between protein concentration in seminal plasma supernatant (obtained after precipitation with 36% ammonium sulfate) and stallion sexual maturity. Seminal plasma proteins obtained from six stallions were chromatographed in a Superose 12 (FPLC system) column followed by C(18) HPLC reverse-phase. Inhibition of trypsin amidase activity was evaluated in the collected fractions. Active proteins with a molecular mass of 6.3-7.0 KDa were identified using mass spectrometry. The older stallions showed a reduction in total seminal plasma protein concentration, but had similar concentrations of proteinase inhibitors (0.28+/-0.10 mg/ml) in seminal plasma supernatant. Different proteinase inhibitor isoforms were found in semen of all stallions which suggests that the isoforms may be used as biomarkers of individual animals.

  7. Several properties of the partially purified proteinase inhibitor in eggplant exocarp.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, M; Ibuki, F; Yamada, M; Tashiro, M; Miyoshi, M

    1975-01-01

    A proteinase inhibitor was isolated and partially purified from the exocarp of eggplant, Solanum melongena L., by means of acetate buffer extraction, heat treatment, salting-out and column chromatography on DEAE-cellulose. This preparation showed inhibitory activities on various proteinases; trypsin [EC 3.4.4.4] and Pronase were strongly inhibited while alpha-chymotrypsin [EC 3.4.4.5] and Nagarse were weakly inhibited. The inhibitor was a protein substance, and, therefore, it was gradually inactivated by the long-time incubation with Pronase. The inhibition mode was non-competitive on trypsin and competitive on Pronase on the basis of Lineweaver-Burk plots. The investigations on the inhibition behavior in the co-existence of two kinds of proteinases suggested that the inhibitor was not of multi-headed type.

  8. Cloning and rational mutagenesis of kexstatin I, a potent proteinaceous inhibitor of Kex2 proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Oda, K; Oyama, H; Ito, S; Fukiharu, M; Miyagawa, Y; Takahashi, S; Hirose, M; Kikuchi, N; Nakayama, T; Shibano, Y

    2001-01-01

    Kexstatin I is a potent proteinaceous inhibitor of Kex2 proteinase (EC 3.4.21.61). In the present study we show the molecular cloning, primary structure determination and expression of the gene encoding kexstatin I. We also demonstrate its enhanced activity and specificity for Kex2 proteinase inhibition by rational mutagenesis. The cloned kexstatin I gene encoded a protein of 145 amino acid residues, including the 35-residue signal sequence for secretion. The amino acid sequence showed 52% identity with those of the Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitors (SSIs). Thus kexstatin I is the first SSI-family member that can inhibit Kex2 proteinase. The reactive site of the inhibitor was determined to be -Thr(69)-Lys(70) downward arrowGlu(71)-, where downward arrow indicates the reactive site. Because Kex2 proteinase generally shows the highest affinity for substrates with basic amino acid residues at the P(1) and P(2) sites, conversion of the Thr(69)-Lys(70) segment of the inhibitor into dibasic motifs was expected to result in enhanced inhibitory activities. Thus we constructed kexstatin I mutants, in which the Thr(69)-Lys(70) sequence was replaced by the Thr(69)-Arg(70), Lys(69)-Lys(70) and Lys(69)-Arg(70) sequences using PCR-based mutagenesis, and analysed them kinetically. Among these mutants, the Lys(69)-Arg(70) mutant was the most potent inhibitor. The K(i) for Kex2 proteinase was 3.2x10(-10) M, which was 140-fold lower than that of the inhibitor with the Thr(69)-Lys(70) sequence. Although kexstatin I could also inhibit subtilisin, the enhancement of inhibitory activity upon such mutations was specific for Kex2 proteinase inhibition. PMID:11284720

  9. Proteolysis of the 85-kilodalton crystalline cysteine proteinase inhibitor from potato releases functional cystatin domains.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, T A; Strickland, J A

    1993-01-01

    The protein crystals found in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber cells consist of a single 85-kD polypeptide. This polypeptide is an inhibitor of papain and other cysteine proteinases and is capable of binding several proteinase molecules simultaneously (P. Rodis, J.E. Hoff [1984] Plant Physiol 74: 907-911). We have characterized this unusual inhibitor in more detail. Titrations of papain activity with the potato papain inhibitor showed that there are eight papain binding sites per inhibitor molecule. The inhibition constant (Ki) value for papain inhibition was 0.1 nM. Treatment of the inhibitor with trypsin resulted in fragmentation of the 85-kD polypeptide into a 32-kD polypeptide and five 10-kD polypeptides. The 32-kD and 10-kD fragments all retained the ability to potently inhibit papain (Ki values against papain were 0.5 and 0.7 nM, respectively) and the molar stoichiometries of papain binding were 2 to 3:1 and 1:1, respectively. Other nonspecific proteinases such as chymotrypsin, subtilisin Carlsberg, thermolysin, and proteinase K also cleaved the 85-kD inhibitor polypeptide into functional 22-kD and several 10-kD fragments. The fragments obtained by digestion of the potato papain inhibitor with trypsin were purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, and the N-terminal amino acid sequence was obtained for each fragment. Comparison of these sequences showed that the fragments shared a high degree of homology but were not identical. The sequences were homologous to the N termini of members of the cystatin superfamily of cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Therefore, the inhibitor appears to comprise eight tandem cystatin domains linked by preteolytically sensitive junctions. We have called the inhibitor potato multicystatin (PMC). By immunoblot analysis and measurement of papain inhibitory activity, PMC was found at high levels in potato leaves (up to 0.6 microgram/g fresh weight tissue), where it accumulated under conditions that induce the

  10. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  11. Proteinase inhibitors in severe inflammatory processes (septic shock and experimental endotoxaemia): biochemical, pathophysiological and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Fritz, H

    1979-01-01

    Plasma levels of antithrombin III, alpha 2-macroglobulin and inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor, as well as those of various clotting, complement and other plasma factors, were significantly decreased in 18 patients suffering from hyperdynamic septic shock. A similar statistically significant reduction of the concentrations of several plasma factors (prothrombin and antithrombin III, plasminogen and alpha 2-plasmin inhibitor, complement factor C3 and clotting factor XIII) was observed in experimental endotoxaemia. In this model the reduction in the plasma levels of these factors was considerably diminished by the intravenous injection of a granulocytic elastase--cathepsin G inhibitor of lower molecular weight from soybeans. The results of both studies indicate that consumption of plasma factors in the course of Gram-negative sepsis proceeds not only via the classical routes (by activation of the clotting, fibrinolytic and complement cascades by system-specific proteinases such as thrombokinase or the plasminogen activator) but also to an appreciable degree of unspecific degradation of plasma factors by neutral proteinases such as elastase and cathepsin G. The endotoxin-induced release of both sorts of proteinases, the system-specific ones and the unspecific lysosomal proteinases from leucocytes and other cells, is likely to be mainly responsible for the consumption of antithrombin III and alpha-2-macroglobulin via complex formation (followed by elimination of the complexes) and the increased turnover of the inter-alpha-trypsin inhibitor as observed in the clinical study. The therapeutic use of an exogenous elastase--cathepsin G inhibitor in the experimental model was stimulated by the observation that human mucous secretions contain and acid-stable inhibitor of the neutral granulocytic proteinases, called HUSI-I or antileucoproteinase. This inhibitor protects mucous membranes and soluble proteins against proteolytic attack by leucocytic proteinases released in the

  12. Alpha 1-antitrypsin genetic polymorphism in ANCA-positive systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Esnault, V L; Testa, A; Audrain, M; Rogé, C; Hamidou, M; Barrier, J H; Sesboüé, R; Martin, J P; Lesavre, P

    1993-06-01

    Alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1-AT) is the major inhibitor of proteinase 3 (PR3), the main target antigen of antineutrophil cytoplasm antibodies (ANCA) in Wegener's granulomatosis. alpha 1-AT is encoded by a polymorphic gene, with over 75 alleles, defining severely, medium and non-deficient protease inhibitor (PI) phenotypes. We describe the association of severely and medium deficient PI phenotypes with anti-PR3 positive systemic vasculitis, and postulate a pathogenetic role for alpha 1-AT deficiency and the occurrence of ANCA, with specificity for PR3 in a subgroup of patients with Wegener's granulomatosis.

  13. Changes in midgut endopeptidase activity of Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are responsible for adaptation to soybean proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, L C; Lopes, A R; Cristofoletti, P T; Parra, J R; Terra, W R; Silva-Filho, M C

    2000-06-01

    The development of transgenic maize plants expressing soybean proteinase inhibitors could reduce the economic damage of one of the major maize pests in Brazil, the fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith, 1797). We examined the influence of soybean proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzyme properties and development of S. frugiperda larvae. The inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin activities in vitro by soybean proteinase inhibitors suggested that either Kunitz (SBTI) or Bowman-Birk (SBBI) would have a potential antimetabolic effect when ingested by insect larvae. However, chronic ingestion of semipurified soybean inhibitors did not result in a significant reduction of growth and development of fall armyworm. Therefore, digestive serine proteinase activities (trypsin and chymotrypsin) of fall armyworm larvae were characterized. The results suggest that S. frugiperda was able to physiologically adapt to dietary proteinase inhibitors by altering the complement of proteolytic enzymes in the insect midguts.

  14. LEKTI domain 15 is a functional Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Vitzithum, Klaus; Lauber, Thomas; Kreutzmann, Peter; Schulz, Axel; Sommerhoff, Christian P; Rösch, Paul; Marx, Ute C

    2008-01-01

    The multidomain proteinase inhibitor LEKTI (lympho-epithelial Kazal-type related inhibitor) consists of 15 potential serine proteinase inhibitory domains. In various diseases such as the severe skin disorder Netherton syndrome as well as atopy, defects in the gene encoding LEKTI have been identified that generate premature termination codons of translation, suggesting a specific role of the COOH-terminal part of LEKTI in healthy individuals. We overexpressed and purified a sequence comprising the 15th domain of LEKTI for further characterisation. Here, we present a high yield expression system for recombinant production and efficient purification of LEKTI domain 15 as a highly soluble protein with a uniform disulfide pattern that is identical to that of other known Kazal-type inhibitors. Also, the expected P1P1' site was confirmed. LEKTI domain 15 is a well-structured protein as verified by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and a tight-binding and stable inhibitor of the serine proteinase trypsin. These findings confirm the designation of domain 15 as a proteinase inhibitor of the Kazal family.

  15. Discovery of an Inhibitor of Z-Alpha1 Antitrypsin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Estenson, Kasey Noel; Baudry, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Polymerization of the Z variant alpha-1-antitrypsin (Z-α1AT) results in the most common and severe form of α1AT deficiency (α1ATD), a debilitating genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to fatal liver and/or lung disease. As the altered conformation of Z-α1AT and its attendant aggregation are responsible for pathogenesis, the polymerization process per se has become a major target for the development of therapeutics. Based on the ability of Z-α1AT to aggregate by recruiting the reactive center loop (RCL) of another Z-α1AT into its s4A cavity, we developed a high-throughput screening assay that uses a modified 6-mer peptide mimicking the RCL to screen for inhibitors of Z-α1AT polymer growth. A subset of compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) with molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da, was used to evaluate the assay’s capabilities. The inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine was identified as a lead compound and its ability to prevent Z-α1AT polymerization confirmed by secondary assays. To further investigate the binding location of S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine, an in silico strategy was pursued and the intermediate α1AT M* state modeled to allow molecular docking simulations and explore various potential binding sites. Docking results predict that S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine can bind at the s4A cavity and at the edge of β-sheet A. The former binding site would directly block RCL insertion whereas the latter site would prevent β-sheet A from expanding between s3A/s5A, and thus indirectly impede RCL insertion. Altogether, our investigations have revealed a novel compound that inhibits the formation of Z-α1AT polymers, as well as in vitro and in silico strategies for identifying and characterizing additional blocking molecules of Z-α1AT polymerization. PMID:25961288

  16. Discovery of an inhibitor of Z-alpha1 antitrypsin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Berthelier, Valerie; Harris, Jason Brett; Estenson, Kasey Noel; Baudry, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Polymerization of the Z variant alpha-1-antitrypsin (Z-α1AT) results in the most common and severe form of α1AT deficiency (α1ATD), a debilitating genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations range from asymptomatic to fatal liver and/or lung disease. As the altered conformation of Z-α1AT and its attendant aggregation are responsible for pathogenesis, the polymerization process per se has become a major target for the development of therapeutics. Based on the ability of Z-α1AT to aggregate by recruiting the reactive center loop (RCL) of another Z-α1AT into its s4A cavity, we developed a high-throughput screening assay that uses a modified 6-mer peptide mimicking the RCL to screen for inhibitors of Z-α1AT polymer growth. A subset of compounds from the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC) with molecular weights ranging from 300 to 700 Da, was used to evaluate the assay's capabilities. The inhibitor S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine was identified as a lead compound and its ability to prevent Z-α1AT polymerization confirmed by secondary assays. To further investigate the binding location of S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine, an in silico strategy was pursued and the intermediate α1AT M* state modeled to allow molecular docking simulations and explore various potential binding sites. Docking results predict that S-(4-nitrobenzyl)-6-thioguanosine can bind at the s4A cavity and at the edge of β-sheet A. The former binding site would directly block RCL insertion whereas the latter site would prevent β-sheet A from expanding between s3A/s5A, and thus indirectly impede RCL insertion. Altogether, our investigations have revealed a novel compound that inhibits the formation of Z-α1AT polymers, as well as in vitro and in silico strategies for identifying and characterizing additional blocking molecules of Z-α1AT polymerization.

  17. Differential antibiosis against Helicoverpa armigera exerted by distinct inhibitory repeat domains of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-05-01

    Plant defensive serine proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are known to have negative impact on digestive physiology of herbivore insects and thus have a crucial role in plant protection. Here, we have assessed the efficacy and specificity of three previously characterized inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) variants from Capsicum annuum PIs viz., IRD-7, -9 and -12 against gut proteinases from Helicoverpa armigera. Comparative study of in silico binding energy revealed that IRD-9 possesses higher affinity towards H. armigera serine proteinases as compared to IRD-7 and -12. H. armigera fed on artificial diet containing 5 TIU/g of recombinant IRD proteins exhibited differential effects on larval growth, survival rate and other nutritional parameters. Major digestive gut trypsin and chymotrypsin genes were down regulated in the IRD fed larvae, while few of them were up-regulated, this indicate alterations in insect digestive physiology. The results corroborated with proteinase activity assays and zymography. These findings suggest that the sequence variations among PIs reflect in their efficacy against proteinases in vitro and in vivo, which also could be used for developing tailor-made multi-domain inhibitor gene(s).

  18. Pest protection conferred by a Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene.

    PubMed

    Smigocki, Ann C; Ivic-Haymes, Snezana; Li, Haiyan; Savić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases.

  19. Pest Protection Conferred by a Beta vulgaris Serine Proteinase Inhibitor Gene

    PubMed Central

    Smigocki, Ann C.; Ivic-Haymes, Snezana; Li, Haiyan; Savić, Jelena

    2013-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors provide a means of engineering plant resistance to insect pests. A Beta vulgaris serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) was fused to the constitutive CaMV35S promoter for over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana plants to study its effect on lepidopteran insect pests. Independently derived BvSTI transgenic tobacco T2 homozygous progeny were shown to have relatively high BvSTI gene transcript levels. BvSTI-specific polyclonal antibodies cross-reacted with the expected 30 kDA recombinant BvSTI protein on Western blots. In gel trypsin inhibitor activity assays revealed a major clear zone that corresponded to the BvSTI proteinase inhibitor that was not detected in the untransformed control plants. BvSTI-transgenic plants were bioassayed for resistance to five lepidopteran insect pests. Spodoptera frugiperda, S. exigua and Manduca sexta larvae fed BvSTI leaves had significant reductions in larval weights as compared to larvae fed on untransformed leaves. In contrast, larval weights increased relative to the controls when Heliothis virescens and Agrotis ipsilon larvae were fed on BvSTI leaves. As the larvae entered the pupal stage, pupal sizes reflected the overall larval weights. Some developmental abnormalities of the pupae and emerging moths were noted. These findings suggest that the sugar beet BvSTI gene may prove useful for effective control of several different lepidopteran insect pests in genetically modified tobacco and other plants. The sugar beet serine proteinase inhibitor may be more effective for insect control because sugar beet is cropped in restricted geographical areas thus limiting the exposure of the insects to sugar beet proteinase inhibitors and build up of non-sensitive midgut proteases. PMID:23468963

  20. Insect and wound induced GUS gene expression from a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor gene promoter

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Inducible gene promoters that are specifically activated by pathogen invasion or insect pest attack are needed for effective expression of resistance genes to control plant diseases. In the present study, a promoter from a serine proteinase inhibitor gene (BvSTI) shown to be up-regulated in resist...

  1. Insect resistance to sugar beet pests mediated by a Beta vulgaris proteinase inhibitor transgene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We transformed sugar beet (Beta vulgaris) hairy roots and Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a Beta vulgaris root gene (BvSTI) that codes for a serine proteinase inhibitor. BvSTI is a root gene cloned from the F1016 breeding line that has moderate levels of resistance to the sugar beet root maggot ...

  2. Antimetastatic activity of adriamycin in combinations with proteinase inhibitors in mice.

    PubMed

    Leto, G; Tumminello, F M; Gebbia, N; Woynarowska, B; Bernacki, R J

    1990-01-01

    The antimetastatic activity of adriamycin in combination with proteinase inhibitors was investigated in mice bearing the metastatic tumors L1210 leukemia, Lewis lung carcinoma or M5076 sarcoma. Leupeptin, a cathepsin B inhibitor, when administered as a single agent was devoid of antimetastatic activity but some therapeutic activity was noted in mice with Lewis lung carcinoma when the agent was administered in combination with adriamycin. Pepstatin A, a cathepsin D inhibitor, had no effect as a single agent in mice with L1210 leukemia but displayed some antimetastatic activity in mice with Lewis lung carcinoma. In mice with M5076 sarcoma the combination of pepstatin A and adriamycin resulted in antimetastatic activity significantly greater than that observed with each agent alone. These results suggest that combinations of proteinase inhibitors with antitumor drugs such as adriamycin, might result in more effective antimetastatic treatment.

  3. Degradation of immunoglobulins, protease inhibitors, and interleukin-1 by a secretory proteinase of Acanthamoeba castellanii

    PubMed Central

    Na, Byoung-Kuk; Cho, Jong-Hwa; Song, Chul-Yong; Kim, Tong-Soo

    2002-01-01

    The effect of a secretory proteinase from the pathogenic amoebae Acanthamoeba castellanii on host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins such as immunoglobulins, interleukin-1, and protease inhibitors was investigated. The enzyme was found to degrade secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), IgG, and IgM. It also degraded interleukin-1α (IL-1α) and IL-1β. Its activity was not inhibited by endogenous protease inhibitors, such as α2-macroglobulin, α1-trypsin inhibitor, and α2-antiplasmin. Furthermore, the enzyme rapidly degraded those endogenous protease inhibitors as well. The degradation of host's defense-oriented or regulatory proteins by the Acanthamoeba proteinase suggested that the enzyme might be an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba infection. PMID:12073735

  4. Solution Structure of the Squash Aspartic Acid Proteinase Inhibitor (SQAPI) and Mutational Analysis of Pepsin Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Headey, Stephen J.; MacAskill, Ursula K.; Wright, Michele A.; Claridge, Jolyon K.; Edwards, Patrick J. B.; Farley, Peter C.; Christeller, John T.; Laing, William A.; Pascal, Steven M.

    2010-01-01

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel β-sheet gripping an α-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting β-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S′ side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp32–Asp215 diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. PMID:20538608

  5. Solution structure of the squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI) and mutational analysis of pepsin inhibition.

    PubMed

    Headey, Stephen J; Macaskill, Ursula K; Wright, Michele A; Claridge, Jolyon K; Edwards, Patrick J B; Farley, Peter C; Christeller, John T; Laing, William A; Pascal, Steven M

    2010-08-27

    The squash aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI), a proteinaceous proteinase inhibitor from squash, is an effective inhibitor of a range of aspartic proteinases. Proteinaceous aspartic proteinase inhibitors are rare in nature. The only other example in plants probably evolved from a precursor serine proteinase inhibitor. Earlier work based on sequence homology modeling suggested SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin. In this work, we determined the solution structure of SQAPI using NMR and show that SQAPI shares the same fold as a plant cystatin. The structure is characterized by a four-strand anti-parallel beta-sheet gripping an alpha-helix in an analogous manner to fingers of a hand gripping a tennis racquet. Truncation and site-specific mutagenesis revealed that the unstructured N terminus and the loop connecting beta-strands 1 and 2 are important for pepsin inhibition, but the loop connecting strands 3 and 4 is not. Using ambiguous restraints based on the mutagenesis results, SQAPI was then docked computationally to pepsin. The resulting model places the N-terminal strand of SQAPI in the S' side of the substrate binding cleft, whereas the first SQAPI loop binds on the S side of the cleft. The backbone of SQAPI does not interact with the pepsin catalytic Asp(32)-Asp(215) diad, thus avoiding cleavage. The data show that SQAPI does share homologous structural elements with cystatin and appears to retain a similar protease inhibitory mechanism despite its different target. This strongly supports our hypothesis that SQAPI evolved from an ancestral cystatin.

  6. A practical total synthesis of the microbial alkaline proteinase inhibitor (MAPI).

    PubMed

    Haebich, Dieter; Hillisch, Alexander; El Sheikh, Sherif

    2009-12-01

    Diverse serine and cysteine proteases as well as alkaline proteinases and elastases play a crucial role in numerous biological processes. Natural peptide aldehydes such as the "microbial alkaline proteinase inhibitor" (MAPI, 1) are valuable tools to characterize novel enzymes and to study their function in nature. Within a drug discovery program we wanted to design and explore non-natural MAPI congeners with novel biological profiles. To that end we devised a simple, practical, and scalable synthesis of MAPI 1 from readily available amino acid building blocks. The modular nature of our approach allows convenient structural modification of the MAPI backbone.

  7. Effects of E-64, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor, on cowpea weevil growth, development, and fecundity

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, L.L.; Shade, R.E.; Pomeroy, M.A.

    1988-06-01

    E-64, a specific inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, was incorporated into artificial seeds at low levels (0.01-0.25% by weight). It prolonged developmental time and increased mortality of the larval cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus (F.), in direct proportion to its concentration in the artificial seeds. The fecundity of females emerging from the artificial seeds was significantly decreased by E-64 concentrations of 0.06% and higher. These observations are compatible with the hypothesis that the midgut cysteine proteinase in C. maculatus is essential for normal growth and development.

  8. The characterization of SaPIN2b, a plant trichome-localized proteinase inhibitor from Solanum americanum.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming; Ding, Ling-Wen; Ge, Zhi-Juan; Wang, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Bo-Lun; Yang, Xiao-Bei; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2012-11-16

    Proteinase inhibitors play an important role in plant resistance of insects and pathogens. In this study, we characterized the serine proteinase inhibitor SaPIN2b, which is constitutively expressed in Solanum americanum trichomes and contains two conserved motifs of the proteinase inhibitor II (PIN2) family. The recombinant SaPIN2b (rSaPIN2b), which was expressed in Escherichia coli, was demonstrated to be a potent proteinase inhibitor against a panel of serine proteinases, including subtilisin A, chymotrypsin and trypsin. Moreover, rSaPIN2b also effectively inhibited the proteinase activities of midgut trypsin-like proteinases that were extracted from the devastating pest Helicoverpa armigera. Furthermore, the overexpression of SaPIN2b in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in enhanced resistance against H. armigera. Taken together, our results demonstrated that SaPIN2b is a potent serine proteinase inhibitor that may act as a protective protein in plant defense against insect attacks.

  9. Isolation and characterization of fibronectin-alpha 1-microglobulin complex in rat plasma.

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, C; Enghild, J J; Thøgersen, I B; Salvesen, G; Akerström, B

    1994-01-01

    Molecules containing the 28 kDa immunoregulatory protein alpha 1-microglobulin (alpha 1-m), also known as protein HC, were isolated from rat plasma or serum by immunoaffinity chromatography. Three molecular species were distinguished on the basis of nondenaturing PAGE. Two of these have been described previously: uncomplexed alpha 1-m, and the complex of alpha 1-m with alpha 1-inhibitor-3. The third species was analysed by denaturing PAGE, immunoblotting, proteinase digestion and N-terminal-sequence analyses, and shown to consist of a complex between alpha 1-m and fibronectin. This complex, with a mass of about 560 kDa, was resistant to dissociation in the presence of denaturants, but not in the presence of reducing agents in combination with denaturants, and we conclude that the two components are linked by disulphide bonds. About 60% of the total detectable plasma alpha 1-m exists as high-molecular-mass complexes distributed approximately evenly between fibronectin and alpha 1-inhibitor-3. Immunochemical analyses were used to determine the proportion of the total plasma pools of fibronectin and alpha 1-inhibitor-3 that circulate in complex with alpha 1-m. About 3-7% of the total plasma fibronectin from three different rat strains contained alpha 1-m, whereas 0.3-0.8% of the total plasma alpha 1-inhibitor-3 contained alpha 1-m. Complexes were found at similar levels in plasma and serum, indicating that coagulation is not responsible for complex formation. Moreover, immunochemical analyses of human plasma revealed small amounts of alpha 1-m in complex with fibronectin and alpha 2-macroglobulin (an alpha 1-inhibitor-3 homologue). The existence of a complex between alpha 1-m and fibronectin in rats and humans suggests a mechanism for the incorporation of the immunoregulatory molecule alpha 1-m into the extracellular matrix. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7519849

  10. The Role of Cysteine Proteinases and their Inhibitors in the Host-Pathogen Cross Talk

    PubMed Central

    Kopitar-Jerala, Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Proteinases and their inhibitors play essential functional roles in basic biological processes in both hosts and pathogens. Endo/lysosomal cathepsins participate in immune response in pathogen recognition and elimination. They are essential for both antigen processing and presentation (host adaptive immune response) and activation of endosomal Toll like receptors (innate immune response). Pathogens can produce proteases and also natural inhibitors to subvert the host immune response. Several pathogens are sensed through the intracellular pathogen recognition receptors, but only some of them use the host proteolytic system to escape into the cytosol. In this review, I provide an update on the most recent developments regarding the role of proteinases and their inhibitors in the initiation and regulation of immune responses. PMID:23305363

  11. Alkaline proteinase inhibitor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: a mutational and molecular dynamics study of the role of N-terminal residues in the inhibition of Pseudomonas alkaline proteinase.

    PubMed

    Feltzer, Rhona E; Trent, John O; Gray, Robert D

    2003-07-11

    Alkaline proteinase inhibitor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a 11.5-kDa, high affinity inhibitor of the serralysin class of zinc-dependent proteinases secreted by several Gram-negative bacteria. X-ray crystallography of the proteinase-inhibitor complex reveals that five N-terminal inhibitor residues occupy the extended substrate binding site of the enzyme and that the catalytic zinc is chelated by the alpha-amino and carbonyl groups of the N-terminal residue of the inhibitor. In this study, we assessed the effect of alteration of inhibitor residues 2-5 on its affinity for Pseudomonas alkaline proteinase (APR) as derived from the ratio of the dissociation and associate rate constants for formation of the enzyme-inhibitor complex. The largest effect was observed at position Ser-2, which occupies the S1' pocket of the enzyme and donates a hydrogen bond to the carboxyl group of the catalytic Glu-177 of the proteinase. Substitution of Asp, Arg, or Trp at this position increased the dissociation constant KD by 35-, 180-, and 13-fold, respectively. Mutation at positions 3-5 of the trunk also resulted in a reduction in enzyme-inhibitor affinity, with the exception of an I4W mutant, which exhibited a 3-fold increase in affinity. Molecular dynamics simulation of the complex formation between the catalytic domain of APR and the S2D mutant showed that the carboxyl of Asp-2 interacts with the catalytic zinc, thereby partially neutralizing the negative charge that otherwise would clash with the carboxyl group of Glu-177 of APR. Simulation of the interaction between the alkaline proteinase and the I4W mutant revealed a major shift in the loop comprised of residues 189-200 of the enzyme that allowed formation of a stacking interaction between the aromatic rings of Ile-4 of the inhibitor and Tyr-158 of the proteinase. This new interaction could account for the observed increase in enzyme-inhibitor affinity.

  12. Altered Expression of Brain Proteinase-Activated Receptor-2, Trypsin-2 and Serpin Proteinase Inhibitors in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Michael J; Durrenberger, Pascal F; Gentleman, Steve M; Walls, Andrew F; Dexter, David T

    2015-09-01

    Neuroinflammation is thought to contribute to cell death in neurodegenerative disorders, but the factors involved in the inflammatory process are not completely understood. Proteinase-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) expression in brain is increased in Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis, but the status of PAR2 in Parkinson's disease is unknown. This study examined expression of PAR2 and endogenous proteinase activators (trypsin-2, mast cell tryptase) and proteinase inhibitors (serpin-A5, serpin-A13) in areas vulnerable and resistant to neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease at different Braak α-synuclein stages of the disease in post-mortem brain. In normal aged brain, expression of PAR-2, trypsin-2, and serpin-A5 and serpin-A13 was found in neurons and microglia, and alterations in the amount of immunoreactivity for these proteins were found in some brain regions. Namely, there was a decrease in neurons positive for serpin-A5 in the dorsal motor nucleus, and serpin-A13 expression was reduced in the locus coeruleus and primary motor cortex, while expression of PAR2, trypsin-2 and both serpins was reduced in neurons within the substantia nigra. There was an increased number of microglia that expressed serpin-A5 in the dorsal motor nucleus of vagus and elevated numbers of microglia that expressed serpin-A13 in the substantia nigra of late Parkinson's disease cases. The number of microglia that expressed trypsin-2 increased in primary motor cortex of incidental Lewy body disease cases. Analysis of Parkinson's disease cases alone indicated that serpin-A5 and serpin-A13, and trypsin-2 expression in midbrain and cerebral cortex was different in cases with a high incidence of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia and psychosis compared to those with low levels of these treatment-induced side effects. This study showed that there was altered expression in brain of PAR2 and some proteins that can control its function in Parkinson's disease. Given the role of PAR2 in

  13. Chemically modified tetracycline-3 (CMT-3): a novel inhibitor of the serine proteinase, elastase.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ying; Lee, Hsi-Ming; Simon, Sanford R; Golub, Lorne M

    2011-12-01

    Two classes of enzymes play an important role in connective tissue breakdown during various inflammatory diseases: serine proteinases and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Tetracyclines (TCs) exhibit important anti-inflammatory and MMP-inhibitory properties that are unrelated to their antibacterial activities. Of the various TCs and their chemically modified NON-antibiotic analogs (CMTs) tested in vitro and in vivo, CMT-3 (6-demethyl-6-deoxy 4 de-dimethylamino tetracycline) has repeatedly been shown to be the most potent inhibitor of MMP activity and cytokine production. In addition to its anti-MMP function, we have shown that among all CMTs, CMT-3 is the only CMT that can also directly inhibit both the amidolytic activity of human leukocyte elastase (HLE, a serine proteinase) and the extracellular matrix degradation mediated by HLE. In addition, CMT-3 has been found to reduce leukocyte elastase activity in vivo in gingival extracts of rats with experimental periodontal disease. Thus, CMT-3 can inhibit pathologic connective tissue breakdown by (at least) two mechanisms: direct inhibition of neutral proteinases (elastase and MMPs); and protecting their endogenous inhibitors, α(1)-PI and TIMPs, from being digested and inactivated by MMPs and HLE, respectively. The pleiotropic properties of CMT-3 including (but not limited to) inhibition of serine proteinases, MMPs, and cytokines provide impressive therapeutic potential to reduce excessive connective tissue breakdown during various pathologic processes including inflammatory diseases, cancer metastasis and metabolic bone diseases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a proteinase inhibitor from marama beans.

    PubMed

    Elfant, M; Bryant, L; Starcher, B

    1985-11-01

    A protease inhibitor was purified from the African marama bean (Tylosema esculenturm). The inhibitor is present in large amounts, representing about 10.5% of the total protein. The molecular weight is slightly larger than soybean trypsin inhibitor and was estimated at 23,000 by SDS-gel electrophoresis or 24,500 by amino acid analysis. The amino acid composition was atypical of most other plant inhibitors with a cysteine content of only one or possibly two residues/mole and a blocked amino terminus. Inhibition studies indicated virtually no inhibition of chymotrypsin activity. Elastase, however, was inhibited to the same extent as trypsin, requiring about 2 moles of inhibitor for complete inhibition of the enzyme.

  15. Three low molecular weight cysteine proteinase inhibitors of human seminal fluid: purification and enzyme kinetic properties.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vikash Kumar; Chhikara, Nirmal; Gill, Kamaldeep; Dey, Sharmistha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

    2013-08-01

    The cystatins form a superfamily of structurally related proteins with highly conserved structural folds. They are all potent, reversible, competitive inhibitors of cysteine proteinases (CPs). Proteins from this group present differences in proteinase inhibition despite their high level of structural similarities. In this study, three cysteine proteinase inhibitors (CPIs) of low molecular weight were isolated from human seminal fluid (HSF) by affinity chromatography on carboxymethyl (CM)-papain-Sepharose column, purified using various chromatographic procedures and checked for purity on sodium-dodecyl PAGE (SDS-PAGE). Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization-time-of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) identified these proteins as cystatin 9, cystatin SN, and SAP-1 (an N-terminal truncated form of cystatin S). All three CPIs suppressed the activity of papain potentially and showed remarkable heat stability. Interestingly SAP-1 also inhibits the activity of trypsin, chymotrypsin, pepsin, and PSA (prostate specific antigen) and acts as a cross-class protease inhibitor in in vitro studies. Using Surface Plasmon Resonance, we have also observed that SAP-1 shows a significant binding with all these proteases. These studies suggest that SAP-1 is a cross-class inhibitor that may regulate activity of various classes of proteases within the reproductive systems. To our knowledge, this is the first report about purification of CPIs from HSF; the identification of such proteins could provide better insights into the physiological processes and offer intimation for further research.

  16. Structurally unique recombinant Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor retains activity when terminally extended and glycosylated.

    PubMed

    Kludkiewicz, Barbara; Kodrík, Dalibor; Grzelak, Krystyna; Nirmala, Xavier; Sehnal, Frantisek

    2005-10-01

    Recombinant derivatives of the Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor GmSPI2 (36 amino acid residues), which is a component of insect silk, were prepared in the expression vector Pichia pastoris. The rhSPI2 had a C-terminal hexahistidine tag attached to the GmSPI2 sequence, rtSPI2 was extended with GluAlaAla at the N-terminus, and rfSPI2 included this N-terminal extension and a C-terminal tail of 22 residues (myc epitope and hexahistidine). A portion of the secreted rfSI2 was O-glycosylated with a trimannosyl or hexamannosyl. The native inhibitor was active slightly on trypsin and highly on subtilisin and proteinase K. The extended C-terminus in rhSPI2 and rfSPI2 enhanced activity on the two latter enzymes and rendered rfSPI2 active on elastase and pronase, but abolished the inhibition of trypsin. The glycosylation of rfSPI2 reduced its inhibitory activity to a level comparable with the native inhibitor. The rtSPI2 with tripeptide extension at the N-terminus and no C-terminal modification was clearly less active than the native inhibitor. None of the tested compounds inhibited alpha-chymotrypsin and the non-serine proteinases.

  17. Molecular cloning of Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor of the shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Kong, Hee Jeong; Cho, Hyun Kook; Park, Eun-Mi; Hong, Gyeong-Eun; Kim, Young-Ok; Nam, Bo-Hye; Kim, Woo-Jin; Lee, Sang-Jun; Han, Hyon Sob; Jang, In-Kwon; Lee, Chang Hoon; Cheong, Jaehun; Choi, Tae-Jin

    2009-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors play important roles in host defence systems involving blood coagulation and pathogen digestion. We isolated and characterized a cDNA clone for a Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor (KPI) from a hemocyte cDNA library of the oriental white shrimp Fenneropenaeus chinensis. The KPI gene consists of three exons and two introns. KPI cDNA contains an open reading frame of 396 bp, a polyadenylation signal sequence AATAAA, and a poly (A) tail. KPI cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 131 amino acids with a putative signal peptide of 21 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of KPI contains two homologous Kazal domains, each with six conserved cysteine residues. The mRNA of KPI is expressed in the hemocytes of healthy shrimp, and the higher expression of KPI transcript is observed in shrimp infected with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV), suggesting a potential role for KPI in host defence mechanisms.

  18. On the modeling of snake venom serine proteinase interactions with benzamidine-based thrombin inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Henriques, Elsa S.; Fonseca, Nelson; Ramos, Maria João

    2004-01-01

    Pit viper venoms contain a number of serine proteinases that exhibit one or more thrombin-like activities on fibrinogen and platelets, this being the case for the kinin-releasing and fibrinogen-clotting KN-BJ from the venom of Bothrops jararaca. A three-dimensional structural model of the KN-BJ2 serine proteinase was built by homology modeling using the snake venom plasminogen activator TSV-PA as a major template and porcine kallikrein as additional structural support. A set of intrinsic buried waters was included in the model and its behavior under dynamic conditions was molecular dynamics simulated, revealing a most interesting similarity pattern to kallikrein. The benzamidine-based thrombin inhibitors α-NAPAP, 3-TAPAP, and 4-TAPAP were docked into the refined model, allowing for a more insightful functional characterization of the enzyme and a better understanding of the reported comparatively low affinity of KN-BJ2 toward those inhibitors. PMID:15322279

  19. A Kunitz proteinase inhibitor from corms of Xanthosoma blandum with bactericidal activity.

    PubMed

    Lima, Thaís B; Silva, Osmar N; Migliolo, Ludovico; Souza-Filho, Carlos R; Gonçalves, Eduardo G; Vasconcelos, Ilka M; Oliveira, José T A; Amaral, André C; Franco, Octávio L

    2011-05-27

    Bacterial infections directly affect the world's population, and this situation has been aggravated by indiscriminate use of antimicrobial agents, which can generate resistant microorganisms. In this report, an initial screening of proteins with antibacterial activity from corms of 15 species of the Xanthosoma genus was conducted. Since Xanthosoma blandum corms showed enhanced activity toward bacteria, a novel protein with bactericidal activity was isolated from this particular species. Edman degradation was used for protein N-termini determination; the primary structure showed similarities with Kunitz inhibitors, and this protein was named Xb-KTI. This protein was further challenged against serine proteinases from different sources, showing clear inhibitory activities. Otherwise, no hemolytic activity was observed for Xb-KTI. The results demonstrate the biotechnological potential of Xb-KTI, the first proteinase inhibitor with antimicrobial activity described in the Xanthosoma genus.

  20. Characterization of the Proteinase that Initiates the Degradation of the Trypsin Inhibitor in Germinating Mung Beans (Vigna radiata).

    PubMed

    Wilson, K A; Tan-Wilson, A L

    1987-05-01

    The proteinase (proteinase F) responsible for the initial proteolysis of the mung bean (Vigna radiata) trypsin inhibitor (MBTI) during germination has been purified 1400-fold from dry beans. The enzyme acts as an endopeptidase, cleaving the native inhibitor, MBTI-F, to produce the first modified inhibitor form, MBTI-E. The cleavage of the Asp76-Lys77 peptide bond of MBTI-F occurs at a pH optimum of 4.5, with the tetrapeptide Lys-Asp-Asp-Asp being released. Proteinase F exhibited no activity against the modified inhibitor forms MBTI-E and MBTI-C. Vicilin, the major storage protein of the mung bean, does not serve as a substrate for proteinase F between pH 4 and 7. Proteinase F is inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride, chymostatin, p-hydroxymercuribenzoate, and p-chlorophenylsulfonate, but not by iodoacetate and CuCl(2). It is not activated by dithiothreitol, and is stable for extended periods of time (10 months, 4 degrees C, pH 4.0) in the absence of reducing agents. An apparent molecular weight of 65,000 was found for proteinase F by gel filtration. Subcellular fractionation in glycerol suggests that greater than 85% of the proteinase F activity is found in the protein bodies of the ungerminated mung bean. The same studies indicate that at least 56% of the MBTI of the seed is also localized in the protein bodies.

  1. Purification and characterization of proteinase inhibitors from winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus (L.) DC.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Shibata, H; Hara, S; Ikenaka, T; Abe, J

    1986-04-01

    Seven proteinase inhibitors were isolated from winged bean seeds by ion-exchange chromatographies. These inhibitors had molecular weights of around 20,000, included four half-cystine residues, and were Kunitz-type inhibitors. Two (WTI-2 and 3) inhibited bovine trypsin strongly and four (WCI-1, 2, 3, and 4) inhibited bovine alpha-chymotrypsin, but in different ways. One mole of WCI-2 or -3 could inhibit 2 mol of alpha-chymotrypsin. The remaining inhibitor (WTCI-1) could bind both bovine trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin at the molar ratio of 1:1, but not simultaneously. All four chymotrypsin inhibitors cross-reacted with rabbit anti-WCI-3 serum, while the other inhibitors did not.

  2. Relationship between angiotensinogen, alpha 1-protease inhibitor elastase complex, antithrombin III and C-reactive protein in septic ARDS.

    PubMed

    Hilgenfeldt, U; Kellermann, W; Kienapfel, G; Jochum, M

    1990-01-01

    The time-course of plasma angiotensinogen (Ao), elastase-alpha 1-protease inhibitor complex (EL alpha 1PI), antithrombin III (AT III) and C-reactive protein (CRP) have been investigated of six patients suffering from adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The total plasma Ao level (active and inactive Ao) varied in individuals but was increased up to five-fold. An increasing amount of inactive Ao is found. From the beginning of their stay in the intensive care unit up to five days half of the patients displayed a positive correlation between the plasma CRP and Ao level. The CRP and Ao values were either not or were negatively correlated with the AT III values. In contrast plasma Ao and AT III levels in all patients were positively correlated during a particular period in the subsequent phase of the disease, where there was no or a negative correlation with CRP. The two acute phase reactants CRP and EL alpha 1PI were only correlated in two patients at the beginning of the disease. The markedly increased plasma level at the beginning of the inflammatory disease indicates that Ao is an acute phase reactant, and this is supported by the parallel changes in plasma CRP and Ao levels during the early days of ARDS. The relationship between the plasma levels of Ao and AT III for more than fourteen days suggests similar regulation of these members of the serpin family after termination of the acute-phase.

  3. Primary structure and reactive site of a novel wheat proteinase inhibitor of subtilisin and chymotrypsin.

    PubMed

    Poerio, Elia; Di Gennaro, Simone; Di Maro, Antimo; Farisei, Francesca; Ferranti, Pasquale; Parente, Augusto

    2003-02-01

    The proteinase inhibitor WSCI, active in inhibiting bacterial subtilisin and a number of animal chymotrypsins, was purified from endosperm of exaploid wheat (Triticum aestivum, c.v. San Pastore) by ion exchange chromatography and its complete amino acid sequence was established by automated Edman degradation. WSCI consists of a single polypeptide chain of 72 amino acid residues, has a molecular mass of 8126.3 Da and a pl of 5.8. The inhibition constants (Ki) for Bacillus licheniformis subtilisin and bovine pancreatic alpha-chymotrypsin are 3.92 x 10(-9) M and 7.24 x 10(-9) M, respectively. The inhibitor contains one methionine and of tryptophan residue and has a high content of essential amino acids (41 over a total of 72 residues), but no cysteines. The primary structure of WSCI shows high similarity with barley subtilisin-chymotrypsin isoinhibitors of the Cl-2 type and with maize subtilisinchymotrypsin inhibitor MPI. Significant degrees of similarity were also found between sequences of WSCI and of other members of the potato inhibitor I family of the serine proteinase inhibitors. The wheat inhibitor WSCI has a single reactive site (the peptide bond between methionyl-48 and glutamyl-49 residues) as identified by affinity chromatography and sequence analysis.

  4. Ethylene-regulated expression of a tomato fruit ripening gene encoding a proteinase inhibitor I with a glutamic residue at the reactive site.

    PubMed Central

    Margossian, L J; Federman, A D; Giovannoni, J J; Fischer, R L

    1988-01-01

    We report the isolation from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) of an ethylene-responsive member of the proteinase inhibitor gene family. DNA sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA clone indicates that the ethylene-responsive gene is distantly related to the tomato proteinase inhibitor I gene, having 53% sequence identity. The predicted amino acid sequence reveals 47% and 45% sequence identity with the tomato and potato proteinase inhibitor I polypeptides, respectively. Additionally, the ethylene-responsive inhibitor has evolved a completely different pattern of gene expression and inhibitory specificity than other members of the inhibitor I family. Gel blot hybridization experiments show that, unlike the tomato proteinase inhibitor I gene, it is not induced in wounded leaves. In contrast, it is activated by the plant hormone ethylene in leaves and during fruit ripening. Furthermore, the ethylene-responsive inhibitor exhibits a novel reactive site, having glutamic acid as the P1 residue. This suggests that the ethylene-responsive proteinase inhibitor does not react with chymotrypsin, as does proteinase inhibitor I, but that it reacts with proteolytic enzymes that cleave at glutamic residues, such as the Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, for which no inhibitors are known. Finally, isolation and analysis of a genomic clone reveals that the ethylene-responsive proteinase inhibitor gene is tightly linked to another, yet unidentified, coordinately expressed gene. We discuss these results with regard to the function and evolution of proteinase inhibitor genes in tomato. Images PMID:2903499

  5. Enzymatic response of the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) to a bis-benzamidine proteinase Inhibitor. i.

    PubMed

    Marinho-Prado, Jeanne Scardini; Lourenção, A L; Guedes, R N C; Pallini, A; Oliveira, J A; Oliveira, M G A

    2012-10-01

    Ingestion of proteinase inhibitors leads to hyperproduction of digestive proteinases, limiting the bioavailability of essential amino acids for protein synthesis, which affects insect growth and development. However, the effects of proteinase inhibitors on digestive enzymes can lead to an adaptive response by the insect. In here, we assessed the biochemical response of midgut proteinases from the eucalypt defoliator Thyrinteina arnobia (Stoll) to different concentrations of berenil, a bis-benzamidine proteinase inhibitor, on eucalyptus. Eucalyptus leaves were immersed in berenil solutions at different concentrations and fed to larvae of T. arnobia. Mortality was assessed daily. The proteolytic activity in the midgut of T. arnobia was assessed after feeding on plants sprayed with aqueous solutions of berenil, fed to fifth instars of T. arnobia for 48 h before midgut removal for enzymatic assays. Larvae of T. arnobia were able to overcome the effects of the lowest berenil concentrations by increasing their trypsin-like activity, but not as berenil concentration increased, despite the fact that the highest berenil concentration resulted in overproduction of trypsin-like proteinases. Berenil also prevented the increase of the cysteine proteinases activity in response to trypsin inhibition.

  6. Alpha-1 antitrypsin reduces ovariectomy-induced bone loss in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alpha-1antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional protein with proteinase inhibitor and anti-inflammatory activities. Recent studies showed that AAT has therapeutic effect for diseases associated with inflammation, such as type 1 diabetes and arthritis. Proinflammatory cytokines are primary mediators of...

  7. Therapeutics: Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Augmentation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Campos, Michael; Lascano, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    Subjects with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency who develop pulmonary disease are managed following general treatment guidelines, including disease management interventions. In addition, administration of intravenous infusions of alpha-1 proteinase inhibitor (augmentation therapy) at regular schedules is a specific therapy for individuals with AATD with pulmonary involvement.This chapter summarizes the manufacturing differences of commercially available formulations and the available evidence of the effects of augmentation therapy. Biologically, there is clear evidence of in vivo local antiprotease effects in the lung and systemic immunomodulatory effects. Clinically, there is cumulative evidence of slowing lung function decline and emphysema progression. The optimal dose of augmentation therapy is being revised as well as more individualized assessment of who needs this therapy.

  8. Uniquely Regulated Proteinase Inhibitor I Gene in a Wild Tomato Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, Vincent P. M.; Ryan, Clarence A.

    1991-01-01

    A uniquely regulated proteinase inhibitor I gene was isolated from the wild tomato species Lycopersicon peruvianum (L.) Mill. (LA 107) and characterized. The inhibitor gene is wound-inducible in leaves and is expressed in unripe fruit during development. The gene (λ clone 1) is present on a 15.5 kilobase pair Sal 1-SalI genomic DNA fragment. Southern blot analysis of L. peruvianum genomic DNA shows only one strongly hybridizing DNA fragment to probes derived from λ clone 1. S1 nuclease protection experiments and Northern analyses confirm that this gene is both wound-inducible in leaves and developmentally regulated in young unripe fruit. These observations are supported by comparisons of the 5′-flanking DNA sequences of the L. peruvianum inhibitor I gene with known elicitor responsive cis-acting sequences. The transcriptional regulation of the λ clone 1 inhibitor I gene in leaves of wounded plants and in developing unripe fruit indicates that the gene contains unique complex regulating elements. These elements respond to both environmental and developmental tissue-specific signals that can regulate proteinase inhibitor synthesis to protect the tissues of this wild species of tomato against predators and pathogens. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:16668426

  9. Purification and characterization of a proteinase inhibitor from field bean, Dolichos lablab perpureus L.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, V R; Manjunatha, N H

    1999-01-01

    A proteinase inhibitor resembling Bowman-Birk family inhibitors has been purified from the seeds of cultivar HA-3 of Dolichos lablab perpureus L. The protein was apparently homogeneous as judged by SDS-PAGE, PAGE, IEF, and immunodiffusion. The inhibitor had 12 mole% 1/2-cystine and a few aromatic amino acids, and lacks tryptophan. Field bean proteinase inhibitor (FBPI) exhibited a pI of 4.3 and an Mr of 18,500 Da. CD spectral studies showed random coiled secondary structure. Conformational changes were detected in the FBPI-trypsin/chymotrypsin complexes by difference spectral studies. Apparent Ka values of complexes of inhibitor with trypsin and chymotrypsin were 2.1x10(7) M(-1) and 3.1x10(7) M(-1), respectively. The binary and ternary complexes of FBPI with trypsin and chymotrypsin have been isolated indicating 1:1 stoichiometry with independent sites for cognate enzymes. Amino acid modification studies showed lysine and tyrosine at the reactive sites of FBPI for trypsin and chymotrypsin, respectively.

  10. Complete amino acid sequences of three proteinase inhibitors from white sword bean (Canavalia gladiata).

    PubMed

    Park, S S; Sumi, T; Ohba, H; Nakamura, O; Kimura, M

    2000-10-01

    Three major serine proteinase inhibitors (SBI-1, -2, and -3) were purified from the seeds of white sword bean (Canavalia gladiata) by FPLC and reversed-phase HPLC. The sequences of these inhibitors were established by automatic Edman degradation and TOF-mass spectrometry. SBI-1, -2, and -3 consisted of 72, 73, and 75 amino acid residues, with molecular masses of 7806.5, 7919.8, and 8163.4, respectively. The sequences of SBI-1 and -2 coincided with those of CLT I and II [Terada et al. (1994) Biosci. Biotech. Biochem., 58, 376-379] except only N- or C-terminal amino acid residues. Analysis of the amino acid sequences showed that the active sites of the inhibitors contained a Lys21-Ser22 against trypsin and Leu48-Ser49 against chymotrypsin, respectively. Further, it became apparent that about seven disulfide bonds were present. These results suggest that sword bean inhibitors are members of the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor family.

  11. A structural comparison of 21 inhibitor complexes of the aspartic proteinase from Endothia parasitica.

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, D.; Cooper, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The aspartic proteinases are an important family of enzymes associated with several pathological conditions such as hypertension (renin), gastric ulcers (pepsin), neoplastic disease (cathepsins D and E), and AIDS (HIV proteinase). Studies of inhibitor binding are therefore of great importance for design of novel inhibitors for potential therapeutic applications. Numerous X-ray analyses have shown that transition-state isostere inhibitors of aspartic proteinases bind in similar extended conformations in the active-site cleft of the target enzyme. Upon comparison of 21 endothiapepsin inhibitor complexes, the hydrogen bond lengths were found to be shortest where the isostere (P1-P'1) interacts with the enzyme's catalytic aspartate pair. Hydrogen bonds with good geometry also occur at P'2, and more so at P3, where a conserved water molecule is involved in the interactions. Weaker interactions also occur at P2, where the side-chain conformations of the inhibitors appear to be more variable than at the more tightly held positions. At P2 and, to a lesser extent, P3, the side-chain conformations depend intriguingly on interactions with spatially adjacent side chains, namely P'1 and P1, respectively. The tight binding at P1-P'1, P3, and P'2 is also reflected in the larger number of van der Waals contacts and the large decreases in solvent-accessible area at these positions, as well as their low temperature factors. Our analysis substantiates earlier proposals for the locations of protons in the transition-state complex. Aspartate 32 is probably ionized in the complexes, its charge being stabilized by 1, or sometimes 2, hydrogen bonds from the transition-state analogues at P1. The detailed comparison also indicates that the P1 and P2 residues of substrate in the ES complex may be strained by the extensive binding interactions at P3, P'1, and P'2 in a manner that would facilitate hydrolysis of the scissile peptide bond. PMID:7703859

  12. Specificity of an extracellular proteinase from Conidiobolus coronatus and its inhibition by an inhibitor from insect hemolymph.

    PubMed

    Bania, Jacek; Samborski, Jaroslaw; Bogus, Mieczyslawa; Polanowski, Antoni

    2006-08-01

    The relatively little-investigated entomopathogen Conidiobolus coronatus secretes several proteinases into culture broth. Using a combination of ion-exchange and size-exclusion chromatography, we purified to homogeneity a serine proteinase of Mr 30,000-32,000, as ascertained by SDS-PAGE. The purified enzyme showed subtilisin-like activity. It very effectively hydrolyzed N-Suc-Ala(2)-Pro-Phe-pNa with a Km-1.36 x 10(-4) M and Kcat-24 s(-1), and N-Suc-Ala(2)-Pro-Leu-pNa with Km-6.65 x 10(-4) M and Kcat-11 s(-1). The specificity index k(cat)/K(m) for the tested substrates was calculated to be 176,340 s(-1) M(-1) and 17,030 s(-1) M(-1), respectively. Using oxidized insulin B chain as a substrate, the purified proteinase exhibited specificity to aromatic and hydrophobic amino-acid residues, such as Phe, Leu, and Gly at the P1 position, splitting primarily the peptide bonds: Phe(1)-Val(2), Leu(15)-Tyr(16), and Gly(23)-Phe(24). The proteinase appeared to be sensitive to the specific synthetic inhibitors of the serine proteinases DFP (diisopropyl flourophosphate) and PMSF (phenyl-methylsulfonyl fluoride) as well as to some naturally occurring protein inhibitors of chymotrypsin. It is worth noting that the enzyme exhibited the highest sensitivity to inhibition by AMCI-1 (with an association constant of 3 x 10(10) M(-1)), an inhibitor of cathepsin G/chymotrypsin from the larval hemolymph of Apis mellifera, reinforcing the possibility of involvement of inhibitors from hemolymph in insect innate immunity. The substrate specificity and proteinase inhibitor effects indicate that the purified proteinase from the fermentation broth of Conidiobolus coronatus is a subtilisin-like serine proteinase.

  13. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties.

  14. Identification and characterisation of proteinase inhibitors and their genes from seeds of apple (Malus domestica).

    PubMed

    Ryan, Stuart N; McManus, Michael T; Laing, William A

    2003-07-01

    Trypsin and papain proteinase inhibitors have been identified and purified from aqueous extracts of apple seeds (Malus domestica). Superdex G75 gel filtration chromatography identified a higher molecular weight (HMW) papain inhibitory fraction (22-26 kDa) and a lower molecular weight papain and trypsin inhibitory fraction (6-12 kDa). The lower molecular weight fraction was separated into a trypsin inhibitor (designated Trp1) and early (designated Pap1) and late (designated Pap2) eluting papain inhibitors after anion exchange (Hitrap SP) chromatography. For Pap2, two inhibitory peaks (designated Pap2-1 and Pap2-2) were identified after further anion exchange (Resource S) chromatography. Each of these lower molecular weight inhibitors was purified by reverse phase HPLC to homogeneity as determined by SDS-PAGE and by mass spectrometry. The HMW papain inhibitory fraction was purified further by anion-exchange (Hitrap Q followed by Resource Q) column chromatography where a minor inhibitor (HMWPap1) and major inhibitor (HMWPap2) fraction were identified. The relative abundance in seeds of apple and the spectrum of proteinase inhibition has been determined for all of these inhibitors. Reverse-phase HPLC separated HMWPap2 into a minor (HMWPap2-1) and a major (HMWPap2-2) inhibitory fraction, and SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry confirmed that HMWPap2-2 was purified to homogeneity. Amino acid composition data were obtained from Trp1, Pap1, Pap2-2, and HMWPap2-2, and N-terminal sequence data from Trp1, Pap2-1, Pap2-2, and HMWPap2-2, with two of these sequences (Pap2-2 and HMWPap2-2) perfectly matching predicted protein sequences based on EST sequences from an apple database. The relationship of these inhibitors with those of other species is discussed.

  15. Wound-Inducible Proteinase Inhibitors in Pepper. Differential Regulation upon Wounding, Systemin, and Methyl Jasmonate1

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Daniel S.; Ryan, Clarence A.

