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Sample records for als phenotypes identifies

  1. Identifying neurocognitive phenotypes in autism.

    PubMed Central

    Tager-Flusberg, Helen; Joseph, Robert M

    2003-01-01

    Autism is a complex disorder that is heterogeneous both in its phenotypic expression and its etiology. The search for genes associated with autism and the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie its behavioural symptoms has been hampered by this heterogeneity. Recent studies indicate that within autism, there may be distinct subgroups that can be defined based on differences in neurocognitive profiles. This paper presents evidence for two kinds of subtypes in autism that are defined on the basis of language profiles and on the basis of cognitive profiles. The implications for genetic and neurobiological studies of these subgroups are discussed, with special reference to evidence relating these cognitive phenotypes to volumetric studies of brain size and organization in autism. PMID:12639328

  2. Phenoscape: Identifying Candidate Genes for Evolutionary Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Richard C.; Su, Baofeng; Balhoff, James P.; Eames, B. Frank; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G.; Vision, Todd J.; Dunham, Rex A.; Mabee, Paula M.; Westerfield, Monte

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes resulting from mutations in genetic model organisms can help reveal candidate genes for evolutionarily important phenotypic changes in related taxa. Although testing candidate gene hypotheses experimentally in nonmodel organisms is typically difficult, ontology-driven information systems can help generate testable hypotheses about developmental processes in experimentally tractable organisms. Here, we tested candidate gene hypotheses suggested by expert use of the Phenoscape Knowledgebase, specifically looking for genes that are candidates responsible for evolutionarily interesting phenotypes in the ostariophysan fishes that bear resemblance to mutant phenotypes in zebrafish. For this, we searched ZFIN for genetic perturbations that result in either loss of basihyal element or loss of scales phenotypes, because these are the ancestral phenotypes observed in catfishes (Siluriformes). We tested the identified candidate genes by examining their endogenous expression patterns in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The experimental results were consistent with the hypotheses that these features evolved through disruption in developmental pathways at, or upstream of, brpf1 and eda/edar for the ancestral losses of basihyal element and scales, respectively. These results demonstrate that ontological annotations of the phenotypic effects of genetic alterations in model organisms, when aggregated within a knowledgebase, can be used effectively to generate testable, and useful, hypotheses about evolutionary changes in morphology. PMID:26500251

  3. Zebrafish phenotypic screen identifies novel Notch antagonists.

    PubMed

    Velaithan, Vithya; Okuda, Kazuhide Shaun; Ng, Mei Fong; Samat, Norazwana; Leong, Sze Wei; Faudzi, Siti Munirah Mohd; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Cheong, Sok Ching; Tan, Pei Jean; Patel, Vyomesh

    2017-04-01

    Zebrafish represents a powerful in vivo model for phenotype-based drug discovery to identify clinically relevant small molecules. By utilizing this model, we evaluated natural product derived compounds that could potentially modulate Notch signaling that is important in both zebrafish embryogenesis and pathogenic in human cancers. A total of 234 compounds were screened using zebrafish embryos and 3 were identified to be conferring phenotypic alterations similar to embryos treated with known Notch inhibitors. Subsequent secondary screens using HEK293T cells overexpressing truncated Notch1 (HEK293TΔE) identified 2 compounds, EDD3 and 3H4MB, to be potential Notch antagonists. Both compounds reduced protein expression of NOTCH1, Notch intracellular domain (NICD) and hairy and enhancer of split-1 (HES1) in HEK293TΔE and downregulated Notch target genes. Importantly, EDD3 treatment of human oral cancer cell lines demonstrated reduction of Notch target proteins and genes. EDD3 also inhibited proliferation and induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest of ORL-150 cells through inducing p27(KIP1). Our data demonstrates the utility of the zebrafish phenotypic screen and identifying EDD3 as a promising Notch antagonist for further development as a novel therapeutic agent.

  4. Gingival Tissue Transcriptomes Identify Distinct Periodontitis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kebschull, M.; Demmer, R.T.; Grün, B.; Guarnieri, P.; Pavlidis, P.; Papapanou, P.N.

    2014-01-01

    The currently recognized principal forms of periodontitis—chronic and aggressive—lack an unequivocal, pathobiology-based foundation. We explored whether gingival tissue transcriptomes can serve as the basis for an alternative classification of periodontitis. We used cross-sectional whole-genome gene expression data from 241 gingival tissue biopsies obtained from sites with periodontal pathology in 120 systemically healthy nonsmokers with periodontitis, with available data on clinical periodontal status, subgingival microbial profiles, and serum IgG antibodies to periodontal microbiota. Adjusted model-based clustering of transcriptomic data using finite mixtures generated two distinct clusters of patients that did not align with the current classification of chronic and aggressive periodontitis. Differential expression profiles primarily related to cell proliferation in cluster 1 and to lymphocyte activation and unfolded protein responses in cluster 2. Patients in the two clusters did not differ with respect to age but presented with distinct phenotypes (statistically significantly different whole-mouth clinical measures of extent/severity, subgingival microbial burden by several species, and selected serum antibody responses). Patients in cluster 2 showed more extensive/severe disease and were more often male. The findings suggest that distinct gene expression signatures in pathologic gingival tissues translate into phenotypic differences and can provide a basis for a novel classification. PMID:24646639

  5. Phenotypic characterization of glioblastoma identified through shape descriptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes quantitatively describing the shape of glioblastoma (GBM) tissue phenotypes as a set of shape features derived from segmentations, for the purposes of discriminating between GBM phenotypes and monitoring tumor progression. GBM patients were identified from the Cancer Genome Atlas, and quantitative MR imaging data were obtained from the Cancer Imaging Archive. Three GBM tissue phenotypes are considered including necrosis, active tumor and edema/invasion. Volumetric tissue segmentations are obtained from registered T1˗weighted (T1˗WI) postcontrast and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) MRI modalities. Shape features are computed from respective tissue phenotype segmentations, and a Kruskal-Wallis test was employed to select features capable of classification with a significance level of p < 0.05. Several classifier models are employed to distinguish phenotypes, where a leave-one-out cross-validation was performed. Eight features were found statistically significant for classifying GBM phenotypes with p <0.05, orientation is uninformative. Quantitative evaluations show the SVM results in the highest classification accuracy of 87.50%, sensitivity of 94.59% and specificity of 92.77%. In summary, the shape descriptors proposed in this work show high performance in predicting GBM tissue phenotypes. They are thus closely linked to morphological characteristics of GBM phenotypes and could potentially be used in a computer assisted labeling system.

  6. Genetic heterogeneity of asthma phenotypes identified by a clustering approach.

    PubMed

    Siroux, Valérie; González, Juan R; Bouzigon, Emmanuelle; Curjuric, Ivan; Boudier, Anne; Imboden, Medea; Anto, Josep Maria; Gut, Ivo; Jarvis, Deborah; Lathrop, Mark; Omenaas, Ernst Reidar; Pin, Isabelle; Wjst, Mathias; Demenais, Florence; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Kogevinas, Manolis; Kauffmann, Francine

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to identify genetic variants associated with refined asthma phenotypes enabling multiple features of the disease to be taken into account. Latent class analysis (LCA) was applied in 3001 adults ever having asthma recruited in the frame of three epidemiological surveys (the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS), the Swiss Study on Air Pollution and Lung Disease in Adults (SAPALDIA) and the Epidemiological Study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA)). 14 personal and phenotypic characteristics, gathered from questionnaires and clinical examination, were used. A genome-wide association study was conducted for each LCA-derived asthma phenotype, compared to subjects without asthma (n=3474). The LCA identified four adult asthma phenotypes, mainly characterised by disease activity, age of asthma onset and atopic status. Associations of genome-wide significance (p<1.25 × 10(-7)) were observed between "active adult-onset nonallergic asthma" and rs9851461 flanking CD200 (3q13.2) and between "inactive/mild nonallergic asthma" and rs2579931 flanking GRIK2 (6q16.3). Borderline significant results (2.5 × 10(-7) < p <8.2 × 10(-7)) were observed between three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the ALCAM region (3q13.11) and "active adult-onset nonallergic asthma". These results were consistent across studies. 15 SNPs identified in previous genome-wide association studies of asthma have been replicated with at least one asthma phenotype, most of them with the "active allergic asthma" phenotype. Our results provide evidence that a better understanding of asthma phenotypic heterogeneity helps to disentangle the genetic heterogeneity of asthma.

  7. A network-based phenotype mapping approach to identify genes that modulate drug response phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Junmei; Ung, Choong Yong; da Rocha, Edroaldo Lummertz; Zhang, Cheng; Correia, Cristina; Weinshilboum, Richard; Wang, Liewei; Li, Hu

    2016-01-01

    To better address the problem of drug resistance during cancer chemotherapy and explore the possibility of manipulating drug response phenotypes, we developed a network-based phenotype mapping approach (P-Map) to identify gene candidates that upon perturbed can alter sensitivity to drugs. We used basal transcriptomics data from a panel of human lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) to infer drug response networks (DRNs) that are responsible for conferring response phenotypes for anthracycline and taxane, two common anticancer agents use in clinics. We further tested selected gene candidates that interact with phenotypic differentially expressed genes (PDEGs), which are up-regulated genes in LCL for a given class of drug response phenotype in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. Our results indicate that it is possible to manipulate a drug response phenotype, from resistant to sensitive or vice versa, by perturbing gene candidates in DRNs and suggest plausible mechanisms regulating directionality of drug response sensitivity. More important, the current work highlights a new way to formulate systems-based therapeutic design: supplementing therapeutics that aim to target disease culprits with phenotypic modulators capable of altering DRN properties with the goal to re-sensitize resistant phenotypes. PMID:27841317

  8. Brain Parenchymal Fraction: A Relatively Simple MRI Measure to Clinically Distinguish ALS Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Venkateswaran; Pioro, Erik P.

    2015-01-01

    Even though neuroimaging and clinical studies indicate that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) manifests with distinct clinical phenotypes, no objective test exists to assess upper motor degeneration in ALS. There is great interest in identifying biomarkers of ALS to allow earlier diagnosis and to recognize disease subtypes. Current quantitative neuroimaging techniques such as T2 relaxometry and diffusion tensor imaging are time-consuming to use in clinical settings due to extensive postprocessing requirements. Therefore, we aimed to study the potential role of brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) as a relatively simple quantitative measure for distinguishing ALS phenotypes. T1-weighted MR images of brain were obtained in 15 neurological controls and 88 ALS patients categorized into 4 distinct clinical phenotypes, upper motor neuron- (UMN-) predominant ALS patients with/without corticospinal tract (CST) hyperintensity on T2/PD-weighted images, classic ALS, and ALS with frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). BPF was calculated using intracranial grey matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid volumes obtained in control and ALS subgroups using SPM8 software. Only ALS-FTD patients had significant reduction in BPF when compared to controls and nondemented ALS patients. Correlation of clinical measures such as disease duration with BPF further supports the view that the BPF could be a potential biomarker for clinical diagnosis of ALS-FTD patients. PMID:26783524

  9. Phenotype Sequencing: Identifying the Genes That Cause a Phenotype Directly from Pooled Sequencing of Independent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc A.; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M. P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liao, James C.; Lee, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50–100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a “Phenotype Sequencing” approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110–$340. PMID:21364744

  10. An Effective Method to Identify Heritable Components from Multivariate Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiangwen; Kranzler, Henry R.; Bi, Jinbo

    2015-01-01

    Multivariate phenotypes may be characterized collectively by a variety of low level traits, such as in the diagnosis of a disease that relies on multiple disease indicators. Such multivariate phenotypes are often used in genetic association studies. If highly heritable components of a multivariate phenotype can be identified, it can maximize the likelihood of finding genetic associations. Existing methods for phenotype refinement perform unsupervised cluster analysis on low-level traits and hence do not assess heritability. Existing heritable component analytics either cannot utilize general pedigrees or have to estimate the entire covariance matrix of low-level traits from limited samples, which leads to inaccurate estimates and is often computationally prohibitive. It is also difficult for these methods to exclude fixed effects from other covariates such as age, sex and race, in order to identify truly heritable components. We propose to search for a combination of low-level traits and directly maximize the heritability of this combined trait. A quadratic optimization problem is thus derived where the objective function is formulated by decomposing the traditional maximum likelihood method for estimating the heritability of a quantitative trait. The proposed approach can generate linearly-combined traits of high heritability that has been corrected for the fixed effects of covariates. The effectiveness of the proposed approach is demonstrated in simulations and by a case study of cocaine dependence. Our approach was computationally efficient and derived traits of higher heritability than those by other methods. Additional association analysis with the derived cocaine-use trait identified genetic markers that were replicated in an independent sample, further confirming the utility and advantage of the proposed approach. PMID:26658140

  11. Phenotypic lentivirus screens to identify functional single domain antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian I.; Hanke, Leo; Morin, Benjamin; Brewer, Rebeccah; Brusic, Vesna; Whelan, Sean P.J.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of proteins is key in assessing their in vivo function. While genetic ablation is straightforward, reversible and specific perturbation of protein function remains a challenge. Single domain antibody fragments, such as camelid-derived VHHs, can serve as inhibitors or activators of intracellular protein function, but functional testing of identified VHHs is laborious. To address this challenge, we developed a lentiviral screening approach to identify VHHs that elicit a phenotype when expressed intracellularly. We identified 19 antiviral VHHs that protect human A549 cells from lethal infection with influenza A virus (IAV) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), respectively. Both negative-sense RNA viruses are vulnerable to VHHs uniquely specific for their respective nucleoproteins. Antiviral VHHs prevented nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins or mRNA transcription, respectively, and may provide clues for novel antiviral reagents. In principle, the screening approach described here should be applicable to identify inhibitors of any pathogen or biological pathway. PMID:27573105

  12. Liver X Receptor Genes Variants Modulate ALS Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Mouzat, Kevin; Molinari, Nicolas; Kantar, Jovana; Polge, Anne; Corcia, Philippe; Couratier, Philippe; Clavelou, Pierre; Juntas-Morales, Raul; Pageot, Nicolas; Lobaccaro, Jean -Marc A; Raoul, Cedric; Lumbroso, Serge; Camu, William

    2017-02-27

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most severe motor neuron (MN) disorders in adults. Phenotype of ALS patients is highly variable and may be influenced by modulators of energy metabolism. Recent works have implicated the liver X receptors α and β (LXRs), either in the propagation process of ALS or in the maintenance of MN survival. LXRs are nuclear receptors activated by oxysterols, modulating cholesterol levels, a suspected modulator of ALS severity. In a cohort of 438 ALS patients and 330 healthy controls, the influence of LXR genes on ALS risk and phenotype was studied using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The two LXRα SNPs rs2279238 and rs7120118 were shown to be associated with age at onset in ALS patients. Consistently, homozygotes were twice more correlated than were heterozygotes to delayed onset. The onset was thus delayed by 3.9 years for rs2279238 C/T carriers and 7.8 years for T/T carriers. Similar results were obtained for rs7120118 (+2.1 years and +6.7 years for T/C and C/C genotypes, respectively). The LXRβ SNP rs2695121 was also shown to be associated with a 30% increase of ALS duration (p = 0.0055, FDR = 0.044). The tested genotypes were not associated with ALS risk. These findings add further evidence to the suspected implication of LXR genes in the disease process of ALS and might open new perspectives in ALS therapeutics.

  13. Phenotypic Approaches to Identify Inhibitors of B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suzie; Wiener, Jake; Rao, Navin L.; Milla, Marcos E.; DiSepio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    An EPIC label-free phenotypic platform was developed to explore B cell receptor (BCR) and CD40R-mediated B cell activation. The phenotypic assay measured the association of RL non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma B cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) to intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1)-coated EPIC plates. Anti-IgM (immunoglobulin M) mediated BCR activation elicited a response that was blocked by LFA-1/ICAM-1 specific inhibitors and a panel of Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitors. LFA-1/ICAM-1 association was further increased on coapplication of anti-IgM and mega CD40L when compared to individual application of either. Anti-IgM, mega CD40L, or the combination of both displayed distinct kinetic profiles that were inhibited by treatment with a BTK inhibitor. We also established a FLIPR-based assay to measure B cell activation in Ramos Burkitt’s lymphoma B cells and an RL cell line. Anti-IgM-mediated BCR activation elicited a robust calcium response that was inhibited by a panel of BTK inhibitors. Conversely, CD40R activation did not elicit a calcium response in the FLIPR assay. Compared to the FLIPR, the EPIC assay has the propensity to identify inhibitors of both BCR and CD40R-mediated B cell activation and may provide more pharmacological depth or novel mechanisms of action for inhibition of B cell activation. PMID:25948491

  14. Identifying Neurobiological Markers of the Broader Autism Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    2014; proposed extended deadline: Jan 19, 2015). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Broader Autism Phenotype (BAP), Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), Social...than can be experienced by people with autism spectrum disorders . BODY The information below describes the research accomplishments...large families with multiple individuals affected with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD).  Recruitment of control participants for participation in

  15. Progeny Clustering: A Method to Identify Biological Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chenyue W.; Kornblau, Steven M.; Slater, John H.; Qutub, Amina A.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating the optimal number of clusters is a major challenge in applying cluster analysis to any type of dataset, especially to biomedical datasets, which are high-dimensional and complex. Here, we introduce an improved method, Progeny Clustering, which is stability-based and exceptionally efficient in computing, to find the ideal number of clusters. The algorithm employs a novel Progeny Sampling method to reconstruct cluster identity, a co-occurrence probability matrix to assess the clustering stability, and a set of reference datasets to overcome inherent biases in the algorithm and data space. Our method was shown successful and robust when applied to two synthetic datasets (datasets of two-dimensions and ten-dimensions containing eight dimensions of pure noise), two standard biological datasets (the Iris dataset and Rat CNS dataset) and two biological datasets (a cell phenotype dataset and an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) reverse phase protein array (RPPA) dataset). Progeny Clustering outperformed some popular clustering evaluation methods in the ten-dimensional synthetic dataset as well as in the cell phenotype dataset, and it was the only method that successfully discovered clinically meaningful patient groupings in the AML RPPA dataset. PMID:26267476

  16. Identifying functional microRNAs in macrophages with polarized phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Graff, Joel W; Dickson, Anne M; Clay, Gwendolyn; McCaffrey, Anton P; Wilson, Mary E

    2012-06-22

    Macrophages respond to external stimuli with rapid changes in expression of many genes. Different combinations of external stimuli lead to distinct polarized activation patterns, resulting in a spectrum of possible macrophage activation phenotypes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that can repress the expression of many target genes. We hypothesized that miRNAs play a role in macrophage polarization. miRNA expression profiles were determined in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) incubated in conditions causing activation toward M1, M2a, M2b, or M2c phenotypes. One miRNA guide strand and seven miRNA passenger strands were significantly altered. Changes were confirmed in MDMs from six separate donors. The amplitude of miRNA expression changes in MDMs was smaller than described studies of monocytes responding to inflammatory stimuli. Further investigation revealed this correlated with higher basal miRNA expression in MDMs compared with monocytes. The regulation of M1- and M2b-responsive miRNAs (miR-27a, miR-29b, miR-125a, miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-222) was similar in differentiated THP-1 cells and primary MDMs. Studies in this model revealed cross-talk between IFNγ- and LPS-associated pathways regulating miRNA expression. Furthermore, expression of M1-associated transcripts was increased in THP-1 cells transfected with mimics of miR-29b, miR-125a-5p, or miR-155. The apparent inflammatory property of miR-29b and miR-125a-5p can be at least partially explained by repression of TNFAIP3, a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling. Overall, these data suggest miRNAs can contribute to changes in macrophage gene expression that occur in different exogenous activating conditions.

  17. Identifying Functional MicroRNAs in Macrophages with Polarized Phenotypes*

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Joel W.; Dickson, Anne M.; Clay, Gwendolyn; McCaffrey, Anton P.; Wilson, Mary E.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages respond to external stimuli with rapid changes in expression of many genes. Different combinations of external stimuli lead to distinct polarized activation patterns, resulting in a spectrum of possible macrophage activation phenotypes. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, noncoding RNAs that can repress the expression of many target genes. We hypothesized that miRNAs play a role in macrophage polarization. miRNA expression profiles were determined in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) incubated in conditions causing activation toward M1, M2a, M2b, or M2c phenotypes. One miRNA guide strand and seven miRNA passenger strands were significantly altered. Changes were confirmed in MDMs from six separate donors. The amplitude of miRNA expression changes in MDMs was smaller than described studies of monocytes responding to inflammatory stimuli. Further investigation revealed this correlated with higher basal miRNA expression in MDMs compared with monocytes. The regulation of M1- and M2b-responsive miRNAs (miR-27a, miR-29b, miR-125a, miR-146a, miR-155, and miR-222) was similar in differentiated THP-1 cells and primary MDMs. Studies in this model revealed cross-talk between IFNγ- and LPS-associated pathways regulating miRNA expression. Furthermore, expression of M1-associated transcripts was increased in THP-1 cells transfected with mimics of miR-29b, miR-125a-5p, or miR-155. The apparent inflammatory property of miR-29b and miR-125a-5p can be at least partially explained by repression of TNFAIP3, a negative regulator of NF-κB signaling. Overall, these data suggest miRNAs can contribute to changes in macrophage gene expression that occur in different exogenous activating conditions. PMID:22549785

  18. Social-Cognition and the Broad Autism Phenotype: Identifying Genetically Meaningful Phenotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losh, Molly; Piven, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Background: Strong evidence from twin and family studies suggests that the genetic liability to autism may be expressed through personality and language characteristics qualitatively similar, but more subtly expressed than those defining the full syndrome. This study examined behavioral features of this "broad autism phenotype" (BAP) in relation…

  19. A cell-based phenotypic assay to identify cardioprotective agents

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Stephanie; Olm-Shipman, Adam; Walters, Andrew; Urciuoli, William R.; Devito, Stefanie; Nadtochiy, Sergiy M.; Wojtovich, Andrew P.; Brookes, Paul S.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Tissue ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury underlies several leading causes of death such as heart-attack and stroke. The lack of clinical therapies for IR injury may be partly due to the difficulty of adapting IR injury models to high-throughput screening (HTS). Objective To develop a model of IR injury that is both physiologically relevant and amenable to HTS. Methods and Results A micro-plate based respirometry apparatus was used. Controlling gas flow in the plate head space, coupled with the instrument’s mechanical systems, yielded a 24 well model of IR injury in which H9c2 cardiomyocytes were transiently trapped in a small volume, rendering them ischemic. Following initial validation with known protective molecules, the model was used to screen a 2000 molecule library, with post IR cell death as an endpoint. pO2 and pH monitoring in each well also afforded metabolic data. Ten protective, detrimental and inert molecules from the screen were subsequently tested in a Langendorff perfused heart model of IR injury, revealing strong correlations between the screening endpoint and both recovery of cardiac function (negative r2=0.66), and infarct size (positive, r2=0.62). Relationships between the effects of added molecules on cellular bioenergetics, and protection against IR injury, were also studied. Conclusion This novel cell-based assay can predict either protective or detrimental effects on IR injury in the intact heart. Its application may help identify therapeutic or harmful molecules. PMID:22394516

  20. Cluster analysis of spontaneous preterm birth phenotypes identifies potential associations among preterm birth mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Esplin, M Sean; Manuck, Tracy A.; Varner, Michael W.; Christensen, Bryce; Biggio, Joseph; Bukowski, Radek; Parry, Samuel; Zhang, Heping; Huang, Hao; Andrews, William; Saade, George; Sadovsky, Yoel; Reddy, Uma M.; Ilekis, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to employ an innovative tool based on common biological pathways to identify specific phenotypes among women with spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB), in order to enhance investigators' ability to identify to highlight common mechanisms and underlying genetic factors responsible for SPTB. Study Design A secondary analysis of a prospective case-control multicenter study of SPTB. All cases delivered a preterm singleton at SPTB ≤34.0 weeks gestation. Each woman was assessed for the presence of underlying SPTB etiologies. A hierarchical cluster analysis was used to identify groups of women with homogeneous phenotypic profiles. One of the phenotypic clusters was selected for candidate gene association analysis using VEGAS software. Results 1028 women with SPTB were assigned phenotypes. Hierarchical clustering of the phenotypes revealed five major clusters. Cluster 1 (N=445) was characterized by maternal stress, cluster 2 (N=294) by premature membrane rupture, cluster 3 (N=120) by familial factors, and cluster 4 (N=63) by maternal comorbidities. Cluster 5 (N=106) was multifactorial, characterized by infection (INF), decidual hemorrhage (DH) and placental dysfunction (PD). These three phenotypes were highly correlated by Chi-square analysis [PD and DH (p<2.2e-6); PD and INF (p=6.2e-10); INF and DH (p=0.0036)]. Gene-based testing identified the INS (insulin) gene as significantly associated with cluster 3 of SPTB. Conclusion We identified 5 major clusters of SPTB based on a phenotype tool and hierarchal clustering. There was significant correlation between several of the phenotypes. The INS gene was associated with familial factors underlying SPTB. PMID:26070700

  1. Refined phenotyping identifies links between preeclampsia and related diseases in a Norwegian preeclampsia family cohort

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Liv Cecilie V.; Melton, Phillip E.; Tollaksen, Kjersti; Lyslo, Ingvill; Roten, Linda T.; Odland, Maria L.; Strand, Kristin M.; Nygård, Ottar; Sun, Chen; Iversen, Ann-Charlotte; Austgulen, Rigmor; Moses, Eric K.; Bjørge, Line

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Preeclampsia is a complex genetic disease of pregnancy with a heterogenous presentation, unknown cause and potential severe outcomes for both mother and child. Preeclamptic women have increased risk for atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease. We aimed to identify heritabilities and phenotypic correlations of preeclampsia and related conditions in the Norwegian Preeclampsia Family Biobank. Methods: By applying a variance components model, a total of 493 individuals (from 138 families with increased occurrence of preeclampsia) were classified according to 30 disease-related phenotypes. Results: Of parous women, 75.7% (263/338) had experienced preeclampsia and 35.7% of women with and 22.4% without preeclampsia delivered children small for gestational age (SGA). We identified 11 phenotypes as heritable. The increased occurrence of preeclampsia was reflected by the presence [heritability (H2r) = 0.60)] and severity (H2r = 0.15) of preeclampsia and being born in a preeclamptic pregnancy (H2r = 0.25). Other heritable phenotypes identified included SGA (H2r = 0.40), chronic hypertension (H2r = 0.57), severity of atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease (H2r = 0.31), BMI (H2r = 0.60) and pulmonary disease (H2r = 0.91). The heritable phenotype preeclampsia overlapped with SGA (P = 0.03), whereas pulmonary disease was phenotypically correlated with atherothrombotic cardiovascular disease (P < 0.01), SGA (P = 0.02) and BMI (P = 0.02). Conclusion: This is the first study identifying the H2r of a range of health-related conditions in preeclamptic families. Our study demonstrates how refinement of phenotypes leads to better H2r estimation and the identification of a biological relationship between preeclampsia and related traits. PMID:26259119

  2. JK null alleles identified from Japanese individuals with Jk(a−b−) phenotype.

    PubMed

    Onodera, T; Sasaki, K; Tsuneyama, H; Isa, K; Ogasawara, K; Satake, M; Tadokoro, K; Uchikawa, M

    2014-05-01

    The Kidd blood group system consists of three common phenotypes: Jk(a+b−), Jk(a−b+) and Jk(a+b+), and one rare phenotype, Jk(a−b−). Jka/Jkb polymorphism is associated with c.838G>A (p.Asp280Asn) in exon 9 of the JK (SLC14A1) gene, and the corresponding alleles are named JK*01 and JK*02. The rare phenotype Jk(a−b−) was first found in a Filipina of Spanish and Chinese ancestry, and to date, several JK null alleles responsible for the Jk(a−b−) phenotype have been reported. We report seven novel JK null alleles, 4 with a JK*01 background and 3 with a JK*02 background, identified from Jk(a−b−) Japanese.

  3. A high-throughput phenotypic screen identifies clofazimine as a potential treatment for cryptosporidiosis.

    PubMed

    Love, Melissa S; Beasley, Federico C; Jumani, Rajiv S; Wright, Timothy M; Chatterjee, Arnab K; Huston, Christopher D; Schultz, Peter G; McNamara, Case W

    2017-02-01

    Cryptosporidiosis has emerged as a leading cause of non-viral diarrhea in children under five years of age in the developing world, yet the current standard of care to treat Cryptosporidium infections, nitazoxanide, demonstrates limited and immune-dependent efficacy. Given the lack of treatments with universal efficacy, drug discovery efforts against cryptosporidiosis are necessary to find therapeutics more efficacious than the standard of care. To date, cryptosporidiosis drug discovery efforts have been limited to a few targeted mechanisms in the parasite and whole cell phenotypic screens against small, focused collections of compounds. Using a previous screen as a basis, we initiated the largest known drug discovery effort to identify novel anticryptosporidial agents. A high-content imaging assay for inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum proliferation within a human intestinal epithelial cell line was miniaturized and automated to enable high-throughput phenotypic screening against a large, diverse library of small molecules. A screen of 78,942 compounds identified 12 anticryptosporidial hits with sub-micromolar activity, including clofazimine, an FDA-approved drug for the treatment of leprosy, which demonstrated potent and selective in vitro activity (EC50 = 15 nM) against C. parvum. Clofazimine also displayed activity against C. hominis-the other most clinically-relevant species of Cryptosporidium. Importantly, clofazimine is known to accumulate within epithelial cells of the small intestine, the primary site of Cryptosporidium infection. In a mouse model of acute cryptosporidiosis, a once daily dosage regimen for three consecutive days or a single high dose resulted in reduction of oocyst shedding below the limit detectable by flow cytometry. Recently, a target product profile (TPP) for an anticryptosporidial compound was proposed by Huston et al. and highlights the need for a short dosing regimen (< 7 days) and formulations for children < 2 years. Clofazimine

  4. A high-throughput phenotypic screen identifies clofazimine as a potential treatment for cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Jumani, Rajiv S.; Wright, Timothy M.; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Huston, Christopher D.; Schultz, Peter G.; McNamara, Case W.

    2017-01-01

    Cryptosporidiosis has emerged as a leading cause of non-viral diarrhea in children under five years of age in the developing world, yet the current standard of care to treat Cryptosporidium infections, nitazoxanide, demonstrates limited and immune-dependent efficacy. Given the lack of treatments with universal efficacy, drug discovery efforts against cryptosporidiosis are necessary to find therapeutics more efficacious than the standard of care. To date, cryptosporidiosis drug discovery efforts have been limited to a few targeted mechanisms in the parasite and whole cell phenotypic screens against small, focused collections of compounds. Using a previous screen as a basis, we initiated the largest known drug discovery effort to identify novel anticryptosporidial agents. A high-content imaging assay for inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum proliferation within a human intestinal epithelial cell line was miniaturized and automated to enable high-throughput phenotypic screening against a large, diverse library of small molecules. A screen of 78,942 compounds identified 12 anticryptosporidial hits with sub-micromolar activity, including clofazimine, an FDA-approved drug for the treatment of leprosy, which demonstrated potent and selective in vitro activity (EC50 = 15 nM) against C. parvum. Clofazimine also displayed activity against C. hominis–the other most clinically-relevant species of Cryptosporidium. Importantly, clofazimine is known to accumulate within epithelial cells of the small intestine, the primary site of Cryptosporidium infection. In a mouse model of acute cryptosporidiosis, a once daily dosage regimen for three consecutive days or a single high dose resulted in reduction of oocyst shedding below the limit detectable by flow cytometry. Recently, a target product profile (TPP) for an anticryptosporidial compound was proposed by Huston et al. and highlights the need for a short dosing regimen (< 7 days) and formulations for children < 2 years

  5. Comparative RNAi screening identifies a conserved core metazoan actinome by phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Sims, David; Liu, Tao; Fedorova, Marina; Schöck, Frieder; Dopie, Joseph; Vartiainen, Maria K.; Kiger, Amy A.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Although a large number of actin-binding proteins and their regulators have been identified through classical approaches, gaps in our knowledge remain. Here, we used genome-wide RNA interference as a systematic method to define metazoan actin regulators based on visual phenotype. Using comparative screens in cultured Drosophila and human cells, we generated phenotypic profiles for annotated actin regulators together with proteins bearing predicted actin-binding domains. These phenotypic clusters for the known metazoan “actinome” were used to identify putative new core actin regulators, together with a number of genes with conserved but poorly studied roles in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, several of which we studied in detail. This work suggests that although our search for new components of the core actin machinery is nearing saturation, regulation at the level of nuclear actin export, RNA splicing, ubiquitination, and other upstream processes remains an important but unexplored frontier of actin biology. PMID:21893601

  6. Identifying Pleiotropic Genes in Genome-Wide Association Studies for Multivariate Phenotypes with Mixed Measurement Scales

    PubMed Central

    Williams, L. Keoki; Buu, Anne

    2017-01-01

    We propose a multivariate genome-wide association test for mixed continuous, binary, and ordinal phenotypes. A latent response model is used to estimate the correlation between phenotypes with different measurement scales so that the empirical distribution of the Fisher’s combination statistic under the null hypothesis is estimated efficiently. The simulation study shows that our proposed correlation estimation methods have high levels of accuracy. More importantly, our approach conservatively estimates the variance of the test statistic so that the type I error rate is controlled. The simulation also shows that the proposed test maintains the power at the level very close to that of the ideal analysis based on known latent phenotypes while controlling the type I error. In contrast, conventional approaches–dichotomizing all observed phenotypes or treating them as continuous variables–could either reduce the power or employ a linear regression model unfit for the data. Furthermore, the statistical analysis on the database of the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment (SAGE) demonstrates that conducting a multivariate test on multiple phenotypes can increase the power of identifying markers that may not be, otherwise, chosen using marginal tests. The proposed method also offers a new approach to analyzing the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence as multivariate phenotypes in genome-wide association studies. PMID:28081206

  7. Phenotype Similarity Regression for Identifying the Genetic Determinants of Rare Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Daniel; Richardson, Sylvia; Turro, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders, which can now be studied systematically with affordable genome sequencing, are often caused by high-penetrance rare variants. Such disorders are often heterogeneous and characterized by abnormalities spanning multiple organ systems ascertained with variable clinical precision. Existing methods for identifying genes with variants responsible for rare diseases summarize phenotypes with unstructured binary or quantitative variables. The Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) allows composite phenotypes to be represented systematically but association methods accounting for the ontological relationship between HPO terms do not exist. We present a Bayesian method to model the association between an HPO-coded patient phenotype and genotype. Our method estimates the probability of an association together with an HPO-coded phenotype characteristic of the disease. We thus formalize a clinical approach to phenotyping that is lacking in standard regression techniques for rare disease research. We demonstrate the power of our method by uncovering a number of true associations in a large collection of genome-sequenced and HPO-coded cases with rare diseases. PMID:26924528

  8. Dissecting molecular stress networks: identifying nodes of divergence between life-history phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2013-02-01

    The complex molecular network that underlies physiological stress response is comprised of nodes (proteins, metabolites, mRNAs, etc.) whose connections span cells, tissues and organs. Variable nodes are points in the network upon which natural selection may act. Thus, identifying variable nodes will reveal how this molecular stress network may evolve among populations in different habitats and how it might impact life-history evolution. Here, we use physiological and genetic assays to test whether laboratory-born juveniles from natural populations of garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans), which have diverged in their life-history phenotypes, vary concomitantly at candidate nodes of the stress response network, (i) under unstressed conditions and (ii) in response to an induced stress. We found that two common measures of stress (plasma corticosterone and liver gene expression of heat shock proteins) increased under stress in both life-history phenotypes. In contrast, the phenotypes diverged at four nodes both under unstressed conditions and in response to stress: circulating levels of reactive oxygen species (superoxide, H(2)O(2)); liver gene expression of GPX1 and erythrocyte DNA damage. Additionally, allele frequencies for SOD2 diverge from neutral markers, suggesting diversifying selection on SOD2 alleles. This study supports the hypothesis that these life-history phenotypes have diverged at the molecular level in how they respond to stress, particularly in nodes regulating oxidative stress. Furthermore, the differences between the life-history phenotypes were more pronounced in females. We discuss the responses to stress in the context of the associated life-history phenotype and the evolutionary pressures thought to be responsible for divergence between the phenotypes.

  9. Integromic Analysis of Genetic Variation and Gene Expression Identifies Networks for Cardiovascular Disease Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Chen; Chen, Brian H.; Joehanes, Roby; Otlu, Burcak; Zhang, Xiaoling; Liu, Chunyu; Huan, Tianxiao; Tastan, Oznur; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Meigs, James B.; Fox, Caroline S.; Freedman, Jane E.; Courchesne, Paul; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Munson, Peter J.; Keles, Sunduz; Levy, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) reflects a highly coordinated complex of traits. Although genome-wide association studies have reported numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be associated with CVD, the role of most of these variants in disease processes remains unknown. Methods and Results We built a CVD network using 1512 SNPs associated with 21 CVD traits in genome-wide association studies (at P≤5×10−8) and cross-linked different traits by virtue of their shared SNP associations. We then explored whole blood gene expression in relation to these SNPs in 5257 participants in the Framingham Heart Study. At a false discovery rate <0.05, we identified 370 cis-expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs; SNPs associated with altered expression of nearby genes) and 44 trans-eQTLs (SNPs associated with altered expression of remote genes). The eQTL network revealed 13 CVD-related modules. Searching for association of eQTL genes with CVD risk factors (lipids, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and body mass index) in the same individuals, we found examples in which the expression of eQTL genes was significantly associated with these CVD phenotypes. In addition, mediation tests suggested that a subset of SNPs previously associated with CVD phenotypes in genome-wide association studies may exert their function by altering expression of eQTL genes (eg, LDLR and PCSK7), which in turn may promote interindividual variation in phenotypes. Conclusions Using a network approach to analyze CVD traits, we identified complex networks of SNP-phenotype and SNP-transcript connections. Integrating the CVD network with phenotypic data, we identified biological pathways that may provide insights into potential drug targets for treatment or prevention of CVD. PMID:25533967

  10. Genome Wide Association Study Identifies New Loci Associated with Undesired Coat Color Phenotypes in Saanen Goats

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Pauline Marie; Palhière, Isabelle; Ricard, Anne; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Rupp, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a quantitative genetics and genomic analysis of undesirable coat color patterns in goats. Two undesirable coat colors have routinely been recorded for the past 15 years in French Saanen goats. One fifth of Saanen females have been phenotyped “pink” (8.0%) or “pink neck” (11.5%) and consequently have not been included in the breeding program as elite animals. Heritability of the binary “pink” and “pink neck” phenotype, estimated from 103,443 females was 0.26 for “pink” and 0.21 for “pink neck”. Genome wide association studies (using haplotypes or single SNPs) were implemented using a daughter design of 810 Saanen goats sired by 9 Artificial Insemination bucks genotyped with the goatSNP50 chip. A highly significant signal (-log10pvalue = 10.2) was associated with the “pink neck” phenotype on chromosome 11, suggesting the presence of a major gene. Highly significant signals for the “pink” phenotype were found on chromosomes 5 and 13 (-log10p values of 7.2 and, 7.7 respectively). The most significant SNP on chromosome 13 was in the ASIP gene region, well known for its association with coat color phenotypes. Nine significant signals were also found for both traits. The highest signal for each trait was detected by both single SNP and haplotype approaches, whereas the smaller signals were not consistently detected by the two methods. Altogether these results demonstrated a strong genetic control of the “pink” and “pink neck” phenotypes in French Saanen goats suggesting that SNP information could be used to identify and remove undesired colored animals from the breeding program. PMID:27030980

  11. Identifying Gut Microbe-Host Phenotype Relationships Using Combinatorial Communities in Gnotobiotic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Faith, Jeremiah J.; Ahern, Philip P.; Ridaura, Vanessa K.; Cheng, Jiye; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying a scalable, unbiased method for discovering which members of the human gut microbiota influence specific physiologic, metabolic and immunologic phenotypes remains a challenge. Here we describe a method in which a clonally-arrayed collection of cultured, sequenced bacteria was generated from one of several human fecal microbiota samples found to transmit a particular phenotype to recipient germ-free mice. Ninety-four bacterial consortia, of diverse size, randomly drawn from the culture collection, were introduced into germ-free animals. We identified an unanticipated range of bacterial strains that promoted accumulation of colonic regulatory T cells (Tregs) and expansion of Nrp1lo/− peripheral Tregs, as well as strains that modulated mouse adiposity and cecal metabolite concentrations using feature selection algorithms and follow-up mono-colonization. This combinatorial approach enabled a systems-level understanding of some of the microbial contributions to human biology. PMID:24452263

  12. Identifying gut microbe-host phenotype relationships using combinatorial communities in gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Faith, Jeremiah J; Ahern, Philip P; Ridaura, Vanessa K; Cheng, Jiye; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-22

    Identifying a scalable, unbiased method for discovering which members of the human gut microbiota influence specific physiologic, metabolic, and immunologic phenotypes remains a challenge. We describe a method in which a clonally arrayed collection of cultured, sequenced bacteria was generated from one of several human fecal microbiota samples found to transmit a particular phenotype to recipient germ-free mice. Ninety-four bacterial consortia of diverse size, randomly drawn from the culture collection, were introduced into germ-free animals. We identified an unanticipated range of bacterial strains that promoted accumulation of colonic regulatory T cells (T(regs)) and expansion of Nrp1(lo/-) peripheral T(regs), as well as strains that modulated mouse adiposity and cecal metabolite concentrations, using feature selection algorithms and follow-up monocolonizations. This combinatorial approach enables a systems-level understanding of microbial contributions to human biology.

  13. Field-based high throughput phenotyping rapidly identifies genomic regions controlling yield components in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tanger, Paul; Klassen, Stephen; Mojica, Julius P.; Lovell, John T.; Moyers, Brook T.; Baraoidan, Marietta; Naredo, Maria Elizabeth B.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Poland, Jesse; Bush, Daniel R.; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E.; McKay, John K.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure food security in the face of population growth, decreasing water and land for agriculture, and increasing climate variability, crop yields must increase faster than the current rates. Increased yields will require implementing novel approaches in genetic discovery and breeding. Here we demonstrate the potential of field-based high throughput phenotyping (HTP) on a large recombinant population of rice to identify genetic variation underlying important traits. We find that detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) with HTP phenotyping is as accurate and effective as traditional labor-intensive measures of flowering time, height, biomass, grain yield, and harvest index. Genetic mapping in this population, derived from a cross of an modern cultivar (IR64) with a landrace (Aswina), identified four alleles with negative effect on grain yield that are fixed in IR64, demonstrating the potential for HTP of large populations as a strategy for the second green revolution. PMID:28220807

  14. Exploration of methods to identify polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair capacity phenotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, I M; Thomas, C B; Xi, T; Mohrenweiser, H W; Nelson, D O

    2006-07-03

    Elucidating the relationship between polymorphic sequences and risk of common disease is a challenge. For example, although it is clear that variation in DNA repair genes is associated with familial cancer, aging and neurological disease, progress toward identifying polymorphisms associated with elevated risk of sporadic disease has been slow. This is partly due to the complexity of the genetic variation, the existence of large numbers of mostly low frequency variants and the contribution of many genes to variation in susceptibility. There has been limited development of methods to find associations between genotypes having many polymorphisms and pathway function or health outcome. We have explored several statistical methods for identifying polymorphisms associated with variation in DNA repair phenotypes. The model system used was 80 cell lines that had been resequenced to identify variation; 191 single nucleotide substitution polymorphisms (SNPs) are included, of which 172 are in 31 base excision repair pathway genes, 19 in 5 anti-oxidation genes, and DNA repair phenotypes based on single strand breaks measured by the alkaline Comet assay. Univariate analyses were of limited value in identifying SNPs associated with phenotype variation. Of the multivariable model selection methods tested: the easiest that provided reduced error of prediction of phenotype was simple counting of the variant alleles predicted to encode proteins with reduced activity, which led to a genotype including 52 SNPs; the best and most parsimonious model was achieved using a two-step analysis without regard to potential functional relevance: first SNPs were ranked by importance determined by Random Forests Regression (RFR), followed by cross-validation in a second round of RFR modeling that included ever more SNPs in declining order of importance. With this approach 6 SNPs were found to minimize prediction error. The results should encourage research into utilization of multivariate

  15. Machine learning based methodology to identify cell shape phenotypes associated with microenvironmental cues.

    PubMed

    Chen, Desu; Sarkar, Sumona; Candia, Julián; Florczyk, Stephen J; Bodhak, Subhadip; Driscoll, Meghan K; Simon, Carl G; Dunkers, Joy P; Losert, Wolfgang

    2016-10-01

    Cell morphology has been identified as a potential indicator of stem cell response to biomaterials. However, determination of cell shape phenotype in biomaterials is complicated by heterogeneous cell populations, microenvironment heterogeneity, and multi-parametric definitions of cell morphology. To associate cell morphology with cell-material interactions, we developed a shape phenotyping framework based on support vector machines. A feature selection procedure was implemented to select the most significant combination of cell shape metrics to build classifiers with both accuracy and stability to identify and predict microenvironment-driven morphological differences in heterogeneous cell populations. The analysis was conducted at a multi-cell level, where a "supercell" method used average shape measurements of small groups of single cells to account for heterogeneous populations and microenvironment. A subsampling validation algorithm revealed the range of supercell sizes and sample sizes needed for classifier stability and generalization capability. As an example, the responses of human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs) to fibrous vs flat microenvironments were compared on day 1. Our analysis showed that 57 cells (grouped into supercells of size 4) are the minimum needed for phenotyping. The analysis identified that a combination of minor axis length, solidity, and mean negative curvature were the strongest early shape-based indicator of hBMSCs response to fibrous microenvironment.

  16. Automated local bright feature image analysis of nuclear proteindistribution identifies changes in tissue phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, David; Sudar, Damir; Bator, Carol; Bissell, Mina

    2006-02-01

    The organization of nuclear proteins is linked to cell and tissue phenotypes. When cells arrest proliferation, undergo apoptosis, or differentiate, the distribution of nuclear proteins changes. Conversely, forced alteration of the distribution of nuclear proteins modifies cell phenotype. Immunostaining and fluorescence microscopy have been critical for such findings. However, there is an increasing need for quantitative analysis of nuclear protein distribution to decipher epigenetic relationships between nuclear structure and cell phenotype, and to unravel the mechanisms linking nuclear structure and function. We have developed imaging methods to quantify the distribution of fluorescently-stained nuclear protein NuMA in different mammary phenotypes obtained using three-dimensional cell culture. Automated image segmentation of DAPI-stained nuclei was generated to isolate thousands of nuclei from three-dimensional confocal images. Prominent features of fluorescently-stained NuMA were detected using a novel local bright feature analysis technique, and their normalized spatial density calculated as a function of the distance from the nuclear perimeter to its center. The results revealed marked changes in the distribution of the density of NuMA bright features as non-neoplastic cells underwent phenotypically normal acinar morphogenesis. In contrast, we did not detect any reorganization of NuMA during the formation of tumor nodules by malignant cells. Importantly, the analysis also discriminated proliferating non-neoplastic cells from proliferating malignant cells, suggesting that these imaging methods are capable of identifying alterations linked not only to the proliferation status but also to the malignant character of cells. We believe that this quantitative analysis will have additional applications for classifying normal and pathological tissues.

  17. A review of approaches to identifying patient phenotype cohorts using electronic health records

    PubMed Central

    Shivade, Chaitanya; Raghavan, Preethi; Fosler-Lussier, Eric; Embi, Peter J; Elhadad, Noemie; Johnson, Stephen B; Lai, Albert M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarize literature describing approaches aimed at automatically identifying patients with a common phenotype. Materials and methods We performed a review of studies describing systems or reporting techniques developed for identifying cohorts of patients with specific phenotypes. Every full text article published in (1) Journal of American Medical Informatics Association, (2) Journal of Biomedical Informatics, (3) Proceedings of the Annual American Medical Informatics Association Symposium, and (4) Proceedings of Clinical Research Informatics Conference within the past 3 years was assessed for inclusion in the review. Only articles using automated techniques were included. Results Ninety-seven articles met our inclusion criteria. Forty-six used natural language processing (NLP)-based techniques, 24 described rule-based systems, 41 used statistical analyses, data mining, or machine learning techniques, while 22 described hybrid systems. Nine articles described the architecture of large-scale systems developed for determining cohort eligibility of patients. Discussion We observe that there is a rise in the number of studies associated with cohort identification using electronic medical records. Statistical analyses or machine learning, followed by NLP techniques, are gaining popularity over the years in comparison with rule-based systems. Conclusions There are a variety of approaches for classifying patients into a particular phenotype. Different techniques and data sources are used, and good performance is reported on datasets at respective institutions. However, no system makes comprehensive use of electronic medical records addressing all of their known weaknesses. PMID:24201027

  18. Rapid phenotyping of knockout mice to identify genetic determinants of bone strength

    PubMed Central

    Freudenthal, Bernard; Logan, John; Croucher, Peter I

    2016-01-01

    The genetic determinants of osteoporosis remain poorly understood, and there is a large unmet need for new treatments in our ageing society. Thus, new approaches for gene discovery in skeletal disease are required to complement the current genome-wide association studies in human populations. The International Knockout Mouse Consortium (IKMC) and the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) provide such an opportunity. The IKMC generates knockout mice representing each of the known protein-coding genes in C57BL/6 mice and, as part of the IMPC initiative, the Origins of Bone and Cartilage Disease project identifies mutants with significant outlier skeletal phenotypes. This initiative will add value to data from large human cohorts and provide a new understanding of bone and cartilage pathophysiology, ultimately leading to the identification of novel drug targets for the treatment of skeletal disease. PMID:27535945

  19. Phenotypic screen quantifying differential regulation of cardiac myocyte hypertrophy identifies CITED4 regulation of myocyte elongation

    PubMed Central

    Ryall, Karen A.; Bezzerides, Vassilios J.; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Saucerman, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is controlled by a highly connected signaling network with many effectors of cardiac myocyte size. Quantification of the contribution of individual pathways to specific changes in shape and transcript abundance is needed to better understand hypertrophy signaling and to improve heart failure therapies. We stimulated cardiac myocytes with 15 hypertrophic agonists and quantitatively characterized differential regulation of 5 shape features using high-throughput microscopy and transcript levels of 12 genes using qPCR. Transcripts measured were associated with phenotypes including fibrosis, cell death, contractility, proliferation, angiogenesis, inflammation, and the fetal cardiac gene program. While hypertrophy pathways are highly connected, the agonist screen revealed distinct hypertrophy phenotypic signatures for the 15 receptor agonists. We then used k-means clustering of inputs and outputs to identify a network map linking input modules to output modules. Five modules were identified within inputs and outputs with many maladaptive outputs grouping together in one module: Bax, C/EBPβ, Serca2a, TNFα, and CTGF. Subsequently, we identified mechanisms underlying two correlations revealed in the agonist screen: correlation between regulators of fibrosis and cell death signaling (CTGF and Bax mRNA) caused by AngII; and myocyte proliferation (CITED4 mRNA) and elongation caused by Nrg1. Follow-up experiments revealed positive regulation of Bax mRNA level by CTGF and an incoherent feedforward loop linking Nrg1, CITED4 and elongation. With this agonist screen, we identified the most influential inputs in the cardiac hypertrophy signaling network for a variety of features related to pathological and protective hypertrophy signaling and shared regulation among cardiac myocyte phenotypes. PMID:24613264

  20. A distinctive oral phenotype points to FAM20A mutations not identified by Sanger sequencing.

    PubMed

    Poulter, James A; Smith, Claire E L; Murrillo, Gina; Silva, Sandra; Feather, Sally; Howell, Marianella; Crinnion, Laura; Bonthron, David T; Carr, Ian M; Watson, Christopher M; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2015-11-01

    Biallelic FAM20A mutations cause two conditions where Amelogenesis Imperfecta (AI) is the presenting feature: Amelogenesis Imperfecta and Gingival Fibromatosis Syndrome; and Enamel Renal Syndrome. A distinctive oral phenotype is shared in both conditions. On Sanger sequencing of FAM20A in cases with that phenotype, we identified two probands with single, likely pathogenic heterozygous mutations. Given the recessive inheritance pattern seen in all previous FAM20A mutation-positive families and the potential for renal disease, further screening was carried out to look for a second pathogenic allele. Reverse transcriptase-PCR on cDNA was used to determine transcript levels. CNVseq was used to screen for genomic insertions and deletions. In one family, FAM20A cDNA screening revealed only a single mutated FAM20A allele with the wild-type allele not transcribed. In the second family, CNV detection by whole genome sequencing (CNVseq) revealed a heterozygous 54.7 kb duplication encompassing exons 1 to 4 of FAM20A. This study confirms the link between biallelic FAM20A mutations and the characteristic oral phenotype. It highlights for the first time examples of FAM20A mutations missed by the most commonly used mutation screening techniques. This information informed renal assessment and ongoing clinical care.