    2001-01-01

    Seven small (approximately 6,000 D) wound-inducible proteinase inhibitor proteins were isolated from leaves of pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants that are members of the potato inhibitor II family. N-terminal sequences obtained indicated that the pepper leaf proteinase inhibitors (PLPIs) exhibit homology to two GenBank accessions that code for preproteins containing three isoinhibitors domains each that, when post-translationally processed, can account for the mixture of isoinhibitors that are reported herein from pepper leaves. A constitutive level of PLPI proteins was found in pepper leaves, and these levels increased up to 2.6-fold upon wounding of the lower leaves. Exposing intact plants to methyl jasmonate vapors induced the accumulation of PLPIs. Supplying excised young pepper plants with water through the cut stems induced PLPI proteins to levels higher than those found in intact plants, but with high variability. Supplying the excised plants with systemin did not result in an increase of PLPI levels that were statistically higher than levels found in excised plants. Gel-blot analyses of PLPI induction revealed the presence of two mRNA bands, having slightly different mobilities in agarose gels. Only the low Mr mRNA is present in untreated control plants, and it appears to be responsible for the constitutive levels of PLPI found in leaves. Both mRNA species are wound- and methyl jasmonate-inducible. Only the low- Mr species is weakly induced by systemin, indicating a differential expression of the two PLPI species. PMID:11351092

  16. Proteinases involved in the degradation of trypsin inhibitor in germinating mung beans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, K A; Tan-Wilson, A L

    1983-01-01

    The mung bean (Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczek) trypsin inhibitor (MBTI) is rapidly modified by limited proteolysis during the early stages of seedling growth. Using an electrophoretic assay that separates the unmodified inhibitor (MBTI-F) and the first two modified species (MBTI-E and -C), a pH optimum of approximately 4 was found for the modification reaction. The inhibitor modifying activity is initially low in ungerminated seeds, with the reaction F leads to E being the primary reaction catalyzed. Activity catalyzing the production of MBTI-C appears on the first day of germination. This activity (F leads to E leads to C) increases up to 6 days after inhibition, at which time the cotyledons begin to abscise. The activity converting MBTI-F and -E to MBTI-C was strongly inhibited by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (3.3 mM) but only weakly by iodoacetate (9 mM) and not at all by pepstatin A (9 microM), leupeptin (18 microM), or EDTA (5 mM). These results suggest the involvement of proteinases other than the major endopeptidase of the germinating seed, vicilin peptidohydrolase. This conclusion is further supported by gel filtration of the extracts of cotyledons on Sephacryl S-200. At least three proteinases are present in germinated cotyledons capable of modifying MBTI-F to MBTI-C and/or -E. All are distinguishable from vicilin peptidohydrolase on the basis of their molecular weight and inhibition by low molecular weight organic reagents.

  17. Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor from disk abalone (Haliotis discus discus): molecular characterization and transcriptional response upon immune stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wickramaarachchi, W D Niroshana; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Whang, Ilson; Wan, Qiang; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-01

    Proteinases and proteinase inhibitors are involved in several biological and physiological processes in all multicellular organisms. Proteinase inhibitors play a key role in regulating the activity of the respective proteinases. Among serine proteinase inhibitors, kazal-type proteinase inhibitors (KPIs) are widely found in mammals, avians, and a variety of invertebrates. In this study, we describe the identification of a kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor (Ab-KPI) from the disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus, which is presumably involved in innate immunity. The full-length cDNA of Ab-KPI includes 600 bp nucleotides with an open reading frame (ORF) encoding a polypeptide of 143 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence of Ab-KPI contains a putative 17-amino acid signal peptide and two tandem kazal domains with high similarity to other kazal-type SPIs. Each kazal domain consists of reactive site (P1) residue containing a leucine (L), and a threonine (T) located in the second amino acid position after the second conserved cysteine of each domain. Temporal expression of Ab-KPI was assessed by real time quantitative PCR in hemocytes and mantle tissue following bacterial and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) challenge, and tissue injury. At 6 h post-bacterial and -VHSV challenge, Ab-KPI expression in hemocytes was increased 14-fold and 4-fold, respectively, compared to control samples. The highest up-regulations upon tissue injury were shown at 9 h and 12 h in hemocytes and mantle, respectively. The transcriptional modulation of Ab-KPI following bacterial and viral challenges and tissue injury indicates that it might be involved in immune defense as well as wound healing process in abalone.

  18. Inhibitors of acrosin and granulocyte proteinases from human genital tract secretions.

    PubMed

    Schiessler, H; Arnhold, M; Ohlsson, K; Fritz, H

    1976-09-01

    Human seminal plasma contains two acid-stable proteinase inhibitors, HUSI-II (Mr approximately 6500) and HUSI-I, (Mr approximately 11 000) with different inhibition specificities. The inhibitory activity of HUSI-II is strongly limited to trypsin and acrosin; both enzyme-inhibitor complexes are very stable (e.g. bovine trypsin-HUSI-II complex: Ki = 1 x 10(-10)M; human acrosin-HUSI-II complex: Ki = 2.7 x 10(-10)M). The inhibitor from human seminal plasma HUSI-II may therefore be seen as the natural antagonist of the sperm protease acrosin. In addition to pancreatic trypsin and alpha-chymotrypsin, HUSI-I forms strong complexes with neutral proteases of the lysosome-like granules from human granulocytes, for example, the elastase (Ki = 2.5 x 10(-9)M) and cathepsin G, the chymotrypsin like protease (Ki = 7 x 10(-8)M).

  19. The reaction of serpins with proteinases involves important enthalpy changes.

    PubMed

    Boudier, C; Bieth, J G

    2001-08-21

    When active serpins are proteolytically inactivated in a substrate-like reaction, they undergo an important structural transition with a resultant increase in their conformational stability. We have used microcalorimetry to show that this conformational alteration is accompanied by an important enthalpy change. For instance, the cleavage of alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor by Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase, Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, or papain and that of antithrombin by leukocyte elastase are characterized by large enthalpy changes (DeltaH = -53 to -63 kcal mol(-1)). The former reaction also has a large and negative heat capacity (DeltaC(p)() = -566 cal K(-1) mol(-1)). In contrast, serpins release significantly less heat when they act as proteinase inhibitors. For example, the inhibition of pancreatic elastase, leukocyte elastase, and pancreatic chymotrypsin by alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor and that of pancreatic trypsin and coagulation factor Xa by antithrombin are accompanied by a DeltaH of -20 to -31 kcal mol(-1). We observe no heat release upon proteolytic cleavage of inactive serpins or following inhibition of serine proteinases by canonical inhibitors or upon acylation of chymotrypsin by N-trans-cinnamoylimidazole. We suggest that part of the large enthalpy change that occurs during the structural transition of serpins is used to stabilize the proteinase in its inactive state.

  20. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Dipak N.; Preeti; Chaudhry, Anshul; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Tomar, ­Shailly; Kumar, Pravindra

    2009-01-01

    A Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor has been purified from tamarind (Tamarindus indica) seeds. SDS–PAGE analysis of a purified sample showed a homogeneous band corresponding to a molecular weight of 21 kDa. The protein was identified as a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor based on N-terminal amino-acid sequence analysis. It was crystallized by the vapour-diffusion method using PEG 6000. The crystals belonged to the orthorhombic space group C2221, with unit-cell parameters a = 37.2, b = 77.1, c = 129.1 Å. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.7 Å. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of one proteinase inhibitor molecule in the asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of 44%. PMID:19574654

  1. Effects of proteinase inhibitors on fertilization in sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Dabrowski, Konrad; Glogowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2004-10-01

    A search for alternative sterilants in parasitic fish encouraged us to explore the usefulness of proteinase inhibitors for this purpose. Fertilization in sea lamprey species (Petromyzon marinus L.) was inhibited by chymotrypsin and trypsin inhibitors 4'-acetamidophenyl 4-guanidinobenzoate (AGB), chymostatin, tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), and N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) when these substances were added into a fertilization medium at the time of fertilization. Preincubation of eggs before fertilization with 100 microM TPCK, but not TLCK, resulted in inhibition of fertilization. Conversely, preincubation of spermatozoa with TLCK, but not TPCK, produced inhibition of fertilization. These data suggest the involvement of the chymotrypsin-like activity of eggs and trypsin-like activity of spermatozoa in fertilization. However, enzymes present in sperm suspensions were able to hydrolyze a chymotrypsin substrate N-glutaryl-L-phenylalanine-p-nitroanilide (GPNA) but not trypsin substrate N-alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA). The nature of this activity can be characterized as serine protease and our results indicate the involvement of serine proteinases in the fertilization of sea lamprey.

  2. Suppression of collagen-induced arthritis with a serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) derived from myxoma virus.

    PubMed

    Brahn, Ernest; Lee, Sarah; Lucas, Alexandra; McFadden, Grant; Macaulay, Colin

    2014-08-01

    Many viruses encode virulence factors to facilitate their own survival by modulating a host's inflammatory response. One of these factors, secreted from cells infected with myxoma virus, is the serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) Serp-1. Because Serp-1 had demonstrated anti-inflammatory properties in arterial injury models and viral infections, it was cloned and evaluated for therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Clinical severity was significantly lower in the Serp-1 protocols (p<0.0001) and blinded radiographs indicated that the Serp-1 group had significantly less erosions than the controls (p<0.01). Delayed-type hypersensitivity was lower in the Serp-1 group but antibody titers to type II collagen were not significantly altered. Recipients had minimal histopathologic synovial changes and did not develop neutralizing antibodies to Serp-1. These results indicate that Serp-1 impedes the pathogenesis of CIA and suggests that the therapeutic potential of serine proteinase inhibitors in inflammatory joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, should be investigated further.

  3. Bio-physical evaluation and in vivo delivery of plant proteinase inhibitor immobilized on silica nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Khandelwal, Neha; Doke, Dhananjay S; Khandare, Jayant J; Jawale, Priyanka V; Biradar, Ankush V; Giri, Ashok P

    2015-06-01

    Recombinant expression of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors (CanPI-13) and its application via synthetic carrier for the crop protection is the prime objective of our study. Herein, we explored proteinase inhibitor peptide immobilization on silica based nanospheres and rods followed by its pH mediated release in vitro and in vivo. Initial studies suggested silica nanospheres to be a suitable candidate for peptide immobilization. Furthermore, the interactions were characterized biophysically to ascertain their conformational stability and biological activity. Interestingly, bioactive peptide loading at acidic pH on nanospheres was found to be 62% and showed 56% of peptide release at pH 10, simulating gut milieu of the target pest Helicoverpa armigera. Additionally, in vivo study demonstrated significant reduction in insect body mass (158 mg) as compared to the control insects (265 mg) on 8th day after feeding with CanPI-13 based silica nanospheres. The study confirms that peptide immobilized silica nanosphere is capable of affecting overall growth and development of the feeding insects, which is known to hamper fecundity and fertility of the insects. Our study illustrates the utility and development of peptide-nanocarrier based platform in delivering diverse biologically active complexes specific to gut pH of H. armigera.

  4. Proteinase inhibitor II from potatoes: isolation and characterization of its protomer components.

    PubMed

    Bryant, J; Green, T R; Gurusaddaiah, T; Ryan, C A

    1976-08-10

    Proteinase inhibitor II, an inhibitor of chymotrypsin and trypsin, is a heat-stable protein with a dimeric molecular weight of 21 000 that is a component of Russet Burbank potato tubers. Four monomeric isoinhibitor species of molecular weight 10 500 comprise inhibitor II and were isolated by chromatography on phosphocellulose in 8 M urea. Upon removal of the urea, each monomeric species dimerized to yield homogeneous dimers. The three major protomer species, called B, C, and D, and their homogeneous dimers were further characterized. They have similar molecular weights and amino acid compositions, and each has an N-terminal alanine residue. Dimers of purified protomers B, C, and D exhibited full cross-reactivities with each other in immunological double-diffusion assays. Reconstituted dimers possess two binding sites for bovine alpha-chymotrypsin, indicating that each monomer possesses one binding site for this enzyme. Significant differences were noted among the reconstituted dimers in their isoelectric points, immunoelectrophoretic mobilities, ion-exchange properties, and their inhibitory reactivities against trypsin. The properties of the inhibitor II dimeric species are similar but not identical to inhibitors IIa and IIb reported from Japanese potatoes (variety "Danshaku-Imo"), indicating the existence of intervarietal, as well as intravarietal, differences among potato tuber inhibitor II isoinhibitors.

  5. Cloning eleven midgut trypsin cDNAs and evaluating the interaction of proteinase inhibitors with Cry1Ac against the tobacco budworm Heliothis virescens (F.) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Midgut trypsins are associated with Bt protoxin activation and toxin degradation. Proteinase inhibitors have potential insecticidal toxicity against a wide range of insect species. Proactive action to examine trypsin gene profiles and proteinase inhibitors for interaction with Bt toxin is necessary ...

  6. Design of dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 aspartic proteinase: A computer-based combinatorial approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caflisch, Amedeo; Schramm, Hans J.; Karplus, Martin

    2000-02-01

    Inhibition of dimerization to the active form of the HIV-1 aspartic proteinase (HIV-1 PR) may be a way to decrease the probability of escape mutations for this viral protein. The Multiple Copy Simultaneous Search (MCSS) methodology was used to generate functionality maps for the dimerization interface of HIV-1 PR. The positions of the MCSS minima of 19 organic fragments, once postprocessed to take into account solvation effects, are in good agreement with experimental data on peptides that bind to the interface. The MCSS minima combined with an approach for computational combinatorial ligand design yielded a set of modified HIV-1 PR C-terminal peptides that are similar to known nanomolar inhibitors of HIV-1 PR dimerization. A number of N-substituted 2,5-diketopiperazines are predicted to be potential dimerization inhibitors of HIV-1 PR.

  7. Protein digestion in cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) as a target for plant defence by endogenous proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pyati, Prashant; Bandani, Ali R; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2011-07-01

    Gut extracts from cereal aphids (Sitobion avenae) showed significant levels of proteolytic activity, which was inhibited by reagents specific for cysteine proteases and chymotrypsin-like proteases. Gut tissue contained cDNAs encoding cathepsin B-like cysteine proteinases, similar to those identified in the closely related pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum). Analysis of honeydew (liquid excreta) from cereal aphids fed on diet containing ovalbumin showed that digestion of ingested proteins occurred in vivo. Protein could partially substitute for free amino acids in diet, although it could not support complete development. Recombinant wheat proteinase inhibitors (PIs) fed in diet were antimetabolic to cereal aphids, even when normal levels of free amino acids were present. PIs inhibited proteolysis by aphid gut extracts in vitro, and digestion of protein fed to aphids in vivo. Wheat subtilisin/chymotrypsin inhibitor, which was found to inhibit serine and cysteine proteinases, was more effective in both inhibitory and antimetabolic activity than wheat cystatin, which inhibited cysteine proteases only. Digestion of ingested protein is unlikely to contribute significantly to nutritional requirements when aphids are feeding on phloem, and the antimetabolic activity of dietary proteinase inhibitors is suggested to result from effects on proteinases involved in degradation of endogenous proteins.

  8. Prevention of polymerization of M and Z alpha1-Antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) with trimethylamine N-oxide. Implications for the treatment of alpha1-at deficiency.

    PubMed

    Devlin, G L; Parfrey, H; Tew, D J; Lomas, D A; Bottomley, S P

    2001-06-01

    alpha1-Antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) is the most abundant circulating proteinase inhibitor. The Z variant results in profound plasma deficiency as the mutant polymerizes within hepatocytes. The retained polymers are associated with cirrhosis, and the lack of circulating protein predisposes to early onset emphysema. We have investigated the role of the naturally occurring solute trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) in modulating the polymerization of normal M and disease-associated Z alpha1-AT. TMAO stabilized both M and Z alpha1-AT in an active conformation against heat-induced polymerization. Spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that this was due to inhibition of the conversion of the native state to a polymerogenic intermediate. However, TMAO did not aid the refolding of denatured alpha1-AT to a native conformation; instead, it enhanced polymerization. These data show that TMAO can be used to control the conformational transitions of folded alpha1-AT but that it is ineffective in promoting folding of the polypeptide chain within the secretory pathway.

  9. Hepatocyte growth factor activator is a potential target proteinase for Kazal-type inhibitor in turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Słowińska, Mariola; Bukowska, Joanna; Hejmej, Anna; Bilińska, Barbara; Kozłowski, Krzysztof; Jankowski, Jan; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2015-08-01

    A peculiar characteristic of turkey seminal plasma is the increased activity of serine proteinases. It is of interest if the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor controls the activity of turkey seminal plasma proteinases. Pure preparations of the Kazal-type inhibitor and anti-Kazal-type inhibitor monospecific immunoglobulin Gs were used as ligands in affinity chromatography for proteinase isolation from turkey seminal plasma. Gene expression and the immunohistochemical detection of the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor in the reproductive tract of turkey toms are described. The hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA) was identified in the binding fraction in affinity chromatography. Hepatocyte growth factor activator activity was inhibited by the Kazal-type inhibitor in a dose-dependent manner. This protease was a primary physiological target for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. Numerous proteoforms of HGFA were present in turkey seminal plasma, and phosphorylation was the primary posttranslational modification of HGFA. In addition to HGFA, acrosin was a target proteinase for the single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor. In seminal plasma, acrosin was present only in complexes with the Kazal-type inhibitor and was not present as a free enzyme. The single-domain Kazal-type inhibitor was specific for the reproductive tract. The germ cell-specific expression of Kazal-type inhibitors in the testis indicated an important function in spermatogenesis; secretion by the epithelial cells of the epididymis and the ductus deferens indicated that the Kazal-type inhibitor was an important factor involved in the changes in sperm membranes during maturation and in the maintenance of the microenvironment in which sperm maturation occurred and sperm was stored. The role of HGFA in these processes remains to be established.

  10. Characterization of the pattern of alphas1- and beta-casein breakdown and release of a bioactive peptide by a cell envelope proteinase from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Elvira María; Mamone, Gianfranco; Picariello, Gianluca; Raya, Raúl R; Savoy, Graciela; Ferranti, Pasquale; Addeo, Francesco

    2008-06-01

    The cell envelope-associated proteinases (CEPs) of the lactobacilli have key roles in bacterial nutrition and contribute to the development of the organoleptic properties of fermented milk products as well, as they can release bioactive health-beneficial peptides from milk proteins. The influence of the peptide supply, carbohydrate source, and osmolites on the CEP activity of the cheese starter Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 was investigated. The CEP activity levels were controlled by the peptide content of the growth medium. The maximum activity was observed in a basal minimal defined medium, whereas in the presence of Casitone, Casamino Acids, or yeast extract, the synthesis of CEP was inhibited 99-, 70-, and 68-fold, respectively. The addition of specific di- or tripeptides containing branched-chain amino acids, such as leucylleucine, prolylleucine, leucylglycylglycine, or leucylproline, to the growth medium negatively affected CEP activity, whereas dipeptides without branched-chain amino acids had no effect on the enzyme's production. The carbon source and osmolites did not affect CEP activity. The CEP of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis CRL 581 exhibited a mixed-type CEP(I/III) variant caseinolytic specificity. Mass-spectrometric screening of the main peptide peaks isolated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography allowed the identification of 33 and 32 peptides in the alpha(s1)- and beta-casein hydrolysates, respectively. By characterizing the peptide sequence in these hydrolysates, a pattern of alpha(s1)- and beta-casein breakdown was defined and is reported herein, this being the first report for a CEP of L. delbrueckii subsp. lactis. In this pattern, a series of potentially bioactive peptides (antihypertensive and phosphopeptides) which are encrypted within the precursor protein could be visualized.

  11. Effects of pH on the association between the inhibitor cystatin and the proteinase chymopapain.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Espinosa, Francisco; Arroyo-Reyna, Alfonso; Garcia-Gutierrez, Ponciano; Serratos, Iris N; Zubillaga, Rafael A

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are involved in many aspects of physiological regulation. In humans, some cathepsins have shown another function in addition to their role as lysosomal proteases in intracellular protein degradation; they have been implicated in the pathogenesis of several heart and blood vessel diseases and in cancer development. In this work, we present a fluorometric and computational study of the binding of one representative plant cysteine proteinase, chymopapain, to one of the most studied inhibitors of these proteinases: chicken cystatin. The binding equilibrium constant, Kb, was determined in the pH range between 3.5 and 10.0, revealing a maximum in the affinity at pH 9.0. We constructed an atomic model for the chymopapain-cystatin dimer by docking the individual 3D protein structures; subsequently, the model was refined using a 100 ns NPT molecular dynamics simulation in explicit water. Upon scrutiny of this model, we identified 14 ionizing residues at the interface of the complex using a cutoff distance of 5.0 Å. Using the pKa values predicted with PROPKA and a modified proton-linkage model, we performed a regression analysis on our data to obtain the composite pKavalues for three isoacidic residues. We also calculated the electrostatic component of the binding energy (ΔGb,elec) at different pH values using an implicit solvent model and APBS software. The pH profile of this calculated energy compares well with the experimentally obtained binding energy, ΔGb. We propose that the residues that form an interchain ionic pair, Lys139A from chymopapain and Glu19B from cystatin, as well as Tyr61A and Tyr67A from chymopapain are the main residues responsible for the observed pH dependence in the chymopapain- cystatin affinity.

  12. Effect of vinyl sulfone inhibitors of cysteine proteinases on Tritrichomonas foetus infection.

    PubMed

    Cobo, Eduardo R; Reed, Sharon L; Corbeil, Lynette B

    2012-03-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a sexually transmitted protozoon that causes genital inflammation and adverse pregnancy outcomes in cattle. Cysteine proteinases (CPs) released by T. foetus degrade immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies, complement component 3 and matrix proteins as well as inducing apoptosis of bovine genital epithelial cells. In this study, the efficacies of the vinyl sulfone CP inhibitors K11777 and WRR-483 were tested against CPs of T. foetus. The activity of secreted T. foetus CPs in culture supernatants was decreased in the presence of vinyl sulfone inhibitors. Inhibitor K11777 reduced the in vitro cytopathogenic effects of T. foetus in bovine foetal trophoblast cells, which are relevant target cells since this pathogen interferes with pregnancy. Pre-treatment of T. foetus prior to intravaginal inoculation diminished genital infection in a murine model. Therefore, vinyl sulfone CP inhibitors reduce several effects of T. foetus-secreted CPs, including cytotoxicity on relevant target host cells and genital infection in a murine model. These inhibitors have potential as chemotherapeutic agents against bovine trichomoniasis. Generalisation to human trichomoniasis requires further study.

  13. Functional Characterization of Cucumis metuliferus Proteinase Inhibitor Gene (CmSPI) in Potyviruses Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Wei; Su, Mei-Hsiu; Lin, Yu-Tsung; Chung, Chien-Hung; Ku, Hsin-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are ubiquitous proteins that block the active center or interact allosterically with proteinases and are involved in plant physiological processes and defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. The CmSPI gene identified from Cucumis metuliferus encodes a serine type PI (8 kDa) that belongs to potato I type family. To evaluate the effect of silencing CmSPI gene on Papaya ringspot virus resistance, RNA interference (RNAi) with an inter-space hairpin RNA (ihpRNA) construct was introduced into a PRSV-resistant C. metuliferus line. CmSPI was down-regulated in CmSPI RNAi transgenic lines in which synchronously PRSV symptoms were evident at 21 day post inoculation. Alternatively, heterogeneous expression of CmSPI in Nicotiana benthamiana was also conducted and showed that CmSPI can provide resistance to Potato virus Y, another member of Potyvirus, in transgenic N. benthamiana lines. This study demonstrated that CmSPI plays an important role in resistant function against potyviruses in C. metuliferus and N. benthamiana. PMID:26184285

  14. Regulation of factor IXa in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. Role of the endothelium and the plasma proteinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, H.E.; Trapp, H.G.; Griffith, M.J.; Roberts, H.R.; Pizzo, S.V.

    1984-06-01

    The regulation of human Factor IXa was studied in vitro in human and mouse plasma and in vivo in the mouse. In human plasma, approximately 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to antithrombin III (ATIII) by 2 h, with no binding to alpha 2-macroglobulin or alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor, as assessed by gel electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose beads. In the presence of heparin, virtually 100% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII by 1 min. The distribution of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa in mouse plasma was similar. The clearance of /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was rapid (50% clearance in 2 min) and biphasic and was inhibited by large molar excesses of ATIII-thrombin and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor-trypsin, but not alpha 2-macro-globulin-trypsin; it was also inhibited by large molar excesses of diisopropylphosphoryl - (DIP-) Factor Xa, DIP-thrombin, and Factor IX, but not by prothrombin or Factor X. The clearance of Factor IX was also rapid (50% clearance in 2.5 min) and was inhibited by a large molar excess of Factor IX, but not by large molar excesses of Factor X, prothrombin, DIP-Factor Xa, or DIP-thrombin. Electrophoresis and IgG- antiproteinase inhibitor-Sepharose bead studies confirmed that by 2 min after injection into the murine circulation, 60% of the /sup 125/I-Factor IXa was bound to ATIII. Organ distribution studies with /sup 125/I-Factor IXa demonstrated that most of the radioactivity was in the liver. These studies suggest that Factor IXa binds to at least two classes of binding sites on endothelial cells. One site apparently recognizes both Factors IX and IXa, but not Factor X, Factor Xa, prothrombin, or thrombin. The other site recognizes thrombin, Factor Xa, and Factor IXa, but not the zymogen forms of these clotting factors. After this binding, Factor IXa is bound to ATIII and the complex is cleared from the circulation by hepatocytes.

  15. Effects of cysteine proteinase inhibitors scN and E-64 on southern corn rootworm larval development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The southern corn rootworm (SCRW) can be a serious pest of peanut pods. A laboratory bioassay was developed to test feeding cysteine proteinase inhibitors soyacystatin N (scN) and E-64 against southern corn rootworm reared on artificial diet to determine the effects on larvae development and mortal...

  16. Computational study of some benzamidine-based inhibitors of thrombin-like snake venom proteinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriques, Elsa S.; Nascimento, Marco A. C.; Ramos, Maria João

    Pit viper venoms contain a number of serine proteinases that, despite their observed coagulant thrombin-like action in vitro, exhibit a paradoxical benign defibrinogenating (anticoagulant) action in vivo, with clinical applications in preventing thrombi and improved blood circulation. Considering that several benzamidine-based inhibitors, some highly selective to thrombin, also inhibit the enzymatic activity of such venombins, the modeling of their enzyme-inhibitor interactions could provide valuable information on the topological factors that determine the divergences in activity. The first step, and the object of the present study, was to derive the necessary set of parameters, consistent with the CHARMM force field, and to perform molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on a few selected representatives of the inhibitors in question under physiological conditions. Bonding and van der Waals parameters were derived by analogy to similar ones in the existing force field. Net atomic charges were obtained with a restrained fitting to the molecular electrostatic potential generated at B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. The parameters were refined to reproduce the available experimental geometries and crystal data, and the MD simulations of the free inhibitors in aqueous solution at 298 K provided an insightful description of their available conformational space.

  17. Protein inhibitors of serine proteinases: role of backbone structure and dynamics in controlling the hydrolysis constant.

    PubMed

    Song, Jikui; Markley, John L

    2003-05-13

    Standard mechanism protein inhibitors of serine proteinases bind as substrates and are cleaved by cognate proteinases at their reactive sites. The hydrolysis constant for this cleavage reaction at the P(1)-P(1)' peptide bond (K(hyd)) is determined by the relative concentrations at equilibrium of the "intact" (uncleaved, I) and "modified" (reactive site cleaved, I*) forms of the inhibitor. The pH dependence of K(hyd) can be explained in terms of a pH-independent term, K(hyd) degrees, plus the proton dissociation constants of the newly formed amino and carboxylate groups at the cleavage site. Two protein inhibitors that differ from one another by a single residue substitution have been found to have K(hyd) degrees values that differ by a factor of 5 [Ardelt, W., and Laskowski, M., Jr. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 220, 1041-1052]: turkey ovomucoid third domain (OMTKY3) has K(hyd) degrees = 1.0, and Indian peafowl ovomucoid third domain (OMIPF3), which differs from OMTKY3 by the substitution P(2)'-Tyr(20)His, has K(hyd) degrees = 5.15. What mechanism is responsible for this small difference? Is it structural (enthalpic) or dynamic (entropic)? Does the mutation affect the free energy of the I state, the I* state, or both? We have addressed these questions through NMR investigations of the I and I forms of OMTKY3 and OMIPF3. Information about structure was derived from measurements of NMR chemical shift changes and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings; information about dynamics was obtained through measurements of (15)N relaxation rates and (1)H-(15)N heteronuclear NOEs with model-free analysis of the results. Although the I forms of each variant are more dynamic than the corresponding I forms, the study revealed no appreciable difference in the backbone dynamics of either intact inhibitor (OMIPF3 vs OMTKY3) or modified inhibitor (OMIPF3* vs OMTKY3*). Instead, changes in chemical shifts and trans-hydrogen-bond J-couplings suggested that the K(hyd) degrees difference arises from

  18. 13C- and 1H-NMR studies of oxyanion and tetrahedral intermediate stabilization by the serine proteinases: optimizing inhibitor warhead specificity and potency by studying the inhibition of the serine proteinases by peptide-derived chloromethane and glyoxal inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Malthouse, J P G

    2007-06-01

    Catalysis by the serine proteinases proceeds via a tetrahedral intermediate whose oxyanion is stabilized by hydrogen-bonding in the oxyanion hole. There have been extensive (13)C-NMR studies of oxyanion and tetrahedral intermediate stabilization in trypsin, subtilisin and chymotrypsin using substrate-derived chloromethane inhibitors. One of the limitations of these inhibitors is that they irreversibly alkylate the active-site histidine residue which results in the oxyanion not being in the optimal position in the oxyanion hole. Substrate-derived glyoxal inhibitors are reversible inhibitors which, if they form tetrahedral adducts in the same way as substrates form tetrahedral intermediates, will overcome this limitation. Therefore we have synthesized (13)C-enriched substrate-derived glyoxal inhibitors which have allowed us to use (13)C-NMR and (1)H-NMR to determine how they interact with proteinases. It is hoped that these studies will help in the design of specific and highly potent warheads for serine proteinase inhibitors.

  19. [Effect of proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors from potato tubers on the growth and development of phytopathogenic microorganisms].

    PubMed

    Revina, T A; Gerasimova, N G; Kladnitskaia, G V; Chalenko, G I; Valueva, T A

    2008-01-01

    We studied the effect of two proteins, PSPI-21 and PKSI, on the growth and development of phytopathogenic microorganisms (Phytophthora infestans oomycete and Fusarium culmorum fungus). Both proteins were isolated from potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Istrinskii) and served as inhibitors of serine proteinases. These proteins differed in the ability to inhibit growth of Phytophthora infestans oomycete and Fusarium culmorum fungus. PSPI-21 was the most potent in modulating the growth of oomycete mycelium. PKSI primarily affected the growth of the fungal mycelium. The proteins under study induced complete destruction of oomycete zoospores and partial destruction of fungal macroconidia. Our results suggest that these proteins are involved in the protection of potato plants from phytopathogenic microorganisms.

  20. Cystein proteinase inhibitor stefin A as an indicator of efficiency of tumor treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Korolenko, T A; Poteryaeva, O N; Falameeva, O V; Levina, O A

    2003-07-01

    The concentration of stefin A (cystatin A in mice) was measured in animals with experimental tumors (LS lymphosarcoma, HA-1-hepatoma, and Lewis lung carcinoma) during effective antitumor therapy. In mice with these tumors serum concentrations of stefin A increased, while the concentration of cystatin C (extracellular cystein proteinase inhibitor) decreased. The concentration of stefin A in tumor tissue in Lewis lung carcinoma was higher than in LS lymphosarcoma and HA-1-hepatoma ascitic cells, which can be explained by the degree of their malignancy. The content of stefin A in tumor tissue was similar to that in the liver and spleen of tumor-bearing animals, while its concentration in the liver and spleen of tumor-bearing animals was lower than in intact mice. The level of stefin A is an important marker of malignancy and an indicator of the efficiency of antitumor therapy.

  1. Detection of alpha 2-macroglobulin, alpha 1-protease inhibitor, and neutral protease-antiprotease complexes within liver granulomas of Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice.

    PubMed

    Truden, J L; Boros, D L

    1988-02-01

    In schistosomiasis mansoni the parasite egg-induced granulomatous tissue inflammations resolve by fibrosis. Intralesional collagen synthesis and deposition are influenced by collagenase, elastase activity that is diminished at the chronic stage of the disease. To determine the cause of diminished neutral protease activity, the authors determined levels of the antiprotease/alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) and alpha 1-protease inhibitor (alpha 1Pi) in extracts or secretions of liver granulomas of infected mice. By ELISA, both antiproteases were detected in granuloma-derived substances, as well as supernatants of cultured, adherent granuloma macrophages. In all samples, alpha 2M was the predominant inhibitor. Antiprotease levels were similar in granuloma-derived samples obtained from acutely and chronically infected mice. However, supernatants of cultured adherent macrophages isolated from granulomas of mice with acute infection contained levels of protease inhibitors several times higher than those of similar preparations obtained from chronically infected animals. Gel filtration of samples on Sephacryl S-200 columns did not separate collagenase and elastase from protease inhibitors. By chromatofocusing, a few inhibitor-free collagenase as well as enzyme-free alpha 2M and alpha 1Pi-active peaks were eluted. The bulk of the material that eluted at the acidic region contained protease-antiprotease activity indicating the presence of enzyme-inhibitor complexes. The intragranulomatous presence of antiproteases complexed with protease enzymes emphasizes their importance in the possible enhancement of fibrosis.

  2. Detection of alpha 2-macroglobulin, alpha 1-protease inhibitor, and neutral protease-antiprotease complexes within liver granulomas of Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Truden, J. L.; Boros, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    In schistosomiasis mansoni the parasite egg-induced granulomatous tissue inflammations resolve by fibrosis. Intralesional collagen synthesis and deposition are influenced by collagenase, elastase activity that is diminished at the chronic stage of the disease. To determine the cause of diminished neutral protease activity, the authors determined levels of the antiprotease/alpha 2-macroglobulin (alpha 2M) and alpha 1-protease inhibitor (alpha 1Pi) in extracts or secretions of liver granulomas of infected mice. By ELISA, both antiproteases were detected in granuloma-derived substances, as well as supernatants of cultured, adherent granuloma macrophages. In all samples, alpha 2M was the predominant inhibitor. Antiprotease levels were similar in granuloma-derived samples obtained from acutely and chronically infected mice. However, supernatants of cultured adherent macrophages isolated from granulomas of mice with acute infection contained levels of protease inhibitors several times higher than those of similar preparations obtained from chronically infected animals. Gel filtration of samples on Sephacryl S-200 columns did not separate collagenase and elastase from protease inhibitors. By chromatofocusing, a few inhibitor-free collagenase as well as enzyme-free alpha 2M and alpha 1Pi-active peaks were eluted. The bulk of the material that eluted at the acidic region contained protease-antiprotease activity indicating the presence of enzyme-inhibitor complexes. The intragranulomatous presence of antiproteases complexed with protease enzymes emphasizes their importance in the possible enhancement of fibrosis. PMID:2449083

  3. Differential Expression of Kunitz and Bowman-Birk Soybean Proteinase Inhibitors in Plant and Callus Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Tan-Wilson, Anna L.; Hartl, Philippe M.; Delfel, Norman E.; Wilson, Karl A.

    1985-01-01

    Bowman-Birk soybean trypsin inhibitor (BBSTI) but not Kunitz soybean trypsin inhibitor (KSTI) was found in samples of undifferentiated and partially differentiated Amsoy 71 tissue culture callus. This suggests the differential metabolism of these two classes of proteinase inhibitors, whether the difference be in synthesis, in rates of degradation, or both. The differential metabolism of the proteinase inhibitors is also seen in the plant. Both BBSTI and KSTI were found in the hypocotyl, root, and epicotyl of the Amsoy 71 soybean seedling in addition to their expected presence in the cotyledons. Whereas the ratio of KSTI to BBSTI in the cotyledon was higher, the ratio of BBSTI to KSTI was higher in the extracotyledonary tissues of the seedling. The levels of both classes of proteinase inhibitors declined during seedling growth, except in the epicotyl and the proximal root. In both of these tissues, an increase in BBSTI, but not in KSTI content, expressed as milligrams inhibitor per plant part, occurred. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:16664236

  4. Embryonic Dorsal-Ventral Signaling: Secreted Frizzled-Related Proteins as Inhibitors of Tolloid Proteinases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hojoon X.; Ambrosio, Andrea L.; Reversade, Bruno; De Robertis, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Here we report an unexpected role for the secreted Frizzled-related protein (sFRP) Sizzled/Ogon as an inhibitor of the extracellular proteolytic reaction that controls BMP signaling during Xenopus gastrulation. Microinjection experiments suggest that the Frizzled domain of Sizzled regulates the activity of Xolloid-related (Xlr), a metalloproteinase that degrades Chordin, through the following molecular pathway: Szl ┤ Xlr ┤ Chd ┤ BMP → P-Smad1 → Szl. In biochemical assays, the Xlr proteinase has similar affinities for its endogenous substrate Chordin and for its competitive inhibitor Sizzled, which is resistant to enzyme digestion. Extracellular levels of Sizzled and Chordin in the gastrula embryo and enzyme reaction constants were all in the 10−8 M range, consistent with a physiological role in the regulation of dorsal-ventral patterning. Sizzled is also a natural inhibitor of BMP1, a Tolloid metalloproteinase of medical interest. Furthermore, mouse sFRP2 inhibited Xlr, suggesting a wider role for this molecular mechanism. PMID:16413488

  5. Synthesis of the proteinase inhibitor LEKTI domain 6 by the fragment condensation method and regioselective disulfide bond formation.

    PubMed

    Vasileiou, Zoe; Barlos, Kostas K; Gatos, Dimitrios; Adermann, Knut; Deraison, Celine; Barlos, Kleomenis

    2010-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors are of high pharmaceutical interest and are drug candidates for a variety of indications. Specific kallikrein inhibitors are important for their antitumor activity and their potential application to the treatment of skin diseases. In this study we describe the synthesis of domain 6 of the kallikrein inhibitor Lympho-Epithilial Kazal-Type Inhibitor (LEKTI) by the fragment condensation method and site-directed cystine bridge formation. To obtain the linear LEKTI precursor, the condensation was best performed in solution, coupling the protected fragment 1-22 to 23-68. This method yielded LEKTI domain 6 of high purity and equipotent to the recombinantly produced peptide.

  6. Free-energy analysis of enzyme-inhibitor binding: aspartic proteinase-pepstatin complexes.

    PubMed

    Kalra, P; Das, A; Jayaram, B

    2001-01-01

    Expeditious in silico determinations of the free energies of binding of a series of inhibitors to an enzyme are of immense practical value in structure-based drug design efforts. Some recent advances in the field of computational chemistry have rendered a rigorous thermodynamic treatment of biologic molecules feasible, starting from a molecular description of the biomolecule, solvent, and salt. Pursuing the goal of developing and making available a software for assessing binding affinities, we present here a computationally rapid, albeit elaborate, methodology to estimate and analyze the molecular thermodynamics of enzyme-inhibitor binding with crystal structures as the point of departure. The complexes of aspartic proteinases with seven inhibitors have been adopted for this study. The standard free energy of complexation is considered in terms of a thermodynamic cycle of six distinct steps decomposed into a total of 18 well-defined components. The model we employed involves explicit all-atom accounts of the energetics of electrostatic interactions, solvent screening effects, van der Waals components, and cavitation effects of solvation combined with a Debye-Huckel treatment of salt effects. The magnitudes and signs of the various components are estimated using the AMBER parm94 force field, generalized Born theory, and solvent accessibility measures. Estimates of translational and rotational entropy losses on complexation as well as corresponding changes in the vibrational and configurational entropy are also included. The calculated standard free energies of binding at this stage are within an order of magnitude of the observed inhibition constants and necessitate further improvements in the computational protocols to enable quantitative predictions. Some areas such as inclusion of structural adaptation effects, incorporation of site-dependent amino acid pKa shifts, consideration of the dynamics of the active site for fine-tuning the methodology are easily

  7. Inhibition of antigen- and lectin-induced proliferation of rat spleen cells by a Taenia taeniaeformis proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Leid, R W; Suquet, C M; Perryman, L E

    1984-01-01

    Rat splenic lymphocytes, cultured in vitro for 3 days in the presence of a larval cestode proteinase inhibitor, exhibited a marked suppression of proliferation when stimulated with Con A, PHA, PWM and ovalbumin. Reduced responsiveness was observed over a full range of concentrations of Con A (16-fold), PHA (50-fold), PWM (four-fold) and ovalbumin (16-fold). These results indicated that the inhibitory action could not be overcome by increasing the mitogen or antigen doses beyond optimal levels. This suppressive effect disappeared when the Taenia taeniaeformis proteinase inhibitor was added 20 h after the initiation of culture, suggesting that the inhibitor affects lymphocyte blastogenesis during the early stages of lymphocyte activation. PMID:6744668

  8. In vitro synthesis of pre-proteins of vacuolar compartmented proteinase inhibitors that accumulate in leaves of wounded tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, C E; Ryan, C A

    1980-04-01

    Two proteinase inhibitor proteins that are compartmented in leaf vacuoles (lysosomes) were synthesized in vitro. mRNA was isolated from 17-day-old expanding tomato leaves by extraction with chaotropic buffers followed by chromatography on oligo(dT)-cellulose and was translated with a rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. Preparations of mRNA from leaves of both wounded plants and unwounded plants directed the incorporation of equivalent amounts of label into trichloroacetic acid-precipitable proteins. Only mRNA from leaves of wounded plants directed label into proteins that could be immunoprecipitated with rabbit IgG specific for either inhibitor I or inhibitor II. These results indicate that the wound-induced accumulation of proteinase inhibitors I and II in leaf vacuoles is a result of the presence of translatable mRNA species not present in leaves of unwounded plants. Gel electrophoresis of the immunoprecipitates in NaDodSO(4)/urea/polyacrylamide gels revealed that inhibitors I and II were translated in vitro as precursors about 2000 daltons larger than the inhibitors found in leaves. The presence of the additional polypeptide sequences in the newly synthesized inhibitors indicates that the inhibitors are processed either during or after synthesis, and the presequences may be signal peptides that are part of the process of inhibitor transport into the vacuolar compartments of tomato leaf cells.

  9. The effects of a plant proteinase inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum on human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Mayer, Barbara; Ries, Christian; de Paula, Cláudia Alessandra Andrade; Karow, Marisa; Neth, Peter; Sampaio, Misako U; Jochum, Marianne; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2011-04-01

    Supplementary to the efficient inhibition of trypsin, chymotrypsin, plasma kallikrein, and plasmin already described by the EcTI inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum, it also blocks human neutrophil elastase (K(iapp)=4.3 nM) and prevents phorbol ester (PMA)-stimulated activation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 probably via interference with membrane-type 1 (MT1)-MMP. Moreover, plasminogen-induced activation of proMMP-9 and processing of active MMP-2 was also inhibited. Furthermore, the effect of EcTI on the human cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 (colorectal), SkBr-3 and MCF-7 (breast), K562 and THP-1 (leukemia), as well as on human primary fibroblasts and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) was studied. EcTI inhibited in a concentration range of 1.0-2.5 μM rather specifically tumor cell viability without targeting primary fibroblasts and hMSCs. Taken together, our data indicate that the polyspecific proteinase inhibitor EcTI prevents proMMP activation and is cytotoxic against tumor cells without affecting normal tissue remodeling fibroblasts or regenerative hMSCs being an important tool in the studies of tumor cell development and dissemination.

  10. Potato type I and II proteinase inhibitors: modulating plant physiology and host resistance.

    PubMed

    Turra, David; Lorito, Matteo

    2011-08-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (PIs) are a large and complex group of plant proteins. Members of the potato type I (Pin1) and II (Pin2) proteinase inhibitor families are among the first and most extensively characterized plant PIs. Many insects and phytopathogenic microorganisms use intracellular and extracellular serine proteases playing important roles in pathogenesis. Plants, however, are able to fight these pathogens through the activation of an intricate defence system that leads to the accumulation of various PIs, including Pin1 and Pin2. Several transgenic plants over-expressing members of the Pin1 and Pin2 families have been obtained in the last twenty years and their enhanced defensive capabilities demonstrated against insects, fungi and bacteria. Furthermore, Pin1 and Pin2 genetically engineered plants showed altered regulation of different plant physiological processes (e.g., dehydratation response, programmed cell death, plant growth, trichome density and branching), supporting an endogenous role in various plant species in addition to the well established defensive one. This review summarizes the current knowledge about Pin1 and Pin2 structure, the role of these proteins in plant defence and physiology, and their potential exploitation in biotechnology.

  11. Single-Step Purification and Characterization of A Recombinant Serine Proteinase Inhibitor from Transgenic Plants.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shweta; Agarwal, Saurabh; Sanyal, Indraneel; Amla, D V

    2016-05-01

    Expression of recombinant therapeutic proteins in transgenic plants has a tremendous impact on safe and economical production of biomolecules for biopharmaceutical industry. The major limitation in their production is downstream processing of recombinant protein to obtain higher yield and purity of the final product. In this study, a simple and rapid process has been developed for purification of therapeutic recombinant α1-proteinase inhibitor (rα1-PI) from transgenic tomato plants, which is an abundant serine protease inhibitor in human serum and chiefly inhibits the activity of neutrophil elastase in lungs. We have expressed rα1-PI with modified synthetic gene in transgenic tomato plants at a very high level (≃3.2 % of total soluble protein). The heterologous protein was extracted with (NH4)2SO4 precipitation, followed by chromatographic separation on different matrices. However, only immunoaffinity chromatography resulted into homogenous preparation of rα1-PI with 54 % recovery. The plant-purified rα1-PI showed molecular mass and structural conformation comparable to native serum α1-PI, as shown by mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy. The results of elastase inhibition assay revealed biological activity of the purified rα1-PI protein. This work demonstrates a simple and efficient one-step purification of rα1-PI from transgenic plants, which is an essential prerequisite for further therapeutic development.

  12. Inhibition of lipopolysaccharide-induced osteoclast formation and bone resorption in vitro and in vivo by cysteine proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Strålberg, Fredrik; Kassem, Ali; Kasprzykowski, Franciszek; Abrahamson, Magnus; Grubb, Anders; Lindholm, Catharina; Lerner, Ulf H

    2017-05-01

    Inflammation-induced bone destruction is a major treatment target in many inflammatory skeletal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate if the cysteine proteinase inhibitors cystatin C, fungal cysteine proteinase inhibitor (E-64), and N-benzyloxycarbonyl-arginyl-leucyl-valyl-glycyl-diazomethane acetate (Z-RLVG-CHN2) can inhibit LPS-induced osteoclast formation. Mouse bone marrow macrophages (BMMs) were isolated and primed with receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL) for 24 h, followed by stimulation with LPS, with and without inhibitors. Adult mice were injected locally with LPS and then treated with E-64 and osteoclast formation assessed by the number of cathepsin K(+) multinucleated cells. Cystatin C inhibited LPS-induced osteoclast formation time and concentration dependently (IC50 = 0.3 μM). The effect was associated with decreased mRNA and protein expression of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K and of the osteoclastogenic transcription factors c-Fos and NFATc1. LPS-induced osteoclast formation on bone slices was also inhibited by cystatin C, resulting in decreased pit formation and release of bone matrix proteins. Similar data were obtained with E-64 and Z-RLVG-CHN2 Cystatin C was internalized in BMMs stimulated by LPS but not in unstimulated BMMs. Osteoclast formation induced by LPS was dependent on TNF-α, and the 3 inhibitors abolished LPS-induced TNF superfamily 2 (gene encoding TNF-α; Tnfsf2) mRNA expression without affecting Il1b, Il6, or oncostatin M (Osm) expression. Formation of osteoclasts in the skull bones after local LPS stimulation was inhibited by E-64. It is concluded that cysteine proteinase inhibitors effectively inhibit LPS-induced osteoclast formation in vivo and in vitro by inhibition of TNF-α expression. The targeting of cysteine proteinases might represent a novel treatment modality for prevention of inflammatory bone loss. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  13. An in-built proteinase inhibitor system for the protection of recombinant proteins recovered from transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Rivard, Daniel; Anguenot, Raphaël; Brunelle, France; Le, Van Quy; Vézina, Louis-Philippe; Trépanier, Sonia; Michaud, Dominique

    2006-05-01

    Proteolytic degradation represents a significant barrier to the efficient production of several recombinant proteins in plants, both in vivo during their expression and in vitro during their recovery from source tissues. Here, we describe a strategy to protect recombinant proteins during the recovery process, based on the coexpression of a heterologous proteinase inhibitor acting as a 'mouse trap' against the host proteases during extraction. After confirming the importance of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like activities in crude protein extracts of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) leaves, transgenic lines of potato expressing either tomato cathepsin D inhibitor (CDI) or bovine aprotinin, both active against trypsin and chymotrypsin, were generated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated genetic transformation. Leaf crude protein extracts from CDI-expressing lines, showing decreased levels of cathepsin D-like and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase hydrolysing activities in vitro, conducted decreased turnover rates of the selection marker protein neomycin phosphotransferase II (NPTII) relative to the turnover rates measured for transgenic lines expressing only the marker protein. A similar stabilizing effect on NPTII was observed in leaf protein extracts from plant lines coexpressing bovine aprotinin, confirming the ability of ectopically expressed broad-spectrum serine proteinase inhibitors to reproduce the protein-stabilizing effect of low-molecular-weight proteinase inhibitors generally added to protein extraction media.

  14. The crystal structure of a major secreted aspartic proteinase from Candida albicans in complexes with two inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, S M; Dodson, E J; Anderson, B F; Moody, P C; Marshall, C J; Sullivan, P A; Cutfield, J F

    1995-11-15

    Infections caused by Candida albicans, a common fungal pathogen of humans, are increasing in incidence, necessitating development of new therapeutic drugs. Secreted aspartic proteinase (SAP) activity is considered an important virulence factor in these infections and might offer a suitable target for drug design. Amongst the various SAP isozymes, the SAP2 gene product is the major form expressed in a number of C. albicans strains. The three-dimensional structures of SAP2 complexed with the tight-binding inhibitor A70450 (a synthetic hexapeptide analogue) and with the general aspartic proteinase inhibitor pepstatin A (a microbial natural product) have been determined to 2.1 A and 3.0 A resolution, respectively. Although the protein structure retains the main features of a typical aspartic proteinase, it also shows some significant differences, due mainly to several sequence insertions and deletions (as revealed by homology modelling), that alter the shape of the binding cleft. There is also considerable variation in the C-terminal structural domain. The differences in side chains, and in the conformations adopted by the two inhibitors, particularly at their P4, P3 and P'2 positions (using standard notation for protease-inhibitor residues), allows the A70450 structure to complement, more accurately, that of the substrate-binding site of SAP2. Some differences in the binding clefts of other SAP isoenzymes may be deduced from the SAP2 structure.

  15. The N-terminal octapeptide acts as a dimerization inhibitor of SARS coronavirus 3C-like proteinase.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ping; Fan, Keqiang; Chen, Hao; Ma, Liang; Huang, Changkang; Tan, Lei; Xi, Dong; Li, Chunmei; Liu, Ying; Cao, Aoneng; Lai, Luhua

    2006-01-20

    The 3C-like proteinase of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus has been proposed to be a key target for structural-based drug design against SARS. Accurate determination of the dimer dissociation constant and the role of the N-finger (residues 1-7) will provide more insights into the enzyme catalytic mechanism of SARS 3CL proteinase. The dimer dissociation constant of the wild-type protein was determined to be 14.0microM by analytical ultracentrifugation method. The N-finger fragment of the enzyme plays an important role in enzyme dimerization as shown in the crystal structure. Key residues in the N-finger have been studied by site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme assay, and analytical ultracentrifugation. A single mutation of M6A was found to be critical to maintain the dimer structure of the enzyme. The N-terminal octapeptide N8 and its mutants were also synthesized and tested for their potency as dimerization inhibitors. Peptide cleavage assay confirms that peptide N8 is a dimerization inhibitor with a K(i) of 2.20mM. The comparison of the inhibitory activities of N8 and its mutants indicates that the hydrophobic interaction of Met-6 and the electrostatic interaction of Arg-4 contribute most for inhibitor binding. This study describes the first example of inhibitors targeting the dimeric interface of SARS 3CL proteinase, providing a novel strategy for drug design against SARS and other coronaviruses.

  16. Functional characterization of single-domain cystatin-like cysteine proteinase inhibitors expressed by the trematode Fasciola hepatica.

    PubMed

    Cancela, Martín; Corvo, Ileana; DA Silva, Edileuza; Teichmann, Aline; Roche, Leda; Díaz, Alvaro; Tort, José Fransisco; Ferreira, Henrique B; Zaha, Arnaldo

    2017-11-01

    Cystatins are small, phylogenetically conserved proteins that are tight-binding inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. The liver fluke Fasciola hepatica uses a diverse set of cysteine proteinases of the papain superfamily for host invasion, immune evasion and nutrition, but little is known about the regulation of these enzymes. The aim of this work is to characterize the cystatin repertoire of F. hepatica. For this purpose, we first surveyed the available sequence databases, identifying three different F. hepatica single-domain cystatins. In agreement with the in silico predictions, at least three small proteins with cysteine proteinase binding activity were identified. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the three cystatins (named FhStf-1, -2 and -3) are members of the I25A subfamily (stefins). Whereas FhStf-1 grouped with classical stefins, FhStf-2 and 3 fell in a divergent stefin subgroup unusually featuring signal peptides. Recombinant rFhStf-1, -2 and -3 had potent inhibitory activity against F. hepatica cathepsin L cysteine proteinases but differed in their capacity to inhibit mammalian cathepsin B, L and C. FhStf-1 was localized in the F. hepatica reproductive organs (testes and ovary), and at the surface lamella of the adult gut, where it may regulate cysteine proteinases related with reproduction and digestion, respectively. FhStf-1 was also detected among F. hepatica excretion-secretion (E/S) products of adult flukes. This suggests that it is secreted by non-classical secretory pathway and that it may interact with host lysosomal cysteine proteinases.

  17. [Molecular cloning and analysis of cDNA sequences encoding serine proteinase and Kunitz type inhibitor in venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper].

    PubMed

    Ramazanova, A S; Fil'kin, S Iu; Starkov, V G; Utkin, Iu N

    2011-01-01

    Serine proteinases and Kunitz type inhibitors are widely represented in venoms of snakes from different genera. During the study of the venoms from snakes inhabiting Russia we have cloned cDNAs encoding new proteins belonging to these protein families. Thus, a new serine proteinase called nikobin was identified in the venom gland of Vipera nikolskii viper. By amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA sequence, nikobin differs from serine proteinases identified in other snake species. Nikobin amino acid sequence contains 15 unique substitutions. This is the first serine proteinase of viper from Vipera genus for which a complete amino acid sequence established. The cDNA encoding Kunitz type inhibitor was also cloned. The deduced amino acid sequence of inhibitor is homologous to those of other proteins from that snakes of Vipera genus. However there are several unusual amino acid substitutions that might result in the change of biological activity of inhibitor.

  18. Juvenile and adult metachromatic leukodystrophy: partial restoration of arylsulfatase A (cerebroside sulfatase) activity by inhibitors of thiol proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    von Figura, K; Steckel, F; Hasilik, A

    1983-01-01

    Arylsulfatase A polypeptides were examined in cultured fibroblasts from a patient with juvenile metachromatic leukodystrophy and three patients with the adult form of the disease, with the aid of metabolic labeling and immunoprecipitation. The mutant cells were severely deficient in the arylsulfatase polypeptides. The apparent rate of synthesis, however, as estimated from the secretion of polypeptides or activity by cells incubated in the presence of 10 mM NH4Cl was 20-50% of control. In the absence of NH4Cl, the mutant enzyme was rapidly degraded upon transport into lysosomes. In the presence of inhibitors of thiol proteinases arylsulfatase A polypeptides were partially protected from degradation, and the catalytic activity of arylsulfatase A was increased. In addition, the treatment partially corrected the capacity of the cells to degrade cerebroside sulfates. Inhibitors of thiol proteinases may be of therapeutic value in variants of metachromatic leukodystrophy, in which an unstable arylsulfatase A is synthesized. Images PMID:6136972

  19. Conformational changes of ovine α-1-proteinase inhibitor: The influence of heparin binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vivek Kumar; Gowda, Lalitha R.

    2008-11-01

    α-1-Proteinase inhibitor (α-1-PI), the archetypal serpin causes rapid, irreversible stoichiometric inhibition of redundant circulating serine proteases and is associated with emphysema, inflammatory response and maintenance of protease-inhibitor equilibrium in vascular and peri-vascular spaces. A homogenous preparation of heparin octasaccharide binds to ovine and human α-1-PI and enhances their protease inhibitory activity phenomenally. Size-exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering experiments reveal that ovine α-1-PI undergoes a decrease in the Stokes' radius upon heparin binding. A strong binding; characterizes this α-1-PI-heparin interaction as revealed by the binding constant ( Kα) 1.98 ± 0.2 × 10 -6 M and 2.1 ± 0.2 × 10 -6 M determined by fluorescence spectroscopy and equilibrium dialysis, respectively. The stoichiometry of heparin binding to ovine α-1-PI was 1.1 ± 0.2:1. The Stern-Volmer constants ( Ksv) for heparin activated ovine and human α-1-PI were found to be 5.13 × 10 -6 M and 5.67 × 10 -6 M, respectively, significantly higher than the native inhibitors. FTIR and CD spectroscopy project the systematic structural reorientations that α-1-PI undergoes upon heparin binding characterized by a decrease in α-helical content and a concomitant increase in β-turn and random coil elements. It is likely that these conformational changes result in the movement of the α-1-PI reactive site loop into an extended structure that is better poised to combat the cognate protease and accelerate the inhibition.

  20. Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor from Clitoria fairchildiana seeds: Isolation, biochemical properties and insecticidal potential.

    PubMed

    Dantzger, Miriam; Vasconcelos, Ilka Maria; Scorsato, Valéria; Aparicio, Ricardo; Marangoni, Sergio; Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues

    2015-10-01

    Herein described is the biochemical characterisation, including in vitro and in vivo assays, for a proteinase inhibitor purified from Clitoria fairchildiana seeds (CFPI). Purification was performed by hydrophobic interaction and gel filtration chromatography. Kinetic studies of the purified inhibitor showed a competitive-type inhibitory activity against bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin, with an inhibition stoichiometry of 1:1 for both enzymes. The inhibition constants against trypsin and chymotrypsin were 3.3 × 10(-10) and 1.5 × 10(-10)M, respectively, displaying a tight binding property. SDS-PAGE showed that CFPI has a single polypeptide chain with an apparent molecular mass of 15 kDa under non-reducing conditions. However, MALDI-TOF analysis demonstrated a molecular mass of 7.973 kDa, suggesting that CFPI is dimeric in solution. The N-terminal sequence of CFPI showed homology with members of the Bowman-Birk inhibitor family. CFPI remained stable to progressive heating for 30 min to each temperature range of 37 up to 100 °C and CD analysis exhibited no changes in spectra at 207 nm after heating at 90 °C and subsequent cooling. Moreover, CFPI was active over a wide pH range (2-10). In contrast, reduction with DTT resulted in a loss of inhibitory activity against trypsin and chymotrypsin. CFPI also exhibited significant inhibitory activity against larval midgut trypsin enzymes from Anagasta kuehniella (76%), Diatraea saccharalis (59%) and Heliothis virescens (49%). Its insecticidal properties were further analysed by bioassays and confirmed by negative impact on A. kuehniella development.