  1. Oral sensory phenotype identifies level of sugar and fat required for maximal liking

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, John E.; Duffy, Valerie B.

    2008-01-01

    A half-century ago, Fischer and colleagues found correlations between food preference and genetic markers of taste [propylthiouracil (PROP), quinine]. Recently, a number of studies report differences in sweet liking/disliking with taste phenotype or genotype. Here we modeled optimal liking for milk/sugar mixtures using the response surface method among 79 mostly normal weight adults (36 women) who reported low dietary restraint. Two non-overlapping phenotype analyses were performed: a) discordance in PROP versus quinine bitterness and b) number of fungiform papillae (FP, taste papillae on the tongue tip). Although all phenotype groups liked highly sweet and creamy sensations (in liking by sensation models), the fat and sugar levels for hedonic optima varied (in liking by concentration models). Males generally liked higher fat (20 to 40%) and sugar levels, with females disliking unsweetened cream. In quinine/PROP groups, liking peaked at 30% fat/15% sucrose for men and women who tasted 0.32mM quinine more bitter than 3.2mM PROP (n=15); a group previously shown to have highest sugar intakes (Duffy et al, 2003). Those tasting PROP more bitter than quinine (n=14) reported greater creamy/sweet sensations, with peak liking at lower fat and sweet levels (3.3% fat/10% sucrose). Generally, those in the high FP group perceived more creamy/sweet sensations with level of liking more influenced by sugar level, especially among high FP females. At high sugar/high fat levels low-FP males and females retained this liking while liking fell off for those in the high FP group. In summary, although most liked sweet/creamy sensations, perceptual differences in these sensations varied with oral phenotype, explaining some of the differences in the amount of sugar and fat required to reach hedonic optima. A high affinity for high sugar/high fat mixtures among oral phenotype subgroups has relevance for energy consumption and could explain the link previously observed between oral sensation

  2. Phenotypic population screen identifies a new mutation in bovine DGAT1 responsible for unsaturated milk fat

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, Klaus; Ward, Hamish; Berry, Sarah D.; Ankersmit-Udy, Alex; Burrett, Alayna; Beattie, Elizabeth M.; Thomas, Natalie L.; Harris, Bevin; Ford, Christine A.; Browning, Sharon R.; Rawson, Pisana; Verkerk, Gwyneth A.; van der Does, Yvonne; Adams, Linda F.; Davis, Stephen R.; Jordan, T. William; MacGibbon, Alastair K. H.; Spelman, Richard J.; Snell, Russell G.

    2015-01-01

    Selective breeding has strongly reduced the genetic diversity in livestock species, and contemporary breeding practices exclude potentially beneficial rare genetic variation from the future gene pool. Here we test whether important traits arising by new mutations can be identified and rescued in highly selected populations. We screened milks from 2.5 million cows to identify an exceptional individual which produced milk with reduced saturated fat content, and improved unsaturated and omega-3 fatty acid concentrations. The milk traits were transmitted dominantly to her offspring, and genetic mapping and genome sequencing revealed a new mutation in a previously unknown splice enhancer of the DGAT1 gene. Homozygous carriers show features of human diarrheal disorders, and may be useful for the development of therapeutic strategies. Our study demonstrates that high-throughput phenotypic screening can uncover rich genetic diversity even in inbred populations, and introduces a novel strategy to develop novel milks with improved nutritional properties. PMID:25719731

  3. An In Vitro Cord Formation Assay Identifies Unique Vascular Phenotypes Associated with Angiogenic Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Swearingen, Michelle; Gough, Wendy H.; Lee, Linda; Foreman, Robert; Uhlik, Mark; Hanson, Jeff C.; Lee, Jonathan A.; McClure, Don B.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a dominant role in angiogenesis. While inhibitors of the VEGF pathway are approved for the treatment of a number of tumor types, the effectiveness is limited and evasive resistance is common. One mechanism of evasive resistance to inhibition of the VEGF pathway is upregulation of other pro-angiogenic factors such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Numerous in vitro assays examine angiogenesis, but many of these assays are performed in media or matrix with multiple growth factors or are driven by VEGF. In order to study angiogenesis driven by other growth factors, we developed a basal medium to use on a co-culture cord formation system of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs). We found that cord formation driven by different angiogenic factors led to unique phenotypes that could be differentiated and combination studies indicate dominant phenotypes elicited by some growth factors. VEGF-driven cords were highly covered by smooth muscle actin, and bFGF-driven cords had thicker nodes, while EGF-driven cords were highly branched. Multiparametric analysis indicated that when combined EGF has a dominant phenotype. In addition, because this assay system is run in minimal medium, potential proangiogenic molecules can be screened. Using this assay we identified an inhibitor that promoted cord formation, which was translated into in vivo tumor models. Together this study illustrates the unique roles of multiple anti-angiogenic agents, which may lead to improvements in therapeutic angiogenesis efforts and better rational for anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:25210890

  4. An in vitro cord formation assay identifies unique vascular phenotypes associated with angiogenic growth factors.

    PubMed

    Falcon, Beverly L; Swearingen, Michelle; Gough, Wendy H; Lee, Linda; Foreman, Robert; Uhlik, Mark; Hanson, Jeff C; Lee, Jonathan A; McClure, Don B; Chintharlapalli, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) plays a dominant role in angiogenesis. While inhibitors of the VEGF pathway are approved for the treatment of a number of tumor types, the effectiveness is limited and evasive resistance is common. One mechanism of evasive resistance to inhibition of the VEGF pathway is upregulation of other pro-angiogenic factors such as fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Numerous in vitro assays examine angiogenesis, but many of these assays are performed in media or matrix with multiple growth factors or are driven by VEGF. In order to study angiogenesis driven by other growth factors, we developed a basal medium to use on a co-culture cord formation system of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) and endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs). We found that cord formation driven by different angiogenic factors led to unique phenotypes that could be differentiated and combination studies indicate dominant phenotypes elicited by some growth factors. VEGF-driven cords were highly covered by smooth muscle actin, and bFGF-driven cords had thicker nodes, while EGF-driven cords were highly branched. Multiparametric analysis indicated that when combined EGF has a dominant phenotype. In addition, because this assay system is run in minimal medium, potential proangiogenic molecules can be screened. Using this assay we identified an inhibitor that promoted cord formation, which was translated into in vivo tumor models. Together this study illustrates the unique roles of multiple anti-angiogenic agents, which may lead to improvements in therapeutic angiogenesis efforts and better rational for anti-angiogenic therapy.

  5. Application of (13)C flux analysis to identify high-productivity CHO metabolic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Neil; Smith, Kevin D; McAtee-Pereira, Allison G; Dorai, Haimanti; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Lang, Steven E; Young, Jamey D

    2017-01-23

    Industrial bioprocesses place high demands on the energy metabolism of host cells to meet biosynthetic requirements for maximal protein expression. Identifying metabolic phenotypes that promote high expression is therefore a major goal of the biotech industry. We conducted a series of (13)C flux analysis studies to examine the metabolic response to IgG expression during early stationary phase of CHO cell cultures grown in 3L fed-batch bioreactors. We examined eight clones expressing four different IgGs and compared with three non-expressing host-cell controls. Some clones were genetically manipulated to be apoptosis-resistant by expressing Bcl-2Δ, which correlated with increased IgG production and elevated glucose metabolism. The metabolic phenotypes of the non-expressing, IgG-expressing, and Bcl-2Δ/IgG-expressing clones were fully segregated by hierarchical clustering analysis. Lactate consumption and citric acid cycle fluxes were most strongly associated with specific IgG productivity. These studies indicate that enhanced oxidative metabolism is a characteristic of high-producing CHO cell lines.

  6. Non-destructive Phenotyping to Identify Brachiaria Hybrids Tolerant to Waterlogging Stress under Field Conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Cardoso, Juan A; Leiva, Luisa F; Gil, Juanita; Forero, Manuel G; Worthington, Margaret L; Miles, John W; Rao, Idupulapati M

    2017-01-01

    Brachiaria grasses are sown in tropical regions around the world, especially in the Neotropics, to improve livestock production. Waterlogging is a major constraint to the productivity and persistence of Brachiaria grasses during the rainy season. While some Brachiaria cultivars are moderately tolerant to seasonal waterlogging, none of the commercial cultivars combines superior yield potential and nutritional quality with a high level of waterlogging tolerance. The Brachiaria breeding program at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, has been using recurrent selection for the past two decades to combine forage yield with resistance to biotic and abiotic stress factors. The main objective of this study was to test the suitability of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and image-based phenotyping as non-destructive approaches to identify Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress under field conditions. Nineteen promising hybrid selections from the breeding program and three commercial checks were evaluated for their tolerance to waterlogging under field conditions. The waterlogging treatment was imposed by applying and maintaining water to 3 cm above soil surface. Plant performance was determined non-destructively using proximal sensing and image-based phenotyping and also destructively via harvesting for comparison. Image analysis of projected green and dead areas, NDVI and shoot biomass were positively correlated (r ≥ 0.8). Our results indicate that image analysis and NDVI can serve as non-destructive screening approaches for the identification of Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress.

  7. Non-destructive Phenotyping to Identify Brachiaria Hybrids Tolerant to Waterlogging Stress under Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Juan de la Cruz; Cardoso, Juan A.; Leiva, Luisa F.; Gil, Juanita; Forero, Manuel G.; Worthington, Margaret L.; Miles, John W.; Rao, Idupulapati M.

    2017-01-01

    Brachiaria grasses are sown in tropical regions around the world, especially in the Neotropics, to improve livestock production. Waterlogging is a major constraint to the productivity and persistence of Brachiaria grasses during the rainy season. While some Brachiaria cultivars are moderately tolerant to seasonal waterlogging, none of the commercial cultivars combines superior yield potential and nutritional quality with a high level of waterlogging tolerance. The Brachiaria breeding program at the International Center for Tropical Agriculture, has been using recurrent selection for the past two decades to combine forage yield with resistance to biotic and abiotic stress factors. The main objective of this study was to test the suitability of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and image-based phenotyping as non-destructive approaches to identify Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress under field conditions. Nineteen promising hybrid selections from the breeding program and three commercial checks were evaluated for their tolerance to waterlogging under field conditions. The waterlogging treatment was imposed by applying and maintaining water to 3 cm above soil surface. Plant performance was determined non-destructively using proximal sensing and image-based phenotyping and also destructively via harvesting for comparison. Image analysis of projected green and dead areas, NDVI and shoot biomass were positively correlated (r ≥ 0.8). Our results indicate that image analysis and NDVI can serve as non-destructive screening approaches for the identification of Brachiaria hybrids tolerant to waterlogging stress. PMID:28243249

  8. The phenotypic patterns of essential hypertension are the key to identifying "high blood pressure" genes.

    PubMed

    Korner, P I

    2010-01-01

    hypertension provide targets for identifying high BP genes. Reading the genome from the phenotype will require new approaches, such as those used in developmental genetics. In addition, transgenic technology may help verify hypotheses and examine whether an observed effect is through single or multiple mechanisms. To obtain answers will require substantial collaborative efforts between physiologists and geneticists.

  9. Anthropometric indices to identify metabolic syndrome and hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype: a comparison between the three stages of adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Patrícia Feliciano; de Faria, Franciane Rocha; de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Hermsdorff, Helen Hermana Miranda; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo Gouveia; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo Castro; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and the hypertriglyceridemic waist phenotype (HW) in a representative adolescent sample; as well as to establish which anthropometric indicator better identifies MS and HW, according to gender and adolescent age. METHODS: This cross sectional study had the participation of 800 adolescents (414 girls) from 10-19 years old. Anthropometric indicators (body mass index, waist perimeter, waist/stature ratio, waist/hip ratio, and central/peripheral skinfolds) were determined by standard protocols. For diagnosis of MS, the criteria proposed by de Ferranti et al. (2004) were used. HW was defined by the simultaneous presence of increased waist perimeter (>75th percentile for age and sex) and high triglycerides (>100 mg/dL). The ability of anthropometric indicators was evaluated by Receiver Operating Characteristic curve. RESULTS: The prevalence of MS was identical to HW (6.4%), without differences between genders and the adolescence phases. The waist perimeter showed higher area under the curve for the diagnosis of MS, except for boys with 17-19 years old, for whom the waist/stature ratio exhibited better performance. For diagnosing HW, waist perimeter also showed higher area under the curve, except for boys in initial and final phases, in which the waist/stature ratio obtained larger area under the curve. The central/peripheral skinfolds had the lowest area under the curve for the presence of both MS and HW phenotype. CONCLUSIONS: The waist perimeter and the waist/stature showed a better performance to identify MS and HW in both genders and in all three phases of adolescence. PMID:25913494

  10. A new system identification approach to identify genetic variants in sequencing studies for a binary phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guolian; Bi, Wenjian; Zhao, Yanlong; Zhang, Ji-Feng; Yang, Jun J; Xu, Heng; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Relling, Mary V; Pounds, Stanley; Cheng, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We propose in this paper a set-valued (SV) system model, which is a generalized form of logistic (LG) and Probit (Probit) regression, to be considered as a method for discovering genetic variants, especially rare genetic variants in next-generation sequencing studies, for a binary phenotype. We propose a new SV system identification method to estimate all underlying key system parameters for the Probit model and compare it with the LG model in the setting of genetic association studies. Across an extensive series of simulation studies, the Probit method maintained type I error control and had similar or greater power than the LG method, which is robust to different distributions of noise: logistic, normal, or t distributions. Additionally, the Probit association parameter estimate was 2.7-46.8-fold less variable than the LG log-odds ratio association parameter estimate. Less variability in the association parameter estimate translates to greater power and robustness across the spectrum of minor allele frequencies (MAFs), and these advantages are the most pronounced for rare variants. For instance, in a simulation that generated data from an additive logistic model with an odds ratio of 7.4 for a rare single nucleotide polymorphism with a MAF of 0.005 and a sample size of 2,300, the Probit method had 60% power whereas the LG method had 25% power at the α = 10(-6) level. Consistent with these simulation results, the set of variants identified by the LG method was a subset of those identified by the Probit method in two example analyses. Thus, we suggest the Probit method may be a competitive alternative to the LG method in genetic association studies such as candidate gene, genome-wide, or next-generation sequencing studies for a binary phenotype.

  11. Genes identified by visible mutant phenotypes show increased bias toward one of two subgenomes of maize.

    PubMed

    Schnable, James C; Freeling, Michael

    2011-03-10

    Not all genes are created equal. Despite being supported by sequence conservation and expression data, knockout homozygotes of many genes show no visible effects, at least under laboratory conditions. We have identified a set of maize (Zea mays L.) genes which have been the subject of a disproportionate share of publications recorded at MaizeGDB. We manually anchored these "classical" maize genes to gene models in the B73 reference genome, and identified syntenic orthologs in other grass genomes. In addition to proofing the most recent version 2 maize gene models, we show that a subset of these genes, those that were identified by morphological phenotype prior to cloning, are retained at syntenic locations throughout the grasses at much higher levels than the average expressed maize gene, and are preferentially found on the maize1 subgenome even with a duplicate copy is still retained on the opposite subgenome. Maize1 is the subgenome that experienced less gene loss following the whole genome duplication in maize lineage 5-12 million years ago and genes located on this subgenome tend to be expressed at higher levels in modern maize. Links to the web based software that supported our syntenic analyses in the grasses should empower further research and support teaching involving the history of maize genetic research. Our findings exemplify the concept of "grasses as a single genetic system," where what is learned in one grass may be applied to another.

  12. Correlation of Phenotypic Profiles Using Targeted Proteomics Identifies Mycobacterial Esx-1 Substrates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Esx/WXG-100 (ESAT-6/Wss) exporters are multiprotein complexes that promote protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in a diverse range of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacterial species. The Esx-1 (ESAT-6 System-1) system mediates virulence factor translocation in mycobacterial pathogens, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although several genes have been associated with Esx-1-mediated transport and virulence, the contribution of individual Esx-1 genes to export is largely undefined. A unique aspect of Esx-1 export is that several substrates require each other for export/stability. We exploited substrate “codependency” to identify Esx-1 substrates. We simultaneously quantified changes in the levels of 13 Esx-1 proteins from both secreted and cytosolic protein fractions generated from 16 Esx-1-deficient Mycobacterium marinum strains in a single experiment using MRM/SRM targeted mass spectrometry. This expansion of measurable Esx-1 proteins allowed us to define statistical rules for assigning novel substrates using phenotypic profiles of known Esx-1 substrates. Using this approach, we identified three additional Esx-1 substrates encoded by the esx-1 region. Our studies begin to address how disruption of specific genes affects several proteins in the Esx-1 complex. Overall, our findings illuminate relationships between Esx-1 proteins and create a framework for the identification of secreted substrates applicable to other protein exporters and pathways. PMID:25106450

  13. Correlation of phenotypic profiles using targeted proteomics identifies mycobacterial esx-1 substrates.

    PubMed

    Champion, Matthew M; Williams, Emily A; Pinapati, Richard S; Champion, Patricia A DiGiuseppe

    2014-11-07

    The Esx/WXG-100 (ESAT-6/Wss) exporters are multiprotein complexes that promote protein translocation across the cytoplasmic membrane in a diverse range of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacterial species. The Esx-1 (ESAT-6 System-1) system mediates virulence factor translocation in mycobacterial pathogens, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Although several genes have been associated with Esx-1-mediated transport and virulence, the contribution of individual Esx-1 genes to export is largely undefined. A unique aspect of Esx-1 export is that several substrates require each other for export/stability. We exploited substrate "codependency" to identify Esx-1 substrates. We simultaneously quantified changes in the levels of 13 Esx-1 proteins from both secreted and cytosolic protein fractions generated from 16 Esx-1-deficient Mycobacterium marinum strains in a single experiment using MRM/SRM targeted mass spectrometry. This expansion of measurable Esx-1 proteins allowed us to define statistical rules for assigning novel substrates using phenotypic profiles of known Esx-1 substrates. Using this approach, we identified three additional Esx-1 substrates encoded by the esx-1 region. Our studies begin to address how disruption of specific genes affects several proteins in the Esx-1 complex. Overall, our findings illuminate relationships between Esx-1 proteins and create a framework for the identification of secreted substrates applicable to other protein exporters and pathways.

  14. Energy Expenditure Responses to Fasting and Overfeeding Identify Phenotypes Associated With Weight Change

    PubMed Central

    Schlögl, Mathias; Pannacciuli, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Susan M.; Krakoff, Jonathan; Thearle, Marie S.

    2015-01-01

    Because it is unknown whether 24-h energy expenditure (EE) responses to dietary extremes will identify phenotypes associated with weight regulation, the aim of this study was to determine whether such responses to fasting or overfeeding are associated with future weight change. The 24-h EE during energy balance, fasting, and four different overfeeding diets with 200% energy requirements was measured in a metabolic chamber in 37 subjects with normal glucose regulation while they resided on our clinical research unit. Diets were given for 24 h each and included the following: 1) low protein (3%), 2) standard (50% carbohydrate, 20% protein), 3) high fat (60%), and 4) high carbohydrate (75%). Participants returned for follow-up 6 months after the initial measures. The decrease in 24-h EE during fasting and the increase with overfeeding were correlated. A larger reduction in EE during fasting, a smaller EE response to low-protein overfeeding, and a larger response to high-carbohydrate overfeeding all correlated with weight gain. The association of the fasting EE response with weight change was not independent from that of low protein in a multivariate model. We identified the following two independent propensities associated with weight gain: a predilection for conserving energy during caloric and protein deprivation and a profligate response to large amounts of carbohydrates. PMID:26185280

  15. Energy Expenditure Responses to Fasting and Overfeeding Identify Phenotypes Associated With Weight Change.

    PubMed

    Schlögl, Mathias; Piaggi, Paolo; Pannacciuli, Nicola; Bonfiglio, Susan M; Krakoff, Jonathan; Thearle, Marie S

    2015-11-01

    Because it is unknown whether 24-h energy expenditure (EE) responses to dietary extremes will identify phenotypes associated with weight regulation, the aim of this study was to determine whether such responses to fasting or overfeeding are associated with future weight change. The 24-h EE during energy balance, fasting, and four different overfeeding diets with 200% energy requirements was measured in a metabolic chamber in 37 subjects with normal glucose regulation while they resided on our clinical research unit. Diets were given for 24 h each and included the following: (1) low protein (3%), (2) standard (50% carbohydrate, 20% protein), (3) high fat (60%), and (4) high carbohydrate (75%). Participants returned for follow-up 6 months after the initial measures. The decrease in 24-h EE during fasting and the increase with overfeeding were correlated. A larger reduction in EE during fasting, a smaller EE response to low-protein overfeeding, and a larger response to high-carbohydrate overfeeding all correlated with weight gain. The association of the fasting EE response with weight change was not independent from that of low protein in a multivariate model. We identified the following two independent propensities associated with weight gain: a predilection for conserving energy during caloric and protein deprivation and a profligate response to large amounts of carbohydrates.

  16. Multi-generational genome wide association studies identify chromosomal regions associated with ascites phenotype.

    PubMed

    Tarrant, K J; Dey, S; Kinney, R; Anthony, N B; Rhoads, D D

    2017-02-21

    Ascites is a multi-faceted disease commonly observed in fast growing broilers, which is initiated when the body is insufficiently oxygenated. A series of events follow, including an increase in pulmonary artery pressure, right ventricle hypertrophy, and accumulation of fluid in the abdominal cavity and pericardium. Advances in management practices along with improved selection programs have decreased ascites incidence in modern broilers. However, ascites syndrome remains an economically important disease throughout the world, causing estimated losses of $100 million per year. In this study, a 60 K Illumina SNP BeadChip was used to perform a series of genome wide association studies (GWAS) on the 16th and 18th generation of our relaxed (REL) line descended from a commercial elite broiler line beginning in 1995. Regions significantly associated with ascites incidence were identified on chromosome 2 around 70 megabase pairs (Mbp) and on chromosome Z around 60 Mbp. Five candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were evaluated as indicators for these 2 regions in order to identify association with ascites and right ventricle to total ventricle weight (RVTV) ratios. Chromosome 2 SNP showed an association with RVTV ratios in males phenotyped as ascites resistant and ascites susceptible (P = 0.02 and P = 0.03, respectively). The chromosome Z region also indicates an association with resistant female RVTV values (P = 0.02). Regions of significance identified on chromosomes 2 and Z described in this study will be used as proposed candidate regions for further investigation into the genetics of ascites. This information will lead to a better understanding of the underlying genetics and gene networks contributing to ascites, and thus advances in ascites reduction through commercial breeding schemes.

  17. High-throughput screening of mouse gene knockouts identifies established and novel skeletal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brommage, Robert; Liu, Jeff; Hansen, Gwenn M; Kirkpatrick, Laura L; Potter, David G; Sands, Arthur T; Zambrowicz, Brian; Powell, David R; Vogel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Screening gene function in vivo is a powerful approach to discover novel drug targets. We present high-throughput screening (HTS) data for 3 762 distinct global gene knockout (KO) mouse lines with viable adult homozygous mice generated using either gene-trap or homologous recombination technologies. Bone mass was determined from DEXA scans of male and female mice at 14 weeks of age and by microCT analyses of bones from male mice at 16 weeks of age. Wild-type (WT) cagemates/littermates were examined for each gene KO. Lethality was observed in an additional 850 KO lines. Since primary HTS are susceptible to false positive findings, additional cohorts of mice from KO lines with intriguing HTS bone data were examined. Aging, ovariectomy, histomorphometry and bone strength studies were performed and possible non-skeletal phenotypes were explored. Together, these screens identified multiple genes affecting bone mass: 23 previously reported genes (Calcr, Cebpb, Crtap, Dcstamp, Dkk1, Duoxa2, Enpp1, Fgf23, Kiss1/Kiss1r, Kl (Klotho), Lrp5, Mstn, Neo1, Npr2, Ostm1, Postn, Sfrp4, Slc30a5, Slc39a13, Sost, Sumf1, Src, Wnt10b), five novel genes extensively characterized (Cldn18, Fam20c, Lrrk1, Sgpl1, Wnt16), five novel genes with preliminary characterization (Agpat2, Rassf5, Slc10a7, Slc26a7, Slc30a10) and three novel undisclosed genes coding for potential osteoporosis drug targets. PMID:26273529

  18. Improved Phenotype-Based Definition for Identifying Carbapenemase Producers among Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    PubMed

    Chea, Nora; Bulens, Sandra N; Kongphet-Tran, Thiphasone; Lynfield, Ruth; Shaw, Kristin M; Vagnone, Paula Snippes; Kainer, Marion A; Muleta, Daniel B; Wilson, Lucy; Vaeth, Elisabeth; Dumyati, Ghinwa; Concannon, Cathleen; Phipps, Erin C; Culbreath, Karissa; Janelle, Sarah J; Bamberg, Wendy M; Guh, Alice Y; Limbago, Brandi; Kallen, Alexander J

    2015-09-01

    Preventing transmission of carbapenemase-producing, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CP-CRE) is a public health priority. A phenotype-based definition that reliably identifies CP-CRE while minimizing misclassification of non-CP-CRE could help prevention efforts. To assess possible definitions, we evaluated enterobacterial isolates that had been tested and deemed nonsusceptible to >1 carbapenem at US Emerging Infections Program sites. We determined the number of non-CP isolates that met (false positives) and CP isolates that did not meet (false negatives) the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CRE definition in use during our study: 30% (94/312) of CRE had carbapenemase genes, and 21% (14/67) of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella isolates had been misclassified as non-CP. A new definition requiring resistance to 1 carbapenem rarely missed CP strains, but 55% of results were false positive; adding the modified Hodge test to the definition decreased false positives to 12%. This definition should be considered for use in carbapenemase-producing CRE surveillance and prevention.

  19. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method

    PubMed Central

    Rietveld, Cornelius A.; Esko, Tõnu; Davies, Gail; Pers, Tune H.; Turley, Patrick; Benyamin, Beben; Chabris, Christopher F.; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D.; Lee, James J.; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Marioni, Riccardo E.; Medland, Sarah E.; Miller, Michael B.; Rostapshova, Olga; van der Lee, Sven J.; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A. E.; Amin, Najaf; Conley, Dalton; Derringer, Jaime; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Glaeser, Edward L.; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hayward, Caroline; Iacono, William G.; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla; Jaddoe, Vincent; Karjalainen, Juha; Laibson, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Liewald, David C.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Martin, Nicholas G.; McGue, Matt; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pinker, Steven; Porteous, David J.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Smith, Blair H.; Starr, John M.; Tiemeier, Henning; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, André G.; Verhulst, Frank C.; Ward, Mary E.; Wright, Margaret J.; Davey Smith, George; Deary, Ian J.; Johannesson, Magnus; Plomin, Robert; Visscher, Peter M.; Benjamin, Daniel J.; Koellinger, Philipp D.

    2014-01-01

    We identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxy-phenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education-associated SNPs. Second, using independent samples (n = 24,189), we measure the association of these education-associated SNPs with cognitive performance. Three SNPs (rs1487441, rs7923609, and rs2721173) are significantly associated with cognitive performance after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. In an independent sample of older Americans (n = 8,652), we also show that a polygenic score derived from the education-associated SNPs is associated with memory and absence of dementia. Convergent evidence from a set of bioinformatics analyses implicates four specific genes (KNCMA1, NRXN1, POU2F3, and SCRT). All of these genes are associated with a particular neurotransmitter pathway involved in synaptic plasticity, the main cellular mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:25201988

  20. Subgrouping siblings of people with autism: Identifying the broader autism phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Carrie; Smith, Paula; Watson, Peter; Auyeung, Bonnie; Ring, Howard; Baron‐Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the broader autism phenotype (BAP) in siblings of individuals with autism spectrum conditions (ASC). Autistic traits were measured in typical controls (n = 2,000), siblings (n = 496), and volunteers with ASC (n = 2,322) using the Autism‐Spectrum Quotient (AQ), both self‐report and parent‐report versions. Using cluster analysis of AQ subscale scores, two sibling subgroups were identified for both males and females: a cluster of low‐scorers and a cluster of high‐scorers. Results show that while siblings as a group have intermediate levels of autistic traits compared to control individuals and participants with ASC, when examined on a cluster level, the low‐scoring sibling group is more similar to typical controls while the high‐scoring group is more similar to the ASC clinical group. Further investigation into the underlying genetic and epigenetic characteristics of these two subgroups will be informative in understanding autistic traits, both within the general population and in relation to those with a clinical diagnosis. Autism Res 2016, 9: 658–665. © 2015 The Authors Autism Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Autism Research PMID:26332889

  1. Magnetic resonance image features identify glioblastoma phenotypic subtypes with distinct molecular pathway activities

    PubMed Central

    Itakura, Haruka; Achrol, Achal S.; Mitchell, Lex A.; Loya, Joshua J.; Liu, Tiffany; Westbroek, Erick M.; Feroze, Abdullah H.; Rodriguez, Scott; Echegaray, Sebastian; Azad, Tej D.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Napel, Sandy; Rubin, Daniel L.; Chang, Steven D.; Harsh, Griffith R.; Gevaert, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and highly lethal primary malignant brain tumor in adults. There is a dire need for easily accessible, noninvasive biomarkers that can delineate underlying molecular activities and predict response to therapy. To this end, we sought to identify subtypes of GBM, differentiated solely by quantitative MR imaging features, that could be used for better management of GBM patients. Quantitative image features capturing the shape, texture, and edge sharpness of each lesion were extracted from MR images of 121 patients with de novo, solitary, unilateral GBM. Three distinct phenotypic “clusters” emerged in the development cohort using consensus clustering with 10,000 iterations on these image features. These three clusters—pre-multifocal, spherical, and rim-enhancing, names reflecting their image features—were validated in an independent cohort consisting of 144 multi-institution patients with similar tumor characteristics from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Each cluster mapped to a unique set of molecular signaling pathways using pathway activity estimates derived from analysis of TCGA tumor copy number and gene expression data with the PARADIGM algorithm. Distinct pathways, such as c-Kit and FOXA, were enriched in each cluster, indicating differential molecular activities as determined by image features. Each cluster also demonstrated differential probabilities of survival, indicating prognostic importance. Our imaging method offers a noninvasive approach to stratify GBM patients and also provides unique sets of molecular signatures to inform targeted therapy and personalized treatment of GBM. PMID:26333934

  2. Circulating Tumor Cells: A Review of Present Methods and the Need to Identify Heterogeneous Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Millner, Lori M.; Linder, Mark W.; Valdes, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) hold promise for advancing personalized therapeutics. CTCs are the precursor to metastatic cancer and thus have the potential to radically alter patient treatment and outcome. Currently, clinical information provided by the enumeration of CTCs is limited to predicting clinical outcome. Other areas of interest in advancing the practice of pathology include: using CTCs for early detection of potential metastasis, determining and monitoring the efficacy of individualized treatment regimens, and predicting site-specific metastasis. Important hurdles to overcome in obtaining this type of clinical information involve present limitations in defining, detecting, and isolating CTCs. Currently, CTCs are detected using epithelial markers. The definition of what distinguishes a CTC should be expanded to include CTCs with heterogeneous phenotypes, and markers should be identified to enable a more comprehensive capture. Additionally, most methods available for detecting CTCs do not capture functionally viable CTCs. Retaining functional viability would provide a significant advantage in characterizing CTC-subtypes that may predict the site of metastatic invasion and thus assist in selecting effective treatment regimens. In this review we describe areas of clinical interest followed by a summary of current circulating cell-separation technologies and present limitations. Lastly, we provide insight into what is required to overcome these limitations as they relate to applications in advancing the practice of pathology and laboratory medicine. PMID:23884225

  3. Novel phenotypes and loci identified through clinical genomics approaches to pediatric cataract.

    PubMed

    Patel, Nisha; Anand, Deepti; Monies, Dorota; Maddirevula, Sateesh; Khan, Arif O; Algoufi, Talal; Alowain, Mohammed; Faqeih, Eissa; Alshammari, Muneera; Qudair, Ahmed; Alsharif, Hadeel; Aljubran, Fatimah; Alsaif, Hessa S; Ibrahim, Niema; Abdulwahab, Firdous M; Hashem, Mais; Alsedairy, Haifa; Aldahmesh, Mohammed A; Lachke, Salil A; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric cataract is highly heterogeneous clinically and etiologically. While mostly isolated, cataract can be part of many multisystem disorders, further complicating the diagnostic process. In this study, we applied genomic tools in the form of a multi-gene panel as well as whole-exome sequencing on unselected cohort of pediatric cataract (166 patients from 74 families). Mutations in previously reported cataract genes were identified in 58% for a total of 43 mutations, including 15 that are novel. GEMIN4 was independently mutated in families with a syndrome of cataract, global developmental delay with or without renal involvement. We also highlight a recognizable syndrome that resembles galactosemia (a fulminant infantile liver disease with cataract) caused by biallelic mutations in CYP51A1. A founder mutation in RIC1 (KIAA1432) was identified in patients with cataract, brain atrophy, microcephaly with or without cleft lip and palate. For non-syndromic pediatric cataract, we map a novel locus in a multiplex consanguineous family on 4p15.32 where exome sequencing revealed a homozygous truncating mutation in TAPT1. We report two further candidates that are biallelically inactivated each in a single cataract family: TAF1A (cataract with global developmental delay) and WDR87 (non-syndromic cataract). In addition to positional mapping data, we use iSyTE developmental lens expression and gene-network analysis to corroborate the proposed link between the novel candidate genes and cataract. Our study expands the phenotypic, allelic and locus heterogeneity of pediatric cataract. The high diagnostic yield of clinical genomics supports the adoption of this approach in this patient group.

  4. High-Throughput Phenotypic Screening of Human Astrocytes to Identify Compounds That Protect Against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Nasir; Shah, Sonia; Zhao, Jean; Class, Bradley; Aguisanda, Francis; Southall, Noel; Xia, Menghang; McKew, John C.; Rao, Mahendra

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes are the predominant cell type in the nervous system and play a significant role in maintaining neuronal health and homeostasis. Recently, astrocyte dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Astrocytes are thus an attractive new target for drug discovery for neurological disorders. Using astrocytes differentiated from human embryonic stem cells, we have developed an assay to identify compounds that protect against oxidative stress, a condition associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. This phenotypic oxidative stress assay has been optimized for high-throughput screening in a 1,536-well plate format. From a screen of approximately 4,100 bioactive tool compounds and approved drugs, we identified a set of 22 that acutely protect human astrocytes from the consequences of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Nine of these compounds were also found to be protective of induced pluripotent stem cell-differentiated astrocytes in a related assay. These compounds are thought to confer protection through hormesis, activating stress-response pathways and preconditioning astrocytes to handle subsequent exposure to hydrogen peroxide. In fact, four of these compounds were found to activate the antioxidant response element/nuclear factor-E2-related factor 2 pathway, a protective pathway induced by toxic insults. Our results demonstrate the relevancy and utility of using astrocytes differentiated from human stem cells as a disease model for drug discovery and development. Significance Astrocytes play a key role in neurological diseases. Drug discovery efforts that target astrocytes can identify novel therapeutics. Human astrocytes are difficult to obtain and thus are challenging to use for high-throughput screening, which requires large numbers of cells. Using human embryonic stem cell

  5. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Modulators of Amyloid Precursor Protein Processing in Human Stem Cell Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Brownjohn, Philip W; Smith, James; Portelius, Erik; Serneels, Lutgarde; Kvartsberg, Hlin; De Strooper, Bart; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Livesey, Frederick J

    2017-03-06

    Human stem cell models have the potential to provide platforms for phenotypic screens to identify candidate treatments and cellular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and the accumulation of APP-derived amyloid β (Aβ) peptides are key processes in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We designed a phenotypic small-molecule screen to identify modulators of APP processing in trisomy 21/Down syndrome neurons, a complex genetic model of AD. We identified the avermectins, commonly used as anthelmintics, as compounds that increase the relative production of short Aβ peptides at the expense of longer, potentially more toxic peptides. Further studies demonstrated that this effect is not due to an interaction with the core γ-secretase responsible for Aβ production. This study demonstrates the feasibility of phenotypic drug screening in human stem cell models of Alzheimer-type dementia, and points to possibilities for indirectly modulating APP processing, independently of γ-secretase modulation.

  6. A Phenotypic High-Content Screening Assay to Identify Regulators of Membrane Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lorey K; Thomas, Daniel W; Simpson, Kaylene J; Humbert, Patrick O

    2016-10-01

    Correct subcellular localization of proteins is a requirement for appropriate function. This is especially true in epithelial cells, which rely on the precise localization of a diverse array of epithelial polarity and cellular adhesion proteins. Loss of cell polarity and adhesion is a hallmark of cancer, and mislocalization of core polarity proteins, such as Scribble, is observed in a range of human epithelial tumors and is prognostic of poor survival. Despite this, little is known about how Scribble membrane localization is regulated. Here, we describe the development and application of a phenotypic high-content screening assay that is designed to specifically quantify membrane levels of Scribble to identify regulators of its membrane localization. A screening platform that is capable of resolving individual cells and quantifying membrane protein localization in confluent epithelial monolayers was developed by using the cytoplasm-to-cell-membrane bioapplication integrated with the Cellomics ArrayScan high-content imaging platform. Application of this method to a boutique human epithelial polarity and signaling small interfering RNA (siRNA) library resulted in highly robust coefficient-of-variance and Z' factor values. As proof of concept, we present two candidate genes whose depletion specifically reduces Scribble protein levels at the membrane. Data mining revealed that these proteins interact with components of the Scribble polarity complex, providing support for the utility of the screening approach. This method is broadly applicable to genome-wide and large-scale compound screening of membrane-bound proteins, and when coupled with pathway analysis the dataset becomes even more valuable and can provide predictive mechanistic insight.

  7. Aberrant phenotypic expression of CD15 and CD56 identifies poor prognostic acute promyelocytic leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; De Propris, Maria Stefania; Minotti, Clara; Stefanizzi, Caterina; Raponi, Sara; Colafigli, Gioia; Latagliata, Roberto; Guarini, Anna; Foà, Robin

    2014-02-01

    Limited information is available on the relationship between expression of some additional aberrant phenotypic features and outcome of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) patients. Here, we set out to assess the frequency of CD15 and CD56 expression, and their prognostic value in a large series of APL patients. One hundred and fourteen adult patients consecutively diagnosed with PML/RARα-positive APL and homogeneously treated with the AIDA induction schedule at a single institution were included in the study. Twelve (10.5%) and 9 (8%) of the 114 patients expressed CD15 and CD56, respectively. CD15 expression identified a subset of patients with a classic morphologic subtype (92%), a prevalent association with a bcr1 expression (67%) with an unexpectedly higher frequency of relapses (42% vs 20% for the CD15- patients, p=0.03) and a low overall survival (OS) (median OS at 5 years 58% vs 85% for the CD15- patients, p=0.01). CD56 expression was detected only in patients with a classic morphologic subtype, a prevalent bcr3 expression (67%), high incidence of differentiation syndrome (55%), higher frequency of relapse (34% vs 20% for the CD56- population, p=0.04) and a low OS (60% vs 85% for the CD56- population p=0.02). We hereby confirm the negative prognostic value of CD56 and we show that the same applies also to cases expressing CD15. These aberrant markers may be considered for the refinement of risk-adapted therapeutic strategies in APL patients.

  8. Drosophila TDP-43 dysfunction in glia and muscle cells cause cytological and behavioural phenotypes that characterize ALS and FTLD

    PubMed Central

    Diaper, Danielle C.; Adachi, Yoshitsugu; Lazarou, Luke; Greenstein, Max; Simoes, Fabio A.; Di Domenico, Angelique; Solomon, Daniel A.; Lowe, Simon; Alsubaie, Rawan; Cheng, Daryl; Buckley, Stephen; Humphrey, Dickon M.; Shaw, Christopher E.; Hirth, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) are neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by cytoplasmic aggregates and nuclear clearance of TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43). Studies in Drosophila, zebrafish and mouse demonstrate that the neuronal dysfunction of TDP-43 is causally related to disease formation. However, TDP-43 aggregates are also observed in glia and muscle cells, which are equally affected in ALS and FTLD; yet, it is unclear whether glia- or muscle-specific dysfunction of TDP-43 contributes to pathogenesis. Here, we show that similar to its human homologue, Drosophila TDP-43, Tar DNA-binding protein homologue (TBPH), is expressed in glia and muscle cells. Muscle-specific knockdown of TBPH causes age-related motor abnormalities, whereas muscle-specific gain of function leads to sarcoplasmic aggregates and nuclear TBPH depletion, which is accompanied by behavioural deficits and premature lethality. TBPH dysfunction in glia cells causes age-related motor deficits and premature lethality. In addition, both loss and gain of Drosophila TDP-43 alter mRNA expression levels of the glutamate transporters Excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1) and EAAT2. Taken together, our results demonstrate that both loss and gain of TDP-43 function in muscle and glial cells can lead to cytological and behavioural phenotypes in Drosophila that also characterize ALS and FTLD and identify the glutamate transporters EAAT1/2 as potential direct targets of TDP-43 function. These findings suggest that together with neuronal pathology, glial- and muscle-specific TDP-43 dysfunction may directly contribute to the aetiology and progression of TDP-43-related ALS and FTLD. PMID:23727833

  9. Epigenome-Wide Scans Identify Differentially Methylated Regions for Age and Age-Related Phenotypes in a Healthy Ageing Population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tsun-Po; Pidsley, Ruth; Nisbet, James; Glass, Daniel; Mangino, Massimo; Zhai, Guangju; Zhang, Feng; Valdes, Ana; Shin, So-Youn; Dempster, Emma L.; Murray, Robin M.; Grundberg, Elin; Hedman, Asa K.; Nica, Alexandra; Small, Kerrin S.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Mill, Jonathan; Spector, Tim D.; Deloukas, Panos

    2012-01-01

    Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been implicated in cellular senescence and longevity, yet the causes and functional consequences of these variants remain unclear. To elucidate the role of age-related epigenetic changes in healthy ageing and potential longevity, we tested for association between whole-blood DNA methylation patterns in 172 female twins aged 32 to 80 with age and age-related phenotypes. Twin-based DNA methylation levels at 26,690 CpG-sites showed evidence for mean genome-wide heritability of 18%, which was supported by the identification of 1,537 CpG-sites with methylation QTLs in cis at FDR 5%. We performed genome-wide analyses to discover differentially methylated regions (DMRs) for sixteen age-related phenotypes (ap-DMRs) and chronological age (a-DMRs). Epigenome-wide association scans (EWAS) identified age-related phenotype DMRs (ap-DMRs) associated with LDL (STAT5A), lung function (WT1), and maternal longevity (ARL4A, TBX20). In contrast, EWAS for chronological age identified hundreds of predominantly hyper-methylated age DMRs (490 a-DMRs at FDR 5%), of which only one (TBX20) was also associated with an age-related phenotype. Therefore, the majority of age-related changes in DNA methylation are not associated with phenotypic measures of healthy ageing in later life. We replicated a large proportion of a-DMRs in a sample of 44 younger adult MZ twins aged 20 to 61, suggesting that a-DMRs may initiate at an earlier age. We next explored potential genetic and environmental mechanisms underlying a-DMRs and ap-DMRs. Genome-wide overlap across cis-meQTLs, genotype-phenotype associations, and EWAS ap-DMRs identified CpG-sites that had cis-meQTLs with evidence for genotype–phenotype association, where the CpG-site was also an ap-DMR for the same phenotype. Monozygotic twin methylation difference analyses identified one potential environmentally-mediated ap-DMR associated with total cholesterol and LDL (CSMD1). Our results suggest that in a

  10. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Loci for the Polled Phenotype in Yak

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Kun; Ding, Xuezhi; Wang, Mingcheng; Chu, Min; Xie, Xiuyue; Qiu, Qiang; Yan, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The absence of horns, known as the polled phenotype, is an economically important trait in modern yak husbandry, but the genomic structure and genetic basis of this phenotype have yet to be discovered. Here, we conducted a genome-wide association study with a panel of 10 horned and 10 polled yaks using whole genome sequencing. We mapped the POLLED locus to a 200-kb interval, which comprises three protein-coding genes. Further characterization of the candidate region showed recent artificial selection signals resulting from the breeding process. We suggest that expressional variations rather than structural variations in protein probably contribute to the polled phenotype. Our results not only represent the first and important step in establishing the genomic structure of the polled region in yak, but also add to our understanding of the polled trait in bovid species. PMID:27389700

  11. Developing a Manually Annotated Clinical Document Corpus to Identify Phenotypic Information for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    South, Brett R; Shen, Shuying; Jones, Makoto; Garvin, Jennifer; Samore, Matthew H; Chapman, Wendy W; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2009-01-01

    Background Natural Language Processing (NLP) systems can be used for specific Information Extraction (IE) tasks such as extracting phenotypic data from the electronic medical record (EMR). These data are useful for translational research and are often found only in free text clinical notes. A key required step for IE is the manual annotation of clinical corpora and the creation of a reference standard for (1) training and validation tasks and (2) to focus and clarify NLP system requirements. These tasks are time consuming, expensive, and require considerable effort on the part of human reviewers. Methods Using a set of clinical documents from the VA EMR for a particular use case of interest we identify specific challenges and present several opportunities for annotation tasks. We demonstrate specific methods using an open source annotation tool, a customized annotation schema, and a corpus of clinical documents for patients known to have a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). We report clinician annotator agreement at the document, concept, and concept attribute level. We estimate concept yield in terms of annotated concepts within specific note sections and document types. Results Annotator agreement at the document level for documents that contained concepts of interest for IBD using estimated Kappa statistic (95% CI) was very high at 0.87 (0.82, 0.93). At the concept level, F-measure ranged from 0.61 to 0.83. However, agreement varied greatly at the specific concept attribute level. For this particular use case (IBD), clinical documents producing the highest concept yield per document included GI clinic notes and primary care notes. Within the various types of notes, the highest concept yield was in sections representing patient assessment and history of presenting illness. Ancillary service documents and family history and plan note sections produced the lowest concept yield. Conclusions Challenges include defining and building appropriate annotation

  12. Developing a manually annotated clinical document corpus to identify phenotypic information for inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    South, Brett R; Shen, Shuying; Jones, Makoto; Garvin, Jennifer; Samore, Matthew H; Chapman, Wendy W; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2009-01-01

    Background Natural Language Processing (NLP) systems can be used for specific Information Extraction (IE) tasks such as extracting phenotypic data from the electronic medical record (EMR). These data are useful for translational research and are often found only in free text clinical notes. A key required step for IE is the manual annotation of clinical corpora and the creation of a reference standard for (1) training and validation tasks and (2) to focus and clarify NLP system requirements. These tasks are time consuming, expensive, and require considerable effort on the part of human reviewers. Methods Using a set of clinical documents from the VA EMR for a particular use case of interest we identify specific challenges and present several opportunities for annotation tasks. We demonstrate specific methods using an open source annotation tool, a customized annotation schema, and a corpus of clinical documents for patients known to have a diagnosis of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). We report clinician annotator agreement at the document, concept, and concept attribute level. We estimate concept yield in terms of annotated concepts within specific note sections and document types. Results Annotator agreement at the document level for documents that contained concepts of interest for IBD using estimated Kappa statistic (95% CI) was very high at 0.87 (0.82, 0.93). At the concept level, F-measure ranged from 0.61 to 0.83. However, agreement varied greatly at the specific concept attribute level. For this particular use case (IBD), clinical documents producing the highest concept yield per document included GI clinic notes and primary care notes. Within the various types of notes, the highest concept yield was in sections representing patient assessment and history of presenting illness. Ancillary service documents and family history and plan note sections produced the lowest concept yield. Conclusion Challenges include defining and building appropriate annotation

  13. Rapid-throughput skeletal phenotyping of 100 knockout mice identifies 9 new genes that determine bone strength.

    PubMed

    Bassett, J H Duncan; Gogakos, Apostolos; White, Jacqueline K; Evans, Holly; Jacques, Richard M; van der Spek, Anne H; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Ryder, Edward; Sunter, David; Boyde, Alan; Campbell, Michael J; Croucher, Peter I; Williams, Graham R

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common polygenic disease and global healthcare priority but its genetic basis remains largely unknown. We report a high-throughput multi-parameter phenotype screen to identify functionally significant skeletal phenotypes in mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project and discover novel genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. The integrated use of primary phenotype data with quantitative x-ray microradiography, micro-computed tomography, statistical approaches and biomechanical testing in 100 unselected knockout mouse strains identified nine new genetic determinants of bone mass and strength. These nine new genes include five whose deletion results in low bone mass and four whose deletion results in high bone mass. None of the nine genes have been implicated previously in skeletal disorders and detailed analysis of the biomechanical consequences of their deletion revealed a novel functional classification of bone structure and strength. The organ-specific and disease-focused strategy described in this study can be applied to any biological system or tractable polygenic disease, thus providing a general basis to define gene function in a system-specific manner. Application of the approach to diseases affecting other physiological systems will help to realize the full potential of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium.