  1. Identification and activity of a lower eukaryotic serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) from Cyanea capillata: analysis of a jellyfish serpin, jellypin.

    PubMed

    Cole, Elisabeth B; Miller, David; Rometo, David; Greenberg, Robert M; Brömme, Dieter; Cataltepe, Sule; Pak, Stephen C; Mills, David R; Silverman, Gary A; Luke, Cliff J

    2004-09-21

    Delineating the phylogenetic relationships among members of a protein family can provide a high degree of insight into the evolution of domain structure and function relationships. To identify an early metazoan member of the high molecular weight serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) superfamily, we initiated a cDNA library screen of the cnidarian, Cyanea capillata. We identified one serpin cDNA encoding for a full-length serpin, jellypin. Phylogenetic analysis using the deduced amino acid sequence showed that jellypin was most similar to the platyhelminthe Echinococcus multiocularis serpin and the clade P serpins, suggesting that this serpin evolved approximately 1000 million years ago (MYA). Modeling of jellypin showed that it contained all the functional elements of an inhibitory serpin. In vitro biochemical analysis confirmed that jellypin was an inhibitor of the S1 clan SA family of serine proteinases. Analysis of the interactions between the human serine proteinases, chymotrypsin, cathepsin G, and elastase, showed that jellypin inhibited these enzymes in the classical serpin manner, forming a SDS stable enzyme/inhibitor complex. These data suggest that the coevolution of serpin structure and inhibitory function date back to at least early metazoan evolution, approximately 1000 MYA.

  2. Purification and characterization of native and recombinant SaPIN2a, a plant sieve element-localized proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen-Yu; Ding, Ling-Wen; Ge, Zhi-Juan; Wang, Zhaoyu; Wang, Fanghai; Li, Ning; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2007-01-01

    SaPIN2a encodes a proteinase inhibitor in nightshade (Solanum americanum), which is specifically localized to the enucleate sieve elements. It has been proposed to play an important role in phloem development by regulating proteolysis in sieve elements. In this study, we purified and characterized native SaPIN2a from nightshade stems and recombinant SaPIN2a expressed in Escherichia coli. Purified native SaPIN2a was found as a charge isomer family of homodimers, and was weakly glycosylated. Native SaPIN2a significantly inhibited serine proteinases such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, and subtilisin, with the most potent inhibitory activity on subtilisin. It did not inhibit cysteine proteinase papain and aspartic proteinase cathepsin D. Recombinant SaPIN2a had a strong inhibitory effect on chymotrypsin, but its inhibitory activities toward trypsin and especially toward subtilisin were greatly reduced. In addition, native SaPIN2a can effectively inhibit midgut trypsin-like activities from Trichoplusia ni and Spodoptera litura larvae, suggesting a potential for the production of insect-resistant transgenic plants.

  3. AbetaPP/APLP2 family of Kunitz serine proteinase inhibitors regulate cerebral thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Feng; Previti, Mary Lou; Nieman, Marvin T; Davis, Judianne; Schmaier, Alvin H; Van Nostrand, William E

    2009-04-29

    The amyloid beta-protein precursor (AbetaPP) is best recognized as the precursor to the Abeta peptide that accumulates in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease, but less is known about its physiological functions. Isoforms of AbetaPP that contain a Kunitz-type serine proteinase inhibitor (KPI) domain are expressed in brain and, outside the CNS, in circulating blood platelets. Recently, we showed that KPI-containing forms of AbetaPP regulates cerebral thrombosis in vivo (Xu et al., 2005, 2007). Amyloid precursor like protein-2 (APLP2), a closely related homolog to AbetaPP, also possesses a highly conserved KPI domain. Virtually nothing is known of its function. Here, we show that APLP2 also regulates cerebral thrombosis risk. Recombinant purified KPI domains of AbetaPP and APLP2 both inhibit the plasma clotting in vitro. In a carotid artery thrombosis model, both AbetaPP(-/-) and APLP2(-/-) mice exhibit similar significantly shorter times to vessel occlusion compared with wild-type mice indicating a prothrombotic phenotype. Similarly, in an experimental model of intracerebral hemorrhage, both AbetaPP(-/-) and APLP2(-/-) mice produce significantly smaller hematomas with reduced brain hemoglobin content compared with wild-type mice. Together, these results indicate that AbetaPP and APLP2 share overlapping anticoagulant functions with regard to regulating thrombosis after cerebral vascular injury.

  4. Inactivation of bronchial mucous proteinase inhibitor by cigarette smoke and phagocyte-derived oxidants

    SciTech Connect

    Carp, H.; Janoff, A.

    1980-08-01

    Freshly prepared aqueous solutions of cigarette smoke suppressed the elastase inhibitory capacity (EIC) of the acid-stable proteinase inhibitor present in bronchial mucus (BMPi) and human seminal plasma (HUSI-I). Thin-layer gel-immunofiltration analysis of mixtures of smoke-treated BMPi and human leukocyte elastase showed decreased elastase: BMPi complexes, increased uncomplexed BMPi and increased free elastase. Phenolic antioxidants prevented the suppression of the EIC of BMPi or HUSI-I by cigarette smoke. In addition, treatment of BMPi or HUSI-I with chemical oxidants caused a similar suppression of EIC. Furthermore, treatment of BMPi or HUSI-I with the phagocyte-derived oxidizing system, myeloperoxidase + H2O2 + Cl-, suppressed EIC. Finally, the functional activity of BMPi was significantly reduced in tracheal aspirates of human smokers compared to that of nonsmokers. These results support the hypothesis that local inactivation of BMPi in the conducting airways of the lung by inhaled cigarette smoke or by phagocyte-derived oxidants may play a role in the pathogenesis of obstructive lung disease in smokers.

  5. Development and bioassay of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing potato proteinase inhibitor II gene

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junjie; Liu, Fan; Yao, Lei; Luo, Chen; Yin, Yue; Wang, Guixiang; Huang, Yubi

    2012-01-01

    Lepidopteran larvae are the most injurious pests of Chinese cabbage production. We attempted the development of transgenic Chinese cabbage expressing the potato proteinase inhibitor II gene (pinII) and bioassayed the pest-repelling ability of these transgenic plants. Cotyledons with petioles from aseptic seedlings were used as explants for Agrobacterium-mediated in vitro transformation. Agrobacterium tumefaciens C58 contained the binary vector pBBBasta-pinII-bar comprising pinII and bar genes. Plants showing vigorous PPT resistance were obtained by a series concentration selection for PPT resistance and subsequent regeneration of leaf explants dissected from the putative chimera. Transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and genomic Southern blotting, which showed that the bar and pinII genes were integrated into the plant genome. Double haploid homozygous transgenic plants were obtained by microspore culture. The pinII expression was detected using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and detection of PINII protein content in the transgenic homozygous lines. Insect-feeding trials using the larvae of cabbage worm (Pieris rapae) and the larvae of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella) showed higher larval mortality, stunted larval development, and lower pupal weights, pupation rates, and eclosion rates in most of the transgenic lines in comparison with the corresponding values in the non-transformed wild-type line. PMID:23136521

  6. Structural and functional characteristics of plant proteinase inhibitor-II (PI-II) family.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Shazia; Aziz, Ejaz; Akhtar, Wasim; Ilyas, Muhammad; Mahmood, Tariq

    2017-02-09

    Plant proteinase inhibitor-II (PI-II) proteins are one of the promising defensive proteins that helped the plants to resist against different kinds of unfavorable conditions. Different roles for PI-II have been suggested such as regulation of endogenous proteases, modulation of plant growth and developmental processes and mediating stress responses. The basic knowledge on genetic and molecular diversity of these proteins has provided significant insight into their gene structure and evolutionary relationships in various members of this family. Phylogenetic comparisons of these family genes in different plants suggested that the high rate of retention of gene duplication and inhibitory domain multiplication may have resulted in the expansion and functional diversification of these proteins. Currently, a large number of transgenic plants expressing PI-II genes are being developed for enhancing the defensive capabilities against insects, bacteria and pathogenic fungi. Much emphasis is yet to be given to exploit this ever expanding repertoire of genes for improving abiotic stress resistance in transgenic crops. This review presents an overview about the current knowledge on PI-II family genes, their multifunctional role in plant defense and physiology with their potential applications in biotechnology.

  7. Cystatin like thiol proteinase inhibitor from pancreas of Capra hircus: purification and detailed biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Priyadarshini, Medha; Bano, Bilqees

    2010-04-01

    A thiol proteinase inhibitor from Capra hircus (goat) pancreas (PTPI) isolated by ammonium sulphate precipitation (20-80%) and gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-100HR, with 20.4% yield and 500-fold purification, gave molecular mass of 44 kDa determined by its electrophoretic and gel filtration behavior, respectively. The stokes radius, diffusion and sedimentation coefficients of PTPI were 27.3 A, 7.87 x 10(-7) cm(2) s(-1) and 3.83 s, respectively. It was stable in pH range 3-10 and up to 70 degrees C (critical temperature, E (a) = 21 kJ mol(-1)). Kinetic analysis revealed reversible and competitive mode of inhibition with PTPI showing the highest inhibitory efficiency against papain (K ( i ) = 5.88 nM). The partial amino acid sequence analysis showed that it shared good homology with bovine parotid and skin cystatin C. PTPI possessed 17.18% alpha helical content assessed by CD spectroscopy. The hydropathy plot of first 24 residues suggested that most amino acids of this stretch might be in the hydrophobic core of the protein.

  8. Identification of a nuclear-specific cyclophilin which interacts with the proteinase inhibitor eglin c.

    PubMed

    Wang, B B; Hayenga, K J; Payan, D G; Fisher, J M

    1996-02-15

    We have identified a novel human cyclophilin (hCyP-60) which interacts with the proteinase inhibitor eglin c using the yeast two-hybrid system. A cDNA isolated from a Raji B lymphocyte library reveals a domain showing sequence similarity to known cyclophilins flanked by unique N- and C-terminal residues. In addition, hCyP-60 contains a tyrosine residue (Tyr 389) instead of a tryptophan residue found in most eukaryotic cyclophilins at a position important for cyclosporin binding. Northern and Western analysis reveal widespread expression with considerable tissue-specific variation. Specifically, the highest levels of mRNA are detected in the thymus, pancreas, testis, and K-562 cell line, while the most protein is detected in the kidney. Immunohistochemistry indicates a nuclear-specific localization both in transfected cells and tissue sections. hCyP-60's specific subcellular localization and conserved amino acid sequence suggest that it may play a specific role in the nucleus.

  9. Identification of a nuclear-specific cyclophilin which interacts with the proteinase inhibitor eglin c.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B B; Hayenga, K J; Payan, D G; Fisher, J M

    1996-01-01

    We have identified a novel human cyclophilin (hCyP-60) which interacts with the proteinase inhibitor eglin c using the yeast two-hybrid system. A cDNA isolated from a Raji B lymphocyte library reveals a domain showing sequence similarity to known cyclophilins flanked by unique N- and C-terminal residues. In addition, hCyP-60 contains a tyrosine residue (Tyr 389) instead of a tryptophan residue found in most eukaryotic cyclophilins at a position important for cyclosporin binding. Northern and Western analysis reveal widespread expression with considerable tissue-specific variation. Specifically, the highest levels of mRNA are detected in the thymus, pancreas, testis, and K-562 cell line, while the most protein is detected in the kidney. Immunohistochemistry indicates a nuclear-specific localization both in transfected cells and tissue sections. hCyP-60's specific subcellular localization and conserved amino acid sequence suggest that it may play a specific role in the nucleus. PMID:8660300

  10. Differential Accumulation of Proteinase Inhibitor I in Normal and Crown Gall Tissue of Tobacco, Tomato, and Potato 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Peter P.; Kuo, Tsungmin; Ryan, Clarence A.; Kado, Clarence I.

    1976-01-01

    A proteinase inhibitor (inhibitor I) is induced in crown gall tumors of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) initiated through infection with the tumorinducing bacterium, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, strains B6 or CG-14. Uninfected tissues do not contain immunologically detectable quantities of inhibitor I. Inhibitor I synthesis in tobacco crown gall tumors paralleled tumor growth at the average rate of about 4.5 μg of inhibitor I per 200 mg of fresh tissue per day. Infection of variegated tobacco mutant Dp-I with A. tumefaciens strain CG-14 produced tumors with 25% more inhibitor than tumors induced with strain B6. Unlike tobacco, tumors induced by either bacterial strain on potato (Solanum tuberosum) and on tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum) did not accumulate inhibitor I. Consequently, inhibitor I accumulation is modulated by the type of plant host used in spite of familial relatedness (Solanaceae) and the strain of A. tumefaciens used for infection. Immunological and electrophoretic properties of inhibitor I from tobacco crown gall tumor, callus, etiolated, and variegated tissues were compared. Agar immunodiffusion assays showed no apparent differences among precipitin reaction lines between inhibitor I of tumor, callus, variegated, and etiolated tissues. The immunoelectrophoretic mobilities of inhibitor I of tumor, variegated, and etiolated tissues were the same, but differed from that of either normal or crown gall callus tissues. These results suggest that different isoinhibitors of inhibitor I could account for the observed differences in electrophoretic mobilities, or that modification of the inhibitor has occurred sometime during, or after, its synthesis. Images PMID:16659453

  11. Use of recombinant Entamoeba histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 to identify a potent inhibitor of amebic invasion in a human colonic model.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-López, Samuel G; Herdman, Scott; Hirata, Ken; Choi, Min-Ho; Choe, Youngchool; Craik, Charles; Caffrey, Conor R; Hansell, Elisabeth; Chávez-Munguía, Bibiana; Chen, Yen Ting; Roush, William R; McKerrow, James; Eckmann, Lars; Guo, Jianhua; Stanley, Samuel L; Reed, Sharon L

    2007-07-01

    Cysteine proteinases are key virulence factors of the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica. We have shown that cysteine proteinases play a central role in tissue invasion and disruption of host defenses by digesting components of the extracellular matrix, immunoglobulins, complement, and cytokines. Analysis of the E. histolytica genome project has revealed more than 40 genes encoding cysteine proteinases. We have focused on E. histolytica cysteine proteinase 1 (EhCP1) because it is one of two cysteine proteinases unique to invasive E. histolytica and is highly expressed and released. Recombinant EhCP1 was expressed in Escherichia coli and refolded to an active enzyme with a pH optimum of 6.0. We used positional-scanning synthetic tetrapeptide combinatorial libraries to map the specificity of the P1 to P4 subsites of the active site cleft. Arginine was strongly preferred at P2, an unusual specificity among clan CA proteinases. A new vinyl sulfone inhibitor, WRR483, was synthesized based on this specificity to target EhCP1. Recombinant EhCP1 cleaved key components of the host immune system, C3, immunoglobulin G, and pro-interleukin-18, in a time- and dose-dependent manner. EhCP1 localized to large cytoplasmic vesicles, distinct from the sites of other proteinases. To gain insight into the role of secreted cysteine proteinases in amebic invasion, we tested the effect of the vinyl sulfone cysteine proteinase inhibitors K11777 and WRR483 on invasion of human colonic xenografts. The resultant dramatic inhibition of invasion by both inhibitors in this human colonic model of amebiasis strongly suggests a significant role of secreted amebic proteinases, such as EhCP1, in the pathogenesis of amebiasis.

  12. Structural and functional characterization of proteinase inhibitors from seeds of Cajanus cajan (cv. ICP 7118).

    PubMed

    Swathi, Marri; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Kannan, Monica; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2014-10-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (C11PI) from mature dry seeds of Cajanus cajan (cv. ICP 7118) were purified by chromatography which resulted in 87-fold purification and 7.9% yield. SDS-PAGE, matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) mass spectrum and two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis together resolved that C11PI possessed molecular mass of 8385.682 Da and existed as isoinhibitors. However, several of these isoinhibitors exhibited self association tendency to form small oligomers. All the isoinhibitors resolved in Native-PAGE and 2-D gel electrophoresis showed inhibitory activity against bovine pancreatic trypsin and chymotrypsin as well as Achaea janata midgut trypsin-like proteases (AjPs), a devastating pest of castor plant. Partial sequences of isoinhibitor (pI 6.0) obtained from MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis and N-terminal sequencing showed 100% homology to Bowman-Birk Inhibitors (BBIs) of leguminous plants. C11PI showed non-competitive inhibition against trypsin and chymotrypsin. A marginal loss (<15%) in C11PI activity against trypsin at 80 (°)C and basic pH (12.0) was associated with concurrent changes in its far-UV CD spectra. Further, in vitro assays demonstrated that C11PI possessed significant inhibitory potential (IC50 of 78 ng) against AjPs. On the other hand, in vivo leaf coating assays demonstrated that C11PI caused significant mortality rate with concomitant reduction in body weight of both larvae and pupae, prolonged the duration of transition from larva to pupa along with formation of abnormal larval-pupal and pupal-adult intermediates. Being smaller peptides, it is possible to express C11PI in castor to protect them against its devastating pest A. janata.

  13. N-terminal extension of the yeast IA3 aspartic proteinase inhibitor relaxes the strict intrinsic selectivity.

    PubMed

    Winterburn, Tim J; Phylip, Lowri H; Bur, Daniel; Wyatt, David M; Berry, Colin; Kay, John

    2007-07-01

    Yeast IA(3) aspartic proteinase inhibitor operates through an unprecedented mechanism and exhibits a remarkable specificity for one target enzyme, saccharopepsin. Even aspartic proteinases that are very closely similar to saccharopepsin (e.g. the vacuolar enzyme from Pichia pastoris) are not susceptible to significant inhibition. The Pichia proteinase was selected as the target for initial attempts to engineer IA(3) to re-design the specificity. The IA(3) polypeptides from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces castellii differ considerably in sequence. Alterations made by deletion or exchange of the residues in the C-terminal segment of these polypeptides had only minor effects. By contrast, extension of each of these wild-type and chimaeric polypeptides at its N-terminus by an MK(H)(7)MQ sequence generated inhibitors that displayed subnanomolar potency towards the Pichia enzyme. This gain-in-function was completely reversed upon removal of the extension sequence by exopeptidase trimming. Capture of the potentially positively charged aromatic histidine residues of the extension by remote, negatively charged side-chains, which were identified in the Pichia enzyme by modelling, may increase the local IA(3) concentration and create an anchor that enables the N-terminal segment residues to be harboured in closer proximity to the enzyme active site, thus promoting their interaction. In saccharopepsin, some of the counterpart residues are different and, consistent with this, the N-terminal extension of each IA(3) polypeptide was without major effect on the potency of interaction with saccharopepsin. In this way, it is possible to convert IA(3) polypeptides that display little affinity for the Pichia enzyme into potent inhibitors of this proteinase and thus broaden the target selectivity of this remarkable small protein.

  14. Biochemical and immunological characterization of a recombinantly-produced antifungal cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa).

    PubMed

    Popovic, Milica; Andjelkovic, Uros; Burazer, Lidija; Lindner, Buko; Petersen, Arnd; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2013-10-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors are considered important defense molecules against insect and pathogen attack. The cysteine proteinase inhibitor (CPI) from green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) belongs to the cystatin family and shows potent antifungal activity (in vitro and in vivo). However, the low abundance of this molecule in fruit (6μg/g of fresh fruit) seems to limit further investigations on the interaction between phytocystatin and photopathogenic fungi. In this paper the cDNA of the kiwi CPI was expressed in Escherichia coli. Fifteen N-terminal amino acids were identified by Edman degradation, and 77% of the rCPI primary structure was confirmed by mass fingerprint. The structural homology of recombinant CPI (rCPI) to its natural counterpart has been clearly demonstrated in immunological assays (immunoblot and ELISA inhibition). Biological activity of rCPI was demonstrated in inhibition assay with cysteine proteinase papain (EC50 2.78nM). In addition, rCPI reveals antifungal properties toward pathogenic fungi (Alternaria radicina and Botrytis cinerea), which designates it as an interesting model protein for the exploration of plant phytocystatins - pathogen interactions. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of natural plant resistance could lead to the development of ecologically safe fungicides for controlling post-harvest diseases and maintaining food quality.

  15. A Plant Proteinase Inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum Attenuates Pulmonary Mechanics, Inflammation and Remodeling Induced by Elastase in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Righetti, Renato Fraga; Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Martins-Oliveira, Bruno Tadeu; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Prado, Carla Máximo; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Pinheiro, Nathalia Montouro; Lobo, Yara Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo

    2017-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and may represent a potential therapeutic treatment for emphysema. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a plant Kunitz proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on several aspects of experimental elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice. C57/Bl6 mice were intratracheally administered elastase (ELA) or saline (SAL) and were treated intraperitoneally with EcTI (ELA-EcTI, SAL-EcTI) on days 1, 14 and 21. On day 28, pulmonary mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and number leucocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. Subsequently, lung immunohistochemical staining was submitted to morphometry. EcTI treatment reduced responses of the mechanical respiratory system, number of cells in the BALF, and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive cells and volume proportion of isoprostane, collagen and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. EcTI treatment reduced elastase induced pulmonary inflammation, remodeling, oxidative stress and mechanical alterations, suggesting that this inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management. PMID:28216579

  16. A Plant Proteinase Inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum Attenuates Pulmonary Mechanics, Inflammation and Remodeling Induced by Elastase in Mice.

    PubMed

    Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Righetti, Renato Fraga; Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Martins-Oliveira, Bruno Tadeu; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Prado, Carla Máximo; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Pinheiro, Nathalia Montouro; Lobo, Yara Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo

    2017-02-14

    Proteinase inhibitors have been associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and may represent a potential therapeutic treatment for emphysema. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a plant Kunitz proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on several aspects of experimental elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice. C57/Bl6 mice were intratracheally administered elastase (ELA) or saline (SAL) and were treated intraperitoneally with EcTI (ELA-EcTI, SAL-EcTI) on days 1, 14 and 21. On day 28, pulmonary mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and number leucocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. Subsequently, lung immunohistochemical staining was submitted to morphometry. EcTI treatment reduced responses of the mechanical respiratory system, number of cells in the BALF, and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive cells and volume proportion of isoprostane, collagen and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. EcTI treatment reduced elastase induced pulmonary inflammation, remodeling, oxidative stress and mechanical alterations, suggesting that this inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management.

  17. Distortion of the catalytic domain of tissue-type plasminogen activator by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 coincides with the formation of stable serpin-proteinase complexes.

    PubMed

    Perron, Michel J; Blouse, Grant E; Shore, Joseph D

    2003-11-28

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a typical member of the serpin family that kinetically traps its target proteinase as a covalent complex by distortion of the proteinase domain. Incorporation of the fluorescently silent 4-fluorotryptophan analog into PAI-1 permitted us to observe changes in the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of two-chain tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) and the proteinase domain of tPA during the inhibition reaction. We demonstrated three distinct conformational changes of the proteinase that occur during complex formation and distortion. A conformational change occurred during the initial formation of the non-covalent Michaelis complex followed by a large conformational change associated with the distortion of the proteinase catalytic domain that occurs concurrently with the formation of stable proteinase-inhibitor complexes. Following distortion, a very slow structural change occurs that may be involved in the stabilization or regulation of the trapped complex. Furthermore, by comparing the inhibition rates of two-chain tPA and the proteinase domain of tPA by PAI-1, we demonstrate that the accessory domains of tPA play a prominent role in the initial formation of the non-covalent Michaelis complex.

  18. Selective Loss of Cysteine Residues and Disulphide Bonds in a Potato Proteinase Inhibitor II Family

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Qing; Zhang, Tieling; Donnelly, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    Disulphide bonds between cysteine residues in proteins play a key role in protein folding, stability, and function. Loss of a disulphide bond is often associated with functional differentiation of the protein. The evolution of disulphide bonds is still actively debated; analysis of naturally occurring variants can promote understanding of the protein evolutionary process. One of the disulphide bond-containing protein families is the potato proteinase inhibitor II (PI-II, or Pin2, for short) superfamily, which is found in most solanaceous plants and participates in plant development, stress response, and defence. Each PI-II domain contains eight cysteine residues (8C), and two similar PI-II domains form a functional protein that has eight disulphide bonds and two non-identical reaction centres. It is still unclear which patterns and processes affect cysteine residue loss in PI-II. Through cDNA sequencing and data mining, we found six natural variants missing cysteine residues involved in one or two disulphide bonds at the first reaction centre. We named these variants Pi7C and Pi6C for the proteins missing one or two pairs of cysteine residues, respectively. This PI-II-7C/6C family was found exclusively in potato. The missing cysteine residues were in bonding pairs but distant from one another at the nucleotide/protein sequence level. The non-synonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks) ratio analysis suggested a positive evolutionary gene selection for Pi6C and various Pi7C. The selective deletion of the first reaction centre cysteine residues that are structure-level-paired but sequence-level-distant in PI-II illustrates the flexibility of PI-II domains and suggests the functionality of their transient gene versions during evolution. PMID:21494600

  19. The M358R variant of α(1)-proteinase inhibitor inhibits coagulation factor VIIa.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, William P; Bhakta, Varsha

    2016-02-12

    The naturally occurring M358R mutation of the plasma serpin α1-proteinase inhibitor (API) changes both its cleavable reactive centre bond to Arg-Ser and the efficacy with which it inhibits different proteases, reducing the rate of inhibition of neutrophil elastase, and enhancing that of thrombin, factor XIa, and kallikrein, by several orders of magnitude. Although another plasma serpin with an Arg-Ser reactive centre, antithrombin (AT), has been shown to inhibit factor VIIa (FVIIa), no published data are available with respect to FVIIa inhibition by API M358R. Recombinant bacterially-expressed API M358R and plasma-derived AT were therefore compared using gel-based and kinetic assays of FVIIa integrity and activity. Under pseudo-first order conditions of excess serpin over protease, both AT and API M358R formed denaturation-resistant inhibitory complexes with FVIIa in reactions accelerated by TF; AT, but not API M358R, also required heparin for maximal activity. The second order rate constant for heparin-independent API M358R-mediated FVIIa inhibition was determined to be 7.8 ± 0.8 × 10(2) M(-1)sec(-1). We conclude that API M358R inhibits FVIIa by forming inhibitory complexes of the serpin type more rapidly than AT in the absence of heparin. The likely 20-fold excess of API M358R over AT in patient plasma during inflammation raises the possibility that it could contribute to the hemorrhagic tendencies manifested by rare individuals expressing this mutant serpin.

  20. Inducible expression of a fusion gene encoding two proteinase inhibitors leads to insect and pathogen resistance in transgenic rice.

    PubMed

    Quilis, Jordi; López-García, Belén; Meynard, Donaldo; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2014-04-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are considered as candidates for increased insect resistance in transgenic plants. Insect adaptation to PI ingestion might, however, compromise the benefits received by transgenic expression of PIs. In this study, the maize proteinase inhibitor (MPI), an inhibitor of insect serine proteinases, and the potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (PCI) were fused into a single open reading frame and introduced into rice plants. The two PIs were linked using either the processing site of the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1B precursor protein or the 2A sequence from the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV). Expression of each fusion gene was driven by the wound- and pathogen-inducible mpi promoter. The mpi-pci fusion gene was stably inherited for at least three generations with no penalty on plant phenotype. An important reduction in larval weight of Chilo suppressalis fed on mpi-pci rice, compared with larvae fed on wild-type plants, was observed. Expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene confers resistance to C. suppressalis (striped stem borer), one of the most important insect pest of rice. The mpi-pci expression systems described may represent a suitable strategy for insect pest control, better than strategies based on the use of single PI genes, by preventing insect adaptive responses. The rice plants expressing the mpi-pci fusion gene also showed enhanced resistance to infection by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae, the causal agent of the rice blast disease. Our results illustrate the usefulness of the inducible expression of the mpi-pci fusion gene for dual resistance against insects and pathogens in rice plants.

  1. Effects of proteinase inhibitor from Adenanthera pavonina seeds on short- and long term larval development of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Daniele Yumi; Jacobowski, Ana Cristina; de Souza, Antônio Pancrácio; Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Franco, Octávio Luiz; Macedo, Maria Lígia Rodrigues

    2015-05-01

    Currently, one of the major global public health concerns is related to the transmission of dengue/yellow fever virus by the vector Aedes aegypti. The most abundant digestive enzymes in Ae. aegypti midgut larvae are trypsin and chymotrypsin. Since protease inhibitors have the capacity to bind to and inhibit the action of insect digestive proteinases, we investigated the short- and long-term effects of Adenanthera pavonina seed proteinase inhibitor (ApTI) on Ae. aegypti larvae, as well as a possible mechanism of adaptation. ApTI had a significant effect on Ae. aegypti larvae exposed to a non-lethal concentration of ApTI during short- and long-duration assays, decreasing survival, weight and proteinase activities of midgut extracts of larvae. The zymographic profile of ApTI demonstrated seven bands; three bands apparently have trypsin-like activity. Moreover, the peritrophic membrane was not disrupted. The enzymes of ApTI-fed larvae were found to be sensitive to ApTI and to have a normal feedback mechanism; also, the larval digestive enzymes were not able to degrade the inhibitor. In addition, ApTI delayed larval development time. Histological studies demonstrated a degeneration of the microvilli of the posterior midgut region epithelium cells, hypertrophy of the gastric caeca cells and an augmented ectoperitrophic space in larvae. Moreover, Ae. aegypti larvae were incapable of overcoming the negative effects of ApTI, indicating that this inhibitor might be used as a promising agent against Ae. aegypti. In addition, molecular modeling and molecular docking studies were also performed in order to construct three-dimensional theoretical models for ApTI, trypsin and chymotrypsin from Ae. aegypti, as well as to predict the possible interactions and affinity values for the complexes ApTI/trypsin and ApTI/chymotrypsin. In this context, this study broadens the base of our understanding about the modes of action of proteinase inhibitors in insects, as well as the way insects

  2. Caspase-1 (interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme) is inhibited by the human serpin analogue proteinase inhibitor 9.

    PubMed Central

    Annand, R R; Dahlen, J R; Sprecher, C A; De Dreu, P; Foster, D C; Mankovich, J A; Talanian, R V; Kisiel, W; Giegel, D A

    1999-01-01

    The regulation of caspases, cysteine proteinases that cleave their substrates after aspartic residues, is poorly understood, even though they are involved in tightly regulated cellular processes. The recently discovered serpin analogue proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI9) is unique among human serpin analogues in that it has an acidic residue in the putative specificity-determining position of the reactive-site loop. We measured the ability of PI9 to inhibit the amidolytic activity of several caspases. The hydrolysis of peptide substrates by caspase-1 (interleukin-1beta-converting enzyme), caspase-4 and caspase-8 is inhibited by PI9 in a time-dependent manner. The rate of reaction of caspase-1 with PI9, as well as the rate of substrate hydrolysis of the initial caspase-PI9 complex, shows a hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of PI9, indicative of a two-step kinetic mechanism for inhibition with an apparent second-order rate constant of 7x10(2) M(-1).s(-1). The hydrolysis of a tetrapeptide substrate by caspase-3 is not inhibited by PI9. The complexes of caspase-1 and caspase-4 with PI9 can be immunoprecipitated but no complex with caspase-3 can be detected. No complex can be immunoprecipitated if the active site of the caspase is blocked with a covalent inhibitor. These results show that PI9 is an inhibitor of caspase-1 and to a smaller extent caspase-4 and caspase-8, but not of the more distantly related caspase-3. PI9 is the first example of a human serpin analogue that inhibits members of this class of cysteine proteinases. PMID:10477277

  3. A Novel Trypsin Inhibitor-Like Cysteine-Rich Peptide from the Frog Lepidobatrachus laevis Containing Proteinase-Inhibiting Activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Wei; Tan, Ji-Min; Du, Can-Wei; Luan, Ning; Yan, Xiu-Wen; Lai, Ren; Lu, Qiu-Min

    2015-08-01

    Various bio-active substances in amphibian skins play important roles in survival of the amphibians. Many protease inhibitor peptides have been identified from amphibian skins, which are supposed to negatively modulate the activity of proteases to avoid premature degradation or release of skin peptides, or to inhibit extracellular proteases produced by invading bacteria. However, there is no information on the proteinase inhibitors from the frog Lepidobatrachus laevis which is unique in South America. In this work, a cDNA encoding a novel trypsin inhibitor-like (TIL) cysteine-rich peptide was identified from the skin cDNA library of L. laevis. The 240-bp coding region encodes an 80-amino acid residue precursor protein containing 10 half-cysteines. By sequence comparison and signal peptide prediction, the precursor was predicted to release a 55-amino acid mature peptide with amino acid sequence, IRCPKDKIYKFCGSPCPPSCKDLTPNCIAVCKKGCFCRDGTVDNNHGKCVKKENC. The mature peptide was named LL-TIL. LL-TIL shares significant domain similarity with the peptides from the TIL supper family. Antimicrobial and trypsin-inhibitory abilities of recombinant LL-TIL were tested. Recombinant LL-TIL showed no antimicrobial activity, while it had trypsin-inhibiting activity with a Ki of 16.5178 μM. These results suggested there was TIL peptide with proteinase-inhibiting activity in the skin of frog L. laevis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of TIL peptide from frog skin.

  4. Expression of the maize proteinase inhibitor (mpi) gene in rice plants enhances resistance against the striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis): effects on larval growth and insect gut proteinases.

    PubMed

    Vila, Laura; Quilis, Jordi; Meynard, Donaldo; Breitler, Jean Christophe; Marfà, Victoria; Murillo, Isabel; Vassal, Jean Michel; Messeguer, Joaquima; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; San Segundo, Blanca

    2005-03-01

    The maize proteinase inhibitor (mpi) gene was introduced into two elite japonica rice varieties. Both constitutive expression of the mpi gene driven by the maize ubiquitin 1 promoter and wound-inducible expression of the mpi gene driven by its own promoter resulted in the accumulation of MPI protein in the transgenic plants. No effect on plant phenotype was observed in mpi-expressing lines. The stability of transgene expression through successive generations of mpi rice lines (up to the T(4) generation) and the production of functional MPI protein were confirmed. Expression of the mpi gene in rice enhanced resistance to the striped stem borer (Chilo suppressalis), one of the most important pests of rice. In addition, transgenic mpi plants were evaluated in terms of their effects on the growth of C. suppressalis larvae and the insect digestive proteolytic system. An important dose-dependent reduction of larval weight of C. suppressalis larvae fed on mpi rice, compared with larvae fed on untransformed rice plants, was observed. Analysis of the digestive proteolytic activity from the gut of C. suppressalis demonstrated that larvae adapted to mpi transgene expression by increasing the complement of digestive proteolytic activity: the serine and cysteine endoproteinases as well as the exopeptidases leucine aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidases A and B. However, the induction of such proteolytic activity did not prevent the deleterious effects of MPI on larval growth. The introduction of the mpi gene into rice plants can thus be considered as a promising strategy to protect rice plants against striped stem borer.

  5. The squash aspartic proteinase inhibitor SQAPI is widely present in the cucurbitales, comprises a small multigene family, and is a member of the phytocystatin family.

    PubMed

    Christeller, John T; Farley, Peter C; Marshall, Richelle K; Anandan, Ananda; Wright, Michele M; Newcomb, Richard D; Laing, William A

    2006-12-01

    The squash (Cucurbita maxima) phloem exudate-expressed aspartic proteinase inhibitor (SQAPI) is a novel aspartic acid proteinase inhibitor, constituting a fifth family of aspartic proteinase inhibitors. However, a comparison of the SQAPI sequence to the phytocystatin (a cysteine proteinase inhibitor) family sequences showed approximately 30% identity. Modeling SQAPI onto the structure of oryzacystatin gave an excellent fit; regions identified as proteinase binding loops in cystatin coincided with regions of SQAPI identified as hypervariable, and tryptophan fluorescence changes were also consistent with a cystatin structure. We show that SQAPI exists as a small gene family. Characterization of mRNA and clone walking of genomic DNA (gDNA) produced 10 different but highly homologous SQAPI genes from Cucurbita maxima and the small family size was confirmed by Southern blotting, where evidence for at least five loci was obtained. Using primers designed from squash sequences, PCR of gDNA showed the presence of SQAPI genes in other members of the Cucurbitaceae and in representative members of Coriariaceae, Corynocarpaceae, and Begoniaceae. Thus, at least four of seven families of the order Cucurbitales possess member species with SQAPI genes, covering approximately 99% of the species in this order. A phylogenetic analysis of these Cucurbitales SQAPI genes indicated not only that SQAPI was present in the Cucurbitales ancestor but also that gene duplication has occurred during evolution of the order. Phytocystatins are widespread throughout the plant kingdom, suggesting that SQAPI has evolved recently from a phytocystatin ancestor. This appears to be the first instance of a cystatin being recruited as a proteinase inhibitor of another proteinase family.

  6. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. I. Kinetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Masia-Perez, J; Garcia-Molina, F; García-Moreno, M; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    Starting from a simple general reaction mechanism of activation of aspartic proteinases zymogens involving a uni- and a bimolecular simultaneous activation route and a reversible inhibition step, the time course equation of the zymogen, inhibitor and activated enzyme concentrations have been derived. Likewise, expressions for the time required for any reaction progress and the corresponding mean activation rates as well as the half-life of the global zymogen activation have been derived. An experimental design and kinetic data analysis is suggested to estimate the kinetic parameters involved in the reaction mechanism proposed.

  7. Enzyme specificity of proteinase inhibitor region in amyloid precursor protein of Alzheimer's disease: different properties compared with protease nexin I.

    PubMed

    Kitaguchi, N; Takahashi, Y; Oishi, K; Shiojiri, S; Tokushima, Y; Utsunomiya, T; Ito, H

    1990-03-29

    Senile plaques, often surrounded by abnormally grown neurites, are characteristic of Alzheimer's diseased brain. The core of the plaque is mainly composed of amyloid beta protein (beta-AP), two of whose three precursors (APP) have serine proteinase inhibitor regions (APPI). APPI derivatives containing 60, 72 or 88 amino-acid fragments (APPI-60, APPI-72 and APPI-88, respectively) of the longest APP were produced in COS-1 cell culture medium, with the APPI cDNA ligated to the signal sequence of tissue plasminogen activator. The secreted APPIs were purified by sequential acetone precipitation followed by affinity chromatography using immobilized trypsin. These three APPIs and O-glycosylation-site-mutated APPI showed similar inhibitory activity against trypsin, chymotrypsin and plasmin. The purified APPI-72 was found to inhibit trypsin (Ki = 1.1 x 10(-10) M) and chymotrypsin (Ki = 5.8 x 10(-9) M) most strongly, and to inhibit leukocyte elastase (Ki = 7.9 x 10(-7) M) and several blood coagulation proteinases (Ki = 0.46-12 x 10(-7) M), but not urokinase or thrombin. The observed inhibition pattern was quite different from that of protease nexin I, one of serine proteinase inhibitors possessing neurite outgrowth activity. This suggests that the physiological roles of APPI are different from those of protease nexin I, and that APPI could not cause aberrant growth of neurite into the plaque. The presence of APPI having strong inhibitory activity in the brain might lead to the formation of amyloid deposits by preventing complete degradation of APPs.

  8. Activation of proteinase 3 contributes to Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Toonen, Erik J M; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine T N; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo A B

    2016-05-24

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive pro-inflammatory mediators IL-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human alpha-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after fed a high fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high fat diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1(-/-) mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with alpha-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 days of a 16 week high fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential.

  9. A five-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor from black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon and its inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Somprasong, Nawarat; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien; Tassanakajon, Anchalee

    2006-01-01

    A novel five-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor, SPIPm2, identified from the hemocyte cDNA library of black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon was successfully expressed in the Escherichia coli expression system. The expressed recombinant SPIPm2 (rSPIPm2) as inclusion bodies was solubilized with a sodium carbonate buffer, pH10, and purified by gel filtration chromatography. The molecular mass of rSPIPm2 was determined using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry to be 29.065 kDa. The inhibitory activities of rSPIPm2 were tested against trypsin, alpha-chymotrypsin, subtilisin and elastase. The inhibitor exhibited potent inhibitory activities against subtilisin and elastase, weak inhibitory activity against trypsin, and did not inhibit chymotrypsin. Tight-binding inhibition assay suggested that the molar ratios of SPIPm2 to subtilisin and elastase were 1:2 and 1:1, respectively. The inhibition against subtilisin and elastase was a competitive type with inhibition constants (Ki) of 0.52 and 3.27 nM, respectively. The inhibitory activity of SPIPm2 against subtilisin implies that, in shrimp, it may function as a defense component against proteinases from pathogenic bacteria but the elastase inhibitory function is not known.

  10. Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase is an endogenous inhibitor to myofibril-bound serine proteinase of crucian carp (Carassius auratus).

    PubMed

    Sun, Le-Chang; Zhou, Li-Gen; Du, Cui-Hong; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Hara, Kenji; Su, Wen-Jin; Cao, Min-Jie

    2009-06-24

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) was purified to homogeneity from the skeletal muscle of crucian carp ( Carassius auratus ) by ammonium sulfate fractionation, column chromatographies of Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose, and Superdex 200 with a yield of 8.0%, and purification folds of 468. The molecular mass of GPI was 120 kDa as estimated by gel filtration, while on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), two subunits (55 and 65 kDa) were identified, suggesting that it is a heterodimer. Interestingly, GPI revealed specific inhibitory activity toward a myofibril-bound serine proteinase (MBSP) from crucian carp, while no inhibitory activity was identified toward other serine proteinases, such as white croaker MBSP and crucian carp trypsin. Kinetic analysis showed that GPI is a competitive inhibitor toward MBSP, and the K(i) was 0.32 microM. Our present results indicated that the multifunctional protein GPI is an endogenous inhibitor to MBSP and may play a significant role in the regulation of muscular protein metabolism in vivo.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a novel proteinase inhibitor from the snake serum of Taiwan habu (Trimeresurus mucrosquamatus).

    PubMed

    Huang, K F; Chow, L P; Chiou, S H

    1999-10-05

    A proteinase inhibitor (designated as TMI) was isolated and purified from the snake serum of Taiwan habu (Trimeresurus mucrosquamatus) by using successive chromatographies which included Sephadex G-100, DEAE-Sephacel chromatographies, and C(4) reverse-phase HPLC. The purified inhibitor was shown to be a homogeneous protein with a molecular mass of about 47 or 36 kDa in the presence or absence of a reducing agent, beta-mercaptoethanol. The inhibitor decreases in molecular mass by about 23% with N-linked neuraminidase treatment, suggesting that it is a glycoprotein. Further enzymatic analyses indicated that this inhibitor possesses strong inhibitory activities toward three zinc-dependent metalloproteinases and not fibrinogenolytic serine proteases previously isolated from the venom of the same snake species with an IC(50) of about 0.2-1.1 microM. Its IC(50) value was approximately three orders of magnitude more effective than those of the tripeptide inhibitors we previously purified from the crude venom of the same snake (Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 248, 562-568 (1998)). The purified inhibitor showed stronger inhibitory action against caseinolytic activities of crude venoms from closely related species of Taiwan habu than those from unrelated species. N-terminal sequence analysis showed that its sequence is distinctly different from sequences of those serum inhibitors reported for other snake species in the literature. Based on inhibition susceptibility and primary structures of various snake protease inhibitors, it is suggested that this novel inhibitor isolated from the serum of Taiwan habu may be a unique self-defense protein factor mainly for protection against envenomation from snakes of the same genus. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  12. Crystal quality and inhibitor binding by aspartic proteinases; preparation of high quality crystals of mouse renin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badasso, M.; Sibanda, B. L.; Cooper, J. B.; Dealwis, C. G.; Wood, S. P.

    1992-08-01

    Renin from mouse submandibular glands has been highly purified and co-crystallized with a synthetic nonapeptide fragment of rat angiotensionogen in which the scissile Leu-Leu bond has been modified as a hydroxyethylene mimic of the transition state. The strong diffraction from these crystals compared to the native form is discussed in relation to the behaviour of other members of the aspartic proteinase family in crystallisation.

  13. Tissue and Cellular Localization of Proteinase Inhibitors I and II in the Fruit of the Wild Tomato, Lycopersicon peruvianum (L.) Mill 1

    PubMed Central

    Wingate, Vincent P. M.; Franceschi, Vincent R.; Ryan, Clarence A.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of proteinase inhibitor I and inhibitor II proteins in the fruit of the wild tomato species Lycopersicon peruvianum (L.) Mill., LA 107 was determined by immunoanalysis of tissue blots and protein-A gold immunocytochemistry. Tissue blot analysis showed that the proteinase inhibitor I proteins were located throughout the fruit tissue, with the exception of the seeds. Light microscopy, using immunocytochemical labeling, indicated that all the parenchyma cells of the pericarp contained inhibitor I and II proteins in dense vacuolar protein aggregates that were not membrane bound. The size, number, and morphology of the aggregates within individual cells varied greatly. The funiculus, ovule, and early embryonic tissues were devoid of inhibitor I and II. Immunocytochemical analysis using transmission electron microscopy confirmed that the proteinase inhibitor I proteins were principally located and stored in protein aggregates within the vacuole of the fruit parenchyma cells. Some cytoplasmic protein-A gold immunolabeling of inhibitor I proteins was evident, which may be related to the synthesis and intermediate transport steps preceding storage of the inhibitor I proteins in the vacuoles. ImagesFigure 7-9Figure 3-6Figure 1Figure 2 PMID:16668425

  14. Is a cysteine proteinase inhibitor involved in the regulation of petal wilting in senescing carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) flowers?

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Hiroaki; Shibuya, Kenichi; Yoshioka, Toshihito; Hashiba, Teruyoshi; Satoh, Shigeru

    2002-03-01

    Senescence of carnation petals is accompanied by autocatalytic ethylene production and wilting of the petals; the former is caused by the expression of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase and ACC oxidase genes and the latter is related to the expression of a cysteine proteinase (CPase) gene. CPase is probably responsible for the degradation of proteins, leading to the decomposition of cell components and resultant cell death during the senescence of petals. The carnation plant also has a gene for the CPase inhibitor (DC-CPIn) that is expressed abundantly in petals at the full opening stage of flowers. In the present study, DC-CPIn cDNA was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant DC-CPIn protein completely inhibited the activities of a proteinase (CPase) extracted from carnation petals and papain. Northern blot analysis showed that the mRNA for CPase (DC-CP1) accumulated in large amounts, whereas that for DC-CPIn disappeared, corresponding to the onset of petal wilting in flowers undergoing natural senescence and exogenous ethylene-induced senescence. Based on these findings, a role of DC-CPIn in the regulation of petal wilting is suggested; DC-CPIn acts as a suppressor of petal wilting, which probably functions to fine-tune petal wilting in contrast to coarse tuning, the up-regulation of CPase activity by gene expression.

  15. Growth and development of Colorado potato beetle larvae, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, on potato plants expressing the oryzacystatin II proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Cingel, Aleksandar; Savić, Jelena; Vinterhalter, Branka; Vinterhalter, Dragan; Kostić, Miroslav; Jovanović, Darka Šešlija; Smigocki, Ann; Ninković, Slavica

    2015-08-01

    Plant proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are attractive tools for crop improvement and their heterologous expression can enhance insect resistance in transgenic plants. PI oryzacystatin II (OCII), isolated from rice, showed potential in controlling pests that utilize cysteine proteinases for protein digestion. To evaluate the applicability of the OCII gene in enhancing plant defence, OCII-transformed potatoes were bioassayed for resistance to Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say). Feeding on transformed leaves of potato cultivars Desiree and Jelica significantly affected larval growth and development, but did not change mortality rates. During the L2 and L3 developmental stages larvae consumed the OCII-transformed foliage faster as compared to the nontransformed control. Also these larvae reached the prepupal stage (end of L4 stage) 2 days earlier than those fed on control leaves. However, the total amounts of consumed OCII-transformed leaves were up to 23% lower than of control, and the maximal weights of prepupal larvae were reduced by up to 18% as compared to larvae fed on nontransformed leaves. The reduction in insect fitness reported in this study in combination with other control measures, could lead to improved CPB resistance management in potato.

  16. A selective reversible azapeptide inhibitor of human neutrophil proteinase 3 derived from a high affinity FRET substrate.

    PubMed

    Epinette, Christophe; Croix, Cécile; Jaquillard, Lucie; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Kellenberger, Christine; Lalmanach, Gilles; Cadene, Martine; Viaud-Massuard, Marie-Claude; Gauthier, Francis; Korkmaz, Brice

    2012-03-15

    The biological functions of human neutrophil proteinase 3 (PR3) remain unclear because of its close structural resemblance to neutrophil elastase and its apparent functional redundancy with the latter. Thus, all natural inhibitors of PR3 preferentially target neutrophil elastase. We have designed a selective PR3 inhibitor based on the sequence of one of its specific, sensitive FRET substrates. This azapeptide, azapro-3, inhibits free PR3 in solution, PR3 bound to neutrophil membranes, and the PR3 found in crude lung secretions from patients with chronic inflammatory pulmonary diseases. But it does not inhibit significantly neutrophil elastase or cathepsin G. Unlike most of azapeptides, this inhibitor does not form a stable acyl-enzyme complex; it is a reversible competitive inhibitor with a K(i) comparable to the K(m) of the parent substrate. Low concentrations (60 μM) of azapro-3 totally inhibited the PR3 secreted by triggered human neutrophils (200,000 cells/100 μL) and the PR3 in neutrophil homogenates and in lung secretions of patients with lung inflammation for hours. Azapro-3 also resisted proteolysis by all proteases contained in these samples for at least 2h.

  17. Alpha 1-antitrypsin activity is markedly decreased in Wegener's granulomatosis.

    PubMed

    Mota, Ali; Sahebghadam Lotfi, Abbas; Jamshidi, Ahmad-Reza; Najavand, Saeed

    2014-04-01

    Alpha 1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is the most abundant proteinase inhibitor in plasma and the main inhibitor of Proteinase 3, the target antigen of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs) that predominant in Wegeners' granulomatosis. Α1AT deficiency correlated with ANCA-associated vasculitis. This study explores the trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC), specific activity, and phenotypic deficiency of Α1AT in Wegener's granulomatosis. Twenty-seven WG patients were studied. ANCA was tested by IIF and ELISA. Serum a1-anti-trypsin levels were quantified in WG patients and healthy controls by immunoturbidimetric assay. Serum TIC was assessed by the enzymatic colorimetric assay. Phenotypes of A1AT were detected by Isoelectric Focusing. A1AT concentration was equivalent in patients and controls; however, serum TIC (P = 0.001) and specific activity of A1AT (P = 0.001) were dramatically lower in WG patients. Five patients had deficient phenotypes of A1AT: MZ (n = 3), MS (n = 1) and SS (n = 1). This was correlated with an increase in the prevalence of deficient phenotypes of A1AT in WG (P = 0.01). Trypsin inhibitory capacity and specific activity of A1AT were decreased in WG patients and may be involve in disease pathogenesis and can worsen the clinical manifestations. This A1AT deficiency probably resulted from oxidative inactivation and/or enzymatic degradation of A1AT. This could result in localized deficiency of A1AT in vessel wall interfaces and lead to severe disease.

  18. Purification and characterization of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin-like protease inhibitor that regulates prohormone thiol protease involved in enkephalin precursor processing.

    PubMed

    Hook, V Y; Purviance, R T; Azaryan, A V; Hubbard, G; Krieger, T J

    1993-09-25

    Evidence is presented showing that alpha 1-antichymotrypsin (ACT) inhibits a novel prohormone thiol protease (PTP) involved in processing the enkephalin precursor. Colocalization of ACT immunoreactivity with PTP within isolated secretory vesicles of bovine adrenal medulla and pituitary indicated that endogenous ACT could regulate PTP in vivo. The endogenous 60 kDa bovine ACT (bACT)-like protein was purified from pituitary by chromatography on DEAE-Sepharose, chromatofocusing, butyl-Sepharose, and Sephacryl S-200. Characterization showed that the bACT-like protein was a potent inhibitor of PTP (Ki,app value of 2.2 nM) as well as an effective inhibitor of chymotrypsin (Ki,app value of 2.3 nM). Furthermore, the bACT-like protein formed sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable complexes with chymotrypsin, which is typical of serpin protease inhibitors. Importantly, PTP formed sodium dodecyl sulfate-stable complexes with human ACT, suggesting that PTP's cleavage specificity may resemble the reactive center of ACT. PTP cleavage of enkephalin-containing peptides at the NH2-terminal side of paired basic residues (Lys-Arg, Arg-Arg, Lys-Lys), flanking the COOH terminus of (Met)enkephalin (Tyr-Gly-GLy-Phe-Met), indicates methionine at the P1 position. PTP cleavage of peptide-methylcoumarin amide and peptide-p-nitroanilide substrates demonstrated specificity for paired basic and monobasic residues, as well as a role for methionine in PTP's cleavage site. These results showing PTP's ability for processing at a methionine residue which resembles the P1 specificity of ACT are compatible with inhibition of PTP by ACT. These findings are the first demonstration of the involvement of a protease inhibitor in neuropeptide precursor processing. The known developmental regulation of ACT in brain and significant amounts of ACT in amyloid plaques of Alzheimer's disease suggest a possible role for PTP in the maturation of peptidergic neurons.

  19. Alpha-1 antitrypsin test

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003715.htm Alpha-1 antitrypsin blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Alpha-1 antitrypsin is a laboratory test to measure ...

  20. Arabidopsis cysteine proteinase inhibitor AtCYSb interacts with a Ca(2+)-dependent nuclease, AtCaN2.

    PubMed

    Guo, Kunyuan; Bu, Yuanyuan; Takano, Tetsuo; Liu, Shenkui; Zhang, Xinxin

    2013-11-01

    Plant cysteine proteinase inhibitors (cystatins) play important roles in plant defense mechanisms. Some proteins that interact with cystatins may defend against abiotic stresses. Here, we showed that AtCaN2, a Ca(2+)-dependent nuclease in Arabidopsis, is transcribed in senescent leaves and stems and interacts with an Arabidopsis cystatin (AtCYSb) in a yeast two-hybrid screen. The interaction between AtCYSb and AtCaN2 was confirmed by in vitro pull-down assay and bimolecular fluorescence complementation. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that the nuclease activity of AtCaN2 against λDNA was inhibited by AtCYSb, which suggests that AtCYSb regulates nucleic acid degradation in cells.

  1. Domain 2 of a Kazal serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2 from Penaeus monodon possesses antiviral activity against WSSV.

    PubMed

    Visetnan, Suwattana; Donpudsa, Suchao; Supungul, Premruethai; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien

    2014-12-01

    A 5-domain Kazal type serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2 from Penaeus monodon is involved in innate immune defense against white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). To test which domains were involved, the 5 domains of SPIPm2 were over-expressed and tested against WSSV infection. By using hemocyte primary cell culture treated with each recombinant SPIPm2 domain along with WSSV, the expression of WSSV early genes ie1, WSV477 and late gene VP28 were substantially reduced as compared to other domains when the recombinant domain 2, rSPIPm2D2, was used. Injecting the WSSV along with rSPIPm2D2 but not with other domains caused delay in mortality rate of the infected shrimp. The results indicate that the SPIPm2D2 possesses strong antiviral activity and, hence, contributes predominantly to the antiviral activity of SPIPm2.

  2. A four-domain Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from Solen grandis is implicated in immune response.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiumei; Yang, Jialong; Yang, Jianmin; Liu, Xiangquan; Liu, Meijun; Yang, Dinglong; Xu, Jie; Hu, Xiaoke

    2012-12-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitor (SPI) serves as a negative regulator in immune signal pathway by restraining the activities of serine proteinase (SP) and plays an essential role in the innate immunity. In the present study, a Kunitz-type SPI was identified from the mollusk razor clam Solen grandis (designated as SgKunitz). The full-length cDNA of SgKunitz was of 1284 bp, containing an open reading frame (ORF) of 768 bp. The ORF encoded four Kunitz domains, and their amino acids were well conserved when compared with those in other Kunitz-type SPIs, especially the six cysteines involved in forming of three disulfide bridges in each domain. In addition, the tertiary structure of all the four domains adopted a typical model of Kunitz-type SPI family, indicating SgKunitz was a new member of Kunitz-type SPI superfamily. The mRNA transcripts of SgKunitz were detected in all tested tissues of razor clam, including muscle, mantle, gonad, gill, hepatopancreas and hemocytes, and with the highest expression level in gill. When the razor clams were stimulated by LPS, PGN or β-1, 3-glucan, the expression level of SgKunitz mRNA in hemocytes was significantly up-regulated (P < 0.01), suggesting SgKunitz might involved in the processes of inhibiting the activity of SPs during the immune responses triggered by various pathogens. Furthermore, the recombinant protein of SgKunitz could effectively inhibit the activities of SP trypsin and chymotrypsin in vitro. The present results suggested SgKunitz could serve as an inhibitor of SP involving in the immune response of S. grandis, and provided helpful evidences to understand the regulation mechanism of immune signal pathway in mollusk.