  14. Methylator phenotype of malignant germ cell tumours in children identifies strong candidates for chemotherapy resistance

    PubMed Central

    Jeyapalan, J N; Noor, D A Mohamed; Lee, S-H; Tan, C L; Appleby, V A; Kilday, J P; Palmer, R D; Schwalbe, E C; Clifford, S C; Walker, D A; Murray, M J; Coleman, N; Nicholson, J C; Scotting, P J

    2011-01-01

    Background: Yolk sac tumours (YSTs) and germinomas are the two major pure histological subtypes of germ cell tumours. To date, the role of DNA methylation in the aetiology of this class of tumour has only been analysed in adult testicular forms and with respect to only a few genes. Methods: A bank of paediatric tumours was analysed for global methylation of LINE-1 repeat elements and global methylation of regulatory elements using GoldenGate methylation arrays. Results: Both germinomas and YSTs exhibited significant global hypomethylation of LINE-1 elements. However, in germinomas, methylation of gene regulatory regions differed little from control samples, whereas YSTs exhibited increased methylation at a large proportion of the loci tested, showing a ‘methylator' phenotype, including silencing of genes associated with Caspase-8-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that the methylator phenotype of YSTs was coincident with higher levels of expression of the DNA methyltransferase, DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 3B, suggesting a mechanism underlying the phenotype. Conclusion: Epigenetic silencing of a large number of potential tumour suppressor genes in YSTs might explain why they exhibit a more aggressive natural history than germinomas and silencing of genes associated with Caspase-8-dependent cell death might explain the relative resistance of YSTs to conventional therapy. PMID:21712824

  15. The interpretation of disease phenotypes to identify TSE strains following murine bioassay: characterisation of classical scrapie.

    PubMed

    Beck, Katy E; Vickery, Christopher M; Lockey, Richard; Holder, Thomas; Thorne, Leigh; Terry, Linda A; Denyer, Margaret; Webb, Paul; Simmons, Marion M; Spiropoulos, John

    2012-11-01

    Mouse bioassay can be readily employed for strain typing of naturally occurring transmissible spongiform encephalopathy cases. Classical scrapie strains have been characterised historically based on the established methodology of assessing incubation period of disease and the distribution of disease-specific vacuolation across the brain following strain stabilisation in a given mouse line. More recent research has shown that additional methods could be used to characterise strains and thereby expand the definition of strain "phenotype". Here we present the phenotypic characteristics of classical scrapie strains isolated from 24 UK ovine field cases through the wild-type mouse bioassay. PrPSc immunohistochemistry (IHC), paraffin embedded tissue blots (PET-blot) and Western blotting approaches were used to determine the neuroanatomical distribution and molecular profile of PrPSc associated with each strain, in conjunction with traditional methodologies. Results revealed three strains isolated through each mouse line, including a previously unidentified strain. Moreover IHC and PET-blot methodologies were effective in characterising the strain-associated types and neuroanatomical locations of PrPSc. The use of Western blotting as a parameter to define classical scrapie strains was limited. These data provide a comprehensive description of classical scrapie strain phenotypes on isolation through the mouse bioassay that can provide a reference for further scrapie strain identification.

  16. Novel inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GuaB2 identified by a target based high-throughput phenotypic screen

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jonathan A. G.; Mugumbate, Grace; Del Peral, Laura Vela-Glez; Jankute, Monika; Abrahams, Katherine A.; Jervis, Peter; Jackenkroll, Stefan; Perez, Arancha; Alemparte, Carlos; Esquivias, Jorge; Lelièvre, Joël; Ramon, Fernando; Barros, David; Ballell, Lluis; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput phenotypic screens have re-emerged as screening tools in antibiotic discovery. The advent of such technologies has rapidly accelerated the identification of ‘hit’ compounds. A pre-requisite to medicinal chemistry optimisation programmes required to improve the drug-like properties of a ‘hit’ molecule is identification of its mode of action. Herein, we have combined phenotypic screening with a biased target-specific screen. The inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) protein GuaB2 has been identified as a drugable target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, however previously identified compounds lack the desired characteristics necessary for further development into lead-like molecules. This study has identified 7 new chemical series from a high-throughput resistance-based phenotypic screen using Mycobacterium bovis BCG over-expressing GuaB2. Hit compounds were identified in a single shot high-throughput screen, validated by dose response and subjected to further biochemical analysis. The compounds were also assessed using molecular docking experiments, providing a platform for their further optimisation using medicinal chemistry. This work demonstrates the versatility and potential of GuaB2 as an anti-tubercular drug target. PMID:27982051

  17. 3D phenotyping and quantitative trait locus mapping identify core regions of the rice genome controlling root architecture.

    PubMed

    Topp, Christopher N; Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S; Anderson, Jill T; Lee, Cheng-Ruei; Zurek, Paul R; Symonova, Olga; Zheng, Ying; Bucksch, Alexander; Mileyko, Yuriy; Galkovskyi, Taras; Moore, Brad T; Harer, John; Edelsbrunner, Herbert; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Weitz, Joshua S; Benfey, Philip N

    2013-04-30

    Identification of genes that control root system architecture in crop plants requires innovations that enable high-throughput and accurate measurements of root system architecture through time. We demonstrate the ability of a semiautomated 3D in vivo imaging and digital phenotyping pipeline to interrogate the quantitative genetic basis of root system growth in a rice biparental mapping population, Bala × Azucena. We phenotyped >1,400 3D root models and >57,000 2D images for a suite of 25 traits that quantified the distribution, shape, extent of exploration, and the intrinsic size of root networks at days 12, 14, and 16 of growth in a gellan gum medium. From these data we identified 89 quantitative trait loci, some of which correspond to those found previously in soil-grown plants, and provide evidence for genetic tradeoffs in root growth allocations, such as between the extent and thoroughness of exploration. We also developed a multivariate method for generating and mapping central root architecture phenotypes and used it to identify five major quantitative trait loci (r(2) = 24-37%), two of which were not identified by our univariate analysis. Our imaging and analytical platform provides a means to identify genes with high potential for improving root traits and agronomic qualities of crops.

  18. HCS-Neurons: identifying phenotypic changes in multi-neuron images upon drug treatments of high-content screening

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-content screening (HCS) has become a powerful tool for drug discovery. However, the discovery of drugs targeting neurons is still hampered by the inability to accurately identify and quantify the phenotypic changes of multiple neurons in a single image (named multi-neuron image) of a high-content screen. Therefore, it is desirable to develop an automated image analysis method for analyzing multi-neuron images. Results We propose an automated analysis method with novel descriptors of neuromorphology features for analyzing HCS-based multi-neuron images, called HCS-neurons. To observe multiple phenotypic changes of neurons, we propose two kinds of descriptors which are neuron feature descriptor (NFD) of 13 neuromorphology features, e.g., neurite length, and generic feature descriptors (GFDs), e.g., Haralick texture. HCS-neurons can 1) automatically extract all quantitative phenotype features in both NFD and GFDs, 2) identify statistically significant phenotypic changes upon drug treatments using ANOVA and regression analysis, and 3) generate an accurate classifier to group neurons treated by different drug concentrations using support vector machine and an intelligent feature selection method. To evaluate HCS-neurons, we treated P19 neurons with nocodazole (a microtubule depolymerizing drug which has been shown to impair neurite development) at six concentrations ranging from 0 to 1000 ng/mL. The experimental results show that all the 13 features of NFD have statistically significant difference with respect to changes in various levels of nocodazole drug concentrations (NDC) and the phenotypic changes of neurites were consistent to the known effect of nocodazole in promoting neurite retraction. Three identified features, total neurite length, average neurite length, and average neurite area were able to achieve an independent test accuracy of 90.28% for the six-dosage classification problem. This NFD module and neuron image datasets are provided as a

  19. Bluetongue virus genetic and phenotypic diversity: towards identifying the molecular determinants that influence virulence and transmission potential.

    PubMed

    Coetzee, Peter; Van Vuuren, Moritz; Stokstad, Maria; Myrmel, Mette; Venter, Estelle H

    2012-12-28

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the prototype member of the Orbivirus genus in the family Reoviridae and is the aetiological agent of the arthropod transmitted disease bluetongue (BT) that affects both ruminant and camelid species. The disease is of significant global importance due to its economic impact and effect on animal welfare. Bluetongue virus, a dsRNA virus, evolves through a process of quasispecies evolution that is driven by genetic drift and shift as well as intragenic recombination. Quasispecies evolution coupled with founder effect and evolutionary selective pressures has over time led to the establishment of genetically distinct strains of the virus in different epidemiological systems throughout the world. Bluetongue virus field strains may differ substantially from each other with regards to their phenotypic properties (i.e. virulence and/or transmission potential). The intrinsic molecular determinants that influence the phenotype of BTV have not clearly been characterized. It is currently unclear what contribution each of the viral genome segments have in determining the phenotypic properties of the virus and it is also unknown how genetic variability in the individual viral genes and their functional domains relate to differences in phenotype. In order to understand how genetic variation in particular viral genes could potentially influence the phenotypic properties of the virus; a closer understanding of the BTV virion, its encoded proteins and the evolutionary mechanisms that shape the diversity of the virus is required. This review provides a synopsis of these issues and highlights some of the studies that have been conducted on BTV and the closely related African horse sickness virus (AHSV) that have contributed to ongoing attempts to identify the molecular determinants that influence the virus' phenotype. Different strategies that can be used to generate BTV mutants in vitro and methods through which the causality between particular genetic

  20. CD15 Expression Does Not Identify a Phenotypically or Genetically Distinct Glioblastoma Population

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mayhani, Talal; Piccirillo, Sara G.M.; Fowler, Joanna; Spiteri, Inmaculada; Jones, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Recent research has focused on the hypothesis that the growth and regeneration of glioblastoma (GB) is sustained by a subpopulation of self-renewing stem-like cells. This has led to the prediction that molecular markers for cancer stem cells in GB may provide a treatment target. One candidate marker is CD15: we wanted to determine if CD15 represented a credible stem cell marker in GB. We first demonstrated that CD15-positive (CD15+) cells were less proliferative than their CD15-negative (CD15−) counterparts in 10 patient GB tumors. Next we compared the proliferative activity of CD15+ and CD15− cells in vitro using tumor-initiating primary GB cell lines (TICs) and found no difference in proliferative behavior. Furthermore, TICs sorted for CD15+ and CD15− were not significantly different cytogenetically or in terms of gene expression profile. Sorted single CD15+ and CD15− cells were equally capable of reconstituting a heterogeneous population containing both CD15+ and CD15− cells over time, and both CD15+ and CD15− cells were able to generate tumors in vivo. No difference was found in the phenotypic or genomic behavior of CD15+ cells compared with CD15− cells from the same patient. Moreover, we found that in vitro, cells were able to interconvert between the CD15+ and CD15− states. Our data challenge the utility of CD15 as a cancer stem cell marker. Significance The data from this study contribute to the ongoing debate about the role of cancer stem cells in gliomagenesis. Results showed that CD15, a marker previously thought to be a cancer stem-like marker in glioblastoma, could not isolate a phenotypically or genetically distinct population. Moreover, isolated CD15-positive and -negative cells were able to generate mixed populations of glioblastoma cells in vitro. PMID:26019225

  1. A candidate gene approach to identify modifiers of the palatal phenotype in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Widdershoven, Josine C.C.; Bowser, Mark; Sheridan, Molly B.; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M.; Zackai, Elaine H.; Solot, Cynthia B.; Kirschner, Richard E.; Beemer, Frits A.; Morrow, Bernice E.; Devoto, Marcella; Emanuel, Beverly S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Palatal anomalies are one of the identifying features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) affecting about one third of patients. To identify genetic variants that increase the risk of cleft or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients, we performed a candidate gene association study in 101 patients with 22q11.2DS genotyped with the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0. Methods Patients from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, USA and Wilhelmina Children's Hospital Utrecht, The Netherlands were stratified based on palatal phenotype (overt cleft, submucosal cleft, bifid uvula). SNPs in 21 candidate genes for cleft palate were analyzed for genotype-phenotype association. In addition, TBX1 sequencing was carried out. Quality control and association analyses were conducted using the software package PLINK. Results Genotype and phenotype data of 101 unrelated patients (63 non-cleft subjects (62.4%), 38 cleft subjects (37.6%)) were analyzed. A Total of 39 SNPs on 10 genes demonstrated a p-value ≤0.05 prior to correction. The most significant SNPs were found on FGF10. However none of the SNPs remained significant after correcting for multiple testing. Conclusions Although these results are promising, analysis of additional samples will be required to confirm that variants in these regions influence risk for cleft palate or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients. PMID:23121717

  2. Leveraging Comparative Genomics to Identify and Functionally Characterize Genes Associated with Sperm Phenotypes in Python bivittatus (Burmese Python).

    PubMed

    Irizarry, Kristopher J L; Rutllant, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomics approaches provide a means of leveraging functional genomics information from a highly annotated model organism's genome (such as the mouse genome) in order to make physiological inferences about the role of genes and proteins in a less characterized organism's genome (such as the Burmese python). We employed a comparative genomics approach to produce the functional annotation of Python bivittatus genes encoding proteins associated with sperm phenotypes. We identify 129 gene-phenotype relationships in the python which are implicated in 10 specific sperm phenotypes. Results obtained through our systematic analysis identified subsets of python genes exhibiting associations with gene ontology annotation terms. Functional annotation data was represented in a semantic scatter plot. Together, these newly annotated Python bivittatus genome resources provide a high resolution framework from which the biology relating to reptile spermatogenesis, fertility, and reproduction can be further investigated. Applications of our research include (1) production of genetic diagnostics for assessing fertility in domestic and wild reptiles; (2) enhanced assisted reproduction technology for endangered and captive reptiles; and (3) novel molecular targets for biotechnology-based approaches aimed at reducing fertility and reproduction of invasive reptiles. Additional enhancements to reptile genomic resources will further enhance their value.

  3. Leveraging Comparative Genomics to Identify and Functionally Characterize Genes Associated with Sperm Phenotypes in Python bivittatus (Burmese Python)

    PubMed Central

    Rutllant, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Comparative genomics approaches provide a means of leveraging functional genomics information from a highly annotated model organism's genome (such as the mouse genome) in order to make physiological inferences about the role of genes and proteins in a less characterized organism's genome (such as the Burmese python). We employed a comparative genomics approach to produce the functional annotation of Python bivittatus genes encoding proteins associated with sperm phenotypes. We identify 129 gene-phenotype relationships in the python which are implicated in 10 specific sperm phenotypes. Results obtained through our systematic analysis identified subsets of python genes exhibiting associations with gene ontology annotation terms. Functional annotation data was represented in a semantic scatter plot. Together, these newly annotated Python bivittatus genome resources provide a high resolution framework from which the biology relating to reptile spermatogenesis, fertility, and reproduction can be further investigated. Applications of our research include (1) production of genetic diagnostics for assessing fertility in domestic and wild reptiles; (2) enhanced assisted reproduction technology for endangered and captive reptiles; and (3) novel molecular targets for biotechnology-based approaches aimed at reducing fertility and reproduction of invasive reptiles. Additional enhancements to reptile genomic resources will further enhance their value. PMID:27200191

  4. Identifying rare variants for genetic risk through a combined pedigree and phenotype approach: application to suicide and asthma.

    PubMed

    Darlington, T M; Pimentel, R; Smith, K; Bakian, A V; Jerominski, L; Cardon, J; Camp, N J; Callor, W B; Grey, T; Singleton, M; Yandell, M; Renshaw, P F; Yurgelun-Todd, D A; Gray, D; Coon, H

    2014-10-21

    Suicidal behavior is a complex disorder, with evidence for genetic risk independent of other genetic risk factors including psychiatric disorders. Since 1996, over 3000 DNA samples from Utah suicide decedents have been collected and banked for research use through the Utah Medical Examiner. In addition, over 12,000 Utah suicides were identified through examination of death certificates back to 1904. By linking this data with the Utah Population Database, we have identified multiple extended pedigrees with increased risk for suicide completion. A number of medical conditions co-occur with suicide, including asthma, and this study was undertaken to identify genetic risk common to asthma and suicide. This study tests the hypothesis that a particular comorbid condition may identify a more homogeneous genetic subgroup, facilitating the identification of specific genetic risk factors in that group. From pedigrees at increased risk for suicide, we identified three pedigrees also at significantly increased familial risk for asthma. Five suicide decedents from each of these pedigrees, plus an additional three decedents not from these pedigrees with diagnosed asthma, and 10 decedents with close relatives with asthma were genotyped. Results were compared with 183 publicly available unaffected control exomes from 1000 Genomes and CEPH (Centre d'etude du polymorphisme humain) samples genotyped on the same platform. A further 432 suicide decedents were also genotyped as non-asthma suicide controls. Genotyping was done using the Infinium HumanExome BeadChip. For analysis, we used the pedigree extension of Variant Annotation, Analysis and Search Tool (pVAAST) to calculate the disease burden of each gene. The Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool (Phevor) then re-ranked our pVAAST results in context of the phenotype. Using asthma as a seed phenotype, Phevor traversed biomedical ontologies and identified genes with similar biological properties to those known to

  5. Phenotypic consequences of a mosaic marker chromosome identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) as being derived from chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.H.; Zhou, X.; Pletcher, B.A.

    1994-09-01

    De novo marker chromosomes are detected in 1 in 2500 amniotic fluid samples and are associated with a 10-15% risk for phenotypic abnormality. FISH can be utilized as a research tool to identify the origins of marker chromosomes. The phenotypic consequences of a marker chromosome derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 are described. A 26-year-old woman underwent amniocentesis at 28 weeks gestation because of a prenatally diagnosed tetralogy of Fallot. Follow-up ultrasounds also showed ventriculomegaly and cleft lip and palate. 32 of 45 cells had the karyotype 47,XY,+mar; the remaining cells were 46,XY. The de novo marker chromosome was C-band positive and non-satellited and failed to stain with distamycin A/DAPI. At birth the ultrasound findings were confirmed and dysmorphic features and cryptorchidism were noted. Although a newborn blood sample contained only normal cells, mosaicism was confirmed in 2 skin biopsies. FISH using whole-chromosome painting and alpha-satellite DNA probes showed that the marker chromosome had originated from chromosome 16. As proximal 16q is distamycin A/DAPI positive, the marker is apparently derived from proximal 16p. At 15 months of age, this child is hypotonic, globally delayed and is gavage-fed. His physical examination is significant for microbrachycephaly, a round face, sparse scalp hair, ocular hypertelorism, exotropia, a flat, wide nasal bridge and tip, mild micrognathia, and tapered fingers with lymphedema of hands and feet. Inguinal hernias have been repaired. His features are consistent with those described for patients trisomic for most or all of the short arm of chromosome 16. Marker chromosomes derived from the short arm of chromosome 16 appear to have phenotypic consequences. As the origin of more marker chromosomes are identified using FISH, their karyotype/phenotype correlations will become more apparent, which will permit more accurate genetic counseling.

  6. Whole Exome Sequencing Identifies CRB1 Defect in an Unusual Maculopathy Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Stephen H.; Burke, Tomas; Oll, Maris; Yzer, Suzanne; Lee, Winston; Xie, Yajing (Angela); Allikmets, Rando

    2014-01-01

    Objective To report a new phenotype caused by mutations in the CRB1 gene in a family with 2 affected siblings. Design Molecular genetics and observational case studies. Participants Two affected siblings and 3 unaffected family members. Methods Each subject received a complete ophthalmic examination together with color fundus photography, fundus autofluorescence (FAF), and spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Microperimetry 1 (MP-1) mapping and electroretinogram (ERG) analysis were performed on the proband. Screening for disease-causing mutations was performed by whole exome sequencing in 3 family members followed by segregation analyses in the entire family. Main Outcome Measures Appearance of the macula as examined by clinical examination, fundus photography, FAF imaging, SD-OCT, and visual function by MP-1 and ERG. Results The proband and her affected brother exhibited unusual, previously unreported, findings of a macular dystrophy with relative sparing of the retinal periphery beyond the vascular arcades. The FAF imaging showed severely affected areas of hypoautofluorescence that extended nasally beyond the optic disc in both eyes. A central macular patch of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) sparing was evident in both eyes on FAF, whereas photoreceptor sparing was documented in the right eye only using SD-OCT. The affected brother presented with irregular patterns of autofluorescence in both eyes characterized by concentric rings of alternating hyper- and hypoautofluorescence, and foveal sparing of photoreceptors and RPE, as seen on SD-OCT, bilaterally. After negative results in screening for mutations in candidate genes including ABCA4 and PRPH2, DNA from 3 members of the family, including both affected siblings and their mother, was screened by whole exome sequencing resulting in identification of 2 CRB1 missense mutations, c.C3991T:p.R1331C and c.C4142T:p.P1381L, which segregated with the disease in the family. Of the 2, the p.R1331C CRB1

  7. Identifying Heritable Brain Phenotypes in an Extended Pedigree of Vervet Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Melega, William P.; Service, Susan K.; Lee, Chris; Chen, Kelly; Tu, Zhuowen; Jorgensen, Matthew J.; Fairbanks, Lynn A.; Cantor, Rita M.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Woods, Roger P.

    2009-01-01

    The area and volume of brain structural features, as assessed by high-resolution 3D magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are among the most heritable measures relating to the human central nervous system. We have conducted MRI scanning of all available monkeys over 2 years of age (n=357) from the extended multigenerational pedigree of the Vervet Research Colony (VRC). Using a combination of automated and manual segmentation we have quantified several correlated but distinct brain structural phenotypes. The estimated heritabilities (h2) for these measures in the VRC are higher than those reported previously for such features in humans or in other non human primates (NHP): total brain volume (h2=0.99, standard error (se)=0.06), cerebral volume (h2=0.98, se=0.06), cerebellar volume (h2=0.86, se=0.09), hippocampal volume (h2=0.95, se=0.07) and corpus callosum cross-sectional areas (h2=0.87, se=0.07). These findings indicate that, in the controlled environment and with the inbreeding structure of the VRC, additive genetic factors account for almost all of the observed variance in brain structure, and suggest the potential of the VRC for genetic mapping of quantitative trait loci (QTL) underlying such variance. PMID:19261882

  8. Temporal expression profiling identifies pathways mediating effect of causal variant on phenotype.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Saumya; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raharja-Liu, Pandu; Lin, Gen; Steinmetz, Lars M; Gagneur, Julien; Sinha, Himanshu

    2015-06-01

    Even with identification of multiple causal genetic variants for common human diseases, understanding the molecular processes mediating the causal variants' effect on the disease remains a challenge. This understanding is crucial for the development of therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat disease. While static profiling of gene expression is primarily used to get insights into the biological bases of diseases, it makes differentiating the causative from the correlative effects difficult, as the dynamics of the underlying biological processes are not monitored. Using yeast as a model, we studied genome-wide gene expression dynamics in the presence of a causal variant as the sole genetic determinant, and performed allele-specific functional validation to delineate the causal effects of the genetic variant on the phenotype. Here, we characterized the precise genetic effects of a functional MKT1 allelic variant in sporulation efficiency variation. A mathematical model describing meiotic landmark events and conditional activation of MKT1 expression during sporulation specified an early meiotic role of this variant. By analyzing the early meiotic genome-wide transcriptional response, we demonstrate an MKT1-dependent role of novel modulators, namely, RTG1/3, regulators of mitochondrial retrograde signaling, and DAL82, regulator of nitrogen starvation, in additively effecting sporulation efficiency. In the presence of functional MKT1 allele, better respiration during early sporulation was observed, which was dependent on the mitochondrial retrograde regulator, RTG3. Furthermore, our approach showed that MKT1 contributes to sporulation independent of Puf3, an RNA-binding protein that steady-state transcription profiling studies have suggested to mediate MKT1-pleiotropic effects during mitotic growth. These results uncover interesting regulatory links between meiosis and mitochondrial retrograde signaling. In this study, we highlight the advantage of analyzing allele

  9. What makes the lac-pathway switch: identifying the fluctuations that trigger phenotype switching in gene regulatory systems.

    PubMed

    Bhogale, Prasanna M; Sorg, Robin A; Veening, Jan-Willem; Berg, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    Multistable gene regulatory systems sustain different levels of gene expression under identical external conditions. Such multistability is used to encode phenotypic states in processes including nutrient uptake and persistence in bacteria, fate selection in viral infection, cell-cycle control and development. Stochastic switching between different phenotypes can occur as the result of random fluctuations in molecular copy numbers of mRNA and proteins arising in transcription, translation, transport and binding. However, which component of a pathway triggers such a transition is generally not known. By linking single-cell experiments on the lactose-uptake pathway in E. coli to molecular simulations, we devise a general method to pinpoint the particular fluctuation driving phenotype switching and apply this method to the transition between the uninduced and induced states of the lac-genes. We find that the transition to the induced state is not caused only by the single event of lac-repressor unbinding, but depends crucially on the time period over which the repressor remains unbound from the lac-operon. We confirm this notion in strains with a high expression level of the lac-repressor (leading to shorter periods over which the lac-operon remains unbound), which show a reduced switching rate. Our techniques apply to multistable gene regulatory systems in general and allow to identify the molecular mechanisms behind stochastic transitions in gene regulatory circuits.

  10. Systems Biology in Animal Breeding: Identifying relationships among markers, genes, and phenotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Breeding and Genetics Symposium titled “Systems Biology in Animal Breeding: Identifying relationships among markers, genes, and phenotypes” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in Phoenix, AZ, July 15 to 19, 201...

  11. Identifying the metabolic differences of a fast-growth phenotype in Synechococcus UTEX 2973

    DOE PAGES

    Mueller, Thomas J.; Ungerer, Justin L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; ...

    2017-01-31

    The photosynthetic capabilities of cyanobacteria make them interesting candidates for industrial bioproduction. One obstacle to large-scale implementation of cyanobacteria is their limited growth rates as compared to industrial mainstays. Synechococcus UTEX 2973, a strain closely related to Synechococcus PCC 7942, was recently identified as having the fastest measured growth rate among cyanobacteria. To facilitate the development of 2973 as a model organism we developed in this study the genome-scale metabolic model iSyu683. Experimental data were used to define CO2 uptake rates as well as the biomass compositions for each strain. The inclusion of constraints based on experimental measurements of CO2more » uptake resulted in a ratio of the growth rates of Synechococcus 2973 to Synechococcus 7942 of 2.03, which nearly recapitulates the in vivo growth rate ratio of 2.13. This identified the difference in carbon uptake rate as the main factor contributing to the divergent growth rates. Additionally four SNPs were identified as possible contributors to modified kinetic parameters of metabolic enzymes and candidates for further study. As a result, comparisons against more established cyanobacterial strains identified a number of differences between the strains along with a correlation between the number of cytochrome c oxidase operons and heterotrophic or diazotrophic capabilities.« less

  12. Identifying the Metabolic Differences of a Fast-Growth Phenotype in Synechococcus UTEX 2973

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Thomas J.; Ungerer, Justin L.; Pakrasi, Himadri B.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2017-01-01

    The photosynthetic capabilities of cyanobacteria make them interesting candidates for industrial bioproduction. One obstacle to large-scale implementation of cyanobacteria is their limited growth rates as compared to industrial mainstays. Synechococcus UTEX 2973, a strain closely related to Synechococcus PCC 7942, was recently identified as having the fastest measured growth rate among cyanobacteria. To facilitate the development of 2973 as a model organism we developed in this study the genome-scale metabolic model iSyu683. Experimental data were used to define CO2 uptake rates as well as the biomass compositions for each strain. The inclusion of constraints based on experimental measurements of CO2 uptake resulted in a ratio of the growth rates of Synechococcus 2973 to Synechococcus 7942 of 2.03, which nearly recapitulates the in vivo growth rate ratio of 2.13. This identified the difference in carbon uptake rate as the main factor contributing to the divergent growth rates. Additionally four SNPs were identified as possible contributors to modified kinetic parameters of metabolic enzymes and candidates for further study. Comparisons against more established cyanobacterial strains identified a number of differences between the strains along with a correlation between the number of cytochrome c oxidase operons and heterotrophic or diazotrophic capabilities. PMID:28139686

  13. Phenotypic transition of microglia into astrocyte-like cells associated with disease onset in a model of inherited ALS

    PubMed Central

    Trias, Emiliano; Díaz-Amarilla, Pablo; Olivera-Bravo, Silvia; Isasi, Eugenia; Drechsel, Derek A.; Lopez, Nathan; Bradford, C. Samuel; Ireton, Kyle E.; Beckman, Joseph S.; Barbeito, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Microglia and reactive astrocytes accumulate in the spinal cord of rats expressing the Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-linked SOD1 G93A mutation. We previously reported that the rapid progression of paralysis in ALS rats is associated with the appearance of proliferative astrocyte-like cells that surround motor neurons. These cells, designated as Aberrant Astrocytes (AbA cells) because of their atypical astrocytic phenotype, exhibit high toxicity to motor neurons. However, the cellular origin of AbA cells remains unknown. Because AbA cells are labeled with the proliferation marker Ki67, we analyzed the phenotypic makers of proliferating glial cells that surround motor neurons by immunohistochemistry. The number of Ki67 +AbA cells sharply increased in symptomatic rats, displaying large cell bodies with processes embracing motor neurons. Most were co-labeled with astrocytic marker GFAP concurrently with the microglial markers Iba1 and CD163. Cultures of spinal cord prepared from symptomatic SOD1 G93A rats yielded large numbers of microglia expressing Iba1, CD11b, and CD68. Cells sorted for CD11b expression by flow cytometry transformed into AbA cells within two weeks. During these two weeks, the expression of microglial markers largely disappeared, while GFAP and S100β expression increased. The phenotypic transition to AbA cells was stimulated by forskolin. These findings provide evidence for a subpopulation of proliferating microglial cells in SOD1 G93A rats that undergo a phenotypic transition into AbA cells after onset of paralysis that may promote the fulminant disease progression. These cells could be a therapeutic target for slowing paralysis progression in ALS. PMID:24399933

  14. A phenotypic assay to identify Chikungunya virus inhibitors targeting the nonstructural protein nsP2.

    PubMed

    Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Lupan, Alexandru; Desprès, Philippe; Thoret, Sylviane; Pamlard, Olivier; Dubois, Joëlle; Guillou, Catherine; Tangy, Frédéric; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène

    2013-02-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted pathogen responsible for an acute infection of abrupt onset, characterized by high fever, polyarthralgia, myalgia, headaches, chills, and rash. In 2006, CHIKV was responsible for an epidemic outbreak of unprecedented magnitude in the Indian Ocean, stressing the need for therapeutic approaches. Since then, we have acquired a better understanding of CHIKV biology, but we are still missing active molecules against this reemerging pathogen. We recently reported that the nonstructural nsP2 protein of CHIKV induces a transcriptional shutoff that allows the virus to block cellular antiviral response. This was demonstrated using various luciferase-based reporter gene assays, including a trans-reporter system where Gal4 DNA binding domain is fused to Fos transcription factor. Here, we turned this assay into a high-throughput screening system to identify small molecules targeting nsP2-mediated shutoff. Among 3040 molecules tested, we identified one natural compound that partially blocks nsP2 activity and inhibits CHIKV replication in vitro. This proof of concept suggests that similar functional assays could be developed to target other viral proteins mediating a cellular shutoff and identify innovative therapeutic molecules.

  15. Phenotypic Screens Identify Parasite Genetic Factors Associated with Malarial Fever Response in Plasmodium falciparum piggyBac Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Phaedra; Sedillo, Jennifer; Oberstaller, Jenna; Li, Suzanne; Zhang, Min; Singh, Naresh; Wang, Chengqi C. Q.; Udenze, Kenneth; Jiang, Rays H. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malaria remains one of the most devastating parasitic diseases worldwide, with 90% of the malaria deaths in Africa in 2013 attributable to Plasmodium falciparum. The clinical symptoms of malaria include cycles of fever, corresponding to parasite rupture from red blood cells every 48 h. Parasite pathways involved in the parasite’s ability to survive the host fever response, and indeed, the functions of ~40% of P. falciparum genes as a whole, are still largely unknown. Here, we evaluated the potential of scalable forward-genetic screening methods to identify genes involved in the host fever response. We performed a phenotypic screen for genes linked to the parasite response to febrile temperatures by utilizing a selection of single-disruption P. falciparum mutants generated via random piggyBac transposon mutagenesis in a previous study. We identified several mutants presenting significant phenotypes in febrile response screens compared to the wild type, indicating possible roles for the disrupted genes in this process. We present these initial studies as proof that forward genetics can be used to gain insight into critical factors associated with parasite biology. IMPORTANCE Though the P. falciparum genome sequence has been available for many years, ~40% of its genes do not have informative annotations, as they show no detectable homology to those of studied organisms. More still have not been evaluated via genetic methods. Scalable forward-genetic approaches that allow interrogation of gene function without any pre-existing knowledge are needed to hasten understanding of parasite biology, which will expedite the identification of drug targets and the development of future interventions in the face of spreading resistance to existing frontline drugs. In this work, we describe a new approach to pursue forward-genetic phenotypic screens for P. falciparum to identify factors associated with virulence. Future large-scale phenotypic screens developed to

  16. Gravimetric phenotyping of whole plant transpiration responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit identifies genotypic variation in water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Annette C; Dodd, Ian C; Rothwell, Shane A; Jones, Ros; Tardieu, Francois; Draye, Xavier; Davies, William J

    2016-10-01

    There is increasing interest in rapidly identifying genotypes with improved water use efficiency, exemplified by the development of whole plant phenotyping platforms that automatically measure plant growth and water use. Transpirational responses to atmospheric vapour pressure deficit (VPD) and whole plant water use efficiency (WUE, defined as the accumulation of above ground biomass per unit of water used) were measured in 100 maize (Zea mays L.) genotypes. Using a glasshouse based phenotyping platform with naturally varying VPD (1.5-3.8kPa), a 2-fold variation in WUE was identified in well-watered plants. Regression analysis of transpiration versus VPD under these conditions, and subsequent whole plant gas exchange at imposed VPDs (0.8-3.4kPa) showed identical responses in specific genotypes. Genotype response of transpiration versus VPD fell into two categories: 1) a linear increase in transpiration rate with VPD with low (high WUE) or high (low WUE) transpiration rate at all VPDs, 2) a non-linear response with a pronounced change point at low VPD (high WUE) or high VPD (low WUE). In the latter group, high WUE genotypes required a significantly lower VPD before transpiration was restricted, and had a significantly lower rate of transpiration in response to VPD after this point, when compared to low WUE genotypes. Change point values were significantly positively correlated with stomatal sensitivity to VPD. A change point in stomatal response to VPD may explain why some genotypes show contradictory WUE rankings according to whether they are measured under glasshouse or field conditions. Furthermore, this novel use of a high throughput phenotyping platform successfully reproduced the gas exchange responses of individuals measured in whole plant chambers, accelerating the identification of plants with high WUE.

  17. Nuclear Morphometry Identifies a Distinct Aggressive Cellular Phenotype in Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Glazer, Evan S.; Bartels, Peter H.; Prasad, Anil R.; Yozwiak, Michael L.; Bartels, Hubert G.; Einspahr, Janine G.; Alberts, David S.; Krouse, Robert S.

    2011-01-01

    By identifying aggressive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) in patients who are at high risk for recurrences or second primaries after resection, intensive surveillance and therapy may decrease morbidity and mortality. We investigated the role of nuclear morphometry (karyometry) in differentiating between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We retrospectively analyzed cSCC lesions from 40 male patients. 22 patients had evidence of aggressive cSCC (local/regional recurrence or a second primary cSCC), and 18 patients were identified with similar ages and sites of disease as control patients with nonaggressive cSCC (no evidence of recurrence, metastasis, or second primary). We performed karyometric analysis to identify nuclear features that discriminate between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC nuclei. We used statistically significant differences (Kruskal-Wallis test P < 0.0001) to compose a quantitative aggressive classification score (proportion of aggressive nuclei from 0% to 100%). For comparisons, we used Fisher’s exact test or Student t test. The mean age was 79 ± 7 years for aggressive cSCC and 80 ± 9 years for nonaggressive cSCC (P = 0.66). We analyzed a mean of 96 nuclei in each group. The mean classification score for aggressive cSCC was significantly higher (69% ± 6%) than for nonaggressive cSCC (28% ± 5%, P = 0.00002). Overall, the classification score accurately categorized 80% of our patients (P = 0.0004). In most patients, karyometry differentiated between aggressive and nonaggressive cSCC. We found that classification scores, which provide information on individual lesions, could be used for risk stratification. PMID:21636541

  18. Broadening of cohesinopathies: exome sequencing identifies mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with Cornelia de Lange-overlapping phenotype.

    PubMed

    Parenti, I; Gervasini, C; Pozojevic, J; Graul-Neumann, L; Azzollini, J; Braunholz, D; Watrin, E; Wendt, K S; Cereda, A; Cittaro, D; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Lazarevic, D; Mariani, M; Russo, S; Werner, R; Krawitz, P; Larizza, L; Selicorni, A; Kaiser, F J

    2016-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) and KBG syndrome are two distinct developmental pathologies sharing common features such as intellectual disability, psychomotor delay, and some craniofacial and limb abnormalities. Mutations in one of the five genes NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, HDAC8 or RAD21, were identified in at least 70% of the patients with CdLS. Consequently, additional causative genes, either unknown or responsible of partially merging entities, possibly account for the remaining 30% of the patients. In contrast, KBG has only been associated with mutations in ANKRD11. By exome sequencing we could identify heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in ANKRD11 in two patients with the clinical diagnosis of CdLS. Both patients show features reminiscent of CdLS such as characteristic facies as well as a small head circumference which is not described for KBG syndrome. Patient A, who carries the mutation in a mosaic state, is a 4-year-old girl with features reminiscent of CdLS. Patient B, a 15-year-old boy, shows a complex phenotype which resembled CdLS during infancy, but has developed to a more KBG overlapping phenotype during childhood. These findings point out the importance of screening ANKRD11 in young CdLS patients who were found to be negative for mutations in the five known CdLS genes.

  19. Phenotypic Screening Identifies Protein Synthesis Inhibitors as H-Ras-Nanocluster-Increasing Tumor Growth Inducers.

    PubMed

    Najumudeen, Arafath K; Posada, Itziar M D; Lectez, Benoit; Zhou, Yong; Landor, Sebastian K-J; Fallarero, Adyary; Vuorela, Pia; Hancock, John; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-12-15

    Ras isoforms H-, N-, and K-ras are each mutated in specific cancer types at varying frequencies and have different activities in cell fate control. On the plasma membrane, Ras proteins are laterally segregated into isoform-specific nanoscale signaling hubs, termed nanoclusters. As Ras nanoclusters are required for Ras signaling, chemical modulators of nanoclusters represent ideal candidates for the specific modulation of Ras activity in cancer drug development. We therefore conducted a chemical screen with commercial and in-house natural product libraries using a cell-based H-ras-nanoclustering FRET assay. Next to established Ras inhibitors, such as a statin and farnesyl-transferase inhibitor, we surprisingly identified five protein synthesis inhibitors as positive regulators. Using commonly employed cycloheximide as a representative compound, we show that protein synthesis inhibition increased nanoclustering and effector recruitment specifically of active H-ras but not of K-ras. Consistent with these data, cycloheximide treatment activated both Erk and Akt kinases and specifically promoted H-rasG12V-induced, but not K-rasG12V-induced, PC12 cell differentiation. Intriguingly, cycloheximide increased the number of mammospheres, which are enriched for cancer stem cells. Depletion of H-ras in combination with cycloheximide significantly reduced mammosphere formation, suggesting an exquisite synthetic lethality. The potential of cycloheximide to promote tumor cell growth was also reflected in its ability to increase breast cancer cell tumors grown in ovo. These results illustrate the possibility of identifying Ras-isoform-specific modulators using nanocluster-directed screening. They also suggest an unexpected feedback from protein synthesis inhibition to Ras signaling, which might present a vulnerability in certain tumor cell types.

  20. A new class of temporarily phenotypic enhancers identified by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genetic screening

    PubMed Central

    Diao, Yarui; Li, Bin; Meng, Zhipeng; Jung, Inkyung; Lee, Ah Young; Dixon, Jesse; Maliskova, Lenka; Guan, Kun-liang; Shen, Yin; Ren, Bing

    2016-01-01

    With <2% of the human genome coding for proteins, a major challenge is to interpret the function of the noncoding DNA. Millions of regulatory sequences have been predicted in the human genome through analysis of DNA methylation, chromatin modification, hypersensitivity to nucleases, and transcription factor binding, but few have been shown to regulate transcription in their native contexts. We have developed a high-throughput CRISPR/Cas9-based genome-editing strategy and used it to interrogate 174 candidate regulatory sequences within the 1-Mbp POU5F1 locus in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We identified two classical regulatory elements, including a promoter and a proximal enhancer, that are essential for POU5F1 transcription in hESCs. Unexpectedly, we also discovered a new class of enhancers that contribute to POU5F1 transcription in an unusual way: Disruption of such sequences led to a temporary loss of POU5F1 transcription that is fully restored after a few rounds of cell division. These results demonstrate the utility of high-throughput screening for functional characterization of noncoding DNA and reveal a previously unrecognized layer of gene regulation in human cells. PMID:26813977

  1. Adult Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Phenotypes Identified by Targeting Embryonic and Postnatal Neural Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, Maria; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are generated during embryonic development and in adulthood, although adult neurogenesis is restricted to two main brain regions, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles generates neural stem/progenitor cells that continually provide the olfactory bulb (OB) with new granule or periglomerular neurons, cells that arrive from the SVZ via the rostral migratory stream. The continued neurogenesis and the adequate integration of these newly generated interneurons is essential to maintain homeostasis in the olfactory bulb, where the differentiation of these cells into specific neural cell types is strongly influenced by temporal cues. Therefore, identifying the critical features that control the generation of adult OB interneurons at either pre- or post-natal stages is important to understand the dynamic contribution of neural stem cells. Here, we used in utero and neonatal SVZ electroporation along with a transposase-mediated stable integration plasmid, in order to track interneurons and glial lineages in the OB. These plasmids are valuable tools to study the development of OB interneurons from embryonic and post-natal SVZ progenitors. Accordingly, we examined the location and identity of the adult progeny of embryonic and post-natally transfected progenitors by examining neurochemical markers in the adult OB. These data reveal the different cell types in the olfactory bulb that are generated in function of age and different electroporation conditions. PMID:27242400

  2. A High-Content, Phenotypic Screen Identifies Fluorouridine as an Inhibitor of Pyoverdine Biosynthesis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence.

    PubMed

    Kirienko, Daniel R; Revtovich, Alexey V; Kirienko, Natalia V

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe health problems. Despite intensive investigation, many aspects of microbial virulence remain poorly understood. We used a high-throughput, high-content, whole-organism, phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Approximately half of the hits were known antimicrobials. A large number of hits were nonantimicrobial bioactive compounds, including the cancer chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. We determined that 5-fluorouracil both transiently inhibits bacterial growth and reduces pyoverdine biosynthesis. Pyoverdine is a siderophore that regulates the expression of several virulence determinants and is critical for pathogenesis in mammals. We show that 5-fluorouridine, a downstream metabolite of 5-fluorouracil, is responsible for inhibiting pyoverdine biosynthesis. We also show that 5-fluorouridine, in contrast to 5-fluorouracil, is a genuine antivirulence compound, with no bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing a whole-organism screen to identify novel compounds with antivirulent properties effective against P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE Despite intense research effort from scientists and the advent of the molecular age of biomedical research, many of the mechanisms that underlie pathogenesis are still understood poorly, if at all. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of soft tissue infections and is responsible for over 50,000 hospital-acquired infections per year. In addition, P. aeruginosa exhibits a striking degree of innate and acquired antimicrobial resistance, complicating treatment. It is increasingly important to understand P. aeruginosa virulence. In an effort to gain this information in an unbiased fashion, we used a high-throughput phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that disrupted bacterial pathogenesis and increased host

  3. A Phenotype-Driven ENU Mutagenesis Screen Identifies Novel Alleles With Functional Roles in Early Mouse Craniofacial Development

    PubMed Central

    Sandell, Lisa L.; Iulianella, Angelo; Melton, Kristin R.; Lynn, Megan; Walker, Macie; Inman, Kimberly E.; Bhatt, Shachi; Leroux-Berger, Margot; Crawford, Michelle; Jones, Natalie C.; Dennis, Jennifer F.; Trainor, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Proper craniofacial development begins during gastrulation and requires the coordinated integration of each germ layer tissue (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) and its derivatives in concert with the precise regulation of cell proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Neural crest cells, which are derived from ectoderm, are a migratory progenitor cell population that generates most of the cartilage, bone, and connective tissue of the head and face. Neural crest cell development is regulated by a combination of intrinsic cell autonomous signals acquired during their formation, balanced with extrinsic signals from tissues with which the neural crest cells interact during their migration and differentiation. Although craniofacial anomalies are typically attributed to defects in neural crest cell development, the cause may be intrinsic or extrinsic. Therefore, we performed a phenotype-driven ENU mutagenesis screen in mice with the aim of identifying novel alleles in an unbiased manner, that are critically required for early craniofacial development. Here we describe 10 new mutant lines, which exhibit phenotypes affecting frontonasal and pharyngeal arch patterning, neural and vascular development as well as sensory organ morphogenesis. Interestingly, our data imply that neural crest cells and endothelial cells may employ similar developmental programs and be interdependent during early embryogenesis, which collectively is critical for normal craniofacial morphogenesis. Furthermore our novel mutants that model human conditions such as exencephaly, craniorachischisis, DiGeorge, and Velocardiofacial sydnromes could be very useful in furthering our understanding of the complexities of specific human diseases. PMID:21305688

  4. Searching in the Dark: Phenotyping Diabetic Retinopathy in a De-Identified Electronic Medical Record Sample of African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Nicole A.; Farber-Eger, Eric; Crawford, Dana C.

    2016-01-01

    A hurdle to EMR-based studies is the characterization and extraction of complex phenotypes not readily defined by single diagnostic/procedural codes. Here we developed an algorithm utilizing data mining techniques to identify a diabetic retinopathy (DR) cohort of type-2 diabetic African Americans from the Vanderbilt University de-identified EMR system. The algorithm incorporates a combination of diagnostic codes, current procedural terminology billing codes, medications, and text matching to identify DR when gold-standard digital photography results were unavailable. DR cases were identified with a positive predictive value of 75.3% and an accuracy of 84.8%. Controls were classified with a negative predictive value of 1.0% as could be assessed. Limited studies of DR have been performed in African Americans who are at an elevated risk of DR. Identification of EMR-based African American cohorts may help stimulate new biomedical studies that could elucidate differences in risk for the development of DR and other complex diseases. PMID:27570675

  5. A Class of Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase 1 Inhibitors Identified by a Combination of Phenotypic High-throughput Screening, Genomics, and Genetics.

    PubMed

    Tschapalda, Kirsten; Zhang, Ya-Qin; Liu, Li; Golovnina, Kseniya; Schlemper, Thomas; Eichmann, Thomas O; Lal-Nag, Madhu; Sreenivasan, Urmila; McLenithan, John; Ziegler, Slava; Sztalryd, Carole; Lass, Achim; Auld, Douglas; Oliver, Brian; Waldmann, Herbert; Li, Zhuyin; Shen, Min; Boxer, Matthew B; Beller, Mathias

    2016-06-01

    Excess lipid storage is an epidemic problem in human populations. Thus, the identification of small molecules to treat or prevent lipid storage-related metabolic complications is of great interest. Here we screened >320.000 compounds for their ability to prevent a cellular lipid accumulation phenotype. We used fly cells because the multifarious tools available for this organism should facilitate unraveling the mechanism-of-action of active small molecules. Of the several hundred lipid storage inhibitors identified in the primary screen we concentrated on three structurally diverse and potent compound classes active in cells of multiple species (including human) and negligible cytotoxicity. Together with Drosophila in vivo epistasis experiments, RNA-Seq expression profiles suggested that the target of one of the small molecules was diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1), a key enzyme in the production of triacylglycerols and prominent human drug target. We confirmed this prediction by biochemical and enzymatic activity tests.

  6. A whole-cell phenotypic screening platform for identifying methylerythritol phosphate pathway-selective inhibitors as novel antibacterial agents.

    PubMed

    Testa, Charles A; Johnson, L Jeffrey

    2012-09-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis is essential for survival of all living organisms. More than 50,000 unique isoprenoids occur naturally, with each constructed from two simple five-carbon precursors: isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Two pathways for the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP are found in nature. Humans exclusively use the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, while most bacteria, including all Gram-negative and many Gram-positive species, use the unrelated methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we report the development of a novel, whole-cell phenotypic screening platform to identify compounds that selectively inhibit the MEP pathway. Strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were engineered to have separately inducible MEP (native) and MVA (nonnative) pathways. These strains, RMC26 and CT31-7d, were then used to differentiate MVA pathway- and MEP pathway-specific perturbation. Compounds that inhibit MEP pathway-dependent bacterial growth but leave MVA-dependent growth unaffected represent MEP pathway-selective antibacterials. This screening platform offers three significant results. First, the compound is antibacterial and is therefore cell permeant, enabling access to the intracellular target. Second, the compound inhibits one or more MEP pathway enzymes. Third, the MVA pathway is unaffected, suggesting selectivity for targeting the bacterial versus host pathway. The cell lines also display increased sensitivity to two reported MEP pathway-specific inhibitors, further biasing the platform toward inhibitors selective for the MEP pathway. We demonstrate development of a robust, high-throughput screening platform that combines phenotypic and target-based screening that can identify MEP pathway-selective antibacterials simply by monitoring optical density as the readout for cell growth/inhibition.

  7. Differential neuronal vulnerability identifies IGF-2 as a protective factor in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Allodi, Ilary; Comley, Laura; Nichterwitz, Susanne; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Benitez, Julio Aguila; Cao, Ming; Corti, Stefania; Hedlund, Eva

    2016-01-01

    The fatal disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by the loss of somatic motor neurons leading to muscle wasting and paralysis. However, motor neurons in the oculomotor nucleus, controlling eye movement, are for unknown reasons spared. We found that insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF-2) was maintained in oculomotor neurons in ALS and thus could play a role in oculomotor resistance in this disease. We also showed that IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), which mediates survival pathways upon IGF binding, was highly expressed in oculomotor neurons and on extraocular muscle endplate. The addition of IGF-2 induced Akt phosphorylation, glycogen synthase kinase-3β phosphorylation and β-catenin levels while protecting ALS patient motor neurons. IGF-2 also rescued motor neurons derived from spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients from degeneration. Finally, AAV9::IGF-2 delivery to muscles of SOD1G93A ALS mice extended life-span by 10%, while preserving motor neurons and inducing motor axon regeneration. Thus, our studies demonstrate that oculomotor-specific expression can be utilized to identify candidates that protect vulnerable motor neurons from degeneration. PMID:27180807

  8. RWCFusion: identifying phenotype-specific cancer driver gene fusions based on fusion pair random walk scoring method

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianmei; Li, Xuecang; Yao, Qianlan; Li, Meng; Zhang, Jian; Ai, Bo; Liu, Wei; Wang, Qiuyu; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Yuejuan; Bai, Xuefeng; Song, Chao; Li, Shang; Li, Enmin; Xu, Liyan; Li, Chunquan

    2016-01-01

    While gene fusions have been increasingly detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies based methods in human cancers, these methods have limitations in identifying driver fusions. In addition, the existing methods to identify driver gene fusions ignored the specificity among different cancers or only considered their local rather than global topology features in networks. Here, we proposed a novel network-based method, called RWCFusion, to identify phenotype-specific cancer driver gene fusions. To evaluate its performance, we used leave-one-out cross-validation in 35 cancers and achieved a high AUC value 0.925 for overall cancers and an average 0.929 for signal cancer. Furthermore, we classified 35 cancers into two classes: haematological and solid, of which the haematological got a highly AUC which is up to 0.968. Finally, we applied RWCFusion to breast cancer and found that top 13 gene fusions, such as BCAS3-BCAS4, NOTCH-NUP214, MED13-BCAS3 and CARM-SMARCA4, have been previously proved to be drivers for breast cancer. Additionally, 8 among the top 10 of the remaining candidate gene fusions, such as SULF2-ZNF217, MED1-ACSF2, and ACACA-STAC2, were inferred to be potential driver gene fusions of breast cancer by us. PMID:27506935

  9. RWCFusion: identifying phenotype-specific cancer driver gene fusions based on fusion pair random walk scoring method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianmei; Li, Xuecang; Yao, Qianlan; Li, Meng; Zhang, Jian; Ai, Bo; Liu, Wei; Wang, Qiuyu; Feng, Chenchen; Liu, Yuejuan; Bai, Xuefeng; Song, Chao; Li, Shang; Li, Enmin; Xu, Liyan; Li, Chunquan

    2016-09-20

    While gene fusions have been increasingly detected by next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies based methods in human cancers, these methods have limitations in identifying driver fusions. In addition, the existing methods to identify driver gene fusions ignored the specificity among different cancers or only considered their local rather than global topology features in networks. Here, we proposed a novel network-based method, called RWCFusion, to identify phenotype-specific cancer driver gene fusions. To evaluate its performance, we used leave-one-out cross-validation in 35 cancers and achieved a high AUC value 0.925 for overall cancers and an average 0.929 for signal cancer. Furthermore, we classified 35 cancers into two classes: haematological and solid, of which the haematological got a highly AUC which is up to 0.968. Finally, we applied RWCFusion to breast cancer and found that top 13 gene fusions, such as BCAS3-BCAS4, NOTCH-NUP214, MED13-BCAS3 and CARM-SMARCA4, have been previously proved to be drivers for breast cancer. Additionally, 8 among the top 10 of the remaining candidate gene fusions, such as SULF2-ZNF217, MED1-ACSF2, and ACACA-STAC2, were inferred to be potential driver gene fusions of breast cancer by us.

  10. Axonal transport defects are a common phenotype in Drosophila models of ALS

    PubMed Central

    Baldwin, Katie R.; Godena, Vinay K.; Hewitt, Victoria L.; Whitworth, Alexander J.

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by the degeneration of motor neurons resulting in a catastrophic loss of motor function. Current therapies are severely limited owing to a poor mechanistic understanding of the pathobiology. Mutations in a large number of genes have now been linked to ALS, including SOD1, TARDBP (TDP-43), FUS and C9orf72. Functional analyses of these genes and their pathogenic mutations have provided great insights into the underlying disease mechanisms. Defective axonal transport is hypothesized to be a key factor in the selective vulnerability of motor nerves due to their extraordinary length and evidence that ALS occurs as a distal axonopathy. Axonal transport is seen as an early pathogenic event that precedes cell loss and clinical symptoms and so represents an upstream mechanism for therapeutic targeting. Studies have begun to describe the impact of a few pathogenic mutations on axonal transport but a broad survey across a range of models and cargos is warranted. Here, we assessed the axonal transport of different cargos in multiple Drosophila models of ALS. We found that axonal transport defects are common across all models tested, although they often showed a differential effect between mitochondria and vesicle cargos. Motor deficits were also common across the models and generally worsened with age, though surprisingly there was not a clear correlation between the severity of axonal transport defects and motor ability. These results further support defects in axonal transport as a common factor in models of ALS that may contribute to the pathogenic process. PMID:27056981

  11. Direct Lineage Reprogramming Reveals Disease-Specific Phenotypes of Motor Neurons from Human ALS Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-Lu; Zang, Tong; Zhang, Chun-Li

    2016-01-05

    Subtype-specific neurons obtained from adult humans will be critical to modeling neurodegenerative diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here, we show that adult human skin fibroblasts can be directly and efficiently converted into highly pure motor neurons without passing through an induced pluripotent stem cell stage. These adult human induced motor neurons (hiMNs) exhibit the cytological and electrophysiological features of spinal motor neurons and form functional neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) with skeletal muscles. Importantly, hiMNs converted from ALS patient fibroblasts show disease-specific degeneration manifested through poor survival, soma shrinkage, hypoactivity, and an inability to form NMJs. A chemical screen revealed that the degenerative features of ALS hiMNs can be remarkably rescued by the small molecule kenpaullone. Taken together, our results define a direct and efficient strategy to obtain disease-relevant neuronal subtypes from adult human patients and reveal their promising value in disease modeling and drug identification.

  12. IL-10 Controls Early Microglial Phenotypes and Disease Onset in ALS Caused by Misfolded Superoxide Dismutase 1.

    PubMed

    Gravel, Mathieu; Béland, Louis-Charles; Soucy, Geneviève; Abdelhamid, Essam; Rahimian, Reza; Gravel, Claude; Kriz, Jasna

    2016-01-20

    While reactive microgliosis is a hallmark of advanced stages of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the role of microglial cells in events initiating and/or precipitating disease onset is largely unknown. Here we provide novel in vivo evidence of a distinct adaptive shift in functional microglial phenotypes in preclinical stages of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1)-mutant-mediated disease. Using a mouse model for live imaging of microglial activation crossed with SOD1(G93A) and SOD1(G37R) mouse models, we discovered that the preonset phase of SOD1-mediated disease is characterized by development of distinct anti-inflammatory profile and attenuated innate immune/TLR2 responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. This microglial phenotype was associated with a 16-fold overexpression of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in baseline conditions followed by a 4.5-fold increase following LPS challenge. While infusion of IL-10R blocking antibody, initiated at day 60, caused a significant increase in markers of microglial activation and precipitated clinical onset of disease, a targeted overexpression of IL-10 in microglial cells, delivered via viral vectors expressed under CD11b promoter, significantly delayed disease onset and increased survival of SOD1(G93A) mice. We propose that the high IL-10 levels in resident microglia in early ALS represent a homeostatic and compensatory "adaptive immune escape" mechanism acting as a nonneuronal determinant of clinical onset of disease. Significance statement: We report here for the first time that changing the immune profile of brain microglia may significantly affect clinical onset and duration of disease in ALS models. We discovered that in presymptomatic disease microglial cells overexpress anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Given that IL-10 is major homeostatic cytokine and its production becomes deregulated with aging, this may suggest that the capacity of microglia to adequately produce IL-10 may be compromised in ALS. We show

  13. Genome-Wide Association Studies Identify Two Novel BMP15 Mutations Responsible for an Atypical Hyperprolificacy Phenotype in Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Demars, Julie; Fabre, Stéphane; Sarry, Julien; Rossetti, Raffaella; Gilbert, Hélène; Persani, Luca; Tosser-Klopp, Gwenola; Mulsant, Philippe; Nowak, Zuzanna; Drobik, Wioleta; Martyniuk, Elzbieta; Bodin, Loys

    2013-01-01

    Some sheep breeds are naturally prolific, and they are very informative for the studies of reproductive genetics and physiology. Major genes increasing litter size (LS) and ovulation rate (OR) were suspected in the French Grivette and the Polish Olkuska sheep populations, respectively. To identify genetic variants responsible for the highly prolific phenotype in these two breeds, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) followed by complementary genetic and functional analyses were performed. Highly prolific ewes (cases) and normal prolific ewes (controls) from each breed were genotyped using the Illumina OvineSNP50 Genotyping Beadchip. In both populations, an X chromosome region, close to the BMP15 gene, harbored clusters of markers with suggestive evidence of association at significance levels between 1E−05 and 1E−07. The BMP15 candidate gene was then sequenced, and two novel non-conservative mutations called FecXGr and FecXO were identified in the Grivette and Olkuska breeds, respectively. The two mutations were associated with the highly prolific phenotype (pFecXGr = 5.98E−06 and pFecXO = 2.55E−08). Homozygous ewes for the mutated allele showed a significantly increased prolificacy (FecXGr/FecXGr, LS = 2.50±0.65 versus FecX+/FecXGr, LS = 1.93±0.42, p<1E−03 and FecXO/FecXO, OR = 3.28±0.85 versus FecX+/FecXO, OR = 2.02±0.47, p<1E−03). Both mutations are located in very well conserved motifs of the protein and altered the BMP15 signaling activity in vitro using a BMP-responsive luciferase test in COV434 granulosa cells. Thus, we have identified two novel mutations in the BMP15 gene associated with increased LS and OR. Notably, homozygous FecXGr/FecXGr Grivette and homozygous FecXO/FecXO Olkuska ewes are hyperprolific in striking contrast with the sterility exhibited by all other known homozygous BMP15 mutations. Our results bring new insights into the key role played by the BMP15 protein in ovarian function and could

  14. A High-Content, Phenotypic Screen Identifies Fluorouridine as an Inhibitor of Pyoverdine Biosynthesis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Kirienko, Daniel R.; Revtovich, Alexey V.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes severe health problems. Despite intensive investigation, many aspects of microbial virulence remain poorly understood. We used a high-throughput, high-content, whole-organism, phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that inhibit P. aeruginosa virulence in Caenorhabditis elegans. Approximately half of the hits were known antimicrobials. A large number of hits were nonantimicrobial bioactive compounds, including the cancer chemotherapeutic 5-fluorouracil. We determined that 5-fluorouracil both transiently inhibits bacterial growth and reduces pyoverdine biosynthesis. Pyoverdine is a siderophore that regulates the expression of several virulence determinants and is critical for pathogenesis in mammals. We show that 5-fluorouridine, a downstream metabolite of 5-fluorouracil, is responsible for inhibiting pyoverdine biosynthesis. We also show that 5-fluorouridine, in contrast to 5-fluorouracil, is a genuine antivirulence compound, with no bacteriostatic or bactericidal activity. To our knowledge, this is the first report utilizing a whole-organism screen to identify novel compounds with antivirulent properties effective against P. aeruginosa. IMPORTANCE Despite intense research effort from scientists and the advent of the molecular age of biomedical research, many of the mechanisms that underlie pathogenesis are still understood poorly, if at all. The opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes a variety of soft tissue infections and is responsible for over 50,000 hospital-acquired infections per year. In addition, P. aeruginosa exhibits a striking degree of innate and acquired antimicrobial resistance, complicating treatment. It is increasingly important to understand P. aeruginosa virulence. In an effort to gain this information in an unbiased fashion, we used a high-throughput phenotypic screen to identify small molecules that disrupted bacterial pathogenesis and

  15. Exploitation of a “hockey-puck” phenotype to identify pilus and biofilm regulators in Serratia marcescens through genetic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shanks, Robert M.Q.; Stella, Nicholas A.; Brothers, Kimberly M.; Polaski, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    Pili are essential adhesive determinants for many bacterial pathogens. A suppressor mutation screen that takes advantage of a pilus-mediated self-aggregative “hockey-puck” colony phenotype was designed to identify novel regulators of type I pili in Serratia marcescens. Mutations that decreased pilus biosynthesis mapped to the fimABCD operon; to the genes alaT, fkpA, and oxyR; upstream of the flagellar master regulator operon flhDC; and to an uncharacterized gene encoding a predicted DUF1401 domain. biofilm formation and pilus-dependent agglutination assays were used to characterize the relative importance of the identified genes in pilus biosynthesis. Additional mutagenic or complementation analysis was used to verify the role of candidate genes in pilus biosynthesis. Presented data support a model that CRP negatively regulates pilus biosynthesis through increased expression of flhDC and decreased expression of oxyR. Further studies are warranted to determine the mechanism by which these genes mediate pilus biosynthesis or function. PMID:26640000

  16. Factor analysis of 27Al MAS NMR spectra for identifying nanocrystalline phases in amorphous geopolymers.

    PubMed

    Urbanova, Martina; Kobera, Libor; Brus, Jiri

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured materials offer enhanced physicochemical properties because of the large interfacial area. Typically, geopolymers with specifically synthesized nanosized zeolites are a promising material for the sorption of pollutants. The structural characterization of these aluminosilicates, however, continues to be a challenge. To circumvent complications resulting from the amorphous character of the aluminosilicate matrix and from the low concentrations of nanosized crystallites, we have proposed a procedure based on factor analysis of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra. The capability of the proposed method was tested on geopolymers that exhibited various tendencies to crystallize (i) completely amorphous systems, (ii) X-ray amorphous systems with nanocrystalline phases, and (iii) highly crystalline systems. Although the recorded (27)Al MAS NMR spectra did not show visible differences between the amorphous systems (i) and the geopolymers with the nanocrystalline phase (ii), the applied factor analysis unambiguously distinguished these materials. The samples were separated into the well-defined clusters, and the systems with the evolving crystalline phase were identified even before any crystalline fraction was detected by X-ray powder diffraction. Reliability of the proposed procedure was verified by comparing it with (29)Si MAS NMR spectra. Factor analysis of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra thus has the ability to reveal spectroscopic features corresponding to the nanocrystalline phases. Because the measurement time of (27)Al MAS NMR spectra is significantly shorter than that of (29)Si MAS NMR data, the proposed procedure is particularly suitable for the analysis of large sets of specifically synthesized geopolymers in which the formation of the limited fractions of nanocrystalline phases is desired.

  17. A molecular and phenotypic integrative approach to identify a no-effect dose level for antiandrogen-induced testicular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Sophie; Tinwell, Helen; Schorsch, Frédéric; Cavaillé, Christel; Pallardy, Marc; Rouquié, David; Bars, Rémi

    2011-07-01

    The safety assessment of chemicals for humans relies on identifying no-observed adverse effect levels (NOAELs) in animal toxicity studies using standard methods. With the advent of high information content technologies, especially microarrays, it is pertinent to determine the impact of molecular data on the NOAELs. Consequently, we conducted an integrative study to identify a no-transcriptomic effect dose using microarray analyses coupled with quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-qPCR) and determined how this correlated with the NOAEL. We assessed the testicular effects of the antiandrogen, flutamide (FM), in a rat 28-day toxicity study using doses of 0.2-30 mg/kg/day. Plasma testosterone levels and testicular histopathology indicated a NOAEL of 1 mg/kg/day. A no-effect dose of 0.2 mg/kg/day was established based on molecular data relevant to the phenotypic changes. We observed differential gene expression starting from 1 mg/kg/day and a deregulation of more than 1500 genes at 30 mg/kg/day. Dose-related changes were identified for the major pathways (e.g., fatty acid metabolism) associated with the testicular lesion (Leydig cell hyperplasia) that were confirmed by RT-qPCR. These data, along with protein accumulation profiles and FM metabolite concentrations in testis, supported the no-effect dose of 0.2 mg/kg/day. Furthermore, the microarray data indicated a dose-dependent change in the fatty acid catabolism pathway, a biological process described for the first time to be affected by FM in testicular tissue. In conclusion, the present data indicate the existence of a transcriptomic threshold, which must be exceeded to progress from a normal state to an adaptative state and subsequently to adverse toxicity.

  18. Human SOD1 ALS Mutations in a Drosophila Knock-In Model Cause Severe Phenotypes and Reveal Dosage-Sensitive Gain- and Loss-of-Function Components.

    PubMed

    Şahin, Aslı; Held, Aaron; Bredvik, Kirsten; Major, Paxton; Achilli, Toni-Marie; Kerson, Abigail G; Wharton, Kristi; Stilwell, Geoff; Reenan, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease and familial forms can be caused by numerous dominant mutations of the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) gene. Substantial efforts have been invested in studying SOD1-ALS transgenic animal models; yet, the molecular mechanisms by which ALS-mutant SOD1 protein acquires toxicity are not well understood. ALS-like phenotypes in animal models are highly dependent on transgene dosage. Thus, issues of whether the ALS-like phenotypes of these models stem from overexpression of mutant alleles or from aspects of the SOD1 mutation itself are not easily deconvolved. To address concerns about levels of mutant SOD1 in disease pathogenesis, we have genetically engineered four human ALS-causing SOD1 point mutations (G37R, H48R, H71Y, and G85R) into the endogenous locus of Drosophila SOD1 (dsod) via ends-out homologous recombination and analyzed the resulting molecular, biochemical, and behavioral phenotypes. Contrary to previous transgenic models, we have recapitulated ALS-like phenotypes without overexpression of the mutant protein. Drosophila carrying homozygous mutations rendering SOD1 protein enzymatically inactive (G85R, H48R, and H71Y) exhibited neurodegeneration, locomotor deficits, and shortened life span. The mutation retaining enzymatic activity (G37R) was phenotypically indistinguishable from controls. While the observed mutant dsod phenotypes were recessive, a gain-of-function component was uncovered through dosage studies and comparisons with age-matched dsod null animals, which failed to show severe locomotor defects or nerve degeneration. We conclude that the Drosophila knock-in model captures important aspects of human SOD1-based ALS and provides a powerful and useful tool for further genetic studies.

  19. A broad phenotypic screen identifies novel phenotypes driven by a single mutant allele in Huntington's disease CAG knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Hölter, Sabine M; Stromberg, Mary; Kovalenko, Marina; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Lopez, Edith; Guide, Jolene; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Schrewed, Anja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Schulz, Holger; Wolf, Eckhard; Wursta, Wolfgang; Gillis, Tammy; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Seidman, Jonathan; MacDonald, Marcy E; Cotman, Susan; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Lee, Jong-Min; Wheeler, Vanessa C

    2013-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing.

  20. A Broad Phenotypic Screen Identifies Novel Phenotypes Driven by a Single Mutant Allele in Huntington’s Disease CAG Knock-In Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Marina; Garrett, Lillian; Glasl, Lisa; Lopez, Edith; Guide, Jolene; Götz, Alexander; Hans, Wolfgang; Becker, Lore; Rathkolb, Birgit; Rozman, Jan; Schrewed, Anja; Klingenspor, Martin; Klopstock, Thomas; Schulz, Holger; Wolf, Eckhard; Wursta, Wolfgang; Gillis, Tammy; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Seidman, Jonathan; MacDonald, Marcy E.; Cotman, Susan; Gailus-Durner, Valérie; Fuchs, Helmut; de Angelis, Martin Hrabě; Lee, Jong-Min; Wheeler, Vanessa C.

    2013-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat in the HTT gene encoding huntingtin. The disease has an insidious course, typically progressing over 10-15 years until death. Currently there is no effective disease-modifying therapy. To better understand the HD pathogenic process we have developed genetic HTT CAG knock-in mouse models that accurately recapitulate the HD mutation in man. Here, we describe results of a broad, standardized phenotypic screen in 10-46 week old heterozygous HdhQ111 knock-in mice, probing a wide range of physiological systems. The results of this screen revealed a number of behavioral abnormalities in HdhQ111/+ mice that include hypoactivity, decreased anxiety, motor learning and coordination deficits, and impaired olfactory discrimination. The screen also provided evidence supporting subtle cardiovascular, lung, and plasma metabolite alterations. Importantly, our results reveal that a single mutant HTT allele in the mouse is sufficient to elicit multiple phenotypic abnormalities, consistent with a dominant disease process in patients. These data provide a starting point for further investigation of several organ systems in HD, for the dissection of underlying pathogenic mechanisms and for the identification of reliable phenotypic endpoints for therapeutic testing. PMID:24278347

  1. Phenotype-based high-content chemical library screening identifies statins as inhibitors of in vivo lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Martin Michael Peter; Reisen, Felix; Zgraggen, Silvana; Fischer, Stephanie; Yuen, Don; Kang, Gyeong Jin; Chen, Lu; Schneider, Gisbert; Detmar, Michael

    2012-10-02

    Lymphangiogenesis plays an important role in promoting cancer metastasis to sentinel lymph nodes and beyond and also promotes organ transplant rejection. We used human lymphatic endothelial cells to establish a reliable three-dimensional lymphangiogenic sprouting assay with automated image acquisition and analysis for inhibitor screening. This high-content phenotype-based assay quantifies sprouts by automated fluorescence microscopy and newly developed analysis software. We identified signaling pathways involved in lymphangiogenic sprouting by screening the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC)(1280) collection of pharmacologically relevant compounds. Hit characterization revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) 1/2 inhibitors substantially block lymphangiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, the drug class of statins, for the first time, emerged as potent inhibitors of lymphangiogenic sprouting in vitro and of corneal and cutaneous lymphangiogenesis in vivo. This effect was mediated by inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and subsequently the isoprenylation of Rac1. Supplementation with the enzymatic products of HMG-CoA reductase functionally rescued lymphangiogenic sprouting and the recruitment of Rac1 to the plasma membrane.

  2. Chronic Exposure to Dietary Sterol Glucosides is Neurotoxic to Motor Neurons and Induces an ALS-PDC Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Tabata, R. C.; Wilson, J. M. B.; Ly, P.; Zwiegers, P.; Kwok, D.; Van Kampen, J. M.; Cashman, N.; Shaw, C. A.

    2008-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of the Guamanian variants of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and parkinsonism, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-parkinsonism dementia complex (ALS-PDC), have shown a positive correlation between consumption of washed cycad seed flour and disease occurrence. Previous in vivo studies by our group have shown that the same seed flour induces ALS and PDC phenotypes in out bred adult male mice. In vitro studies using isolated cycad compounds have also demonstrated that several of these are neurotoxic, specifically, a number of water insoluble phytosterol glucosides of which β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside (BSSG) forms the largest fraction. BSSG is neurotoxic to motor neurons and other neuronal populations in culture. The present study shows that an in vitro hybrid motor neuron (NSC-34) culture treated with BSSG undergoes a dose-dependent cell loss. Surviving cells show increased expression of HSP70, decreased cytosolic heavy neurofilament expression, and have various morphological abnormalities. CD-1 mice fed mouse chow pellets containing BSSG for 15 weeks showed motor deficits and motor neuron loss in the lumbar and thoracic spinal cord, along with decreased glutamate transporter labelling, and increased glial fibrillary acid protein reactivity. Other pathological outcomes included increased caspase-3 labelling in the striatum and decreased tyrosine-hydroxylase labelling in the striatum and substantia nigra. C57BL/6 mice fed BSSG-treated pellets for 10 weeks exhibited progressive loss of motor neurons in the lumbar spinal cord that continued to worsen even after the BSSG exposure ended. These results provide further support implicating sterol glucosides as one potential causal factor in the motor neuron pathology previously associated with cycad consumption and ALS-PDC. PMID:18196479

  3. Behcet brain tissue identified with increased levels of Si and Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranyosiova, Monika; Kopani, Martin; Rychly, Boris; Jakubovsky, Jan; Velic, Dusan

    2008-12-01

    Behcet disease is a multi-system disorder with still uncertain chemical causality. Chemical composition of molecules and elements in a human brain tissue of Behcet diseased patient is of interest. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry is used to provide complex composition in Behcet disease and control tissues. Determined organic compounds are represented by fragments of carbohydrates, phospholipids, amino acids, and peptides in both samples without any qualitative differences. Trace heavy elements as Fe, Zn, and Cu are identified in Behcet disease tissue with increased intensities by only an averaged factor of 2.2 in comparison to the control. The significant differences between the control and Behcet disease tissues are in the presence of Si and Al. These two elements have significantly higher intensities by an averaged factor of 10.0 in Behcet disease tissue. The origin of Al and Si occurrence and the chronology of their accumulation are not clear, moreover this observation supports a significance of chemical characterization in an early stage of disease.

  4. Genome-wide Association Study Identifies HLA 8.1 Ancestral Haplotype Alleles as Major Genetic Risk Factors for Myositis Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Frederick W.; Chen, Wei; O’Hanlon, Terrance P.; Cooper, Robert G.; Vencovsky, Jiri; Rider, Lisa G.; Danko, Katalin; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Lundberg, Ingrid E.; Pachman, Lauren M.; Reed, Ann M.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Padyukov, Leonid; Selva-O’Callaghan, Albert; Radstake, Timothy R.; Isenberg, David A.; Chinoy, Hector; Ollier, William E.R.; Scheet, Paul; Peng, Bo; Lee, Annette; Byun, Jinyoung; Lamb, Janine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Amos, Christopher I.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis; 473 juvenile dermatomyositis; 532 polymyositis; and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (P < 5 × 10−8) in GWAS were identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region for all myositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1haplotype comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations. PMID:26291516

  5. Genome-wide association study identifies HLA 8.1 ancestral haplotype alleles as major genetic risk factors for myositis phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Miller, F W; Chen, W; O'Hanlon, T P; Cooper, R G; Vencovsky, J; Rider, L G; Danko, K; Wedderburn, L R; Lundberg, I E; Pachman, L M; Reed, A M; Ytterberg, S R; Padyukov, L; Selva-O'Callaghan, A; Radstake, T R; Isenberg, D A; Chinoy, H; Ollier, W E R; Scheet, P; Peng, B; Lee, A; Byun, J; Lamb, J A; Gregersen, P K; Amos, C I

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis, 473 juvenile dermatomyositis, 532 polymyositis and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl-tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (P<5×10(-8)) in GWAS were identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region for all myositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1 comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations.

  6. NCR1 Expression Identifies Canine Natural Killer Cell Subsets with Phenotypic Similarity to Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Foltz, Jennifer A.; Somanchi, Srinivas S.; Yang, Yanwen; Aquino-Lopez, Arianexys; Bishop, Erin E.; Lee, Dean A.

    2016-01-01

    Canines spontaneously develop many cancers similar to humans – including osteosarcoma, leukemia, and lymphoma – offering the opportunity to study immune therapies in a genetically heterogeneous and immunocompetent environment. However, a lack of antibodies recognizing canine NK cell markers has resulted in suboptimal characterization and unknown purity of NK cell products, hindering the development of canine models of NK cell adoptive immunotherapy. To this end, we generated a novel antibody to canine NCR1 (NKp46), the putative species-wide marker of NK cells, enabling purification of NK cells for further characterization. We demonstrate that CD3−/NKp46+ cells in healthy and osteosarcoma-bearing canines have phenotypic similarity to human CD3−/NKp46+ NK cells, expressing mRNA for CD16 and the natural cytotoxicity receptors NKp30, NKp44, and NKp80. Functionally, we demonstrate with the calcein release assay that canine CD3−/NKp46+ cells kill canine tumor cell lines without prior sensitization and secrete IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-10, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor as measured by Luminex. Similar to human NK cells, CD3−/NKp46+ cells expand rapidly on feeder cells expressing 4-1BBL and membrane-bound IL-21 (median = 20,283-fold in 21 days). Furthermore, we identify a minor Null population (CD3−/CD21−/CD14−/NKp46−) with reduced cytotoxicity against osteosarcoma cells, but similar cytokine secretion as CD3−/NKp46+ cells. Null cells in canines and humans have reduced expression of NKG2D, NKp44, and CD16 compared to NKp46+ NK cells and can be induced to express NKp46 with further expansion on feeder cells. In conclusion, we have identified and characterized canine NK cells, including an NKp46− subset of canine and human NK cells, using a novel anti-canine NKp46 antibody, and report robust ex vivo expansion of canine NK cells sufficient for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27933061

  7. Molecular genetics of addiction and related heritable phenotypes: genome wide association approaches identify “connectivity constellation” and drug target genes with pleiotropic effects

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, George R; Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine; Li, Chuan-Yun; Contoreggi, Carlo; Hess, Judith; Naiman, Daniel; Liu, Qing-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association (GWA) can elucidate molecular genetic bases for human individual differences in “complex” phenotypes that include vulnerability to addiction. Here, we review: a) evidence that supports polygenic models with (at least) modest heterogeneity for the genetic architectures of addiction and several related phenotypes; b) technical and ethical aspects of importance for understanding genome wide association data: genotyping in individual samples vs DNA pools, analytic approaches, power estimation and ethical issues in genotyping individuals with illegal behaviors; c) the samples and the data that shape our current understanding of the molecular genetics of individual differences in vulnerability to substance dependence and related phenotypes; d) overlaps between GWA datasets for dependence on different substances; e) overlaps between GWA data for addictions vs other heritable, brain-based phenotypes that include: i) bipolar disorder, ii) cognitive ability, iii) frontal lobe brain volume, iv) ability to successfully quit smoking, v) neuroticism and vi) Alzheimer’s disease. These convergent results identify potential targets for drugs that might modify addictions and play roles in these other phenotypes. They add to evidence that individual differences in the quality and quantity of brain connections make pleiotropic contributions to individual differences in vulnerability to addictions and to related brain disorders and phenotypes. A “connectivity constellation” of brain phenotypes and disorders appears to receive substantial pathogenic contributions from individual differences in a constellation of genes whose variants provide individual differences in the specification of brain connectivities during development and in adulthood. Heritable brain differences that underlie addiction vulnerability thus lie squarely in the midst of the repertoire of heritable brain differences that underlie vulnerability to other common brain disorders and

  8. Proteome-wide association studies identify biochemical modules associated with a wing-size phenotype in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Hirokazu; Ebhardt, H. Alexander; Vonesch, Sibylle Chantal; Aebersold, Ruedi; Hafen, Ernst

    2016-01-01

    The manner by which genetic diversity within a population generates individual phenotypes is a fundamental question of biology. To advance the understanding of the genotype–phenotype relationships towards the level of biochemical processes, we perform a proteome-wide association study (PWAS) of a complex quantitative phenotype. We quantify the variation of wing imaginal disc proteomes in Drosophila genetic reference panel (DGRP) lines using SWATH mass spectrometry. In spite of the very large genetic variation (1/36 bp) between the lines, proteome variability is surprisingly small, indicating strong molecular resilience of protein expression patterns. Proteins associated with adult wing size form tight co-variation clusters that are enriched in fundamental biochemical processes. Wing size correlates with some basic metabolic functions, positively with glucose metabolism but negatively with mitochondrial respiration and not with ribosome biogenesis. Our study highlights the power of PWAS to filter functional variants from the large genetic variability in natural populations. PMID:27582081

  9. In Silico Analysis of Gene Expression Network Components Underlying Pigmentation Phenotypes in the Python Identified Evolutionarily Conserved Clusters of Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Color variation provides the opportunity to investigate the genetic basis of evolution and selection. Reptiles are less studied than mammals. Comparative genomics approaches allow for knowledge gained in one species to be leveraged for use in another species. We describe a comparative vertebrate analysis of conserved regulatory modules in pythons aimed at assessing bioinformatics evidence that transcription factors important in mammalian pigmentation phenotypes may also be important in python pigmentation phenotypes. We identified 23 python orthologs of mammalian genes associated with variation in coat color phenotypes for which we assessed the extent of pairwise protein sequence identity between pythons and mouse, dog, horse, cow, chicken, anole lizard, and garter snake. We next identified a set of melanocyte/pigment associated transcription factors (CREB, FOXD3, LEF-1, MITF, POU3F2, and USF-1) that exhibit relatively conserved sequence similarity within their DNA binding regions across species based on orthologous alignments across multiple species. Finally, we identified 27 evolutionarily conserved clusters of transcription factor binding sites within ~200-nucleotide intervals of the 1500-nucleotide upstream regions of AIM1, DCT, MC1R, MITF, MLANA, OA1, PMEL, RAB27A, and TYR from Python bivittatus. Our results provide insight into pigment phenotypes in pythons. PMID:27698666

  10. RNAseq Analyses Identify Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Inflammation as a Major Abnormality in ALS Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Brohawn, David G; O'Brien, Laura C; Bennett, James P

    2016-01-01

    ALS is a rapidly progressive, devastating neurodegenerative illness of adults that produces disabling weakness and spasticity arising from death of lower and upper motor neurons. No meaningful therapies exist to slow ALS progression, and molecular insights into pathogenesis and progression are sorely needed. In that context, we used high-depth, next generation RNA sequencing (RNAseq, Illumina) to define gene network abnormalities in RNA samples depleted of rRNA and isolated from cervical spinal cord sections of 7 ALS and 8 CTL samples. We aligned >50 million 2X150 bp paired-end sequences/sample to the hg19 human genome and applied three different algorithms (Cuffdiff2, DEseq2, EdgeR) for identification of differentially expressed genes (DEG's). Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) and Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) identified inflammatory processes as significantly elevated in our ALS samples, with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) found to be a major pathway regulator (IPA) and TNFα-induced protein 2 (TNFAIP2) as a major network "hub" gene (WGCNA). Using the oPOSSUM algorithm, we analyzed transcription factors (TF) controlling expression of the nine DEG/hub genes in the ALS samples and identified TF's involved in inflammation (NFkB, REL, NFkB1) and macrophage function (NR1H2::RXRA heterodimer). Transient expression in human iPSC-derived motor neurons of TNFAIP2 (also a DEG identified by all three algorithms) reduced cell viability and induced caspase 3/7 activation. Using high-density RNAseq, multiple algorithms for DEG identification, and an unsupervised gene co-expression network approach, we identified significant elevation of inflammatory processes in ALS spinal cord with TNF as a major regulatory molecule. Overexpression of the DEG TNFAIP2 in human motor neurons, the population most vulnerable to die in ALS, increased cell death and caspase 3/7 activation. We propose that therapies targeted to reduce inflammatory TNFα signaling may be helpful

  11. Exome sequencing identifies de novo pathogenic variants in FBN1 and TRPS1 in a patient with a complex connective tissue phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Zastrow, Diane B.; Zornio, Patricia A.; Dries, Annika; Kohler, Jennefer; Fernandez, Liliana; Waggott, Daryl; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Eng, Christine M.; Manning, Melanie A.; Farrelly, Ellyn; Fisher, Paul G.; Ashley, Euan A.; Bernstein, Jonathan A.

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a patient who presented with a history of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, inguinal hernia, and recurrent umbilical hernia. She also has joint laxity, hypotonia, and dysmorphic features. A unifying diagnosis was not identified based on her clinical phenotype. As part of her evaluation through the Undiagnosed Diseases Network, trio whole-exome sequencing was performed. Pathogenic variants in FBN1 and TRPS1 were identified as causing two distinct autosomal dominant conditions, each with de novo inheritance. Fibrillin 1 (FBN1) mutations are associated with Marfan syndrome and a spectrum of similar phenotypes. TRPS1 mutations are associated with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome types I and III. Features of both conditions are evident in the patient reported here. Discrepant features of the conditions (e.g., stature) and the young age of the patient may have made a clinical diagnosis more difficult in the absence of exome-wide genetic testing. PMID:28050602

  12. Exome sequencing identifies de novo pathogenic variants in FBN1 and TRPS1 in a patient with a complex connective tissue phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zastrow, Diane B; Zornio, Patricia A; Dries, Annika; Kohler, Jennefer; Fernandez, Liliana; Waggott, Daryl; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Eng, Christine M; Manning, Melanie A; Farrelly, Ellyn; Fisher, Paul G; Ashley, Euan A; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Wheeler, Matthew T

    2017-01-01

    Here we describe a patient who presented with a history of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, inguinal hernia, and recurrent umbilical hernia. She also has joint laxity, hypotonia, and dysmorphic features. A unifying diagnosis was not identified based on her clinical phenotype. As part of her evaluation through the Undiagnosed Diseases Network, trio whole-exome sequencing was performed. Pathogenic variants in FBN1 and TRPS1 were identified as causing two distinct autosomal dominant conditions, each with de novo inheritance. Fibrillin 1 (FBN1) mutations are associated with Marfan syndrome and a spectrum of similar phenotypes. TRPS1 mutations are associated with trichorhinophalangeal syndrome types I and III. Features of both conditions are evident in the patient reported here. Discrepant features of the conditions (e.g., stature) and the young age of the patient may have made a clinical diagnosis more difficult in the absence of exome-wide genetic testing.

  13. An introductory review of parallel independent component analysis (p-ICA) and a guide to applying p-ICA to genetic data and imaging phenotypes to identify disease-associated biological pathways and systems in common complex disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Liu, Jingyu; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2015-01-01

    Complex inherited phenotypes, including those for many common medical and psychiatric diseases, are most likely underpinned by multiple genes contributing to interlocking molecular biological processes, along with environmental factors (Owen et al., 2010). Despite this, genotyping strategies for complex, inherited, disease-related phenotypes mostly employ univariate analyses, e.g., genome wide association. Such procedures most often identify isolated risk-related SNPs or loci, not the underlying biological pathways necessary to help guide the development of novel treatment approaches. This article focuses on the multivariate analysis strategy of parallel (i.e., simultaneous combination of SNP and neuroimage information) independent component analysis (p-ICA), which typically yields large clusters of functionally related SNPs statistically correlated with phenotype components, whose overall molecular biologic relevance is inferred subsequently using annotation software suites. Because this is a novel approach, whose details are relatively new to the field we summarize its underlying principles and address conceptual questions regarding interpretation of resulting data and provide practical illustrations of the method. PMID:26442095

  14. Ab initio identified design principles of solid-solution strengthening in Al.

    PubMed

    Ma, Duancheng; Friák, Martin; von Pezold, Johann; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Solid-solution strengthening in six Al-X binary systems is investigated using first-principle methods. The volumetric mismatch parameter and the solubility enthalpy per solute were calculated. We derive three rules for designing solid-solution strengthened alloys: (i) the solubility enthalpy per solute is related to the volumetric mismatch by a power law; (ii) for each annealing temperature, there exists an optimal solute-volume mismatch to achieve maximum strength; and (iii) the strengthening potential of high volumetric mismatch solutes is severely limited by their low solubility. Our results thus show that the thermodynamic properties of the system (here Al-X alloys) set clear upper bounds to the achievable strengthening effects owing to the reduced solubility with increasing volume mismatch.

  15. Exome Sequencing of Phenotypic Extremes Identifies CAV2 and TMC6 as Interacting Modifiers of Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Emond, Mary J.; Louie, Tin; Emerson, Julia; Chong, Jessica X.; Mathias, Rasika A.; Knowles, Michael R.; Rieder, Mark J.; Tabor, Holly K.; Nickerson, Debbie A.; Barnes, Kathleen C.; GO, Lung; Gibson, Ronald L.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of rare or low frequency variants in exome or genome data that are associated with complex traits often will require use of very large sample sizes to achieve adequate statistical power. For a fixed sample size, sequencing of individuals sampled from the tails of a phenotype distribution (i.e., extreme phenotypes design) maximizes power and this approach was recently validated empirically with the discovery of variants in DCTN4 that influence the natural history of P. aeruginosa airway infection in persons with cystic fibrosis (CF; MIM219700). The increasing availability of large exome/genome sequence datasets that serve as proxies for population-based controls affords the opportunity to test an alternative, potentially more powerful and generalizable strategy, in which the frequency of rare variants in a single extreme phenotypic group is compared to a control group (i.e., extreme phenotype vs. control population design). As proof-of-principle, we applied this approach to search for variants associated with risk for age-of-onset of chronic P. aeruginosa airway infection among individuals with CF and identified variants in CAV2 and TMC6 that were significantly associated with group status. These results were validated using a large, prospective, longitudinal CF cohort and confirmed a significant association of a variant in CAV2 with increased age-of-onset of P. aeruginosa airway infection (hazard ratio = 0.48, 95% CI=[0.32, 0.88]) and variants in TMC6 with diminished age-of-onset of P. aeruginosa airway infection (HR = 5.4, 95% CI=[2.2, 13.5]) A strong interaction between CAV2 and TMC6 variants was observed (HR=12.1, 95% CI=[3.8, 39]) for children with the deleterious TMC6 variant and without the CAV2 protective variant. Neither gene showed a significant association using an extreme phenotypes design, and conditions for which the power of an extreme phenotype vs. control population design was greater than that for the extreme phenotypes design were

  16. The phenotype enhancement method identifies the Xcp outer membrane secretion machinery from Pseudomonas alcaligenes as a bottleneck for lipase production.

    PubMed

    Gerritse, G; Ure, R; Bizoullier, F; Quax, W J

    1998-09-17

    Pseudomonas alcaligenes M-1 has been selected from an intensive screening for micro-organisms that can naturally produce a lipase active in detergent formulations. The lipase expression has been increased to allow high level secretion from Pseudomonas alcaligenes, via the introduction of multi-copy plasmids. In order to improve the lipase yield further, the phenotype enhancement method has been developed. This idea comprises the reintroduction of a cosmid library with random chromosomal fragments in a P. alcaligenes strain with already high lipase productivity. One of the strains which showed an enhanced lipase production appeared to contain a cosmid encoding the outer membrane secretion genes. These xcp-genes are clustered in two divergently transcribed operons similar to the situation in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Remarkably and dissimilar to P. aeruginosa, in between the two xcp gene clusters, two reading frames of unknown function--OrfV and OrfX--are present. For OrfX no equivalent can be found in the known protein data bases. On the other hand, OrfV shows homology to the regulatory proteins MalT and AcoK. Some evidence is provided that suggests that OrfV acts as a regulator of the xcp operons. A model is proposed for the regulation of the secretion system from P. alcaligenes.

  17. Phenotypic heterogeneity in a SOD1 G93D Italian ALS family: an example of human model to study a complex disease.

    PubMed

    Penco, Silvana; Lunetta, Christian; Mosca, Lorena; Maestri, Eleonora; Avemaria, Francesca; Tarlarini, Claudia; Patrosso, Maria Cristina; Marocchi, Alessandro; Corbo, Massimo

    2011-05-01

    We report different clinical expression in seven members of a large family with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and the G93D mutation in exon 4 of the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. The ALS clinical course in the proband showed an unusually fast progression of the disease compared to the paucisymptomatic presentation associated to this mutation in the two previously Italian families described. The remaining mutation carriers did not show the aggressive clinical course displayed by the proband. We selected few genes known to be ALS modifiers searching for genetic variants that could explain the wide phenotypic diversity within the family. Exclusion of causative genes such as TDP43, FUS, PGRN and VAPB was performed too. We believe that this kind of family with contrasting phenotypes of ALS may be considered an excellent human model to study the relationship between a wider genetic profile, including modifier genes, and the clinical expression of the disease. Therefore, the novelty of our approach is also represented by the study of a single family to reproduce a composite structure in which search for possible modifier genes/genetic variants linked to SOD1 mutated.

  18. A phenotypic screen in zebrafish identifies a novel small-molecule inducer of ectopic tail formation suggestive of alterations in non-canonical Wnt/PCP signaling.

    PubMed

    Gebruers, Evelien; Cordero-Maldonado, María Lorena; Gray, Alexander I; Clements, Carol; Harvey, Alan L; Edrada-Ebel, Ruangelie; de Witte, Peter A M; Crawford, Alexander D; Esguerra, Camila V

    2013-01-01

    Zebrafish have recently emerged as an attractive model for the in vivo bioassay-guided isolation and characterization of pharmacologically active small molecules of natural origin. We carried out a zebrafish-based phenotypic screen of over 3000 plant-derived secondary metabolite extracts with the goal of identifying novel small-molecule modulators of the BMP and Wnt signaling pathways. One of the bioactive plant extracts identified in this screen - Jasminum gilgianum, an Oleaceae species native to Papua New Guinea - induced ectopic tails during zebrafish embryonic development. As ectopic tail formation occurs when BMP or non-canonical Wnt signaling is inhibited during the tail protrusion process, we suspected a constituent of this extract to act as a modulator of these pathways. A bioassay-guided isolation was carried out on the basis of this zebrafish phenotype, identifying para-coumaric acid methyl ester (pCAME) as the active compound. We then performed an in-depth phenotypic analysis of pCAME-treated zebrafish embryos, including a tissue-specific marker analysis of the secondary tails. We found pCAME to synergize with the BMP-inhibitors dorsomorphin and LDN-193189 in inducing ectopic tails, and causing convergence-extension defects in compound-treated embryos. These results indicate that pCAME may interfere with non-canonical Wnt signaling. Inhibition of Jnk, a downstream target of Wnt/PCP signaling (via morpholino antisense knockdown and pharmacological inhibition with the kinase inhibitor SP600125) phenocopied pCAME-treated embryos. However, immunoblotting experiments revealed pCAME to not directly inhibit Jnk-mediated phosphorylation of c-Jun, suggesting additional targets of SP600125, and/or other pathways, as possibly being involved in the ectopic tail formation activity of pCAME. Further investigation of pCAME's mechanism of action will help determine this compound's pharmacological utility.

  19. Screening of a large cohort of Leber congenital amaurosis and retinitis pigmentosa patients identifies novel LCA5 mutations and new genotype-phenotype correlations

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Ruifang; van den Born, L. Ingeborgh; Berson, Eliot L.; Ocaka, Louise A.; Davidson, Alice E.; Heckenlively, John R.; Branham, Kari; Ren, Huanan; Lopez, Irma; Maria, Maleeha; Azam, Maleeha; Henkes, Arjen; Blokland, Ellen; Qamar, Raheel; Webster, Andrew R.; Andreasson, Sten; de Baere, Elfride; Bennett, Jean; Chader, Gerald J.; Berger, Wolfgang; Golovleva, Irina; Greenberg, Jacquie; den Hollander, Anneke I.; Klaver, Caroline C.W.; Klevering, B. Jeroen; Lorenz, Birgit; Preising, Markus N.; Ramsear, Raj; Roberts, Lisa; Roepman, Ronald; Rohrschneider, Klaus; Wissinger, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the prevalence of sequence variants in LCA5 in patients with Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), early onset rod-cone dystrophy (EORD) and autosomal recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP), to delineate the ocular phenotypes, and to provide an overview of all published LCA5 variants in an online database._Patients underwent standard ophthalmic evaluations after providing informed consent. In selected patients, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus autofluorescence imaging was possible. DNA samples from 797 unrelated patients with LCA and 211 with the various types of RP were screened by Sanger sequence analysis of all LCA5 exons and intron/exon junctions. Some LCA patients were pre-screened by APEX technology or selected based on homozygosity mapping. In silico analyses were performed to assess the pathogenicity of the variants. Segregation analysis was performed where possible. Published and novel LCA5 variants were collected, amended for their correct nomenclature, and listed in a Leiden Open Variation Database (LOVD). Sequence analysis identified 18 new probands with 19 different LCA5 variants. Seventeen of the 19 LCA5 variants were novel. Except for two missense variants and one splice site variant, all variants were protein-truncating mutations. Most patients expressed a severe phenotype, typical of LCA. However, some LCA subjects had better vision and intact inner segment/outer segment (IS/OS) junctions on OCT imaging. In two families with LCA5 variants, the phenotype was more compatible with EORD with affected individuals displaying preserved islands of RPE. One of these milder families harbored a homozygous splice site mutation, a second family was found to have a combination of a stop mutation and a missense mutation. This is the largest LCA5 study to date. We sequenced 1008 patients (797 with LCA, 211 with arRP) and identified 18 probands with LCA5 mutations. Mutations in LCA5 are a rare cause of childhood retinal dystrophy accounting for

  20. Phenotypic chemical screening using a zebrafish neural crest EMT reporter identifies retinoic acid as an inhibitor of epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jimenez, Laura; Wang, Jindong; Morrison, Monique A.; Whatcott, Clifford; Soh, Katherine K.; Warner, Steven; Bearss, David; Jette, Cicely A.; Stewart, Rodney A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a highly conserved morphogenetic program essential for embryogenesis, regeneration and cancer metastasis. In cancer cells, EMT also triggers cellular reprogramming and chemoresistance, which underlie disease relapse and decreased survival. Hence, identifying compounds that block EMT is essential to prevent or eradicate disseminated tumor cells. Here, we establish a whole-animal-based EMT reporter in zebrafish for rapid drug screening, called Tg(snai1b:GFP), which labels epithelial cells undergoing EMT to produce sox10-positive neural crest (NC) cells. Time-lapse and lineage analysis of Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos reveal that cranial NC cells delaminate from two regions: an early population delaminates adjacent to the neural plate, whereas a later population delaminates from within the dorsal neural tube. Treating Tg(snai1b:GFP) embryos with candidate small-molecule EMT-inhibiting compounds identified TP-0903, a multi-kinase inhibitor that blocked cranial NC cell delamination in both the lateral and medial populations. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) analysis and chemical rescue experiments show that TP-0903 acts through stimulating retinoic acid (RA) biosynthesis and RA-dependent transcription. These studies identify TP-0903 as a new therapeutic for activating RA in vivo and raise the possibility that RA-dependent inhibition of EMT contributes to its prior success in eliminating disseminated cancer cells. PMID:26794130

  1. Screening in ALS and FTD patients reveals 3 novel UBQLN2 mutations outside the PXX domain and a pure FTD phenotype.

    PubMed

    Synofzik, Matthis; Maetzler, Walter; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Vom Hagen, Jennifer Müller; Haack, Tobias; Rebassoo, Piret; Munz, Marita; Schöls, Ludger; Biskup, Saskia

    2012-12-01

    Mutations in UBQLN2 have recently been shown to cause dominant X-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and ALS plus frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Information on their frequency in different populations is still rare, and a pure FTD phenotype has not yet been reported. Moreover, the mutational spectrum of known UBQLN2 mutations is still limited to its PXX repeat region. Based on a screening of 206 ALS and FTD patients, we here report 3 novel UBQLN2 mutations, accounting for 1.2% (2/161) ALS and 2.2% (1/45) FTD patients, including a patient with pure FTD. All mutations were located in highly conserved domains outside the PXX repeat region and not observed in 1450 ethnically matched control X-chromosomes. All affected patients presented with apparently sporadic disease. UBQLN2 mutations are rare in Central European ALS and FTD patients, but contribute significantly to patients with seemingly sporadic disease. UBQLN2 is able to cause any disease on the ALS-FTD continuum, including pure FTD. Because the pathogenic mechanism of UBQLN2 mutations is not limited to its PXX region, UBQLN2 screening in neurodegenerative patients should not be limited to this region.