  3. Plant Proteinase Inhibitor BbCI Modulates Lung Inflammatory Responses and Mechanic and Remodeling Alterations Induced by Elastase in Mice.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Theodoro-Junior, Osmar A; Oliveira, Bruno T M; Oliva, Leandro V; Toledo-Arruda, Alessandra C; Bonturi, Camila R; Brito, Marlon V; Lopes, Fernanda D T Q S; Prado, Carla M; Florencio, Ariana C; Martins, Mílton A; Owen, Caroline A; Leick, Edna A; Oliva, Maria L V; Tibério, Iolanda F L C

    2017-01-01

    Background. Proteinases play a key role in emphysema. Bauhinia bauhinioides cruzipain inhibitor (BbCI) is a serine-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. We evaluated BbCI treatment in elastase-induced pulmonary alterations. Methods.  C57BL/6 mice received intratracheal elastase (ELA group) or saline (SAL group). One group of mice was treated with BbCI (days 1, 15, and 21 after elastase instillation, ELABC group). Controls received saline and BbCI (SALBC group). After 28 days, we evaluated respiratory mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In lung tissue we measured airspace enlargement, quantified neutrophils, TNFα-, MMP-9-, MMP-12-, TIMP-1-, iNOS-, and eNOS-positive cells, 8-iso-PGF2α, collagen, and elastic fibers in alveolar septa and airways. MUC-5-positive cells were quantified only in airways. Results. BbCI reduced elastase-induced changes in pulmonary mechanics, airspace enlargement and elastase-induced increases in total cells, and neutrophils in BALF. BbCI reduced macrophages and neutrophils positive cells in alveolar septa and neutrophils and TNFα-positive cells in airways. BbCI attenuated elastic and collagen fibers, MMP-9- and MMP-12-positive cells, and isoprostane and iNOS-positive cells in alveolar septa and airways. BbCI reduced MUC5ac-positive cells in airways. Conclusions. BbCI improved lung mechanics and reduced lung inflammation and airspace enlargement and increased oxidative stress levels induced by elastase. BbCI may have therapeutic potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  4. Plant Proteinase Inhibitor BbCI Modulates Lung Inflammatory Responses and Mechanic and Remodeling Alterations Induced by Elastase in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Theodoro-Junior, Osmar A.; Oliveira, Bruno T. M.; Oliva, Leandro V.; Toledo-Arruda, Alessandra C.; Bonturi, Camila R.; Brito, Marlon V.; Prado, Carla M.; Florencio, Ariana C.; Martins, Mílton A.; Owen, Caroline A.; Oliva, Maria L. V.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Proteinases play a key role in emphysema. Bauhinia bauhinioides cruzipain inhibitor (BbCI) is a serine-cysteine proteinase inhibitor. We evaluated BbCI treatment in elastase-induced pulmonary alterations. Methods.  C57BL/6 mice received intratracheal elastase (ELA group) or saline (SAL group). One group of mice was treated with BbCI (days 1, 15, and 21 after elastase instillation, ELABC group). Controls received saline and BbCI (SALBC group). After 28 days, we evaluated respiratory mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. In lung tissue we measured airspace enlargement, quantified neutrophils, TNFα-, MMP-9-, MMP-12-, TIMP-1-, iNOS-, and eNOS-positive cells, 8-iso-PGF2α, collagen, and elastic fibers in alveolar septa and airways. MUC-5-positive cells were quantified only in airways. Results. BbCI reduced elastase-induced changes in pulmonary mechanics, airspace enlargement and elastase-induced increases in total cells, and neutrophils in BALF. BbCI reduced macrophages and neutrophils positive cells in alveolar septa and neutrophils and TNFα-positive cells in airways. BbCI attenuated elastic and collagen fibers, MMP-9- and MMP-12-positive cells, and isoprostane and iNOS-positive cells in alveolar septa and airways. BbCI reduced MUC5ac-positive cells in airways. Conclusions. BbCI improved lung mechanics and reduced lung inflammation and airspace enlargement and increased oxidative stress levels induced by elastase. BbCI may have therapeutic potential in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. PMID:28466019

  5. [Prions and proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors: structural analogs and their consequences. II. Dynamics of prion diseases].

    PubMed

    Verevka, S V

    2000-01-01

    The assumption about pathogenic prions as the proteins supplying the extracellular proteinases transport into intracellular space permits to bring the pathogenesis of prion diseases to order of the known and partially proved process regarding the case of prion diseases. We present the mathematical model of the dynamics of prion pathogenesis explaining the existence of the minimal infectious dose and small influence of its exceeding on the duration of long-term latent period of the disease. According to the model proposed the transformation of the neuronal cell into PrPSc breeder is the result of proteolytic damage of shaperoning system caused by accumulation in the cell of some crucial amount of proteinase-transporting prions. Such an accumulation is considered as the result of successive and centripheral lay-by-lay transformation of compact cellular locus from higher affinity to prions to normal one. The formation in the moveable frontier lays of the wave with high prion consisting and its closing into the locus center leads to dramatic splash of prion concentration even at moderate difference between higher and normal affinity levels. The final concentration of prions depends mainly on the correlation between these affinities whilst on exceeding of some value the dimension of the locus is of no importance.

  6. Identification of a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor from Pithecellobium dumosum seeds with insecticidal properties and double activity.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A S; Migliolo, L; Aquino, R O; Ribeiro, J K C; Macedo, L L P; Andrade, L B S; Bemquerer, M P; Santos, E A; Kiyota, S; Sales, M P

    2007-09-05

    A trypsin inhibitor, PdKI, was purified from Pithecellobium dumosum seeds by TCA precipitation, trypsin-sepharose chromatography, and reversed-phase-HPLC. PdKI was purified 217.6-fold and recovered 4.7%. SDS-PAGE showed that PdKI is a single polypeptide chain of 18.9 kDa and 19.7 kDa by MALDI-TOF. The inhibition on trypsin was stable in the pH range 2-10 and at a temperature of 50 degrees C. The Ki values were 3.56 x 10(-8)and 7.61 x 10(-7) M with competitive and noncompetitive inhibition mechanisms for trypsin and papain, respectively. The N-terminal sequence identified with members of Kunitz-type inhibitors from the Mimosoideae and Caesalpinoideae subfamilies. PdKI was effective against digestive proteinase from Zabrotes subfasciatus, Ceratitis capitata, Plodia interpunctella, Alabama argillaceae, and Callosobruchus maculatus, with 69, 66, 44, 38, and 29% inhibition, respectively. Results support that PdKI is a member of the Kunitz inhibitor family and its insecticidal properties indicate a potent insect antifeedant.

  7. Basis for the Specificity and Activation of the Serpin Protein Z-dependent Proteinase Inhibitor (ZPI) as an Inhibitor of Membrane-associated Factor Xa

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T.; Gettins, Peter G.W.

    2012-12-13

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction {approx}2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca{sup 2+}. To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ{sub {Delta}GD}) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing {approx}5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only {approx}2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional {approx}1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  8. Basis for the specificity and activation of the serpin protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI) as an inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Dementiev, Alexey; Olson, Steven T; Gettins, Peter G W

    2010-06-25

    The serpin ZPI is a protein Z (PZ)-dependent specific inhibitor of membrane-associated factor Xa (fXa) despite having an unfavorable P1 Tyr. PZ accelerates the inhibition reaction approximately 2000-fold in the presence of phospholipid and Ca(2+). To elucidate the role of PZ, we determined the x-ray structure of Gla-domainless PZ (PZ(DeltaGD)) complexed with protein Z-dependent proteinase inhibitor (ZPI). The PZ pseudocatalytic domain bound ZPI at a novel site through ionic and polar interactions. Mutation of four ZPI contact residues eliminated PZ binding and membrane-dependent PZ acceleration of fXa inhibition. Modeling of the ternary Michaelis complex implicated ZPI residues Glu-313 and Glu-383 in fXa binding. Mutagenesis established that only Glu-313 is important, contributing approximately 5-10-fold to rate acceleration of fXa and fXIa inhibition. Limited conformational change in ZPI resulted from PZ binding, which contributed only approximately 2-fold to rate enhancement. Instead, template bridging from membrane association, together with previously demonstrated interaction of the fXa and ZPI Gla domains, resulted in an additional approximately 1000-fold rate enhancement. To understand why ZPI has P1 tyrosine, we examined a P1 Arg variant. This reacted at a diffusion-limited rate with fXa, even without PZ, and predominantly as substrate, reflecting both rapid acylation and deacylation. P1 tyrosine thus ensures that reaction with fXa or most other arginine-specific proteinases is insignificant unless PZ binds and localizes ZPI and fXa on the membrane, where the combined effects of Gla-Gla interaction, template bridging, and interaction of fXa with Glu-313 overcome the unfavorability of P1 Tyr and ensure a high rate of reaction as an inhibitor.

  9. Discovery of small molecule inhibitors of ubiquitin-like poxvirus proteinase I7L using homology modeling and covalent docking approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Byrd, Chelsea M.; Tseitin, Vladimir; Dai, Dongcheng; Raush, Eugene; Totrov, Maxim; Abagyan, Ruben; Jordan, Robert; Hruby, Dennis E.

    2007-10-01

    Essential for viral replication and highly conserved among poxviridae, the vaccinia virus I7L ubiquitin-like proteinase (ULP) is an attractive target for development of smallpox antiviral drugs. At the same time, the I7L proteinase exemplifies several interesting challenges from the rational drug design perspective. In the absence of a published I7L X-ray structure, we have built a detailed 3D model of the I7L ligand binding site (S2-S2' pocket) based on exceptionally high structural conservation of this site in proteases of the ULP family. The accuracy and limitations of this model were assessed through comparative analysis of available X-ray structures of ULPs, as well as energy based conformational modeling. The 3D model of the I7L ligand binding site was used to perform covalent docking and VLS of a comprehensive library of about 230,000 available ketone and aldehyde compounds. Out of 456 predicted ligands, 97 inhibitors of I7L proteinase activity were confirmed in biochemical assays (˜20% overall hit rate). These experimental results both validate our I7L ligand binding model and provide initial leads for rational optimization of poxvirus I7L proteinase inhibitors. Thus, fragments predicted to bind in the prime portion of the active site can be combined with fragments on non-prime side to yield compounds with improved activity and specificity.

  10. Dronerarone acts as a selective inhibitor of 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine binding to thyroid hormone receptor-alpha1: in vitro and in vivo evidence.

    PubMed

    Van Beeren, H C; Jong, W M C; Kaptein, E; Visser, T J; Bakker, O; Wiersinga, W M

    2003-02-01

    Dronedarone (Dron), without iodine, was developed as an alternative to the iodine-containing antiarrhythmic drug amiodarone (AM). AM acts, via its major metabolite desethylamiodarone, in vitro and in vivo as a thyroid hormone receptor alpha(1) (TRalpha(1)) and TRbeta(1) antagonist. Here we investigate whether Dron and/or its metabolite debutyldronedarone inhibit T(3) binding to TRalpha(1) and TRbeta(1) in vitro and whether dronedarone behaves similarly to amiodarone in vivo. In vitro, Dron had a inhibitory effect of 14% on the binding of T(3) to TRalpha(1), but not on TRbeta(1). Desethylamiodarone inhibited T(3) binding to TRalpha(1) and TRbeta(1) equally. Debutyldronedarone inhibited T(3) binding to TRalpha(1) by 77%, but to TRbeta(1) by only 25%. In vivo, AM increased plasma TSH and rT(3), and decreased T(3). Dron decreased T(4) and T(3), rT(3) did not change, and TSH fell slightly. Plasma total cholesterol was increased by AM, but remained unchanged in Dron-treated animals. TRbeta(1)-dependent liver low density lipoprotein receptor protein and type 1 deiodinase activities decreased in AM-treated, but not in Dron-treated, animals. TRalpha(1)-mediated lengthening of the QTc interval was present in both AM- and Dron-treated animals. The in vitro and in vivo findings suggest that dronedarone via its metabolite debutyldronedarone acts as a TRalpha(1)-selective inhibitor.

  11. Proteins of circularly permuted sequence present within the same organism: The major serine proteinase inhibitor from Capsicum annuum seeds

    PubMed Central

    Antcheva, Nikolinka; Pintar, Alessandro; Patthy, András; Simoncsits, András; Barta, Endre; Tchorbanov, Bojidar; Pongor, Sándor

    2001-01-01

    The major serine proteinase inhibitor from bell pepper (Capsicum annuum, paprika) seeds was isolated, characterized, and sequenced, and its disulfide bond topology was determined. PSI-1.2 is a 52-amino-acid-long, cysteine-rich polypeptide that inhibits both trypsin (Ki = 4.6 × 10−9 M) and chymotrypsin (Ki = 1.1 × 10−8 M) and is a circularly permuted member of the potato type II inhibitor family. Mature proteins of this family are produced from precursor proteins containing two to eight repeat units that are proteolytically cleaved within, rather than between, the repeats. In contrast, PSI-1.2 corresponds to a complete repeat that was predicted as the putative ancestral protein of the potato type II family. To our knowledge, this is the first case in which two proteins related to each other by circular permutation are shown to exist in the same organism and are expressed within the same organ. PSI-1.2 is not derived from any of the known precursors, and it contains a unique amphiphilic segment in one of its loops. A systematic comparison of the related precursor repeat-sequences reveals common evolutionary patterns that are in agreement with the ancestral gene-duplication hypothesis. PMID:11604534

  12. Preliminary crystallographic studies of EcTI, a serine proteinase inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum seeds.

    PubMed

    Batista, I F; Nonato, M C; Bonfadini, M R; Beltramini, L M; Oliva, M L; Sampaio, M U; Sampaio, C A; Garratt, R C

    2001-04-01

    Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI) belongs to the Kunitz family of plant inhibitors, which are widely distributed in nature, especially in plant seeds. EcTI is composed of two polypeptide chains with a total of 174 residues, homologous to other inhibitors from the same family. EcTI crystals, which were obtained with the acupuncture-gel technique, diffract to 2.0 A resolution and belong to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 37.12, b = 38.42, c = 54.08 A, beta = 98.08 degrees. Molecular-replacement techniques using Erythrina caffra trypsin inhibitor (PDB code 1tie) as the search model indicate one monomer in the asymmetric unit. The secondary-structure content of EcTI was determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy, yielding values compatible with the expected topology.

  13. Altered sputum granzyme B and granzyme B/proteinase inhibitor-9 in patients with non-eosinophilic asthma.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Jodie L; Gibson, Peter G; Yang, Ian A; Upham, John; James, Alan; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    The non-eosinophilic phenotype of asthma (NEA) is associated with chronic airway inflammation and airway neutrophilia. An accumulation of apoptotic airway epithelial cells, if not efficiently cleared by efferocytosis, can undergo secondary necrosis, with the potential for inflammation of surrounding tissues. Apoptosis may occur via the T cell granzyme B pathway. The role of granzyme B in NEA is not known. The aim of this study was to investigate production of granzyme B and its inhibitor proteinase inhibitor (PI)-9 by T cells from induced sputum and compare expression between eosinophilic, NEA and healthy controls. We investigated T cell intracellular granzyme B and its inhibitor, PI-9, in sputum from healthy control subjects (n = 10), and patients with NEA (n = 22) or eosinophilic asthma (EA) (n = 15) using flow cytometry. Granzyme B expression and the ratio of granzyme B to PI-9 positive cells were highest in those with NEA for both CD3+ and CD4+ T cells. The expression of granzyme B was not statistically different between patients with NEA and EA; however, the ratio of granzyme B to PI-9 positive cells for CD3+ T cells was significantly higher in those with NEA compared with EA. Induced sputum provides a non-invasive tool for investigating T cell cytotoxic mediators in the various asthma subtypes. Granzyme B expression is increased in NEA and the contribution of granzyme B to chronic inflammation requires further study. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  14. Effect of the secretory leucocyte proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) on Candida albicans biological processes: a therapeutic alternative?

    PubMed

    Curvelo, José Alexandre da Rocha; Barreto, Anna Léa Silva; Portela, Maristela Barbosa; Alviano, Daniela Sales; Holandino, Carla; Souto-Padrón, Thaís; Soares, Rosangela Maria de Araújo

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of SLPI on the growth and biological processes of Candida albicans. Two C. albicans strains were used in this study, a clinical isolate resistant to fluconazole (PRI) and a reference strain ATCC 24433. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined according to the CLSI methodology. The influence of SLPI on secreted serine proteinase activities (SSP) was measured by the cleavage of specific substrate, and surface hydrophobicity was determined by the aqueous-hydrocarbon biphasic separation method. Flow cytometry was performed to investigate receptors for SLPI and variations in the cell wall mannoprotein expression. Interaction between yeast and epithelium was assessed using the MA-104 cells lineage. Ultrastructure was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). MIC values were calculated as 18 and 18.9μM for the PRI and ATCC 24433, respectively. SSP activity was reduced by 48.8% by 18μM of SLPI and cell surface hydrophobicity increased by 11.1%. Flow cytometry suggest the existence of SLPI binding sites on the surface of the yeast. Results showed a reduction in the expression of mannoproteins in 20.8% by the cells treated with 80μM of SLPI, and 18μM reduced the adhesion of yeasts to mammalian cells in 60.1%. TEM revealed ultrastructural changes in cells treated with 80μM of SLPI, such as the presence of membrane-like structures within the cytoplasm. SLPI exerts a significant influence on C. albicans viability and biological processes. Considering its constitutive and physiologic features, SLPI may become a promising tool for the development of new methodologies for the treatment and control of candidiasis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Water molecules participate in proteinase-inhibitor interactions: crystal structures of Leu18, Ala18, and Gly18 variants of turkey ovomucoid inhibitor third domain complexed with Streptomyces griseus proteinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, K.; Lu, W.; Anderson, S.; Laskowski, M.; James, M. N.

    1995-01-01

    Crystal structures of the complexes of Streptomyces griseus proteinase B (SGPB) with three P1 variants of turkey ovomucoid inhibitor third domain (OMTKY3), Leu18, Ala18, and Gly18, have been determined and refined to high resolution. Comparisons among these structures and of each with native, uncomplexed SGPB reveal that each complex features a unique solvent structure in the S1 binding pocket. The number and relative positions of water molecules bound in the S1 binding pocket vary according to the size of the side chain of the P1 residue. Water molecules in the S1 binding pocket of SGPB are redistributed in response to the complex formation, probably to optimize hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the inhibitor. There are extensive water-mediated hydrogen bonds in the interfaces of the complexes. In all complexes, Asn 36 of OMTKY3 participates in forming hydrogen bonds, via water molecules, with residues lining the S1 binding pocket of SGPB. For a homologous series of aliphatic straight side chains, Gly18, Ala18, Abu18, Ape18, and Ahp18 variants, the binding free energy is a linear function of the hydrophobic surface area buried in the interface of the corresponding complexes. The resulting constant of proportionality is 34.1 cal mol-1 A-2. These structures confirm that the binding of OMTKY3 to the preformed S1 pocket in SGPB involves no substantial structural disturbances that commonly occur in the site-directed mutagenesis studies of interior residues in other proteins, thus providing one of the most reliable assessments of the contribution of the hydrophobic effect to protein-complex stability. PMID:8535235

  16. Interaction of new kinase inhibitors cabozantinib and tofacitinib with human serum alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. A comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular Docking approach.

    PubMed

    Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-04-15

    In the current study we have investigated the interaction of newly approved kinase inhibitors namely Cabozantinib (CBZ) and Tofacitinib (TFB) with human Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) under simulated physiological conditions using fluorescence quenching measurements, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking methods. CBZ and TFB binds to AAG with significant affinity and the calculated binding constant for the drugs lie in the order of 10(4). With the increase in temperature the binding constant values decreased for both CBZ and TFB. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from AAG to CBZ and TFB suggested the fluorescence intensity of AAG was quenched by the two studied drugs via the formation of a non-fluorescent complex in the static manner. The molecular distance r value calculated from FRET is around 2 nm for both drugs, fluorescence spectroscopy data was employed for the study of thermodynamic parameters, standard Gibbs free energy change at 300 K was calculated as -5.234 kcal mol(-1) for CBZ-AAG interaction and -6.237 kcal mol(-1) for TFB-AAG interaction, standard enthalpy change and standard entropy change for CBZ-AAG interaction are -9.553 kcal mol(-1) and -14.618 cal mol(-1) K(-1) respectively while for AAG-TFB interaction, standard enthalpy and standard entropy change was calculated as 4.019 kcal mol(-1) and 7.206 cal mol(-1) K(-1) respectively. Protein binding of the two drugs caused the tertiary structure alterations. Dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated the reduction in the hydrodynamic radii of the protein. Furthermore molecular docking results suggested the Hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding were the interactive forces in the binding process of CBZ to AAG while in case of TFB only hydrophobic interactions were found to be involved, overlap of the binding site for two studied drugs on the AAG molecule was revealed by docking results.

  17. Interaction of new kinase inhibitors cabozantinib and tofacitinib with human serum alpha-1 acid glycoprotein. A comprehensive spectroscopic and molecular Docking approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajmal, Mohammad Rehan; Abdelhameed, Ali Saber; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-04-01

    In the current study we have investigated the interaction of newly approved kinase inhibitors namely Cabozantinib (CBZ) and Tofacitinib (TFB) with human Alpha-1 acid glycoprotein (AAG) under simulated physiological conditions using fluorescence quenching measurements, circular dichroism, dynamic light scattering and molecular docking methods. CBZ and TFB binds to AAG with significant affinity and the calculated binding constant for the drugs lie in the order of 104. With the increase in temperature the binding constant values decreased for both CBZ and TFB. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from AAG to CBZ and TFB suggested the fluorescence intensity of AAG was quenched by the two studied drugs via the formation of a non-fluorescent complex in the static manner. The molecular distance r value calculated from FRET is around 2 nm for both drugs, fluorescence spectroscopy data was employed for the study of thermodynamic parameters, standard Gibbs free energy change at 300K was calculated as - 5.234 kcal mol- 1 for CBZ-AAG interaction and - 6.237 kcal mol- 1 for TFB-AAG interaction, standard enthalpy change and standard entropy change for CBZ-AAG interaction are - 9.553 kcal mol- 1 and - 14.618 cal mol- 1K- 1 respectively while for AAG-TFB interaction, standard enthalpy and standard entropy change was calculated as 4.019 kcal mol- 1 and 7.206 cal mol- 1K- 1 respectively. Protein binding of the two drugs caused the tertiary structure alterations. Dynamic light scattering measurements demonstrated the reduction in the hydrodynamic radii of the protein. Furthermore molecular docking results suggested the Hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding were the interactive forces in the binding process of CBZ to AAG while in case of TFB only hydrophobic interactions were found to be involved, overlap of the binding site for two studied drugs on the AAG molecule was revealed by docking results.

  18. Effects of an alpha1A/D-adrenoceptor antagonist, naftopidil, and a phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, tadalafil, on urinary bladder remodeling in rats with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kadekawa, Katsumi; Majima, Tsuyoshi; Kawamorita, Naoki; Okada, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Kenichi; Tyagi, Pradeep; Sugaya, Kimio; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2017-08-01

    In order to clarify whether an alpha1A/D-adrenoceptor (α1 A/D-AR) antagonist, naftopidil, or a phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor, tadalafil, prevents bladder wall remodeling after spinal cord injury (SCI), we examined the bladder and urethral activity as well as ischemic and fibrotic changes in the bladder using SCI rats with or without naftopidil or tadalafil treatment. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups: (1) normal (spinal cord intact); (2) vehicle SCI; (3) naftopidil SCI; and (4) tadalafil SCI groups. In SCI groups, rats underwent Th9-10 spinal cord transection followed by oral application of vehicle, naftopidil (20 mg/kg/day) or tadalafil (2 mg/kg/day) for 1, 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Bladder and urethral pressures, mRNA levels of fibrosis-related molecules and ischemia markers and the composition of bladder collagen and elastin were evaluated. Naftopidil treatment reduced the upregulation of mRNA levels of ischemia and fibrosis markers at the early phase of SCI, and ameliorated the decrease of bladder compliance and voiding efficiency, and the increase of urethral pressure and collagen concentration in the bladder wall at the late phase of SCI. Tadalafil treatment reduced the upregulation of mRNA levels of fibrosis markers, the decrease of bladder compliance and the increase of collagen concentration at the late phase of SCI. These results suggest that naftopidil and tadalafil treatments improved the bladder remodeling shown by increased bladder collagen contents after SCI in a different time course. Thus, these treatments could be effective for reducing the SCI-related tissue remodeling in the bladder. Neurourol. Urodynam. 9999:XX-XX, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Aflatoxin contamination in soybeans: role of proteinase inhibitors, zinc availability, and seed coat integrity.

    PubMed Central

    Stössel, P

    1986-01-01

    Soybean trypsin inhibitors are thought to ward off pathogens. Studies with aflatoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus, frequent soybean contaminants, revealed that trypsin inhibitors do not affect the growth of these fungi and aflatoxin production. Further, the availability of zinc, an essential mineral for aflatoxin synthesis that was thought to explain increased aflatoxin accumulation in cooked compared with raw soybeans, was shown to decrease upon cooking. Seed coat integrity, ensuring limited access and a low moisture content, is responsible for the slow colonization of the seed by A. flavus. Images PMID:3089160

  20. Cysteine proteinase inhibitor Act d 4 is a functional allergen contributing to the clinical symptoms of kiwifruit allergy.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Milica M; Milovanovic, Mina; Burazer, Lidija; Vuckovic, Olga; Hoffmann-Sommergruber, Karin; Knulst, Andre C; Lindner, Buko; Petersen, Arnd; Jankov, Ratko; Gavrovic-Jankulovic, Marija

    2010-03-01

    Kiwifruit has become a frequent cause of fruit allergy in the recent years. The molecular basis of type I hypersensitivity to kiwifruit is attributed to 11 IUIS allergens, with Act d 1, Act d 2 and Act d 5 characterized in extenso. Evaluation of the allergenic properties of Act d 4, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor from green kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) was performed in this study. Identity of the purified glycoprotein was determined by Edman degradation and by mass fingerprint whereby more than 90% of the primary structure of the mature kiwifruit cystatin was confirmed. Using MALDI TOF analysis, molecular masses of 10902.5 and 11055.2 Da were detected for Act d 4, respectively. Positive skin prick reactivity with Act d 4 was induced in three kiwifruit allergic patients, as well as the upregulation of CD63 and CD203c molecules in the basophile activation assay. The IgE reactivity was detected in dot blot analysis while Western blot analysis was negative using sera from six kiwifruit patients, suggesting the presence of conformational IgE epitopes on the Act d 4 molecule. As activator of effector cells in type I hypersensitivity Act d 4 is a functional allergen contributing to the clinical symptoms of kiwifruit allergy.

  1. Expression, purification and characterization of recombinant human serine proteinase inhibitor Kazal-type 6 (SPINK6) in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hairong; Huang, Jinjiang; Li, Guodong; Ge, Kuikui; Wu, Hongyu; Huang, Qingshan

    2012-03-01

    Human serine proteinase inhibitor Kazal-type 6 (SPINK6) belongs to the medically important SPINK family. Malfunctions of SPINK members are linked to many diseases, including pancreatitis, skin barrier defects, and cancer. SPINK6 has been shown to selectively inhibit Kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) in human skin. As a SPINK protein, it contains a typical Kazal domain, which requires three intramolecular disulfide bonds for correct folding and activity. Preparation of functional protein is a prerequisite for studying this important human factor. Here, we report the successful generation of tagless SPINK6 using a yeast expression system. The recombinant protein was secreted and purified by cation exchange and size-exclusion chromatography. The protein identity was confirmed by MALDI-TOF MS and N-terminal sequencing. Pichia pastoris-derived recombinant human SPINK6 (rhSPINK6) showed higher inhibitory activity against Kallikrein-related peptidase 14 (KLK14) (K(i)=0.16 nM) than previously reported Escherichia coli-derived rhSPINK6 (K(i)=0.5 nM). This protein also exhibited moderate inhibition of bovine trypsin (K(i)=33 nM), while previous E. coli-derived rhSPINK6 did not. The results indicate that P. pastoris is a better system to generate active rhSPINK6, warranting further studies on this medically important SPINK family candidate.

  2. The Plant-Derived Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein Proteinase Inhibitor (rBbKI) Attenuates Elastase-Induced Emphysema in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Olivera, Bruno Tadeu; Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Neto dos Santos Nunes, Natalia; Olivo, Clarice Rosa; Vilela de Brito, Marlon; Prado, Carla Máximo; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Elastase mediates important oxidative actions during the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, few resources for the inhibition of elastase have been investigated. Our study evaluated the ability of the recombinant plant derived Bauhinia bauhinioides Kallikrein proteinase Inhibitor (rBbKI) to modulate elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation. Methods. C57Bl/6 mice were given intratracheal elastase (ELA group) or saline (SAL group) and were treated intraperitoneally with rBbKI (ELA-rBbKI and SAL-rBbKI groups). At day 28, the following analyses were performed: (I) lung mechanics, (II) exhaled nitric oxide (ENO), (III) bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and (IV) lung immunohistochemical staining. Results. In addition to decreasing mechanical alterations and alveolar septum disruption, rBbKI reduced the number of cells in the BALF and decreased the cellular expression of TNF-α, MMP-9, MMP-12, TIMP-1, eNOS, and iNOS in airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. rBbKI decreased the volume proportion of 8-iso-PGF2α, collagen, and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. A reduction in the number of MUC-5-positive cells in the airway walls was also observed. Conclusion. rBbKI reduced elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling. rBbKI may be a potential pharmacological tool for COPD treatment. PMID:27528793

  3. The refined 2.4 A X-ray crystal structure of recombinant human stefin B in complex with the cysteine proteinase papain: a novel type of proteinase inhibitor interaction.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, M T; Laber, B; Bode, W; Huber, R; Jerala, R; Lenarcic, B; Turk, V

    1990-01-01

    A stoichiometric complex of human stefin B and carboxymethylated papain has been crystallized in a trigonal crystal form. Data to 2.37 A resolution were collected using the area detector diffractometer FAST. The crystal structure of the complex has been solved by Patterson search techniques using papain as search model. Starting from the structure of chicken cystatin, the stefin structure was elucidated through cycles of model building and crystallographic refinement. The current crystallographic R factor is 0.19. Like cystatin, the stefin molecule consists of a five stranded beta-sheet wrapped around a five turn alpha-helix, but with an additional carboxy terminal strand running along the convex side of the sheet. Topological equivalence of stefin and cystatin reveal the previous sequence alignment to be incorrect in part, through deletion of the intermediate helix. The conserved residues form a tripartite wedge, which slots into the papain active site as proposed through consideration of the tertiary structures of the individual components (Bode et al., 1988). The main interactions are provided by the amino terminal 'trunk' (occupying the 'unprimed' subsites of the enzyme), and by the first hairpin loop, containing the highly conserved QVVAG sequence, with minor contributions from the second hairpin loop. The carboxyl terminus of stefin provides an additional interaction region with respect to cystatin. The interaction is dominated by hydrophobic contacts. Inhibition by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors is fundamentally different to that observed for the serine proteinase inhibitors. Images Fig. 5. Fig. 6. Fig. 8. PMID:2347312

  4. α1Proteinase Inhibitor Regulates CD4+ Lymphocyte Levels and Is Rate Limiting in HIV-1 Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bristow, Cynthia L.; Babayeva, Mariya A.; LaBrunda, Michelle; Mullen, Michael P.; Winston, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Background The regulation of adult stem cell migration through human hematopoietic tissue involves the chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1) and its receptor CXCR4 (CD184). In addition, human leukocyte elastase (HLE) plays a key role. When HLE is located on the cell surface (HLECS), it acts not as a proteinase, but as a receptor for α1proteinase inhibitor (α1PI, α1antitrypsin, SerpinA1). Binding of α1PI to HLECS forms a motogenic complex. We previously demonstrated that α1PI deficiency attends HIV-1 disease and that α1PI augmentation produces increased numbers of immunocompetent circulating CD4+ lymphocytes. Herein we investigated the mechanism underlying the α1PI deficiency that attends HIV-1 infection. Methods and Findings Active α1PI in HIV-1 subjects (median 17 µM, n = 35) was significantly below normal (median 36 µM, p<0.001, n = 30). In HIV-1 uninfected subjects, CD4+ lymphocytes were correlated with the combined factors α1PI, HLECS+ lymphocytes, and CXCR4+ lymphocytes (r2 = 0.91, p<0.001, n = 30), but not CXCL12. In contrast, in HIV-1 subjects with >220 CD4 cells/µl, CD4+ lymphocytes were correlated solely with active α1PI (r2 = 0.93, p<0.0001, n = 26). The monoclonal anti-HIV-1 gp120 antibody 3F5 present in HIV-1 patient blood is shown to bind and inactivate human α1PI. Chimpanzee α1PI differs from human α1PI by a single amino acid within the 3F5-binding epitope. Unlike human α1PI, chimpanzee α1PI did not bind 3F5 or become depleted following HIV-1 challenge, consistent with the normal CD4+ lymphocyte levels and benign syndrome of HIV-1 infected chimpanzees. The presence of IgG-α1PI immune complexes correlated with decreased CD4+ lymphocytes in HIV-1 subjects. Conclusions This report identifies an autoimmune component of HIV-1 disease that can be overcome therapeutically. Importantly, results identify an achievable vaccine modification with the novel objective to protect against AIDS as opposed to the current objective to

  5. Increased proteinase inhibitor-9 (PI-9) and reduced granzyme B in lung cancer: mechanism for immune evasion?

    PubMed

    Soriano, Cyd; Mukaro, Violet; Hodge, Greg; Ahern, Jessica; Holmes, Mark; Jersmann, Hubertus; Moffat, David; Meredith, David; Jurisevic, Craig; Reynolds, Paul N; Hodge, Sandra

    2012-07-01

    Cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cells mount immune responses to cancer via cytotoxic pathways including granzyme B. Cancer cells are also known to develop immune evasion mechanisms. We hypothesised that lung cancer cells would over-express the granzyme B-inhibitor, proteinase inhibitor-9 (PI-9) and down-regulate granzyme B expression by neighbouring CD8(+) T-cells. We investigated PI-9 expression in lung cancer cell lines, and primary lung cancer cells obtained at curative lung resection from cancer patients with/without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Granzyme B and PI-9 expression was also determined in CD8(+) T-cells from the cancer and non-cancer areas of resected lung tissue and from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). We then evaluated the effects of conditioned media from lung cancer cell lines on granzyme B expression and the cytotoxic activity of CD8(+) T-cells. PI-9 was highly expressed in lung cancer cell lines. Increased PI-9 expression was also observed in primary cancer cells vs. epithelial cells from non-cancer tissue or bronchial brushing-derived normal primary large airway epithelial cells. Expression significantly correlated with cancer stage. Significantly reduced granzyme B was noted in CD8(+) T-cells from cancer vs. non-cancer tissue. Granzyme B production by CD8(+) T-cells was reduced in the presence of conditioned media from lung cancer cell lines. Our data suggest that lung cancer cells utilise their increased PI-9 expression to protect from granzyme B-mediated cytotoxicity as an immune evasion mechanism, a function that increases with lung cancer stage.

  6. Purification and biochemical characterization of a serine proteinase inhibitor from Derris trifoliata Lour. seeds: insight into structural and antimalarial features.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Arindam; Babu, Cherukuri R

    2009-04-01

    A potent serine proteinase inhibitor was isolated and characterized from the seeds of the tropical legume liana, Derris trifoliata (DtTCI) by ammonium sulfate precipitation, ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration chromatography. SDS-PAGE as well as MALDI-TOF analysis showed that DtTCI is a single polypeptide chain with a molecular mass of approximately 20 kDa. DtTCI has three isoinhibitors (pI: 4.55, 5.34 and 5.72) and, inhibited both trypsin and chymotrypsin in a 1:1 molar ratio. Both Dixon plots and Lineweaver-Burk double reciprocal plots revealed a competitive inhibition of trypsin and chymotrypsin activity, with inhibition constants (K(i)) of 1.7x10(-10) and 1.25x10(-10) M, respectively. N-terminal sequence of DtTCI showed over 50% similarity with numerous Kunitz-type inhibitors of the Papilionoideae subfamily. High pH amplitude and broad temperature optima were noted for DtTCI, and time course experiments indicated a gradual loss in inhibitory potency on treatment with dithiothreitol (DTT). Circular Dichroism (CD) spectrum of native DtTCI revealed an unordered structure whereas exposure to thermal-pH extremes, DTT and guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn HCl) suggested that an abundance of beta-sheets along with intramolecular disulfide bonds provide conformational stability to the active site of DtTCI, and that severity of denaturants cause structural modifications promoting inhibitory inactivity. Antimalarial studies of DtTCI indicate it to be a potent antiparasitic agent.

  7. Leucaena leucocephala serine proteinase inhibitor: primary structure and action on blood coagulation, kinin release and rat paw edema.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M L; Souza-Pinto, J C; Batista, I F; Araujo, M S; Silveira, V F; Auerswald, E A; Mentele, R; Eckerskorn, C; Sampaio, M U; Sampaio, C A

    2000-03-07

    A serine proteinase inhibitor isolated from Leucaena leucocephala seeds (LlTI) was purified to homogeneity by acetone fractionation, ion exchange chromatography, gel filtration and reverse phase chromatography (HPLC). SDS-PAGE indicated a protein with M(r) 20000 and two polypeptide chains (alpha-chain, M(r) 15000, and beta-chain, M(r) 5000), the sequence being determined by automatic Edman degradation and by mass spectroscopy. LlTI is a 174 amino acid residue protein which shows high homology to plant Kunitz inhibitors, especially those double chain proteins purified from the Mimosoideae subfamily. LlTI inhibits plasmin (K(i) 3.2 x 10(-10) M), human plasma kallikrein (K(i) 6.3 x 10(-9) M), trypsin (K(i) 2.5 x 10(-8) M) and chymotrypsin (K(i) 1.4 x 10(-8) M). Factor XIIa activity is inhibited but K(i) was not determined, and factor Xa, tissue kallikrein and thrombin are not inhibited by LlTI. The action of LlTI on enzymes that participate in the blood clotting extrinsic pathway is confirmed by the prolongation of activated partial thromboplastin time, used as clotting time assay. The inhibition of the fibrinolytic activity of plasmin was confirmed on the hydrolysis of fibrin plates. LlTI inhibits kinin release from high molecular weight kininogen by human plasma kallikrein in vitro and, administered intravenously, causes a decrease in paw edema induced by carrageenin or heat in male Wistar rats. In addition, lower concentrations of bradykinin were found in limb perfusion fluids of LlTI-treated rats.

  8. Affinity and Western blotting reveal homologies between ovine intervertebral disc serine proteinase inhibitory proteins and bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Melrose, J; Shen, B; Ghosh, P

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess any similarities between ovine intervertebral disc (IVD) serine proteinase inhibitory proteins (SPIs) and known mammalian IVD SPIs. Ovine IVDs were dissected into the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus and the tissue finely diced then extracted with 4 M guanidine hydrochloride. The tissue extracts were subjected to caesium chloride density gradient ultracentrifugation to separate the large high buoyant density (rho > 1.5 g/mL) proteoglycans from the SPI proteins of low buoyant density (rho < 1.33 g/mL). The top two ultracentrifuge fractions containing the SPIs of interest were subjected to enzyme linked immunosorbent analysis (ELISA) and also examined by Western and Affinity blotting using an antibody to bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and biotinylated trypsin respectively for detection and an alkaline phosphatase 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl phosphate/nitro blue tetrazolium system for visualisation. The major SPI proteins present in the Western and Affinity blots were 34-36 kDa species, minor 12 and 16, and 85 and 120 kDa species were also present. Qualitatively similar results were obtained for each respective tissue zone of the lumbar and lumbosacral disc specimens examined. Densitometric analysis of the major 34-36 kDa SPI bands visualised on Western and Affinity blots using NIH 1.61.1 image analysis software indicated that lumbar IVD samples contained higher levels of this SPI species than lumbosacral IVD samples. ELISA confirmed that lumbar IVD extracts contained quantitatively higher levels of BPTI equivalents per g of tissue extracted than lumbosacral IVDs. This study therefore has demonstrated that the ovine disc contains a range of SPI species which share some homology with bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and in this respect are similar to SPIs previously demonstrated in canine IVDs.

  9. A three-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor exhibiting domain inhibitory and bacteriostatic activities from freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Cang; Wang, Xian-Wei; Wang, Zong-Heng; Zhao, Xiao-Fan; Wang, Jin-Xing

    2009-12-01

    In crustaceans, Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in hemolymph are believed to function as regulators of the host-defense reactions or inhibitors against proteinases from microorganisms. In this study, we report a Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor, named hcPcSPI1, from freshwater crayfish (Procambarus clarkii). We found that hcPcSPI1 is composed of a putative signal peptide, an RGD motif, and three tandem Kazal-type domains with the domain P1 residues L, L and E, respectively. Mainly, hcPcSPI1 was detected in hemocytes as well as in the heart, gills, and intestine at both the mRNA and protein levels. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that hcPcSPI1 in hemocytes was upregulated by the stimulation of Esherichia coli (8099) or became decreased after a white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge. In addition, hcPcSPI1 and its three independent domains were overexpressed and purified to explore their potential functions. All four proteins inhibited subtilisin A and proteinase K, but not alpha-chymotypsin or trypsin. Recombinant hcPcSPI1 could firmly attach to Gram-negative bacteria E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae; Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Staphylococcus aureus; fungi Candida albicans and Saccharomyce cerevisiae, and only domain 1 was responsible for the binding to E. coli and S. aureus. In addition, recombinant hcPcSPI1 was also found to possess bacteriostatic activity against the B. subtilis and B. thuringiensis. Domains 2 and 3 contributed mainly to these bacteriostatic activities. All results suggested that hcPcSPI1 might play important roles in the innate immunity of crayfish.

  10. cDNA cloning and heterologous expression of a wheat proteinase inhibitor of subtilisin and chymotrypsin (WSCI) that interferes with digestive enzymes of insect pests.

    PubMed

    Di Gennaro, Simone; Ficca, Anna G; Panichi, Daniela; Poerio, Elia

    2005-04-01

    A cDNA encoding the proteinase inhibitor WSCI (wheat subtilisin/chymotrypsin inhibitor) was isolated by RT-PCR. Degenerate oligonucleotide primers were designed based on the amino acid sequence of WSCI and on the nucleotide sequence of the two homologous inhibitors (CI-2A and CI-2B) isolated from barley. For large-scale production, wsci cDNA was cloned into the E. coli vector pGEX-2T. The fusion protein GST-WSCI was efficiently produced in the bacterial expression system and, as the native inhibitor, was capable of inhibiting bacterial subtilisin, mammalian chymotrypsins and chymotrypsin-like activities present in crude extracts of a number of insect larvae ( Helicoverpa armigera , Plodia interpunctella and Tenebrio molitor ). The recombinant protein produced was also able to interfere with chymotrypsin-like activity isolated from immature wheat caryopses. These findings support a physiological role for this inhibitor during grain maturation.

  11. Overexpression of a Weed (Solanum americanum) Proteinase Inhibitor in Transgenic Tobacco Results in Increased Glandular Trichome Density and Enhanced Resistance to Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming; Wang, Zhaoyu; Li, Huapeng; Xia, Kuai-Fei; Cai, Yinpeng; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2009-01-01

    In this study we produced transgenic tobacco plants by overexpressing a serine proteinase inhibitor gene, SaPIN2a, from the American black nightshade Solanum americanum under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. SaPIN2a was properly transcribed and translated as indicated by Northern blot and Western blot analyses. Functional integrity of SaPIN2a in transgenic plants was confirmed by proteinase inhibitory activity assay. Bioassays for insect resistance showed that SaPIN2a-overexpressing transgenic tobacco plants were more resistant to cotton bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) and tobacco cutworm (Spodoptera litura) larvae, two devastating pests of important crop plants, than the control plants. Interestingly, overexpression of SaPIN2a in transgenic tobacco plants resulted in a significant increase in glandular trichome density and a promotion of trichome branching, which could also provide an additional resistance mechanism in transgenic plants against insect pests. Therefore, SaPIN2a could be used as an alternative proteinase inhibitor for the production of insect-resistant transgenic plants. PMID:19468345

  12. Interaction between Kazal serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2 and viral protein WSV477 reduces the replication of white spot syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Ponprateep, Sirikwan; Phiwsaiya, Kornsunee; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien

    2013-09-01

    White spot syndrome (WSS) is a viral disease caused by white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) which leads to severe mortality in cultured penaeid shrimp. In response to WSSV infection in Penaeus monodon, a Kazal serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2, normally stored in the granules of granular and semi-granular hemocytes is up-regulated and found to deter the viral replication. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we have identified a viral target protein, namely WSV477. Instead of being a proteinase, the WSV477 was reported to be a Cys2/Cys2-type zinc finger regulatory protein having ATP/GTP-binding activity. In vitro pull down assay confirmed the protein-protein interaction between rSPIPm2 and rWSV477. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the SPIPm2 and WSV477 were co-localized in the cytoplasm of shrimp hemocytes. Using RNA interference, the silencing of WSV477 resulted in down-regulated of viral late gene VP28, the same result obtained with SPIPm2. In this instance, the SPIPm2 does not function as proteinase inhibitor but inhibit the regulatory function of WSV477.

  13. Occurrence of two distinct types of tissue inhibitors of metallo-proteinases-2 in Fugu rubripes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoyama, Yoshihiro; Tsukamoto, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tohru; Mizuta, Shohshi; Yoshinaka, Reiji

    2005-07-01

    In this study, genes of two distinct tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) from Japanese puffer fish Fugu rubripes, Fugu TIMP-2a and TIMP-2b, were cloned. The open reading frames of Fugu TIMP-2a and TIMP-2b cDNAs are composed of 660 and 657 nucleotides and 220 and 219 amino acids, respectively. Both Fugu TIMP-2s contain 12 cysteine residues, which might form six disulfide bonds as in other animals’ TIMP-2s. Reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the mRNAs of Fugu TIMP-2a and TIMP-2b to be expressed in some tissues examined with different expression patterns. These findings suggest that the two distinct Fugu TIMP-2s might perform different functions in Fugu tissues.

  14. Novel chemo-enzymatic oligomers of cinnamic acids as direct and indirect inhibitors of coagulation proteinases.

    PubMed

    Monien, Bernhard H; Henry, Brian L; Raghuraman, Arjun; Hindle, Michael; Desai, Umesh R

    2006-12-01

    Thrombin and factor Xa, two important procoagulant enzymes, have been prime targets for regulation of clotting through the direct and indirect mechanism of inhibition. Our efforts on exploiting the indirect mechanism led us to study a carboxylic acid-based scaffold, which displayed major acceleration in the inhibition of these enzymes [J. Med. Chem.2005, 48, 1269, 5360]. This work advances the study to chemo-enzymatically prepared oligomers of 4-hydroxycinnamic acids, DHPs, which display interesting anticoagulant properties. Oligomers, ranging in size from tetramers to pentadecamers, were prepared through peroxidase-catalyzed oxidative coupling of caffeic, ferulic, and sinapic acids, and sulfated using triethylamine-sulfur trioxide complex. Chromatographic, spectroscopic, and elemental studies suggest that the DHPs are heterogeneous, polydisperse preparations composed of inter-monomer linkages similar to those found in natural lignins. Measurement of activated thromboplastin and prothrombin time indicates that both the sulfated and unsulfated derivatives of the DHPs display anticoagulant activity, which is dramatically higher than that of the reference polyacrylic acids. More interestingly, this activity approaches that of low-molecular-weight heparin with the sulfated derivative showing approximately 2- to 3-fold greater potency than the unsulfated parent. Studies on the inhibition of factor Xa and thrombin indicate that the oligomers exert their anticoagulant effect through both direct and indirect inhibition mechanisms. This dual inhibition property of 4-hydroxycinnamic acid-based DHP oligomers is the first example in inhibitors of coagulation. This work puts forward a novel, non-heparin structure, which may be exploited for the design of potent, dual action inhibitors of coagulation through combinatorial virtual screening on a library of DHP oligomers.

  15. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-01-01

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemical data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found in WT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  16. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    DOE PAGES

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; ...

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemicalmore » data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in vivo

  17. AFM Imaging Reveals Topographic Diversity of Wild Type and Z Variant Polymers of Human α1-Proteinase Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gaczynska, Maria; Karpowicz, Przemyslaw; Stuart, Christine E.; Norton, Malgorzata G.; Teckman, Jeffrey H.; Marszal, Ewa; Osmulski, Pawel A.

    2016-03-23

    α1-Proteinase inhibitor (antitrypsin) is a canonical example of the serpin family member that binds and inhibits serine proteases. The natural metastability of serpins is crucial to carry out structural rearrangements necessary for biological activity. However, the enhanced metastability of the mutant Z variant of antitrypsin, in addition to folding defect, may substantially contribute to its polymerization, a process leading to incurable serpinopathy. The metastability also impedes structural studies on the polymers. There are no crystal structures of Z monomer or any kind of polymers larger than engineered wild type (WT) trimer. Our understanding of polymerization mechanisms is based on biochemical data using in vitro generated WT oligomers and molecular simulations. Here we applied atomic force microscopy (AFM) to compare topography of monomers, in vitro formed WT oligomers, and Z type polymers isolated from transgenic mouse liver. We found the AFM images of monomers closely resembled an antitrypsin outer shell modeled after the crystal structure. We confirmed that the Z variant demonstrated higher spontaneous propensity to dimerize than WT monomers. We also detected an unexpectedly broad range of different types of polymers with periodicity and topography depending on the applied method of polymerization. Short linear oligomers of unit arrangement similar to the Z polymers were especially abundant in heat-treated WT preparations. Long linear polymers were a prominent and unique component of liver extracts. However, the liver preparations contained also multiple types of oligomers of topographies undistinguishable from those found inWT samples polymerized with heat, low pH or guanidine hydrochloride treatments. In conclusion, we established that AFM is an excellent technique to assess morphological diversity of antitrypsin polymers, which is important for etiology of serpinopathies. These data also support previous, but controversial models of in

  18. Spatial and temporal expression patterns of diverse Pin-II proteinase inhibitor genes in Capsicum annuum Linn.

    PubMed

    Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Giri, Ashok P; Kumar, Pavan; Gupta, Vidya S

    2009-08-01

    Pin-II type proteinase inhibitor (PI) genes were cloned from fruit and stem tissues of Capsicum annuum L. var Phule Jyoti using primers designed from reported CanPI gene sequence (AF039398). In total, 21 novel CanPIs, members of the Pin-II PI family, were identified in the study, with three isoforms of 1-inhibitory repeat domain (IRD), eight isoforms of 2-IRD, three isoforms of 3-IRD, five isoforms of 4-IRD and two partial CanPI sequences. Most of the sequences showed variation (2 to 20%) in the deduced AA sequences which were pronounced close to the reactive site loop. Expression patterns of CanPIs in the fruit and stem tissues of mature C. annuum plants were shown to vary qualitatively and quantitatively using semi-quantitative RT-PCR expression analysis. In the fruit tissue, CanPIs with different IRDs (from 1 to 4) were expressed simultaneously. In stem tissue, 1- and 2-IRD CanPIs were strongly expressed along moderate expression of 3- and 4-IRD genes. Analysis of CanPI protein activity showed a range of active forms across the tissues. CanPI expression was differentially up-regulated upon wounding and insect attack. Although infestation by aphids (Myzus persicae) and lepidopteran pests (Spodoptera litura) specifically induced 4-IRD CanPIs, virus-infected leaves did not affect CanPI expression. Analysis of CanPI protein activity indicated that the up-regulation in CanPI expression was not always correlated with increase in PI activity. Our results demonstrated that CanPI expression is regulated spatially, temporally as well as qualitatively and quantitatively.

  19. Bmcystatin, a cysteine proteinase inhibitor characterized from the tick Boophilus microplus

    SciTech Connect

    Lima, Cassia A.; Sasaki, Sergio D.; Tanaka, Aparecida S. . E-mail: Tanaka.bioq@epm.br

    2006-08-18

    The bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is a blood-sucking animal, which is responsible for Babesia spp and Anaplasma marginale transmission for cattle. From a B. microplus fat body cDNA library, 465 selected clones were sequenced randomly and resulted in 60 Contigs. An open reading frame (ORF) contains 98 amino acids named Bmcystatin, due to 70% amino acid identity to a classical type 1 cystatin from Ixodes scapularis tick (GenBank Accession No. DQ066227). The Bmcystatin amino acid sequence analysis showed two cysteine residues, theoretical pI of 5.92 and M{sub r} of 11kDa. Bmcystatin gene was cloned in pET 26b vector and the protein expressed using bacteria Escherichia coli BL21 SI. Recombinant Bmcystatin (rBmcystatin) purified by affinity chromatography on Ni-NTA-agarose column and ionic exchange chromatography on HiTrap Q column presented molecular mass of 11kDa, by SDS-PAGE and the N-terminal amino acid sequenced revealed unprocessed N-terminal containing part of pelB signal sequence. Purified rBmcystatin showed to be a C1 cysteine peptidase inhibitor with K{sub i} value of 0.1 and 0.6nM for human cathepsin L and VTDCE (vitellin degrading cysteine endopeptidase), respectively. The rBmcystatin expression analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the amplification of a specific DNA sequence (294bp) in the fat body and ovary cDNA preparation. On the other hand, a protein band was detected in the fat body, ovary, and the salivary gland extracts using anti-Bmcystatin antibody by Western blot. The present results suggest a possible role of Bmcystatin in the ovary, even though the gene was cloned from the fat body, which could be another site of this protein synthesis.

  20. A unique downstream estrogen responsive unit mediates estrogen induction of proteinase inhibitor-9, a cellular inhibitor of IL-1beta- converting enzyme (caspase 1).

    PubMed

    Krieg, S A; Krieg, A J; Shapiro, D J

    2001-11-01

    Recently, proteinase inhibitor 9 (PI-9) was identified as the first endogenous inhibitor of caspase 1 (IL-1beta-converting enzyme). The regulation of PI-9 expression, therefore, has great importance in the control of inflammatory processes. We reported that PI-9 mRNA and protein are rapidly and directly induced by estrogen in human liver cells. Using transient transfections to assay PI-9 promoter truncations and mutations, we demonstrate that this strong estrogen induction is mediated by a unique downstream estrogen responsive unit (ERU) approximately 200 nucleotides downstream of the transcription start site. Using primers flanking the ERU in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrate estrogen-dependent binding of ER to the cellular PI-9 promoter. The ERU consists of an imperfect estrogen response element (ERE) palindrome immediately adjacent to a direct repeat containing two consensus ERE half-sites separated by 13 nucleotides (DR13). In transient transfections, all four of the ERE half-sites in the imperfect ERE and in the DR13 were important for estrogen inducibility. Transfected chicken ovalbumin upstream transcription factor I and II down-regulated estrogen-mediated expression from the ERU. EMSAs using purified recombinant human ERalpha demonstrate high-affinity binding of two ER complexes to the ERU. Further EMSAs showed that one ER dimer binds to an isolated DR13, supporting the view that one ER dimer binds to the imperfect ERE and one ER dimer binds to DR13. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting showed that purified ER protected all four of the half-sites in the ERU. Our finding that a direct repeat can function with an imperfect ERE palindrome to confer estrogen inducibility on a native gene extends the repertoire of DNA sequences able to function as EREs.

  1. Accelerated development of liver fibrosis in CCl4-treated rats by the weekly induction of acute phase response episodes: upregulation of alpha1(I) procollagen and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Greenwel, P; Rojkind, M

    1997-08-22

    Patients with alcoholic hepatitis have several manifestations of the acute phase response (APR) and have elevated blood levels of interleukin-1, interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We have previously shown that liver stellate cells express interleukin-6 mRNA and protein and respond to this cytokine with increased expression of alpha1(I) procollagen mRNA. We further showed that the production of an APR episode stimulates a transient expression of alpha1(I) procollagen mRNA in the liver. In this communication we demonstrate that the concomitant induction of a weekly APR episode in rats with a schedule of CCl4 to produce cirrhosis, accelerates the development of liver fibrosis. We show that the enhancement of liver fibrosis is due, in part, to further upregulation in the expression of alpha1(I) procollagen and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 mRNAs above values observed in control rats receiving only CCl4. The effect of the APR appears to have specificity since not all the mRNAs measured were equally affected. Altogether, these results suggest that increased blood or liver levels of APR cytokines, whether induced by APR episodes, endotoxin or other unrelated causes, may contribute to the development of liver fibrosis by enhancing the expression of type I collagen and of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 mRNAs.

  2. Utilization of the 1, 2, 3, 5-Thiatriazolidin-3-one 1, 1-Dioxide Scaffold in the Design of Potential Inhibitors of Human Neutrophil Proteinase 3

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Dengfeng; He, Guijia; Li, Yi; Lai, Zhong; Wei, Liuqing; Alliston, Kevin R.; Lushington, Gerald H.; Eichhorn, David M.; Groutas, William C.

    2010-01-01

    The S’ subsites of human neutrophil proteinase 3 (Pr 3) were probed by constructing diverse libraries of compounds based on the 1, 2, 3, 5-thiatriazolidin-3-one 1, 1-dioxide using combinational and click chemistry methods. The multiple points of diversity embodied in the heterocyclic scaffold render it well-suited to the exploration of the S’ subsites of Pr 3. Molecular modeling studies suggest that further exploration of the S’ subsites of Pr 3 using the aforementioned heterocyclic scaffold may lead to the identification of highly selective, reversible competitive inhibitors of Pr 3. PMID:20061159

  3. Isolation, characterization, and cDNA sequencing of alpha-1-antiproteinase-like protein from rainbow trout seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Mak, Monika; Mak, Paweł; Olczak, Mariusz; Szalewicz, Agata; Glogowski, Jan; Dubin, Adam; Watorek, Wiesław; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2004-03-17

    Seminal plasma of teleost fish contains serine proteinase inhibitors related to those present in blood. These inhibitors can be bound to Q-Sepharose and sequentially eluted with a NaCl gradient. In the present study, using a two-step procedure, we purified (73-fold to homogeneity) and characterized the inhibitor eluted as the second fraction of antitrypsin activity (inhibitor II) from Q-Sepharose. The molecular weight of this inhibitor was estimated to be 56 kDa with an isoelectric point of 5.4. It effectively inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin but was less effective against elastase. It formed SDS-stable complexes with cod and bovine trypsin. Inhibitor II appeared to be a glycoprotein. Carbohydrate content was determined to be 16%. N-terminal Edman sequencing allowed identification of the first 30 N-terminal amino acids HDGDHAGHTEDHHHHLHHIAGEAHPQHSHG and 25 amino acids within the reactive loop IMPMSLPDTIMLNRPFLLFILEDST. The N-terminal sequence did not match any known sequence, however, the sequence within the reactive loop was significantly similar to carp and mammalian alpha1-antiproteinases. Both sequences were used to construct primers and obtain a cDNA sequence from liver. The mRNA coding the protein is 1675 nt in length including a single open reading frame of 1281 nt that encodes 426 amino acid residues. Analysis of this sequence indicated the presence of putative conserved serpin domains and confirmed the similarity to carp alpha1-antiproteinase and mammalian alpha1-antiproteinase. Our results indicate that inhibitor II belongs to the serpin superfamily and is similar to alpha1-antiproteinase.

  4. [Extracellular proteinases of filamentous fungi as potential markers of phytopathogenesis].