  2. Imputation of Variants from the 1000 Genomes Project Modestly Improves Known Associations and Can Identify Low-frequency Variant - Phenotype Associations Undetected by HapMap Based Imputation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Andrew R.; Perry, John R. B.; Tanaka, Toshiko; Hernandez, Dena G.; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Melzer, David; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Nalls, Michael A.; Weedon, Michael N.; Spector, Tim D.; Richards, J. Brent; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi; Singleton, Andrew B.; Frayling, Timothy M.

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have been limited by the reliance on common variants present on microarrays or imputable from the HapMap Project data. More recently, the completion of the 1000 Genomes Project has provided variant and haplotype information for several million variants derived from sequencing over 1,000 individuals. To help understand the extent to which more variants (including low frequency (1% ≤ MAF <5%) and rare variants (<1%)) can enhance previously identified associations and identify novel loci, we selected 93 quantitative circulating factors where data was available from the InCHIANTI population study. These phenotypes included cytokines, binding proteins, hormones, vitamins and ions. We selected these phenotypes because many have known strong genetic associations and are potentially important to help understand disease processes. We performed a genome-wide scan for these 93 phenotypes in InCHIANTI. We identified 21 signals and 33 signals that reached P<5×10−8 based on HapMap and 1000 Genomes imputation, respectively, and 9 and 11 that reached a stricter, likely conservative, threshold of P<5×10−11 respectively. Imputation of 1000 Genomes genotype data modestly improved the strength of known associations. Of 20 associations detected at P<5×10−8 in both analyses (17 of which represent well replicated signals in the NHGRI catalogue), six were captured by the same index SNP, five were nominally more strongly associated in 1000 Genomes imputed data and one was nominally more strongly associated in HapMap imputed data. We also detected an association between a low frequency variant and phenotype that was previously missed by HapMap based imputation approaches. An association between rs112635299 and alpha-1 globulin near the SERPINA gene represented the known association between rs28929474 (MAF = 0.007) and alpha1-antitrypsin that predisposes to emphysema (P = 2.5×10−12). Our data provide important proof of principle

  3. Comparative analysis of Edwardsiella isolates from fish in the eastern United States identifies two distinct genetic taxa amongst organisms phenotypically classified as E. tarda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Matt J.; Quiniou, Sylvie M.; Cody, Theresa; Tabuchi, Maki; Ware, Cynthia; Cipriano, Rocco C.; Mauel, Michael J.; Soto, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, has been implicated in significant losses in aquaculture facilities worldwide. Here, we assessed the intra-specific variability of E. tarda isolates from 4 different fish species in the eastern United States. Repetitive sequence mediated PCR (rep-PCR) using 4 different primer sets (ERIC I & II, ERIC II, BOX, and GTG5) and multi-locus sequence analysis of 16S SSU rDNA, groEl, gyrA, gyrB, pho, pgi, pgm, and rpoA gene fragments identified two distinct genotypes of E. tarda (DNA group I; DNA group II). Isolates that fell into DNA group II demonstrated more similarity to E. ictaluri than DNA group I, which contained the reference E. tarda strain (ATCC #15947). Conventional PCR analysis using published E. tarda-specific primer sets yielded variable results, with several primer sets producing no observable amplification of target DNA from some isolates. Fluorometric determination of G + C content demonstrated 56.4% G + C content for DNA group I, 60.2% for DNA group II, and 58.4% for E. ictaluri. Surprisingly, these isolates were indistinguishable using conventional biochemical techniques, with all isolates demonstrating phenotypic characteristics consistent with E. tarda. Analysis using two commercial test kits identified multiple phenotypes, although no single metabolic characteristic could reliably discriminate between genetic groups. Additionally, anti-microbial susceptibility and fatty acid profiles did not demonstrate remarkable differences between groups. The significant genetic variation (<90% similarity at gyrA, gyrB, pho, phi and pgm; <40% similarity by rep-PCR) between these groups suggests organisms from DNA group II may represent an unrecognized, genetically distinct taxa of Edwardsiella that is phenotypically indistinguishable from E. tarda.

  4. A simple and predictive phenotypic High Content Imaging assay for Plasmodium falciparum mature gametocytes to identify malaria transmission blocking compounds

    PubMed Central

    Lucantoni, Leonardo; Silvestrini, Francesco; Signore, Michele; Siciliano, Giulia; Eldering, Maarten; Dechering, Koen J.; Avery, Vicky M.; Alano, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes, specifically the mature stages, are the only malaria parasite stage in humans transmissible to the mosquito vector. Anti-malarial drugs capable of killing these forms are considered essential for the eradication of malaria and tools allowing the screening of large compound libraries with high predictive power are needed to identify new candidates. As gametocytes are not a replicative stage it is difficult to apply the same drug screening methods used for asexual stages. Here we propose an assay, based on high content imaging, combining “classic” gametocyte viability readout based on gametocyte counts with a functional viability readout, based on gametocyte activation and the discrimination of the typical gamete spherical morphology. This simple and rapid assay has been miniaturized to a 384-well format using acridine orange staining of wild type P. falciparum 3D7A sexual forms, and was validated by screening reference antimalarial drugs and the MMV Malaria Box. The assay demonstrated excellent robustness and ability to identify quality hits with high likelihood of confirmation of transmission reducing activity in subsequent mosquito membrane feeding assays. PMID:26553647

  5. Divergent Urinary Metabolic Phenotypes between Major Depressive Disorder and Bipolar Disorder Identified by a Combined GC-MS and NMR Spectroscopic Metabonomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Chan-Juan; Liu, Zhao; Fu, Yu-Ying; Zheng, Peng; Yang, De-Yu; Li, Qi; Mu, Jun; Wei, You-Dong; Zhou, Jing-Jing; Huang, Hua; Xie, Peng

    2015-08-07

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a complex debilitating mental disorder that is often misdiagnosed as major depressive disorder (MDD). Therefore, a large percentage of BD subjects are incorrectly treated with antidepressants in clinical practice. To address this challenge, objective laboratory-based tests are needed to discriminate BD from MDD patients. Here, a combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic-based metabonomic approach was performed to profile urine samples from 76 MDD and 43 BD subjects (training set) to identify the differential metabolites. Samples from 126 healthy controls were included as metabolic controls. A candidate biomarker panel was identified by further analyzing these differential metabolites. A testing set of, 50 MDD and 28 BD subjects was then used to independently validate the diagnostic efficacy of the identified panel using an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). A total of 20 differential metabolites responsible for the discrimination between MDD and BD subjects were identified. A panel consisting of six candidate urinary metabolite biomarkers (propionate, formate, (R*,S*)2,3-dihydroxybutanoic acid, 2,4-dihydroxypyrimidine, phenylalanine, and β-alanine) was identified. This panel could distinguish BD from MDD subjects with an AUC of 0.913 and 0.896 in the training and testing sets, respectively. These results reveal divergent urinary metabolic phenotypes between MDD and BD. The identified urinary biomarkers can aid in the future development of an objective laboratory-based diagnostic test for distinguishing BD from MDD patients.

  6. Evaluation of von Willebrand factor phenotypes and genotypes in Hemophilia A patients with and without identified F8 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Boylan, Brian; Rice, Anne S.; De Staercke, Christine; Eyster, M. Elaine; Yaish, Hassan M.; Knoll, Christine M.; Bean, Christopher J.; Miller, Connie H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Hemophilia A (HA) is an X-linked bleeding disorder caused by a deficiency in factor VIII (FVIII). von Willebrand disease (VWD) is characterized by a quantitative or qualitative defect in von Willebrand Factor (VWF). Patients with VWD with severely low VWF or VWD Type 2N (VWD2N), a VWD subtype distinguished by defective VWF binding to FVIII, may have reduced FVIII levels secondary to their VWD. These patients superficially resemble patients with HA, and pose a potential for misdiagnosis. Objectives Investigate the unexplained cause of bleeding in HA patients without known FVIII mutations by assessing plasma VWF antigen (VWF:Ag), FVIII binding capacities, and VWF genotypes. Patients/Methods Thirty-seven of 1027 patients with HA studied as part of the Hemophilia Inhibitor Research Study lacked identifiable F8 mutations. These patients (cases) and 73 patients with identified F8 mutations (controls) were evaluated for VWF:Ag, patient's VWF capacity to bind FVIII (VWF:FVIIIB), and VWF sequence. Results Four cases had VWF:Ag <3 IU/dL and VWF mutations consistent with Type3 VWD. Six cases and one control were heterozygous for mutations previously reported to cause Type1 VWD (VWD1) (n=5 cases and 1 control) or predicted to be deleterious by Polyphen2 and SIFT prediction tools (n=1 case). One control had VWF:Ag <30 IU/dl, and seven patients (4 cases and 3 controls), including two cases who were heterozygous for a known VWD2N mutation, had reduced VWF:FVIIIB. Conclusions These data emphasize that some patients diagnosed with HA require VWF assessments in order to achieve a comprehensive diagnosis and an optimal treatment strategy. PMID:25780857

  7. Transcriptional and functional characterization of CD137L-dendritic cells identifies a novel dendritic cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Harfuddin, Zulkarnain; Dharmadhikari, Bhushan; Wong, Siew Cheng; Duan, Kaibo; Poidinger, Michael; Kwajah, Shaqireen; Schwarz, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    The importance of monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) is evidenced by the fact that they are essential for the elimination of pathogens. Although in vitro DCs can be generated by treatment of monocytes with GM-CSF and IL-4, it is unknown what stimuli induce differentiation of DCs in vivo. CD137L-DCs are human monocyte-derived DC that are generated by CD137 ligand (CD137L) signaling. We demonstrate that the gene signature of in vitro generated CD137L-DCs is most similar to those of GM-CSF and IL-4-generated immature DCs and of macrophages. This is reminiscent of in vivo inflammatory DC which also have been reported to share gene signatures with monocyte-derived DCs and macrophages. Performing direct comparison of deposited human gene expression data with a CD137L-DC dataset revealed a significant enrichment of CD137L-DC signature genes in inflammatory in vivo DCs. In addition, surface marker expression and cytokine secretion by CD137L-DCs resemble closely those of inflammatory DCs. Further, CD137L-DCs express high levels of adhesion molecules, display strong attachment, and employ the adhesion molecule ALCAM to stimulate T cell proliferation. This study characterizes the gene expression profile of CD137L-DCs, and identifies significant similarities of CD137L-DCs with in vivo inflammatory monocyte-derived DCs and macrophages. PMID:27431276

  8. A quantitative comparison of human HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells and primary human dermal fibroblasts identifies a 3D migration mechanism with properties unique to the transformed phenotype.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Michael P; Rogers, Robert E; Singh, Samir P; Lee, Justin Y; Loveland, Samuel G; Koepsel, Justin T; Witze, Eric S; Montanez-Sauri, Sara I; Sung, Kyung E; Tokuda, Emi Y; Sharma, Yasha; Everhart, Lydia M; Nguyen, Eric H; Zaman, Muhammad H; Beebe, David J; Ahn, Natalie G; Murphy, William L; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-01-01

    Here, we describe an engineering approach to quantitatively compare migration, morphologies, and adhesion for tumorigenic human fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080s) and primary human dermal fibroblasts (hDFs) with the aim of identifying distinguishing properties of the transformed phenotype. Relative adhesiveness was quantified using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) arrays and proteolytic 3-dimensional (3D) migration was investigated using matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-degradable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels ("synthetic extracellular matrix" or "synthetic ECM"). In synthetic ECM, hDFs were characterized by vinculin-containing features on the tips of protrusions, multipolar morphologies, and organized actomyosin filaments. In contrast, HT-1080s were characterized by diffuse vinculin expression, pronounced β1-integrin on the tips of protrusions, a cortically-organized F-actin cytoskeleton, and quantitatively more rounded morphologies, decreased adhesiveness, and increased directional motility compared to hDFs. Further, HT-1080s were characterized by contractility-dependent motility, pronounced blebbing, and cortical contraction waves or constriction rings, while quantified 3D motility was similar in matrices with a wide range of biochemical and biophysical properties (including collagen) despite substantial morphological changes. While HT-1080s were distinct from hDFs for each of the 2D and 3D properties investigated, several features were similar to WM239a melanoma cells, including rounded, proteolytic migration modes, cortical F-actin organization, and prominent uropod-like structures enriched with β1-integrin, F-actin, and melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM/CD146/MUC18). Importantly, many of the features observed for HT-1080s were analogous to cellular changes induced by transformation, including cell rounding, a disorganized F-actin cytoskeleton, altered organization of focal adhesion proteins, and a weakly adherent phenotype. Based on our results, we

  9. Drug Discovery for Schistosomiasis: Hit and Lead Compounds Identified in a Library of Known Drugs by Medium-Throughput Phenotypic Screening

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Brian; Snedecor, June; Lim, Kee-Chong; Xu, Fengyun; Renslo, Adam R.; Williams, Janice; McKerrow, James H.; Caffrey, Conor R.

    2009-01-01

    Background Praziquantel (PZQ) is the only widely available drug to treat schistosomiasis. Given the potential for drug resistance, it is prudent to search for novel therapeutics. Identification of anti-schistosomal chemicals has traditionally relied on phenotypic (whole organism) screening with adult worms in vitro and/or animal models of disease—tools that limit automation and throughput with modern microtiter plate-formatted compound libraries. Methods A partially automated, three-component phenotypic screen workflow is presented that utilizes at its apex the schistosomular stage of the parasite adapted to a 96-well plate format with a throughput of 640 compounds per month. Hits that arise are subsequently screened in vitro against adult parasites and finally for efficacy in a murine model of disease. Two GO/NO GO criteria filters in the workflow prioritize hit compounds for tests in the animal disease model in accordance with a target drug profile that demands short-course oral therapy. The screen workflow was inaugurated with 2,160 chemically diverse natural and synthetic compounds, of which 821 are drugs already approved for human use. This affords a unique starting point to ‘reposition’ (re-profile) drugs as anti-schistosomals with potential savings in development timelines and costs. Findings Multiple and dynamic phenotypes could be categorized for schistosomula and adults in vitro, and a diverse set of ‘hit’ drugs and chemistries were identified, including anti-schistosomals, anthelmintics, antibiotics, and neuromodulators. Of those hits prioritized for tests in the animal disease model, a number of leads were identified, one of which compares reasonably well with PZQ in significantly decreasing worm and egg burdens, and disease-associated pathology. Data arising from the three components of the screen are posted online as a community resource. Conclusions To accelerate the identification of novel anti-schistosomals, we have developed a partially

  10. Genomic and Transcriptomic Associations Identify a New Insecticide Resistance Phenotype for the Selective Sweep at the Cyp6g1 Locus of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Battlay, Paul; Schmidt, Joshua M.; Fournier-Level, Alexandre; Robin, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Scans of the Drosophila melanogaster genome have identified organophosphate resistance loci among those with the most pronounced signature of positive selection. In this study, the molecular basis of resistance to the organophosphate insecticide azinphos-methyl was investigated using the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel, and genome-wide association. Recently released full transcriptome data were used to extend the utility of the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel resource beyond traditional genome-wide association studies to allow systems genetics analyses of phenotypes. We found that both genomic and transcriptomic associations independently identified Cyp6g1, a gene involved in resistance to DDT and neonicotinoid insecticides, as the top candidate for azinphos-methyl resistance. This was verified by transgenically overexpressing Cyp6g1 using natural regulatory elements from a resistant allele, resulting in a 6.5-fold increase in resistance. We also identified four novel candidate genes associated with azinphos-methyl resistance, all of which are involved in either regulation of fat storage, or nervous system development. In Cyp6g1, we find a demonstrable resistance locus, a verification that transcriptome data can be used to identify variants associated with insecticide resistance, and an overlap between peaks of a genome-wide association study, and a genome-wide selective sweep analysis. PMID:27317781

  11. Genome-Scale Genotype-Phenotype Matching of Two Lactococcus lactis Isolates from Plants Identifies Mechanisms of Adaptation to the Plant Niche▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Siezen, Roland J.; Starrenburg, Marjo J. C.; Boekhorst, Jos; Renckens, Bernadet; Molenaar, Douwe; van Hylckama Vlieg, Johan E. T.

    2008-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis is a primary constituent of many starter cultures used for the manufacturing of fermented dairy products, but the species also occurs in various nondairy niches such as (fermented) plant material. Three genome sequences of L. lactis dairy strains (IL-1403, SK11, and MG1363) are publicly available. An extensive molecular and phenotypic diversity analysis was now performed on two L. lactis plant isolates. Diagnostic sequencing of their genomes resulted in over 2.5 Mb of sequence for each strain. A high synteny was found with the genome of L. lactis IL-1403, which was used as a template for contig mapping and locating deletions and insertions in the plant L. lactis genomes. Numerous genes were identified that do not have homologs in the published genome sequences of dairy L. lactis strains. Adaptation to growth on substrates derived from plant cell walls is evident from the presence of gene sets for the degradation of complex plant polymers such as xylan, arabinan, glucans, and fructans but also for the uptake and conversion of typical plant cell wall degradation products such as α-galactosides, β-glucosides, arabinose, xylose, galacturonate, glucuronate, and gluconate. Further niche-specific differences are found in genes for defense (nisin biosynthesis), stress response (nonribosomal peptide synthesis and various transporters), and exopolysaccharide biosynthesis, as well as the expected differences in various mobile elements such as prophages, plasmids, restriction-modification systems, and insertion sequence elements. Many of these genes were identified for the first time in Lactococcus lactis. In most cases good correspondence was found with the phenotypic characteristics of these two strains. PMID:18039825

  12. Screen for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes in mouse embryonic stem cells identifies a model for succinyl-CoA ligase deficiency and mtDNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    Donti, Taraka R.; Stromberger, Carmen; Ge, Ming; Eldin, Karen W.; Craigen, William J.; Graham, Brett H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mutations in subunits of succinyl-CoA synthetase/ligase (SCS), a component of the citric acid cycle, are associated with mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, elevation of methylmalonic acid (MMA), and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion. A FACS-based retroviral-mediated gene trap mutagenesis screen in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells for abnormal mitochondrial phenotypes identified a gene trap allele of Sucla2 (Sucla2SAβgeo), which was used to generate transgenic mice. Sucla2 encodes the ADP-specific β-subunit isoform of SCS. Sucla2SAβgeo homozygotes exhibited recessive lethality, with most mutants dying late in gestation (e18.5). Mutant placenta and embryonic (e17.5) brain, heart and muscle showed varying degrees of mtDNA depletion (20–60%). However, there was no mtDNA depletion in mutant liver, where the gene is not normally expressed. Elevated levels of MMA were observed in embryonic brain. SCS-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) demonstrated a 50% reduction in mtDNA content compared with wild-type MEFs. The mtDNA depletion resulted in reduced steady state levels of mtDNA encoded proteins and multiple respiratory chain deficiencies. mtDNA content could be restored by reintroduction of Sucla2. This mouse model of SCS deficiency and mtDNA depletion promises to provide insights into the pathogenesis of mitochondrial diseases with mtDNA depletion and into the biology of mtDNA maintenance. In addition, this report demonstrates the power of a genetic screen that combines gene trap mutagenesis and FACS analysis in mouse ES cells to identify mitochondrial phenotypes and to develop animal models of mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:24271779

  13. A Korean family with KBG syndrome identified by ANKRD11 mutation, and phenotypic comparison of ANKRD11 mutation and 16q24.3 microdeletion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyo Jeong; Cho, Eunhae; Park, Jong Bum; Im, Woo Young; Kim, Hyon J

    2015-02-01

    KBG syndrome is a rare disease characterized by intellectual disability, typical craniofacial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Recently, ANKRD11 was identified as a gene that is responsible for the disease. In addition, microdeletion of 16q24.3, including ANKRD11, has been reported to result in the KBG syndrome phenotype. Herein, we discuss a Korean family with KBG syndrome, as identified by ANKRD11 gene mutation. The patients included a nine-month-old boy and his 21-month-old sister who failed to thrive and have delayed development. Chromosomal microarray was performed to identify the underlying genetic cause, but the results showed no abnormalities. However, the mother of the children was found to have features similar to her children. Therefore, we strongly suspected an autosomal-dominant inherited disease and performed whole exome sequencing. A mutation of ANKRD11 gene was found in all patients, and the frameshift variant c.2395-2398delAAAG was confirmed. Clinical manifestations of the patients were consistent with KBG syndrome. We reviewed all reported cases with confirmed ANKRD11 mutation or 16q24.3 microdeletion including ANKRD11. As a result, we conclude that severe short stature, intellectual disability, and macrodontia are the main characteristics in KBG syndrome related to ANKRD11 mutation.

  14. Phenotype-driven chemical screening in zebrafish for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration identifies multiple pathways potentially involved in metastatic invasion.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Viviana E; Varshney, Gaurav K; Lee, Minnkyong; Bupp, Sujata; Xu, Lisha; Shinn, Paul; Crawford, Nigel P; Inglese, James; Burgess, Shawn M

    2015-06-01

    In the last decade, high-throughput chemical screening has become the dominant approach for discovering novel compounds with therapeutic properties. Automated screening using in vitro or cultured cell assays have yielded thousands of candidate drugs for a variety of biological targets, but these approaches have not resulted in an increase in drug discovery despite major increases in expenditures. In contrast, phenotype-driven screens have shown a much stronger success rate, which is why we developed an in vivo assay using transgenic zebrafish with a GFP-marked migrating posterior lateral line primordium (PLLp) to identify compounds that influence collective cell migration. We then conducted a high-throughput screen using a compound library of 2160 annotated bioactive synthetic compounds and 800 natural products to identify molecules that block normal PLLp migration. We identified 165 compounds that interfere with primordium migration without overt toxicity in vivo. Selected compounds were confirmed in their migration-blocking activity by using additional assays for cell migration. We then proved the screen to be successful in identifying anti-metastatic compounds active in vivo by performing orthotopic tumor implantation assays in mice. We demonstrated that the Src inhibitor SU6656, identified in our screen, can be used to suppress the metastatic capacity of a highly aggressive mammary tumor cell line. Finally, we used CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish to genetically validate predicted targets of compounds. This approach demonstrates that the migrating PLLp in zebrafish can be used for large-scale, high-throughput screening for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration and, potentially, anti-metastatic compounds.

  15. Whole genome association study of brain-wide imaging phenotypes for identifying quantitative trait loci in MCI and AD: A study of the ADNI cohort.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li; Kim, Sungeun; Risacher, Shannon L; Nho, Kwangsik; Swaminathan, Shanker; West, John D; Foroud, Tatiana; Pankratz, Nathan; Moore, Jason H; Sloan, Chantel D; Huentelman, Matthew J; Craig, David W; Dechairo, Bryan M; Potkin, Steven G; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Saykin, Andrew J

    2010-11-15

    A genome-wide, whole brain approach to investigate genetic effects on neuroimaging phenotypes for identifying quantitative trait loci is described. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1.5 T MRI and genetic dataset was investigated using voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and FreeSurfer parcellation followed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). One hundred forty-two measures of grey matter (GM) density, volume, and cortical thickness were extracted from baseline scans. GWAS, using PLINK, were performed on each phenotype using quality-controlled genotype and scan data including 530,992 of 620,903 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 733 of 818 participants (175 AD, 354 amnestic mild cognitive impairment, MCI, and 204 healthy controls, HC). Hierarchical clustering and heat maps were used to analyze the GWAS results and associations are reported at two significance thresholds (p<10(-7) and p<10(-6)). As expected, SNPs in the APOE and TOMM40 genes were confirmed as markers strongly associated with multiple brain regions. Other top SNPs were proximal to the EPHA4, TP63 and NXPH1 genes. Detailed image analyses of rs6463843 (flanking NXPH1) revealed reduced global and regional GM density across diagnostic groups in TT relative to GG homozygotes. Interaction analysis indicated that AD patients homozygous for the T allele showed differential vulnerability to right hippocampal GM density loss. NXPH1 codes for a protein implicated in promotion of adhesion between dendrites and axons, a key factor in synaptic integrity, the loss of which is a hallmark of AD. A genome-wide, whole brain search strategy has the potential to reveal novel candidate genes and loci warranting further investigation and replication.

  16. Coexpression of Tim-3 and PD-1 identifies a CD8+ T-cell exhaustion phenotype in mice with disseminated acute myelogenous leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Munger, Meghan E; Veenstra, Rachelle G; Weigel, Brenda J; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Munn, David H; Murphy, William J; Azuma, Miyuki; Anderson, Ana C; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Blazar, Bruce R

    2011-04-28

    Tumor-associated immune suppression can lead to defective T cell-mediated antitumor immunity. Here, we identified a unique phenotype of exhausted T cells in mice with advanced acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). This phenotype is characterized by the coexpression of Tim-3 and PD-1 on CD8(+) T cells in the liver, the major first site of AML metastases. PD-1 and Tim-3 coexpression increased during AML progression. PD-1(+)Tim-3(+) CD8(+) T cells were deficient in their ability to produce IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 in response to PD-1 ligand (PDL1) and Tim-3 ligand (galectin-9) expressing AML cells. PD-1 knockout (KO), which were partially resistant to AML challenge, up-regulated Tim-3 during AML progression and such Tim-3(+)PD-1- KO CD8(+) T cells had reduced cytokine production. Galectin-9 KO mice were more resistant to AML, which was associated with reduced T-regulatory cell accumulation and a modest induction of PD-1 and Tim-3 expression on CD8(+) T cells. Whereas blocking the PD-1/PDL1 or Tim-3/galectin-9 pathway alone was insufficient to rescue mice from AML lethality, an additive effect was seen in reducing-albeit not eliminating-both tumor burden and lethality when both pathways were blocked. Therefore, combined PD-1/PDL1 and Tim-3/galectin-9 blockade may be beneficial in preventing CD8(+) T-cell exhaustion in patients with hematologic malignancies such as advanced AML.

  17. MicroRNA Expression Profile Identifies High Grade, Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Tumors at Elevated Risk to Progress to an Invasive Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lenherr, Sara M.; Tsai, Sheaumei; Silva Neto, Brasil; Sullivan, Travis B.; Cimmino, Cara B.; Logvinenko, Tanya; Gee, Jason; Huang, Wei; Libertino, John A.; Summerhayes, Ian C.; Rieger-Christ, Kimberly M.

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify a panel of microRNAs (miRNAs) differentially expressed in high-grade non-muscle invasive (NMI; TaG3–T1G3) urothelial carcinoma that progress to muscle-invasive disease compared to those that remain non-muscle invasive, whether recurrence happens or not. Eighty-nine high-grade NMI urothelial carcinoma lesions were identified and total RNA was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue. Patients were categorized as either having a non-muscle invasive lesion with no evidence of progression over a 3-year period or as having a similar lesion showing progression to muscle invasion over the same period. In addition, comparison of miRNA expression levels between patients with and without prior intravesical therapy was performed. Total RNA was pooled for microarray analysis in each group (non-progressors and progressors), and qRT-PCR of individual samples validated differential expression between non-progressive and progressive lesions. MiR-32-5p, -224-5p, and -412-3p were associated with cancer-specific survival. Downregulation of miR-203a-3p and miR-205-5p were significantly linked to progression in non-muscle invasive bladder tumors. These miRNAs include those implicated in epithelial mesenchymal transition, previously identified as members of a panel characterizing transition from the non-invasive to invasive phenotype in bladder tumors. Furthermore, we were able to identify specific miRNAs that are linked to postoperative outcome in patients with high grade NMI urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) that progressed to muscle-invasive (MI) disease. PMID:28218662

  18. Comparison of the Accuracy of Two Conventional Phenotypic Methods and Two MALDI-TOF MS Systems with That of DNA Sequencing Analysis for Correctly Identifying Clinically Encountered Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Qiao-Ting; Lee, Tai-Fen; Teng, Shih-Hua; Peng, Li-Yun; Chen, Ping-Hung; Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the accuracy of species-level identification of two commercially available matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems (Bruker Biotyper and Vitek MS) and two conventional phenotypic methods (Phoenix 100 YBC and Vitek 2 Yeast ID) with that of rDNA gene sequencing analysis among 200 clinical isolates of commonly encountered yeasts. The correct identification rates of the 200 yeast isolates to species or complex (Candida parapsilosis complex, C. guilliermondii complex and C. rugosa complex) levels by the Bruker Biotyper, Vitek MS (using in vitro devices [IVD] database), Phoenix 100 YBC and Vitek 2 Yeast ID (Sabouraud's dextrose agar) systems were 92.5%, 79.5%, 89%, and 74%, respectively. An additional 72 isolates of C. parapsilosis complex and 18 from the above 200 isolates (30 in each of C. parapsilosis, C. metapsilosis, and C. orthopsilosis) were also evaluated separately. Bruker Biotyper system could accurately identify all C. parapsilosis complex to species level. Using Vitek 2 MS (IVD) system, all C. parapsilosis but none of C. metapsilosis, or C. orthopsilosis could be accurately identified. Among the 89 yeasts misidentified by the Vitek 2 MS (IVD) system, 39 (43.8%), including 27 C. orthopsilosis isolates, could be correctly identified Using the Vitek MS Plus SARAMIS database for research use only. This resulted in an increase in the rate of correct identification of all yeast isolates (87.5%) by Vitek 2 MS. The two species in C. guilliermondii complex (C. guilliermondii and C. fermentati) isolates were correctly identified by cluster analysis of spectra generated by the Bruker Biotyper system. Based on the results obtained in the current study, MALDI-TOF MS systems present a promising alternative for the routine identification of yeast species, including clinically commonly and rarely encountered yeast species and several species belonging to C. parapsilosis complex, C. guilliermondii complex

  19. β-N-methylamino-l-alanine causes neurological and pathological phenotypes mimicking Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS): the first step towards an experimental model for sporadic ALS.

    PubMed

    de Munck, Estefanía; Muñoz-Sáez, Emma; Miguel, Begoña G; Solas, M Teresa; Ojeda, Irene; Martínez, Ana; Gil, Carmen; Arahuetes, Rosa Ma

    2013-09-01

    β-N-methylamino-l-alanine (L-BMAA) is a neurotoxic amino acid that has been related to various neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this work was to analyze the biotoxicity produced by L-BMAA in vivo in rats, trying to elucidate its physiopathological mechanisms and to search for analogies between the found effects and pathologies like Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Our data demonstrated that the neurotoxic effects in vivo were dosage-dependent. For evaluating the state of the animals, a neurological evaluation scale was developed as well as a set of functional tests. Ultrastructural cell analysis of spinal motoneurons has revealed alterations both in endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Since GSK3β could play a role in some neuropathological processes, we analyzed the alterations occurring in GSK3β levels in L-BMAA treated rats, we have observed an increase in the active form of GSK3β levels in lumbar spinal cord and motor cerebral cortex. On the other hand, (TAR)-DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) increased in L-BMAA treated animals. Our results indicated that N-acetylaspartate (NAA) declined in animals treated with L-BMAA, and the ratio of N-acetylaspartate/choline (NAA/Cho), N-acetylaspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) and N-acetylaspartate/choline+creatine (NAA/Cho+Cr) tended to decrease in lumbar spinal cord and motor cortex. This project offers some encouraging results that could help establishing the progress in the development of an animal model of sporadic ALS and L-BMAA could be a useful tool for this purpose.

  20. The Whole Genome Expression Analysis using Two Microarray Technologies to Identify Gene Networks That Mediate the Myocardial Phenotype of CD36 Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Sabaouni, Imane; Moussa, Ahmed; Vannier, Brigitte; Semlali, Oussama; Pietka, Terri A; Abumrad, Nada A; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that CD36 is a membrane protein that facilitates long chain fatty acid (FA) transport by muscle tissues. We also documented the significant impact of muscle CD36 expression on heart function, skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity as well as on overall metabolism. To identify a comprehensive set of genes that are differentially regulated by CD36 expression in the heart, we used two microarray technologies (Affymetrix and Agilent) to compare gene expression in heart tissues from CD36 KnocK-Out (KO-CD36) versus wild type (WT-CD36) mice. The obtained results using the two technologies were similar with around 35 genes differentially expressed using both technologies. Absence of CD36 led to down-regulation of the expression of three groups of genes involved in pathways of FA metabolism, angiogenesis/apoptosis and structure. These data are consistent with the fact that the CD36 protein binds FA and thrombospondin 1 invoved respectively in lipid metabolism and anti-angiogenic activities. In conclusion, our findings led to validate our data analysis workflow and identify specific pathways, possibly underlying the phenotypic abnormalities in CD36 Knock -Out hearts. PMID:24250110

  1. The Whole Genome Expression Analysis using Two Microarray Technologies to Identify Gene Networks That Mediate the Myocardial Phenotype of CD36 Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Sabaouni, Imane; Moussa, Ahmed; Vannier, Brigitte; Semlali, Oussama; Pietka, Terri A; Abumrad, Nada A; Ibrahimi, Azeddine

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that CD36 is a membrane protein that facilitates long chain fatty acid (FA) transport by muscle tissues. We also documented the significant impact of muscle CD36 expression on heart function, skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity as well as on overall metabolism. To identify a comprehensive set of genes that are differentially regulated by CD36 expression in the heart, we used two microarray technologies (Affymetrix and Agilent) to compare gene expression in heart tissues from CD36 KnocK-Out (KO-CD36) versus wild type (WT-CD36) mice. The obtained results using the two technologies were similar with around 35 genes differentially expressed using both technologies. Absence of CD36 led to down-regulation of the expression of three groups of genes involved in pathways of FA metabolism, angiogenesis/apoptosis and structure. These data are consistent with the fact that the CD36 protein binds FA and thrombospondin 1 invoved respectively in lipid metabolism and anti-angiogenic activities. In conclusion, our findings led to validate our data analysis workflow and identify specific pathways, possibly underlying the phenotypic abnormalities in CD36 Knock -Out hearts.

  2. Comparative Genomics Integrated with Association Analysis Identifies Candidate Effector Genes Corresponding to Lr20 in Phenotype-Paired Puccinia triticina Isolates from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing Qin; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Dong, Chongmei; Zhang, Peng; Cuomo, Christina A.; Park, Robert F.

    2017-01-01

    Leaf rust is one of the most common and damaging diseases of wheat, and is caused by an obligate biotrophic basidiomycete, Puccinia triticina (Pt). In the present study, 20 Pt isolates from Australia, comprising 10 phenotype-matched pairs with contrasting pathogenicity for Lr20, were analyzed using whole genome sequencing. Compared to the reference genome of the American Pt isolate 1-1 BBBD Race 1, an average of 404,690 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) per isolate was found and the proportion of heterozygous SNPs was above 87% in the majority of the isolates, demonstrating a high level of polymorphism and a high rate of heterozygosity. From the genome-wide SNPs, a phylogenetic tree was inferred, which consisted of a large clade of 15 isolates representing diverse presumed clonal lineages including 14 closely related isolates and the more diverged isolate 670028, and a small clade of five isolates characterized by lower heterozygosity level. Principle component analysis detected three distinct clusters, corresponding exactly to the two major subsets of the small clade and the large clade comprising all 15 isolates without further separation of isolate 670028. While genome-wide association analysis identified 302 genes harboring at least one SNP associated with Lr20 virulence (p < 0.05), a Wilcoxon rank sum test revealed that 36 and 68 genes had significant (p < 0.05) and marginally significant (p < 0.1) differences in the counts of non-synonymous mutations between Lr20 avirulent and virulent groups, respectively. Twenty of these genes were predicted to have a signal peptide without a transmembrane segment, and hence identified as candidate effector genes corresponding to Lr20. SNP analysis also implicated the potential involvement of epigenetics and small RNA in Pt pathogenicity. Future studies are thus warranted to investigate the biological functions of the candidate effectors as well as the gene regulation mechanisms at epigenetic and post

  3. Comparative Genomics Integrated with Association Analysis Identifies Candidate Effector Genes Corresponding to Lr20 in Phenotype-Paired Puccinia triticina Isolates from Australia.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing Qin; Sakthikumar, Sharadha; Dong, Chongmei; Zhang, Peng; Cuomo, Christina A; Park, Robert F

    2017-01-01

    Leaf rust is one of the most common and damaging diseases of wheat, and is caused by an obligate biotrophic basidiomycete, Puccinia triticina (Pt). In the present study, 20 Pt isolates from Australia, comprising 10 phenotype-matched pairs with contrasting pathogenicity for Lr20, were analyzed using whole genome sequencing. Compared to the reference genome of the American Pt isolate 1-1 BBBD Race 1, an average of 404,690 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) per isolate was found and the proportion of heterozygous SNPs was above 87% in the majority of the isolates, demonstrating a high level of polymorphism and a high rate of heterozygosity. From the genome-wide SNPs, a phylogenetic tree was inferred, which consisted of a large clade of 15 isolates representing diverse presumed clonal lineages including 14 closely related isolates and the more diverged isolate 670028, and a small clade of five isolates characterized by lower heterozygosity level. Principle component analysis detected three distinct clusters, corresponding exactly to the two major subsets of the small clade and the large clade comprising all 15 isolates without further separation of isolate 670028. While genome-wide association analysis identified 302 genes harboring at least one SNP associated with Lr20 virulence (p < 0.05), a Wilcoxon rank sum test revealed that 36 and 68 genes had significant (p < 0.05) and marginally significant (p < 0.1) differences in the counts of non-synonymous mutations between Lr20 avirulent and virulent groups, respectively. Twenty of these genes were predicted to have a signal peptide without a transmembrane segment, and hence identified as candidate effector genes corresponding to Lr20. SNP analysis also implicated the potential involvement of epigenetics and small RNA in Pt pathogenicity. Future studies are thus warranted to investigate the biological functions of the candidate effectors as well as the gene regulation mechanisms at epigenetic and post

  4. Indigenous and spoilage microbiota of farmed sea bream stored in ice identified by phenotypic and 16S rRNA gene analysis.

    PubMed

    Parlapani, F F; Meziti, A; Kormas, K Ar; Boziaris, I S

    2013-02-01

    Investigation of the initial and spoilage microbial diversity of iced stored sea bream was carried out. Culture dependent methods were used for bacterial enumeration and phenotypic identification of bacterial isolates, while culture independent methods, using bacterial 16S rRNA gene amplification, cloning and sequencing of DNA extracted directly from the flesh were also employed. The culture dependent approach revealed that the initial microbiota was dominated by Acinetobacter, Shewanella, Pseudomonas and Flavobacterium, while at the end of shelf-life determined by sensory analysis (16 days), the predominant microbiota was Pseudomonas and Shewanella. Culture independent approach showed that initially the sea bream flesh was strongly dominated by Acinetobacter, while Pseudomonas, Aeromonas salmonicida and Shewanella were the predominant phylotypes at the end of shelf-life. Initial and spoilage microbiota comprised of phylotypes previously identified by others using traditional or molecular techniques. However, Aeromonas has not been reported as part of the dominant microbiota of sea bream at the time of spoilage. Combination of classical and molecular methodologies better reveals the microbiota during storage by revealing bacteria that escape standard approaches and, thus, provides valuable complementary information regarding microbiological spoilage.

  5. Defining Disease Phenotypes in Primary Care Electronic Health Records by a Machine Learning Approach: A Case Study in Identifying Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shang-Ming; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Kennedy, Jonathan; Cooksey, Roxanne; Atkinson, Mark; Denaxas, Spiros; Siebert, Stefan; Dixon, William G.; O’Neill, Terence W.; Choy, Ernest; Sudlow, Cathie; Brophy, Sinead

    2016-01-01

    Objectives 1) To use data-driven method to examine clinical codes (risk factors) of a medical condition in primary care electronic health records (EHRs) that can accurately predict a diagnosis of the condition in secondary care EHRs. 2) To develop and validate a disease phenotyping algorithm for rheumatoid arthritis using primary care EHRs. Methods This study linked routine primary and secondary care EHRs in Wales, UK. A machine learning based scheme was used to identify patients with rheumatoid arthritis from primary care EHRs via the following steps: i) selection of variables by comparing relative frequencies of Read codes in the primary care dataset associated with disease case compared to non-disease control (disease/non-disease based on the secondary care diagnosis); ii) reduction of predictors/associated variables using a Random Forest method, iii) induction of decision rules from decision tree model. The proposed method was then extensively validated on an independent dataset, and compared for performance with two existing deterministic algorithms for RA which had been developed using expert clinical knowledge. Results Primary care EHRs were available for 2,238,360 patients over the age of 16 and of these 20,667 were also linked in the secondary care rheumatology clinical system. In the linked dataset, 900 predictors (out of a total of 43,100 variables) in the primary care record were discovered more frequently in those with versus those without RA. These variables were reduced to 37 groups of related clinical codes, which were used to develop a decision tree model. The final algorithm identified 8 predictors related to diagnostic codes for RA, medication codes, such as those for disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, and absence of alternative diagnoses such as psoriatic arthritis. The proposed data-driven method performed as well as the expert clinical knowledge based methods. Conclusion Data-driven scheme, such as ensemble machine learning methods, has

  6. Inhibitors of Ras/Raf-1 interaction identified by two-hybrid screening revert Ras-dependent transformation phenotypes in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kato-Stankiewicz, Juran; Hakimi, Irina; Zhi, Gang; Zhang, Jie; Serebriiskii, Ilya; Guo, Lea; Edamatsu, Hironori; Koide, Hiroshi; Menon, Sanjay; Eckl, Robert; Sakamuri, Sukumar; Lu, Yingchun; Chen, Quin-Zene; Agarwal, Seema; Baumbach, William R; Golemis, Erica A; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Khazak, Vladimir

    2002-10-29

    The interaction of activated Ras with Raf initiates signaling cascades that contribute to a significant percentage of human tumors, suggesting that agents that specifically disrupt this interaction might have desirable chemotherapeutic properties. We used a subtractive forward two-hybrid approach to identify small molecule compounds that block the interaction of Ras with Raf. These compounds (MCP1 and its derivatives, 53 and 110) reduced serum-induced transcriptional activation of serum response element as well as Ras-induced transcription by way of the AP-1 site. They also inhibited Ras-induced Raf-1 activation in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, Raf-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 activities in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, and epidermal growth factor-induced Raf-1 activation in A549 lung carcinoma cells. The MCP compounds caused reversion of ras-transformed phenotypes including morphology, in vitro invasiveness, and anchorage-independent growth of HT1080 cells. Decreased level of matrix metalloproteinases was also observed. Further characterization showed that MCP compounds restore actin stress fibers and cause flat reversion in NIH 3T3 cells transformed with H-Ras (V12) but not in NIH 3T3 cells transformed with constitutively active Raf-1 (RafDeltaN). Finally, we show that MCP compounds inhibit anchorage-independent growth of A549 and PANC-1 cells harboring K-ras mutation. Furthermore, MCP110 caused G(1) enrichment of A549 cells with the decrease of cyclin D level. These results highlight potent and specific effects of MCP compounds on cancer cells with intrinsic Ras activation.

  7. Inhibitors of Ras/Raf-1 interaction identified by two-hybrid screening revert Ras-dependent transformation phenotypes in human cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kato-Stankiewicz, Juran; Hakimi, Irina; Zhi, Gang; Zhang, Jie; Serebriiskii, Ilya; Guo, Lea; Edamatsu, Hironori; Koide, Hiroshi; Menon, Sanjay; Eckl, Robert; Sakamuri, Sukumar; Lu, Yingchun; Chen, Quin-Zene; Agarwal, Seema; Baumbach, William R.; Golemis, Erica A.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko; Khazak, Vladimir

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of activated Ras with Raf initiates signaling cascades that contribute to a significant percentage of human tumors, suggesting that agents that specifically disrupt this interaction might have desirable chemotherapeutic properties. We used a subtractive forward two-hybrid approach to identify small molecule compounds that block the interaction of Ras with Raf. These compounds (MCP1 and its derivatives, 53 and 110) reduced serum-induced transcriptional activation of serum response element as well as Ras-induced transcription by way of the AP-1 site. They also inhibited Ras-induced Raf-1 activation in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, Raf-1 and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 activities in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, and epidermal growth factor-induced Raf-1 activation in A549 lung carcinoma cells. The MCP compounds caused reversion of ras-transformed phenotypes including morphology, in vitro invasiveness, and anchorage-independent growth of HT1080 cells. Decreased level of matrix metalloproteinases was also observed. Further characterization showed that MCP compounds restore actin stress fibers and cause flat reversion in NIH 3T3 cells transformed with H-Ras (V12) but not in NIH 3T3 cells transformed with constitutively active Raf-1 (RafΔN). Finally, we show that MCP compounds inhibit anchorage-independent growth of A549 and PANC-1 cells harboring K-ras mutation. Furthermore, MCP110 caused G1 enrichment of A549 cells with the decrease of cyclin D level. These results highlight potent and specific effects of MCP compounds on cancer cells with intrinsic Ras activation. PMID:12391290

  8. Large-scale comparative phenotypic and genomic analyses reveal ecological preferences of shewanella species and identify metabolic pathways conserved at the genus level.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Serres, Margrethe H; Tiedje, James M

    2011-08-01

    The use of comparative genomics for the study of different microbiological species has increased substantially as sequence technologies become more affordable. However, efforts to fully link a genotype to its phenotype remain limited to the development of one mutant at a time. In this study, we provided a high-throughput alternative to this limiting step by coupling comparative genomics to the use of phenotype arrays for five sequenced Shewanella strains. Positive phenotypes were obtained for 441 nutrients (C, N, P, and S sources), with N-based compounds being the most utilized for all strains. Many genes and pathways predicted by genome analyses were confirmed with the comparative phenotype assay, and three degradation pathways believed to be missing in Shewanella were confirmed as missing. A number of previously unknown gene products were predicted to be parts of pathways or to have a function, expanding the number of gene targets for future genetic analyses. Ecologically, the comparative high-throughput phenotype analysis provided insights into niche specialization among the five different strains. For example, Shewanella amazonensis strain SB2B, isolated from the Amazon River delta, was capable of utilizing 60 C compounds, whereas Shewanella sp. strain W3-18-1, isolated from deep marine sediment, utilized only 25 of them. In spite of the large number of nutrient sources yielding positive results, our study indicated that except for the N sources, they were not sufficiently informative to predict growth phenotypes from increasing evolutionary distances. Our results indicate the importance of phenotypic evaluation for confirming genome predictions. This strategy will accelerate the functional discovery of genes and provide an ecological framework for microbial genome sequencing projects.

  9. Leaf mass per area is independent of vein length per area: avoiding pitfalls when modelling phenotypic integration (reply to Blonder et al. 2014)

    PubMed Central

    Sack, Lawren; Scoffoni, Christine; John, Grace P.; Poorter, Hendrik; Mason, Chase M.; Mendez-Alonzo, Rodrigo; Donovan, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    It has been recently proposed that leaf vein length per area (VLA) is the major determinant of leaf mass per area (LMA), and would thereby determine other traits of the leaf economic spectrum (LES), such as photosynthetic rate per mass (A mass), nitrogen concentration per mass (N mass) and leaf lifespan (LL). In a previous paper we argued that this ‘vein origin’ hypothesis was supported only by a mathematical model with predestined outcomes, and that we found no support for the ‘vein origin’ hypothesis in our analyses of compiled data. In contrast to the ‘vein origin’ hypothesis, empirical evidence indicated that VLA and LMA are independent mechanistically, and VLA (among other vein traits) contributes to a higher photosynthetic rate per area (A area), which scales up to driving a higher A mass, all independently of LMA, N mass and LL. In their reply to our paper, Blonder et al. (2014) raised questions about our analysis of their model, but did not address our main point, that the data did not support their hypothesis. In this paper we provide further analysis of an extended data set, which again robustly demonstrates the mechanistic independence of LMA from VLA, and thus does not support the ‘vein origin’ hypothesis. We also address the four specific points raised by Blonder et al. (2014) regarding our analyses. We additionally show how this debate provides critical guidance for improved modelling of LES traits and other networks of phenotypic traits that determine plant performance under contrasting environments. PMID:25118296

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies chromosome 10q24.32 variants associated with arsenic metabolism and toxicity phenotypes in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Brandon L; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Tong, Lin; Jasmine, Farzana; Argos, Maria; Roy, Shantanu; Paul-Brutus, Rachelle; Rahaman, Ronald; Rakibuz-Zaman, Muhammad; Parvez, Faruque; Ahmed, Alauddin; Quasem, Iftekhar; Hore, Samar K; Alam, Shafiul; Islam, Tariqul; Slavkovich, Vesna; Gamble, Mary V; Yunus, Md; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Baron, John A; Graziano, Joseph H; Ahsan, Habibul

    2012-01-01

    Arsenic contamination of drinking water is a major public health issue in many countries, increasing risk for a wide array of diseases, including cancer. There is inter-individual variation in arsenic metabolism efficiency and susceptibility to arsenic toxicity; however, the basis of this variation is not well understood. Here, we have performed the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of arsenic-related metabolism and toxicity phenotypes to improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which arsenic affects health. Using data on urinary arsenic metabolite concentrations and approximately 300,000 genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for 1,313 arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi individuals, we identified genome-wide significant association signals (P<5×10(-8)) for percentages of both monomethylarsonic acid (MMA) and dimethylarsinic acid (DMA) near the AS3MT gene (arsenite methyltransferase; 10q24.32), with five genetic variants showing independent associations. In a follow-up analysis of 1,085 individuals with arsenic-induced premalignant skin lesions (the classical sign of arsenic toxicity) and 1,794 controls, we show that one of these five variants (rs9527) is also associated with skin lesion risk (P = 0.0005). Using a subset of individuals with prospectively measured arsenic (n = 769), we show that rs9527 interacts with arsenic to influence incident skin lesion risk (P = 0.01). Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analyses of genome-wide expression data from 950 individual's lymphocyte RNA suggest that several of our lead SNPs represent cis-eQTLs for AS3MT (P = 10(-12)) and neighboring gene C10orf32 (P = 10(-44)), which are involved in C10orf32-AS3MT read-through transcription. This is the largest and most comprehensive genomic investigation of arsenic metabolism and toxicity to date, the only GWAS of any arsenic-related trait, and the first study to implicate 10q24.32 variants in both arsenic metabolism and arsenical skin

  11. Intensive field phenotyping of maize (Zea mays L.) root crowns identifies phenes and phene integration associated with plant growth and nitrogen acquisition.

    PubMed

    York, Larry M; Lynch, Jonathan P

    2015-09-01

    Root architecture is an important regulator of nitrogen (N) acquisition. Existing methods to phenotype the root architecture of cereal crops are generally limited to seedlings or to the outer roots of mature root crowns. The functional integration of root phenes is poorly understood. In this study, intensive phenotyping of mature root crowns of maize was conducted to discover phenes and phene modules related to N acquisition. Twelve maize genotypes were grown under replete and deficient N regimes in the field in South Africa and eight in the USA. An image was captured for every whorl of nodal roots in each crown. Custom software was used to measure root phenes including nodal occupancy, angle, diameter, distance to branching, lateral branching, and lateral length. Variation existed for all root phenes within maize root crowns. Size-related phenes such as diameter and number were substantially influenced by nodal position, while angle, lateral density, and distance to branching were not. Greater distance to branching, the length from the shoot to the emergence of laterals, is proposed to be a novel phene state that minimizes placing roots in already explored soil. Root phenes from both older and younger whorls of nodal roots contributed to variation in shoot mass and N uptake. The additive integration of root phenes accounted for 70% of the variation observed in shoot mass in low N soil. These results demonstrate the utility of intensive phenotyping of mature root systems, as well as the importance of phene integration in soil resource acquisition.

  12. Intensive field phenotyping of maize (Zea mays L.) root crowns identifies phenes and phene integration associated with plant growth and nitrogen acquisition

    PubMed Central

    York, Larry M.; Lynch, Jonathan P.

    2015-01-01

    Root architecture is an important regulator of nitrogen (N) acquisition. Existing methods to phenotype the root architecture of cereal crops are generally limited to seedlings or to the outer roots of mature root crowns. The functional integration of root phenes is poorly understood. In this study, intensive phenotyping of mature root crowns of maize was conducted to discover phenes and phene modules related to N acquisition. Twelve maize genotypes were grown under replete and deficient N regimes in the field in South Africa and eight in the USA. An image was captured for every whorl of nodal roots in each crown. Custom software was used to measure root phenes including nodal occupancy, angle, diameter, distance to branching, lateral branching, and lateral length. Variation existed for all root phenes within maize root crowns. Size-related phenes such as diameter and number were substantially influenced by nodal position, while angle, lateral density, and distance to branching were not. Greater distance to branching, the length from the shoot to the emergence of laterals, is proposed to be a novel phene state that minimizes placing roots in already explored soil. Root phenes from both older and younger whorls of nodal roots contributed to variation in shoot mass and N uptake. The additive integration of root phenes accounted for 70% of the variation observed in shoot mass in low N soil. These results demonstrate the utility of intensive phenotyping of mature root systems, as well as the importance of phene integration in soil resource acquisition. PMID:26041317

  13. The Use of MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry, Ribotyping and Phenotypic Tests to Identify Lactic Acid Bacteria from Fermented Cereal Foods in Abidjan (Côte d’Ivoire)

    PubMed Central

    Soro-Yao, Amenan A; Schumann, Peter; Thonart, Philippe; Djè, Koffi M; Pukall, Rüdiger

    2014-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) protein analysis, automated ribotyping, and phenotypic tests (e.g., cell morphology, gas production from glucose, growth and acid production on homofermemtative-heterofermentative differential (HHD) agar medium, sugar fermentation patterns) were used to identify 23 lactic acid bacteria (LAB) isolated from fermented cereal foods available in Abidjan, Côte d’Ivoire. Pediococcus acidilactici (56.5%), Lactobacillus fermentum (30.4%), L. salivarius (4.3%), P. pentosaceus (4.3%) and L. plantarum subsp. plantarum (4.3%) were the species and subspecies identified. Protein based identification was confirmed by automated ribotyping for selected isolates and was similar to that provided by the phenotypic characterization. MALDI-TOF MS protein analysis provided a high level of discrimination among the isolates and could be used for the rapid screening of LAB starter cultures. PMID:25279017

  14. Using whole genome sequencing to identify resistance determinants and predict antimicrobial resistance phenotypes for year 2015 invasive pneumococcal disease isolates recovered in the United States.

    PubMed

    Metcalf, B J; Chochua, S; Gertz, R E; Li, Z; Walker, H; Tran, T; Hawkins, P A; Glennen, A; Lynfield, R; Li, Y; McGee, L; Beall, B

    2016-12-01

    Our whole genome sequence (WGS) pipeline was assessed for accurate prediction of antimicrobial phenotypes. For 2316 invasive pneumococcal isolates recovered during 2015 we compared WGS pipeline data to broth dilution testing (BDT) for 18 antimicrobials. For 11 antimicrobials categorical discrepancies were assigned when WGS-predicted MICs and BDT MICs predicted different categorizations for susceptibility, intermediate resistance or resistance, ranging from 0.9% (tetracycline) to 2.9% (amoxicillin). For β-lactam antibiotics, the occurrence of at least four-fold differences in MIC ranged from 0.2% (meropenem) to 1.0% (penicillin), although phenotypic retesting resolved 25%-78% of these discrepancies. Non-susceptibility to penicillin, predicted by penicillin-binding protein types, was 2.7% (non-meningitis criteria) and 23.8% (meningitis criteria). Other common resistance determinants included mef (475 isolates), ermB (191 isolates), ermB + mef (48 isolates), tetM (261 isolates) and cat (51 isolates). Additional accessory resistance genes (tetS, tet32, aphA-3, sat4) were rarely detected (one to three isolates). Rare core genome mutations conferring erythromycin-resistance included a two-codon rplD insertion (rplD69-KG-70) and the 23S rRNA A2061G substitution (six isolates). Intermediate cotrimoxazole-resistance was associated with one or two codon insertions within folP (238 isolates) or the folA I100L substitution (38 isolates), whereas full cotrimoxazole-resistance was attributed to alterations in both genes (172 isolates). The two levofloxacin-resistant isolates contained parC and/or gyrA mutations. Of 11 remaining isolates with moderately elevated MICs to both ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, seven contained parC or gyrA mutations. The two rifampin-resistant isolates contained rpoB mutations. WGS-based antimicrobial phenotype prediction was an informative alternative to BDT for invasive pneumococci.

  15. A Novel Zebrafish ret Heterozygous Model of Hirschsprung Disease Identifies a Functional Role for mapk10 as a Modifier of Enteric Nervous System Phenotype Severity

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Koichi; Pachnis, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) is characterized by absence of enteric neurons from the distal colon and severe intestinal dysmotility. To understand the pathophysiology and genetics of HSCR we developed a unique zebrafish model that allows combined genetic, developmental and in vivo physiological studies. We show that ret mutant zebrafish exhibit cellular, physiological and genetic features of HSCR, including absence of intestinal neurons, reduced peristalsis, and varying phenotype expressivity in the heterozygous state. We perform live imaging experiments using a UAS-GAL4 binary genetic system to drive fluorescent protein expression in ENS progenitors. We demonstrate that ENS progenitors migrate at reduced speed in ret heterozygous embryos, without changes in proliferation or survival, establishing this as a principal pathogenic mechanism for distal aganglionosis. We show, using live imaging of actual intestinal movements, that intestinal motility is severely compromised in ret mutants, and partially impaired in ret heterozygous larvae, and establish a clear correlation between neuron position and organised intestinal motility. We exploited the partially penetrant ret heterozygous phenotype as a sensitised background to test the influence of a candidate modifier gene. We generated mapk10 loss-of-function mutants, which show reduced numbers of enteric neurons. Significantly, we show that introduction of mapk10 mutations into ret heterozygotes enhanced the ENS deficit, supporting MAPK10 as a HSCR susceptibility locus. Our studies demonstrate that ret heterozygous zebrafish is a sensitized model, with many significant advantages over existing murine models, to explore the pathophysiology and complex genetics of HSCR. PMID:27902697

  16. Optically confined polarized resonance Raman studies in identifying crystalline orientation of sub-diffraction limited AlGaN nanostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Sivadasan, A. K. Patsha, Avinash; Dhara, Sandip

    2015-04-27

    An optical characterization tool of Raman spectroscopy with extremely weak scattering cross section tool is not popular to analyze scattered signal from a single nanostructure in the sub-diffraction regime. In this regard, plasmonic assisted characterization tools are only relevant in spectroscopic studies of nanoscale object in the sub-diffraction limit. We have reported polarized resonance Raman spectroscopic (RRS) studies with strong electron-phonon coupling to understand the crystalline orientation of a single AlGaN nanowire of diameter ∼100 nm. AlGaN nanowire is grown by chemical vapor deposition technique using the catalyst assisted vapor-liquid-solid process. The results are compared with the high resolution transmission electron microscopic analysis. As a matter of fact, optical confinement effect due to the dielectric contrast of nanowire with respect to that of surrounding media assisted with electron-phonon coupling of RRS is useful for the spectroscopic analysis in the sub-diffraction limit of 325 nm (λ/2N.A.) using an excitation wavelength (λ) of 325 nm and near ultraviolet 40× far field objective with a numerical aperture (N.A.) value of 0.50.

  17. Genome-wide association study of multiple congenital heart disease phenotypes identifies a susceptibility locus for atrial septal defect at chromosome 4p16

    PubMed Central

    Cordell, Heather J.; Bentham, Jamie; Topf, Ana; Zelenika, Diana; Heath, Simon; Mamasoula, Chrysovalanto; Cosgrove, Catherine; Blue, Gillian; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Breckpot, Jeroen; Soemedi, Rachel; Martin, Ruairidh; Rahman, Thahira J.; Hall, Darroch; van Engelen, Klaartje; Moorman, Antoon F.M.; Zwinderman, Aelko H; Barnett, Phil; Koopmann, Tamara T.; Adriaens, Michiel E.; Varro, Andras; George, Alfred L.; dos Remedios, Christobal; Bishopric, Nanette H.; Bezzina, Connie R.; O’Sullivan, John; Gewillig, Marc; Bu’Lock, Frances A.; Winlaw, David; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; Brook, J. David; Mulder, Barbara J.M.; Mital, Seema; Postma, Alex V.; Lathrop, G. Mark; Farrall, Martin; Goodship, Judith A.; Keavney, Bernard D.

    2013-01-01

    We carried out a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of congenital heart disease (CHD). Our discovery cohort comprised 1,995 CHD cases and 5,159 controls, and included patients from each of the three major clinical CHD categories (septal, obstructive and cyanotic defects). When all CHD phenotypes were considered together, no regions achieved genome-wide significant association. However, a region on chromosome 4p16, adjacent to the MSX1 and STX18 genes, was associated (P=9.5×10−7) with the risk of ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) in the discovery cohort (N=340 cases), and this was replicated in a further 417 ASD cases and 2520 controls (replication P=5.0×10−5; OR in replication cohort 1.40 [95% CI 1.19-1.65]; combined P=2.6×10−10). Genotype accounted for ~9% of the population attributable risk of ASD. PMID:23708191

  18. Structural in silico dissection of the collagen V interactome to identify genotype-phenotype correlations in classic Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS).

    PubMed

    Paladin, Lisanna; Tosatto, Silvio C E; Minervini, Giovanni

    2015-12-21

    Collagen V mutations are associated with Elhers-Danlos syndrome (EDS), a group of heritable collagenopathies. Collagen V structure is not available and the disease-causing mechanism is unclear. To address this issue, we manually curated missense mutations suspected to promote classic type EDS (cEDS) insurgence from the literature and performed a genotype-phenotype correlation study. Further, we generated a homology model of the collagen V triple helix to evaluate the pathogenic effects. The resulting structure was used to map known protein-protein interactions enriched with in silico predictions. An interaction network model for collagen V was created. We found that cEDS heterogeneous manifestations may be explained by the involvement in two different extracellular matrix pathways, related to cell adhesion and tissue repair or cell differentiation, growth and apoptosis.

  19. Identifying Mutations of the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain 37 (TTC37) Gene in Infants With Intractable Diarrhea and a Comparison of Asian and Non-Asian Phenotype and Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Ju-Li; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jaing, Tang-Her; Ou, Liang-Shiou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Syndromic diarrhea/tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare, autosomal recessive and severe bowel disorder mainly caused by mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene which act as heterotetrameric cofactors to enhance aberrant mRNAs decay. The phenotype and immune profiles of SD/THE overlap those of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Neonates with intractable diarrhea underwent immunologic assessments including immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling function. Candidate genes for PIDs predisposing to inflammatory bowel disease were sequencing in this study. Two neonates, born to nonconsanguineous parents, suffered from intractable diarrhea, recurrent infections, and massive hematemesis from esopharyngeal varices due to liver cirrhosis or accompanying Trichorrhexis nodosa that developed with age and thus guided the diagnosis of SD/THE compatible to TTC37 mutations (homozygous DelK1155H, Fs∗2; heterozygous Y1169Ter and InsA1143, Fs∗3). Their immunologic evaluation showed normal mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling, but low IgG levels, undetectable antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen and decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. A PubMed search for bi-allelic TTC37 mutations and phenotypes were recorded in 14 Asian and 12 non-Asian cases. They had similar presentations of infantile onset refractory diarrhea, facial dysmorphism, hair anomalies, low IgG, low birth weight, and consanguinity. A higher incidence of heart anomalies (8/14 vs 2/12; P = 0.0344, Chi-square), nonsense mutations (19 in 28 alleles), and hot-spot mutations (W936Ter, 2779-2G>A, and Y1169Ter) were found in the Asian compared with the non-Asian patients. Despite immunoglobulin therapy in 20 of the patients, 4 died from liver cirrhosis and 1 died from sepsis. Patients of all ethnicities with SD/THE with the

  20. Genome-wide association mapping in a wild avian population identifies a link between genetic and phenotypic variation in a life-history trait.

    PubMed

    Husby, Arild; Kawakami, Takeshi; Rönnegård, Lars; Smeds, Linnéa; Ellegren, Hans; Qvarnström, Anna

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the genetic basis of traits involved in adaptation is a major challenge in evolutionary biology but remains poorly understood. Here, we use genome-wide association mapping using a custom 50 k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array in a natural population of collared flycatchers to examine the genetic basis of clutch size, an important life-history trait in many animal species. We found evidence for an association on chromosome 18 where one SNP significant at the genome-wide level explained 3.9% of the phenotypic variance. We also detected two suggestive quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on chromosomes 9 and 26. Fitness differences among genotypes were generally weak and not significant, although there was some indication of a sex-by-genotype interaction for lifetime reproductive success at the suggestive QTL on chromosome 26. This implies that sexual antagonism may play a role in maintaining genetic variation at this QTL. Our findings provide candidate regions for a classic avian life-history trait that will be useful for future studies examining the molecular and cellular function of, as well as evolutionary mechanisms operating at, these loci.

  1. Heterogeneity of subclinical autistic traits among parents of children with autism spectrum disorder: Identifying the broader autism phenotype with a data-driven method.

    PubMed

    Bora, Emre; Aydın, Aydan; Saraç, Tuğba; Kadak, Muhammed Tayyib; Köse, Sezen

    2017-02-01

    Clinical diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be conceptualized as the extreme end of the distribution of subclinical autistic traits related to genetic susceptibility factors (broad autism phenotype (BAP)) in the general population. Subclinical autistic traits are significantly more common among unaffected first-degree relatives of probands with autism. However, there is a significant heterogeneity of autistic traits in family members of individuals with ASD and severity of autistic traits are not significantly different from controls in the majority of these relatives. The current study investigated the heterogeneity of autistic traits using latent class analysis (LCA) of the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) ratings of 673 parents of children with ASD and 147 parents of typically developing children. Two distinct subgroups, including a "low-scoring" and a "high-scorer (BAP)" groups, were found. In comparison to control parents, a significantly larger proportion (21.1% vs. 7.5%) of parents of ASD were members of BAP group. Communication subscale made a distinctive contribution to the separation of high and low-scoring groups (d = 2.77). Further studies investigating neurobiological and genetic biomarkers and stability of these two subgroups over time are important for understanding the nature of autistic traits in the general population. Autism Res 2017, 10: 321-326. © 2016 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. CD133+, CD166+CD44+, and CD24+CD44+ phenotypes fail to reliably identify cell populations with cancer stem cell functional features in established human colorectal cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Muraro, Manuele Giuseppe; Mele, Valentina; Däster, Silvio; Han, Junyi; Heberer, Michael; Cesare Spagnoli, Giulio; Iezzi, Giandomenica

    2012-08-01

    Increasing evidence that cancers originate from small populations of so-called cancer stem cells (CSCs), capable of surviving conventional chemotherapies and regenerating the original tumor, urges the development of novel CSC-targeted treatments. Screening of new anticancer compounds is conventionally conducted on established tumor cell lines, providing sufficient material for high-throughput studies. Whether tumor cell lines might comprise CSC populations resembling those of primary tumors, however, remains highly debated. We have analyzed the expression of defined phenotypic profiles, including CD133+, CD166+CD44+, and CD24+CD44+, reported as CSC-specific in human primary colorectal cancer (CRC), on a panel of 10 established CRC cell lines and evaluated their correlation with CSC properties. None of the putative CSC phenotypes consistently correlated with stem cell-like features, including spheroid formation ability, clonogenicity, aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 activity, and side population phenotype. Importantly, CRC cells expressing putative CSC markers did not exhibit increased survival when treated with chemotherapeutic drugs in vitro or display higher tumorigenicity in vivo. Thus, the expression of CD133 or the coexpression of CD166/CD44 or CD24/CD44 did not appear to reliably identify CSC populations in established CRC cell lines. Our findings question the suitability of cell lines for the screening of CSC-specific therapies and underline the urgency of developing novel platforms for anticancer drug discovery.

  3. High-throughput phenotyping (HTP) identifies seedling root traits linked to variation in seed yield and nutrient capture in field-grown oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C. L.; Graham, N. S.; Hayden, R.; Meacham, M. C.; Neugebauer, K.; Nightingale, M.; Dupuy, L. X.; Hammond, J. P.; White, P. J.; Broadley, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Root traits can be selected for crop improvement. Techniques such as soil excavations can be used to screen root traits in the field, but are limited to genotypes that are well-adapted to field conditions. The aim of this study was to compare a low-cost, high-throughput root phenotyping (HTP) technique in a controlled environment with field performance, using oilseed rape (OSR; Brassica napus) varieties. Methods Primary root length (PRL), lateral root length and lateral root density (LRD) were measured on 14-d-old seedlings of elite OSR varieties (n = 32) using a ‘pouch and wick’ HTP system (∼40 replicates). Six field experiments were conducted using the same varieties at two UK sites each year for 3 years. Plants were excavated at the 6- to 8-leaf stage for general vigour assessments of roots and shoots in all six experiments, and final seed yield was determined. Leaves were sampled for mineral composition from one of the field experiments. Key Results Seedling PRL in the HTP system correlated with seed yield in four out of six (r = 0·50, 0·50, 0·33, 0·49; P < 0·05) and with emergence in three out of five (r = 0·59, 0·22, 0·49; P < 0·05) field experiments. Seedling LRD correlated positively with leaf concentrations of some minerals, e.g. calcium (r = 0·46; P < 0·01) and zinc (r = 0·58; P < 0·001), but did not correlate with emergence, general early vigour or yield in the field. Conclusions Associations between PRL and field performance are generally related to early vigour. These root traits might therefore be of limited additional selection value, given that vigour can be measured easily on shoots/canopies. In contrast, LRD cannot be assessed easily in the field and, if LRD can improve nutrient uptake, then it may be possible to use HTP systems to screen this trait in both elite and more genetically diverse, non-field-adapted OSR. PMID:27052342

  4. Development and application of a sensitive, phenotypic, high-throughput image-based assay to identify compound activity against Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, Melissa L.; Avery, Vicky M.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a high content 384-well, image-based assay to estimate the effect of compound treatment on Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes in 3T3 fibroblasts. In the same well, the effect of compound activity on host cells can also be determined, as an initial indicator of cytotoxicity. This assay has been used to identify active compounds from an in-house library of compounds with either known biological activity or that are FDA approved, and separately, from the Medicines for Malaria Venture Malaria Box collection. Active compounds were screened against T. cruzi trypomastigotes, utilising an assay developed with the viability dye resazurin. Twelve compounds with reconfirmed solid sample activity, with IC50 values of less than 10 μM and selectivity indices to T. cruzi amastigotes over 3T3 host cells of between >22 and 319 times were identified from these libraries. As 3T3 cells are contact inhibited, with limited proliferation in the assay, selective compounds of interest were profiled in a separate assay to estimate the viability of compound treated, replicating HEK293 cells. Selective compounds that were not previously reported in the literature were further profiled by extending the incubation time against amastigote infected 3T3 cells to determine if there were residual amastigotes post-treatment, important for the consideration of the exposure time required for further biological characterisation. The assay development process and the suitability of identified compounds as hit molecules for Chagas disease research are discussed. PMID:27120069

  5. Development and application of a sensitive, phenotypic, high-throughput image-based assay to identify compound activity against Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Melissa L; Avery, Vicky M

    2015-12-01

    We have developed a high content 384-well, image-based assay to estimate the effect of compound treatment on Trypanosoma cruzi amastigotes in 3T3 fibroblasts. In the same well, the effect of compound activity on host cells can also be determined, as an initial indicator of cytotoxicity. This assay has been used to identify active compounds from an in-house library of compounds with either known biological activity or that are FDA approved, and separately, from the Medicines for Malaria Venture Malaria Box collection. Active compounds were screened against T. cruzi trypomastigotes, utilising an assay developed with the viability dye resazurin. Twelve compounds with reconfirmed solid sample activity, with IC50 values of less than 10 μM and selectivity indices to T. cruzi amastigotes over 3T3 host cells of between >22 and 319 times were identified from these libraries. As 3T3 cells are contact inhibited, with limited proliferation in the assay, selective compounds of interest were profiled in a separate assay to estimate the viability of compound treated, replicating HEK293 cells. Selective compounds that were not previously reported in the literature were further profiled by extending the incubation time against amastigote infected 3T3 cells to determine if there were residual amastigotes post-treatment, important for the consideration of the exposure time required for further biological characterisation. The assay development process and the suitability of identified compounds as hit molecules for Chagas disease research are discussed.

  6. Imputation of variants from the 1000 Genomes Project modestly improves known associations and can identify low-frequency variant-phenotype associations undetected by HapMap based imputation.

    PubMed

    Wood, Andrew R; Perry, John R B; Tanaka, Toshiko; Hernandez, Dena G; Zheng, Hou-Feng; Melzer, David; Gibbs, J Raphael; Nalls, Michael A; Weedon, Michael N; Spector, Tim D; Richards, J Brent; Bandinelli, Stefania; Ferrucci, Luigi; Singleton, Andrew B; Frayling, Timothy M

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have been limited by the reliance on common variants present on microarrays or imputable from the HapMap Project data. More recently, the completion of the 1000 Genomes Project has provided variant and haplotype information for several million variants derived from sequencing over 1,000 individuals. To help understand the extent to which more variants (including low frequency (1% ≤ MAF <5%) and rare variants (<1%)) can enhance previously identified associations and identify novel loci, we selected 93 quantitative circulating factors where data was available from the InCHIANTI population study. These phenotypes included cytokines, binding proteins, hormones, vitamins and ions. We selected these phenotypes because many have known strong genetic associations and are potentially important to help understand disease processes. We performed a genome-wide scan for these 93 phenotypes in InCHIANTI. We identified 21 signals and 33 signals that reached P<5×10(-8) based on HapMap and 1000 Genomes imputation, respectively, and 9 and 11 that reached a stricter, likely conservative, threshold of P<5×10(-11) respectively. Imputation of 1000 Genomes genotype data modestly improved the strength of known associations. Of 20 associations detected at P<5×10(-8) in both analyses (17 of which represent well replicated signals in the NHGRI catalogue), six were captured by the same index SNP, five were nominally more strongly associated in 1000 Genomes imputed data and one was nominally more strongly associated in HapMap imputed data. We also detected an association between a low frequency variant and phenotype that was previously missed by HapMap based imputation approaches. An association between rs112635299 and alpha-1 globulin near the SERPINA gene represented the known association between rs28929474 (MAF = 0.007) and alpha1-antitrypsin that predisposes to emphysema (P = 2.5×10(-12)). Our data provide important proof of principle

  7. Extreme-phenotype genome-wide association study (XP-GWAS): a method for identifying trait-associated variants by sequencing pools of individuals selected from a diversity panel.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jinliang; Jiang, Haiying; Yeh, Cheng-Ting; Yu, Jianming; Jeddeloh, Jeffrey A; Nettleton, Dan; Schnable, Patrick S

    2015-11-01

    Although approaches for performing genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are well developed, conventional GWAS requires high-density genotyping of large numbers of individuals from a diversity panel. Here we report a method for performing GWAS that does not require genotyping of large numbers of individuals. Instead XP-GWAS (extreme-phenotype GWAS) relies on genotyping pools of individuals from a diversity panel that have extreme phenotypes. This analysis measures allele frequencies in the extreme pools, enabling discovery of associations between genetic variants and traits of interest. This method was evaluated in maize (Zea mays) using the well-characterized kernel row number trait, which was selected to enable comparisons between the results of XP-GWAS and conventional GWAS. An exome-sequencing strategy was used to focus sequencing resources on genes and their flanking regions. A total of 0.94 million variants were identified and served as evaluation markers; comparisons among pools showed that 145 of these variants were statistically associated with the kernel row number phenotype. These trait-associated variants were significantly enriched in regions identified by conventional GWAS. XP-GWAS was able to resolve several linked QTL and detect trait-associated variants within a single gene under a QTL peak. XP-GWAS is expected to be particularly valuable for detecting genes or alleles responsible for quantitative variation in species for which extensive genotyping resources are not available, such as wild progenitors of crops, orphan crops, and other poorly characterized species such as those of ecological interest.

  8. Genome sequencing of the Trichoderma reesei QM9136 mutant identifies a truncation of the transcriptional regulator XYR1 as the cause for its cellulase-negative phenotype

    DOE PAGES

    Lichius, Alexander; Bidard, Frédérique; Buchholz, Franziska; ...

    2015-04-20

    Trichoderma reesei is the main industrial source of cellulases and hemicellulases required for the hydrolysis of biomass to simple sugars, which can then be used in the production of biofuels and biorefineries. The highly productive strains in use today were generated by classical mutagenesis. As byproducts of this procedure, mutants were generated that turned out to be unable to produce cellulases. In order to identify the mutations responsible for this inability, we sequenced the genome of one of these strains, QM9136, and compared it to that of its progenitor T. reesei QM6a.

  9. Exome sequencing of extreme clopidogrel response phenotypes identifies B4GALT2 as a determinant of on-treatment platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Scott, S A; Collet, J-P; Baber, U; Yang, Y; Peter, I; Linderman, M; Sload, J; Qiao, W; Kini, A S; Sharma, S K; Desnick, R J; Fuster, V; Hajjar, R J; Montalescot, G; Hulot, J-S

    2016-09-01

    Interindividual variability in platelet aggregation is common among patients treated with clopidogrel and both high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) and low on-treatment platelet reactivity (LTPR) increase risks for adverse clinical outcomes. CYP2C19 influences clopidogrel response but only accounts for ∼12% of the variability in platelet reactivity. To identify novel variants implicated in on-treatment platelet reactivity, patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) with extreme pharmacodynamic responses to clopidogrel and wild-type CYP2C19 were subjected to exome sequencing. Candidate variants that clustered in the LTPR subgroup subsequently were genotyped across the discovery cohort (n = 636). Importantly, carriers of B4GALT2 c.909C>T had lower on-treatment P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs; P = 0.0077) and residual platelet aggregation (P = 0.0008) compared with noncarriers, which remained significant after adjusting for CYP2C19 and other clinical variables in both the discovery (P = 0.0298) and replication (n = 160; PRU: P = 0.0001) cohorts. B4GALT2 is a platelet-expressed galactosyltransferase, indicating that B4GALT2 c.909C>T may influence clopidogrel sensitivity through atypical cell-surface glycoprotein processing and platelet adhesion.

  10. Early biomarkers identified in a rat model of a healthier phenotype based on early postnatal dietary intervention may predict the response to an obesogenic environment in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Torrens, Juana M; Konieczna, Jadwiga; Palou, Mariona; Sánchez, Juana; Picó, Catalina; Palou, Andreu

    2014-02-01

    Moderate maternal calorie restriction during lactation in rats provides certain protection against obesity in adult offspring. Hence, we used this model with 20% calorie restriction to identify early changes at the gene expression level in key tissues involved in energy homeostasis, as well as to assess whether they are maintained in adulthood, to consider them as potential biomarkers of metabolic health. Offspring of control and 20% calorie-restricted dams during lactation (CR) were followed. Animals were studied at weaning and at 6 months old under normal-fat (NF) diet and after being moved to a high-fat (HF) diet for the last 2 months. Adult CR animals showed lower body weight, decreased hepatic lipids and improved circulating parameters vs. controls. At weaning, CR pups, in retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (rWAT), displayed lower messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of lipogenesis-related genes and higher mRNA levels of genes related with lipolysis and insulin signaling vs. controls. CR animals also showed lower hepatic mRNA levels of the lipogenesis-related gene sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP1c) and higher mRNA levels of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 isoform a, adipose triglyceride lipase and long-form leptin receptor (ObRb). Some of these changes were sustained in adulthood under HF diet, and mRNA levels of IRS1 (rWAT) and of ObRb and SREBP1c (liver) in adult animals correlated with hepatic lipids and circulating parameters. In conclusion, the protective effects of moderate calorie restriction during lactation on offspring metabolic health are reflected in early changes at gene expression level in key tissues. Among them, transcript levels of IRS1 (rWAT) and of ObRb and SREBP1c (liver) emerge as particularly interesting as potential transcript-based biomarkers of metabolic health.

  11. Retraction: "Over-expression of FoxM1 leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells" by Bao et al.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    The above article, published online on April 18, 2011 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the second author that found Figures 1C and 4C to be inappropriately re-used and re-labeled. REFERENCE Bao B, Wang Z, Ali S, Kong D, Banerjee S, Ahmad A, Li Y, Azmi AS, Miele L, Sarkar FH. 2011. Over-expression of FoxM1 leads to epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer stem cell phenotype in pancreatic cancer cells. J Cell Biochem 112:2296-2306; doi: 10.1002/jcb.23150.

  12. Translational profiling identifies a cascade of damage initiated in motor neurons and spreading to glia in mutant SOD1-mediated ALS

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Shuying; Sun, Ying; Ling, Shuo-Chien; Ferraiuolo, Laura; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Zou, Yiyang; Drenner, Kevin; Wang, Yin; Ditsworth, Dara; Tokunaga, Seiya; Kopelevich, Alex; Kaspar, Brian K.; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Cleveland, Don W.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitous expression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)-causing mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) provokes noncell autonomous paralytic disease. By combining ribosome affinity purification and high-throughput sequencing, a cascade of mutant SOD1-dependent, cell type-specific changes are now identified. Initial mutant-dependent damage is restricted to motor neurons and includes synapse and metabolic abnormalities, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and selective activation of the PRKR-like ER kinase (PERK) arm of the unfolded protein response. PERK activation correlates with what we identify as a naturally low level of ER chaperones in motor neurons. Early changes in astrocytes occur in genes that are involved in inflammation and metabolism and are targets of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor and liver X receptor transcription factors. Dysregulation of myelination and lipid signaling pathways and activation of ETS transcription factors occur in oligodendrocytes only after disease initiation. Thus, pathogenesis involves a temporal cascade of cell type-selective damage initiating in motor neurons, with subsequent damage within glia driving disease propagation. PMID:26621731

  13. Macrophage phenotypes in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Colin, Sophie; Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Staels, Bart

    2014-11-01

    Initiation and progression of atherosclerosis depend on local inflammation and accumulation of lipids in the vascular wall. Although many cells are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis, macrophages are fundamental contributors. For nearly a decade, the phenotypic heterogeneity and plasticity of macrophages has been studied. In atherosclerotic lesions, macrophages are submitted to a large variety of micro-environmental signals, such as oxidized lipids and cytokines, which influence the phenotypic polarization and activation of macrophages resulting in a dynamic plasticity. The macrophage phenotype spectrum is characterized, at the extremes, by the classical M1 macrophages induced by T-helper 1 (Th-1) cytokines and by the alternative M2 macrophages induced by Th-2 cytokines. M2 macrophages can be further classified into M2a, M2b, M2c, and M2d subtypes. More recently, additional plaque-specific macrophage phenotypes have been identified, termed as Mox, Mhem, and M4. Understanding the mechanisms and functional consequences of the phenotypic heterogeneity of macrophages will contribute to determine their potential role in lesion development and plaque stability. Furthermore, research on macrophage plasticity could lead to novel therapeutic approaches to counteract cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The present review summarizes our current knowledge on macrophage subsets in atherosclerotic plaques and mechanism behind the modulation of the macrophage phenotype.

  14. The exome sequencing identified the mutation in YARS2 encoding the mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase as a nuclear modifier for the phenotypic manifestation of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pingping; Jin, Xiaofen; Peng, Yanyan; Wang, Meng; Liu, Hao; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhang, Zengjun; Ji, Yanchun; Zhang, Juanjuan; Liang, Min; Zhao, Fuxin; Sun, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Minglian; Zhou, Xiangtian; Chen, Ye; Mo, Jun Qin; Huang, Taosheng; Qu, Jia; Guan, Min-Xin

    2016-02-01

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is the most common mitochondrial disorder. Nuclear modifier genes are proposed to modify the phenotypic expression of LHON-associated mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations. By using an exome sequencing approach, we identified a LHON susceptibility allele (c.572G>T, p.191Gly>Val) in YARS2 gene encoding mitochondrial tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase, which interacts with m.11778G>A mutation to cause visual failure. We performed functional assays by using lymphoblastoid cell lines derived from members of Chinese families (asymptomatic individuals carrying m.11778G>A mutation, or both m.11778G>A and heterozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations and symptomatic subjects harboring m.11778G>A and homozygous p.191Gly>Val mutations) and controls lacking these mutations. The 191Gly>Val mutation reduced the YARS2 protein level in the mutant cells. The aminoacylated efficiency and steady-state level of tRNA(Tyr) were markedly decreased in the cell lines derived from patients both carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The failure in tRNA(Tyr) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for polypeptides with high content of tyrosine codon such as ND4, ND5, ND6 and COX2 in cells lines carrying homozygous YARS2 p.191Gly>Val and m.11778G>A mutations. The YARS2 p.191Gly>Val mutation worsened the respiratory phenotypes associated with m.11778G>A mutation, especially reducing activities of complexes I and IV. The respiratory deficiency altered the efficiency of mitochondrial ATP synthesis and increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Thus, mutated YARS2 aggravates mitochondrial dysfunctions associated with the m.11778G>A mutation, exceeding the threshold for the expression of blindness phenotype. Our findings provided new insights into the pathophysiology of LHON that were manifested by interaction between mtDNA mutation and mutated nuclear-modifier YARS2.

  15. Circulating Endocannabinoids and the Polymorphism 385C>A in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Gene May Identify the Obesity Phenotype Related to Cardiometabolic Risk: A Study Conducted in a Brazilian Population of Complex Interethnic Admixture.

    PubMed

    Martins, Cyro José de Moraes; Genelhu, Virginia; Pimentel, Marcia Mattos Gonçalves; Celoria, Bruno Miguel Jorge; Mangia, Rogerio Fabris; Aveta, Teresa; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Francischetti, Emilio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system is associated with cardiometabolic complications of obesity. Allelic variants in coding genes for this system components may contribute to differences in the susceptibility to obesity and related health hazards. These data have mostly been shown in Caucasian populations and in severely obese individuals. We investigated a multiethnic Brazilian population to study the relationships among the polymorphism 385C>A in an endocannabinoid degrading enzyme gene (FAAH), endocannabinoid levels and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Fasting plasma levels of endocannabinoids and congeners (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, N-oleoylethanolamide and N-palmitoylethanolamide) were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in 200 apparently healthy individuals of both genders with body mass indices from 22.5 ± 1.8 to 35.9 ± 5.5 kg/m2 (mean ± 1 SD) and ages between 18 and 60 years. All were evaluated for anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, metabolic variables, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, and genotyping. The endocannabinoid levels increased as a function of obesity and insulin resistance. The homozygous genotype AA was associated with higher levels of anandamide and lower levels of adiponectin versus wild homozygous CC and heterozygotes combined. The levels of anandamide were independent and positively associated with the genotype AA position 385 of FAAH, C-reactive protein levels and body mass index. Our findings provide evidence for an endocannabinoid-related phenotype that may be identified by the combination of circulating anandamide levels with genotyping of the FAAH 385C>A; this phenotype is not exclusive to mono-ethnoracial populations nor to individuals with severe obesity.

  16. Circulating Endocannabinoids and the Polymorphism 385C>A in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Gene May Identify the Obesity Phenotype Related to Cardiometabolic Risk: A Study Conducted in a Brazilian Population of Complex Interethnic Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Cyro José de Moraes; Genelhu, Virginia; Pimentel, Marcia Mattos Gonçalves; Celoria, Bruno Miguel Jorge; Mangia, Rogerio Fabris; Aveta, Teresa; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Francischetti, Emilio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system is associated with cardiometabolic complications of obesity. Allelic variants in coding genes for this system components may contribute to differences in the susceptibility to obesity and related health hazards. These data have mostly been shown in Caucasian populations and in severely obese individuals. We investigated a multiethnic Brazilian population to study the relationships among the polymorphism 385C>A in an endocannabinoid degrading enzyme gene (FAAH), endocannabinoid levels and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Fasting plasma levels of endocannabinoids and congeners (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, N-oleoylethanolamide and N-palmitoylethanolamide) were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in 200 apparently healthy individuals of both genders with body mass indices from 22.5 ± 1.8 to 35.9 ± 5.5 kg/m2 (mean ± 1 SD) and ages between 18 and 60 years. All were evaluated for anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, metabolic variables, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, and genotyping. The endocannabinoid levels increased as a function of obesity and insulin resistance. The homozygous genotype AA was associated with higher levels of anandamide and lower levels of adiponectin versus wild homozygous CC and heterozygotes combined. The levels of anandamide were independent and positively associated with the genotype AA position 385 of FAAH, C-reactive protein levels and body mass index. Our findings provide evidence for an endocannabinoid-related phenotype that may be identified by the combination of circulating anandamide levels with genotyping of the FAAH 385C>A; this phenotype is not exclusive to mono-ethnoracial populations nor to individuals with severe obesity. PMID:26561012

  17. Full-Genome Sequencing Identifies in the Genetic Background Several Determinants That Modulate the Resistance Phenotype in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Carrying the Novel mecC Gene.

    PubMed

    Milheiriço, Catarina; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Tomasz, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Most methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains are resistant to beta-lactam antibiotics due to the presence of the mecA gene, encoding an extra penicillin-binding protein (PBP2A) that has low affinity for virtually all beta-lactam antibiotics. Recently, a new resistance determinant-the mecC gene-was identified in S. aureus isolates recovered from humans and dairy cattle. Although having typically low MICs to beta-lactam antibiotics, MRSA strains with the mecC determinant are also capable of expressing high levels of oxacillin resistance when in an optimal genetic background. In order to test the impact of extensive beta-lactam selection on the emergence of mecC-carrying strains with high levels of antibiotic resistance, we exposed the prototype mecC-carrying MRSA strain, LGA251, to increasing concentrations of oxacillin. LGA251 was able to rapidly adapt to high concentrations of oxacillin in growth medium. In such laboratory mutants with increased levels of oxacillin resistance, we identified mutations in genes with no relationship to the mecC regulatory system, indicating that the genetic background plays an important role in the establishment of the levels of oxacillin resistance. Our data also indicate that the stringent stress response plays a critical role in the beta-lactam antibiotic resistance phenotype of MRSA strains carrying the mecC determinant.

  18. Comment to Santos et al., "hyper-IgD and periodic fever syndrome: a new MVK mutation (p.R277G) associated with a severe phenotype".

    PubMed

    Santos, Ruda de Luna Almeida; Crovella, Sergio; Celsi, Fulvio

    2015-03-15

    We performed molecular modeling analysis onto a novel mutation in the gene MVK, described by Santos et al., found to be causative of a severe form of Hyper-IgD/Mevalonate Kinase Deficiency. The mutation p.R277G, in our analysis, lowers the binding affinity for some enzyme's substrates. Interestingly, we found that p.R277G mutation inhibits binding of Isopentenyl Pyrophosphate (IPP) (binding free energy=0 kcal/mol), one of isoprenoids responsible for feedback-inhibition of MVK. IPP is known to be an activator of a specific class of T-cells and we can hypothesize that increased levels of this metabolite generate an aberrant immune system response. Indeed other experiments are needed to verify this hypothesis; however, this work demonstrates usefulness of molecular modeling in generating novel pathogenic hypothesis.

  19. Rescue of an in vitro neuron phenotype identified in Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons by modulating the WNT pathway and calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Efthymiou, Anastasia G; Steiner, Joe; Pavan, William J; Wincovitch, Stephen; Larson, Denise M; Porter, Forbes D; Rao, Mahendra S; Malik, Nasir

    2015-03-01

    Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a familial disorder that has devastating consequences on postnatal development with multisystem effects, including neurodegeneration. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment option for NPC1; however, several potentially therapeutic compounds have been identified in assays using yeast, rodent models, and NPC1 human fibroblasts. Although these discoveries were made in fibroblasts from NPC1 subjects and were in some instances validated in animal models of the disease, testing these drugs on a cell type more relevant for NPC1 neurological disease would greatly facilitate both study of the disease and identification of more relevant therapeutic compounds. Toward this goal, we have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a subject homozygous for the most frequent NPC1 mutation (p.I1061T) and subsequently created a stable line of neural stem cells (NSCs). These NSCs were then used to create neurons as an appropriate disease model. NPC1 neurons display a premature cell death phenotype, and gene expression analysis of these cells suggests dysfunction of important signaling pathways, including calcium and WNT. The clear readout from these cells makes them ideal candidates for high-throughput screening and will be a valuable tool to better understand the development of NPC1 in neural cells, as well as to develop better therapeutic options for NPC1.

  20. An overlapping phenotype of Osteogenesis imperfecta and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome due to a heterozygous mutation in COL1A1 and biallelic missense variants in TNXB identified by whole exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mackenroth, Luisa; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Egerer, Johannes; Hecht, Jochen; Kallinich, Tilmann; Stenzel, Werner; Spors, Birgit; von Moers, Arpad; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe; Gerhold, Kerstin; Horn, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) are variable genetic disorders that overlap in different ways [Cole 1993; Grahame 1999]. Here, we describe a boy presenting with severe muscular hypotonia, multiple fractures, and joint hyperflexibility, features that are compatible with mild OI and hypermobility type EDS, respectively. By whole exome sequencing, we identified both a COL1A1 mutation (c.4006-1G > A) inherited from the patient's mildly affected mother and biallelic missense variants in TNXB (p.Val1213Ile, p.Gly2592Ser). Analysis of cDNA showed that the COL1A1 splice site mutation led to intron retention causing a frameshift (p.Phe1336Valfs*72). Type 1 collagen secretion by the patient's skin fibroblasts was reduced. Immunostaining of a muscle biopsy obtained from the patient revealed a clear reduction of tenascin-X in the extracellular matrix compared to a healthy control. These findings imply that the combination of the COL1A1 mutation with the TNXB variants might cause the patient's unique phenotype.

  1. Identifying the Distribution of Al 3+ in LiNi 0.8 Co 0.15 Al 0.05 O 2

    SciTech Connect

    Trease, Nicole M.; Seymour, Ieuan D.; Radin, Maxwell D.; Liu, Haodong; Liu, Hao; Hy, Sunny; Chernova, Natalya; Parikh, Pritesh; Devaraj, Arun; Wiaderek, Kamila M.; Chupas, Peter J.; Chapman, Karena W.; Whittingham, M. Stanley; Meng, Ying Shirley; Van der Van, Anton; Grey, Clare P.

    2016-11-22

    The doping of Al into layered Li transition metal (TM) oxide cathode materials, LiTMO2, is known to improve the structural and thermal stability, although the origin of the enhanced properties is not well understood. The effect of aluminum doping on layer stabilization has been investigated using a combination of techniques to measure the aluminum distribution in layered LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 (NCA) over multiple length scales with 27Al and 7Li MAS NMR, local electrode atom probe (APT) tomography, X-ray and neutron diffraction, DFT, and SQUID magnetic susceptibility measurements. APT ion maps show a homogenous distribution of Ni, Co, Al and O2 throughout the structure at the single particle level in agreement with the high-temperature phase diagram. 7Li and 27Al NMR indicates that the Ni3+ ions undergo a dynamic Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion. 27Al NMR spectra indicate that the Al reduces the strain associated with the JT distortion, by preferential electronic ordering of the JT long bonds directed toward the Al3+ ion. The ability to understand the complex atomic and orbital ordering around Al3+ demonstrated in the current method will be useful for studying the local environment of Al3+ in a range of transition metal oxide battery materials.

  2. Genotypic susceptibility testing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates for amikacin and kanamycin resistance by use of a rapid sloppy molecular beacon-based assay identifies more cases of low-level drug resistance than phenotypic Lowenstein-Jensen testing.

    PubMed

    Chakravorty, Soumitesh; Lee, Jong Seok; Cho, Eun Jin; Roh, Sandy S; Smith, Laura E; Lee, Jiim; Kim, Cheon Tae; Via, Laura E; Cho, Sang-Nae; Barry, Clifton E; Alland, David

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to amikacin (AMK) and kanamycin (KAN) in clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains is largely determined by specific mutations in the rrs gene and eis gene promoter. We developed a rapid, multiplexed sloppy molecular beacon (SMB) assay to identify these mutations and then evaluated assay performance on 603 clinical M. tuberculosis DNA samples collected in South Korea. Assay performance was compared to gold-standard phenotypic drug susceptibility tests, including Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) absolute concentration, mycobacterial growth indicator tubes (MGIT), and TREK Sensititre MycoTB MIC plate (MycoTB) methods. Target amplicons were also tested for mutations by Sanger sequencing. The SMB assay correctly detected 115/116 mutant and mixed sequences and 487/487 wild-type sequences (sensitivity and specificity of 99.1 and 100%, respectively). Using the LJ method as the reference, sensitivity and specificity for AMK resistance were 92.2% and 100%, respectively, and sensitivity and specificity for KAN resistance were 87.7% and 95.6%, respectively. Mutations in the rrs gene were unequivocally associated with high-level cross-resistance to AMK and KAN in all three conventional drug susceptibility testing methods. However, eis promoter mutations were associated with KAN resistance using the MGIT or MycoTB methods but not the LJ method. No testing method associated eis promoter mutations with AMK resistance. Among the discordant samples with AMK and/or KAN resistance but wild-type sequence at the target genes, we discovered four new mutations in the whiB7 5' untranslated region (UTR) in 6/22 samples. All six samples were resistant only to KAN, suggesting the possible role of these whiB7 5' UTR mutations in KAN resistance.

  3. New ALS-Related Genes Expand the Spectrum Paradigm of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sabatelli, Mario; Marangi, Giuseppe; Conte, Amelia; Tasca, Giorgio; Zollino, Marcella; Lattante, Serena

    2016-03-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by the degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. Clinical heterogeneity is a well-recognized feature of the disease as age of onset, site of onset and the duration of the disease can vary greatly among patients. A number of genes have been identified and associated to familial and sporadic forms of ALS but the majority of cases remains still unexplained. Recent breakthrough discoveries have demonstrated that clinical manifestations associated with ALS-related genes are not circumscribed to motor neurons involvement. In this view, ALS appears to be linked to different conditions over a continuum or spectrum in which overlapping phenotypes may be identified. In this review, we aim to examine the increasing number of spectra, including ALS/Frontotemporal Dementia and ALS/Myopathies spectra. Considering all these neurodegenerative disorders as different phenotypes of the same spectrum can help to identify common pathological pathways and consequently new therapeutic targets in these incurable diseases.