    PubMed

    Dunaevskiĭ, Ia E; Gruban', T N; Beliakova, G A; Belozerskiĭ, M A

    2006-01-01

    The presence of proteins in the culture liquid of filamentous fungi under study was found to induce the secretion of proteinases. The inhibitory analysis of the major extracellular proteinases of the saprotrophic fungus Trichoderma harzianum and the phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata showed that they both belong to the group of serine proteinases. The substrate specificity of these proteinases and their sensitivity to inhibitors suggest that the enzyme of T. harzianum is a subtilisin-like proteinase and the enzyme of A. alternata is a trypsin-like proteinase. This difference between the proteinases may reflect the physiological difference between their producers (saprotroph and phytopathogen).

  5. Negative Effects of a Nonhost Proteinase Inhibitor of ~19.8 kDa from Madhuca indica Seeds on Developmental Physiology of Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner)

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Farrukh; Singh, Dushyant; Pandey, Prabhash K.

    2014-01-01

    An affinity purified trypsin inhibitor from the seed flour extracts of Madhuca indica (MiTI) on denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that MiTI consisted of a single polypeptide chain with molecular mass of ~19.8 kDa. MiTI inhibited the total proteolytic and trypsin-like activities of the midgut proteinases of Helicoverpa armigera larvae by 87.51% and 76.12%, respectively, at concentration of 5 µg/mL with an IC50 of 1.75 µg/mL against trypsin like midgut proteinases. The enzyme kinetic studies demonstrated that MiTI is a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 4.1 × 10−10 M for Helicoverpa trypsin like midgut proteinases. In vivo experiments with different concentrations of MiTI in artificial diet (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% w/w) showed an effective downfall in the larval body weight and an increase in larval mortality. The concentration of MiTI in the artificial diet to cause 50% mortality (LD50) of larvae was 1.5% w/w and that to cause reduction in mass of larvae by 50% (ED50) was 1.0% w/w. Nutritional indices observations suggest the toxic and adverse effects of MiTI on the growth and development of H. armigera larvae. The results suggest a strong bioinsecticidal potential of affinity purified MiTI which can be exploited in insect pest management of crop plants. PMID:25298962

  6. Two cysteine proteinase inhibitors from Arabidopsis thaliana, AtCYSa and AtCYSb, increasing the salt, drought, oxidation and cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinxin; Liu, Shenkui; Takano, Tetsuo

    2008-09-01

    Two cysteine proteinase inhibitors (cystatins) from Arabidopsis thaliana, designated AtCYSa and AtCYSb, were characterized. Recombinant GST-AtCYSa and GST-AtCYSb were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified. They inhibit the catalytic activity of papain, which is generally taken as evidence for cysteine proteinase inhibitor function. Northern blot analyses showed that the expressions of AtCYSa and AtCYSb gene in Arabidopsis cells and seedlings were strongly induced by multiple abiotic stresses from high salt, drought, oxidant, and cold. Interestingly, the promoter region of AtCYSa gene contains a dehydration-responsive element (DRE) and an abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive element (ABRE), which identifies it as a DREB1A and AREB target gene. Under normal conditions, AtCYSa was expressed in 35S: DREB1A and 35S: AREB1 plants at a higher level than in WT plants, while AtCYSa gene was expressed in 35S: DREB2A plants at the same level as in WT plants. Under stress conditions (salt, drought and cold), AtCYSa was expressed more in all three transgenic plants than in WT plants. Over-expression of AtCYSa and AtCYSb in transgenic yeast and Arabidopsis plants increased the resistance to high salt, drought, oxidative, and cold stresses. Taken together, these data raise the possibility of using AtCYSa and AtCYSb to genetically improve environmental stresses tolerance in plants.

  7. Determination of three-dimensional structures of proteins by simulated annealing with interproton distance restraints. Application to crambin, potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and barley serine proteinase inhibitor 2.

    PubMed

    Nilges, M; Gronenborn, A M; Brünger, A T; Clore, G M

    1988-04-01

    An automated method, based on the principle of simulated annealing, is presented for determining the three-dimensional structures of proteins on the basis of short (less than 5 A) interproton distance data derived from nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) measurements. The method makes use of Newton's equations of motion to increase temporarily the temperature of the system in order to search for the global minimum region of a target function comprising purely geometric restraints. These consist of interproton distances supplemented by bond lengths, bond angles, planes and soft van der Waals repulsion terms. The latter replace the dihedral, van der Waals, electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding potentials of the empirical energy function used in molecular dynamics simulations. The method presented involves the implementation of a number of innovations over our previous restrained molecular dynamics approach [Clore, G.M., Brünger, A.T., Karplus, M. and Gronenborn, A.M. (1986) J. Mol. Biol., 191, 523-551]. These include the development of a new effective potential for the interproton distance restraints whose functional form is dependent on the magnitude of the difference between calculated and target values, and the design and implementation of robust and fully automatic protocol. The method is tested on three systems: the model system crambin (46 residues) using X-ray structure derived interproton distance restraints, and potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor (CPI; 39 residues) and barley serine proteinase inhibitor 2 (BSPI-2; 64 residues) using experimentally derived interproton distance restraints. Calculations were carried out starting from the extended strands which had atomic r.m.s. differences of 57, 38 and 33 A with respect to the crystal structures of BSPI-2, crambin and CPI respectively. Unbiased sampling of the conformational space consistent with the restraints was achieved by varying the random number seed used to assign the initial velocities. This ensures

  8. Purification and Partial Characterization of Trypsin-Specific Proteinase Inhibitors from Pigeonpea Wild Relative Cajanus platycarpus L. (Fabaceae) Active against Gut Proteases of Lepidopteran Pest Helicoverpa armigera

    PubMed Central

    Swathi, Marri; Mishra, Prashant K.; Lokya, Vadthya; Swaroop, Vanka; Mallikarjuna, Nalini; Dutta-Gupta, Aparna; Padmasree, Kollipara

    2016-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are natural defense proteins of plants found to be active against gut proteases of various insects. A pigeonpea wild relative Cajanus platycarpus was identified as a source of resistance against Helicoverpa armigera, a most devastating pest of several crops including pigeonpea. In the light of earlier studies, trypsin-specific PIs (CpPI 63) were purified from mature dry seeds of C. platycarpus (ICPW-63) and characterized their biochemical properties in contributing to H. armigera resistance. CpPI 63 possessed significant H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteinase inhibitor (HGPI) activity than trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity. Analysis of CpPI 63 using two-dimensional (2-D) electrophoresis and matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry revealed that it contained several isoinhibitors and small oligomers with masses ranging between 6 and 58 kDa. The gelatin activity staining studies suggest that these isoinhibitors and oligomers possessed strong inhibitory activity against H. armigera gut trypsin-like proteases (HGPs). The N-terminal sequence of the isoinhibitors (pI 6.6 and pI 5.6) of CpPI 63 exhibited 80% homology with several Kunitz trypsin inhibitors (KTIs) as well as miraculin-like proteins (MLPs). Further, modification of lysine residue(s) lead to 80% loss in both TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63. In contrast, the TI and HGPI activities of CpPI 63 were stable over a wide range of temperature and pH conditions. The reported results provide a biochemical basis for pod borer resistance in C. platycarpus. PMID:27656149

  9. Alpha1-antitrypsin protects beta-cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Lu, Yuanqing; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Spencer, Terry; Wasserfall, Clive; Atkinson, Mark; Song, Sihong

    2007-05-01

    Beta-cell apoptosis appears to represent a key event in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Previous studies have demonstrated that administration of the serine proteinase inhibitor alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) prevents type 1 diabetes development in NOD mice and prolongs islet allograft survival in rodents; yet the mechanisms underlying this therapeutic benefit remain largely unclear. Herein we describe novel findings indicating that AAT significantly reduces cytokine- and streptozotocin (STZ)-induced beta-cell apoptosis. Specifically, strong antiapoptotic activities for AAT (Prolastin, human) were observed when murine insulinoma cells (MIN6) were exposed to tumor necrosis factor-alpha. In a second model system involving STZ-induced beta-cell apoptosis, treatment of MIN6 cells with AAT similarly induced a significant increase in cellular viability and a reduction in apoptosis. Importantly, in both model systems, treatment with AAT completely abolished induced caspase-3 activity. In terms of its activities in vivo, treatment of C57BL/6 mice with AAT prevented STZ-induced diabetes and, in agreement with the in vitro analyses, supported the concept of a mechanism involving the disruption of beta-cell apoptosis. These results propose a novel biological function for this molecule and suggest it may represent an effective candidate for attempts seeking to prevent or reverse type 1 diabetes.

  10. Evaluation of in vitro and in vivo effects of semipurified proteinase inhibitors from Theobroma seeds on midgut protease activity of Lepidopteran pest insects.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, Luis Cesar Maffei Sartini; Sebbenn, Alexandre Magno; de Carvalho Derbyshire, Maria Tereza Vitral; Góes-Neto, Aristóteles; de Paula Brotto, Marco Aurélio; Figueira, Antonio

    2012-09-01

    We have characterized in vitro and in vivo effects of trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma seeds on the activity of trypsin- and chymotrypsin-like proteins from Lepidopteran pest insects. The action of semipurified trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma was evaluated by the inhibition of bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin activities determined by the hydrolysis of N-Benzoyl-DL-Arginine-p-Nitroanilide (BAPA) and N-Succinyl-Ala-Ala-Pho-Phe p-Nitroanilide (S-(Ala)2ProPhe-pNA). Proteinase inhibitor activities from Theobroma cacao and T. obovatum seeds were the most effective in inhibiting trypsin-like proteins, whereas those from T. obovatum and T. sylvestre were the most efficient against chymotrypsin-like proteins. All larvae midgut extracts showed trypsin-like proteolytic activities, and the putative trypsin inhibitors from Theobroma seeds significantly inhibited purified bovine trypsin. With respect to the influence of Theobroma trypsin inhibitors on intact insects, the inclusion of T. cacao extracts in artificial diets of velvet bean caterpillars (Anticarsia gemmatalis) and sugarcane borer (Diatraea saccharalis) produced a significant increase in the percentage of adult deformation, which is directly related to both the survival rate of the insects and oviposition.

  11. Specificity of binding of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein to different conformational states of the clade E serpins plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and proteinase nexin-1.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jan K; Dolmer, Klavs; Gettins, Peter G W

    2009-07-03

    The low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) is the principal clearance receptor for serpins and serpin-proteinase complexes. The ligand binding regions of LRP consist of clusters of cysteine-rich approximately 40-residue complement-like repeats (CR), with cluster II being the principal ligand-binding region. To better understand the specificity of binding at different sites within the cluster and the ability of LRP to discriminate in vivo between uncomplexed and proteinase-complexed serpins, we have systematically examined the affinities of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and proteinase nexin-1 (PN-1) in their native, cleaved, and proteinase-complexed states to (CR)(2) and (CR)(3) fragments of LRP cluster II. A consistent blue shift of the CR domain tryptophan fluorescence suggested a common mode of serpin binding, involving lysines on the serpin engaging the acidic region around the calcium binding site of the CR domain. High affinity binding of non-proteinase-complexed PAI-1 and PN-1 occurred to all fragments containing three CR domains (3-59 nm) and most that contain only two CR domains, although binding energies to different (CR)(3) fragments differed by up to 18% for PAI-1 and 9% for PN-1. No detectable difference in affinity was seen between native and cleaved serpin. However, the presence of proteinase in complex with the serpin enhanced affinity modestly and presumably nonspecifically. This may be sufficient to give preferential binding of such complexes in vivo at the relevant physiological concentrations.

  12. Molecular characterization, expression and function analysis of a five-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dianchang; Ma, Jianjun; Jiang, Shigui

    2014-03-01

    Serine proteinase inhibitors represent an expanding superfamily of endogenous inhibitors that are regulate proteolytic events and involved in a variety of physiological and immunological processes. A five-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor (poKSPI) was identified and characterized from pearl oyster Pinctada fucata based on expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis. The full-length cDNA was 737 bp with an open reading frame (ORF) 660 bp encoding a 219 amino acid protein a theoretical molecular weight (Mw) of 23.3 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 8.40. A putative signal peptide of 19 amino acid residues and five tandem Kazal domains were identified. Four of the Kazal domains had the highly conserved motif sequences with six cysteine residues responsible for the formation of disulfide bridges. The deduced amino acid sequence of the poKSPI shared high homology with KSPIs from Hirudo medicinalis. The poKSPI mRNA could be detected in all examined tissues, the expression level of the poKSPI mRNA was the highest in mantle and gonad, while the lowest in haemocyte and intestine. After LPS challenge, the expression level of the poKSPI mRNA in digestive gland was significantly up-regulated at 4 h post-challenge and reached the peak at 12 h post-challenge, which was 4.23-fold higher than control group; the expression level of the poKSPI mRNA in gill was also significantly up-regulated at 8 and 12 h post-challenge, which were 4.48 and 2.26-fold higher than control group. After Vibrio alginolyticus challenge, the expression levels of the poKSPI mRNA in digestive gland were significantly up-regulated at 8, 12, 48 and 72 h post-challenge, which were 1.70, 1.79, 3.89 and 5.69-fold higher than control group, respectively; the expression level of the poKSPI mRNA in gill was significantly up-regulated at 24 h post-challenge, which was 5.30-fold higher than control group. The recombinant poKSPI protein could inhibit chymotrypsin and trypsin activities in dose

  13. Gene expression of proteases and protease inhibitors in the human ciliary epithelium and ODM-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ortego, J; Escribano, J; Coca-Prados, M

    1997-08-01

    Complementary DNAs (cDNAs), corresponding to the human proteinases cathepsins D and O and proteinase inhibitors alpha2-macroglobulin and PP5/TFPI-2, have recently been isolated and identified from a subtractive human ciliary body library. In the present study we determined: (i) their pattern of expression in the human eye; (ii) the ability of the ciliary body and/or ciliary epithelial cells to synthesize and secrete cathepsin D and alpha1-antitrypsin in vitro; and (iii) whether alpha1-antitrypsin expression in cultured ciliary epithelial cells is modulated by protein kinase C activation. Northern analysis demonstrated that the ciliary body expresses high levels of cathepsins D and O, alpha2-macroglobulin, alpha1-antitrypsin and PP5/TFPI-2 transcripts. Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitation experiments with cathepsin D and alpha1-antitrypsin antibodies indicated that metabolically labeled ciliary body explants and/or ciliary epithelial cells in vitro with 35S-methionine, synthesize and secrete these proteins. Cultured nonpigmented ciliary epithelial ODM-2 cells, in response to phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), but not to the non-protein kinase C binding phorbol ester 4 alpha-phorbol didecanoate (PDBu), elicited up-regulation (up to 5-fold) of transcription, synthesis and secretion of alpha1-antitrypsin. These results provide in vitro evidence that the ciliary epithelium synthesizes and secretes a selective group of proteinases and proteinase inhibitors detected also in aqueous humor. The expression of at least of one of the proteinase inhibitors, alpha1-antitrypsin, can be modulated in response to phorbol ester.

  14. Pollination in Nicotiana alata stimulates synthesis and transfer to the stigmatic surface of NaStEP, a vacuolar Kunitz proteinase inhibitor homologue

    PubMed Central

    Busot, Grethel Yanet; McClure, Bruce; Ibarra-Sánchez, Claudia Patricia; Jiménez-Durán, Karina; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia; Cruz-García, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    After landing on a wet stigma, pollen grains hydrate and germination generally occurs. However, there is no certainty of the pollen tube growth through the style to reach the ovary. The pistil is a gatekeeper that evolved in many species to recognize and reject the self-pollen, avoiding endogamy and encouraging cross-pollination. However, recognition is a complex process, and specific factors are needed. Here the isolation and characterization of a stigma-specific protein from N. alata, NaStEP (N. alata Stigma Expressed Protein), that is homologous to Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitors, are reported. Activity gel assays showed that NaStEP is not a functional serine proteinase inhibitor. Immunohistochemical and protein blot analyses revealed that NaStEP is detectable in stigmas of self-incompatible (SI) species N. alata, N. forgetiana, and N. bonariensis, but not in self-compatible (SC) species N. tabacum, N. plumbaginifolia, N. benthamiana, N. longiflora, and N. glauca. NaStEP contains the vacuolar targeting sequence NPIVL, and immunocytochemistry experiments showed vacuolar localization in unpollinated stigmas. After self-pollination or pollination with pollen from the SC species N. tabacum or N. plumbaginifolia, NaStEP was also found in the stigmatic exudate. The synthesis and presence in the stigmatic exudate of this protein was strongly induced in N. alata following incompatible pollination with N. tabacum pollen. The transfer of NaStEP to the stigmatic exudate was accompanied by perforation of the stigmatic cell wall, which appeared to release the vacuolar contents to the apoplastic space. The increase in NaStEP synthesis after pollination and its presence in the stigmatic exudates suggest that this protein may play a role in the early pollen–stigma interactions that regulate pollen tube growth in Nicotiana. PMID:18689443

  15. NaStEP: a proteinase inhibitor essential to self-incompatibility and a positive regulator of HT-B stability in Nicotiana alata pollen tubes.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Durán, Karina; McClure, Bruce; García-Campusano, Florencia; Rodríguez-Sotres, Rogelio; Cisneros, Jesús; Busot, Grethel; Cruz-García, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    In Solanaceae, the self-incompatibility S-RNase and S-locus F-box interactions define self-pollen recognition and rejection in an S-specific manner. This interaction triggers a cascade of events involving other gene products unlinked to the S-locus that are crucial to the self-incompatibility response. To date, two essential pistil-modifier genes, 120K and High Top-Band (HT-B), have been identified in Nicotiana species. However, biochemistry and genetics indicate that additional modifier genes are required. We recently reported a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor, named NaStEP (for Nicotiana alata Stigma-Expressed Protein), that is highly expressed in the stigmas of self-incompatible Nicotiana species. Here, we report the proteinase inhibitor activity of NaStEP. NaStEP is taken up by both compatible and incompatible pollen tubes, but its suppression in Nicotiana spp. transgenic plants disrupts S-specific pollen rejection; therefore, NaStEP is a novel pistil-modifier gene. Furthermore, HT-B levels within the pollen tubes are reduced when NaStEP-suppressed pistils are pollinated with either compatible or incompatible pollen. In wild-type self-incompatible N. alata, in contrast, HT-B degradation occurs preferentially in compatible pollinations. Taken together, these data show that the presence of NaStEP is required for the stability of HT-B inside pollen tubes during the rejection response, but the underlying mechanism is currently unknown.

  16. Milnacipran, a serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, suppresses long-term potentiation in the rat hippocampal CA1 field via 5-HT1A receptors and alpha 1-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Kaori; Matsumoto, Machiko; Togashi, Hiroko; Kojima, Taku; Morimoto, Yuji; Kemmotsu, Osamu; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2004-03-04

    Pharmacological characteristics of a serotonin (5-HT) and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI), milnacipran, in modulation of the synaptic plasticity were investigated. Milnacipran (30 mg/kg, i.p.) suppressed the long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampal CA1 field of anesthetized rats. Milnacipran-induced suppression was reversed by pretreatment with the selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist WAY 100635 (0.1 mg/kg, i.v.) or the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (1 and 10 microg/rat, i.c.v.). The alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist idazoxan (5 mg/kg, i.p.) did not influence the milnacipran-induced synaptic responses. These data suggest that the inhibitory effects of milnacipran on LTP induction are mediated via both 5-HT1A receptors and alpha1-adrenoceptors. In other words, functional interaction between the serotonergic and noradrenergic neuronal systems is involved in alteration of the hippocampal synaptic plasticity, which may be implicated in the SNRI-induced therapeutic effect on psychiatric disorders.

  17. Polymorphism of alpha-1-antitrypsin in hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) or serine protease inhibitor A1 (SERPINA1) is an important serine protease inhibitor in humans. The main physiological role of AAT is to inhibit neutrophil elastase (NE) released from triggered neutrophils, with an additional lesser role in the defense against damage inflicted by other serine proteases, such as cathepsin G and proteinase 3. Although there is a reported association between AAT polymorphism and different types of cancer, this association with hematological malignancies (HM) is, as yet, unknown. We identified AAT phenotypes by isoelectric focusing (in the pH 4.2-4.9 range) in 151 serum samples from patients with HM (Hodgkins lymphomas, non-Hodgkins lymphomas and malignant monoclonal gammopathies). Healthy blood-donors constituted the control group (n = 272). The evaluated population of patients as well as the control group, were at Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium for the AAT gene (χ2 = 4.42, d.f.11, p = 0.96 and χ2 = 4.71, d.f.11, p = 0.97, respectively). There was no difference in the frequency of deficient AAT alleles (Pi Z and Pi S) between patients and control. However, we found a significantly higher frequency of PiM1M1 homozygote and PiM1 allele in HM patients than in control (for phenotype: f = 0.5166 and 0.4118 respectively, p = 0.037; for allele: f = 0.7020 and 0.6360 respectively, p = 0.05). In addition, PiM homozygotes in HM-patients were more numerous than in controls (59% and 48%, respectively, p = 0.044). PiM1 alleles and PiM1 homozygotes are both associated with hematological malignancies, although this is considered a functionally normal AAT variant. PMID:21637443

  18. Hereditary fructose intolerance and alpha(1) antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Hillebrand, G; Schneppenheim, R; Oldigs, H D; Santer, R

    2000-07-01

    A patient with coexisting hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) and alpha(1) antitrypsin deficiency (alpha(1)ATD) is described. Protease inhibitor typing was not conclusive, presumably because of impaired N-glycosylation secondary to HFI. The case underlines the diagnostic role of molecular genetic techniques in inborn errors of metabolism.

  19. [Serine proteinases of lower vertebrates].

    PubMed

    Kolodzeĭskaia, M V

    1986-01-01

    Recent data on the effect of serine proteinases of lower vertebrates are generalized. Hydrolysis specificity and kinetics of different synthetic substrates, dependence of the activity of enzymes on pH, their irreversible inhibition by chloromethyl ketones of amino acids and peptides as well as high-molecular proteinase inhibitors are considered in detail. The data testify to the fact that chymotrypsins and trypsins of higher vertebrates and serine proteinases of lower vertebrates act as an acid-base catalysis. Enzymes in the pyloric cacca of fishes are in the state of proenzymes and are transformed into an active form with the aid of their own proteolytic factors. The esterase and proteolytic activity of fish proteinases is concentrated in the same active site and reaches the highest values at pH 7,8. New data are presented on particularities of the lower vertebrate proteinases, on the similarity and differences in their specificity. A distinct difference is shown in the nature of the binding site of the active centre in a number of serine proteinases of fishes as compared to chymotrypsin and trypsin of higher vertebrates.

  20. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  1. Activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1999-08-10

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  2. Inhibition of a Plasmodium vinckei cysteine proteinase cures murine malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, P J; Lee, G K; Smith, R E

    1993-01-01

    Intraerythrocytic malaria parasites degrade hemoglobin as a principal source of amino acids for parasite protein synthesis. We have previously identified a Plasmodium falciparum trophozoite cysteine proteinase as a putative hemoglobinase and shown that specific inhibitors of this proteinase block the hydrolysis of globin and the development of cultured parasites. We now show that the murine malaria parasite Plasmodium vinckei has an analogous cysteine proteinase with similar biochemical properties to the P. falciparum proteinase, including an acid pH optimum, a preference for the peptide proteolytic substrate benzyloxycarbonyl (Z)-Phe-Arg-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, and nonomolar inhibition by seven peptide fluoromethyl ketone proteinase inhibitors. Thus, P. vinckei offers a model system for the in vivo testing of the antimalarial properties of cysteine proteinase inhibitors. One of the proteinase inhibitors studied, morpholine urea (Mu)-Phe-Homophenylalanine (HPhe)-CH2F strongly inhibited the P. vinckei cysteine proteinase in vitro and rapidly blocked parasite cysteine proteinase activity in vivo. When administered four times a day for 4 d to P. vinckei-infected mice, Mu-Phe-HPhe-CH2F elicited long-term cures in 80% of the treated animals. These results show that peptide proteinase inhibitors can be effective antimalarial compounds in vivo and suggest that the P. falciparum cysteine proteinase is a promising target for chemotherapy. Images PMID:8450035

  3. A substrate-based approach to convert SerpinB1 into a specific inhibitor of proteinase 3, the Wegener's granulomatosis autoantigen.

    PubMed

    Jégot, Gwenhael; Derache, Chrystelle; Castella, Sandrine; Lahouassa, Hichem; Pitois, Elodie; Jourdan, Marie Lise; Remold-O'Donnell, Eileen; Kellenberger, Christine; Gauthier, Francis; Korkmaz, Brice

    2011-09-01

    The physiological and pathological functions of proteinase 3 (PR3) are not well understood due to its close similarity to human neutrophil elastase (HNE) and the lack of a specific inhibitor. Based on structural analysis of the active sites of PR3 and HNE, we generated mutants derived from the polyvalent inhibitor SerpinB1 (monocyte/neutrophil elastase inhibitor) that specifically inhibit PR3 and that differ from wt-SerpinB1 by only 3 or 4 residues in the reactive center loop. The rate constant of association between the best SerpinB1 mutant and PR3 is 1.4 × 10⁷ M⁻¹ · s⁻¹, which is ∼100-fold higher than that observed with wt-SerpinB1 and compares with that of α1-protease inhibitor (α1-PI) toward HNE. SerpinB1(S/DAR) is cleaved by HNE, but due to differences in rate, inhibition of PR3 by SerpinB1(S/DAR) is only minimally affected by the presence of HNE even when the latter is in excess. SerpinB1(S/DAR) inhibits soluble PR3 and also membrane-bound PR3 at the surface of activated neutrophils. Moreover, SerpinB1(S/DAR) clears induced PR3 from the surface of activated neutrophils. Overall, these specific inhibitors of PR3 will be valuable for defining biological functions of the protease and may prove useful as therapeutics for PR3-related inflammatory diseases, such as Wegener's granulomatosis.

  4. Using a Caesalpinia echinata Lam. protease inhibitor as a tool for studying the roles of neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and proteinase 3 in pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Silva, Ilana; Neuhof, Christiane; Gozzo, Andrezza Justino; Nunes, Viviane Abreu; Hirata, Izaura Yoshico; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Figueiredo-Ribeiro, Rita de Cássia; Neuhof, Heinz; Araújo, Mariana da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is characterized by neutrophil infiltration and the release of proteases, mainly elastase (NE), cathepsin G (Cat G) and proteinase 3 (PR3), which can be controlled by specific endogenous inhibitors. However, inhibitors of these proteases have been isolated from different sources, including plants. For this study, CeEI, or Caesalpinia echinata elastase inhibitor, was purified from C. echinata (Brazil-wood) seeds after acetone fractionation, followed by ion exchange and reversed phase chromatographic steps. Characterization with SDS-PAGE, stability assays, amino acid sequencing and alignment with other protein sequences confirmed that CeEI is a member of the soybean Kunitz trypsin inhibitor family. Like other members of this family, CeEI is a 20 kDa monomeric protein; it is stable within a large pH and temperature range, with four cysteine residues forming two disulfide bridges, conserved amino acid residues and leucine-isoleucine residues in the reactive site. CeEI was able to inhibit NE and Cat G at a nanomolar range (with K(i)s of 1.9 and 3.6 nM, respectively) and inhibited PR3 within a micromolar range (K(i) 3.7 μM), leading to hydrolysis of specific synthetic substrates. In a lung edema model, CeEI reduced the lung weight and pulmonary artery pressure until 180 min after the injection of zymosan-activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils. In experiments performed in the presence of a Cat G and PR3, but not an NE inhibitor, lung edema was reduced only until 150 min and pulmonary artery pressure was similar to that of the control. These results confirm that NE action is crucial to edema establishment and progression. Additionally, CeEI appears to be a useful tool for studying the physiology of pulmonary edema and provides a template for molecular engineering and drug design for ALI therapy.

  5. Proteolytic activity and fatal gram-negative sepsis in burned mice: effect of exogenous proteinase inhibition.

    PubMed Central

    Neely, A N; Miller, R G; Holder, I A

    1994-01-01

    Circulating proteolytic activity (PA) increases following burn or surgical trauma. Challenging traumatized mice with the yeast Candida albicans further increases PA. Once a PA threshold has been passed, mortality increases as PA increases. The purposes of this study were to determine (i) if gram-negative bacterial challenge affects circulating PA and mortality as Candida challenge does and (ii) if proteinase inhibitor treatment with aprotinin, antithrombin III, and alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor decreases circulating PA and increases the survival of burned mice infected with a bacterium. For all bacteria tested (Proteus mirabilis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumoniae), burn plus challenge significantly elevated PA and mortality above levels in mice that were only burned or only challenged. Quantitative culture counts indicated that the mice died of sepsis. Proteinase inhibitor treatment of mice burned and challenged with K. pneumoniae significantly decreased circulating PA, decreased the hepatic microbial load, and increased survival. Hence, in traumatized mice challenged with either C. albicans or gram-negative bacteria, a relationship exists between proteolytic load and subsequent septic death. Parallels between these animal studies and human studies are discussed. PMID:8188336

  6. Cinanserin is an inhibitor of the 3C-like proteinase of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and strongly reduces virus replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lili; Gui, Chunshan; Luo, Xiaomin; Yang, Qingang; Günther, Stephan; Scandella, Elke; Drosten, Christian; Bai, Donglu; He, Xichang; Ludewig, Burkhard; Chen, Jing; Luo, Haibin; Yang, Yiming; Yang, Yifu; Zou, Jianping; Thiel, Volker; Chen, Kaixian; Shen, Jianhua; Shen, Xu; Jiang, Hualiang

    2005-06-01

    The 3C-like proteinase (3CLpro) of severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is one of the most promising targets for anti-SARS-CoV drugs due to its crucial role in the viral life cycle. In this study, a database containing structural information of more than 8,000 existing drugs was virtually screened by a docking approach to identify potential binding molecules of SARS-CoV 3CLpro. As a target for screening, both a homology model and the crystallographic structure of the binding pocket of the enzyme were used. Cinanserin (SQ 10,643), a well-characterized serotonin antagonist that has undergone preliminary clinical testing in humans in the 1960s, showed a high score in the screening and was chosen for further experimental evaluation. Binding of both cinanserin and its hydrochloride to bacterially expressed 3CLpro of SARS-CoV and the related human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) was demonstrated by surface plasmon resonance technology. The catalytic activity of both enzymes was inhibited with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 5 microM, as tested with a fluorogenic substrate. The antiviral activity of cinanserin was further evaluated in tissue culture assays, namely, a replicon system based on HCoV-229E and quantitative test assays with infectious SARS-CoV and HCoV-229E. All assays revealed a strong inhibition of coronavirus replication at nontoxic drug concentrations. The level of virus RNA and infectious particles was reduced by up to 4 log units, with IC50 values ranging from 19 to 34 microM. These findings demonstrate that the old drug cinanserin is an inhibitor of SARS-CoV replication, acting most likely via inhibition of the 3CL proteinase.

  7. Biochemical, immunological and kinetic characterization and partial sequence analysis of a thiol proteinase inhibitor from Bubalus bubalis kidney: An attempt targeting kidney disorders.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Anas; Ahmed, Azaj; Bano, Bilqees

    2017-01-01

    In the present study a thiol proteinase inhibitor was isolated from buffalo kidney making use of ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-100HR column. Purified inhibitor is homogeneous as it displayed a single band in gel electrophoresis both under reducing and non-reducing environment and is of 65KDa as revealed by gel filtration and SDS PAGE. Kinetic studies revealed the presence of reversible accompanied with competitive mode of inhibition; showing maximum efficacy against papain (Ki=2.90×10(-4)). It was maximally active at pH 8.0 and was stable for a period of 30, 60 and 90 days at 37, 4 and -20°C respectively. Immunological studies confirmed its purity of epitopes as a single precipitin line is obtained in immunodiffusion. N-terminal analysis revealed that it shared a good homology with mouse kidney cystatin as well as with Human Cys C and Cys E thereby advocating its use as a model for various human oriented studies which targets how the kidney cystatin level varies in accordance with various drugs that are currently being used as a target for variety of diseases.

  8. A serine proteinase inhibitor locus at 18q21.3 contains a tandem duplication of the human squamous cell carcinoma antigen gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, S S; Schick, C; Fish, K E; Miller, E; Pena, J C; Treter, S D; Hui, S M; Silverman, G A

    1995-01-01

    The squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA) is a member of the ovalbumin family of serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins). A neutral form of the protein is found in normal and some malignant squamous cells, whereas an acidic form is detected exclusively in tumor cells and in the circulation of patients with squamous cell tumors. In this report, we describe the cloning of the SCCA gene from normal genomic DNA. Surprisingly, two genes were found. They were tandemly arrayed and flanked by two other closely related serpins, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2 (PAI2) and maspin at 18q21.3. The genomic structure of the two genes, SCCA1 and SCCA2, was highly conserved. The predicted amino acid sequences were 92% identical and suggested that the neutral form of the protein was encoded by SCCA1 and the acidic form was encoded by SCCA2. Further characterization of the region should determine whether the differential expression of the SCCA genes plays a causal role in development of more aggressive squamous cell carcinomas. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7724531

  9. HTS identifies novel and specific uncompetitive inhibitors of the two-component NS2B-NS3 proteinase of West Nile virus.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Paul A; Phillips, Jennifer; Shun, Tong Ying; Shinde, Sunita; Lazo, John S; Huryn, Donna M; Myers, Michael C; Ratnikov, Boris I; Smith, Jeffrey W; Su, Ying; Dahl, Russell; Cosford, Nicholas D P; Shiryaev, Sergey A; Strongin, Alex Y

    2007-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV), a member of the Flavividae family, is a mosquito-borne, emerging pathogen. In addition to WNV, the family includes dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, which affect millions of individuals worldwide. Because countermeasures are currently unavailable, flaviviral therapy is urgently required. The flaviviral two-component nonstructural NS2B-NS3 proteinase (protease [pro]) is essential for viral life cycle and, consequently, is a promising drug target. We report here the results of the miniaturization of an NS2B-NS3pro activity assay, followed by high-throughput screening of the National Institutes of Health's 65,000 compound library and identification of novel, uncompetitive inhibitors of WNV NS2B-NS3pro that appear to interfere with the productive interactions of the NS2B cofactor with the NS3pro domain. We anticipate that following structure optimization, the identified probes could form the foundation for the design of novel and specific therapeutics for WNV infection. We also provide the structural basis for additional species-selective allosteric inhibitors of flaviviruses.

  10. Cystatins may confer viral resistance in plants by inhibition of a virus-induced cell death phenomenon in which cysteine proteinases are active: cloning and molecular characterization of a cDNA encoding cysteine-proteinase inhibitor (celostatin) from Celosia cristata (crested cock's comb).

    PubMed

    Gholizadeh, Ashraf; Santha, Ittiaparambu Mana; Kohnehrouz, Bahram Baghban; Lodha, Madan Lal; Kapoor, Harish Chander

    2005-12-01

    Cystatins (cysteine proteinase inhibitors) have been recently used in plants as antiviral strategy against those viruses whose replication involves cysteine proteinase activity. We proposed an idea that cystatins may confer resistance by inhibition of a virus-induced cell-death phenomenon in which cysteine proteinases are active. To test this idea, a full-length cDNA library was constructed from the preflowering stage of Celosia cristata (crested cock's comb) leaves, and a cDNA clone with cystatin domain was isolated using an oligonucleotide probe designed on the basis of the conserved peptide of plant cystatins. It was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system as a fusion protein. The purified recombinant product, termed 'celostatin' (Celosia cystatin), inhibited the enzymatic activity of papain indicating its cystatin activity and prevented TMV (tobacco mosaic virus)-induced hypersensitive-response cell death in Nicotiana glutinosa (a wild species of tobacco) leaves by 65-70% at the concentration of approx. 50 ng/ml. It also offered resistance against TMV and caused normal growth of the test plant. Since the activity of cysteine proteinases is not involved in the TMV replication process, we speculated that inhibition of the hypersensitive response by celostatin may be due to the inactivation of proteolysis involved in the plant cell death programme, a phenomenon that has already been reported in animal systems.

  11. Molecular characterization and mapping of murine genes encoding three members of the stefin family of cysteine proteinase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, F.W.L.; Hingwo Tsui; Mok, S. Toronto Hospital, Ontario ); Mlinaric, I.; Siminovitch, K.A. Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario ); Copeland, N.G.; Gilbert, D.J.; Jenkins, N.A. )

    1993-03-01

    Stefins or Type 1 cystatins belong to a large, evolutionarily conserved protein superfamily, the members of which inhibit the papain-like cysteine proteinases. The authors report here on the molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of three newly identified members of the murine stefin gene family. These genes, designated herein as mouse stefins 1, 2, and 3, were isolated on the basis of their relatively increased expression in moth-eaten viable compared to normal congenic mouse bone marrow cells. The open reading frames of the stefin cDNAs encode proteins of approximately 11.5 kDa that show between 50 and 92% identity to sequences of stefins isolated from various other species. Data from Southern analysis suggest that the murine stefin gene family encompasses at least 6 and possible 10-20 membranes, all of which appear to be clustered in the genome. Analysis of interspecific backcross mice indicates that the genes encoding the three mouse stefins all map to mouse chromosome 16, a localization that is consistent with the recent assignment of the human stefin A gene to a region of conserved homology between human chromosome 3q and the proximal region of mouse chromosome 16. 51 refs., 7 figs.

  12. A Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor from chicken liver (clTI-1): purification, primary structure, and inhibitory properties.

    PubMed

    Kubiak, Agnieszka; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Polanowski, Antoni

    2009-08-01

    Low-molecular-mass trypsin inhibitor (clTI-1; chicken liver Trypsin Inhibitor-1) was purified from chicken liver by extraction with perchloric acid, ammonium sulfate precipitation, a combination of ethanol-acetone fractionation followed by gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography and RP-HPLC on a C18 column. The inhibitor occurs in two isoforms with molecular masses of 5938.56 and 6026.29 Da (determined by MALDI TOFF mass spectrometry). The complete amino acid sequences of both isoforms were determined (UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot P85000; ISK1L_CHICK). The inhibitor shows a high homology to Kazal-type family inhibitors, especially to trypsin/acrosin inhibitors and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitors. clTI-1 inhibits both bovine and porcine trypsin (K(a)=1.1 x 10(9) M(-1) and 2.5 x 10(9) M(-1), respectively). Significant differences were shown in the inhibition of the anionic and cationic forms of chicken trypsin (K(a)=4.5 x 10(8) M(-1) and 1.2 x 10(10) M(-1)). Weak interaction with human plasmin (K(a)=1.2 x 10(7) M(-1)) was also revealed.

  13. Elastase, α1-proteinase inhibitor, and interleukin-8 in children and young adults with end-stage kidney disease undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.

    PubMed

    Polańska, Bożena; Augustyniak, Daria; Makulska, Irena; Niemczuk, Maria; Jankowski, Adam; Zwolińska, Danuta

    2014-06-01

    Peritoneal dialysis is one of the main modality of treatment in end-stage kidney diseases (ESKD) in children. In our previous work in chronic kidney disease patients, in pre-dialyzed period and on hemodialysis, the neutrophils were highly activated. The aim of this study was to assess an inflammatory condition and neutrophil activation in ESKD patients undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD). Thirteen CAPD patients without infection, both sexes, aged 2.5-24 years, and group of healthy subjects (C) were studied. For comparative purposes the conservatively treated (CT) group of ESKD patients was included. Neutrophil elastase in complex with α1-proteinase inhibitor (NE-α1PI; ELISA), α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1PI; radial immunodiffusion) and interleukin-8 (IL-8; ELISA) were measured in the blood samples from CAPD, CT, and C group and in the peritoneal dialysate fluid (PDF) samples of patients on CAPD. A significantly increased plasma NE-α1PI levels (median 176.5 μg/L, range 85.2-373.2 μg/L; p < 0.00005), serum IL-8 (median 18.6 pg/mL, range 15.73-35.28 pg/mL; p < 0.05), and slightly decreased serum α1PI (median 1,540 mg/L, range 1,270-1,955; p ≤ 0.05) compared to the control groups were found. There were no significant differences of analyzed parameters between CAPD and CT patients. The concentration ratio of NE-α1PI, α1PI and IL-8 in blood/PDF was 29.97, 8.24, and 4.48, respectively. There were significantly positive correlations between serum and PDF concentration of α1PI and IL-8 (r = 0.613, p < 0.05; r = 0.59; p < 0.005, respectively). The results of our study demonstrate that neutrophils are highly activated in non-infected CAPD patients. The pivotal marker of this activation is NE-α1PI. It may contribute to chronic inflammation and tissues injury.

  14. Molecular basis of alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency and emphysema associated with the alpha 1-antitrypsin Mmineral springs allele.

    PubMed Central

    Curiel, D T; Vogelmeier, C; Hubbard, R C; Stier, L E; Crystal, R G

    1990-01-01

    The Mmineral springs alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT) allele, causing alpha 1AT deficiency and emphysema, is unique among the alpha 1AT-deficiency alleles in that it was observed in a black family, whereas most mutations causing alpha 1AT deficiency are confined to Caucasian populations of European descent. Immobilized pH gradient analysis of serum demonstrated that alpha 1AT Mmineral springs migrated cathodal to the normal M2 allele. Evaluation of Mmineral springs alpha 1AT as an inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, its natural substrate, demonstrated markedly lower than normal function. Characterization of the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs gene demonstrated that it differed from the common normal M1(Ala213) allele by a single-base substitution causing the amino acid substitution Gly-67 (GGG)----Glu-67 (GAG). Capitalizing on the fact that this mutation creates a polymorphism for the restriction endonuclease AvaII, family analysis demonstrated that the Mmineral springs alpha 1AT allele was transmitted in an autosomal-codominant fashion. Evaluation of genomic DNA showed that the index case was homozygous for the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs allele. Cytoplasmic blot analysis of blood monocytes of the Mmineral springs homozygote demonstrated levels of alpha 1AT mRNA transcripts comparable to those in cells of a normal M1 (Val213) homozygote control. Evaluation of in vitro translation of Mmineral springs alpha 1AT mRNA transcripts demonstrated a normal capacity to direct the translation of alpha 1AT. Evaluation of secretion of alpha 1AT by the blood monocytes by pulse-chase labeling with [35S]methionine, however, demonstrated less secretion by the Mmineral springs cells than normal cells. To characterize the posttranslational events causing the alpha 1AT-secretory defect associated with the alpha 1AT Mmineral springs gene, retroviral gene transfer was used to establish polyclonal populations of murine fibroblasts containing either a normal human M1 alpha 1AT cDNA or an Mmineral

  15. Modeling the 3D structure of wheat subtilisin/chymotrypsin inhibitor (WSCI). Probing the reactive site with two susceptible proteinases by time-course analysis and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Facchiano, Angelo M; Costantini, Susan; Di Maro, Antimo; Panichi, Daniela; Chambery, Angela; Parente, Augusto; Di Gennaro, Simone; Poerio, Elia

    2006-07-01

    Comparative modeling and time-course hydrolysis experiments have been applied to investigate two enzyme-inhibitor complexes formed between the wheat subtilisin-chymotrypsin inhibitor (WSCI) and two susceptible proteinases. WSCI represents the first case of a wheat protein inhibitor active against animal chymotrypsins and bacterial subtilisins. The model was created using as template structure that of the CI-2A inhibitor from barley (PDB code: 2CI2), which shares 87% sequence identity with WSCI. Under these conditions of high similarity, the comparative modeling approach can be successfully applied. We predicted the WSCI 3D model and used it to investigate enzyme-inhibitor complex systems. Experimental observations indicated that chymotrypsin, but not subtilisin, in addition to cleavage at the primary reactive site Met48-Glu49, is able to hydrolyze a second peptide bond between Phe58 and Val59. Here, we report on cleavage of the peptide bond at the inhibitor's reactive site (Met48-Glu49) determined using time-course hydrolysis experiments; the same event was investigated for both subtilisin/WSCI and chymotrypsin/WSCI complexes using molecular dynamics simulations. The molecular details of the initial inhibitor-enzyme interactions, as well as of the changes observed during the simulations, allow us to speculate on the different fates of the two WSCI-proteinase complexes.

  16. Potential Use of Proteinase Inhibitors, Avidin, and Other Bio-reagents for Synergizing Bt Performance and Delaying Resistance Development to Bt

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    After being ingested by target insects, the insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) need to go through a proteolytic process by insect midgut proteinases to become activated. At the same time, Bt can be hydrolyzed and degraded by midgut proteinases to become non-toxic to target insect...

  17. Inhibitory effects of a Kunitz-type inhibitor from Pithecellobium dumosum (Benth) seeds against insect-pests' digestive proteinases.

    PubMed

    Rufino, Fabiola P S; Pedroso, Vanessa M A; Araujo, Jonalson N; França, Anderson F J; Rabêlo, Luciana M A; Migliolo, Ludovico; Kiyota, Sumika; Santos, Elizeu A; Franco, Octavio L; Oliveira, Adeliana S

    2013-02-01

    Pithecellobium dumosum is a tree belonging to the Mimosoideae subfamily that presents various previously characterized Kunitz-type inhibitors. The present study provides a novel Kunitz-trypsin inhibitor isoform purified from P. dumosum seeds. Purification procedure was performed by TCA precipitation followed by a trypsin-Sepharose chromatography and a further reversed-phase HPLC. Purified inhibitor (PdKI-4) showed enhanced inhibitory activity against bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin. Furthermore, PdKI-4 showed remarkable inhibitory activity against serine proteases from the coleopterans Callosobruchus maculatus and Zabrotes subfasciatus, and the lepidopterans Alabama argillacea and Telchin licus. However, PdKI-4 was unable to inhibit porcine pancreatic elastase, pineapple bromelain and Carica papaya papain. SDS-PAGE showed that PdKI-4 consisted of a single polypeptide chain with molecular mass of 21 kDa. Kinetic studies demonstrated that PdKI-4 is probably a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 5.7 × 10(-10) M for bovine trypsin. PdKI-4 also showed higher stability over a wide range of temperature (37-100 °C) and pH (2-12). N-termini sequence was obtained by Edman degradation showing higher identity with other Mimosoideae subfamily Kunitz-type inhibitor members. In summary, data here reported indicate the biotechnological potential of PdKI-4 for development of products against insect-pests.

  18. A Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor SPIPm2 from the black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon is involved in antiviral responses.

    PubMed

    Donpudsa, Suchao; Ponprateep, Sirikwan; Prapavorarat, Adisak; Visetnan, Suwattana; Tassanakajon, Anchalee; Rimphanitchayakit, Vichien

    2010-10-01

    A five-domain Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor, SPIPm2, from Penaeus monodon has recently been implicated in antiviral responses for it is up-regulated upon viral infection and needs further studies. The SPIPm2 genomic gene was composed of seven exons and six introns. The genomic DNA segments coding for each Kazal domain were separated by introns of variable lengths supporting the hypothesis of gene duplication in the Kazal-type gene family. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis revealed that the SPIPm2 transcript and its five-domain protein product were expressed mainly in the hemocytes and less in gill, heart and antennal gland. Upon white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, the SPIPm2 was only detected in the hemocytes and plasma. Immunocytochemical study of P. monodon hemocytes showed that the percentage of SPIPm2-producing hemocytes was reduced by about half after WSSV infection. Quantitative RT-PCR revealed further that the SPIPm2 was up-regulated early in the hemocytes of WSSV-infected shrimp and gradually reduced as the infection progressed. Injection of the recombinant SPIPm2 (rSPIPm2) prior to WSSV injection resulted in a significant inhibition of WSSV replication. The rSPIPm2 injection also prolonged the mortality rate of WSSV-infected shrimp. Therefore, the SPIPm2 was involved in the innate immunity against WSSV infection in shrimp. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Entamoeba histolytica: correlation of assessment methods to measure erythrocyte digestion, and effect of cysteine proteinases inhibitors in HM-1:IMSS and HK-9:NIH strains.

    PubMed

    Mora-Galindo, Juan; Anaya-Velázquez, Fernando; Ramírez-Romo, Susana; González-Robles, Arturo

    2004-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites are able to degrade human erythrocytes; the loss of erythrocyte cellular matrix and degradation of plasma membrane were observed, along with the decrease in the average size of digestive vacuoles. Ninety-six percent of hemoglobin ingested was hydrolyzed by trophozoites within 3h, as evidenced by electrophoresis. Accordingly, X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of iron inside vacuoles after erythrophagocytosis, the concentration of which decreased to control levels in a similar period. Quantification of erythrocyte digestion at the early and late periods was determined by a spectrophotometric procedure, with t(1/2)=1.67 h and 35-min for HM-1:IMSS and HK-9:NIH trophozoites, respectively. In the latter, activity was due to the combined action of intracellular enzymatic activity and exocytosis. E-64c and leupeptin totally inhibited erythrocyte digestion within a 3-h period, thereafter hydrolysis took place at lower rate. Our results suggest that erythrocyte digestion in E. histolytica proceeds in different ways in these two amebic strains, and can be blocked by proteinase inhibitors.

  20. Two separate signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins regulate transcription of the serine proteinase inhibitor-3 gene in hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Kordula, T; Ripperger, J; Morella, K M; Travis, J; Baumann, H

    1996-03-22

    The serine proteinase inhibitor (SPI-3) gene expression is transcriptionally regulated by interleukin (IL)-6 and glucocorticoids in hepatic cells. To identify the transcription factors involved in regulation of the SPI-3 promoter-chloramphenicol acetyltransferase constructs we overexpressed Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT) proteins (STAT1, STAT3, STAT5B, and STAT6) and CAAT enhancer-binding protein beta. Specific signaling pathways were activated by cointroduced receptors for growth hormone, IL-3, IL-4, or chimeric receptors containing the cytoplasmic domain of gp130. STAT3 and STAT5B induced transcription via the SPI-3 promoter. The STAT5B response was substantially enhanced by truncation of the 5'-flanking region from -1021 to -148. The responsiveness to STAT3 and STAT5B required the STAT binding element at -132 to -124. This element was sufficient to confer regulation onto a heterologous promoter gene construct. In contrast, overexpression of CAAT enhancer-binding protein beta reduced the transcriptional activity of the SPI-3 promoter, presumably by interfering with STAT protein binding to the promoter element. The SPI-3 gene is the first example of an acute phase gene that is responsive to both STAT3 and STAT5B.

  1. The NTR module: domains of netrins, secreted frizzled related proteins, and type I procollagen C-proteinase enhancer protein are homologous with tissue inhibitors of metalloproteases.

    PubMed Central

    Bányai, L.; Patthy, L.

    1999-01-01

    Using homology search, structure prediction, and structural characterization methods we show that the C-terminal domains of (1) netrins, (2) complement proteins C3, C4, C5, (3) secreted frizzled-related proteins, and (4) type I procollagen C-proteinase enhancer proteins (PCOLCEs) are homologous with the N-terminal domains of (5) tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs). The proteins harboring this netrin module (NTR module) fulfill diverse biological roles ranging from axon guidance, regulation of Wnt signaling, to the control of the activity of metalloproteases. With the exception of TIMPs, it is not known at present what role the NTR modules play in these processes. In view of the fact that the NTR modules of TIMPs are involved in the inhibition of matrixin-type metalloproteases and that the NTR module of PCOLCEs is involved in the control of the activity of the astacin-type metalloprotease BMP1, it seems possible that interaction with metzincins could be a shared property of NTR modules and could be critical for the biological roles of the host proteins. PMID:10452607

  2. Trichocystatin-2 (TC-2): an endogenous inhibitor of cysteine proteinases in Trichomonas vaginalis is associated with TvCP39.

    PubMed

    Puente-Rivera, Jonathan; Ramón-Luing, Lucero de los Ángeles; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa Elvira; Ortega-López, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana

    2014-09-01

    The causal agent of trichomoniasis is a parasitic protist, Trichomonas vaginalis, which is rich in proteolytic activity, primarily carried out by cysteine proteases (CPs). Some CPs are known virulence factors. T. vaginalis also possesses three genes encoding endogenous cystatin-like CP inhibitors. The aim of this study was to identify and characterize one of these CP inhibitors. Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS), a cystatin-like peptidase inhibitor dubbed Trichocystatin-2 (TC-2) was identified in the T. vaginalis active degradome in association with TvCP39, a 39kDa CP involved in cytotoxicity. To characterize the TC-2 inhibitor, we cloned and expressed the tvicp-2 gene, purified the recombinant protein (TC-2r), and produced a specific polyclonal antibody (α-TC-2r). This antibody recognized a 10kDa protein band by western blotting. An indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and cell fractionation assays using the α-TC-2r antibody showed that TC-2 was localized in the cytoplasm and lysosomes and that it colocalized with TvCP39. TC-2r showed inhibitory activity against papain, cathepsin-L, and TvCP39 in trichomonad extracts and live parasites but not legumain-like CPs. Live trichomonads treated with TC-2r showed reduced trichomonal cytotoxicity to HeLa cell monolayers in a TC-2r-concentration-dependent manner. In this study, we identified and characterized an endogenous cystatin-like inhibitor in T. vaginalis, TC-2, which is associated with TvCP39 and appears to regulate the cellular damage caused by T. vaginalis.

  3. The recombinant prepro region of TvCP4 is an inhibitor of cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis that inhibits trichomonal haemolysis.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Ortega-López, Jaime; Flores-Pucheta, Claudia Ivonne; Benítez-Cardoza, Claudia Guadalupe; Arroyo, Rossana

    2015-02-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis expresses multiple proteinases, mainly of the cysteine type (CPs). A cathepsin L-like 34kDa CP, designated TvCP4, is synthesized as a 305-amino-acid precursor protein. TvCP4 contains the prepro fragment and the catalytic triad that is typical of the papain-like CP family of clan CA. The aim of this work was to determine the function of the recombinant TvCP4 prepro region (ppTvCP4r) as a specific inhibitor of CPs. We cloned, expressed, and purified the recombinant TvCP4 prepro region. The conformation of the purified and refolded ppTvCP4r polypeptide was verified by circular dichroism spectroscopy and fluorescence emission spectra. The inhibitory effect of ppTvCP4r was tested on protease-resistant extracts from T. vaginalis using fluorogenic substrates for cathepsin L and legumain CPs. In 1-D zymograms, the inhibitory effect of ppTvCP4r on trichomonad CP proteolytic activity was observed in the ∼97, 65, 39, and 30 kDa regions. By using 2-D zymograms and mass spectrometry, several of the CPs inhibited by ppTvCP4r were identified. A clear reduction in the proteolytic activity of several cathepsin L-like protein spots (TvCP2, TvCP4, TvCP4-like, and TvCP39) was observed compared with the control zymogram. Moreover, pretreatment of live parasites with ppTvCP4r inhibited trichomonal haemolysis in a concentration dependent manner. These results confirm that the recombinant ppTvCP4 is a specific inhibitor of the proteolytic activity of cathepsin L-like T. vaginalis CPs that is useful for inhibiting virulence properties depending on clan CA papain-like CPs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitor from Cyclina sinensis is involved in immune response and signal pathway initiation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yipeng; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Baoping; Yan, Chuncai

    2015-11-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (SPIs) are an important group of protease inhibitors involved in a variety of biological processes. In the present study, a Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor homolog gene (designated as CsKPI) was identified from a Cyclina sinensis cDNA library. The open reading frame consists of 456 bp and encodes a protein of 151 amino acid residues with a theoretical molecular mass of 16.85 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.74. Furthermore, using quantitative real-time PCR, we focused on the expression patterns of CsKPI found in tissues and on the stimulation of this gene's expression by bacteria. The results show that a higher-level mRNA expression of CsKPI was detected in hemocytes (P < 0.05) and was significantly upregulated at 3 h (P < 0.01) upon receiving bacterial challenges with Vibrio anguillarum. In addition, after the CsKPI gene was silenced by RNA interference, the expression of the CsTLR2 and CsMyD88 genes was extremely significantly decreased (P < 0.01) in C. sinensis. Finally, the recombinant CsKPI (rCsKPI) protein was purified and shown to exhibit less inhibitory activity than C-lyz against V. anguillarum in vitro. Hence, we propose that CsKPI plays an important role in the innate immunity and mediates TLR2 and MyD88-dependent pathway initiation in C. sinensis.

  5. Global proteome changes in larvae of Callosobruchus maculatus Coleoptera:Chrysomelidae:Bruchinae) following ingestion of a cysteine proteinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Fábio C S; Silva, Carlos P; Alexandre, Daniel; Samuels, Richard I; Soares, Emanoella L; Aragão, Francisco J L; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Domont, Gilberto B; Roepstorff, Peter; Campos, Francisco A P

    2012-08-01

    The seed-feeding beetle Callosobruchus maculatus is an important cowpea pest (Vigna unguiculata) as well as an interesting model to study insect digestive physiology. The larvae of C. maculatus rely on cysteine and aspartic peptidases to digest proteins in their diet. In this work, the global proteomic changes induced in the intestinal tract of larval C. maculatus challenged by the ingestion of cystatin, a cysteine peptidase inhibitor, was investigated by a nanoLC-MS/MS approach. The ingestion of cystatin caused a delay in the development of the larvae, but the mortality was not high, indicating that C. maculatus is able to adapt to this inhibitor. This proteomic strategy resulted in the identification of 752 and 550 protein groups in the midgut epithelia and midgut contents, respectively, and quantitative analyses allowed us to establish relative differences of the identified proteins. Ingestion of cystatin led to significant changes in the proteome of both the midgut epithelia and midgut contents. We have observed that proteins related to plant cell wall degradation, particularly the key glycoside hydrolases of the families GH5 (endo-β-1,4-mannanase) and GH 28 (polygalacturonase) were overexpressed. Conversely, α-amylases were downexpressed, indicating that an increase in hemicelluloses digestion helps the larvae to cope with the challenge of cystatin ingestion. Furthermore, a number of proteins associated with transcription/translation and antistress reactions were among the cystatin-responsive proteins, implying that a substantial rearrangement in the proteome occurred in C. maculatus exposed to the inhibitor.

  6. Higher accumulation of proteinase inhibitors in flowers than leaves and fruits as a possible basis for differential feeding preference of Helicoverpa armigera on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill, Cv. Dhanashree).