  4. Exacerbation phenotyping in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Martin; Korman, Tony; King, Paul; Hamza, Kais; Bardin, Philip

    2013-11-01

    Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) are crucial events but causes remain poorly defined. A method to clinically 'phenotype' AECOPD have been proposed, and 52 hospitalized chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbations according to underlying aetiology have now been prospectively phenotyped. Multiple exacerbation phenotypes were identified. A subpopulation coinfected with virus and bacteria had a significantly longer length of hospital stay, and this pilot study indicates that exacerbation phenotyping may be advantageous.

  5. A newly identified Thr99fsX110 mutation in the PMP22 gene associated with an atypical phenotype of the hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies.

    PubMed

    Moszyńska, Izabela; Kabzińska, Dagmara; Sinkiewicz-Darol, Elena; Kochański, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is manifested by a spectrum of phenotypes, from the classical HNPP course associated with intermittent nerve palsies to a neuropathy resembling Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1 (CMT1) disease. The majority of HNPP cases are associated with submicroscopical deletions in the 17p11.2-p12 region containing the PMP22 gene, while PMP22 point mutations are rare, representing about 15% of HNPP cases. In this study, we present a patient manifesting with atypical HNPP phenotype associated with a new Thr99fsX110 mutation in the PMP22 gene. We conclude that all patients who fulfill the electrophysiological criteria of HNPP, even if they lack the typical HNPP phenotype, should be tested for point mutations in the PMP22 gene.

  6. Cation-Poor Complex Metallic Alloys in Ba(Eu)-Au-Al(Ga) Systems: Identifying the Keys that Control Structural Arrangements and Atom Distributions at the Atomic Level.

    PubMed

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Steinberg, Simon; Mudryk, Yaroslav; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Miller, Gordon J; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2015-11-02

    Four complex intermetallic compounds BaAu(6±x)Ga(6±y) (x = 1, y = 0.9) (I), BaAu(6±x)Al(6±y) (x = 0.9, y = 0.6) (II), EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III), and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV) have been synthesized, and their structures and homogeneity ranges have been determined by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. Whereas I and II originate from the NaZn13-type structure (cF104-112, Fm3̅c), III (tP52, P4/nbm) is derived from the tetragonal Ce2Ni17Si9-type, and IV (oP104, Pbcm) crystallizes in a new orthorhombic structure type. Both I and II feature formally anionic networks with completely mixed site occupation by Au and triel (Tr = Al, Ga) atoms, while a successive decrease of local symmetry from the parental structures of I and II to III and, ultimately, to IV correlates with increasing separation of Au and Tr on individual crystallographic sites. Density functional theory-based calculations were employed to determine the crystallographic site preferences of Au and the respective triel element to elucidate reasons for the atom distribution ("coloring scheme"). Chemical bonding analyses for two different "EuAu6Tr6" models reveal maximization of the number of heteroatomic Au-Tr bonds as the driving force for atom organization. The Fermi levels fall in broad pseudogaps for both models allowing some electronic flexibility. Spin-polarized band structure calculations on the "EuAu6Tr6" models hint to singlet ground states for europium and long-range magnetic coupling for both EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III) and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV). This is substantiated by experimental evidence because both compounds show nearly identical magnetic behavior with ferromagnetic transitions at TC = 6 K and net magnetic moments of 7.35 μB/f.u. at 2 K. The effective moments of 8.3 μB/f.u., determined from Curie-Weiss fits, point to divalent oxidation states for europium in both III and IV.

  7. ALS2 mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Susanne A.; Carr, Lucinda; Deuschl, Guenther; Hopfner, Franziska; Stamelou, Maria; Wood, Nicholas W.; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the genetic etiology in 2 consanguineous families who presented a novel phenotype of autosomal recessive juvenile amyotrophic lateral sclerosis associated with generalized dystonia. Methods: A combination of homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in the first family and Sanger sequencing of candidate genes in the second family were used. Results: Both families were found to have homozygous loss-of-function mutations in the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis 2 (juvenile) (ALS2) gene. Conclusions: We report generalized dystonia and cerebellar signs in association with ALS2-related disease. We suggest that the ALS2 gene should be screened for mutations in patients who present with a similar phenotype. PMID:24562058

  8. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype–Phenotype Association

    PubMed Central

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M.; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-01-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated—in terms of effect size—with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype–phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype–phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype–phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype–phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3—the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the

  9. Multivariate Analysis of Genotype-Phenotype Association.

    PubMed

    Mitteroecker, Philipp; Cheverud, James M; Pavlicev, Mihaela

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of modern imaging and measurement technology, complex phenotypes are increasingly represented by large numbers of measurements, which may not bear biological meaning one by one. For such multivariate phenotypes, studying the pairwise associations between all measurements and all alleles is highly inefficient and prevents insight into the genetic pattern underlying the observed phenotypes. We present a new method for identifying patterns of allelic variation (genetic latent variables) that are maximally associated-in terms of effect size-with patterns of phenotypic variation (phenotypic latent variables). This multivariate genotype-phenotype mapping (MGP) separates phenotypic features under strong genetic control from less genetically determined features and thus permits an analysis of the multivariate structure of genotype-phenotype association, including its dimensionality and the clustering of genetic and phenotypic variables within this association. Different variants of MGP maximize different measures of genotype-phenotype association: genetic effect, genetic variance, or heritability. In an application to a mouse sample, scored for 353 SNPs and 11 phenotypic traits, the first dimension of genetic and phenotypic latent variables accounted for >70% of genetic variation present in all 11 measurements; 43% of variation in this phenotypic pattern was explained by the corresponding genetic latent variable. The first three dimensions together sufficed to account for almost 90% of genetic variation in the measurements and for all the interpretable genotype-phenotype association. Each dimension can be tested as a whole against the hypothesis of no association, thereby reducing the number of statistical tests from 7766 to 3-the maximal number of meaningful independent tests. Important alleles can be selected based on their effect size (additive or nonadditive effect on the phenotypic latent variable). This low dimensionality of the genotype-phenotype map

  10. Identifying spectrometric signatures of phosphate deposits and enclosing sediments in Al-Awabed area, Northern Palmyrides, Central Syria, by the use of statistical factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Asfahani, J; Al-Hent, R; Aissa, M

    2006-09-01

    In previous published research, a factor analysis approach has been applied to airborne spectrometric data of Al-Awabed area, Northern Palmyrides, Syria. A model of four factors (F1, F2, F3 and F4) has proven to be sufficient to represent the acquired data, where 94% of the total data variance is explained. A powerful tool for direct differentiation of various rocks units is obtained through the mapping of these four factors, where a scored lithological map including 11 radiometric units is established. Ninety nine rock samples have been taken according to the four factors to be analyzed by the gamma-spectrometry technique in order to determine their content of eU, eTh and K%. The analysis of 65 samples according to F1 indicates that uranium concentration varies between 2.74 and 123.3 ppm with an average of 58.85 ppm and a standard deviation of 32.53 ppm. The analysis of 18 samples taken according to F2 indicates that K% concentration varies between 0.001 and 0.324 with an average of 0.145 and a standard deviation of 0.122. The analysis of 16 samples taken according to F3 indicates that K% concentration varies between 0.024 and 0.558 with an average of 0.227 and a standard deviation of 0.133. These gamma-results are expected and fit very well with the results obtained by the factor analysis approach. Therefore, the validity and efficacy of the factor analysis approach, to be widely used as a guide in exploration and smart sampling for mining programs, are well demonstrated. The established phosphate maps show a width extension and distribution, and clearly indicate the potential of the research area, and it merits to be followed by economic exploration.

  11. The Human Phenotype Ontology in 2017

    PubMed Central

    Köhler, Sebastian; Vasilevsky, Nicole A.; Engelstad, Mark; Foster, Erin; McMurry, Julie; Aymé, Ségolène; Baynam, Gareth; Bello, Susan M.; Boerkoel, Cornelius F.; Boycott, Kym M.; Brudno, Michael; Buske, Orion J.; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Cipriani, Valentina; Connell, Laureen E.; Dawkins, Hugh J.S.; DeMare, Laura E.; Devereau, Andrew D.; de Vries, Bert B.A.; Firth, Helen V.; Freson, Kathleen; Greene, Daniel; Hamosh, Ada; Helbig, Ingo; Hum, Courtney; Jähn, Johanna A.; James, Roger; Krause, Roland; F. Laulederkind, Stanley J.; Lochmüller, Hanns; Lyon, Gholson J.; Ogishima, Soichi; Olry, Annie; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Pontikos, Nikolas; Rath, Ana; Schaefer, Franz; Scott, Richard H.; Segal, Michael; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Sever, Richard; Smith, Cynthia L.; Straub, Volker; Thompson, Rachel; Turner, Catherine; Turro, Ernest; Veltman, Marijcke W.M.; Vulliamy, Tom; Yu, Jing; von Ziegenweidt, Julie; Zankl, Andreas; Züchner, Stephan; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Jacobsen, Julius O.B.; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Mungall, Christopher J.; Haendel, Melissa; Robinson, Peter N.

    2017-01-01

    Deep phenotyping has been defined as the precise and comprehensive analysis of phenotypic abnormalities in which the individual components of the phenotype are observed and described. The three components of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO; www.human-phenotype-ontology.org) project are the phenotype vocabulary, disease-phenotype annotations and the algorithms that operate on these. These components are being used for computational deep phenotyping and precision medicine as well as integration of clinical data into translational research. The HPO is being increasingly adopted as a standard for phenotypic abnormalities by diverse groups such as international rare disease organizations, registries, clinical labs, biomedical resources, and clinical software tools and will thereby contribute toward nascent efforts at global data exchange for identifying disease etiologies. This update article reviews the progress of the HPO project since the debut Nucleic Acids Research database article in 2014, including specific areas of expansion such as common (complex) disease, new algorithms for phenotype driven genomic discovery and diagnostics, integration of cross-species mapping efforts with the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, an improved quality control pipeline, and the addition of patient-friendly terminology. PMID:27899602

  12. The Human Phenotype Ontology in 2017.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Sebastian; Vasilevsky, Nicole A; Engelstad, Mark; Foster, Erin; McMurry, Julie; Aymé, Ségolène; Baynam, Gareth; Bello, Susan M; Boerkoel, Cornelius F; Boycott, Kym M; Brudno, Michael; Buske, Orion J; Chinnery, Patrick F; Cipriani, Valentina; Connell, Laureen E; Dawkins, Hugh J S; DeMare, Laura E; Devereau, Andrew D; de Vries, Bert B A; Firth, Helen V; Freson, Kathleen; Greene, Daniel; Hamosh, Ada; Helbig, Ingo; Hum, Courtney; Jähn, Johanna A; James, Roger; Krause, Roland; F Laulederkind, Stanley J; Lochmüller, Hanns; Lyon, Gholson J; Ogishima, Soichi; Olry, Annie; Ouwehand, Willem H; Pontikos, Nikolas; Rath, Ana; Schaefer, Franz; Scott, Richard H; Segal, Michael; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Sever, Richard; Smith, Cynthia L; Straub, Volker; Thompson, Rachel; Turner, Catherine; Turro, Ernest; Veltman, Marijcke W M; Vulliamy, Tom; Yu, Jing; von Ziegenweidt, Julie; Zankl, Andreas; Züchner, Stephan; Zemojtel, Tomasz; Jacobsen, Julius O B; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Mungall, Christopher J; Haendel, Melissa; Robinson, Peter N

    2017-01-04

    Deep phenotyping has been defined as the precise and comprehensive analysis of phenotypic abnormalities in which the individual components of the phenotype are observed and described. The three components of the Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO; www.human-phenotype-ontology.org) project are the phenotype vocabulary, disease-phenotype annotations and the algorithms that operate on these. These components are being used for computational deep phenotyping and precision medicine as well as integration of clinical data into translational research. The HPO is being increasingly adopted as a standard for phenotypic abnormalities by diverse groups such as international rare disease organizations, registries, clinical labs, biomedical resources, and clinical software tools and will thereby contribute toward nascent efforts at global data exchange for identifying disease etiologies. This update article reviews the progress of the HPO project since the debut Nucleic Acids Research database article in 2014, including specific areas of expansion such as common (complex) disease, new algorithms for phenotype driven genomic discovery and diagnostics, integration of cross-species mapping efforts with the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology, an improved quality control pipeline, and the addition of patient-friendly terminology.

  13. Sporadic and hereditary amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

    PubMed

    Ajroud-Driss, Senda; Siddique, Teepu

    2015-04-01

    Genetic discoveries in ALS have a significant impact on deciphering molecular mechanisms of motor neuron degeneration. The identification of SOD1 as the first genetic cause of ALS led to the engineering of the SOD1 mouse, the backbone of ALS research, and set the stage for future genetic breakthroughs. In addition, careful analysis of ALS pathology added valuable pieces to the ALS puzzle. From this joint effort, major pathogenic pathways emerged. Whereas the study of TDP43, FUS and C9ORF72 pointed to the possible involvement of RNA biology in motor neuron survival, recent work on P62 and UBQLN2 refocused research on protein degradation pathways. Despite all these efforts, the etiology of most cases of sporadic ALS remains elusive. Newly acquired genomic tools now allow the identification of genetic and epigenetic factors that can either increase ALS risk or modulate disease phenotype. These developments will certainly allow for better disease modeling to identify novel therapeutic targets for ALS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Neuromuscular Diseases: Pathology and Molecular Pathogenesis.

  14. Identifying different mechanisms of circular photogalvanic effect in GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As two dimensional electron gas by photo-modulation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Hui; Jiang, Chongyun; Liu, Yu; Zhu, Laipan; Qin, Xudong; Chen, Yonghai

    2013-06-01

    We investigate the circular photogalvanic effect (CPGE) excited by sub-bandgap radiation in a GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As two dimensional electron gas and tune its amplitude by synchronously imposing an above-bandgap unpolarized light at normal incidence. With this photo-modulation technique, we identify two microscopic mechanisms of CPGE according to the dramatic change of apparent Rashba and Dresselhaus effects. We suggest the optical transitions to be Franz-Keldysh and intraband regime, respectively. Both regimes coexist in conventional CPGE and the intraband regime dominates at sufficient modulation power.

  15. ALS-linked protein disulfide isomerase variants cause motor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Woehlbier, Ute; Colombo, Alicia; Saaranen, Mirva J; Pérez, Viviana; Ojeda, Jorge; Bustos, Fernando J; Andreu, Catherine I; Torres, Mauricio; Valenzuela, Vicente; Medinas, Danilo B; Rozas, Pablo; Vidal, Rene L; Lopez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Salameh, Johnny; Fernandez-Collemann, Sara; Muñoz, Natalia; Matus, Soledad; Armisen, Ricardo; Sagredo, Alfredo; Palma, Karina; Irrazabal, Thergiory; Almeida, Sandra; Gonzalez-Perez, Paloma; Campero, Mario; Gao, Fen-Biao; Henny, Pablo; van Zundert, Brigitte; Ruddock, Lloyd W; Concha, Miguel L; Henriquez, Juan P; Brown, Robert H; Hetz, Claudio

    2016-04-15

    Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis is a common feature of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Protein disulfide isomerases (PDIs) areERfoldases identified as possibleALSbiomarkers, as well as neuroprotective factors. However, no functional studies have addressed their impact on the disease process. Here, we functionally characterized fourALS-linked mutations recently identified in two majorPDIgenes,PDIA1 andPDIA3/ERp57. Phenotypic screening in zebrafish revealed that the expression of thesePDIvariants induce motor defects associated with a disruption of motoneuron connectivity. Similarly, the expression of mutantPDIs impaired dendritic outgrowth in motoneuron cell culture models. Cellular and biochemical studies identified distinct molecular defects underlying the pathogenicity of thesePDImutants. Finally, targetingERp57 in the nervous system led to severe motor dysfunction in mice associated with a loss of neuromuscular synapses. This study identifiesERproteostasis imbalance as a risk factor forALS, driving initial stages of the disease.

  16. Semiparametric Allelic Tests for Mapping Multiple Phenotypes: Binomial Regression and Mahalanobis Distance.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Arunabha; Witte, John S; Ghosh, Saurabh

    2015-12-01

    Binary phenotypes commonly arise due to multiple underlying quantitative precursors and genetic variants may impact multiple traits in a pleiotropic manner. Hence, simultaneously analyzing such correlated traits may be more powerful than analyzing individual traits. Various genotype-level methods, e.g., MultiPhen (O'Reilly et al. []), have been developed to identify genetic factors underlying a multivariate phenotype. For univariate phenotypes, the usefulness and applicability of allele-level tests have been investigated. The test of allele frequency difference among cases and controls is commonly used for mapping case-control association. However, allelic methods for multivariate association mapping have not been studied much. In this article, we explore two allelic tests of multivariate association: one using a Binomial regression model based on inverted regression of genotype on phenotype (Binomial regression-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [BAMP]), and the other employing the Mahalanobis distance between two sample means of the multivariate phenotype vector for two alleles at a single-nucleotide polymorphism (Distance-based Association of Multivariate Phenotypes [DAMP]). These methods can incorporate both discrete and continuous phenotypes. Some theoretical properties for BAMP are studied. Using simulations, the power of the methods for detecting multivariate association is compared with the genotype-level test MultiPhen's. The allelic tests yield marginally higher power than MultiPhen for multivariate phenotypes. For one/two binary traits under recessive mode of inheritance, allelic tests are found to be substantially more powerful. All three tests are applied to two different real data and the results offer some support for the simulation study. We propose a hybrid approach for testing multivariate association that implements MultiPhen when Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE) is violated and BAMP otherwise, because the allelic approaches assume HWE.

  17. Systems Biology Analysis Merging Phenotype, Metabolomic and Genomic Data Identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and Cellular Maintenance Processes as Major Contributors to Genetic Variability in Bovine Feed Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M.; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  18. Systems biology analysis merging phenotype, metabolomic and genomic data identifies Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) and cellular maintenance processes as major contributors to genetic variability in bovine feed efficiency.

    PubMed

    Widmann, Philipp; Reverter, Antonio; Weikard, Rosemarie; Suhre, Karsten; Hammon, Harald M; Albrecht, Elke; Kuehn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    Feed efficiency is a paramount factor for livestock economy. Previous studies had indicated a substantial heritability of several feed efficiency traits. In our study, we investigated the genetic background of residual feed intake, a commonly used parameter of feed efficiency, in a cattle resource population generated from crossing dairy and beef cattle. Starting from a whole genome association analysis, we subsequently performed combined phenotype-metabolome-genome analysis taking a systems biology approach by inferring gene networks based on partial correlation and information theory approaches. Our data about biological processes enriched with genes from the feed efficiency network suggest that genetic variation in feed efficiency is driven by genetic modulation of basic processes relevant to general cellular functions. When looking at the predicted upstream regulators from the feed efficiency network, the Tumor Protein P53 (TP53) and Transforming Growth Factor beta 1 (TGFB1) genes stood out regarding significance of overlap and number of target molecules in the data set. These results further support the hypothesis that TP53 is a major upstream regulator for genetic variation of feed efficiency. Furthermore, our data revealed a significant effect of both, the Non-SMC Condensin I Complex, Subunit G (NCAPG) I442M (rs109570900) and the Growth /differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) Q204X (rs110344317) loci, on residual feed intake and feed conversion. For both loci, the growth promoting allele at the onset of puberty was associated with a negative, but favorable effect on residual feed intake. The elevated energy demand for increased growth triggered by the NCAPG 442M allele is obviously not fully compensated for by an increased efficiency in converting feed into body tissue. As a consequence, the individuals carrying the NCAPG 442M allele had an additional demand for energy uptake that is reflected by the association of the allele with increased daily energy intake as

  19. Optical Whole-Genome Restriction Mapping as a Tool for Rapidly Distinguishing and Identifying Bacterial Contaminants in Clinical Samples

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    multiple bacteria could be uniquely identified within mixtures. In the first set of experiments, three unique organisms ( Bacillus subtilis subsp. globigii...4th, Oglesby T, et al.Whole-genome sequencing and phenotypic analysis of Bacillus subtilis mutants following evolution under conditions of relaxed

  20. Rings Reconcile Genotypic and Phenotypic Evolution within the Proteobacteria.

    PubMed

    Lake, James A; Larsen, Joseph; Sarna, Brooke; de la Haba, Rafael R; Pu, Yiyi; Koo, HyunMin; Zhao, Jun; Sinsheimer, Janet S

    2015-12-10

    Although prokaryotes are usually classified using molecular phylogenies instead of phenotypes after the advent of gene sequencing, neither of these methods is satisfactory because the phenotypes cannot explain the molecular trees and the trees do not fit the phenotypes. This scientific crisis still exists and the profound disconnection between these two pillars of evolutionary biology--genotypes and phenotypes--grows larger. We use rings and a genomic form of goods thinking to resolve this conundrum (McInerney JO, Cummins C, Haggerty L. 2011. Goods thinking vs. tree thinking. Mobile Genet Elements. 1:304-308; Nelson-Sathi S, et al. 2015. Origins of major archaeal clades correspond to gene acquisitions from bacteria. Nature 517:77-80). The Proteobacteria is the most speciose prokaryotic phylum known. It is an ideal phylogenetic model for reconstructing Earth's evolutionary history. It contains diverse free living, pathogenic, photosynthetic, sulfur metabolizing, and symbiotic species. Due to its large number of species (Whitman WB, Coleman DC, Wiebe WJ. 1998. Prokaryotes: the unseen majority. Proc Nat Acad Sci U S A. 95:6578-6583) it was initially expected to provide strong phylogenetic support for a proteobacterial tree of life. But despite its many species, sequence-based tree analyses are unable to resolve its topology. Here we develop new rooted ring analyses and study proteobacterial evolution. Using protein family data and new genome-based outgroup rooting procedures, we reconstruct the complex evolutionary history of the proteobacterial rings (combinations of tree-like divergences and endosymbiotic-like convergences). We identify and map the origins of major gene flows within the rooted proteobacterial rings (P < 3.6 × 10(-6)) and find that the evolution of the "Alpha-," "Beta-," and "Gammaproteobacteria" is represented by a unique set of rings. Using new techniques presented here we also root these rings using outgroups. We also map the independent flows of

  1. High-throughput discovery of novel developmental phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Mary E.; Flenniken, Ann M.; Ji, Xiao; Teboul, Lydia; Wong, Michael D.; White, Jacqueline K.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Weninger, Wolfgang J.; Westerberg, Henrik; Adissu, Hibret; Baker, Candice N.; Bower, Lynette; Brown, James M.; Caddle, L. Brianna; Chiani, Francesco; Clary, Dave; Cleak, James; Daly, Mark J.; Denegre, James M.; Doe, Brendan; Dolan, Mary E.; Edie, Sarah M.; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Galli, Antonella; Gambadoro, Alessia; Gallegos, Juan; Guo, Shiying; Horner, Neil R.; Hsu, Chih-wei; Johnson, Sara J.; Kalaga, Sowmya; Keith, Lance C.; Lanoue, Louise; Lawson, Thomas N.; Lek, Monkol; Mark, Manuel; Marschall, Susan; Mason, Jeremy; McElwee, Melissa L.; Newbigging, Susan; Nutter, Lauryl M.J.; Peterson, Kevin A.; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Rowland, Douglas J.; Ryder, Edward; Samocha, Kaitlin E.; Seavitt, John R.; Selloum, Mohammed; Szoke-Kovacs, Zsombor; Tamura, Masaru; Trainor, Amanda G; Tudose, Ilinca; Wakana, Shigeharu; Warren, Jonathan; Wendling, Olivia; West, David B.; Wong, Leeyean; Yoshiki, Atsushi; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P.; Gao, Xiang; Flicek, Paul; Bradley, Allan; Skarnes, William C.; Justice, Monica J.; Parkinson, Helen E.; Moore, Mark; Wells, Sara; Braun, Robert E.; Svenson, Karen L.; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Herault, Yann; Mohun, Tim; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Henkelman, R. Mark; Brown, Steve D.M.; Adams, David J.; Lloyd, K.C. Kent; McKerlie, Colin; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Bucan, Maja; Murray, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately one third of all mammalian genes are essential for life. Phenotypes resulting from mouse knockouts of these genes have provided tremendous insight into gene function and congenital disorders. As part of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium effort to generate and phenotypically characterize 5000 knockout mouse lines, we have identified 410 lethal genes during the production of the first 1751 unique gene knockouts. Using a standardised phenotyping platform that incorporates high-resolution 3D imaging, we identified novel phenotypes at multiple time points for previously uncharacterized genes and additional phenotypes for genes with previously reported mutant phenotypes. Unexpectedly, our analysis reveals that incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity are common even on a defined genetic background. In addition, we show that human disease genes are enriched for essential genes identified in our screen, thus providing a novel dataset that facilitates prioritization and validation of mutations identified in clinical sequencing efforts. PMID:27626380

  2. Interoperability between phenotype and anatomy ontologies

    PubMed Central

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Oellrich, Anika; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Phenotypic information is important for the analysis of the molecular mechanisms underlying disease. A formal ontological representation of phenotypic information can help to identify, interpret and infer phenotypic traits based on experimental findings. The methods that are currently used to represent data and information about phenotypes fail to make the semantics of the phenotypic trait explicit and do not interoperate with ontologies of anatomy and other domains. Therefore, valuable resources for the analysis of phenotype studies remain unconnected and inaccessible to automated analysis and reasoning. Results: We provide a framework to formalize phenotypic descriptions and make their semantics explicit. Based on this formalization, we provide the means to integrate phenotypic descriptions with ontologies of other domains, in particular anatomy and physiology. We demonstrate how our framework leads to the capability to represent disease phenotypes, perform powerful queries that were not possible before and infer additional knowledge. Availability: http://bioonto.de/pmwiki.php/Main/PheneOntology Contact: rh497@cam.ac.uk PMID:20971987

  3. In-silico identification of phenotype-biased functional modules

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Phenotypes exhibited by microorganisms can be useful for several purposes, e.g., ethanol as an alternate fuel. Sometimes, the target phenotype maybe required in combination with other phenotypes, in order to be useful, for e.g., an industrial process may require that the organism survive in an anaerobic, alcohol rich environment and be able to feed on both hexose and pentose sugars to produce ethanol. This combination of traits may not be available in any existing organism or if they do exist, the mechanisms involved in the phenotype-expression may not be efficient enough to be useful. Thus, it may be required to genetically modify microorganisms. However, before any genetic modification can take place, it is important to identify the underlying cellular subsystems responsible for the expression of the target phenotype. Results In this paper, we develop a method to identify statistically significant and phenotypically-biased functional modules. The method can compare the organismal network information from hundreds of phenotype expressing and phenotype non-expressing organisms to identify cellular subsystems that are more prone to occur in phenotype-expressing organisms than in phenotype non-expressing organisms. We have provided literature evidence that the phenotype-biased modules identified for phenotypes such as hydrogen production (dark and light fermentation), respiration, gram-positive, gram-negative and motility, are indeed phenotype-related. Conclusion Thus we have proposed a methodology to identify phenotype-biased cellular subsystems. We have shown the effectiveness of our methodology by applying it to several target phenotypes. The code and all supplemental files can be downloaded from (http://freescience.org/cs/phenotype-biased-biclusters/). PMID:22759578

  4. Social Cognition, Social Skill, and the Broad Autism Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sasson, Noah J.; Nowlin, Rachel B.; Pinkham, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Social-cognitive deficits differentiate parents with the "broad autism phenotype" from non-broad autism phenotype parents more robustly than other neuropsychological features of autism, suggesting that this domain may be particularly informative for identifying genetic and brain processes associated with the phenotype. The current study…

  5. Genome sequencing of the Trichoderma reesei QM9136 mutant identifies a truncation of the transcriptional regulator XYR1 as the cause for its cellulase-negative phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Lichius, Alexander; Bidard, Frédérique; Buchholz, Franziska; Le Crom, Stéphane; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Austerlitz, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V; Baker, Scott E; Margeot, Antoine; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2015-04-20

    Trichoderma reesei is the main industrial source of cellulases and hemicellulases required for the hydrolysis of biomass to simple sugars, which can then be used in the production of biofuels and biorefineries. The highly productive strains in use today were generated by classical mutagenesis. As byproducts of this procedure, mutants were generated that turned out to be unable to produce cellulases. In order to identify the mutations responsible for this inability, we sequenced the genome of one of these strains, QM9136, and compared it to that of its progenitor T. reesei QM6a.

  6. A new mutation in MC1R explains a coat color phenotype in 2 "old" breeds: Saluki and Afghan hound.

    PubMed

    Dreger, Dayna L; Schmutz, Sheila M

    2010-01-01

    Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) has been studied in a wide variety of domestic animals (Klungland et al. 1995; Marklund et al. 1996; Våge et al. 1997; Kijas et al. 1998; Newton et al. 2000; Våge et al. 2003), and also several wild animals (Robbins et al. 1993; Ritland et al. 2001; Eizirik et al. 2003; Nachman et al. 2003; McRobie et al. 2009) in relation to coat color variation. A variety of phenotypic changes have been reported including coat colors from pure black to pure red, as well as some phenotypes with hairs with red and black bands. One phenotype, called grizzle in Salukis and domino in Afghan Hounds, appears to be unique to these 2 old dog breeds. This pattern is characterized by a pale face with a widow's peak above the eyes. The body hairs on the dorsal surface of Salukis and Afghan Hounds have both phaeomelanin and eumelanin portions, even though they had an a(t)/a(t) genotype at ASIP. In addition, all had at least one copy of a newly identified mutation in MC1R, g.233G>T, resulting in p.Gly78Val. This new allele, that we suggest be designated as E(G), is dominant to the E and e (p.Arg306ter) alleles at MC1R but recessive to the E(M) (p.Met264Val) allele. The K(B) allele (p.Gly23del) at DEFB103 and the a(y) allele (p.Ala82Ser and p.Arg83His) of ASIP are epistatic to grizzle and domino.

  7. Phenotypic equilibrium as probabilistic convergence in multi-phenotype cell population dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Da-Quan; Zhou, Da

    2017-01-01

    We consider the cell population dynamics with n different phenotypes. Both the Markovian branching process model (stochastic model) and the ordinary differential equation (ODE) system model (deterministic model) are presented, and exploited to investigate the dynamics of the phenotypic proportions. We will prove that in both models, these proportions will tend to constants regardless of initial population states (“phenotypic equilibrium”) under weak conditions, which explains the experimental phenomenon in Gupta et al.’s paper. We also prove that Gupta et al.’s explanation is the ODE model under a special assumption. As an application, we will give sufficient and necessary conditions under which the proportion of one phenotype tends to 0 (die out) or 1 (dominate). We also extend our results to non-Markovian cases. PMID:28182672

  8. Division of the genus Borrelia into two genera (corresponding to Lyme disease and relapsing fever groups) reflects their genetic and phenotypic distinctiveness and will lead to a better understanding of these two groups of microbes (Margos et al. (2016) There is inadequate evidence to support the division of the genus Borrelia. Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. doi: 10.1099/ijsem.0.001717).

    PubMed

    Barbour, Alan G; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Gupta, Radhey S

    2017-01-27

    This rebuttal Letter responds to a Letter in the IJSEM by Margos et al. challenging division of the genus Borrelia into two genera. We discuss here point-by-point the issues raised by Margos et al. and show that much of their criticism is unfounded and in several cases based on misreading of the presented results. We summarize here the extensive evidence based on genomic, genetic and phenotypic properties showing that the members of the family Borreliaceae (containing mainly the genus Borrelia) comprises two distinct and cohesive groups of microbes, differing in diseases they cause and other phenotypes. Prior to the proposed division, Borrelia spp. causing Lyme disease (LD) were already functionally treated as a distinct group, referred to as "B. burgdorferi sensu lato" to distinguish them from the other cluster of Borrelia spp. which includes all known species causing relapsing fever (RF). With the more explicit division of Borreliaceae species into two genus level groups, which are distinguishable from each other based on numerous unique genetic and molecular characteristics, the attention can now be focused on the biological significance of different molecular characteristics differentiating the two groups. The clear distinction of the LD and the RF groups of microbes based on numerous highly reliable markers, which are expected to be present even in uncharacterized members of these two groups, should aid in the improved diagnosis as well treatment of both these diseases, which is hindered by the conflation of a common name for agents causing two different types of diseases.

  9. Animal models of RLS phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Allen, Richard P; Donelson, Nathan C; Jones, Byron C; Li, Yuqing; Manconi, Mauro; Rye, David B; Sanyal, Subhabrata; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2017-03-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a complex disorder that involves sensory and motor systems. The major pathophysiology of RLS is low iron concentration in the substantia nigra containing the cell bodies of dopamine neurons that project to the striatum, an area that is crucial for modulating movement. People who have RLS often present with normal iron values outside the brain; recent studies implicate several genes are involved in the syndrome. Like most complex diseases, animal models usually do not faithfully capture the full phenotypic spectrum of "disease," which is a uniquely human construct. Nonetheless, animal models have proven useful in helping to unravel the complex pathophysiology of diseases such as RLS and suggesting novel treatment paradigms. For example, hypothesis-independent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified several genes as increasing the risk for RLS, including BTBD9. Independently, the murine homolog Btbd9 was identified as a candidate gene for iron regulation in the midbrain in mice. The relevance of the phenotype of another of the GWAS identified genes, MEIS1, has also been explored. The role of Btbd9 in iron regulation and RLS-like behaviors has been further evaluated in mice carrying a null mutation of the gene and in fruit flies when the BTBD9 protein is degraded. The BTBD9 and MEIS1 stories originate from human GWAS research, supported by work in a genetic reference population of mice (forward genetics) and further verified in mice, fish flies, and worms. Finally, the role of genetics is further supported by an inbred mouse strain that displays many of the phenotypic characteristics of RLS. The role of animal models of RLS phenotypes is also extended to include periodic limb movements.

  10. High-throughput discovery of novel developmental phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Mary E; Flenniken, Ann M; Ji, Xiao; Teboul, Lydia; Wong, Michael D; White, Jacqueline K; Meehan, Terrence F; Weninger, Wolfgang J; Westerberg, Henrik; Adissu, Hibret; Baker, Candice N; Bower, Lynette; Brown, James M; Caddle, L Brianna; Chiani, Francesco; Clary, Dave; Cleak, James; Daly, Mark J; Denegre, James M; Doe, Brendan; Dolan, Mary E; Edie, Sarah M; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Galli, Antonella; Gambadoro, Alessia; Gallegos, Juan; Guo, Shiying; Horner, Neil R; Hsu, Chih-Wei; Johnson, Sara J; Kalaga, Sowmya; Keith, Lance C; Lanoue, Louise; Lawson, Thomas N; Lek, Monkol; Mark, Manuel; Marschall, Susan; Mason, Jeremy; McElwee, Melissa L; Newbigging, Susan; Nutter, Lauryl M J; Peterson, Kevin A; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Rowland, Douglas J; Ryder, Edward; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Seavitt, John R; Selloum, Mohammed; Szoke-Kovacs, Zsombor; Tamura, Masaru; Trainor, Amanda G; Tudose, Ilinca; Wakana, Shigeharu; Warren, Jonathan; Wendling, Olivia; West, David B; Wong, Leeyean; Yoshiki, Atsushi; MacArthur, Daniel G; Tocchini-Valentini, Glauco P; Gao, Xiang; Flicek, Paul; Bradley, Allan; Skarnes, William C; Justice, Monica J; Parkinson, Helen E; Moore, Mark; Wells, Sara; Braun, Robert E; Svenson, Karen L; de Angelis, Martin Hrabe; Herault, Yann; Mohun, Tim; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Henkelman, R Mark; Brown, Steve D M; Adams, David J; Lloyd, K C Kent; McKerlie, Colin; Beaudet, Arthur L; Bućan, Maja; Murray, Stephen A

    2016-09-22

    Approximately one-third of all mammalian genes are essential for life. Phenotypes resulting from knockouts of these genes in mice have provided tremendous insight into gene function and congenital disorders. As part of the International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium effort to generate and phenotypically characterize 5,000 knockout mouse lines, here we identify 410 lethal genes during the production of the first 1,751 unique gene knockouts. Using a standardized phenotyping platform that incorporates high-resolution 3D imaging, we identify phenotypes at multiple time points for previously uncharacterized genes and additional phenotypes for genes with previously reported mutant phenotypes. Unexpectedly, our analysis reveals that incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity are common even on a defined genetic background. In addition, we show that human disease genes are enriched for essential genes, thus providing a dataset that facilitates the prioritization and validation of mutations identified in clinical sequencing efforts.

  11. Advanced phenotyping and phenotype data analysis for the study of plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Rahaman, Md. Matiur; Chen, Dijun; Gillani, Zeeshan; Klukas, Christian; Chen, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Due to an increase in the consumption of food, feed, fuel and to meet global food security needs for the rapidly growing human population, there is a necessity to breed high yielding crops that can adapt to the future climate changes, particularly in developing countries. To solve these global challenges, novel approaches are required to identify quantitative phenotypes and to explain the genetic basis of agriculturally important traits. These advances will facilitate the screening of germplasm with high performance characteristics in resource-limited environments. Recently, plant phenomics has offered and integrated a suite of new technologies, and we are on a path to improve the description of complex plant phenotypes. High-throughput phenotyping platforms have also been developed that capture phenotype data from plants in a non-destructive manner. In this review, we discuss recent developments of high-throughput plant phenotyping infrastructure including imaging techniques and corresponding principles for phenotype data analysis. PMID:26322060

  12. Phenotype definition in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Winawer, Melodie R

    2006-05-01

    Phenotype definition consists of the use of epidemiologic, biological, molecular, or computational methods to systematically select features of a disorder that might result from distinct genetic influences. By carefully defining the target phenotype, or dividing the sample by phenotypic characteristics, we can hope to narrow the range of genes that influence risk for the trait in the study population, thereby increasing the likelihood of finding them. In this article, fundamental issues that arise in phenotyping in epilepsy and other disorders are reviewed, and factors complicating genotype-phenotype correlation are discussed. Methods of data collection, analysis, and interpretation are addressed, focusing on epidemiologic studies. With this foundation in place, the epilepsy subtypes and clinical features that appear to have a genetic basis are described, and the epidemiologic studies that have provided evidence for the heritability of these phenotypic characteristics, supporting their use in future genetic investigations, are reviewed. Finally, several molecular approaches to phenotype definition are discussed, in which the molecular defect, rather than the clinical phenotype, is used as a starting point.

  13. Phenotypic plasticity and divergence in gene expression.

    PubMed

    Healy, Timothy M; Schulte, Patricia M

    2015-07-01

    The extent to which phenotypic plasticity, or the ability of a single genotype to produce different phenotypes in different environments, impedes or promotes genetic divergence has been a matter of debate within evolutionary biology for many decades (see, for example, Ghalambor et al. ; Pfennig et al. ). Similarly, the role of evolution in shaping phenotypic plasticity remains poorly understood (Pigliucci ). In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Dayan et al. () provide empirical data relevant to these questions by assessing the extent of plasticity and divergence in the expression levels of 2272 genes in muscle tissue from killifish (genus Fundulus) exposed to different temperatures. F. heteroclitus (Fig. A) and F. grandis are minnows that inhabit estuarine marshes (Fig. B) along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico in North America. These habitats undergo large variations in temperature both daily and seasonally, and these fish are known to demonstrate substantial phenotypic plasticity in response to temperature change (e.g. Fangue et al. ). Furthermore, the range of F. heteroclitus spans a large latitudinal gradient of temperatures, such that northern populations experience temperatures that are on average ~10°C colder than do southern populations (Schulte ). By comparing gene expression patterns between populations of these fish from different thermal habitats held in the laboratory at three different temperatures, Dayan et al. () address two important questions regarding the interacting effects of plasticity and evolution: (i) How does phenotypic plasticity affect adaptive divergence? and (ii) How does adaptive divergence affect plasticity?

  14. Retraction: "Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf Deficiency Promote Aggressiveness of Pancreatic Cancer by Induction of EMT Consistent With Cancer Stem Cell Phenotype" by Wang et al.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The above article, published online on November 23, 2012 in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the journal Editor in Chief, Gary S. Stein, and Wiley Periodicals, Inc. The retraction has been agreed following an investigation from Wayne State University involving the first author and the corresponding author that found Figure 4B and C to be inappropriately manipulated and re-labeled. Literature Cited Wang Z, Ali S, Banerjee S, Bao B, Li Y, Azmi AS, Korc M, Sarkar FH. 2013. Activated K-Ras and INK4a/Arf deficiency promote aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer by induction of EMT consistent with cancer stem cell phenotype. J Cell Physiol 228:556-562; doi: 10.1002/jcp.24162.

  15. Phenotypic deconstruction of gene circuitry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomnitz, Jason G.; Savageau, Michael A.

    2013-06-01

    It remains a challenge to obtain a global perspective on the behavioral repertoire of complex nonlinear gene circuits. In this paper, we describe a method for deconstructing complex systems into nonlinear sub-systems, based on mathematically defined phenotypes, which are then represented within a system design space that allows the repertoire of qualitatively distinct phenotypes of the complex system to be identified, enumerated, and analyzed. This method efficiently characterizes large regions of system design space and quickly generates alternative hypotheses for experimental testing. We describe the motivation and strategy in general terms, illustrate its use with a detailed example involving a two-gene circuit with a rich repertoire of dynamic behavior, and discuss experimental means of navigating the system design space.

  16. A database of Caenorhabditis elegans behavioral phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Yemini, Eviatar; Jucikas, Tadas; Grundy, Laura J; Brown, André E X; Schafer, William R

    2013-09-01

    Using low-cost automated tracking microscopes, we have generated a behavioral database for 305 Caenorhabditis elegans strains, including 76 mutants with no previously described phenotype. The growing database currently consists of 9,203 short videos segmented to extract behavior and morphology features, and these videos and feature data are available online for further analysis. The database also includes summary statistics for 702 measures with statistical comparisons to wild-type controls so that phenotypes can be identified and understood by users.

  17. Multidimensional Clinical Phenotyping of an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient Population

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Douglas J.; Bailey, Barbara A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease resulting from mutations in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) gene and has major manifestations in the sino-pulmonary, and gastro-intestinal tracts. Clinical phenotypes were generated using 26 common clinical variables to generate classes that overlapped quantiles of lung function and were based on multiple aspects of CF systemic disease. Methods The variables included age, gender, CFTR mutations, FEV1% predicted, FVC% predicted, height, weight, Brasfield chest xray score, pancreatic sufficiency status and clinical microbiology results. Complete datasets were compiled on 211 subjects. Phenotypes were identified using a proximity matrix generated by the unsupervised Random Forests algorithm and subsequent clustering by the Partitioning around Medoids (PAM) algorithm. The final phenotypic classes were then characterized and compared to a similar dataset obtained three years earlier. Findings Clinical phenotypes were identified using a clustering strategy that generated four and five phenotypes. Each strategy identified 1) a low lung health scores phenotype, 2) a younger, well-nourished, male-dominated class, 3) various high lung health score phenotypes that varied in terms of age, gender and nutritional status. This multidimensional clinical phenotyping strategy identified classes with expected microbiology results and low risk clinical phenotypes with pancreatic sufficiency. Interpretation This study demonstrated regional adult CF clinical phenotypes using non-parametric, continuous, ordinal and categorical data with a minimal amount of subjective data to identify clinically relevant phenotypes. These studies identified the relative stability of the phenotypes, demonstrated specific phenotypes consistent with published findings and identified others needing further study. PMID:25822311

  18. Overeating phenotypes in overweight and obese children.

    PubMed

    Boutelle, Kerri N; Peterson, Carol B; Crosby, Ross D; Rydell, Sarah A; Zucker, Nancy; Harnack, Lisa

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify overeating phenotypes and their correlates in overweight and obese children. One hundred and seventeen treatment-seeking overweight and obese 8-12year-old children and their parents completed the study. Children completed an eating in the absence of hunger (EAH) paradigm, the Eating Disorder Examination interview, and measurements of height and weight. Parents and children completed questionnaires that evaluated satiety responsiveness, food responsiveness, negative affect eating, external eating and eating in the absence of hunger. Latent profile analysis was used to identify heterogeneity in overeating phenotypes in the child participants. Latent classes were then compared on measures of demographics, obesity status and nutritional intake. Three latent classes of overweight and obese children were identified: High Satiety Responsive, High Food Responsive, and Moderate Satiety and Food Responsive. Results indicated that the High Food Responsive group had higher BMI and BMI-Z scores compared to the High Satiety Responsive group. No differences were found among classes in demographics or nutritional intake. This study identified three overeating phenotypes, supporting the heterogeneity of eating patterns associated with overweight and obesity in treatment-seeking children. These finding suggest that these phenotypes can potentially be used to identify high risk groups, inform prevention and intervention targets, and develop specific treatments for these behavioral phenotypes.

  19. Diagnosing ALS

    MedlinePlus

    ... that a person diagnosed with ALS seek a second opinion from an ALS "expert" - someone who diagnoses and treats many ALS patients and has training in this medical specialty. The ALS Association maintains a list of recognized experts in the field of ALS. See ALS Association Certified Centers of ...

  20. Identifying Neurobiological Markers of the Broader Autism Phenotype

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    ASD), Social Communication, Vocal Emotion Processing, Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( fMRI ), Structural MRI 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...10 of this report.   A set of in-scanner fMRI tasks that produce behavioral responses equivalent to the out-of-scanner behavioral paradigm was...group of three trials alternated between conditions. A total of 216 whole brain volumes were acquired for this fMRI run using a whole-brain T2

  1. [Phenotypic heterogeneity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Agustí, Alvar; Barberà, Joan A; Belda, José; Farrero, Eva; Ferrer, Antoni; Ferrer, Jaume; Gáldiz, Juan B; Gea, Joaquim; Gómez, Federico P; Monsó, Eduard; Morera, Josep; Roca, Josep; Sauleda, Jaume; Antó, Josep M

    2009-03-01

    A functional definition of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) based on airflow limitation has largely dominated the field. However, a view has emerged that COPD involves a complex array of cellular, organic, functional, and clinical events, with a growing interest in disentangling the phenotypic heterogeneity of COPD. The present review is based on the opinion of the authors, who have extensive research experience in several aspects of COPD. The starting assumption of the review is that current knowledge on the pathophysiology and clinical features of COPD allows us to classify phenotypic information in terms of the following dimensions: respiratory symptoms and health status, acute exacerbations, lung function, structural changes, local and systemic inflammation, and systemic effects. Twenty-six phenotypic traits were identified and assigned to one of the 6 dimensions. For each dimension, a summary is provided of the best evidence on the relationships among phenotypic traits, in particular among those corresponding to different dimensions, and on the relationship between these traits and relevant events in the natural history of COPD. The information has been organized graphically into a phenotypic matrix where each cell representing a pair of phenotypic traits is linked to relevant references. The information provided has the potential to increase our understanding of the heterogeneity of COPD phenotypes and help us plan future studies on aspects that are as yet unexplored.

  2. Target deconvolution techniques in modern phenotypic profiling.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiyoun; Bogyo, Matthew

    2013-02-01

    The past decade has seen rapid growth in the use of diverse compound libraries in classical phenotypic screens to identify modulators of a given process. The subsequent process of identifying the molecular targets of active hits, also called 'target deconvolution', is an essential step for understanding compound mechanism of action and for using the identified hits as tools for further dissection of a given biological process. Recent advances in 'omics' technologies, coupled with in silico approaches and the reduced cost of whole genome sequencing, have greatly improved the workflow of target deconvolution and have contributed to a renaissance of 'modern' phenotypic profiling. In this review, we will outline how both new and old techniques are being used in the difficult process of target identification and validation as well as discuss some of the ongoing challenges remaining for phenotypic screening.

  3. Geographically multifarious phenotypic divergence during speciation

    PubMed Central

    Gompert, Zachariah; Lucas, Lauren K; Nice, Chris C; Fordyce, James A; Alex Buerkle, C; Forister, Matthew L

    2013-01-01

    Speciation is an important evolutionary process that occurs when barriers to gene flow evolve between previously panmictic populations. Although individual barriers to gene flow have been studied extensively, we know relatively little regarding the number of barriers that isolate species or whether these barriers are polymorphic within species. Herein, we use a series of field and lab experiments to quantify phenotypic divergence and identify possible barriers to gene flow between the butterfly species Lycaeides idas and Lycaeides melissa. We found evidence that L. idas and L. melissa have diverged along multiple phenotypic axes. Specifically, we identified major phenotypic differences in female oviposition preference and diapause initiation, and more moderate divergence in mate preference. Multiple phenotypic differences might operate as barriers to gene flow, as shown by correlations between genetic distance and phenotypic divergence and patterns of phenotypic variation in admixed Lycaeides populations. Although some of these traits differed primarily between species (e.g., diapause initiation), several traits also varied among conspecific populations (e.g., male mate preference and oviposition preference). PMID:23532669

  4. Maintenance of a bone collagen phenotype by osteoblast-like cells in 3D periodic porous titanium (Ti-6Al-4 V) structures fabricated by selective electron beam melting.

    PubMed

    Hrabe, Nikolas W; Heinl, Peter; Bordia, Rajendra K; Körner, Carolin; Fernandes, Russell J

    2013-01-01

    Regular 3D periodic porous Ti-6Al-4 V structures were fabricated by the selective electron beam melting method (EBM) over a range of relative densities (0.17-0.40) and pore sizes (500-1500 µm). Structures were seeded with human osteoblast-like cells (SAOS-2) and cultured for four weeks. Cells multiplied within these structures and extracellular matrix collagen content increased. Type I and type V collagens typically synthesized by osteoblasts were deposited in the newly formed matrix with time in culture. High magnification scanning electron microscopy revealed cells attached to surfaces on the interior of the structures with an increasingly fibrous matrix. The in-vitro results demonstrate that the novel EBM-processed porous structures, designed to address the effect of stress-shielding, are conducive to osteoblast attachment, proliferation and deposition of a collagenous matrix characteristic of bone.