    PubMed

    Damle, Mrunal S; Giri, Ashok P; Sainani, Mohini N; Gupta, Vidya S

    2005-11-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill; cultivar- Dhanashree) proteinase inhibitors (PIs) were tested for their trypsin inhibitory (TI) and Helicoverpa armigera gut proteinases inhibitory (HGPI) activity in different organs of the tomato plants. Analysis of TI and HGPI distribution in various parts of the plant showed that flowers accumulated about 300 and 1000 times higher levels of TI while 700 and 400 times higher levels of HGPI as compared to those in leaves and fruits, respectively. Field observation that H. armigera larvae infest leaves and fruits but not the flowers could be at least partially attributed to the protective role-played by the higher levels of PIs in the flower tissue. Tomato PIs inhibited about 50-80% HGP activity of H. armigera larvae feeding on various host plants including tomato, of larvae exposed to non-host plant PIs and of various larval instars. Tomato PIs were found to be highly stable to insect proteinases wherein incubation of inhibitor with HGP even for 3h at optimum conditions did not affect inhibitory activity. Bioassay using H. armigera larvae fed on artificial diet containing tomato PIs revealed adverse effect on larval growth, pupae development, adult formation and fecundity.

  7. The 2.5 A X-ray crystal structure of the acid-stable proteinase inhibitor from human mucous secretions analysed in its complex with bovine alpha-chymotrypsin.

    PubMed Central

    Grütter, M G; Fendrich, G; Huber, R; Bode, W

    1988-01-01

    Orthorhombic crystals of the complex formed between bovine alpha-chymotrypsin and a recombinant human mucous proteinase inhibitor (SLPI) were grown. Data to 2.3 A resolution were collected on the area-detector diffractometer FAST. The crystal structure of the complex was solved by Patterson search techniques using chymotrypsin as a search model. A cyclic procedure of modeling and crystallographic refinement enabled the determination of the SLPI structure. The current crystallographic R-value is 0.19. SLPI has a boomerang-like shape with both wings comprising two well separated domains of similar architecture. In each domain the polypeptide chain is arranged like a stretched spiral. Two internal strands form a regular beta-hairpin loop which is accompanied by two external strands linked by the proteinase binding segment. The polypeptide segment of each domain is interconnected by four disulfide bridges with a connectivity pattern hitherto unobserved. The reactive site loop of the second domain has elastase and chymotrypsin binding properties. It contains the scissile peptide bond between Leu72I and Met73I and has a similar conformation to that observed in other serine proteinase protein inhibitors. Eight residues of this loop, two of the adjacent hairpin loop, the C-terminal segment and Trp30I are in direct contact with the cognate enzyme. The binding loop of the first domain (probably with anti-trypsin activity) is disordered due to proteolytic cleavage occurring in the course of crystallization. PMID:3366116

  8. Manduca sexta hemolymph proteinase 21 activates prophenoloxidase-activating proteinase 3 in an insect innate immune response proteinase cascade.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Maureen J; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Haobo; Kanost, Michael R

    2007-04-20

    Melanization, an insect immune response, requires a set of hemolymph proteins including pathogen recognition proteins that initiate the response, a cascade of mostly unknown serine proteinases, and phenoloxidase. Until now, only initial and final proteinases in the pathways have been conclusively identified. Four such proteinases have been purified from the larval hemolymph of Manduca sexta: hemolymph proteinase 14 (HP14), which autoactivates in the presence of microbial surface components, and three prophenoloxidase-activating proteinases (PAP1-3). In this study, we have used two complementary approaches to identify a serine proteinase that activates proPAP3. Partial purification from hemolymph of an activator of proPAP3 resulted in an active fraction with two abundant polypeptides of approximately 32 and approximately 37 kDa. Labeling of these polypeptides with a serine proteinase inhibitor, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, indicated that they were active serine proteinases. N-terminal sequencing revealed that both were cleaved forms of the previously identified hemolymph serine proteinase, HP21. Surprisingly, cleavage of proHP21 had occurred not at the predicted activation site but more N-terminal to it. In vitro reactions carried out with purified HP14 (which activates proHP21), proHP21, proPAP3, and site-directed mutant forms of the latter two proteinases confirmed that HP21 activates proPAP3 by limited proteolysis. Like the HP21 products purified from hemolymph, HP21 that was activated by HP14 in the in vitro reactions was not cleaved at its predicted activation site.

  9. Engineering of alpha1-antitrypsin variants selective for subtilisin-like proprotein convertases PACE4 and PC6: importance of the P2' residue in stable complex formation of the serpin with proprotein convertase.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Akihiko; Kanie, Hiroki; Makise, Hirotaka; Yuasa, Keizo; Nagahama, Masami; Matsuda, Yoshiko

    2007-04-01

    Furin and PACE4, members of the subtilisin-like proprotein convertase (SPC) family, have been implicated in the metastatic progression of certain tumors in addition to the activation of viral coat proteins and bacterial toxins, indicating that these enzymes are potential targets for therapeutic agents. Alpha1-Antitrypsin Portland is an engineered alpha1-antitrypsin designed as a furin-specific inhibitor and has been used as a tool in the functional analysis of furin. In this work, we engineered rat alpha1-antitrypsin to create a PACE4-specific inhibitor. Substituting Arg-Arg-Arg-Arg for Ala-Val-Pro-Met(352) at P4-P1 and Ala for Leu(354) at P2' created a potent PACE4- and PC6-specific inhibitor. This variant (RRRRSA) formed an SDS- and heat-stable serpin/proteinase complex with PACE4 or PC6 and inhibited both enzyme activities. The RRRRSA variant was efficiently cleaved by furin without formation of the stable complex. This is the first report of a highly selective protein-based inhibitor of PACE4 and PC6. This inhibitor will be useful in delineating the roles of PACE4 and PC6 localized in the extracellular matrix.

  10. Entamoeba invadens: characterization of cysteine proteinases.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M; Hirata, K; Herdman, S; Reed, S

    1996-10-01

    Cysteine proteinases have a number of important functions in the life cycle of protozoan parasites. Based on our previous studies demonstrating the role of cysteine proteinases in invasion by Entamoeba histolytica, we evaluated the cysteine proteinases of E. invadens, a related protozoan which causes invasive disease of reptiles. E. invadens readily encysts in axenic culture and provides a model to investigate the role of cysteine proteinases in encystation. Broad bands of approximately 130-230, 55, and 35 kDa were detected on gelatin substrate gels and were inhibited with specific cysteine proteinase inhibitors. Maximal enzymatic activity was detected with peptide substrates containing arginine in the P2 position. A 567-bp fragment containing the active site of an E. invadens cysteine proteinase gene was amplified by PCR and had 37.7, 79.1, and 67.9% identity to the derived amino acid sequences of the acp 1, 2, and 3 genes, respectively, of E. histolytica. The PCR product hybridized with a single band of 1.1 kb on a Southern blot of EcoRI-restricted E. invadens genomic DNA. Long-term inhibition of cysteine proteinase activity during encystation resulted in significantly fewer cysts (P < 0.02); however, this effect appeared to be secondary to decreased trophozoite cell division. No difference in chitin synthase activity was detected between controls and encysting cells with inhibited cysteine proteinases, suggesting that these proteinases are not critical for activation of a zymogen form of chitin synthase. These studies demonstrate that cysteine proteinases may be critical for the survival of E. invadens, and specific inhibition may ultimately interrupt transmission.

  11. Knock-down of transcript abundance of a family of Kunitz proteinase inhibitor genes in white clover (Trifolium repens) reveals a redundancy and diversity of gene function.

    PubMed

    Islam, Afsana; Leung, Susanna; Burgess, Elisabeth P J; Laing, William A; Richardson, Kim A; Hofmann, Rainer W; Dijkwel, Paul P; McManus, Michael T

    2015-12-01

    The transcriptional regulation of four phylogenetically distinct members of a family of Kunitz proteinase inhibitor (KPI) genes isolated from white clover (Trifolium repens; designated Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, Tr-KPI4 and Tr-KPI5) has been investigated to determine their wider functional role. The four genes displayed differential transcription during seed germination, and in different tissues of the mature plant, and transcription was also ontogenetically regulated. Heterologous over-expression of Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2, Tr-KPI4 and Tr-KPI5 in Nicotiana tabacum retarded larval growth of the herbivore Spodoptera litura, and an increase in the transcription of the pathogenesis-related genes PR1 and PR4 was observed in the Tr-KPI1 and Tr-KPI4 over-expressing lines. RNA interference (RNAi) knock-down lines in white clover displayed significantly altered vegetative growth phenotypes with inhibition of shoot growth and a stimulation of root growth, while knock-down of Tr-KPI1, Tr-KPI2 and Tr-KPI5 transcript abundance also retarded larval growth of S. litura. Examination of these RNAi lines revealed constitutive stress-associated phenotypes as well as altered transcription of cellular signalling genes. These results reveal a functional redundancy across members of the KPI gene family. Further, the regulation of transcription of at least one member of the family, Tr-KPI2, may occupy a central role in the maintenance of a cellular homeostasis.

  12. Serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Heilmann, Romy M; Parnell, Nolie K; Grützner, Niels; Mansell, Joanne; Berghoff, Nora; Schellenberg, Stefan; Reusch, Claudia E; Suchodolski, Jan S; Steiner, Jörg M

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) protein loss, due to lymphangiectasia or chronic inflammation, can be challenging to diagnose. This study evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of serum and fecal canine α1-proteinase inhibitor (cα1PI) concentrations to detect crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation in dogs. Serum and fecal cα1PI concentrations were measured in 120 dogs undergoing GI tissue biopsies, and were compared between dogs with and without crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for dichotomous outcomes. Serial serum cα1PI concentrations were also evaluated in 12 healthy corticosteroid-treated dogs. Serum cα1PI and albumin concentrations were significantly lower in dogs with crypt abscesses and/or lacteal dilation than in those without (both P <0.001), and more severe lesions were associated with lower serum cα1PI concentrations, higher 3 days-mean fecal cα1PI concentrations, and lower serum/fecal cα1PI ratios. Serum and fecal cα1PI, and their ratios, distinguished dogs with moderate or severe GI crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation from dogs with only mild or none such lesions with moderate sensitivity (56-92%) and specificity (67-81%). Serum cα1PI concentrations increased during corticosteroid administration. We conclude that serum and fecal α1PI concentrations reflect the severity of intestinal crypt abscesses/lacteal dilation in dogs. Due to its specificity for the GI tract, measurement of fecal cα1PI appears to be superior to serum cα1PI for diagnosing GI protein loss in dogs. In addition, the serum/fecal cα1PI ratio has an improved accuracy in hypoalbuminemic dogs, but serum cα1PI concentrations should be carefully interpreted in corticosteroid-treated dogs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Enterolobium contortisiliquum Trypsin Inhibitor (EcTI), a Plant Proteinase Inhibitor, Decreases in Vitro Cell Adhesion and Invasion by Inhibition of Src Protein-Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Signaling Pathways*

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Cláudia Alessandra Andrade; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien Jane; Ferreira, Joana Gasperazzo; Maza, Paloma Korehisa; Suzuki, Erika; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza V.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor cell invasion is vital for cancer progression and metastasis. Adhesion, migration, and degradation of the extracellular matrix are important events involved in the establishment of cancer cells at a new site, and therefore molecular targets are sought to inhibit such processes. The effect of a plant proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on the adhesion, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells was the focus of this study. EcTI showed no effect on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells or fibroblasts but inhibited the adhesion, migration, and cell invasion of gastric cancer cells; however, EcTI had no effect upon the adhesion of fibroblasts. EcTI was shown to decrease the expression and disrupt the cellular organization of molecules involved in the formation and maturation of invadopodia, such as integrin β1, cortactin, neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, membrane type 1 metalloprotease, and metalloproteinase-2. Moreover, gastric cancer cells treated with EcTI presented a significant decrease in intracellular phosphorylated Src and focal adhesion kinase, integrin-dependent cell signaling components. Together, these results indicate that EcTI inhibits the invasion of gastric cancer cells through alterations in integrin-dependent cell signaling pathways. PMID:22039045

  14. Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), a plant proteinase inhibitor, decreases in vitro cell adhesion and invasion by inhibition of Src protein-focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Cláudia Alessandra Andrade; Coulson-Thomas, Vivien Jane; Ferreira, Joana Gasperazzo; Maza, Paloma Korehisa; Suzuki, Erika; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza V

    2012-01-02

    Tumor cell invasion is vital for cancer progression and metastasis. Adhesion, migration, and degradation of the extracellular matrix are important events involved in the establishment of cancer cells at a new site, and therefore molecular targets are sought to inhibit such processes. The effect of a plant proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on the adhesion, migration, and invasion of gastric cancer cells was the focus of this study. EcTI showed no effect on the proliferation of gastric cancer cells or fibroblasts but inhibited the adhesion, migration, and cell invasion of gastric cancer cells; however, EcTI had no effect upon the adhesion of fibroblasts. EcTI was shown to decrease the expression and disrupt the cellular organization of molecules involved in the formation and maturation of invadopodia, such as integrin β1, cortactin, neuronal Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein, membrane type 1 metalloprotease, and metalloproteinase-2. Moreover, gastric cancer cells treated with EcTI presented a significant decrease in intracellular phosphorylated Src and focal adhesion kinase, integrin-dependent cell signaling components. Together, these results indicate that EcTI inhibits the invasion of gastric cancer cells through alterations in integrin-dependent cell signaling pathways.

  15. The remarkable efficiency of a Pin-II proteinase inhibitor sans two conserved disulfide bonds is due to enhanced flexibility and hydrogen bond density in the reactive site loop.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Mishra, Manasi; Tamhane, Vaijayanti A; Ghosh, Anirban; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Suresh, C G; Joshi, Rajendra; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-01-01

    Capsicum annuum (L.) expresses diverse potato type II family proteinase inhibitors comprising of inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) as basic functional unit. Most IRDs contain eight conserved cysteines forming four disulfide bonds, which are indispensible for their stability and activity. We investigated the functional significance of evolutionary variations in IRDs and their role in mediating interaction between the inhibitor and cognate proteinase. Among the 18 IRDs encoded by C. annuum, IRD-7, -9, and -12 were selected for further characterization on the basis of variation in their reactive site loop, number of conserved cysteine residues, and higher theoretical ΔGbind for interaction with Helicoverpa armigera trypsin. Moreover, inhibition kinetics showed that IRD-9, despite loss of some of the disulfide bonds, was a more potent proteinase inhibitor among the three selected IRDs. Molecular dynamic simulations revealed that serine residues in the place of cysteines at seventh and eighth positions of IRD-9 resulted in an increase in the density of intramolecular hydrogen bonds and reactive site loop flexibility. Results of the serine residues chemical modification also supported this observation and provided a possible explanation for the remarkable inhibitory potential of IRD-9. Furthermore, this natural variant among IRDs showed special attributes like stability to proteolysis and synergistic inhibitory effect on other IRDs. It is likely that IRDs have coevolved selective specialization of their structure and function as a response towards specific insect proteases they encountered. Understanding the molecular mechanism of pest protease-plant proteinaceous inhibitor interaction will help in developing effective pest control strategies. An animated interactive 3D complement (I3DC) is available in Proteopedia at http://proteopedia.org/w/Journal:JBSD:39.

  16. Ability of a proteinase inhibitor mixture to kill poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae in an in vitro feeding system.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, R; Nisbet, A J; Huntley, J F

    2006-11-05

    The development of a reliable in vitro feeding system has enabled the rapid testing of presumptive anti-mite factors, a mixture of protease inhibitors (PI), by incorporating these into the blood feed. Mites were collected from a caged-hen facility and underwent a regime of starvation under varying conditions of temperature and darkness to determine the optimum conditions that encouraged mites to feed in the in vitro system. The efficacy of two anti-coagulants, heparin (HS) and acid citrate glucose (ACD), on mite feeding rates and mortality was evaluated. The ability of a mixture of PI to kill mites was also evaluated. The rate of feeding was greater in mites that were starved and cooled for between 7 and 30 days compared with mites that were not starved or cooled. The percentage of mites that fed when presented with HS treated blood (70%) was greater when compared with ACD treated blood (48%). The mortality of mites fed blood treated with HS + PI increased to 45% compared with a mortality level of 5% in mites fed on blood treated with HS alone. A reliable in vitro method for feeding D. gallinae which has the potential to be used to rapidly screen blood-borne products for their efficacy in reducing mite numbers has been developed.

  17. Leukocyte Cell Surface Proteinases: Regulation of Expression, Functions, and Mechanisms of Surface Localization

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Caroline A.

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: 1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinase by cells; 2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or 3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: 1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; 2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; 3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; 4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and 5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes. PMID:18329945

  18. Leukocyte cell surface proteinases: regulation of expression, functions, and mechanisms of surface localization.

    PubMed

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    A number of proteinases are expressed on the surface of leukocytes including members of the serine, metallo-, and cysteine proteinase superfamilies. Some proteinases are anchored to the plasma membrane of leukocytes by a transmembrane domain or a glycosyl phosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor. Other proteinases bind with high affinity to classical receptors, or with lower affinity to integrins, proteoglycans, or other leukocyte surface molecules. Leukocyte surface levels of proteinases are regulated by: (1) cytokines, chemokines, bacterial products, and growth factors which stimulate synthesis and/or release of proteinases by cells; (2) the availability of surface binding sites for proteinases; and/or (3) internalization or shedding of surface-bound proteinases. The binding of proteinases to leukocyte surfaces serves many functions including: (1) concentrating the activity of proteinases to the immediate pericellular environment; (2) facilitating pro-enzyme activation; (3) increasing proteinase stability and retention in the extracellular space; (4) regulating leukocyte function by proteinases signaling through cell surface binding sites or other surface proteins; and (5) protecting proteinases from inhibition by extracellular proteinase inhibitors. There is strong evidence that membrane-associated proteinases on leukocytes play critical roles in wound healing, inflammation, extracellular matrix remodeling, fibrinolysis, and coagulation. This review will outline the biology of membrane-associated proteinases expressed by leukocytes and their roles in physiologic and pathologic processes.

  19. Oncostatin M induced alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) gene expression in Hep G2 cells is mediated by a 3' enhancer.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Kevin; Marsters, Peter; Morley, Stephen; van Gent, Diana; Hejazi, Ala; Backx, Matt; Thorpe, Emma R K; Kalsheker, Noor

    2002-07-15

    alpha(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT) is the major serine proteinase inhibitor (SERPIN A1) in human plasma. Its target proteinase is neutrophil elastase and its main physiological function is protection of the lower respiratory tract from the destructive effects of neutrophil elastase during an inflammatory response. Circulating levels of AAT rise 2-3-fold during inflammation and the liver produces most of this increase. The cytokines oncostatin M (OSM) and interleukin-6 have been shown to be mainly responsible for this effect, which is mediated via the interaction of cytokine-inducible transcription factors with regulatory elements within the gene. In the present study, we report for the first time that OSM stimulation of hepatocyte AAT occurs via an interaction between the hepatocyte promoter and an OSM-responsive element at the 3'-end of the AAT gene. This effect is mediated by the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 ('STAT 3') binding to an OSM-responsive element (sequence TTCTCTTAA), and this site is distinct from, but close to, a previously reported interleukin-6-responsive element.

  20. The human corticosteroid binding globulin gene is located on chromosome 14q31-q32.1 near two other serine protease inhibitor genes.

    PubMed

    Seralini, G E; Bérubé, D; Gagné, R; Hammond, G L

    1990-11-01

    Human corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG) cDNA fragments were radiolabeled and hybridized in situ to metaphase chromosome preparations. The results localized the CBG gene to the q31-q32.1 region of human chromosome 14. This location also contains the genes for two closely related serine protease inhibitors: alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor and alpha 1-antichymotrypsin. It is therefore likely that these genes evolved by duplication events, and it would appear that this region contains a series of functionally related genes.

  1. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated alpha-1 antitrypsin gene therapy prevents type I diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Song, S; Goudy, K; Campbell-Thompson, M; Wasserfall, C; Scott-Jorgensen, M; Wang, J; Tang, Q; Crawford, J M; Ellis, T M; Atkinson, M A; Flotte, T R

    2004-01-01

    Type I diabetes results from an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. Although the exact immunologic processes underlying this disease are unclear, increasing evidence suggests that immunosuppressive, immunoregulatory and anti-inflammatory agents can interrupt the progression of the disease. Alpha 1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a multifunctional serine proteinase inhibitor (serpin) that also displays a wide range of anti-inflammatory properties. To test the ability of AAT to modulate the development of type I diabetes, we performed a series of investigations involving recombinant adeno-associated virus vector (rAAV)-mediated gene delivery of human alpha-1 antitrypsin (hAAT) to nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. Recombinant AAV-expressing hAAT (rAAV2-CB-AT) was administered intramuscularly to 4-week-old female NOD mice (1 x 10(10) i.u./mouse). A single injection of this vector reduced the intensity of insulitis, the levels of insulin autoantibodies, and the frequency of overt type I diabetes (30% (3/10) at 32 weeks of age versus 70% (7/10) in controls). Transgene expression at the injection sites was confirmed by immunostaining. Interestingly, antibodies against hAAT were present in a majority of the vector-injected mice and circulating hAAT was undetectable when assessed 10 weeks postinjection. This study suggests a potential therapeutic role for AAT in preventing type I diabetes as well as the ability of AAV gene therapy-based approaches to ameliorate disease effectively.

  2. Differential subcellular targeting of recombinant human α₁-proteinase inhibitor influences yield, biological activity and in planta stability of the protein in transgenic tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Jha, Shweta; Agarwal, Saurabh; Sanyal, Indraneel; Jain, G K; Amla, D V

    2012-11-01

    The response of protein accumulation site on yield, biological activity and in planta stability of therapeutic recombinant human proteinase inhibitor (α₁-PI) was analyzed via targeting to different subcellular locations, like endoplasmic reticulum (ER), apoplast, vacuole and cytosol in leaves of transgenic tomato plants. In situ localization of the recombinant α₁-PI protein in transgenic plant cells was monitored by immunohistochemical staining. Maximum accumulation of recombinant α₁-PI in T₀ and T₁ transgenic tomato plants was achieved from 1.5 to 3.2% of total soluble protein (TSP) by retention in ER lumen, followed by vacuole and apoplast, whereas cytosolic targeting resulted into degradation of the protein. The plant-derived recombinant α₁-PI showed biological activity for elastase inhibition, as monitored by residual porcine pancreatic elastase (PPE) activity assay and band-shift assay. Recombinant α₁-PI was purified from transgenic tomato plants with high yield, homogeneity and biological activity. Purified protein appeared as a single band of ∼48-50 kDa on SDS-PAGE with pI value ranging between 5.1 and 5.3. Results of mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy of purified recombinant α₁-PI revealed the structural integrity of the recombinant protein comparable to native serum α₁-PI. Enzymatic deglycosylation and lectin-binding assays with the purified recombinant α₁-PI showed compartment-specific N-glycosylation of the protein targeted to ER, apoplast and vacuole. Conformational studies based on urea-induced denaturation and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy revealed relatively lower stability of the recombinant α₁-PI protein, compared to its serum counterpart. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of plant derived recombinant and human plasma-purified α₁-PI in rat, by intravenous route, revealed significantly faster plasma clearance and lower area under curve (AUC) of recombinant protein. Our data suggested significance of

  3. Alpha-1-antitrypsin for the improvement of autoimmunity and allograft rejection in beta cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jian; Liao, Yu-Ting; Jian, You-Qiang; Zhang, Xiao-Dan; Wei, Pei; Qi, Hui; Deng, Chun-Yan; Li, Fu-Rong

    2013-02-01

    Islet transplantation offers hope for patients with type 1 diabetes, which is an autoimmune disease. However, islet transplant recipients must overcome two obstacles in both allograft rejection and autoimmune reaction. Alpha-1-antitrypsin (a1-proteinase inhibitor, AAT) possesses anti-inflammatory properties, reduces cytokine-mediated islet damage, and induces specific immune tolerance. In this study, an insulinoma cell line, NIT-1, was transfected with human AAT (hAAT), named NIT-hAAT, and was transplanted to the left renal subcapsular spaces of 7-week-old female non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice (n=22). Cyclophosphamide(CY) was administered to synchronize and accelerate the development of diabetes. Thus, the immunosuppressive and cytoprotective activity of hAAT in β-cell transplantation was investigated. NIT-hAAT has immunomodulatory properties, which delay the onset of autoimmune diabetes, reduce diabetes incidence, inhibit insulitis and β-cell apoptosis, and dampen transplant site inflammation. We propose that NIT-hAAT has a dual function by improving islet autoimmunity and protecting transplanted β-cells from allograft rejection. However, the low expression of hAAT in vivo results in the inability of NIT-hAAT to induce long-term specific immune tolerance and to completely block allograft rejection.

  4. Acid Denaturation of alpha1-antitrypsin: characterization of a novel mechanism of serpin polymerization.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Glyn L; Chow, Michelle K M; Howlett, Geoffrey J; Bottomley, Stephen P

    2002-12-06

    The native serpin architecture is extremely sensitive to mutation and environmental factors. These factors induce the formation of a partially folded species that results in the production of inactive loop-sheet polymers. The deposition of these aggregates in tissue, results in diseases such as liver cirrhosis, thrombosis, angioedema and dementia. In this study, we characterize the kinetics and conformational changes of alpha(1)-antitrypsin polymerization at pH 4 using tryptophan fluorescence, circular dichroism, turbidity changes and thioflavin T binding. These biophysical techniques have demonstrated that polymerization begins with a reversible conformational change that results in partial loss of secondary structure and distortion at the top of beta-sheet A. This is followed by two bimolecular processes. First, protodimers are formed, which can be dissociated by changing the pH back to 8. Then, an irreversible conformational change occurs, resulting in the stabilization of the dimers with a concomitant increase in beta-sheet structure, allowing for subsequent polymer extension. Electron microscopy analysis of the polymers, coupled with the far-UV CD and thioflavin T properties of the pH 4 polymers suggest they do not form via the classical loop-beta-sheet A linkage. However, they more closely resemble those formed by the pathological variant M(malton). Taken together, these data describe a novel kinetic mechanism of serine proteinase inhibitor polymerization.

  5. α1-Proteinase inhibitor (human) in the treatment of hereditary emphysema secondary to α1-antitrypsin deficiency: number and costs of years of life gained.

    PubMed

    Sclar, David Alexander; Evans, Marc A; Robison, Linda M; Skaer, Tracy L

    2012-05-01

    α(1)-Antitrypsin deficiency (α-ATD) is a disorder inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern, with co-dominant alleles known as the protease inhibitor system (Pi). The main function of α(1)-antitrypsin (α-AT) is to protect the lungs against a powerful elastase released from neutrophil leucocytes. α-ATD typically presents with a serum α-AT level of <50 mg/dL. In severe α-ATD, phenotype PiZZ, protection of the lungs is compromised, leading to an accelerated decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)). As a result, a patient may develop pulmonary emphysema of the panacinar type at a young age (third to fourth decades of life), with cigarette smoking being the most significant additional risk factor. It has been shown that weekly or monthly infusion of human α-AT is effective in raising serum α-AT levels to desired levels (>80 mg/dL), with few, if any, adverse effects. The present study was designed to discern the number of years of life gained, and the expense per year of life gained, associated with use of α-AT augmentation therapy (α(1)-proteinase inhibitor [human]), relative to 'no therapeutic intervention' in persons with α-ATD. Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) was used to: (i) estimate the number of years of life gained; and (ii) estimate the health service expenditures per year of life gained for persons receiving, or not receiving, α-AT augmentation therapy. MCS afforded a decision-analytical framework parameterized with both stochastic (random) and deterministic (fixed) components, and yielded a fiscal risk-profile for each simulated cohort of interest (eight total: by sex, smoking status [non-smoker; or past use (smoker)]; and use of α-AT augmentation therapy). The stochastic components employed in the present inquiry were: (i) age-specific body weight, and height; (ii) age-specific mortality; and (iii) the probability distribution for receipt of a lung transplant, as a function of FEV(1). The deterministic components employed in

  6. Extracellular alkaline proteinase of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides.

    PubMed

    Dunaevsky, Ya E; Matveeva, A R; Beliakova, G A; Domash, V I; Belozersky, M A

    2007-03-01

    The main proteinase of the filamentous fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides causing anthracnoses and serious problems for production and storage of agricultural products has molecular mass of 57 kD and was purified more than 200-fold to homogeneity with the yield of 5%. Maximal activity of the proteinase is at pH 9.0-10.0, and the enzyme is stable at pH 6.0-11.5 (residual activity not less than 70%). The studied enzyme completely kept its activity to 55 degrees C, with a temperature optimum of 45 degrees C. The purified C. gloeosporioides proteinase is stable at alkaline pH values, but rapidly loses its activity at pH values lower than 5.0. Addition of bovine serum albumin stabilizes the enzyme under acidic conditions. Data on inhibitor analysis and substrate specificity of the enzyme allow its classification as a serine proteinase of subtilisin family. It is demonstrated that the extracellular proteinase of C. gloeosporioides specifically effects plant cell wall proteins. It is proposed that the studied proteinase--via hydrolysis of cell wall--provides for penetration of the fungus into the tissues of the host plant.

  7. Evidence for direct regulation of myocardial Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 phosphorylation and activity by 90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK): effects of the novel and specific RSK inhibitor fmk on responses to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cuello, Friederike; Snabaitis, Andrew K; Cohen, Michael S; Taunton, Jack; Avkiran, Metin

    2007-03-01

    Multiple stimuli of physiological and pathophysiological significance, including alpha1-adrenoceptor agonists, stimulate the cardiac sarcolemmal Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 1 (NHE1) through activation of the mitogen-activated or extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase (MEK) ERK-90-kDa ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK) signaling cascade. However, the individual contributions of ERK and RSK, which can each phosphorylate the NHE1 regulatory domain, to such stimulation are unknown. In the present study, we have used the novel RSK inhibitor fmk to determine the role of RSK as a direct regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity in response to alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, in ventricular myocytes isolated from the adult rat heart. Initial experiments confirmed that pretreatment of myocytes with fmk before exposure to the alpha1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine inhibited RSK C-terminal kinase activity and thereby RSK N-terminal kinase activation, without affecting MEK or ERK activation. Pretreatment of myocytes with fmk also inhibited phenylephrine-induced increases in NHE1 phosphorylation and the rate of NHE1-mediated H+ efflux under conditions of intracellular acidosis. These findings reveal, for the first time to our knowledge, that RSK is the principal regulator of NHE1 phosphorylation and activity after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation in adult myocardium.

  8. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) ... develop. The most common faulty gene that can cause AAT deficiency is called PiZ. If you inherit ...

  9. Distinctive biophysical and pharmacological properties of class A (BI) calcium channel alpha 1 subunits.

    PubMed

    Sather, W A; Tanabe, T; Zhang, J F; Mori, Y; Adams, M E; Tsien, R W

    1993-08-01

    Transcripts for the class A Ca2+ channel alpha 1 subunit (also known as BI) are present at high levels in many parts of the mammalian CNS and are widely assumed to encode the P-type Ca2+ channel. To characterize the biophysical and pharmacological properties of alpha 1A channels, macroscopic and single-channel recordings were made in Xenopus oocytes injected with alpha 1A cRNA. alpha 1-specific properties were identified by making systematic comparisons with the more familiar class C alpha 1 subunit under the condition of a standard ancillary subunit (alpha 2/delta + beta) makeup. alpha 1A currents activate and inactivate more rapidly and display steeper voltage dependence of gating than alpha 1C currents. Unlike alpha 1C, alpha 1A channels are largely insensitive to dihydropyridines and FPL 64176, but respond to the cone snail peptide omega-CTx-MVIIC(SNX-230), a potent and fairly selective inhibitor. In comparison with P-type Ca2+ channels in rat cerebellar Purkinje cells, alpha 1A channels in oocytes are approximately 10(2)-fold less sensitive to omega-Aga-IVA and approximately 10-fold more sensitive to omega-CTx-MVIIC. alpha 1A channels are not inhibited by Bay K 8644 and inactivate much more rapidly than P-type Ca2+ channels. Thus, alpha 1A is capable of generating a Ca2+ channel phenotype quite different from P-type current.

  10. Disruption of the murine alpha1-antitrypsin/PI2 gene.

    PubMed

    Kushi, Atsuko; Akiyama, Kiyotaka; Noguchi, Masato; Edamura, Koji; Yoshida, Takayuki; Sasai, Hitoshi

    2004-10-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (alpha1-AT) is a member of the serine protease inhibitor family regulating numerous proteolytic processes. The genetic disorder, alpha1-AT deficiency, is well known as a cause of hereditary pulmonary emphysema and liver cirrhosis. To create an animal model of human alpha1-AT deficiency, we disrupted the major murine isoform PI2, which is similar to human alpha1-AT and is one of 7 alpha1-AT isoforms found in the mouse. The ability of the serum to inhibit the activities of human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and human chymotrypsin (CYT) was significantly lower in heterozygous mice (alpha1-AT/PI2 -/+) than wild-type (alpha1-AT/PI2 +/+) mice (73.2% vs. 100% for HLE and 67.8% vs.100% for CYT, respectively; P<0.05). The distribution of genotypes among F(2) progeny was not in accordance with Mendelian distribution (P<0.01), as the percentages of wild-type, heterozygotes and homozygotes were 47.8%, 37.3% and 14.9%, respectively. Thus, it is likely that impairment of the protease inhibitor had a critical effect on fetus development. The alpha1-AT/PI2 deficient mouse will be a useful animal model for elucidating the function of alpha1-AT in fetal development, studying the mechanisms of chronic inflammatory disease and evaluating therapeutic candidates for the treatment of inflammatory disease.

  11. Multiple forms of calcium-dependent proteinase in crustacean muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Mykles, D.L.; Skinner, D.M.

    1986-01-01

    Four calcium-dependent proteinase (CDP) activities in lobster muscles have been resolved by high performance liquid chromatography. These activities differ in molecular weight and net charge. Though optimum activity occurred at high (5 and 10 mM) calcium at pH 6.8, the enzymes differ in activation at lower calcium concentrations. Only one of the CDPs is active at 100 ..mu..M calcium; none are active at 10 ..mu..M and below. Although all four CDPs are inhibited by the cysteine proteinase inhibitors leupeptin, E-64, and iodoacetamide, they show a differential response to the aspartic proteinase inhibitor pepstatin and the serine proteinase inhibitor PMSF. In contrast to CDPs from vertebrate tissues, crustacean muscles contain multiple forms that require calcium at millimolar levels. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  12. NaStEP: A Proteinase Inhibitor Essential to Self-Incompatibility and a Positive Regulator of HT-B Stability in Nicotiana alata Pollen Tubes1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Durán, Karina; McClure, Bruce; García-Campusano, Florencia; Rodríguez-Sotres, Rogelio; Cisneros, Jesús; Busot, Grethel; Cruz-García, Felipe

    2013-01-01

    In Solanaceae, the self-incompatibility S-RNase and S-locus F-box interactions define self-pollen recognition and rejection in an S-specific manner. This interaction triggers a cascade of events involving other gene products unlinked to the S-locus that are crucial to the self-incompatibility response. To date, two essential pistil-modifier genes, 120K and High Top-Band (HT-B), have been identified in Nicotiana species. However, biochemistry and genetics indicate that additional modifier genes are required. We recently reported a Kunitz-type proteinase inhibitor, named NaStEP (for Nicotiana alata Stigma-Expressed Protein), that is highly expressed in the stigmas of self-incompatible Nicotiana species. Here, we report the proteinase inhibitor activity of NaStEP. NaStEP is taken up by both compatible and incompatible pollen tubes, but its suppression in Nicotiana spp. transgenic plants disrupts S-specific pollen rejection; therefore, NaStEP is a novel pistil-modifier gene. Furthermore, HT-B levels within the pollen tubes are reduced when NaStEP-suppressed pistils are pollinated with either compatible or incompatible pollen. In wild-type self-incompatible N. alata, in contrast, HT-B degradation occurs preferentially in compatible pollinations. Taken together, these data show that the presence of NaStEP is required for the stability of HT-B inside pollen tubes during the rejection response, but the underlying mechanism is currently unknown. PMID:23150644

  13. Co-expression of the proteinase inhibitors oryzacystatin I and oryzacystatin II in transgenic potato alters Colorado potato beetle larval development.

    PubMed

    Cingel, Aleksandar; Savić, Jelena; Lazarević, Jelica; Ćosić, Tatjana; Raspor, Martin; Smigocki, Ann; Ninković, Slavica

    2017-10-01

    Colorado potato beetle (CPB; Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say, Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) has shown a remarkable adaptability to a variety of control measures. Although oryzacystatin I and II (OCI and OCII) have potential in controlling pests that use cysteine proteinases for food digestion, expression of a single OC gene in potato exhibited a minimal or no effect on CPB fitness traits. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of coexpressed OCI and OCII in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars Desiree, Dragačevka and Jelica on CPB larvae. Growth parameters, consumption rates and food utilization, as well as activity of proteases of CPB larvae were assayed. Second and third instar larvae fed on transformed leaves molted earlier and had higher relative growth and consumption rates than larvae fed on nontransformed leaves, while efficiency of food utilization was unaffected. In contrast, fourth instar maximum weight gain and amount of leaves consumed were about 20% lower for the larvae fed on transgenic potato. Analysis of total protease activity of third instar larvae revealed reduction in overall proteolytic activity measured by azocasein hydrolysis, accompanied with inhibition of cysteine proteinase activity 24 h after ingestion of potato leaves expressing OCI and OCII. However, after long-term feeding on transformed leaves proteolytic activities of larvae became similar to the controls. Although feeding on OCI/OCII leaves did not affect larval survival, coexpression of OC genes reduced the development time and thus significantly decreased plant damage caused by CPB larvae. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  14. Delivery of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin to Airways.

    PubMed

    Griese, Matthias; Scheuch, Gerhard

    2016-08-01

    Treatment with exogenous alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT), a potent serine protease inhibitor, was developed originally for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease associated with AAT deficiency; however, other lung conditions involving neutrophilic inflammation and proteolytic tissue injury related to neutrophil elastase and other serine proteases may also be considered for AAT therapy. These conditions include bronchiectasis caused by primary ciliary dyskinesia, cystic fibrosis, and other diseases associated with an increased free elastase activity in the airways. Inhaled AAT may be a viable option to counteract proteolytic tissue damage. This form of treatment requires efficient drug delivery to the targeted pulmonary compartment. Aerosol technology meeting this requirement is currently available and offers an alternative therapeutic approach to systemic AAT administration. To date, early studies in humans have shown biochemical efficacy and have established the safety of inhaled AAT. However, to bring aerosol AAT therapy to patients, large phase 3 protocols in carefully selected patient populations (i.e., subgroups of patients with AAT deficiency, cystic fibrosis, or other lung diseases with bronchiectasis) will be needed with clinical end points in addition to the measurement of proteolytic activity in the airway. The outcomes likely will have to include lung function, lung structure assessed by computed tomography imaging, disease exacerbations, health status, and mortality.

  15. Characterization and pathogenetic role of proteinase from Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Na, B K; Kim, J C; Song, C Y

    2001-01-01

    A secreted proteinase was purified from the culture supernatant of Acanthamoeba castellanii with several chromatographic steps. The purified proteinase was a chymotrypsin-like serine proteinase. Its molecular weight was approximately 12 kDa on SDS-PAGE, and its native molecular weight was 12 kDa when determined by molecular sieve chromatography. It showed a broad temperature optimum ranging 30-55 degrees C with an optimal at 55 degrees C and an optimal pH of 8.5. It could degrade various protein substrates, such as collagen, fibronectin, laminin, secretory immunoglobulin A, immunoglobulin G, plasminogen, fibrinogen, haemoglobin and rabbit corneal proteins. It showed strong cytopathic effects in cultured cells, including HEp2 and HEK cells. The corneal lesions, induced by both the purified proteinase and A. castellanii, displayed similar clinical results for both cases, in which the stromal infiltration and opacity with the epithelial defect were revealed. These results suggest that the enzyme was highly associated with the pathogenesis of Acanthamoeba. The fact that cytopathic effects and development of corneal lesions caused by the proteinase of Acanthamoeba were inhibited by the proteinase inhibitor suggest that the proteinase inhibitor might be useful as a therapeutic agent.

  16. Completion of the amino acid sequence of the alpha 1 chain from type I calf skin collagen. Amino acid sequence of alpha 1(I)B8.

    PubMed Central

    Glanville, R W; Breitkreutz, D; Meitinger, M; Fietzek, P P

    1983-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of the 279-residue CNBr peptide CB8 from the alpha 1 chain of type I calf skin collagen is presented. It was determined by sequencing overlapping fragments of CB8 produced by Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase, trypsin, Endoproteinase Arg-C and hydroxylamine. Tryptic cleavages were also made specific for lysine by blocking arginine residues with cyclohexane-1,2-dione. This completes the amino acid sequence analysis of the 1054-residues-long alpha (I) chain of calf skin collagen. PMID:6354180

  17. A novel Glycine soja cysteine proteinase inhibitor GsCPI14, interacting with the calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK, regulated plant tolerance to alkali stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Yang, Shanshan; Sun, Mingzhe; Wang, Sunting; Ding, Xiaodong; Zhu, Dan; Ji, Wei; Cai, Hua; Zhao, Chaoyue; Wang, Xuedong; Zhu, Yanming

    2014-05-01

    It has been well demonstrated that cystatins regulated plant stress tolerance through inhibiting the cysteine proteinase activity under environmental stress. However, there was limited information about the role of cystatins in plant alkali stress response, especially in wild soybean. Here, in this study, we focused on the biological characterization of a novel Glycine soja cystatin protein GsCPI14, which interacted with the calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK and positively regulated plant alkali stress tolerance. The protein-protein interaction between GsCBRLK and GsCPI14 was confirmed by using split-ubiquitin based membrane yeast two-hybrid analysis and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay. Expression of GsCPI14 was greatly induced by salt, ABA and alkali stress in G. soja, and GsCBRLK overexpression (OX) in Glycine max promoted the stress induction of GmCPI14 expression under stress conditions. Furthermore, we found that GsCPI14-eGFP fusion protein localized in the entire Arabidopsis protoplast and onion epidermal cell, and GsCPI14 showed ubiquitous expression in different tissues of G. soja. In addition, we gave evidence that the GST-GsCPI14 fusion protein inhibited the proteolytic activity of papain in vitro. At last, we demonstrated that OX of GsCPI14 in Arabidopsis promoted the seed germination under alkali stress, as evidenced by higher germination rates. GsCPI14 transgenic Arabidopsis seedlings also displayed better growth performance and physiological index under alkali stress. Taken together, results presented in this study demonstrated that the G. soja cysteine proteinase inhibitor GsCPI14 interacted with the calcium/calmodulin-binding receptor-like kinase GsCBRLK and regulated plant tolerance to alkali stress.

  18. [The HIV proteinase--a target for antiviral agents].

    PubMed

    Grinde, B; Jonassen, T O

    1996-10-10

    The enormous resources spent on developing inhibitors of the HIV proteinase is finally proving worth while. The FDA in the USA approved saquinavir (Invirase, Roche) for treatment of AIDS in December 1995, and the presumably even more useful inhibitors, ritonavir (Norvir, Abbott) and indinavir (Crixivan, Merck) in March 1996. The clinical trials indicate that these substances are more efficient antiviral agents than the well known reverse transcriptase inhibitors (e.g., AZT or ddC). In the present article, the function of the HIV proteinase will be discussed, as well as the drug design strategies leading to the success. We believe that the combination of biotechnology and computer modelling is a potent tool for designing drugs, and that these proteinase inhibitors not only signal optimism in the treatment of AIDS, but also a new era in the development of therapeutics.

  19. Do native and polymeric alpha1-antitrypsin activate human neutrophils in vitro?

    PubMed

    Persson, Caroline; Subramaniyam, Devipriya; Stevens, Tim; Janciauskiene, Sabina

    2006-06-01

    alpha(1)-Antitrypsin (AAT)-Z deficiency is a risk factor for the development of COPD. Compared to wild-type M, AAT-Z has an increased tendency to polymerize, rendering it inactive as a serine proteinase inhibitor. It has been demonstrated that wild-type M- and Z-deficiency AAT polymers are chemotactic for human neutrophils. However, our own studies dispute a proinflammatory role for polymerized AAT-M and AAT-Z, suggesting rather that they are predominantly antiinflammatory, exhibiting inhibitory effects on lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human monocyte activation. The discrepancies between these observations prompted us to re-examine the effects of AAT. The effects of native and polymerized AAT-M and AAT-Z with varying levels of endotoxin contamination (0.08 to 2.55 endotoxin units [EU]/mg protein) on human neutrophil chemotaxis and interleukin (IL)-8 release, in vitro, were evaluated. Neither native nor polymerized (M- or Z-deficient) AAT contaminated with low levels of endotoxin (/= 0.88 EU/mg protein), and significant chemotaxis occurred when AAT was spiked with either endotoxin or zymosan. In support, native and polymeric AAT-M with low endotoxin contamination completely inhibited neutrophil IL-8 release triggered by the zymosan, while AATs with high endotoxin contamination strongly induced IL-8 release and did not inhibit zymosan-stimulated IL-8 release. The proinflammatory effects of native and polymeric AAT may be critically dependent on the presence of other cell activators, bacterial or otherwise, while pure preparations of AAT appear to exert predominantly antiinflammatory activity.

  20. Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis. Occurrence of non-functioning components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the presence of proteinase inhibitors: evidence for proteolytic control over assembly of the respiratory chain.

    PubMed Central

    Galkin, A V; Tsoi, T V; Luzikov, V N

    1980-01-01

    Yeast was grown in glucose- or galactose-containing media without or with proteinase inhibitors, phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride and pepstatin. Culture growth was practically not affected by these compounds. Yeast growth on glucose in the presence of either phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin entails accumulation of cytochromes c, c1, b and aa3 to a 25--30% excess above the control by the stationary phase, while cell respiration is unaffected. During growth on galactose the maximal cytochrome content (per unit weight of biomass) is reached in the mid-exponential phase and then decreases by 30--40% towards the stationary phase, while cell respiration remains constant. Addition of phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride or pepstatin in the mid-exponential phase blocks the decrease in cytochrome levels and has no effect on cell respiration. Mitochondrial populations isolated from stationary-phase control and phenylmethanesulphonyl fluoride-grown cells glucose cultures display identical succinate oxidase and partial-respiratory-chain activities, despite the differences in cytochrome contents. However, the activities of individual respiratory complexes measured after maximal activation are nearly proportional to the amounts of corresponding components. The same situation holds true for mitochondrial populations from mid-exponential-phase, stationary-phase control and stationary-phase inhibitor-grown cells of galactose cultures. The findings suggest that the 'surplus' respiratory-chain components do not participate in electron flow because of the lack of interaction with adjacent carriers. PMID:7004440

  1. Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency asthma and allergy.

    PubMed

    Palma-Carlos, A G; Palma-Carlos, M L

    2007-04-01

    The biochemistry, genetics and pathology of alpha-1-anti-trypsin deficiency are reviewed. The geographical distribution in Europe of more current phenotypes M, SZ is discussed. Two cases of alpha-1- anti-trypsin are presented one homozygotic ZZ non-smoker without any respiratory pathology and one heterozygotic SZ heavy smoker with a severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and reversibility to Beta-2-mimetics suggesting asthma. The relationship between alpha-1-antitrypsin and asthma is discussed and general measures of treatment or prevention suggested.

  2. Alpha1-antitrypsin gene therapy modulates cellular immunity and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuanqing; Tang, Mei; Wasserfall, Clive; Kou, Zhongchen; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Gardemann, Thomas; Crawford, James; Atkinson, Mark; Song, Sihong

    2006-06-01

    An imbalance of the immune-regulatory pathways plays an important role in the development of type 1 diabetes. Therefore, immunoregulatory and antiinflammatory strategies hold great potential for the prevention of this autoimmune disease. Studies have demonstrated that two serine proteinase inhibitors, alpha1-antitrypsin (AAT) and elafin, act as potent antiinflammatory agents. In the present study, we sought to develop an efficient gene therapy approach to prevent type 1 diabetes. Cohorts of 4-week-old female nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice were injected intramuscularly with rAAV1-CB-hAAT, rAAV1-CB-hElafin, or saline. AAV1 vector mediated sustained high levels of transgene expression, sufficient to overcome a humoral immune response against hAAT. AAT gene therapy, contrary to elafin and saline, was remarkably effective in preventing type 1 diabetes. T cell receptor spectratyping indicated that AAT gene therapy altered T cell repertoire diversity in splenocytes from NOD mice. Adoptive transfer experiments demonstrated that AAT gene therapy attenuated cellular immunity associated with beta cell destruction. This study demonstrates that AAT gene therapy attenuates cell-mediated autoimmunity, alters the T cell receptor repertoire, and efficiently prevents type 1 diabetes in the NOD mouse model. These results strongly suggest that rAAV1-mediated AAT gene therapy may be useful as a novel approach to prevent type 1 diabetes.

  3. Novel therapeutic uses of alpha-1 antitrypsin: a window to the future.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Adam; Arce, Adriana De; Pardee, Erin

    2012-12-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin, a potent serine protease inhibitor, has been used as augmentation therapy in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency for many years. Recent research into the diverse anti-inflammatory, immune-modulatory and tissue-protective actions of alpha-1 antitrypsin has raised the possibility of broadening the therapeutic spectrum of alpha-1 antitrypsin to include diseases other than alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. The purpose of the workshop was to summarize the results of basic investigations and, if available, clinical studies in which the effects of alpha-1 antitrypsin were explored in relation to clinical conditions that are not associated with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency. Included among these are type 1 diabetes, cell/organ rejection, viral infection, cystic fibrosis, bronchiectasis/COPD, heart failure, Crohn's disease and connective tissue diseases. Although the therapeutic utility of alpha-1 antitrypsin in these conditions remains to be established, the existing data suggest that this protein eventually will become a treatment option in several diseases some of which are not rare. At present, only human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin is available for clinical use. Given the limited supply and the potential for extended use of this product, there will be a need for new formulations of alpha-1 antitrypsin in the future. Therefore, the prospect of finding new sources and airway delivery methods of alpha-1 antitrypsin were also discussed. The presentations at the meeting addressed the scientific basis for new clinical applications of alpha-1 antitrypsin and the regulatory requirements needed to bring this therapeutic protein to a wider range of patient populations.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetic modifiers of emphysema risk. Thorax. 2004 Mar;59(3):259-64. Review. Citation on PubMed ... alpha}1-antitrypsin deficiency. Arch Intern Med. 2009 Mar 23;169(6):546-50. doi: 10.1001/ ...

  5. Alpha1-antitrypsin inhibits angiogenesis and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hanhua; Campbell, Steven C; Nelius, Thomas; Bedford, Dhugal F; Veliceasa, Dorina; Bouck, Noel P; Volpert, Olga V

    2004-12-20

    Disturbances of the ratio between angiogenic inducers and inhibitors in tumor microenvironment are the driving force behind angiogenic switch critical for tumor progression. Angiogenic inhibitors may vary depending on organismal age and the tissue of origin. We showed that alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT), a serine protease inhibitor (serpin) is an inhibitor of angiogenesis, which induced apoptosis and inhibited chemotaxis of endothelial cells. S- and Z-type mutations that cause abnormal folding and defective serpin activity abrogated AAT antiangiogenic activity. Removal of the C-terminal reactive site loop had no effect on its angiostatic activity. Both native AAT and AAT truncated on C-terminus (AATDelta) inhibited neovascularization in the rat cornea and delayed the growth of subcutaneous tumors in mice. Treatment with native AAT and truncated AATDelta, but not control vehicle reduced tumor microvessel density, while increasing apoptosis within tumor endothelium. Comparative analysis of the human tumors and normal tissues of origin showed correlation between reduced local alpha(1)-antitrypsin expression and more aggressive tumor growth.

  6. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Lan.

    1989-01-01

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward ({sup 3}H)-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics.

  7. Alpha1 and Alpha2 Integrins Mediate Invasive Activity of Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells through Regulation of Stromelysin-1 Expression

    SciTech Connect

    Lochter, Andre; Navre, Marc; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    1998-06-29

    Tumor cell invasion relies on cell migration and extracellular matrix proteolysis. We investigated the contribution of different integrins to the invasive activity of mouse mammary carcinoma cells. Antibodies against integrin subunits {alpha}6 and {beta}1, but not against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, inhibited cell locomotion on a reconstituted basement membrane in two-dimensional cell migration assays, whereas antibodies against {beta}1, but not against a6 or {alpha}2, interfered with cell adhesion to basement membrane constituents. Blocking antibodies against {alpha}1 integrins impaired only cell adhesion to type IV collagen. Antibodies against {alpha}1, {alpha}2, {alpha}6, and {beta}1, but not {alpha}5, integrin subunits reduced invasion of a reconstituted basement membrane. Integrins {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, which contributed only marginally to motility and adhesion, regulated proteinase production. Antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2, but not {alpha}6 and {beta}1, integrin subunits inhibited both transcription and protein expression of the matrix metalloproteinase stromelysin-1. Inhibition of tumor cell invasion by antibodies against {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 was reversed by addition of recombinant stromelysin-1. In contrast, stromelysin-1 could not rescue invasion inhibited by anti-{alpha}6 antibodies. Our data indicate that {alpha}1 and {alpha}2 integrins confer invasive behavior by regulating stromelysin-1 expression, whereas {alpha}6 integrins regulate cell motility. These results provide new insights into the specific functions of integrins during tumor cell invasion.

  8. Preliminary neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the aspartic proteinase endothiapepsin cocrystallized with a gem-diol inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, Han-Fang; Erskine, Peter; Langan, Paul; Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton

    2007-01-01

    Endothiapepsin has been cocrystallized with the gem-diol inhibitor PD-135,040 in a low solvent-content (39%) unit cell, which is unprecedented for this enzyme–inhibitor complex and enables ultrahigh-resolution (1.0 Å) X-ray diffraction data to be collected. This atomic resolution X-ray data set will be used to deduce the protonation states of the catalytic aspartate residues. A room-temperature neutron data set has also been collected for joint refinement with a room-temperature X-ray data set in order to locate the H/D atoms at the active site. PMID:18084100

  9. cDNA cloning of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase from crucian carp (Carassius carassius) and expression of the active region as myofibril-bound serine proteinase inhibitor in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Han, Long; Cao, Min-Jie; Shi, Chao-lan; Wei, Xiao-Nan; Li, Huan; Du, Cui-Hong

    2014-02-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) (EC 5.3.1.9) can act as a myofibril-bound serine proteinase (MBSP) inhibitor (MBSPI) in fish. In order to better understand the biological information of the GPI and its functional domain for inhibiting MBSP, the cDNA of GPI was cloned from crucian carp (Carassius carassius) with RT-PCR, nested-PCR and 3'-RACE. The result of sequencing showed that the GPI cDNA had an open reading frame of 1662bp encoding 553 amino acid residues. After constructing and comparing the three-dimensional structures of GPI and MBSP, the middle fragment of crucian carp GPI (GPI-M) was predicted as a functional domain for inhibiting MBSP. Then the crucian carp GPI-M gene was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed that the recombinant GPI-M (rGPI-M) with molecular mass of approximately 21kDa in the form of inclusion bodies. The rGPI-M was obtained at an electrophoresis level purity of approximately 95% after denaturation and dialysis renaturation.

  10. Preliminary neutron and ultrahigh-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the aspartic proteinase endothiapepsin cocrystallized with a gem-diol inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan, Han-Fang; Erskine, Peter; Langan, Paul; Cooper, Jon; Coates, Leighton

    2007-12-01

    Three data sets have been collected on endothiapepsin complexed with the gem-diol inhibitor PD-135,040: a high-resolution synchrotron X-ray data set, a room-temperature X-ray data set and a neutron diffraction data set. Until recently, it has been impossible to grow large protein crystals of endothiapepsin with any gem-diol inhibitor that are suitable for neutron diffraction. Endothiapepsin has been cocrystallized with the gem-diol inhibitor PD-135,040 in a low solvent-content (39%) unit cell, which is unprecedented for this enzyme–inhibitor complex and enables ultrahigh-resolution (1.0 Å) X-ray diffraction data to be collected. This atomic resolution X-ray data set will be used to deduce the protonation states of the catalytic aspartate residues. A room-temperature neutron data set has also been collected for joint refinement with a room-temperature X-ray data set in order to locate the H/D atoms at the active site.

  11. Alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes in adult liver disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Alempijevic, Tamara; Milutinovic, Aleksandra Sokic; Kovacevic, Nada

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is an important serine protease inhibitor in humans. Hereditary alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) affects lungs and liver. Liver disease caused by AATD in paediatric patients has been previously well documented. However, the association of liver disease with alpha-1-antitrypsin gene polymorphisms in adults is less clear. Therefore, we aimed to study AAT polymorphisms in adults with liver disease. We performed a case-control study. AAT polymorphisms were investigated by isoelectric focusing in 61 patients with liver cirrhosis and 9 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The control group consisted of 218 healthy blood donors. A significant deviation of observed and expected frequency of AAT phenotypes from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (chi-square = 34.77, df 11, P = 0.000) in the patient group was caused by a higher than expected frequency of Pi ZZ homozygotes (f = 0.0143 and f = 0.0005, respectively, P = 0.000). In addition, Pi M homozygotes were more frequent in patients than in controls (63% and 46%, respectively, P = 0.025). Our study results show that Pi ZZ homozygosity in adults could be associated with severe liver disease. Presence of Pi M homozygosity could be associated with liver disease via some mechanism different from Z allele-induced liver damage through accumulation of AAT polymers. PMID:19961268

  12. Liver replacement for alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Charles W.; Porter, Kendrick A.; Peters, Robert L.; Ashcavai, Mary; Redeker, Allan G.; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    A 16-year-old girl with advanced cirrhosis and severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency of the homozygous PiZZ phenotype was treated by orthotopic liver transplantation. After replacement of the liver with a homograft from a donor with the normal PiMM phenotype, the alpha1-antitrypsin concentration in the recipient’s serum rose to normal; it had the PiMM phenotype. Two and a third years later, chronic rejection necessitated retransplantation. Insertion of a homograft from a heterozygous PiMZ donar was followed by the identification of that phenotype in the recipient’s serum. Neither liver graft developed the alpha1-antitrypsin glycoprotein deposits seen with the deficiency state. These observations confirm that this hepatic- based inborn error metabolism is metabolically cured by liver replacement. PMID:320694

  13. Interactions outside the proteinase-binding loop contribute significantly to the inhibition of activated coagulation factor XII by its canonical inhibitor from corn.

    PubMed

    Korneeva, Vera A; Trubetskov, Mikhail M; Korshunova, Alena V; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Kolyadko, Vladimir N; Sergienko, Olga V; Lunin, Vladimir G; Panteleev, Mikhail A; Ataullakhanov, Fazoil I

    2014-05-16

    Activated factor XII (FXIIa) is selectively inhibited by corn Hageman factor inhibitor (CHFI) among other plasma proteases. CHFI is considered a canonical serine protease inhibitor that interacts with FXIIa through its protease-binding loop. Here we examined whether the protease-binding loop alone is sufficient for the selective inhibition of serine proteases or whether other regions of a canonical inhibitor are involved. Six CHFI mutants lacking different N- and C-terminal portions were generated. CHFI-234, which lacks the first and fifth disulfide bonds and 11 and 19 amino acid residues at the N and C termini, respectively, exhibited no significant changes in FXIIa inhibition (Ki = 3.2 ± 0.4 nm). CHFI-123, which lacks 34 amino acid residues at the C terminus and the fourth and fifth disulfide bridges, inhibited FXIIa with a Ki of 116 ± 16 nm. To exclude interactions outside the FXIIa active site, a synthetic cyclic peptide was tested. The peptide contained residues 20-45 (Protein Data Bank code 1BEA), and a C29D substitution was included to avoid unwanted disulfide bond formation between unpaired cysteines. Surprisingly, the isolated protease-binding loop failed to inhibit FXIIa but retained partial inhibition of trypsin (Ki = 11.7 ± 1.2 μm) and activated factor XI (Ki = 94 ± 11 μm). Full-length CHFI inhibited trypsin with a Ki of 1.3 ± 0.2 nm and activated factor XI with a Ki of 5.4 ± 0.2 μm. Our results suggest that the protease-binding loop is not sufficient for the interaction between FXIIa and CHFI; other regions of the inhibitor also contribute to specific inhibition.

  14. Kinetic analysis of a general model of activation of aspartic proteinase zymogens involving a reversible inhibitor. II. Contribution of the uni- and bimolecular activation routes.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-López, A; Sotos-Lomas, A; Arribas, E; Escribano, J; Masia-Perez, J; Muñoz-Muñoz, J L; Varon, R

    2007-04-01

    From the kinetic study carried out in part I of this series (preceding article) an analysis quantifying the relative contribution to the global process of the uni- and bimolecular routes has been carried out. This analysis suggests a way to predict the time course of the relative contribution as well as the effect on this relative weight of the initial zymogen, inhibitor and activating enzyme concentrations.

  15. Proteinases of the cornea and preocular tear film.

    PubMed

    Ollivier, F J; Gilger, B C; Barrie, K P; Kallberg, M E; Plummer, C E; O'Reilly, S; Gelatt, K N; Brooks, D E

    2007-01-01

    Maintenance and repair of corneal stromal extracellular matrix (ECM) requires a tightly coordinated balance of ECM synthesis, degradation and remodeling in which proteolytic enzymes (proteinases) perform important functions. There are natural proteinase inhibitors present in preocular tear film (PTF) and cornea simultaneously with proteinases that prevent excessive degradation of normal healthy tissue. Disorders occur when there is an imbalance between proteinases and proteinase inhibitors in favor of the proteinases, causing pathologic degradation of stromal collagen and proteoglycans in the cornea. Two matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), MMP-2 and MMP-9, are of major importance in terms of remodeling and degradation of the corneal stromal collagen. Immunohistochemical studies have shown different origins of MMP-2 and -9. MMP-2 is synthesized by corneal keratocytes and performs a surveillance function in the normal cornea, becoming locally activated to degrade collagen molecules that occasionally become damaged. Alternatively, MMP-9 may be produced by epithelial cells and polymorphonuclear neutrophils following corneal wounding. Because the cornea is in close contact with the preocular tear film (PTF), proteinases have been evaluated in the PTF. In damaged corneas, total proteolytic activity in the tear fluid was found to be significantly increased compared to normal eyes and contralateral eyes. Studies analyzing the proteolytic activity in serial PTF samples during corneal healing led to the following conclusions: ulcerative keratitis in animals is associated with initially high levels of tear film proteolytic activity, which decrease as ulcers heal; proteinase levels in melting ulcers remain elevated leading to rapid progression of the ulcers. The success of medical and surgical treatment of the corneal ulcers is reflected by the proteolytic activity in tears. In animals, successful treatment leads to a rapid reduction in tear film proteolytic activity that

  16. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, C.W.; Mangel, W.F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying the peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described. 29 figs.

  17. Co-factor activated recombinant adenovirus proteinases

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Mangel, Walter F.

    1996-08-06

    This application describes methods and expression constructs for producing activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases. Purified activatable recombinant adenovirus proteinases and methods of purification are described. Activated adenovirus proteinases and methods for obtaining activated adenovirus proteinases are further included. Isolated peptide cofactors of adenovirus proteinase activity, methods of purifying and identifying said peptide cofactors are also described. Antibodies immunoreactive with adenovirus proteinases, immunospecific antibodies, and methods for preparing them are also described. Other related methods and materials are also described.

  18. Potyviral NIa proteinase, a proteinase with novel deoxyribonuclease activity.

    PubMed

    Anindya, Roy; Savithri, Handanahal S

    2004-07-30

    The NIa proteinase from pepper vein banding virus (PVBV) is a sequence-specific proteinase required for processing of viral polyprotein in the cytoplasm. It accumulates in the nucleus of the infected plant cell and forms inclusion bodies. The function of this protein in the nucleus is not clear. The purified recombinant NIa proteinase was active, and the mutation of the catalytic residues His-46, Asp-81, and Cys-151 resulted in complete loss of activity. Most interesting, the PVBV NIa proteinase exhibited previously unidentified activity, namely nonspecific double-stranded DNA degradation. This DNase activity of the NIa proteinase showed an absolute requirement for Mg(2+). Site-specific mutational analysis showed that of the three catalytic residues, Asp-81 was the crucial residue for DNase activity. Mutation of His-46 and Cys-151 had no effect on the DNase activity, whereas mutant D81N was partially active, and D81G was completely inactive. Based on kinetic analysis and molecular modeling, a metal ion-dependent catalysis similar to that observed in other nonspecific DNases is proposed. Similar results were obtained with glutathione S-transferase-fused PVBV NIa proteinase and tobacco etch virus NIa proteinase, confirming that the DNase function is an intrinsic property of potyviral NIa proteinase. The NIa protein present in the infected plant nuclear extract also showed the proteinase and the DNase activities, suggesting that the PVBV NIa protein that accumulates in the nucleus late in the infection cycle might serve to degrade the host DNA. Thus the dual function of the NIa proteinase could play an important role in the life cycle of the virus.

  19. Predicting proteinase specificities from free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Seble Merid; Olufsen, Magne; Smalås, Arne O; Brandsdal, Bjørn O

    2006-10-01

    The role of the primary binding residue (P1) in complexes between three different subtilases (subtilisin Carlsberg, thermitase and proteinase K) and their canonical protein inhibitor eglin c have been studied by free energy calculations. Based on the crystal structures of eglin c in complex with subtilisin Carlsberg and thermitase, and a homology model of the eglin c-proteinase K complex, a total of 57 mutants have been constructed and docked into their host proteins. The binding free energy was then calculated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with the linear interaction energy (LIE) method for all complexes differing only in the nature of the amino acid at the P1 position. LIE calculations for 19 different complexes for each subtilase were thus carried out excluding proline. The effects of substitutions at the P1 position on the binding free energies are found to be very large, and positively charged residues (Arg, Lys and His) are particularly deleterious for all three enzymes. The charged variants of the acidic side chains are found to bind more favorably as compared to their protonated states in all three subtilases. Furthermore, hydrophobic amino acids are accommodated most favorably at the S1-site in all three enzymes. Comparison of the three series of binding free energies shows only minor differences in the 19 computed relative binding free energies among these subtilases. This is further reflected in the correlation coefficient between the 23 relative binding free energies obtained, including the possible protonation states of ionizable side chains, but excluding the P1 Pro, for subtilisin Carlsberg versus thermitase (0.95), subtilisin versus proteinase K (0.94) and thermitase versus proteinase K (0.96).

  20. Proteinases in the joint: clinical relevance of proteinases in joint destruction

    PubMed Central

    Rengel, Yvonne; Ospelt, Caroline; Gay, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    Proteinases are involved in essential steps in cartilage and bone homeostasis. Consequently, efforts have been made to establish their potential role in the pathology of rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and spondyloarthritis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are sensitive markers of disease severity and response to treatment, and therefore they have potential in the assessment of rheumatic diseases. Despite disappointing early results with synthetic inhibitors of MMPs, there is still much scope for developing effective and safe MMPs inhibitors, and consequently to deliver new options to inhibit joint destruction. PMID:18001502

  1. Comparison of the Ca2 + currents induced by expression of three cloned alpha1 subunits, alpha1G, alpha1H and alpha1I, of low-voltage-activated T-type Ca2 + channels.

    PubMed

    Klöckner, U; Lee, J H; Cribbs, L L; Daud, A; Hescheler, J; Pereverzev, A; Perez-Reyes, E; Schneider, T

    1999-12-01

    Expression of rat alpha1G, human alpha1H and rat alpha1I subunits of voltage-activated Ca2 + channels in HEK-293 cells yields robust Ca2 + inward currents with 1.25 mM Ca2 + as the charge carrier. Both similarities and marked differences are found between their biophysical properties. Currents induced by expression of alpha1G show the fastest activation and inactivation kinetics. The alpha1H and alpha1I currents activate and inactivate up to 1.5- and 5-fold slower, respectively. No differences in the voltage dependence of steady state inactivation are detected. Currents induced by expression of alpha1G and alpha1H deactivate with time constants of up to 6 ms at a test potential of - 80 mV, but currents induced by alpha1I deactivate about three-fold faster. Recovery from short-term inactivation is more than three-fold slower for currents induced by alpha1H and alpha1I in comparison to alpha1G. In contrast to these characteristics, reactivation after long-term inactivation was fastest for currents arising from expression of alpha1I and slowest in cells expressing alpha1H calcium channels. The calcium inward current induced by expression of alpha1I is increased by positive prepulses while currents induced by alpha1H and alpha1G show little ( < 5%) or no facilitation. The data thus provide a characteristic fingerprint of each channel's activity, which may allow correlation of the alpha1G, alpha1H and alpha1I induced currents with their in vivo counterparts.

  2. Interference of Wegener's granulomatosis autoantibodies with neutrophil Proteinase 3 activity.

    PubMed Central

    van de Wiel, B A; Dolman, K M; van der Meer-Gerritsen, C H; Hack, C E; von dem Borne, A E; Goldschmeding, R

    1992-01-01

    Classic anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (C-ANCA) are disease-specific markers of Wegener's granulomatosis (WG). The possible pathogenetic role of these autoantibodies, which are directed against Proteinase 3 (PR3), is not yet clear. We studied the effect of C-ANCA on PR3 proteolytic activity and on the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1-antitrypsin (alpha 1AT). C-ANCA IgG from eight patients with active WG significantly inhibited PR3 proteolytic activity, particularly towards elastin (median 84.2% inhibition). C-ANCA IgG significantly inhibited the complexation of PR3 with alpha 1AT (median 58.8% inhibition). Moreover, addition of purified PR3 to C-ANCA-positive sera from WG patients yielded less complexes with alpha 1AT (median 44.8%) compared with sera containing perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (P-ANCA) or ANCA-negative sera. These findings indicate the existence of a hitherto unknown property of C-ANCA, which may be of importance in the pathogenesis of WG. PMID:1458677

  3. Ubiquitin ligase gp78 increases solubility and facilitates degradation of the Z variant of {alpha}-1-antitrypsin

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Yuxian; Ballar, Petek; Fang, Shengyun . E-mail: fangs@umbi.umd.edu

    2006-11-03

    Deficiency of circulating {alpha}-1-antitrypsin (AAT) is the most widely recognized abnormality of a proteinase inhibitor that causes lung disease. AAT-deficiency is caused by mutations of the AAT gene that lead to AAT protein retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Moreover, the mutant AAT accumulated in the ER predisposes the homozygote to severe liver injuries, such as neonatal hepatitis, juvenile cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Despite the fact that mutant AAT protein is subject to ER-associated degradation (ERAD), yeast genetic studies have determined that the ubiquitination machinery, Hrd1/Der3p-cue1p-Ubc7/6p, which plays a prominent role in ERAD, is not involved in degradation of mutant AAT. Here we report that gp78, a ubiquitin ligase (E3) pairing with mammalian Ubc7 for ERAD, ubiquitinates and facilitates degradation of ATZ, the classic deficiency variant of AAT having a Z mutation (Glu 342 Lys). Unexpectedly, gp78 over-expression also significantly increases ATZ solubility. p97/VCP, an AAA ATPase essential for retrotranslocation of misfolded proteins from the ER during ERAD, is involved in gp78-mediated degradation of ATZ. Surprisingly, unlike other ERAD substrates that cause ER stress leading to apoptosis when accumulated in the ER, ATZ, in fact, increases cell proliferation when over-expressed in cells. This effect can be partially inhibited by gp78 over-expression. These data indicate that gp78 assumes multiple unique quality control roles over ATZ, including the facilitation of degradation and inhibition of aggregation of ATZ.

  4. Corticosteroid-binding globulin cleavage is paradoxically reduced in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: Implications for cortisol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Nenke, Marni A; Holmes, Mark; Rankin, Wayne; Lewis, John G; Torpy, David J

    2016-01-15

    High-affinity corticosteroid-binding globulin (haCBG) is cleaved by neutrophil elastase (NE) resulting in permanent transition to the low cortisol-binding affinity form (laCBG), thereby increasing cortisol availability at inflammatory sites. Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is the major inhibitor of NE. AAT deficiency (AATD) predisposes patients to early-onset emphysema due to increased proteolytic destruction from the inherent proteinase-antiproteinase imbalance. We hypothesized that AATD may result in increased CBG cleavage in vivo. We collected demographic data and blood samples from 10 patients with AATD and 28 healthy controls measuring total CBG and haCBG levels by parallel in-house ELISAs, as well as AAT, total and free cortisol levels. haCBG was higher (median [range]); 329 [210-551] vs. 250 [175-365] nmol/L; P<0.005, and laCBG lower; 174 [68-229] vs. 220 [119-348] nmol/L; P=0.016 in the AATD group, compared with controls. The ratio of haCBG:total CBG was also higher in AATD; 72 [53-83] vs. 54 [41-72] %; P=0.0001). There was a negative correlation between haCBG:total CBG and AAT levels (P<0.05, R=-0.64). Paradoxically, proteolytic cleavage of CBG was reduced in AATD, despite the recognized increase in NE activity. This implies that NE activity is not the mechanism for systemic CBG cleavage in basal, low inflammatory conditions. Relatively low levels of laCBG may have implications for cortisol action in AATD.

  5. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects. PMID:26413996

  6. Challenges and Prospects for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wozniak, Joanna; Wandtke, Tomasz; Kopinski, Piotr; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2015-11-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a protease inhibitor belonging to the serpin family. A number of identified mutations in the SERPINA1 gene encoding this protein result in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD). A decrease in AAT serum concentration or reduced biological activity causes considerable risk of chronic respiratory and liver disorders. As a monogenic disease, AATD appears to be an attractive target for gene therapy, particularly for patients with pulmonary dysfunction, where augmentation of functional AAT levels in plasma might slow down respiratory disease development. The short AAT coding sequence and its activity in the extracellular matrix would enable an increase in systemic serum AAT production by cellular secretion. In vitro and in vivo experimental AAT gene transfer with gamma-retroviral, lentiviral, adenoviral, and adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors has resulted in enhanced AAT serum levels and a promising safety profile. Human clinical trials using intramuscular viral transfer with AAV1 and AAV2 vectors of the AAT gene demonstrated its safety, but did not achieve a protective level of AAT >11 μM in serum. This review provides an in-depth critical analysis of current progress in AATD gene therapy based on viral gene transfer. The factors affecting transgene expression levels, such as site of administration, dose and type of vector, and activity of the immune system, are discussed further as crucial variables for optimizing the clinical effectiveness of gene therapy in AATD subjects.

  7. Compartmentalization of proteinases and amylases in Nauphoeta cinerea midgut.

    PubMed

    Elpidina, E N; Vinokurov, K S; Gromenko, V A; Rudenskaya, Y A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Zhuzhikov, D P

    2001-12-01

    Compartmentalization of proteinases, amylases, and pH in the midgut of Nauphoeta cinerea Oliv. (Blattoptera:Blaberidae) was studied in order to understand the organization of protein and starch digestion. Total proteolytic activity measured with azocasein was maximal at pH 11.5 both in anterior (AM) and posterior (PM) halves of the midgut, but the bulk of activity (67%) was found in PM. Total AM and PM preparations were fractionated on a Sephadex G-50 column and further analysed by means of activity electrophoresis and specific inhibitors and activators. The major activity in PM was classified as an unusual SH-dependent proteinase with M(r) 24,000 and pH optimum with synthetic substrate BApNA at 10.0. The enzyme was 43-fold activated in the presence of 1 mM DTT, insensitive to synthetic inhibitors of serine (PMSF, TLCK, TPCK) and cysteine (IAA, E-64) proteinases, strongly inhibited by STI, and displayed four active bands on zymograms. In PM, activities of trypsin-like, chymotrypsin-like, subtilisin-like, and cysteine proteinases were observed. Aspartic and metalloproteinases were not detected. In AM, activity of unusual SH-dependent proteinase also dominated and activity of chymotrypsin-like proteinase was observed, but their levels were much lower than in PM. Distribution of amylase activity, exhibiting an optimum at pH 6.0, was quite the opposite. The major part of it (67%) was located in AM. Treatment of amylase preparation with proteinases from AM and PM reduced amylase activity twofold. pH of the midgut contents was 6.0-7.2 in AM, 6.4-7.6 in the first and 8.8-9.3 in the second halves of PM. Thus, pH in AM is in good agreement with the optimal pH of amylase, located in this compartment, but the activity of proteinases, including the ability to degrade amylase, in such an environment is low. Active proteolysis takes place in the second half of PM, where pH of the gut is close to the optimal pH of proteinases. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-adrenergic receptors differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Doze, Van A; Handel, Evelyn M; Jensen, Kelly A; Darsie, Belle; Luger, Elizabeth J; Haselton, James R; Talbot, Jeffery N; Rorabaugh, Boyd R

    2009-08-18

    Tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) drugs are used for the treatment of chronic depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), and anxiety-related disorders. Chronic use of TCA drugs increases the expression of alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs). Yet, it is unclear whether increased alpha(1)-AR expression contributes to the antidepressant effects of these drugs or if this effect is unrelated to their therapeutic benefit. In this study, mice expressing constitutively active mutant alpha(1A)-ARs (CAM alpha(1A)-AR) or CAM alpha(1B)-ARs were used to examine the effects of alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-AR signaling on rodent behavioral models of depression, OCD, and anxiety. CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice, but not CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice, exhibited antidepressant-like behavior in the tail suspension test and forced swim test. This behavior was reversed by prazosin, a selective alpha(1)-AR inverse agonist, and mimicked by chronically treating wild type mice with cirazoline, an alpha(1A)-AR agonist. Marble burying behavior, commonly used to model OCD in rodents, was significantly decreased in CAM alpha(1A)-AR mice but not in CAM alpha(1B)-AR mice. In contrast, no significant differences in anxiety-related behavior were observed between wild type, CAM alpha(1A)-AR, and CAM alpha(1B)-AR animals in the elevated plus maze and light/dark box. This is the first study to demonstrate that alpha(1A)- and alpha(1B)-ARs differentially modulate antidepressant-like behavior in the mouse. These data suggest that alpha(1A)-ARs may be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of depression.

  9. Effects of leupeptin on proteinase and germination of castor beans

    SciTech Connect

    Alpi, A.; Beevers, H.

    1981-10-01

    Leupeptin, tripeptide inhibitor of some proteinases, was shown previously to maintain the stability of several enzymes (isocitrate lyase, fumarase, and catalase) in crude extracts of castor bean endosperm. This reagent is now shown to inhibit the breakdown of water-soluble and crystalloid-storage proteins of the protein bodies isolated from castor beans by the SH-proteinase and it also inhibits the endopeptidase from mung beans. When suitably introduced into the endosperm of dry castor beans it strongly inhibits germination and seedling development. Application of leupeptin to endosperm halves removed from the seed prevents the normal development of enzymes concerned with gluconeogenesis from fat and drastically curtails sugar production. The results suggest that the SH-proteinase is intimately involved in the mobilization of storage proteins.

  10. Effects of leupeptin on proteinase and germination of castor beans.

    PubMed

    Alpi, A; Beevers, H

    1981-10-01

    Leupeptin, a tripeptide inhibitor of some proteinases, was shown previously to maintain the stability of several enzymes (isocitrate lyase, fumarase, and catalase) in crude extracts of castor bean endosperm. This reagent is now shown to inhibit the breakdown of water-soluble and crystalloidstorage proteins of the protein bodies isolated from castor beans by the SH-proteinase and it also inhibits the endopeptidase from mung beans. When suitably introduced into the endosperm of dry castor beans it strongly inhibits germination and seedling development. Application of leupeptin to endosperm halves removed from the seed prevents the normal development of enzymes concerned with gluconeogenesis from fat and drastically curtails sugar production. The results suggest that the SH-proteinase is intimately involved in the mobilization of storage proteins.

  11. Elastase-induced emphysema: retention of instilled proteinase in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhaus, R.A.; Janoff, A.

    1982-11-01

    Airway instillation of proteinases with the ability to degrade elastin has been used to produce disease in the rat analogous to human pulmonary emphysema. This study examined the retention, localization, and fate of endotracheally instilled elastase using /sup 125/I labeled enzyme and immunoperoxidase histochemistry. Porcine pancreatic elastase labeled with /sup 125/I was detected in rat lungs through 96 h after instillation; over half of the label was still present after 7 h. Similar results were obtained when elastase was reacted with a specific, catalytic site inactivator prior to instillation. Trypsin and denatured elastase, however, were cleared much more rapidly from the lung (less than half of the label present after 30 min). When lungs were homogenized after instillation of active elastase, the soluble fraction contained elastase bound to rat alpha1-antitrypsin. In addition, a small amount of label (less than 10%) appeared bound to insoluble components for extended periods of time. Using immunoperoxidase histochemistry, it was found that exogenous elastase was rapidly contained with pulmonary alveolar macrophages, as well as associated with alveolar septums and other parenchymal structures. Similar results were obtained with elastase from both porcine pancreas and human neutrophils. These results suggest that exogenous elastase in the rat, and perhaps endogenous elastolytic enzymes in humans, may have several fates in the lungs: complex formation with endogenous inhibitors, containment within the macrophage, and/or association with connective tissue targets.

  12. [Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency - an update].

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Nikolas; Bals, Robert; Fähndrich, Sebastian

    2016-09-01

    Alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency is a genetic risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive airway disease (COPD) and liver cirrhosis. The disease is widely underdiagnosed. The hallmarks of therapy are smoking cessation, prevention from environmental dust exposure and augmentation therapy. Findings from the recently published prospective, placebo-controlled and randomized RAPID trial proved effectiveness of AAT augmentation therapy for slowing progression of emphysema, measured by CT lung density. CT lung density may be more sensitive than forced exspiratory volume in one second (FEV1) or monoxid diffusion capacity (DLCO). The data suggest that higher therapeutic serum AAT levels lead to lower decline in lung density.

  13. Candida albicans Secreted Aspartyl Proteinases in Virulence and Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Naglik, Julian R.; Challacombe, Stephen J.; Hube, Bernhard

    2003-01-01

    Candida albicans is the most common fungal pathogen of humans and has developed an extensive repertoire of putative virulence mechanisms that allows successful colonization and infection of the host under suitable predisposing conditions. Extracellular proteolytic activity plays a central role in Candida pathogenicity and is produced by a family of 10 secreted aspartyl proteinases (Sap proteins). Although the consequences of proteinase secretion during human infections is not precisely known, in vitro, animal, and human studies have implicated the proteinases in C. albicans virulence in one of the following seven ways: (i) correlation between Sap production in vitro and Candida virulence, (ii) degradation of human proteins and structural analysis in determining Sap substrate specificity, (iii) association of Sap production with other virulence processes of C. albicans, (iv) Sap protein production and Sap immune responses in animal and human infections, (v) SAP gene expression during Candida infections, (vi) modulation of C. albicans virulence by aspartyl proteinase inhibitors, and (vii) the use of SAP-disrupted mutants to analyze C. albicans virulence. Sap proteins fulfill a number of specialized functions during the infective process, which include the simple role of digesting molecules for nutrient acquisition, digesting or distorting host cell membranes to facilitate adhesion and tissue invasion, and digesting cells and molecules of the host immune system to avoid or resist antimicrobial attack by the host. We have critically discussed the data relevant to each of these seven criteria, with specific emphasis on how this proteinase family could contribute to Candida virulence and pathogenesis. PMID:12966142

  14. Immune-modulating effects of alpha-1 antitrypsin.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Mario R

    2014-10-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) is a circulating serine protease inhibitor (serpin) that inhibits neutrophil elastase in the lung, and AAT deficiency is associated with early-onset emphysema. AAT is also a liver-derived acute-phase protein that, in vitro and in vivo, reduces production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, inhibits apoptosis, blocks leukocyte degranulation and migration, and modulates local and systemic inflammatory responses. In monocytes, AAT has been shown to increase intracellular cAMP, regulate expression of CD14, and suppress NFκB nuclear translocation. These effects may be mediated by AAT's serpin activity or by other protein-binding activities. In preclinical models of autoimmunity and transplantation, AAT therapy prevents or reverses autoimmune disease and graft loss, and these effects are accompanied by tolerogenic changes in cytokine and transcriptional profiles and T cell subsets. This review highlights advances in our understanding of the immune-modulating effects of AAT and their potential therapeutic utility.

  15. Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Crystal, Ronald G

    2016-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, characterized by low plasma levels of the serine protease inhibitor AAT, is associated with emphysema secondary to insufficient protection of the lung from neutrophil proteases. Although AAT augmentation therapy with purified AAT protein is efficacious, it requires weekly to monthly intravenous infusion of AAT purified from pooled human plasma, has the risk of viral contamination and allergic reactions, and is costly. As an alternative, gene therapy offers the advantage of single administration, eliminating the burden of protein infusion, and reduced risks and costs. The focus of this review is to describe the various strategies for AAT gene therapy for the pulmonary manifestations of AAT deficiency and the state of the art in bringing AAT gene therapy to the bedside.

  16. Cross-talk between receptors with intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity and alpha1b-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    del Carmen Medina, L; Vázquez-Prado, J; García-Sáinz, J A

    2000-01-01

    The effect of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) on the phosphorylation and function of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors transfected into Rat-1 fibroblasts was studied. EGF and PDGF increased the phosphorylation of these adrenoceptors. The effect of EGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1478 and that of PDGF was blocked by tyrphostin AG1296, inhibitors of the intrinsic tyrosine kinase activities of the receptors for these growth factors. Wortmannin, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase, blocked the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF but not that induced by PDGF. Inhibition of protein kinase C blocked the adrenoceptor phosphorylation induced by EGF and PDGF. The ability of noradrenaline to increase [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP[S]) binding in membrane preparations was used as an index of the functional coupling of the alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors and G-proteins. Noradrenaline-stimulated [(35)S]GTP[S] binding was markedly decreased in membranes from cells pretreated with EGF or PDGF. Our data indicate that: (i) activation of EGF and PDGF receptors induces phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors, (ii) phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase is involved in the EGF response, but does not seem to play a major role in the action of PDGF, (iii) protein kinase C mediates this action of both growth factors and (iv) the phosphorylation of alpha(1b)-adrenoceptors induced by EGF and PDGF is associated with adrenoceptor desensitization. PMID:10947955

  17. Purification and properties of extracellular carboxyl proteinase secreted by Candida pulcherrima.

    PubMed

    Gotoh, T; Kikuchi, K; Kodama, K; Konno, H; Kakuta, T; Koizumi, T; Nojiro, K

    1995-03-01

    An extracellular proteinase secreted by Candida pulcherrima KSY 188-5 was purified about 60-fold to electrophoretical homogeneity from its culture supernatant, by ammonium sulfate fractionation, anion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. The proteinase had a molecular weight of approximately 36,500 and an isoelectric point of pH 4.7. The enzyme had an optimum pH of around 2.5-3.5 for activity and 3.0-5.0 for stability. The optimum temperature was around 45 degrees C at pH 3.0. The enzyme showed a broad substrate specificity for a variety of proteins to hydrolyze casein, BSA, hemoglobin keratin, and collagen. Among several proteinase inhibitors, pepstatin A completely abolished the enzyme activity; indicating that the extracellular proteinase from C. pulcherrima KSY 188-5 was classified in the group of carboxyl proteinases.

  18. Who Is at Risk for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency? Alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency occurs in all ethnic groups. However, the ... most often in White people of European descent. AAT deficiency is an inherited condition. "Inherited" means the ...

  19. Novel arylpiperazines as selective alpha1-adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Murray, W V; Jolliffe, L; Pulito, V

    2000-05-15

    A novel series of arylpiperazines has been synthesized and identified as antagonists of alpha1a adrenergic receptor (alpha1a-AR) implicated in benign prostatic hyperplasia. These compounds selectively bind to membrane bound alpha1a-AR with K(i)s as low as 0.66 nM. As such, these potentially represent a viable treatment for BPH without the side effects associated with known alpha1-adrenergic antagonists.

  20. Arachidonic acid modulation of alpha1H, a cloned human T-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Cribbs, L L; Satin, J

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and the products of its metabolism are central mediators of changes in cellular excitability. We show that the recently cloned and expressed T-type or low-voltage-activated Ca channel, alpha1H, is modulated by external AA. AA (10 microM) causes a slow, time-dependent attenuation of alpha1H current. At a holding potential of -80 mV, 10 microM AA reduces peak inward alpha1H current by 15% in 15 min and 70% in 30 min and shifts the steady-state inactivation curve -25 mV. AA inhibition was not affected by applying the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin or the lipoxygenase inhibitor nordihydroguaiaretic acid. The epoxygenase inhibitor octadecynoic acid partially antagonized AA attenuation of alpha1H. The epoxygenase metabolite epoxyeicosatrienoic acid (8,9-EET) mimicked the inhibitory effect of AA on alpha1H peak current. A protein kinase C (PKC)-specific inhibitor (peptide fragment 19-36) only partially antagonized the AA-induced reduction of peak alpha1H current and the shift of the steady-state inactivation curve but had no effect on 8,9-EET-induced attenuation of current. In contrast, PKA has no role in the modulation of alpha1H. These results suggest that AA attenuation and shift of alpha1H may be mediated directly by AA. The heterologous expression of T-type Ca channels allows us to study for the first time properties of this important class of ion channel in isolation. There is a significant overlap of the steady-state activation and inactivation curves, which implies a substantial window current. The selective shift of the steady-state inactivation curve by AA reduces peak Ca current and eliminates the window current. We conclude that AA may partly mediate physiological effects such as vasodilatation via the attenuation of T-type Ca channel current and the elimination of a T-type channel steady window current.

  1. Roles for proteinases in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Caroline A

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1960s, a compelling body of evidence has accumulated to show that proteinases play critical roles in airspace enlargement in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, until recently the causative enzymes and their exact roles in pathologic processes in COPD have not been clear. Recent studies of gene-targeted mice in murine models of COPD have confirmed roles for proteinases not only in airspace enlargement, but also in airway pathologies in COPD. These studies have also shed light on the specific proteinases involved in COPD pathogenesis, and the mechanisms by which these proteinases injure the lung. They have also identified important interactions between different classes of proteinases, and between proteinases and other molecules that amplify lung inflammation and injury. This review will discuss the biology of proteinases and the mechanisms by which they contribute to the pathogenesis of COPD. In addition, I will discuss the potential of proteinase inhibitors and anti-inflammatory drugs as new treatment strategies for COPD patients. PMID:18686734

  2. Laboratory diagnosis of alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency.

    PubMed

    Ferrarotti, Ilaria; Scabini, Roberta; Campo, Ilaria; Ottaviani, Stefania; Zorzetto, Michele; Gorrini, Marina; Luisetti, Maurizio

    2007-11-01

    The laboratory diagnosis of alpha(1)-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency (AATD) has evolved over the last 40 years since the first cases of the disorder were reported. It is currently performed in specialized centers, and it requires a combination of different biochemical methods: nephelometric AAT concentration, isoelectric focusing, genotyping, and sequencing. The availability of matrices such as the dried blood spot have facilitated the implementation of laboratory analyses for AATD, but they have also challenged laboratories to develop more reliable and reproducible techniques starting from dried blood. In this article, we describe the protocols we have optimized for AATD diagnosis from dried blood spot, in an attempt to hopefully provide useful information for physicians and scientists involved in this diagnostic line. We also describe the diagnostic flowchart for AATD detection that we have developed accordingly.

  3. Severe alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, O J; Godden, D J; Martin, P D; Danielian, P J

    1999-06-01

    This case study describes a successful pregnancy in a 27-yr-old patient with severe emphysema, secondary to alpha1-antitrypsin deficiency, genotype PiZZ. Despite significant respiratory compromise, more severe than previously reported, no complications ensued. Maternal pulmonary function did not deteriorate significantly until the 32nd week of pregnancy, with an elective Caesarean section being performed during the 37th week. This experience suggests that even severe maternal airflow obstruction is, in itself, not an absolute contra-indication to pregnancy. Pre-pregnancy multidisciplinary counselling is likely to be helpful in these patients, including frank discussion on the risks of pregnancy, the prospects of successful completion and the mother's future prognosis in relation to caring for the child.

  4. Digestive proteinases of yellow mealworm (Tenebrio molitor) larvae: purification and characterization of a trypsin-like proteinase.

    PubMed

    Tsybina, T A; Dunaevsky, Y E; Belozersky, M A; Zhuzhikov, D P; Oppert, B; Elpidina, E N

    2005-03-01

    A new trypsin-like proteinase was purified to homogeneity from the posterior midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae by ion-exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex A-50 and gel filtration on Superdex-75. The isolated enzyme had molecular mass of 25.5 kD and pI 7.4. The enzyme was also characterized by temperature optimum at 55 degrees C, pH optimum at 8.5, and K(m) value of 0.04 mM (for hydrolysis of Bz-Arg-pNA). According to inhibitor analysis the enzyme is a trypsin-like serine proteinase stable within the pH range of 5.0-9.5. The enzyme hydrolyzes peptide bonds formed by Arg or Lys residues in the P1 position with a preference for relatively long peptide substrates. The N-terminal amino acid sequence, IVGGSSISISSVPXQIXLQY, shares 50-72% identity with other insect trypsin-like proteinases, and 44-50% identity to mammalian trypsins. The isolated enzyme is sensitive to inhibition by plant proteinase inhibitors and it can serve as a suitable target for control of digestion in this stored product pest.

  5. Class specific inhibition of house dust mite proteinases which cleave cell adhesion, induce cell death and which increase the permeability of lung epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Winton, Helen L; Wan, Hong; Cannell, Mark B; Thompson, Philip J; Garrod, David R; Stewart, Geoffrey A; Robinson, Clive

    1998-01-01

    House dust mite (HDM) allergens with cysteine and serine proteinase activity are risk factors for allergic sensitization and asthma. A simple method to fractionate proteinase activity from HDM faecal pellets into cysteine and serine class activity is described. Both proteinase fractions increased the permeability of epithelial cell monolayers. The effects of the serine proteinase fraction were inhibited by 4-(2-aminoethyl)-benzenesulphonyl fluoride hydrochloride (AEBSF) and soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI). The effects of the cysteine proteinase fraction could be inhibited by E-64. No reciprocity of action was found. Treatment of epithelial monolayers with either proteinase fraction caused breakdown of tight junctions (TJs). AEBSF inhibited TJ breakdown caused by the serine proteinase fraction, whereas E-64 inhibited the cysteine proteinase fraction. Agarose gel electrophoresis revealed that the proteinases induced DNA cleavage which was inhibited by the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor BB-250. Compound E-64 inhibited DNA fragmentation caused by the cysteine proteinase fraction, but was without effect on the serine proteinase fraction. Staining of proteinase-treated cells with annexin V (AV) and propidium iodide (PI) revealed a diversity of cellular responses. Some cells stained only with AV indicating early apoptosis, whilst others were dead and stained with both AV and PI. HDM proteinases exert profound effects on epithelial cells which will promote allergic sensitization; namely disruption of intercellular adhesion, increased paracellular permeability and initiation of cell death. Attenuation of these actions by proteinase inhibitors leads to the conclusion that compounds designed to be selective for the HDM enzymes may represent a novel therapy for asthma. PMID:9720772

  6. Phenylpiperazinylalkylamino substituted pyridazinones as potent alpha(1) adrenoceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Barlocco, D; Cignarella, G; Piaz, V D; Giovannoni, M P; De Benedetti, P G; Fanelli, F; Montesano, F; Poggesi, E; Leonardi, A

    2001-07-19

    QSAR models have been used for designing a series of compounds characterized by a N-phenylpiperazinylalkylamino moiety linked to substituted pyridazinones, which have been synthesized. Measurements of the binding affinities of the new compounds toward the alpha(1a)-, alpha(1b)-, and alpha(1d)-AR cloned subtypes as well as the 5-HT(1A) receptor have been done validating, at least in part, the estimations of the theoretical models. This study provides insight into the structure activity relationships of the alpha(1)-ARs ligands and their alpha(1)-AR/5-HT(1A) selectivity.

  7. Transcriptional expression profiles of the main proteinases and their regulators in coronary artery ectasia patients' mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Wu, Wei; Chen, Lianfeng; Chen, Houzao; Zhang, Shuyang

    2016-04-01

    Proteolytic enzymes might contribute to coronary artery ectasia (CAE) through the destruction of extracellular matrix (ECM) vessel components. This study aimed to find out if peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) served as a source of those proteinases and their regulators. In this study, transcriptional expression profiles of the main proteinases and their regulators were detected in the PBMCs of CAE patients as follows: (1) matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, 12 and 13; (2) the serine proteinases elastase: cathepsin G and proteinases 3; (3) the cysteine proteinases: cathepsin L and cathepsin S; (4) the main endogenous inhibitors for the above proteinases: tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP) 1 and 2, α1-antitrypsin (α1-PI) and α2-macroglobulin (A2M); (5) twelve cytokines that could regulate the above proteinases. The characteristic changes in CAE were: (1) MMP1 and MMP9 increased while the serine and cysteine families did not change; (2) the four proteinase inhibitors did not change in the CAE group; (3) among the 12 cytokines, interleukin-1 alpha (IL1A), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), interferon gamma (IFNγ) and growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) were elevated. Partial correlation analysis showed that MMP1 significantly correlated with IL1A and with IFNγ, and MMP9 correlated with IFNγ and with GDF 15. PBMCs might participate in the pathological process of CAE by the increased expression of MMP1, MMP9, IL1A, IFNγ and GDF15.

  8. Alpha-1-Antitrypsin Deficiency in Serbian Adults with Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Stankovic, Marija; Divac-Rankov, Aleksandra; Petrovic-Stanojevic, Natasa; Mitic-Milikic, Marija; Nagorni-Obradovic, Ljudmila; Radojkovic, Dragica

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Alpha-1-antitrypsin (A1AT) is the main inhibitor of neutrophil elastase, and severe alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD) is a genetic risk factor for early-onset emphysema. Despite the relatively high prevalence of A1ATD, this condition is frequently underdiagnosed. Our aim was to determine the distribution of the A1ATD phenotypes/alleles in patients with lung diseases as well as in the Serbian population. Methods: The study included the adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n=348), asthma (n=71), and bronchiectasis (n=35); the control was 1435 healthy blood donors. The A1ATD variants were identified by isoelectric focusing or polymerase chain reaction-mediated site-directed mutagenesis. Results: PiMZ heterozygotes, PiZZ homozygotes, and Z allele carriers are associated with significantly higher risk of developing COPD than healthy individuals (odds ratios 3.43, 42.42, and 5.49 respectively). The calculated prevalence of PiZZ, PiMZ, and PiSZ was higher in patients with COPD (1:202, 1:8, and 1:1243) than in the Serbian population (1:5519, 1:38, and 1:5519). Conclusion: The high prevalence of A1ATD phenotypes/allele in our population has confirmed the necessity of screening for A1ATD in patients with COPD. On the other hand, on the basis of the estimated number of those with A1ATD among the COPD patients, it is possible to assess the diagnostic efficiency of A1ATD in the Serbian population. PMID:22971141

  9. Activation of Proteinase 3 Contributes to Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Toonen, Erik JM; Mirea, Andreea-Manuela; Tack, Cees J; Stienstra, Rinke; Ballak, Dov B; van Diepen, Janna A; Hijmans, Anneke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Dokter, Wim H; Pham, Christine TN; Netea, Mihai G; Dinarello, Charles A; Joosten, Leo AB

    2016-01-01

    Activation of inflammatory pathways is known to accompany development of obesity-induced nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In addition to caspase-1, the neutrophil serine proteases proteinase 3, neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are able to process the inactive proinflammatory mediators interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-18 to their bioactive forms, thereby regulating inflammatory responses. In this study, we investigated whether proteinase 3 is involved in obesity-induced development of insulin resistance and NAFLD. We investigated the development of NAFLD and insulin resistance in mice deficient for neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3 and neutrophil elastase/cathepsin G and in wild-type mice treated with the neutrophil serine proteinase inhibitor human α-1 antitrypsin. Expression profiling of metabolically relevant tissues obtained from insulin-resistant mice showed that expression of proteinase 3 was specifically upregulated in the liver, whereas neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and caspase-1 were not. Neutrophil elastase/proteinase 3-deficient mice showed strongly reduced levels of lipids in the liver after being fed a high-fat diet. Moreover, these mice were resistant to high–fat–diet-induced weight gain, inflammation and insulin resistance. Injection of proteinase 3 exacerbated insulin resistance in caspase-1–/– mice, indicating that proteinase 3 acts independently of caspase-1. Treatment with α-1 antitrypsin during the last 10 d of a 16-wk high-fat diet reduced hepatic lipid content and decreased fasting glucose levels. We conclude that proteinase 3 is involved in NAFLD and insulin resistance and that inhibition of proteinase 3 may have therapeutic potential. PMID:27261776

  10. Long-term efficacy and safety of α1 proteinase inhibitor treatment for emphysema caused by severe α1 antitrypsin deficiency: an open-label extension trial (RAPID-OLE).

    PubMed

    McElvaney, Noel G; Burdon, Jonathan; Holmes, Mark; Glanville, Allan; Wark, Peter A B; Thompson, Philip J; Hernandez, Paul; Chlumsky, Jan; Teschler, Helmut; Ficker, Joachim H; Seersholm, Niels; Altraja, Alan; Mäkitaro, Riitta; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna; Sanak, Marek; Stoicescu, Paul I; Piitulainen, Eeva; Vit, Oliver; Wencker, Marion; Tortorici, Michael A; Fries, Michael; Edelman, Jonathan M; Chapman, Kenneth R

    2017-01-01

    Purified α1 proteinase inhibitor (A1PI) slowed emphysema progression in patients with severe α1 antitrypsin deficiency in a randomised controlled trial (RAPID-RCT), which was followed by an open-label extension trial (RAPID-OLE). The aim was to investigate the prolonged treatment effect of A1PI on the progression of emphysema as assessed by the loss of lung density in relation to RAPID-RCT. Patients who had received either A1PI treatment (Zemaira or Respreeza; early-start group) or placebo (delayed-start group) in the RAPID-RCT trial were included in this 2-year open-label extension trial (RAPID-OLE). Patients from 22 hospitals in 11 countries outside of the USA received 60 mg/kg per week A1PI. The primary endpoint was annual rate of adjusted 15th percentile lung density loss measured using CT in the intention-to-treat population with a mixed-effects regression model. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00670007. Between March 1, 2006, and Oct 13, 2010, 140 patients from RAPID-RCT entered RAPID-OLE: 76 from the early-start group and 64 from the delayed-start group. Between day 1 and month 24 (RAPID-RCT), the rate of lung density loss in RAPID-OLE patients was lower in the early-start group (-1·51 g/L per year [SE 0·25] at total lung capacity [TLC]; -1·55 g/L per year [0·24] at TLC plus functional residual capacity [FRC]; and -1·60 g/L per year [0·26] at FRC) than in the delayed-start group (-2·26 g/L per year [0·27] at TLC; -2·16 g/L per year [0·26] at TLC plus FRC, and -2·05 g/L per year [0·28] at FRC). Between months 24 and 48, the rate of lung density loss was reduced in delayed-start patients (from -2·26 g/L per year to -1·26 g/L per year), but no significant difference was seen in the rate in early-start patients during this time period (-1·51 g/L per year to -1·63 g/L per year), thus in early-start patients the efficacy was sustained to month 48. RAPID-OLE supports the continued efficacy of A1PI in slowing disease

  11. Treatment of Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Strange, Charlie; Beiko, Tatsiana

    2015-08-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is a rare genetic disease that creates multiple unique phenotypes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. While bronchospasm, cough, dyspnea, and sputum production all occur with AATD, the phenotypic differences require a computed tomographic (CT) scan to decipher. The availability of augmentation therapy in the United States since 1989 has generated both controversy and evidence that informs the science of usual chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because of the predominance of emphysema in AATD, much of the best evidence concerning biomarkers of emphysema progression comes from this population. Imaging measurement of emphysema progression, impact of emphysema phenotypes on hyperinflation and dynamic hyperinflation, and correlation with traditional spirometric measures of COPD progression are required to understand the impact of AAT therapies. These studies are important for better understanding of usual COPD pathogenesis. Significantly, there are no adequately powered research studies to determine if augmentation therapy is helpful for the non-emphysema phenotypes of AATD. Specifically, phenotypes of chronic bronchitis, asthma predominant disease, and bronchiectasis will require targeted research studies to define optimal therapy.

  12. The Alpha-1A Adrenergic Receptor in the Rabbit Heart

    PubMed Central

    Myagmar, Bat-Erdene; Swigart, Philip M.; Baker, Anthony J.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The alpha-1A-adrenergic receptor (AR) subtype is associated with cardioprotective signaling in the mouse and human heart. The rabbit is useful for cardiac disease modeling, but data on the alpha-1A in the rabbit heart are limited. Our objective was to test for expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart. By quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qPCR) on mRNA from ventricular myocardium of adult male New Zealand White rabbits, the alpha-1B was 99% of total alpha-1-AR mRNA, with <1% alpha-1A and alpha-1D, whereas alpha-1A mRNA was over 50% of total in brain and liver. Saturation radioligand binding identified ~4 fmol total alpha-1-ARs per mg myocardial protein, with 17% alpha-1A by competition with the selective antagonist 5-methylurapidil. The alpha-1D was not detected by competition with BMY-7378, indicating that 83% of alpha-1-ARs were alpha-1B. In isolated left ventricle and right ventricle, the selective alpha-1A agonist A61603 stimulated a negative inotropic effect, versus a positive inotropic effect with the nonselective alpha-1-agonist phenylephrine and the beta-agonist isoproterenol. Blood pressure assay in conscious rabbits using an indwelling aortic telemeter showed that A61603 by bolus intravenous dosing increased mean arterial pressure by 20 mm Hg at 0.14 μg/kg, 10-fold lower than norepinephrine, and chronic A61603 infusion by iPRECIO programmable micro Infusion pump did not increase BP at 22 μg/kg/d. A myocardial slice model useful in human myocardium and an anthracycline cardiotoxicity model useful in mouse were both problematic in rabbit. We conclude that alpha-1A mRNA is very low in rabbit heart, but the receptor is present by binding and mediates a negative inotropic response. Expression and function of the alpha-1A in rabbit heart differ from mouse and human, but the vasopressor response is similar to mouse. PMID:27258143

  13. Alpha 1-antitrypsin deficiency: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    alpha 1-Antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency, also known as alpha 1-antiprotease inhibitor deficiency, is a disease caused by genetically determined AAT deficiency. It occurs as a result of inheritance of two protease inhibitor (PI) deficiency alleles from the AAT gene locus (designated PI) on chromosomal segment 14q32.1. The most common deficiency allele is PI*Z and a large majority of individuals with severe AAT deficiency are PI type ZZ. The disease occurs predominantly in white persons of European origin and its frequency in Europe and North America is comparable to that of cystic fibrosis (1 in 2000 to 1 in 7000.) Persons with AAT deficiency may have no clinical manifestations. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with a high frequency of panacinar emphysema is the most prevalent clinical disorder associated with AAT deficiency and the most frequent cause of disability and death. Tobacco smoking is the major risk factor for developing COPD, which generally begins by the third decade of life, much earlier than "usual" COPD that occurs in AAT-replete individuals. Liver disease, the second most frequent clinical manifestation of AAT deficiency, typically presents as cholestasis in infancy but is usually not severe and generally remits by adolescence. Chronic liver disease develops infrequently, although AAT deficiency is the commonest cause of chronic liver disease in childhood. Cirrhosis and carcinoma of the liver affect at least 25% of AAT-deficient adults over the age of 50 years. AAT deficiency appears to be widely underdiagnosed and based on predicted gene frequencies even in the most intensely studied populations, only a small proportion of those predicted to have AAT deficiency have been diagnosed. Human AAT is available in limited quantity for augmentation therapy. This Memorandum summarizes the discussions and recommendations made by participants at a WHO meeting held in Geneva on 18-20 March 1996 to review existing knowledge about this highly prevalent

  14. Purification and characterization of major extracellular proteinases from Trichophyton rubrum.

    PubMed Central

    Asahi, M; Lindquist, R; Fukuyama, K; Apodaca, G; Epstein, W L; McKerrow, J H

    1985-01-01

    Two extracellular proteinases that probably play a central role in the metabolism and pathogenesis of the most common dermatophyte of man, Trichophyton rubrum, were purified to homogeneity. Size-exclusion chromatography and Chromatofocusing were used to purify the major proteinases 42-fold from crude fungal culture filtrate. The major enzyme has pI 7.8 and subunit Mr 44 000, but forms a dimer of Mr approx. 90 000 in the absence of reducing agents. A second enzyme with pI 6.5 and subunit Mr 36 000, was also purified. It is very similar in substrate specificity to the major enzyme but has lower specific activity, and may be an autoproteolysis product. The major proteinase has pH optimum 8, a Ca2+-dependence maximum of 1 mM, and was inhibited by serine-proteinase inhibitors, especially tetrapeptidyl chloromethane derivatives with hydrophobic residues at the P-1 site. Kinetic studies also showed that tetrapeptides containing aromatic or hydrophobic residues at P-1 were the best substrates. A kcat./Km of 27 000 M-1 X S-1 was calculated for the peptide 3-carboxypropionyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe-p-nitroanilide. The enzyme has significant activity against keratin, elastin and denatured type I collagen (Azocoll). Images Fig. 1. PMID:3910025

  15. Trypanosoma cruzi: insights into naphthoquinone effects on growth and proteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Saulo C; Cavalcanti, Danielle F B; de Souza, Alessandra M T; Castro, Helena C; Rodrigues, Carlos R; Albuquerque, Magaly G; Santos, Dilvani O; da Silva, Gabriel Gomes; da Silva, Fernando C; Ferreira, Vitor F; de Pinho, Rosa T; Alves, Carlos R

    2011-01-01

    In this study we compared the effects of naphthoquinones (α-lapachone, β-lapachone, nor-β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap) on growth of Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes forms, and on viability of VERO cells. In addition we also experimentally analyzed the most active compounds inhibitory profile against T. cruzi serine- and cysteine-proteinases activity and theoretically evaluated them against cruzain, the major T. cruzi cysteine proteinase by using a molecular docking approach. Our results confirmed β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap with a high trypanocidal activity in contrast to α-lapachone and nor-β-lapachone whereas Epoxy-α-lap presented the safest toxicity profile against VERO cells. Interestingly the evaluation of the active compounds effects against T. cruzi cysteine- and serine-proteinases activities revealed different targets for these molecules. β-Lapachone is able to inhibit the cysteine-proteinase activity of T. cruzi proteic whole extract and of cruzain, similar to E-64, a classical cysteine-proteinase inhibitor. Differently, Epoxy-α-lap inhibited the T. cruzi serine-proteinase activity, similar to PMSF, a classical serine-proteinase inhibitor. In agreement to these biological profiles in the enzymatic assays, our theoretical analysis showed that E-64 and β-lapachone interact with the cruzain specific S2 pocket and active site whereas Epoxy-α-lap showed no important interactions. Overall, our results infer that β-lapachone and Epoxy-α-lap compounds may inhibit T. cruzi epimastigotes growth by affecting T. cruzi different proteinases. Thus the present data shows the potential of these compounds as prototype of protease inhibitors on drug design studies for developing new antichagasic compounds.

  16. Functional analysis of alpha 1 beta 1 integrin in human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Villar, J J; Melero, I; Gismondi, A; Santoni, A; López-Botet, M

    1996-09-01

    Upon activation with interleukin (IL)-2 human natural killer (NK) cells acquire on their surface the alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1 integrins and down-regulate the expression of alpha 6 beta 1. By employing alpha 1 beta 1-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) HP-2B6, characterized in our laboratory, we examined the functional role of the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin in NK cells. Treatment with HP-2B6 mAb partially interfered with attachment of cultured NK cells to type I collagen, and combined with an anti-alpha 2 beta 1 (TEA 1/41) mAb, it completely abrogated cell adhesion to this extracelular matrix protein. In contrast, NK cell attachment to laminin was completely blocked by the anti-beta 1 LIA 1/2 mAb, but was unaffected by alpha 1 and alpha 2-specific mAb; as alpha 3 beta 1 and alpha 6 beta 1 were undetectable, the data indicate that the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin binding sites for type I collagen and laminin are different. Incubation with anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 or its F(ab')2 fragments specifically induced a rapid homotypic aggregation of NK cells that was dependent on active metabolism, an intact cytoskeleton and the presence of divalent cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+); homotypic cell adhesion was selectively blocked by anti-CD18, CD11a or CD54 mAb. In addition, stimulation of cultured NK cells with the anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 enhanced TNF-alpha production and induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 110-kDa protein. Pretreatment with specific inhibitors of protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity (tyrphostin 25 and herbimycin A) completely abrogated the functional effects induced by the anti-alpha 1 HP-2B6 mAb. Our data show that ligation of the alpha 1 beta 1 integrin positively modulates IL-2-activated NK cell function via a PTK-dependent pathway.

  17. New potential uroselective NO-donor alpha1-antagonists.

    PubMed

    Boschi, Donatella; Tron, Gian Cesare; Di Stilo, Antonella; Fruttero, Roberta; Gasco, Alberto; Poggesi, Elena; Motta, Gianni; Leonardi, Amedeo

    2003-08-14

    A recent uroselective alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, REC15/2739, has been joined with nitrooxy and furoxan NO-donor moieties to give new NO-donor alpha(1)-antagonists. All the compounds studied proved to be potent and selective ligands of human cloned alpha(1a)-receptor subtype. Derivatives 6 and 7 were able to relax the prostatic portion of rat vas deferens contracted by (-)-noradrenaline because of both their alpha(1A)-antagonist and their NO-donor properties.

  18. Synergistic anticryptosporidial potential of the combination alpha-1-antitrypsin and paromomycin.

    PubMed Central

    Forney, J R; Yang, S; Healey, M C

    1997-01-01

    The combined effect of the serine protease inhibitor alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) and the aminoglycoside paromomycin on Cryptosporidium parvum infection in vitro was investigated. AAT and paromomycin were mixed with C. parvum oocysts as either single or combined treatments and used to inoculate epithelial cell cultures. Single- and combined-treatment groups had significantly lower (P < 0.01) parasite numbers than untreated controls. The mean fractional inhibitory concentration indices suggested significant synergistic activity. PMID:9303402

  19. Pharmacological profiles of a novel alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist, PNO-49B, at alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, I; Ohmura, T; Kigoshi, S

    1995-01-01

    The effects of a newly synthesized compound, PNO-49B, (R)-(-)-3'-(2-amino-1-hydroxyethyl)-4'-fluoromethanesulfonanilide hydrochloride, on alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes were examined in various tissues in which the following distribution of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes has been suggested: dog carotid artery (alpha 1B), dog mesenteric artery (alpha 1N), rabbit thoracic aorta (alpha 1B + alpha 1L), rat liver (alpha 1B), rat vas deferens (alpha 1A + alpha 1L), rat cerebral cortex (alpha 1A + alpha 1B) and rat thoracic aorta (controversial subtype). PNO-49B (0.1-100 microM) produced concentration-dependent contractions in dog mesenteric artery, rabbit thoracic aorta, rat thoracic aorta and rat vas deferens; and the maximal amplitudes of contraction were almost the same as or slightly less than those of noradrenaline. By contrast, the maximal response to PNO-49B in dog carotid artery was markedly smaller than the response to noradrenaline. In rabbit thoracic aorta, the contractile response to PNO-49B was not affected by inactivation of the alpha 1B subtype with chloroethylclonidine (CEC), although the response to noradrenaline was attenuated by that treatment. The dissociation constants (KA) of PNO-49B were not different among the rat thoracic aorta, dog carotid and mesenteric arteries and rabbit thoracic aorta (CEC-pretreated). The contractile responses to PNO-49B were inhibited competitively by prazosin, HV723 (alpha-ethyl-3,4,5-trimethoxy-alpha-(3-((2-(2-methoxyphenoxy)-ethyl)- amino(propyl)benzeneacetonitrile fumarate) and by WB4101 (2-(2,6-dimethoxyphenoxyethyl)-aminomethyl-1,4- benzodioxane).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Pulmonary emphysema associated with the FZ alpha 1-antitrypsin phenotype.

    PubMed

    Cockcroft, D W; Tennent, R K; Horne, S L

    1981-03-15

    In one family three brothers were found to have a moderate deficiency of alpha 1-antitrypsin associated with the unusual Pi (protease inhibitor) phenotype FZ. The Pi phenotypes of their six living siblings were found to be FM (in three), M (in two) and MZ (in one). The three FZ brothers all had moderate to severe obstructive airways disease, and two had at least moderately severe pulmonary emphysema. Additional risk factors included moderate cigarette smoking in two and prolonged exposure to grain dust in all three. The same risk factors applied to the six non-FZ siblings, but they had only mild symptoms and pulmonary dysfunction or no lung problems at all; one, a female smoker with the MZ phenotype, had probable early emphysema demonstrated radiologically. The three FZ men may have had reduced fertility, as they produced only 1 child among them, as compared with 39 among the other eight siblings. This family study thus suggests that individuals with the FZ phenotype are at risk for pulmonary emphysema and chronic obstructive airways disease, particularly in the presence of other risk factors, such as cigarette smoking and grain dust exposure.

  1. NMR studies of internal dynamics of serine proteinase protein inhibitors: Binding region mobilities of intact and reactive-site hydrolyzed Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor (CMTI)-III of the squash family and comparison with those of counterparts of CMTI-V of the potato I family.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J.; Gong, Y.; Prakash, O.; Wen, L.; Lee, I.; Huang, J. K.; Krishnamoorthi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Serine proteinase protein inhibitors follow the standard mechanism of inhibition (Laskowski M Jr, Kato I, 1980, Annu Rev Biochem 49:593-626), whereby an enzyme-catalyzed equilibrium between intact (I) and reactive-site hydrolyzed inhibitor (I*) is reached. The hydrolysis constant, Khyd, is defined as [I*]/[I]. Here, we explore the role of internal dynamics in the resynthesis of the scissile bond by comparing the internal mobility data of intact and cleaved inhibitors belonging to two different families. The inhibitors studied are recombinant Cucurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (rCMTI-III; Mr 3 kDa) of the squash family and rCMTI-V (Mr approximately 7 kDa) of the potato I family. These two inhibitors have different binding loop-scaffold interactions and different Khyd values--2.4 (CMTI-III) and 9 (CMTI-V)--at 25 degrees C. The reactive-site peptide bond (P1-P1') is that between Arg5 and Ile6 in CMTI-III, and that between Lys44 and Asp45 in CMTI-V. The order parameters (S2) of backbone NHs of uniformly 15N-labeled rCMTI-III and rCMTI-III* were determined from measurements of 15N spin-lattice and spin-spin relaxation rates, and [1H]-15N steady-state heteronuclear Overhauser effects, using the model-free formalism, and compared with the data reported previously for rCMTI-V and rCMTI-V*. The backbones of rCMTI-III [(S2) = 0.71] and rCMTI-III* [(S2) = 0.63] are more flexible than those of rCMTI-V [(S2) = 0.83] and rCMTI-V* [(S2) = 0.85]. The binding loop residues, P4-P1, in the two proteins show the following average order parameters: 0.57 (rCMTI-III) and 0.44 (rCMTI-III*); 0.70 (rCMTI-V) and 0.40 (rCMTI-V*). The P1'-P4' residues, on the other hand, are associated with (S2) values of 0.56 (rCMTI-III) and 0.47 (rCMTI-III*); and 0.73 (rCMTI-V) and 0.83 (rCMTI-V*). The newly formed C-terminal (Pn residues) gains a smaller magnitude of flexibility in rCMTI-III* due to the Cys3-Cys20 crosslink. In contrast, the newly formed N-terminal (Pn' residues) becomes more flexible

  2. Three cases of alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Jack, C I; Evans, C C

    1991-09-01

    We report three elderly patients who presented with increasing dyspnoea on exertion and radiological evidence of basal bullous emphysema. On further investigation they were found to have alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency. We emphasize that alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency can present much later than is usually the case especially if the patient is a life-long non-smoker.

  3. Therapeutics: Gene Therapy for Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gruntman, Alisha M; Flotte, Terence R

    2017-01-01

    This review seeks to give an overview of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency, including the different disease phenotypes that it encompasses. We then describe the different therapeutic endeavors that have been undertaken to address these different phenotypes. Lastly we discuss future potential therapeutics, such as genome editing, and how they may play a role in treating alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency.

  4. Alpha-1-antitrypsin inhibits nitric oxide production.

    PubMed

    Chan, Edward D; Pott, Gregory B; Silkoff, Philip E; Ralston, Annemarie H; Bryan, Courtney L; Shapiro, Leland

    2012-12-01

    NO is an endogenously produced gas that regulates inflammation, vascular tone, neurotransmission, and immunity. NO production can be increased by exposing cells to several endogenous and exogenous proinflammatory mediators, including IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, and LPS. As AAT has been shown to inhibit cell activation and suppress cytokine production associated with proinflammatory stimulation, we examined AAT for NO-suppressive function. In RAW 264.7 murine macrophagic cells, physiological AAT concentrations significantly inhibited combined LPS- and IFN-γ-induced NO synthesis, and NO synthesis inhibition was associated with decreased expression of iNOS, suppressed NF-κB activation, and reduced translocation of extracellular AAT into the interior of RAW 264.7 cells. CE-2072, a synthetic inhibitor of serine proteases, also suppressed NO production, iNOS expression, and NF-κB activation. However, AAT did not alter activation of intracellular MAPKs. In subjects with genetic AAT deficiency, exhaled NO was increased significantly compared with exhaled NO in healthy controls. These in vitro and in vivo studies suggest that AAT is an endogenous inhibitor of NO production. Administering AAT or AAT-like molecules may have use as a treatment for diseases associated with excessive NO production.

  5. Interrelationships between the Human Alveolar Macrophage and Alpha-1-Antitrypsin

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Allen B.

    1973-01-01

    Alveolar macrophages lavaged from human lungs contain protease activity at an optimum pH of 3.0 and possibly a lesser peak of activity at pH 5.5. Protease activity measured at pH 4.1 is inhibited by purified alpha-1-antitrypsin. Fluorescent antibody studies of human alveolar macrophages showed that alpha-1-antitrypsin is present in normal alveolar macrophages. In addition, macrophages from a patient with a homozygous deficiency of alpha-1-antitrypsin exhibited less fluorescence when incubated in autologous serum than the same macrophages incubated in normal serum. Macrophages from normal subjects showed maximal fluorescence when removed from the lung and additional incubation with serum did not increase fluorescence. These results implicate the human alveolar macrophage as a possible source of an enzyme that may cause emphysema in patients deficient in alpha-1-antitrypsin. They also show that alpha-1-antitrypsin has access to the alveolus in normal subjects. Images PMID:4201266

  6. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteinase activity is necessary for parasite adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, R; Alderete, J F

    1989-01-01

    The role of cysteine proteinases in adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to HeLa and human vaginal epithelial cells was evaluated. Only pretreatment of trichomonads, but not epithelial cells, with N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), an inhibitor of trichomonad cysteine proteinases, greatly diminished the ability of T. vaginalis to recognize and bind to epithelial cells. Leupeptin and L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, other cysteine proteinase inhibitors, also decreased T. vaginalis cytadherence. Parasites incubated with TLCK and washed extensively still did not adhere to cells at levels equal to those seen for control trichomonads treated with phosphate-buffered saline or culture medium alone. Exposure of TLCK-treated organisms with other cysteine proteinases restored cytadherence levels, indicating that proteinase action on the parasite surface is prerequisite for host cell attachment. Concentrations of TLCK which inhibited cytadherence did not alter the metabolism of T. vaginalis, as determined by metabolic labeling of trichomonad proteins; the protein patterns of T. vaginalis in the presence and absence of TLCK were identical. Kinetics of TLCK-mediated inhibition of cytadherence of other T. vaginalis isolates with different levels of epithelial-cell parasitism were similar to the concentration-dependent inhibition seen for isolate NYH 286. Incubation of TLCK-treated, washed organisms in growth medium resulted in regeneration of adherence. Finally, treatment of T. vaginalis organisms with proteinase inhibitors for abrogation of cytadherence effectively rendered the trichomonads unable to kill host cells, which is consistent with the contact-dependent nature of host cytotoxicity. These data show for the first time the involvement of T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases in parasite attachment to human epithelial cells. These results have implications for future pharmacologic intervention at a key step in infection. PMID:2789190

  7. Trichomonas vaginalis surface proteinase activity is necessary for parasite adherence to epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, R; Alderete, J F

    1989-10-01

    The role of cysteine proteinases in adherence of Trichomonas vaginalis NYH 286 to HeLa and human vaginal epithelial cells was evaluated. Only pretreatment of trichomonads, but not epithelial cells, with N-alpha-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone (TLCK), an inhibitor of trichomonad cysteine proteinases, greatly diminished the ability of T. vaginalis to recognize and bind to epithelial cells. Leupeptin and L-1-tosylamide-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, other cysteine proteinase inhibitors, also decreased T. vaginalis cytadherence. Parasites incubated with TLCK and washed extensively still did not adhere to cells at levels equal to those seen for control trichomonads treated with phosphate-buffered saline or culture medium alone. Exposure of TLCK-treated organisms with other cysteine proteinases restored cytadherence levels, indicating that proteinase action on the parasite surface is prerequisite for host cell attachment. Concentrations of TLCK which inhibited cytadherence did not alter the metabolism of T. vaginalis, as determined by metabolic labeling of trichomonad proteins; the protein patterns of T. vaginalis in the presence and absence of TLCK were identical. Kinetics of TLCK-mediated inhibition of cytadherence of other T. vaginalis isolates with different levels of epithelial-cell parasitism were similar to the concentration-dependent inhibition seen for isolate NYH 286. Incubation of TLCK-treated, washed organisms in growth medium resulted in regeneration of adherence. Finally, treatment of T. vaginalis organisms with proteinase inhibitors for abrogation of cytadherence effectively rendered the trichomonads unable to kill host cells, which is consistent with the contact-dependent nature of host cytotoxicity. These data show for the first time the involvement of T. vaginalis cysteine proteinases in parasite attachment to human epithelial cells. These results have implications for future pharmacologic intervention at a key step in infection.

  8. Increase in net activity of serine proteinases but not gelatinases after local endotoxin exposure in the peripheral airways of healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Margaretha E; Bozinovski, Steven; Malmhäll, Carina; Sjöstrand, Margareta; Glader, Pernilla; Venge, Per; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Anderson, Gary P; Lindén, Anders; Qvarfordt, Ingemar

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that activation of the innate immune response induces an imbalance in the proteolytic homeostasis in the peripheral airways of healthy subjects, towards excess serine or gelatinase proteinase activity. During bronchoscopy, 18 healthy human subjects underwent intra-bronchial exposure to endotoxin and contra-lateral exposure to vehicle. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples were harvested 24 or 48 hours (h) later. We quantified archetype proteinases, anti-proteinases, inflammatory BAL cells, and, importantly, total plus net proteinase activities using functional substrate assays. As expected, endotoxin exposure increased the concentrations of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN's) and macrophages, of proteinases and the anti-proteinases tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, α-1-antitrypsin and, to a lesser extent, secretory leukoproteinase inhibitor, at both time points. Notably, at these time points, endotoxin exposure substantially increased the quantitative NE/SLPI ratio and the net serine proteinase activity corresponding to neutrophil elastase (NE). Endotoxin exposure also increased the total gelatinase activity corresponding to matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9; an activity dominating over that of MMP-2. However, endotoxin exposure had no impact on net gelatinolytic activity at 24 or 48 h after exposure. Thus, local activation of the innate immune response induces an imbalance towards increased net serine proteinase activity in the proteolytic homeostasis of the peripheral airways in healthy subjects. Hypothetically, this serine proteinase activity can contribute to tissue remodelling and hypersecretion via NE from PMN's, if it is triggered repeatedly, as might be the case in chronic inflammatory airway disorders.

  9. Alpha1-antitrypsin monotherapy prolongs islet allograft survival in mice.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Eli C; Shapiro, Leland; Bowers, Owen J; Dinarello, Charles A

    2005-08-23

    Islet transplantation for type 1 diabetic patients shows promising results with the use of nondiabetogenic immunosuppressive therapy. However, in addition to compromising the immune system of transplant recipients, long-term studies demonstrate that islet viability is impaired. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of immunosuppressive agents, monotherapy with clinical-grade human alpha1-antitrypsin (hAAT), the major serum serine-protease inhibitor, prolongs islet graft survival and normoglycemia in transplanted allogeneic diabetic mice, lasting until the development of anti-hAAT antibodies. Compared to untreated or albumin-control-treated graft recipients, which rejected islets at day 10, AAT-treated mice displayed diminished cellular infiltrates and intact intragraft insulin production throughout treatment. Using peritoneal infiltration models, we demonstrate that AAT decreases allogeneic fibroblast-elicited natural-killer-cell influx by 89%, CD3-positive cell influx by 44%, and thioglycolate-elicited neutrophil emigration by 66%. ATT also extended islet viability in mice after streptozotocin-induced beta cell toxicity. In vitro, several islet responses to IL-1beta/IFNgamma stimulation were examined. In the presence of AAT, islets displayed enhanced viability and inducible insulin secretion. Islets also released 36% less nitric oxide and 82% less macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha and expressed 63% fewer surface MHC class II molecules. TNFalpha release from IL-1beta/IFNgamma-stimulated islet cells was reduced by 99%, accompanied by an 8-fold increase in the accumulation of membrane TNFalpha on CD45-positive islet cells. In light of the established safety record and the nondiabetogenic potential of AAT, these data suggest that AAT may be beneficial as adjunctive therapy in patients undergoing islet transplantation.

  10. Involement of an acrosinlike proteinase in the sulfhydryl-induced degradation of rabbit sperm nuclear protamine

    PubMed Central

    Zirkin, BR; Chang, TSK; Heaps, J

    1980-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that proteolytic activity is associated with isolated rabbit sperm nuclei and is responsible for the degradation of nuclear protamine that occurs during thiol-induced in vitro decondensation of the nuclei (Zirkin and Chang, 1977; Chang and Zirkin, 1978). In this study, we present the results of experiments designed to characterize this proteolytic activity. Basic protein isolated from rabbit sperm nuclei incubated with 5 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) and 1 percent Triton X-100 for increasing periods of time exhibited progressively faster migrating bands on acid-urea polyacrylamide gels, reflection the progressive degradation of protamine. Ultimately, a specific and characteristic peptide banding pattern resulted. When sperm nuclei were treated with the esterase inhibitor nitrophenyl-p-guanidino benzoate (NPGB) to inhibit the nuclear-associated proteolytic activity and then incubated with one of several exogenous proteinases in addition to DTT and Triton X-100, characteristic peptide banding patterns were seen for each exogenous proteinase employed. For trypsin, chymotrypsin, pronase, and papain, the peptide banding patterns differed from one another and from the pattern characteristic of protamine degradation by the nuclear-associated proteinase. By contrast, when rabbit acrosin served as the exogenous proteinase, the peptide banding pattern seen was identical to the pattern characteristic of the nuclear-associated proteinase. These results demonstrate directly that the proteinase associated with rabbit sperm nuclei and involved in sperm nuclear decondensation in vitro is acrosinlike. PMID:6988441

  11. Deleterious effect of Brij 35 on alkyl 2-pyrones and other hydrophobic inhibitors of human sputum and leucocyte elastase.

    PubMed

    Cook, L; Ternai, B

    1988-10-01

    Brij 35 significantly reduced the inhibitory activity of hydrophobic alkyl 2-pyrones, oleic acid and alkyl peptides towards human sputum and leucocyte elastase, whereas 4-methoxy-6-(2'-hydroxy-2'-(carbobutyloxy)-vinyl)-2-pyrone, alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor and a sulfated chitosan were unaffected. The effect of Brij 35 on elastase appeared to be irreversible, since dialysis against Brij-free buffer was not accompanied by a return to inhibitory activity by the first group of inhibitors. However, passage through an ionic-exchange column was effective in removing the detergent from the enzyme. Brij 35 is also an activator of the elastases: kcat for Boc-Ala-4-nitrophenyl ester and methylsuccinyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-4-nitroanilide increased by 20% and 40%, respectively in the presence of 0.015% Brij 35. Binding of the substrates to the enzyme is unaffected, since Km is unchanged.

  12. Phenylacetamides as selective alpha-1A adrenergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Patane, M A; DiPardo, R M; Newton, R C; Price, R P; Broten, T P; Chang, R S; Ransom, R W; Di Salvo, J; Nagarathnam, D; Forray, C; Gluchowski, C; Bock, M G

    2000-08-07

    A novel class of potent and selective alpha-1a receptor antagonists has been identified. The structures of these antagonists were derived from truncating the 4-aryl dihydropyridine subunit present in known alpha-1a antagonists. The design principles which led to the discovery of substituted phenylacetamides, the synthesis and SAR of key analogues, and the results of select in vitro and in vivo studies are described.

  13. Impaired alpha1-adrenergic responses in aged rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Montagne, Olivier; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Guenoun, Thierry; Laplace, Monique; Crozatier, Bertrand

    2005-06-01

    To determine age-related changes in the cardiac effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation, both cardiomyocyte Ca2+-transient and cardiac protein kinase C (PKC) activity were measured in 3-month- (3MO) and 24-month- (24MO) old Wistar rats. Ca2+ transients obtained under 1 Hz pacing by microfluorimetry of cardiomyocyte loaded with indo-1 (405/480 nm fluorescence ratio) were compared in control conditions (Kreb's solution alone) and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation (phenylephrine or cirazoline, an alpha1-specific agonist). PKC activity and PKC translocation index (particulate/total activity) were also assayed before and after alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In 3MO, cirazoline induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient for a 10(-9) M concentration which returned to control values for larger concentrations. In contrast, in 24MO, we observed a constant negative effect of cirazoline on the Ca2+ transient with a significant decrease at 10(-6) M compared with both baseline and Kreb's solution. Preliminary experiments showed that, in a dose-response curve to phenylephrine, the response of Ca2+ transient was maximal at 10(-7) M. This concentration induced a significant increase in Ca2+ transient in 3MO and a significant decrease in 24MO. The same concentration was chosen to perform PKC activity measurements under alpha1-adrenergic stimulation. In the basal state, PKC particulate activity was higher in 24MO than that in 3MO but was not different in cytosolic fractions; so that the translocation index was higher in 24MO (P < 0.01). After phenylephrine, a translocation of PKC toward the particulate fraction was observed in 3MO but not in 24MO. In conclusion, cardiac alpha1-adrenoceptor response was found to be impaired in aged hearts. The negative effect of alpha1-adrenergic stimulation on Ca2+ transient in cardiomyocytes obtained from old rats can be related to an absence of alpha1-adrenergic-induced PKC translocation.

  14. Augmentation therapy of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency associated emphysema.

    PubMed

    Traclet, J; Delaval, P; Terrioux, P; Mornex, J-F

    2015-04-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin, secreted by the liver, inhibits neutrophil elastase. Its deficiency favours the development of emphysema. Restoring a "protective" serum level in deficient patients should make it possible to inhibit the development of emphysema. Human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin is a blood-derived drug sold in France under the name Alfalastin(®). The recommended posology is an I.V. administration of 60 mg/kg once a week. Human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin restores anti-elastase protection in the lower lung and prevents experimental emphysema induced by the elastasis of human neutrophils in hamster. The low number of patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is one of the difficulties to perform sufficiently powerful randomised studies. However, randomised studies have reported the efficacy of human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin perfusions on mortality, FEV1 decline and the frequency of exacerbations. Randomised control trials have demonstrated the efficacy of human plasma-derived alpha-1 antitrypsin perfusions on the loss of lung density assessed by CT scan. Augmentation therapy is simple in its conception and implementation, but it is expensive. However, there are currently no other solutions. Copyright © 2014 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. CP30, a Cysteine Proteinase Involved in Trichomonas vaginalis Cytoadherence

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-López, M. Remedios; Becerril-Garcia, Cecilia; Fattel-Facenda, Loriz V.; Avila-Gonzalez, Leticia; Ruíz-Tachiquín, Martha E.; Ortega-Lopez, Jaime; Arroyo, Rossana

    2000-01-01

    We describe here the participation of a Trichomonas vaginalis 30-kDa proteinase (CP30) with affinity to the HeLa cell surface in attachment of this parasite to host epithelial cells. The CP30 band is a cysteine proteinase because its activity was inhibited by E-64, a thiol proteinase inhibitor. In two-dimensional substrate gel electrophoresis of total extracts of the trichomonad isolate CNCD 147, three spots with proteolytic activity were detected in the 30-kDa region, in the pI range from 4.5 to 5.5. Two of the spots (pI 4.5 and 5.0) bound to the surfaces of fixed HeLa cells corresponding to the CP30 band. The immunoglobulin G fraction of the rabbit anti-CP30 antiserum that recognized a 30-kDa band by Western blotting and immunoprecipitated CP30 specifically inhibited trichomonal cytoadherence to HeLa cell monolayers in a concentration-dependent manner and reacted with CP30 at the parasite surface. CP30 degraded proteins found on the female urogenital tract, including fibronectin, collagen IV, and hemoglobin. Interestingly, CP30 digested fibronectin and collagen IV only at pH levels between 4.5 and 5.0. Moreover, trichomonosis patients whose diagnosis was confirmed by in vitro culture possessed antibody to CP30 in both sera and vaginal washes, and CP30 activity was found in vaginal washes. Our results suggest that surface CP30 is a cysteine proteinase necessary for trichomonal adherence to human epithelial cells. PMID:10948104

  16. Inactivation of key factors of the plasma proteinase cascade systems by Bacteroides gingivalis.

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, T; Carlsson, J; Sundqvist, G

    1985-01-01

    The effect of Bacteroides gingivalis W83 on various key components of the human plasma proteinase cascade systems was studied. When purified C1-inhibitor was incubated with the bacterium, the inhibitor was rapidly inactivated by limited proteolytic cleavage. In citrated whole plasma, C1-inhibitor, antithrombin, plasminogen, prekallikrein, prothrombinase complex, the clotting factor X, and most of the alpha 2-antiplasmin were functionally eliminated after 30 min of incubation with the bacterium. Fibrinogen disappeared from the plasma almost immediately upon mixing with the bacterial suspension. In contrast, there was no appreciable decrease in the bulk of other plasma proteins, such as various transport proteins (albumin, prealbumin, transferrin) and immunoglobulins, during 4 h of incubation with the bacterium. Most of the observed effects can be assigned to the proteolytic activity of the bacterium itself, since there was little evidence for generation of intrinsic plasma proteinase activity, despite the loss of proteinase inhibitory activities. B. gingivalis W83 thus seems to be equipped with proteolytic enzyme systems which selectively recognize and rapidly inactivate the most important proteinase inhibitors and proenzymes present in human plasma. This bacterium therefore seems to be able to efficiently paralyze the host's various defenses against invading microorganisms. Images PMID:3902645

  17. Isolation and Properties of Stachyrase A, a Chymotrypsin-Like Serine Proteinase from Stachybotrys chartarum

    PubMed Central

    Kordula, Tomasz; Banbula, Agnieszka; Macomson, Jeremy; Travis, James

    2002-01-01

    A strain of the common mold Stachybotrys chartarum has been isolated from the lung of a child with pulmonary hemorrhage. We report the purification of stachyrase A, a new serine chymotrypsin-like proteinase from S. chartarum. This enzyme cleaves major protease inhibitors, several biologically active peptides, and collagen, all of which are found in the lung. PMID:11748212

  18. The nonpsychotropic cannabinoid cannabidiol modulates and directly activates alpha-1 and alpha-1-Beta glycine receptor function.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jörg; Demir, Reyhan; Leuwer, Martin; de la Roche, Jeanne; Krampfl, Klaus; Foadi, Nilufar; Karst, Matthias; Haeseler, Gertrud

    2009-01-01

    Loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord plays a key role in the development of chronic pain following inflammation or nerve injury. Inhibitory postsynaptic transmission in the adult spinal cord involves mainly glycine. Cannabidiol is a nonpsychotropic plant constituent of Cannabis sativa. As we hypothesized that non-CB receptor mechanisms of cannabidiol might contribute to its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects, we investigated the interaction of cannabidiol with strychnine-sensitive alpha(1 )and alpha(1)beta glycine receptors by using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Cannabidiol showed a positive allosteric modulating effect in a low micromolar concentration range (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 12.3 +/- 3.8 micromol/l and alpha(1)beta = 18.1 +/- 6.2 micromol/l). Direct activation of glycine receptors was observed at higher concentrations above 100 micromol/l (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 132.4 +/- 12.3 micromol/l and alpha(1)beta = 144.3 +/- 22.7 micromol/l). These in vitro results suggest that strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors may be a target for cannabidiol mediating some of its anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties.

  19. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-01-01

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2327970

  20. [Ulysses retrotransposon aspartate proteinase (Drosophila virilis)].

    PubMed

    Volkov, D A; Savvateeva, L V; Dergousova, N I; Rumsh, L D

    2002-01-01

    Retrotransposones are mobile genetic elements occurring in genomes of bacteria, plants or animals. Retrotransposones were found to contain nucleotide sequences encoding proteins which are homological to retroviral aspartic proteinases. Our research has been focused on Ulysses which is mobile genetic element found in Drosophila virilis. We suggested a primary structure of Ulysses proteinase using comparative analysis of amino acid sequences of retroviral proteinases and proteinases from retrotransposones. The appropriate cDNA fragment has been cloned and expressed in E. coli. The purification of recombinant protein (12 kD) has been carried out by affinity chromatography using pepstatine-agarose. The obtained protein has proteolytic activity at optimum pH 5.5 like the majority of aspartic proteinases.

  1. The cysteine proteinases of the pineapple plant.

    PubMed

    Rowan, A D; Buttle, D J; Barrett, A J

    1990-03-15

    The pineapple plant (Ananas comosus) was shown to contain at least four distinct cysteine proteinases, which were purified by a procedure involving active-site-directed affinity chromatography. The major proteinase present in extracts of plant stem was stem bromelain, whilst fruit bromelain was the major proteinase in the fruit. Two additional cysteine proteinases were detected only in the stem: these were ananain and a previously undescribed enzyme that we have called comosain. Stem bromelain, fruit bromelain and ananain were shown to be immunologically distinct. Enzymic characterization revealed differences in both substrate-specificities and inhibition profiles. A study of the cysteine proteinase derived from the related bromeliad Bromelia pinguin (pinguinain) indicated that in many respects it was similar to fruit bromelain, although it was found to be immunologically distinct.

  2. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system....5420 Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-glycoproteins... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system....5420 Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-glycoproteins... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5580 - Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system....5580 Alpha-1-lipoprotein immuno-logical test system. (a) Identification. An alpha-1-lipoprotein... the alpha-1-lipoprotein (high-density lipoprotein) in serum and plasma. Measurement of alpha-1...

  5. alpha1-Adrenoceptors stimulate a Galphas protein and reduce the transient outward K+ current via a cAMP/PKA-mediated pathway in the rat heart.

    PubMed

    Gallego, Mónica; Setién, Raúl; Puebla, Lilian; Boyano-Adánez, María Del Carmen; Arilla, Eduardo; Casis, Oscar

    2005-03-01

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptor stimulation prolongs the duration of the cardiac action potentials and leads to positive inotropic effects by inhibiting the transient outward K(+) current (I(to)). In the present study, we have examined the role of several protein kinases and the G protein involved in I(to) inhibition in response to alpha(1)-adrenoceptor stimulation in isolated adult rat ventricular myocytes. Our findings exclude the classic alpha(1)-adrenergic pathway: activation of the G protein G(alphaq), phospholipase C (PLC), and protein kinase C (PKC), because neither PLC, nor PKC, nor G(alphaq) blockade prevents the alpha(1)-induced I(to) reduction. To the contrary, the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor does not inhibit I(to) in the presence of protein kinase A (PKA), adenylyl cyclase, or G(alphas) inhibitors. In addition, PKA and adenylyl cyclase activation inhibit I(to) to the same extent as phenylephrine. Finally, we have shown a functional coupling between the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor and G(alphas) in a physiological system. Moreover, this coupling seems to be compartmentalized, because the alpha(1)-adrenoceptor increases cAMP levels only in intact cells, but not in isolated membranes, and the effect on I(to) disappears when the cytoskeleton is disrupted. We conclude that alpha(1)-adrenoceptor stimulation reduces the amplitude of the I(to) by activating a G(alphas) protein and the cAMP/PKA signaling cascade, which in turn leads to I(to) channel phosphorylation.

  6. Elevated soluble HLA II protein levels in patients with alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency with or without COPD.

    PubMed

    Li, Liping; Kueppers, Friedrich; Hildebrand, William; Buchli, Rico; Gaughan, John

    2012-08-01

    Elevated levels of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins have been reported in several pathologic conditions that are associated with increased concentrations of white blood cells (e.g., infection, inflammation, and lymphoproliferative disorders). The mechanisms by which HLA proteins are solubilized from cell membranes are insufficiently understood. We hypothesized that HLA proteins may be cleaved from cell membranes by insufficiently inhibited leukocytic elastase, as expected in alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (A1ATD), resulting in elevated plasma levels of soluble HLA (sHLA) proteins. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we measured sHLA II levels in the peripheral blood of patients with A1ATD with or without co-existing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), with COPD only, and in a control group. Mean (±SD) sHLA II plasma levels were 110 ± 200 pg/mL in patients with A1ATD and COPD (Group 1), 10 ± 30 pg/mL in patients with COPD without A1ATD (Group 2), 70 ± 90 pg/mL in patients with A1ATD without COPD (Group 3), and 10 ± 30 pg/mL in healthy donors (Group 4). Soluble HLA II plasma levels were significantly higher in Group 1 (P = .001) and Group 3 (P = .002) versus Group 4. Our preliminary results suggest that leukocytic elastase and probably other proteinases solubilize HLA proteins from cell membranes. This mechanism would operate in inflammation with elevated leukocytic elastase levels but more so with inflammation and A1ATD, where elastase would be insufficiently inhibited. If this mechanism is verified, plasma sHLA levels could potentially be used to measure cell damage due to proteinases and, therefore, for monitoring the therapeutic efficacy of alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) augmentation therapy.

  7. Co-purification of the Lewis blood group N-acetylglucosaminide alpha 1 goes to 4 fucosyltransferase and an N-acetylglucosaminide alpha 1 goes to 3 fucosyltransferase from human milk.

    PubMed

    Prieels, J P; Monnom, D; Dolmans, M; Beyer, T A; Hill, R L

    1981-10-25

    The Lewis blood group-specified N-acetylglucosaminide alpha 1 goes to 4 fucosyltransferase and an N-acetylglucosaminide alpha 1 goes to 3 fucosyltransferase have been copurified over 500,000-fold from human milk by affinity chromatography on GDP-hexanolamine agarose. The purified enzyme preparation migrates as two major bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with apparent Mr = 53,000 and 51,000. Analysis of the acceptor substrate specificity of the transferase(s) and structural characterization of the reaction products indicate that the enzyme(s) forms the Fuc alpha 1 goes to 4GlcNAc, Fuc alpha 1 goes to 3GlcNAc, and Fuc alpha 1 goes to 3Glc linkages with oligosaccharide acceptors containing the nonreducing terminal sequences Gal beta 1 goes to 3GlcNAc, Gal beta 1 goes to 4GlcNAc, and Gal beta 1 goes to 4Glc, respectively. The two fucosyltransferase activities are activated to the same extent by a variety of divalent metal ions, inactivated at identical rates by thermal denaturation or reaction with N-ethylmaleimide, and inhibited to the same extent by rabbit antiserum prepared against the purified fucosyltransferase(s). In addition, kinetic analysis of the initial rate data obtained using acceptors for one of the fucosyltransferase activities as an inhibitor of the second suggests that acceptors for both fucosyltransferase activities bind at a single active site.

  8. Complement-inactivating Proteinase(s) from Clostridium histolyticum1

    PubMed Central

    Goldlust, Marvin B.; Luzzati, Alma; Levine, Lawrence

    1968-01-01

    A proteinase fraction inhibiting the hemolytic activity of guinea pig complement was obtained from supernatant fluids of Clostridium histolyticum cultures and purified 150- to 350-fold by ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-75 gel filtration, and diethylaminoethyl cellulose chromatography. An assay was developed based on the inactivation of hemolytic complement. Partially purified anticomplementary preparations were active against casein and were capable of “solubilizing” Escherichia coli endotoxin. Two components were found by differential heat inactivation, with complement and casein as substrates, but only one of these components was active against endotoxin. The more heat-stable activity, showing 50% inactivation at about 47 C, was characterized as to pH and ionic strength optima and sensitivity to reagents such as cysteine, β-mercaptoethanol, ethylenediaminetetraacetate, and heavy metals. PMID:5724966

  9. Effects of wortmannin on alpha-1/alpha-2 adrenergic receptor-mediated contractile responses in rabbit vascular tissues.

    PubMed

    Waen-Safranchik, V I; Deth, R C

    1994-06-01

    The inhibitory effect of wortmannin (WO), a fungus-derived protein kinase inhibitor, was assessed on contractile responses elicited by phenylephrine-induced alpha 1-(alpha 1 R) and UK 14304-induced alpha 2-adrenergic receptor (alpha 2R) stimulation in the rabbit aorta and saphenous vein, respectively. In agonist dose-response studies, WO caused a noncompetitive inhibition of both alpha 1R and alpha 2R responses, but was more potent against alpha 2R. Maximally effective single-dose responses at both receptors were less sensitive to WO. The initial alpha 1R contractile response, associated with intracellular Ca2+ release and myosin light chain kinase activation, was relatively insensitive to WO, while the Ca2+ influx-dependent tonic contraction was more sensitive. Contractions induced by high K+ buffer were relatively insensitive to WO in both the aorta and saphenous vein. These results indicate that WO inhibits receptor-initiated Ca2+ influx-dependent contractile responses such as those caused by alpha 2R stimulation and the sustained phase of alpha 1R stimulation more readily than Ca2+ release-dependent responses.

  10. Synergistic alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenergic stimulation of rat proximal nephron Na+/H+ exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Gesek, F.A.; Cragoe, E.J. Jr.; Strandhoy, J.W.

    1989-06-01

    Both alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors have been localized to the renal cortex, with the majority of binding sites on the proximal tubule. Because the major regulator of Na+ uptake into the proximal tubule is the Na+/H+ exchanger, and because alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptors stimulate it in other tissues, we tested the hypothesis that both alpha adrenoceptor subtypes can increase Na+ uptake into the proximal nephron by stimulating the Na+/H+ antiporter. Enhancement of Na+ transport by agonists was studied in isolated rat proximal tubules by determining the uptake of 22Na that was suppressible by the Na+/H+ inhibitor, 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA). The phorbol ester, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, (0.1 microM), directly stimulated the antiporter through protein kinase C and increased EIPA-suppressible 22Na uptake 250% above control. The alpha-1 adrenoceptor agonists, cirazoline and phenylephrine, in addition to the mixed agonist, norepinephrine, maximally stimulated uptake by 226 to 232% at 1 microM concentrations. alpha-2 agonists produced a range of maximal stimulations at 1 microM from 65% with guanabenz to 251% with B-HT 933. Increases in 22Na uptake by agonists were inhibited by selective adrenergic antagonists and by EIPA. The drugs did not change the EIPA-resistant component of 22Na uptake. Inasmuch as the adrenoceptor subtypes likely stimulated Na+/H+ exchange by differing intracellular pathways impinging upon common transport steps, we examined whether simultaneous stimulation of both pathways was additive. Submaximal concentrations (5 nM each) of alpha-1 and alpha-2 adrenoceptor agonists in combination synergistically enhanced 22Na uptake to a level similar to 1 microM concentrations of adrenoceptor agonists alone or in combination.

  11. Induction of a heparin-stimulated serine proteinase in sex accessory gland tumors of the Lobund-Wistar rat.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michael J; Lind, Jeremy; Sinha, Akhouri A

    2015-08-01

    Induction of new proteinase activities that may process growth factors, modify cell surface receptors, cleave extracellular matrix proteins, etc. is considered fundamental in carcinogenesis. The purpose of this study was to characterize a novel proteinase activity induced in sex accessory gland cancers (about 70% in seminal vesicles) of adult male Lobund-Wistar rats by a single injection of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU; 25mg/kg) followed by implanted testosterone propionate (45mg in silastic tubing every 2months) treatment for 10-14months. A 28kDa proteinase activity was detected in tumor extracts using SDS-gelatin gel zymography with incubations done without CaCl2. Its activity was stimulated 15 fold by heparin (optimal activity 1.5-3.0μg/lane) added to the tissue extract-SDS sample buffer prior to electrophoresis. No 28kDa heparin-stimulated proteinase (H-SP) was found in the dorsal, lateral and anterior (coagulating gland) prostate lobes or seminal vesicles of untreated adult rats, but there was a 26-30kDa Ca(2+)-independent proteinase activity in the ventral prostate that showed limited heparin stimulation. The 28kDa H-SP was completely inhibited by 1.0mM 4-(2-aminoethyl)benzenesulfonylfluoride (AESBF) indicating that it was a serine-type proteinase. Other types of proteinase inhibitors were without effect, including serine proteinase inhibitors benzamidine, tranexamic acid and ε-aminocaproic acid. Proteinase activities of about 28kDa were found with casein, fibrinogen or carboxymethylated transferrin as substrate, however, these activities were not stimulated by heparin. Similar levels of activities of the 28kDa H-SP were found in primary tumors and their metastases, but little/no activity was detected in serum, even from rats with large tumor volume and metastases. These data demonstrate overexpression of a heparin-stimulated 28kDa serine proteinase in the primary tumors of sex accessory gland cancers and their metastases. This proteinase either does not

  12. Automated docking of {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides in the glucoamylase active site

    SciTech Connect

    Countinho, P.M.; Reilly, P.J.; Dowd, M.K.

    1998-06-01

    Low-energy conformers of five {alpha}-(1,4)- and {alpha}-(1,6)-linked glucosyl trisaccharides were flexibly docked into the glucoamylase active site using AutoDock 2.2. To ensure that all significant conformational space was searched, the starting trisaccharide conformers for docking were all possible combinations of the corresponding disaccharide low-energy conformers. All docked trisaccharides occupied subsites {minus}1 and +1 in very similar modes to those of corresponding nonreducing-end disaccharides. For linear substrates, full binding at subsite +2 occurred only when the substrate reducing end was {alpha}-(1,4)-linked, with hydrogen-bonding with the hydroxy-methyl group being the only polar interaction there. Given the absence of other important interactions at this subsite, multiple substrate conformations are allowed. For the one docked branched substrate, steric hindrance in the {alpha}-(1,6)-glycosidic oxygen suggests that the active-site residues have to change position for hydrolysis to occur. Subsite +1 of the glucoamylase active site allows flexibility in binding but, at least in Aspergillus glucoamylases, subsite +2 selectively binds substrates {alpha}-(1,4)-linked between subsites +1 and +2. Enzyme engineering to limit substrate flexibility at subsite +2 could improve glucoamylase industrial properties.

  13. High-molecular-mass multicatalytic proteinase complexes produced by the nitrogen-fixing actinomycete Frankia strain BR.

    PubMed Central

    Benoist, P; Müller, A; Diem, H G; Schwencke, J

    1992-01-01

    A major-high-molecular mass proteinase and seven latent minor proteinases were found in cell extracts and in concentrates of culture medium from Frankia sp. strain BR after nondenaturing electrophoresis in mixed gelatin-polyacrylamide gels. All of these complexes showed multicatalytic properties. Their molecular masses and their sedimentation coefficients varied from 1,300 kDa (28S) to 270 kDa (12S). The electroeluted 1,300-kDa proteinase complex dissociated into 11 low-molecular-mass proteinases (40 to 19 kDa) after sodium dodecyl sulfate activation at 30 degrees C and electrophoresis under denaturing conditions. All of these electroeluted proteinases hydrolyzed N-carbobenzoxy-Pro-Ala-Gly-Pro-4-methoxy-beta- naphthylamide, D-Val-Leu-Arg-4-methoxy-beta-naphthylamide, and Boc-Val-Pro-Arg-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide, whereas Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-4-methyl-7-coumarylamide was cleaved only by the six lower-molecular-mass proteinases (27.5 to 19 kDa). Examination by electron microscopy of uranyl acetate-stained, electroeluted 1,300- and 650-kDa intracellular and extracellular proteinase complexes showed ring-shaped and cylindrical particles (10 to 11 nm in diameter, 15 to 16 nm long) similar to those of eukaryotic prosomes and proteasomes. Polyclonal antibodies raised against rat skeletal muscle proteasomes cross-reacted with all of the high-molecular-mass proteinase complexes and, after denaturation of the electroeluted 1,300-kDa band, with polypeptides of 35 to 38, 65, and 90 kDa. Electrophoresis of the activated cell extracts under denaturing conditions revealed 11 to 17 gelatinases from 40 to 19 kDa, including the 11 proteinases of the 1,300-kDa proteinase complex. The inhibition pattern of these proteinases is complex. Thiol-reactive compounds and 1-10-phenanthroline strongly inhibited all of the proteinases, but inhibitors against serine-type proteinases were also effective for most of them. Images PMID:1537794

  14. 21 CFR 866.5080 - Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... immunochemical techniques alpha-1-antichymotrypsin (a protein) in serum, other body fluids, and tissues. Alpha-1-antichymotrypsin helps protect tissues against proteolytic (protein-splitting) enzymes released during...

  15. 21 CFR 866.5420 - Alpha-1-glycoproteins immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... alpha-1-glycoproteins (a group of plasma proteins found in the alpha-1 group when subjected to... diagnosis of collagen (connective tissue) disorders, tuberculosis, infections, extensive malignancy,...

  16. Positive allosteric modulatory effects of ajulemic acid at strychnine-sensitive glycine alpha1- and alpha1beta-receptors.

    PubMed

    Ahrens, Jörg; Leuwer, Martin; Demir, Reyhan; Krampfl, Klaus; de la Roche, Jeanne; Foadi, Nilufar; Karst, Matthias; Haeseler, Gertrud

    2009-04-01

    The synthetic cannabinoid ajulemic acid (CT-3) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist which was found to reduce pain scores in neuropathic pain patients in the absence of cannabis-like psychotropic adverse effects. The reduced psychotropic activity of ajulemic acid has been attributed to a greater contribution of peripheral CB receptors to its mechanism of action as well as to non-CB receptor mechanisms. Loss of inhibitory synaptic transmission within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord plays a key role in the development of chronic pain following inflammation or nerve injury. Inhibitory postsynaptic transmission in the adult spinal cord involves mainly glycine. As we hypothesised that additional non-CB receptor mechanisms of ajulemic acid might contribute to its effect in neuropathic pain, we investigated the interaction of ajulemic acid with strychnine-sensitive alpha(1)- and alpha(1)beta-glycine receptors by using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Ajulemic acid showed a positive allosteric modulating effect in a concentration range which can be considered close to clinically relevant concentrations (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 9.7 +/- 2.6 microM and alpha(1)beta = 12.4 +/- 3.4 microM). Direct activation of glycine receptors was observed at higher concentrations above 100 microM (EC(50) values: alpha(1) = 140.9 +/- 21.5 microM and alpha(1)beta = 154.3 +/- 32.1 microM). These in vitro results demonstrate that ajulemic acid modulates strychnine-sensitive glycine receptors in clinically relevant concentrations.

  17. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate labeling of sperm-associated proteinases

    SciTech Connect

    Odem, R.R.; Willand, J.L.; Polakoski, K.L. )

    1990-02-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been shown to be capable of preventing various aspects of fertilization. Diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) is an irreversible inhibitor of trypsin-like enzymes that is commercially available in a radiolabeled form. The experiments described herein were designed to determine if DFP would prevent sperm function in live, motile sperm and to identify the sperm proteins bound with DFP. DFP at 5 mM concentrations had no observable effect on sperm motility, but inhibited the penetration of zona-free hamster ova by human sperm (5.5%) compared to controls (33.5%). Acid extracts of motile sperm that had been incubated with radiolabeled DFP and collected by the swim-up procedure demonstrated the presence of radiolabeled DFP, and the autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gels of these extracts localized the uptake of radiolabeled DFP to proteins in the molecular weight region of the proacrosin-acrosin system. Acid-extracted proteinases from semen samples incubated with DFP demonstrated a concentration-dependent inhibition of both esterolytic hydrolysis of benzoyl-arginine ethyl ester on spectrophotometric analysis and proteolytic activity on gelatin SDS-PAGE zymography. DFP-labeled proteins were precipitated by highly specific antibodies to proacrosin. These results demonstrated that DFP is capable of inhibiting sperm function, and that it associates with the proacrosin-acrosin system in live motile sperm.

  18. Purification and characterization of serine proteinase 2 from Bacillus intermedius 3-19.

    PubMed

    Balaban, N P; Mardanova, A M; Sharipova, M R; Gabdrakhmanova, L A; Sokolova, E A; Rudenskaya, G N; Leshchinskaya, I B

    2004-04-01

    A proteinase secreted in the late stationary phase was isolated from the culture fluid of Bacillus intermedius 3-19 by ion-exchange chromatography on CM-cellulose followed by FPLC on a Mono S column. The enzyme was completely inhibited by the serine proteinase inhibitors diisopropyl fluorophosphate and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride. The maximum proteolytic activity against the synthetic chromogenic substrate Z-Ala-Ala-Leu-pNA was observed at pH 9.0. The molecular weight of the enzyme is 28 kD and its isoelectric point is 9.2. We have also determined pH- and thermostability and Km and kcat of this proteinase. The enzyme has been classified as a thiol-dependent serine proteinase. N-Terminal amino acid sequence (10 residues) and amino acid composition of the protein were also determined. By the mode of hydrolysis of peptide bonds in the oxidized B-chain of insulin, this enzyme is similar to the thiol-dependent serine proteinase 1 from B. intermedius 3-19 secreted during vegetative growth.

  19. Taraxalisin -- a serine proteinase from dandelion Taraxacum officinale Webb s.l.

    PubMed

    Rudenskaya, G N; Bogacheva, A M; Preusser, A; Kuznetsova, A V; Dunaevsky YaE; Golovkin, B N; Stepanov, V M

    1998-10-23

    Latex of dandelion roots contains a serine proteinase that hydrolyzes a chromogenic peptide substrate Glp-Ala-Ala-Leu-pNA optimally at pH 8.0. Maximal activity of the proteinase in the roots is attained in April, at the beginning of plant development after the winter period. The protease was isolated by ammonium sulfate precipitation of the root extract followed by affinity chromatography on a Sepharose-Ala-Ala-Leu-mrp and gel filtration on Superose 6R performed in FPLC regime. Pure serine proteinase named taraxalisin was inactivated by specific inhibitors of serine proteinases, diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP) and phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF). Its molecular mass is 67 kDa and pI 4.5. pH stability range is 6-9 in the presence of 2 mM Ca2+, temperature optimum is at 40 degrees C; Km=0.37+/-0.06 mM. The substrate specificity of taraxalisin towards synthetic peptides and insulin B-chain is comparable with that of two other subtilisin-like serine proteinases, cucumisin and macluralisin. The taraxalisin N-terminal sequence traced for 15 residues revealed 40% coinciding residues when aligned with that of subtilisin Carlsberg.

  20. Candida guilliermondii isolated from HIV-infected human secretes a 50 kDa serine proteinase that cleaves a broad spectrum of proteinaceous substrates.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Soares, Rosangela Maria de Araújo

    2005-01-01

    Non-albicans Candida species cause 35-65% of all candidemias in the general population, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. Here, we describe a case of a 19-year-old HIV-infected man with pneumonia due to a yeast-like organism. This clinical yeast isolate was identified as Candida guilliermondii through mycological tests. C. guilliermondii was cultivated in brain heart infusion medium for 48 h at 37 degrees C. After sequential centrifugation and concentration steps, the free-cell culture supernatant was obtained and extracellular proteolytic activity was assayed firstly using gelatin-SDS-PAGE. A 50 kDa proteolytic enzyme was detected with activity at physiological pH. This activity was completely blocked by 10 mM phenylmethylsulphonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine proteinase inhibitor, suggesting that this extracellular proteinase belongs to the serine proteinase class. E-64, a strong cysteine proteinase inhibitor, and pepstatin A, a specific aspartic proteolytic inhibitor, did not interfere with the 50 kDa proteinase. Conversely, a zinc-metalloproteinase inhibitor (1,10-phenanthroline) restrained the proteinase activity released by C. guilliermondii by approximately 50%. Proteinases are a well-known class of enzymes that participate in a vast context of yeast-host interactions. In an effort to establish a functional implication for this extracellular serine-type enzyme, we investigated its capacity to hydrolyze some serum proteins and extracellular matrix components. We demonstrated that the 50 kDa exocellular serine proteinase cleaved human serum albumin, non-immune human immunoglobulin G, human fibronectin and human placental laminin, generating low molecular mass polypeptides. Collectively, these results showed for the first time the ability of an extracellular proteolytic enzyme other than aspartic-type proteinases in destroying a broad spectrum of relevant host proteins by a clinical species of non-albicans Candida.

  1. A pepstatin-insensitive aspartic proteinase from a thermophilic Bacillus sp.

    PubMed Central

    Toogood, H S; Prescott, M; Daniel, R M

    1995-01-01

    Bacillus sp. strain Wp22.A1 produced a cell-associated aspartic proteinase which was purified to homogeneity using phenyl-Sepharose (hydrophobic and affinity chromatography) and Mono Q. The proteinase has a molecular mass of 45 kDa by SDS/PAGE and a pI of 3.8. It is insensitive to pepstatin, but is sensitive to the other aspartic proteinase-specific inhibitors diazoacetyl-DL-norleucine methyl ester (DAN) and 1,2-epoxy-3-(p-nitrophenoxy)propane. Inactivation by DAN was only partial, suggesting that it had non-specifically modified an aspartate residue at a site other than the active site. The enzyme was not inhibited by any of the serine or cysteine proteinase inhibitors tested. Maximum proteolytic activity was observed at pH 3.5. The proteinase had a higher activity with haemoglobin, but was more specific (Vmax./Km) for cytochrome c. Substrate inhibition was observed with both these substrates. The cleavage of oxidized insulin B chain tended to occur at sites where the P1 amino acid was bulky and non-polar, and the P1' amino acid was bulky and polar, such as its primary cleavage site of Val2-Asn3. The proteinase was stable in the pH range 2.5-5.5. Thermostability was increased in the presence of Ca2+, although to a lesser extent at higher temperatures. The thermostabilities at 60, 70, 80 and 90 degrees C were 45 h, 102, 21 and 3 min respectively in the presence of Ca2+. Images Figure 1 PMID:7741709

  2. Analysis of human immunoglobulin-degrading cysteine proteinases of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed Central

    Provenzano, D; Alderete, J F

    1995-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a protozoan parasite that causes a widely distributed sexually transmitted disease (STD). Since immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to specific trichomonad immunogens are found in serum and vaginal washes (VWs) from patients with trichomoniasis, a potential mechanism of immune evasion by this parasite might be the ability of T. vaginalis proteinases to degrade human immunoglobulins (Igs). Incubation of human IgG with lysates of T. vaginalis organisms resulted in time- and concentration-dependent degradation of the heavy chain. Secretory IgA was degraded similarly. Inhibitors of cysteine proteinases, when added to trichomonal lysates, abolished IgG and IgA degradation, while EDTA, a metalloproteinase inhibitor, did not. Substrate-gel electrophoresis with human IgG, IgM, or IgA copolymerized with acrylamide revealed several distinct cysteine proteinases in both lysates and culture supernatants from logarithmically growing parasites that degraded all classes of human antibodies. Trichomonal lysates and supernatants of numerous isolates tested all had Ig-degrading activity. Finally, proteolytic activity against IgG was detected in most (26 of 33; 78%) VWs from patients with trichomoniasis. In contrast, 18 of 28 (65%) VWs from women without trichomoniasis or from patients infected with other STDs had no detectable proteinases when tested in an identical manner. The other 10 of these 28 VWs (35%) had smaller amounts of detectable Ig-degrading proteinases. These differences in Ig-degrading proteinase activity between patients with and without trichomoniasis, regardless of coinfecting STDs, were statistically significant (P = 0.001). These results illustrate that T. vaginalis is capable of degrading human Igs. PMID:7642267

  3. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  4. Molecular characterization of alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptors.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J K; Pearson, W R; Lynch, K R

    1991-02-01

    Three 'alpha 1-adrenoceptors' and three 'alpha 2-adrenoceptors' have now been cloned. How closely do these receptors match the native receptors that have been identified pharmacologically? What are the properties of these receptors, and how do they relate to other members of the cationic amine receptor family? Kevin Lynch and his colleagues discuss these questions in this review.

  5. Deficiency of a alpha-1-antitrypsin influences systemic iron homeostasis

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Background: There is evidence that proteases and anti-proteases participate in the iron homeostasis of cells and living systems. We tested the postulate that alpha-1 antitrypsin (A1AT) polymorphism and the consequent deficiency of this anti-protease in humans are asso...

  6. Role of Na+, K+-ATPase alpha1 subunit in the intracellular accumulation of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Shuichi; Kawazoe, Yuji; Ikeno, Mako; Saitoh, Mizuha; Nakano, Yukari; Nishi, Yuko; Fukushima, Shoji; Takeuchi, Yoshikazu

    2006-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify what regulates intracellular cisplatin (CDDP) accumulation and what changes in membrane fraction of CDDDP-resistant cell line. The CDDP-resistant rat hepatoma cell line, H4-II-E/CDDP, shows a significant decrease in intracellular platinum accumulation compared with parental H4-II-E cells, although there was no difference in the efflux of CDDP between these two cell lines. In this study, we examined the contribution of functional change in active transport to the CDDP resistance of H4-II-E/CDDP cells. Compared with the resistant cells, platinum accumulation in the parental cells was clearly decreased by low temperature or ATP depletion. In addition, the Na+, K+-ATPase inhibitor ouabain and the K+ channel inhibitor tetraethylammonium decreased platinum accumulation in parental cells but did not change the accumulation in resistant cells. Amphotericin B, an antifungal agent, increased the intracellular platinum accumulation in resistant cells to the same level as in parent cells. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the Na+, K+-ATPase alpha1 subunit was reduced in resistant cells compared with the parental cells, although there was no difference in the expression of the beta1 subunit between the two cell lines. Furthermore, the Na+, K+-ATPase alpha1 subunit of H4-II-E was decreased following a 24-h exposure to CDDP. These results suggest that Na+, K+-ATPase-dependent active transport of CDDP does not occur in resistant cells, and, furthermore, our findings provide the first evidence that the Na+, K+-ATPase alpha1 subunit plays an important role in the transport of CDDP.

  7. Alpha 1-adrenergic blockade and sudden cardiac death.

    PubMed

    Vanoli, E; Hull, S S; Foreman, R D; Ferrari, A; Schwartz, P J

    1994-01-01

    The primary goal of the present study was to test whether selective pharmacologic blockade of alpha 1 receptors, and specifically of the subtype alpha 1a, could prevent ventricular fibrillation (VF) during acute myocardial ischemia. The development of new autonomic interventions is of clinical interest in view of the failure of traditional antiarrhythmic drugs to prevent sudden death. Experimental evidence indicates that alpha 1 receptors, and in particular the subtype alpha 1a, may be involved in the genesis of malignant arrhythmias during acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. Despite this evidence, questions have been raised about the actual antifibrillatory efficacy of alpha-adrenergic blockade in the acutely ischemic myocardium. The effects of prazosin and of abanoquil (UK 52,046), a highly selective alpha 1a receptor blocker, were tested and compared with propranolol in a conscious animal preparation for sudden death. Ten dogs with a 1-month-old anterior wall myocardial infarction were studied. These dogs had all developed, in control conditions, VF during a 2-minute occlusion of the circumflex coronary artery while exercising (n = 9) or lying on the table (n = 1). Afterwards, the dogs underwent additional tests with the following intravenously administered drugs: abanoquil (n = 10; 1 micrograms/kg), prazosin (n = 9; 0.1 mg/kg), and propranolol (n = 10; 1 mg/kg). Internal control analysis was used. All dogs tested had recurrence of VF with both alpha-adrenergic blockers. Propranolol significantly reduced heart rate during ischemia and prevented VF in 5 of 10 dogs tested (P < 0.05). When heart rate was kept constant by atrial pacing (n = 3), 2 of the 3 animals remained protected by propranolol. Just prior to onset of VF, heart rate was not significantly different in the control and in the abanoquil tests (237 +/- 45 and 253 +/- 34 beats/min, respectively), whereas it was higher (P < 0.05) with prazosin (288 +/- 40 beats/min). Alpha 1 and alpha 1a receptor

  8. Aging increases cytochrome P450 4A modulation of alpha1-adrenergic vasoconstriction in mesenteric arteries.

    PubMed

    Berezan, Dellice J; Dunn, Kathryn M J; Falck, John R; Davidge, Sandra T

    2008-03-01

    Aging is associated with peripheral vascular dysfunction. In vascular smooth muscle, cytochrome P450 4A (CYP4A) enzymes form the vasoconstrictor 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE). 20-HETE acts as an intracellular messenger to modulate vasoconstriction induced by various agonists, including the alpha1-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine (PE) and endothelin-1 (ET-1). Eicosanoids produced by CYP4A contribute to the elevated vascular tone in hypertension, but the effects of advanced age on CYP4A modulation of vasoconstriction are unknown. Mesenteric arteries were isolated from young (3 to 4 months) and aged (17 to 18 months) Sprague-Dawley rats. Vasoconstriction was induced with PE or ET-1 in the absence or presence of the CYP4A inhibitor DDMS and/or the ETA inhibitor BQ123. CYP4A inhibition with DDMS significantly reduced PE sensitivity in aged rats, but it had no effect in young. Furthermore, in aged rats only, ETA inhibition reduced PE sensitivity while combined inhibition of CYP4A and ETA had no additional effect, suggesting that the pathways work in concert in aging. Exogenous ET-1 constriction was not altered by DDMS in young or aged rats. Overall, our data indicate that aging increases the contribution of CYP4A to alpha1-adrenergic vasoconstriction in systemic arteries. Understanding aging-related changes in vascular function is important for development of novel targets for the prevention of cardiovascular disease.

  9. Functional analysis of {alpha}1,3/4-fucosyltransferase VI in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qiya; Guo, Bin; Wang, Yingming; Wu, Jun; Jiang, Wenjun; Zhao, Shenan; Qiao, Shouyi; Wu, Yanhua

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Human FUT6 is up-regulated in HCC tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of FUT6 promotes G0/G1-S transition and cell growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FUT6 confers a growth advantage in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FUT6 suppresses p21 expression through modulating PI3K/Akt signaling. -- Abstract: The {alpha}1,3/4-fucosyltransferases (FUT) subfamily are key enzymes in cell surface antigen synthesis during various biological processes. A novel role of FUTs in tumorigenesis has been discovered recently, however, the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here, we characterized FUT6, a member of {