  5. Identifying Hazards

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The federal government has established a system of labeling hazardous materials to help identify the type of material and threat posed. Summaries of information on over 300 chemicals are maintained in the Envirofacts Master Chemical Integrator.

  6. Automated tools for phenotype extraction from medical records.

    PubMed

    Yetisgen-Yildiz, Meliha; Bejan, Cosmin A; Vanderwende, Lucy; Xia, Fei; Evans, Heather L; Wurfel, Mark M

    2013-01-01

    Clinical research studying critical illness phenotypes relies on the identification of clinical syndromes defined by consensus definitions. Historically, identifying phenotypes has required manual chart review, a time and resource intensive process. The overall research goal of C ritical I llness PH enotype E xt R action (deCIPHER) project is to develop automated approaches based on natural language processing and machine learning that accurately identify phenotypes from EMR. We chose pneumonia as our first critical illness phenotype and conducted preliminary experiments to explore the problem space. In this abstract, we outline the tools we built for processing clinical records, present our preliminary findings for pneumonia extraction, and describe future steps.

  7. ALS Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... toward a world without ALS! Walk to Defeat ALS® Walk to Defeat ALS® draws people of all ... We need your help. I Will Advocate National ALS Registry The National ALS Registry is a congressionally ...

  8. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species.

  9. Serum Biochemical Phenotypes in the Domestic Dog

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Mei; Hadox, Erin; Szladovits, Balazs; Garden, Oliver A.

    2016-01-01

    The serum or plasma biochemical profile is essential in the diagnosis and monitoring of systemic disease in veterinary medicine, but current reference intervals typically take no account of breed-specific differences. Breed-specific hematological phenotypes have been documented in the domestic dog, but little has been published on serum biochemical phenotypes in this species. Serum biochemical profiles of dogs in which all measurements fell within the existing reference intervals were retrieved from a large veterinary database. Serum biochemical profiles from 3045 dogs were retrieved, of which 1495 had an accompanying normal glucose concentration. Sixty pure breeds plus a mixed breed control group were represented by at least 10 individuals. All analytes, except for sodium, chloride and glucose, showed variation with age. Total protein, globulin, potassium, chloride, creatinine, cholesterol, total bilirubin, ALT, CK, amylase, and lipase varied between sexes. Neutering status significantly impacted all analytes except albumin, sodium, calcium, urea, and glucose. Principal component analysis of serum biochemical data revealed 36 pure breeds with distinctive phenotypes. Furthermore, comparative analysis identified 23 breeds with significant differences from the mixed breed group in all biochemical analytes except urea and glucose. Eighteen breeds were identified by both principal component and comparative analysis. Tentative reference intervals were generated for breeds with a distinctive phenotype identified by comparative analysis and represented by at least 120 individuals. This is the first large-scale analysis of breed-specific serum biochemical phenotypes in the domestic dog and highlights potential genetic components of biochemical traits in this species. PMID:26919479

  10. Rare variant association test with multiple phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Selyeong; Won, Sungho; Kim, Young Jin; Kim, Yongkang; Kim, Bong-Jo; Park, Taesung

    2017-04-01

    Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have now discovered thousands of genetic variants associated with common traits, such variants cannot explain the large degree of "missing heritability," likely due to rare variants. The advent of next generation sequencing technology has allowed rare variant detection and association with common traits, often by investigating specific genomic regions for rare variant effects on a trait. Although multiple correlated phenotypes are often concurrently observed in GWAS, most studies analyze only single phenotypes, which may lessen statistical power. To increase power, multivariate analyses, which consider correlations between multiple phenotypes, can be used. However, few existing multivariant analyses can identify rare variants for assessing multiple phenotypes. Here, we propose Multivariate Association Analysis using Score Statistics (MAAUSS), to identify rare variants associated with multiple phenotypes, based on the widely used sequence kernel association test (SKAT) for a single phenotype. We applied MAAUSS to whole exome sequencing (WES) data from a Korean population of 1,058 subjects to discover genes associated with multiple traits of liver function. We then assessed validation of those genes by a replication study, using an independent dataset of 3,445 individuals. Notably, we detected the gene ZNF620 among five significant genes. We then performed a simulation study to compare MAAUSS's performance with existing methods. Overall, MAAUSS successfully conserved type 1 error rates and in many cases had a higher power than the existing methods. This study illustrates a feasible and straightforward approach for identifying rare variants correlated with multiple phenotypes, with likely relevance to missing heritability.

  11. Molecular Genetic Studies of Complex Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Marian, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    The approach to molecular genetic studies of complex phenotypes has evolved considerably during the recent years. The candidate gene approach, restricted to analysis of a few single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a modest number of cases and controls, has been supplanted by the unbiased approach of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), wherein a large number of tagger SNPs are typed in a large number of individuals. GWAS, which are designed upon the common disease- common variant hypothesis (CD-CV), have identified a large number of SNPs and loci for complex phenotypes. However, alleles identified through GWAS are typically not causative but rather in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with the true causal variants. The common alleles, which may not capture the uncommon and rare variants, account only for a fraction of heritability of the complex traits. Hence, the focus is being shifted to rare variants – common disease (RV-CD) hypothesis, surmising that rare variants exert large effect sizes on the phenotype. In conjunctional with this conceptual shift technological advances in DNA sequencing techniques have dramatically enhanced whole genome or whole exome sequencing capacity. The sequencing approach affords identification of not only the rare but also the common variants. The approach – whether used in complementation with GWAS or as a stand-alone approach - could define the genetic architecture of the complex phenotypes. Robust phenotyping and large-scale sequencing studies are essential to extract the information content of the vast number of DNA sequence variants (DSVs) in the genome. To garner meaningful clinical information and link the genotype to a phenotype, identification and characterization of a very large number of causal fields beyond the information content of DNA sequence variants would be necessary. This review provides an update on the current progress and limitations in identifying DSVs that are associated with phenotypic effects. PMID

  12. AL Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    systemic nature of the disease, non-invasive biopsies such as abdominal fat aspiration should be considered before taking biopsies from involved organs, in order to reduce the risk of bleeding complications. Differential diagnosis Systemic AL amyloidosis should be distinguished from other diseases related to deposition of monoclonal LC, and from other forms of systemic amyloidosis. When pathological studies have failed to identify the nature of amyloid deposits, genetic studies should be performed to diagnose hereditary amyloidosis. Management Treatment of AL amyloidosis is based on chemotherapy, aimed at controlling the underlying plasma clone that produces amyloidogenic LC. The hematological response should be carefully checked by serial measurements of serum free LC. The association of an alkylating agent with high-dose dexamethasone has proven to be effective in two thirds of patients and is considered as the current reference treatment. New agents used in the treatment of multiple myeloma are under investigation and appear to increase hematological response rates. Symptomatic measures and supportive care is necessary in patients with organ failure. Noticeably, usual treatments for cardiac failure (i.e. calcium inhibitors, β-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors) are inefficient or even dangerous in patients with amyloid heart disease, that should be managed using diuretics. Amiodarone and pace maker implantation should be considered in patients with rhythm or conduction abnormalities. In selected cases, heart and kidney transplantation may be associated with prolonged patient and graft survival. Prognosis Survival in AL amyloidosis depends on the spectrum of organ involvement (amyloid heart disease being the main prognosis factor), the severity of individual organs involved and haematological response to treatment. PMID:22909024

  13. Phenotypic consequences of aneuploidy in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Henry, Isabelle M; Dilkes, Brian P; Miller, Eric S; Burkart-Waco, Diana; Comai, Luca

    2010-12-01

    Aneuploid cells are characterized by incomplete chromosome sets. The resulting imbalance in gene dosage has phenotypic consequences that are specific to each karyotype. Even in the case of Down syndrome, the most viable and studied form of human aneuploidy, the mechanisms underlying the connected phenotypes remain mostly unclear. Because of their tolerance to aneuploidy, plants provide a powerful system for a genome-wide investigation of aneuploid syndromes, an approach that is not feasible in animal systems. Indeed, in many plant species, populations of aneuploid individuals can be easily obtained from triploid individuals. We phenotyped a population of Arabidopsis thaliana aneuploid individuals containing 25 different karyotypes. Even in this highly heterogeneous population, we demonstrate that certain traits are strongly associated with the dosage of specific chromosome types and that chromosomal effects can be additive. Further, we identified subtle developmental phenotypes expressed in the diploid progeny of aneuploid parent(s) but not in euploid controls from diploid lineages. These results indicate long-term phenotypic consequences of aneuploidy that can persist after chromosomal balance has been restored. We verified the diploid nature of these individuals by whole-genome sequencing and discuss the possibility that trans-generational phenotypic effects stem from epigenetic modifications passed from aneuploid parents to their diploid progeny.

  14. Down Syndrome: Cognitive Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverman, Wayne

    2007-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most prevalent cause of intellectual impairment associated with a genetic anomaly, in this case, trisomy of chromosome 21. It affects both physical and cognitive development and produces a characteristic phenotype, although affected individuals vary considerably with respect to severity of specific impairments. Studies…

  15. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism.

    PubMed

    Fortuna, Miguel A; Zaman, Luis; Ofria, Charles; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms from a vast space of 10141 genotypes (instruction sequences), which can form 512 different phenotypes. These phenotypes are distinguished by different Boolean logic functions they can compute, as well as by the complexity of these functions. We observe several properties with parallels in natural systems, such as connected genotype networks and asymmetric phenotypic transitions. The likely common cause is robustness to genotypic change. We describe an intriguing tension between phenotypic complexity and evolvability that may have implications for biological evolution. On the one hand, genotypic change is more likely to yield novel phenotypes in more complex organisms. On the other hand, the total number of novel phenotypes reachable through genotypic change is highest for organisms with simple phenotypes. Artificial evolving systems can help us study aspects of biological evolvability that are not accessible in vastly more complex natural systems. They can also help identify properties, such as robustness, that are required for both human-designed artificial systems and synthetic biological systems to be evolvable.

  16. The genotype-phenotype map of an evolving digital organism

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Luis; Wagner, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    To understand how evolving systems bring forth novel and useful phenotypes, it is essential to understand the relationship between genotypic and phenotypic change. Artificial evolving systems can help us understand whether the genotype-phenotype maps of natural evolving systems are highly unusual, and it may help create evolvable artificial systems. Here we characterize the genotype-phenotype map of digital organisms in Avida, a platform for digital evolution. We consider digital organisms from a vast space of 10141 genotypes (instruction sequences), which can form 512 different phenotypes. These phenotypes are distinguished by different Boolean logic functions they can compute, as well as by the complexity of these functions. We observe several properties with parallels in natural systems, such as connected genotype networks and asymmetric phenotypic transitions. The likely common cause is robustness to genotypic change. We describe an intriguing tension between phenotypic complexity and evolvability that may have implications for biological evolution. On the one hand, genotypic change is more likely to yield novel phenotypes in more complex organisms. On the other hand, the total number of novel phenotypes reachable through genotypic change is highest for organisms with simple phenotypes. Artificial evolving systems can help us study aspects of biological evolvability that are not accessible in vastly more complex natural systems. They can also help identify properties, such as robustness, that are required for both human-designed artificial systems and synthetic biological systems to be evolvable. PMID:28241039

  17. Characterizing the ADHD Phenotype for Genetic Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Jim; Asherson, Phil; Hay, David; Levy, Florence; Swanson, Jim; Thapar, Anita; Willcutt, Erik

    2005-01-01

    The genetic study of ADHD has made considerable progress. Further developments in the field will be reliant in part on identifying the most appropriate phenotypes for genetic analysis. The use of both categorical and dimensional measures of symptoms related to ADHD has been productive. The use of multiple reporters is a valuable feature of the…

  18. The Behavioural Phenotype of Angelman Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsler, K.; Oliver, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review is to examine the notion of a behavioural phenotype for Angelman syndrome and identify methodological and conceptual influences on the accepted presentation. Methods: Studies examining the behavioural characteristics associated with Angelman syndrome are reviewed and methodology is described. Results:…

  19. The Phenotype of Spontaneous Preterm Birth: Application of a Clinical Phenotyping Tool

    PubMed Central

    Manuck, Tracy A.; Esplin, M. Sean; Biggio, Joseph; Bukowski, Radek; Parry, Samuel; Zhang, Heping; Varner, Michael W.; Andrews, William; Saade, George; Sadovsky, Yoel; Reddy, Uma M.; Ilekis, John

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spontaneous preterm birth (SPTB) is a complex condition that is likely a final common pathway with multiple possible etiologies. We hypothesized that a comprehensive classification system could appropriately group women with similar STPB etiologies, and provide an explanation, at least in part, for the disparities in SPTB associated with race and gestational age at delivery. Study Design Planned analysis of a multicenter, prospective study of singleton SPTB. Women with SPTB < 34 weeks were included. We defined 9 potential SPTB phenotypes based on clinical data, including infection/inflammation, maternal stress, decidual hemorrhage, uterine distention, cervical insufficiency, placental dysfunction, premature rupture of the membranes, maternal comorbidities, and familial factors. Each woman was evaluated for each phenotype. Delivery gestational age was compared between those with and without each phenotype. Phenotype profiles were also compared between women with very early (20.0–27.9 weeks) SPTB vs. those with early SPTB (28.0–34.0 weeks), and between African-American and Caucasian women. Statistical analysis was by t-test and chi-square as appropriate. Results The phenotyping tool was applied to 1025 women with SPTB who delivered at a mean 30.0 (+/− 3.2) weeks gestation. Of these, 800 (78%) had ≥2 phenotypes. Only 43 (4.2%) had no phenotypes. The 281 women with early SPTB were more likely to have infection/inflammation, decidual hemorrhage, and cervical insufficiency phenotypes (all p≤0.001). African-American women had more maternal stress and cervical insufficiency but less decidual hemorrhage and placental dysfunction compared to Caucasian women (all p<0.05). Gestational age at delivery decreased as the number of phenotypes present increased. Conclusions Precise SPTB phenotyping classifies women with SPTB and identifies specific differences between very early and early SPTB and between African-Americans and Caucasians. PMID:25687564

  20. Phenotype of the taurine transporter knockout mouse.

    PubMed

    Warskulat, Ulrich; Heller-Stilb, Birgit; Oermann, Evelyn; Zilles, Karl; Haas, Helmut; Lang, Florian; Häussinger, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    ; Liu et al., 1992; Ramamoorthy et al., 1994; Schloss et al., 1994; Smith et al., 1992; Uchida et al., 1992; Vinnakota et al., 1997; Yancey et al., 1975). Taurine is not incorporated into proteins. It is involved in cell volume regulation, neuromodulation, antioxidant defense, protein stabilization, stress responses, and via formation of taurine-chloramine in immunomodulation (Chapman et al., 1993; Green et al., 1991; Huxtable, 1992; Timbrell et al., 1995). On the basis of its functions, taurine may protect cells against various types of injury (Chapman et al., 1993; Green et al., 1991; Huxtable, 1992; Kurz et al., 1998; Park et al., 1995; Stapleton et al., 1998; Timbrell et al., 1995; Welch and Brown, 1996; Wettstein and Häussinger, 1997). In order to examine the multiple taurine functions, murine models have several intrinsic advantages for in vivo research compared to other animal models, including lower cost, maintenance, and rapid reproduction rate. Further, experimental reagents for cellular and molecular studies are widely available for the mouse. In particular, mice can be easily genetically manipulated by making transgene and knockout mice. This chapter focuses on the phenotype of the TAUT-deficient murine model (taut-/-; Heller-Stilb et al., 2002), which may help researchers elucidate the diverse roles of taurine in development and maintenance of normal organ functions and morphology.

  1. A new method to infer causal phenotype networks using QTL and phenotypic information.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huange; van Eeuwijk, Fred A

    2014-01-01

    In the context of genetics and breeding research on multiple phenotypic traits, reconstructing the directional or causal structure between phenotypic traits is a prerequisite for quantifying the effects of genetic interventions on the traits. Current approaches mainly exploit the genetic effects at quantitative trait loci (QTLs) to learn about causal relationships among phenotypic traits. A requirement for using these approaches is that at least one unique QTL has been identified for each trait studied. However, in practice, especially for molecular phenotypes such as metabolites, this prerequisite is often not met due to limited sample sizes, high noise levels and small QTL effects. Here, we present a novel heuristic search algorithm called the QTL+phenotype supervised orientation (QPSO) algorithm to infer causal directions for edges in undirected phenotype networks. The two main advantages of this algorithm are: first, it does not require QTLs for each and every trait; second, it takes into account associated phenotypic interactions in addition to detected QTLs when orienting undirected edges between traits. We evaluate and compare the performance of QPSO with another state-of-the-art approach, the QTL-directed dependency graph (QDG) algorithm. Simulation results show that our method has broader applicability and leads to more accurate overall orientations. We also illustrate our method with a real-life example involving 24 metabolites and a few major QTLs measured on an association panel of 93 tomato cultivars. Matlab source code implementing the proposed algorithm is freely available upon request.

  2. Single cell dynamic phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Patsch, Katherin; Chiu, Chi-Li; Engeln, Mark; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Ruderman, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging has improved our ability to measure phenotypic heterogeneity. However, bottlenecks in imaging and image processing often make it difficult to differentiate interesting biological behavior from technical artifact. Thus there is a need for new methods that improve data quality without sacrificing throughput. Here we present a 3-step workflow to improve dynamic phenotype measurements of heterogeneous cell populations. We provide guidelines for image acquisition, phenotype tracking, and data filtering to remove erroneous cell tracks using the novel Tracking Aberration Measure (TrAM). Our workflow is broadly applicable across imaging platforms and analysis software. By applying this workflow to cancer cell assays, we reduced aberrant cell track prevalence from 17% to 2%. The cost of this improvement was removing 15% of the well-tracked cells. This enabled detection of significant motility differences between cell lines. Similarly, we avoided detecting a false change in translocation kinetics by eliminating the true cause: varied proportions of unresponsive cells. Finally, by systematically seeking heterogeneous behaviors, we detected subpopulations that otherwise could have been missed, including early apoptotic events and pre-mitotic cells. We provide optimized protocols for specific applications and step-by-step guidelines for adapting them to a variety of biological systems. PMID:27708391

  3. ALS - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

  4. [Phenotype specific therapy of COPD].

    PubMed

    Rothe, Thomas

    2014-12-10

    COPD is not a homogenous disease but consists of at least four different phenotypes: Emphysema, COPD with chronic bronchitis, asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS), and COPD with recurrent exacerbations. With differentiation, treatment can be designed phenotype-specific. Some modern drugs are not indicated in all phenotypes.

  5. Delineating the GRIN1 phenotypic spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Geider, Kirsten; Helbig, Katherine L.; Heyne, Henrike O.; Schütz, Hannah; Hentschel, Julia; Courage, Carolina; Depienne, Christel; Nava, Caroline; Heron, Delphine; Møller, Rikke S.; Hjalgrim, Helle; Lal, Dennis; Neubauer, Bernd A.; Nürnberg, Peter; Thiele, Holger; Kurlemann, Gerhard; Arnold, Georgianne L.; Bhambhani, Vikas; Bartholdi, Deborah; Pedurupillay, Christeen Ramane J.; Misceo, Doriana; Frengen, Eirik; Strømme, Petter; Dlugos, Dennis J.; Doherty, Emily S.; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; Ruivenkamp, Claudia A.; Hoffer, Mariette J.V.; Goldstein, Amy; Rajan, Deepa S.; Narayanan, Vinodh; Ramsey, Keri; Belnap, Newell; Schrauwen, Isabelle; Richholt, Ryan; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; Sá, Joaquim; Mendonça, Carla; de Kovel, Carolien G.F.; Weckhuysen, Sarah; Hardies, Katia; De Jonghe, Peter; De Meirleir, Linda; Milh, Mathieu; Badens, Catherine; Lebrun, Marine; Busa, Tiffany; Francannet, Christine; Piton, Amélie; Riesch, Erik; Biskup, Saskia; Vogt, Heinrich; Dorn, Thomas; Helbig, Ingo; Michaud, Jacques L.; Laube, Bodo; Syrbe, Steffen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the phenotypic spectrum caused by mutations in GRIN1 encoding the NMDA receptor subunit GluN1 and to investigate their underlying functional pathophysiology. Methods: We collected molecular and clinical data from several diagnostic and research cohorts. Functional consequences of GRIN1 mutations were investigated in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Results: We identified heterozygous de novo GRIN1 mutations in 14 individuals and reviewed the phenotypes of all 9 previously reported patients. These 23 individuals presented with a distinct phenotype of profound developmental delay, severe intellectual disability with absent speech, muscular hypotonia, hyperkinetic movement disorder, oculogyric crises, cortical blindness, generalized cerebral atrophy, and epilepsy. Mutations cluster within transmembrane segments and result in loss of channel function of varying severity with a dominant-negative effect. In addition, we describe 2 homozygous GRIN1 mutations (1 missense, 1 truncation), each segregating with severe neurodevelopmental phenotypes in consanguineous families. Conclusions: De novo GRIN1 mutations are associated with severe intellectual disability with cortical visual impairment as well as oculomotor and movement disorders being discriminating phenotypic features. Loss of NMDA receptor function appears to be the underlying disease mechanism. The identification of both heterozygous and homozygous mutations blurs the borders of dominant and recessive inheritance of GRIN1-associated disorders. PMID:27164704

  6. Understanding Genotypes and Phenotypes in Epileptic Encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Helbig, Ingo; Tayoun, Abou Ahmad N.

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic encephalopathies are severe often intractable seizure disorders where epileptiform abnormalities contribute to a progressive disturbance in brain function. Often, epileptic encephalopathies start in childhood and are accompanied by developmental delay and various neurological and non-neurological comorbidities. In recent years, this concept has become virtually synonymous with a group of severe childhood epilepsies including West syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Dravet syndrome, and several other severe childhood epilepsies for which genetic factors are increasingly recognized. In the last 5 years, the field has seen a virtual explosion of gene discovery, raising the number of bona fide genes and possible candidate genes for epileptic encephalopathies to more than 70 genes, explaining 20-25% of all cases with severe early-onset epilepsies that had otherwise no identifiable causes. This review will focus on the phenotypic variability as a characteristic aspect of genetic epilepsies. For many genetic epilepsies, the phenotypic presentation can be broad, even in patients with identical genetic alterations. Furthermore, patients with different genetic etiologies can have seemingly similar clinical presentations, such as in Dravet syndrome. While most patients carry mutations in SCN1A, similar phenotypes can be seen in patients with mutations in PCDH19, CHD2, SCN8A, or in rare cases GABRA1 and STXBP1. In addition to the genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity, both benign phenotypes and severe encephalopathies have been recognized in an increasing number of genetic epilepsies, raising the question whether these conditions represent a fluid continuum or distinct entities. PMID:27781027

  7. Development of a novel aluminum tolerance phenotyping platform used for comparisons of cereal aluminum tolerance and investigations into rice aluminum tolerance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Famoso, Adam N; Clark, Randy T; Shaff, Jon E; Craft, Eric; McCouch, Susan R; Kochian, Leon V

    2010-08-01

    The genetic and physiological mechanisms of aluminum (Al) tolerance have been well studied in certain cereal crops, and Al tolerance genes have been identified in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) and wheat (Triticum aestivum). Rice (Oryza sativa) has been reported to be highly Al tolerant; however, a direct comparison of rice and other cereals has not been reported, and the mechanisms of rice Al tolerance are poorly understood. To facilitate Al tolerance phenotyping in rice, a high-throughput imaging system and root quantification computer program was developed, permitting quantification of the entire root system, rather than just the longest root. Additionally, a novel hydroponic solution was developed and optimized for Al tolerance screening in rice and compared with the Yoshida's rice solution commonly used for rice Al tolerance studies. To gain a better understanding of Al tolerance in cereals, comparisons of Al tolerance across cereal species were conducted at four Al concentrations using seven to nine genetically diverse genotypes of wheat, maize (Zea mays), sorghum, and rice. Rice was significantly more tolerant than maize, wheat, and sorghum at all Al concentrations, with the mean Al tolerance level for rice found to be 2- to 6-fold greater than that in maize, wheat, and sorghum. Physiological experiments were conducted on a genetically diverse panel of more than 20 rice genotypes spanning the range of rice Al tolerance and compared with two maize genotypes to determine if rice utilizes the well-described Al tolerance mechanism of root tip Al exclusion mediated by organic acid exudation. These results clearly demonstrate that the extremely high levels of rice Al tolerance are mediated by a novel mechanism, which is independent of root tip Al exclusion.

  8. Genetic Regulation of Phenotypic Plasticity and Canalisation in Yeast Growth.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Anupama; Dhole, Kaustubh; Sinha, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a genotype to show diverse phenotypes in different environments is called phenotypic plasticity. Phenotypic plasticity helps populations to evade extinctions in novel environments, facilitates adaptation and fuels evolution. However, most studies focus on understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic regulation in specific environments. As a result, while it's evolutionary relevance is well established, genetic mechanisms regulating phenotypic plasticity and their overlap with the environment specific regulators is not well understood. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly sensitive to the environment, which acts as not just external stimulus but also as signalling cue for this unicellular, sessile organism. We used a previously published dataset of a biparental yeast population grown in 34 diverse environments and mapped genetic loci regulating variation in phenotypic plasticity, plasticity QTL, and compared them with environment-specific QTL. Plasticity QTL is one whose one allele exhibits high plasticity whereas the other shows a relatively canalised behaviour. We mapped phenotypic plasticity using two parameters-environmental variance, an environmental order-independent parameter and reaction norm (slope), an environmental order-dependent parameter. Our results show a partial overlap between pleiotropic QTL and plasticity QTL such that while some plasticity QTL are also pleiotropic, others have a significant effect on phenotypic plasticity without being significant in any environment independently. Furthermore, while some plasticity QTL are revealed only in specific environmental orders, we identify large effect plasticity QTL, which are order-independent such that whatever the order of the environments, one allele is always plastic and the other is canalised. Finally, we show that the environments can be divided into two categories based on the phenotypic diversity of the population within them and the two categories have differential regulators of

  9. Relational Machine Learning for Electronic Health Record-Driven Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Peissig, Peggy L.; Costa, Vitor Santos; Caldwell, Michael D.; Rottscheit, Carla; Berg, Richard L.; Mendonca, Eneida A.; Page, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective Electronic health records (EHR) offer medical and pharmacogenomics research unprecedented opportunities to identify and classify patients at risk. EHRs are collections of highly inter-dependent records that include biological, anatomical, physiological, and behavioral observations. They comprise a patient’s clinical phenome, where each patient has thousands of date-stamped records distributed across many relational tables. Development of EHR computer-based phenotyping algorithms require time and medical insight from clinical experts, who most often can only review a small patient subset representative of the total EHR records, to identify phenotype features. In this research we evaluate whether relational machine learning (ML) using Inductive Logic Programming (ILP) can contribute to addressing these issues as a viable approach for EHR-based phenotyping. Methods Two relational learning ILP approaches and three well-known WEKA (Waikato Environment for Knowledge Analysis) implementations of non-relational approaches (PART, J48, and JRIP) were used to develop models for nine phenotypes. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) coded EHR data were used to select training cohorts for the development of each phenotypic model. Accuracy, precision, recall, F-Measure, and Area Under the Receiver Operating Characteristic (AUROC) curve statistics were measured for each phenotypic model based on independent manually verified test cohorts. A two-sided binomial distribution test (sign test) compared the five ML approaches across phenotypes for statistical significance. Results We developed an approach to automatically label training examples using ICD-9 diagnosis codes for the ML approaches being evaluated. Nine phenotypic models for each MLapproach were evaluated, resulting in better overall model performance in AUROC using ILP when compared to PART (p=0.039), J48 (p=0.003) and JRIP (p=0.003). Discussion ILP has the potential to improve

  10. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium Web Portal, a unified point of access for knockout mice and related phenotyping data

    PubMed Central

    Koscielny, Gautier; Yaikhom, Gagarine; Iyer, Vivek; Meehan, Terrence F.; Morgan, Hugh; Atienza-Herrero, Julian; Blake, Andrew; Chen, Chao-Kung; Easty, Richard; Di Fenza, Armida; Fiegel, Tanja; Grifiths, Mark; Horne, Alan; Karp, Natasha A.; Kurbatova, Natalja; Mason, Jeremy C.; Matthews, Peter; Oakley, Darren J.; Qazi, Asfand; Regnart, Jack; Retha, Ahmad; Santos, Luis A.; Sneddon, Duncan J.; Warren, Jonathan; Westerberg, Henrik; Wilson, Robert J.; Melvin, David G.; Smedley, Damian; Brown, Steve D. M.; Flicek, Paul; Skarnes, William C.; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Parkinson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) web portal (http://www.mousephenotype.org) provides the biomedical community with a unified point of access to mutant mice and rich collection of related emerging and existing mouse phenotype data. IMPC mouse clinics worldwide follow rigorous highly structured and standardized protocols for the experimentation, collection and dissemination of data. Dedicated ‘data wranglers’ work with each phenotyping center to collate data and perform quality control of data. An automated statistical analysis pipeline has been developed to identify knockout strains with a significant change in the phenotype parameters. Annotation with biomedical ontologies allows biologists and clinicians to easily find mouse strains with phenotypic traits relevant to their research. Data integration with other resources will provide insights into mammalian gene function and human disease. As phenotype data become available for every gene in the mouse, the IMPC web portal will become an invaluable tool for researchers studying the genetic contributions of genes to human diseases. PMID:24194600

  11. The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium Web Portal, a unified point of access for knockout mice and related phenotyping data.

    PubMed

    Koscielny, Gautier; Yaikhom, Gagarine; Iyer, Vivek; Meehan, Terrence F; Morgan, Hugh; Atienza-Herrero, Julian; Blake, Andrew; Chen, Chao-Kung; Easty, Richard; Di Fenza, Armida; Fiegel, Tanja; Grifiths, Mark; Horne, Alan; Karp, Natasha A; Kurbatova, Natalja; Mason, Jeremy C; Matthews, Peter; Oakley, Darren J; Qazi, Asfand; Regnart, Jack; Retha, Ahmad; Santos, Luis A; Sneddon, Duncan J; Warren, Jonathan; Westerberg, Henrik; Wilson, Robert J; Melvin, David G; Smedley, Damian; Brown, Steve D M; Flicek, Paul; Skarnes, William C; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Parkinson, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) web portal (http://www.mousephenotype.org) provides the biomedical community with a unified point of access to mutant mice and rich collection of related emerging and existing mouse phenotype data. IMPC mouse clinics worldwide follow rigorous highly structured and standardized protocols for the experimentation, collection and dissemination of data. Dedicated 'data wranglers' work with each phenotyping center to collate data and perform quality control of data. An automated statistical analysis pipeline has been developed to identify knockout strains with a significant change in the phenotype parameters. Annotation with biomedical ontologies allows biologists and clinicians to easily find mouse strains with phenotypic traits relevant to their research. Data integration with other resources will provide insights into mammalian gene function and human disease. As phenotype data become available for every gene in the mouse, the IMPC web portal will become an invaluable tool for researchers studying the genetic contributions of genes to human diseases.

  12. Phenotype mining in CNV carriers from a population cohort†

    PubMed Central

    Pietiläinen, Olli P. H.; Rehnström, Karola; Jakkula, Eveliina; Service, Susan K.; Congdon, Eliza; Tilgmann, Carola; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Taanila, Anja; Heikura, Ulla; Paunio, Tiina; Ripatti, Samuli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Isohanni, Matti; Sabatti, Chiara; Palotie, Aarno; Freimer, Nelson B.; Peltonen, Leena

    2011-01-01

    Phenotype mining is a novel approach for elucidating the genetic basis of complex phenotypic variation. It involves a search of rich phenotype databases for measures correlated with genetic variation, as identified in genome-wide genotyping or sequencing studies. An initial implementation of phenotype mining in a prospective unselected population cohort, the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort (NFBC1966), identifies neurodevelopment-related traits—intellectual deficits, poor school performance and hearing abnormalities—which are more frequent among individuals with large (>500 kb) deletions than among other cohort members. Observation of extensive shared single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes around deletions suggests an opportunity to expand phenotype mining from cohort samples to the populations from which they derive. PMID:21505072

  13. Quality Control Test for Sequence-Phenotype Assignments

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Maria Teresa Lara; Rosario, Pablo Benjamín Leon; Luna-Nevarez, Pablo; Gamez, Alba Savin; Martínez-del Campo, Ana; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Relating a gene mutation to a phenotype is a common task in different disciplines such as protein biochemistry. In this endeavour, it is common to find false relationships arising from mutations introduced by cells that may be depurated using a phenotypic assay; yet, such phenotypic assays may introduce additional false relationships arising from experimental errors. Here we introduce the use of high-throughput DNA sequencers and statistical analysis aimed to identify incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments and observed that 10–20% of these false assignments are expected in large screenings aimed to identify critical residues for protein function. We further show that this level of incorrect DNA sequence-phenotype assignments may significantly alter our understanding about the structure-function relationship of proteins. We have made available an implementation of our method at http://bis.ifc.unam.mx/en/software/chispas. PMID:25700273

  14. `Weak A' phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, J. P.; Gerbal, A.; Hughes-Jones, N. C.; Salmon, C.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty-five weak A samples including fourteen A3, eight Ax, seven Aend, three Am and three Ae1 were studied in order to determine their A antigen site density, using an IgG anti-A labelled with 125I. The values obtained ranged between 30,000 A antigen sites for A3 individuals, and 700 sites for the Ae1 red cells. The hierarchy of values observed made it possible to establish a quantitative relationship between the red cell agglutinability of these phenotypes measured under standard conditions, and their antigen site density. PMID:4435836

  15. Bioimaging for quantitative phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Xia, Xian; Huang, Yi; Chen, Xingwei; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2016-06-01

    With the development of bio-imaging techniques, an increasing number of studies apply these techniques to generate a myriad of image data. Its applications range from quantification of cellular, tissue, organismal and behavioral phenotypes of model organisms, to human facial phenotypes. The bio-imaging approaches to automatically detect, quantify, and profile phenotypic changes related to specific biological questions open new doors to studying phenotype-genotype associations and to precisely evaluating molecular changes associated with quantitative phenotypes. Here, we review major applications of bioimage-based quantitative phenotype analysis. Specifically, we describe the biological questions and experimental needs addressable by these analyses, computational techniques and tools that are available in these contexts, and the new perspectives on phenotype-genotype association uncovered by such analyses.

  16. Investigating the role of ALS genes CHCHD10 and TUBA4A in Belgian FTD-ALS spectrum patients.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Federica; Nguyen, Hung Phuoc; Van Mossevelde, Sara; Moisse, Matthieu; Sieben, Anne; Santens, Patrick; De Bleecker, Jan; Vandenbulcke, Mathieu; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Baets, Jonathan; Cras, Patrick; Vandenberghe, Rik; De Jonghe, Peter; De Deyn, Peter P; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Van Damme, Philip; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; van der Zee, Julie

    2017-03-01

    Mutation screening and phenotypic profiling of 2 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-(ALS) and frontotemporal dementia-(FTD) associated genes, CHCHD10 and TUBA4A, were performed in a Belgian cohort of 459 FTD, 28 FTD-ALS, and 429 ALS patients. In CHCHD10, we identified a novel nonsense mutation (p.Gln108*) in a patient with atypical clinical FTD and pathology-confirmed Parkinson's disease (1/459, 0.22%) leading to loss of transcript. We further observed 3 previously described missense variants (p.Pro34Ser, p.Pro80Leu, and p.Pro96Thr) that were also present in the matched control series. In TUBA4A, we detected a novel frameshift mutation (p.Arg64Glyfs*90) leading to a truncated protein in 1 FTD patient (1/459 of 0.22%) with family history of Parkinson's disease and cognitive impairment, and a novel missense mutation (p.Thr381Met) in 2 sibs with familial ALS and memory problems (1 index patient/429, 0.23%) in whom we previously identified a pathogenic Chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 repeat expansion mutation. The present study confirms the role of CHCHD10 and TUBA4A in the FTD-ALS spectrum, although genetic variations in these 2 genes are extremely rare in the Belgian population and often associated with symptomatology of related neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Rings Reconcile Genotypic and Phenotypic Evolution within the Proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Lake, James A.; Larsen, Joseph; Sarna, Brooke; de la Haba, Rafael R.; Pu, Yiyi; Koo, HyunMin; Zhao, Jun; Sinsheimer, Janet S.

    2015-01-01

    Although prokaryotes are usually classified using molecular phylogenies instead of phenotypes after the advent of gene sequencing, neither of these methods is satisfactory because the phenotypes cannot explain the molecular trees and the trees do not fit the phenotypes. This scientific crisis still exists and the profound disconnection between these two pillars of evolutionary biology—genotypes and phenotypes—grows larger. We use rings and a genomic form of goods thinking to resolve this conundrum (McInerney JO, Cummins C, Haggerty L. 2011. Goods thinking vs. tree thinking. Mobile Genet Elements. 1:304–308; Nelson-Sathi S, et al. 2015. Origins of major archaeal clades correspond to gene acquisitions from bacteria. Nature 517:77–80). The Proteobacteria is the most speciose prokaryotic phylum known. It is an ideal phylogenetic model for reconstructing Earth’s evolutionary history. It contains diverse free living, pathogenic, photosynthetic, sulfur metabolizing, and symbiotic species. Due to its large number of species (Whitman WB, Coleman DC, Wiebe WJ. 1998. Prokaryotes: the unseen majority. Proc Nat Acad Sci U S A. 95:6578–6583) it was initially expected to provide strong phylogenetic support for a proteobacterial tree of life. But despite its many species, sequence-based tree analyses are unable to resolve its topology. Here we develop new rooted ring analyses and study proteobacterial evolution. Using protein family data and new genome-based outgroup rooting procedures, we reconstruct the complex evolutionary history of the proteobacterial rings (combinations of tree-like divergences and endosymbiotic-like convergences). We identify and map the origins of major gene flows within the rooted proteobacterial rings (P < 3.6 × 10−6) and find that the evolution of the “Alpha-,” “Beta-,” and “Gammaproteobacteria” is represented by a unique set of rings. Using new techniques presented here we also root these rings using outgroups. We also map

  18. The Phenotype of Loneliness

    PubMed Central

    Cacioppo, John T.; Cacioppo, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Goossens’ (in press) review nicely maps the progression of scientific research from its early focus on loneliness as a dysphoric state that results from the discrepancy between a person's ideal and actual social relationships to its current emphasis on the centrality of loneliness to our very nature as a social species, and he argues that developmental science throughout Europe has a great deal to contribute to our understanding of this construct. He concludes that psychologists should care about research on loneliness for five reasons: (i) it is a well-defined phenotype, (ii) it shows both high stability and individual differences in rates of change across years, (iii) it has adaptive value and evolutionary significance, (iv) it has a genetic substrate that is moderated by social environments, and (v) it has self-maintaining features that can lead to adverse mental health outcomes. Goossen's (2012) review is rife with information and ideas. We focus here on two additional important reasons and on the phenotype of loneliness. PMID:23024688

  19. Quantification of Microbial Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Verónica S.; Krömer, Jens O.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolite profiling technologies have improved to generate close to quantitative metabolomics data, which can be employed to quantitatively describe the metabolic phenotype of an organism. Here, we review the current technologies available for quantitative metabolomics, present their advantages and drawbacks, and the current challenges to generate fully quantitative metabolomics data. Metabolomics data can be integrated into metabolic networks using thermodynamic principles to constrain the directionality of reactions. Here we explain how to estimate Gibbs energy under physiological conditions, including examples of the estimations, and the different methods for thermodynamics-based network analysis. The fundamentals of the methods and how to perform the analyses are described. Finally, an example applying quantitative metabolomics to a yeast model by 13C fluxomics and thermodynamics-based network analysis is presented. The example shows that (1) these two methods are complementary to each other; and (2) there is a need to take into account Gibbs energy errors. Better estimations of metabolic phenotypes will be obtained when further constraints are included in the analysis. PMID:27941694

  20. From Phenotype to Genotype

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The progress in phenotype descriptions, measurements, and analyses has been remarkable in the last 50 years. Biomarkers (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, hormones, various RNAs and cDNAs, microarrays) have been discovered and correlated with diseases and disorders, as well as physiological responses to disease, injury, stress, within blood, urine, and saliva. Three-dimensional digital imaging advanced how we “see” and utilize phenotypes toward diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. In each example, scientific discovery led to inform clinical health care. In tandem, genetics evolved from Mendelian inheritance (single gene mutations) to include Complex Human Diseases (multiple gene-gene and gene-environment interactions). In addition, epigenetics blossomed with new insights about gene modifiers (e.g., histone and non-histone chromosomal protein methylation, acetylation, sulfation, phosphorylation). We are now at the beginning of a new era using human and microbial whole-genome sequencing to make significant healthcare decisions as to risk, stratification of patients, diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes. Are we as clinicians, scientists, and educators prepared to expand our scope of practice, knowledge base, integration into primary health care (medicine, pharmacy, nursing, and allied health science professions), and clinical approaches to craniofacial-oral-dental health care? The time is now. PMID:24799423

  1. Phenotypic approaches to drought in cassava: review.

    PubMed

    Okogbenin, Emmanuel; Setter, Tim L; Ferguson, Morag; Mutegi, Rose; Ceballos, Hernan; Olasanmi, Bunmi; Fregene, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Cassava is an important crop in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Cassava can be produced adequately in drought conditions making it the ideal food security crop in marginal environments. Although cassava can tolerate drought stress, it can be genetically improved to enhance productivity in such environments. Drought adaptation studies in over three decades in cassava have identified relevant mechanisms which have been explored in conventional breeding. Drought is a quantitative trait and its multigenic nature makes it very challenging to effectively manipulate and combine genes in breeding for rapid genetic gain and selection process. Cassava has a long growth cycle of 12-18 months which invariably contributes to a long breeding scheme for the crop. Modern breeding using advances in genomics and improved genotyping, is facilitating the dissection and genetic analysis of complex traits including drought tolerance, thus helping to better elucidate and understand the genetic basis of such traits. A beneficial goal of new innovative breeding strategies is to shorten the breeding cycle using minimized, efficient or fast phenotyping protocols. While high throughput genotyping have been achieved, this is rarely the case for phenotyping for drought adaptation. Some of the storage root phenotyping in cassava are often done very late in the evaluation cycle making selection process very slow. This paper highlights some modified traits suitable for early-growth phase phenotyping that may be used to reduce drought phenotyping cycle in cassava. Such modified traits can significantly complement the high throughput genotyping procedures to fast track breeding of improved drought tolerant varieties. The need for metabolite profiling, improved phenomics to take advantage of next generation sequencing technologies and high throughput phenotyping are basic steps for future direction to improve genetic gain and maximize speed for drought tolerance breeding.

  2. Phenotypic approaches to drought in cassava: review

    PubMed Central

    Okogbenin, Emmanuel; Setter, Tim L.; Ferguson, Morag; Mutegi, Rose; Ceballos, Hernan; Olasanmi, Bunmi; Fregene, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Cassava is an important crop in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Caribbean. Cassava can be produced adequately in drought conditions making it the ideal food security crop in marginal environments. Although cassava can tolerate drought stress, it can be genetically improved to enhance productivity in such environments. Drought adaptation studies in over three decades in cassava have identified relevant mechanisms which have been explored in conventional breeding. Drought is a quantitative trait and its multigenic nature makes it very challenging to effectively manipulate and combine genes in breeding for rapid genetic gain and selection process. Cassava has a long growth cycle of 12–18 months which invariably contributes to a long breeding scheme for the crop. Modern breeding using advances in genomics and improved genotyping, is facilitating the dissection and genetic analysis of complex traits including drought tolerance, thus helping to better elucidate and understand the genetic basis of such traits. A beneficial goal of new innovative breeding strategies is to shorten the breeding cycle using minimized, efficient or fast phenotyping protocols. While high throughput genotyping have been achieved, this is rarely the case for phenotyping for drought adaptation. Some of the storage root phenotyping in cassava are often done very late in the evaluation cycle making selection process very slow. This paper highlights some modified traits suitable for early-growth phase phenotyping that may be used to reduce drought phenotyping cycle in cassava. Such modified traits can significantly complement the high throughput genotyping procedures to fast track breeding of improved drought tolerant varieties. The need for metabolite profiling, improved phenomics to take advantage of next generation sequencing technologies and high throughput phenotyping are basic steps for future direction to improve genetic gain and maximize speed for drought tolerance breeding. PMID

  3. Cancer cells exhibit clonal diversity in phenotypic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity in cancers is associated with invasive progression and drug resistance. This heterogeneity arises in part from the ability of cancer cells to switch between phenotypic states, but the dynamics of this cellular plasticity remain poorly understood. Here we apply DNA barcodes to quantify and track phenotypic plasticity across hundreds of clones in a population of cancer cells exhibiting epithelial or mesenchymal differentiation phenotypes. We find that the epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell ratio is highly variable across the different clones in cancer cell populations, but remains stable for many generations within the progeny of any single clone—with a heritability of 0.89. To estimate the effects of combination therapies on phenotypically heterogeneous tumours, we generated quantitative simulations incorporating empirical data from our barcoding experiments. These analyses indicated that combination therapies which alternate between epithelial- and mesenchymal-specific treatments eventually select for clones with increased phenotypic plasticity. However, this selection could be minimized by increasing the frequency of alternation between treatments, identifying designs that may minimize selection for increased phenotypic plasticity. These findings establish new insights into phenotypic plasticity in cancer, and suggest design principles for optimizing the effectiveness of combination therapies for phenotypically heterogeneous tumours. PMID:28202626

  4. Cancer cells exhibit clonal diversity in phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Robert Austin; Sokol, Ethan S; Gupta, Piyush B

    2017-02-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity in cancers is associated with invasive progression and drug resistance. This heterogeneity arises in part from the ability of cancer cells to switch between phenotypic states, but the dynamics of this cellular plasticity remain poorly understood. Here we apply DNA barcodes to quantify and track phenotypic plasticity across hundreds of clones in a population of cancer cells exhibiting epithelial or mesenchymal differentiation phenotypes. We find that the epithelial-to-mesenchymal cell ratio is highly variable across the different clones in cancer cell populations, but remains stable for many generations within the progeny of any single clone-with a heritability of 0.89. To estimate the effects of combination therapies on phenotypically heterogeneous tumours, we generated quantitative simulations incorporating empirical data from our barcoding experiments. These analyses indicated that combination therapies which alternate between epithelial- and mesenchymal-specific treatments eventually select for clones with increased phenotypic plasticity. However, this selection could be minimized by increasing the frequency of alternation between treatments, identifying designs that may minimize selection for increased phenotypic plasticity. These findings establish new insights into phenotypic plasticity in cancer, and suggest design principles for optimizing the effectiveness of combination therapies for phenotypically heterogeneous tumours.

  5. The Genetic Basis of Mendelian Phenotypes: Discoveries, Challenges, and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Jessica X.; Buckingham, Kati J.; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Boehm, Corinne; Sobreira, Nara; Smith, Joshua D.; Harrell, Tanya M.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Gambin, Tomasz; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep H.; Doheny, Kimberly; Scott, Alan F.; Avramopoulos, Dimitri; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Mathews, Debra; Witmer, P. Dane; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt; Watkins, Lee; Patterson, Karynne E.; Reinier, Frederic; Blue, Elizabeth; Muzny, Donna; Kircher, Martin; Bilguvar, Kaya; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Sutton, V. Reid; Tabor, Holly K.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Gunel, Murat; Mane, Shrikant; Gibbs, Richard A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hamosh, Ada; Shendure, Jay; Lupski, James R.; Lifton, Richard P.; Valle, David; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Discovering the genetic basis of a Mendelian phenotype establishes a causal link between genotype and phenotype, making possible carrier and population screening and direct diagnosis. Such discoveries also contribute to our knowledge of gene function, gene regulation, development, and biological mechanisms that can be used for developing new therapeutics. As of February 2015, 2,937 genes underlying 4,163 Mendelian phenotypes have been discovered, but the genes underlying ∼50% (i.e., 3,152) of all known Mendelian phenotypes are still unknown, and many more Mendelian conditions have yet to be recognized. This is a formidable gap in biomedical knowledge. Accordingly, in December 2011, the NIH established the Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMGs) to provide the collaborative framework and infrastructure necessary for undertaking large-scale whole-exome sequencing and discovery of the genetic variants responsible for Mendelian phenotypes. In partnership with 529 investigators from 261 institutions in 36 countries, the CMGs assessed 18,863 samples from 8,838 families representing 579 known and 470 novel Mendelian phenotypes as of January 2015. This collaborative effort has identified 956 genes, including 375 not previously associated with human health, that underlie a Mendelian phenotype. These results provide insight into study design and analytical strategies, identify novel mechanisms of disease, and reveal the extensive clinical variability of Mendelian phenotypes. Discovering the gene underlying every Mendelian phenotype will require tackling challenges such as worldwide ascertainment and phenotypic characterization of families affected by Mendelian conditions, improvement in sequencing and analytical techniques, and pervasive sharing of phenotypic and genomic data among researchers, clinicians, and families. PMID:26166479

  6. The Genetic Basis of Mendelian Phenotypes: Discoveries, Challenges, and Opportunities.

    PubMed

    Chong, Jessica X; Buckingham, Kati J; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Boehm, Corinne; Sobreira, Nara; Smith, Joshua D; Harrell, Tanya M; McMillin, Margaret J; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Gambin, Tomasz; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep H; Doheny, Kimberly; Scott, Alan F; Avramopoulos, Dimitri; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Mathews, Debra; Witmer, P Dane; Ling, Hua; Hetrick, Kurt; Watkins, Lee; Patterson, Karynne E; Reinier, Frederic; Blue, Elizabeth; Muzny, Donna; Kircher, Martin; Bilguvar, Kaya; López-Giráldez, Francesc; Sutton, V Reid; Tabor, Holly K; Leal, Suzanne M; Gunel, Murat; Mane, Shrikant; Gibbs, Richard A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hamosh, Ada; Shendure, Jay; Lupski, James R; Lifton, Richard P; Valle, David; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J

    2015-08-06

    Discovering the genetic basis of a Mendelian phenotype establishes a causal link between genotype and phenotype, making possible carrier and population screening and direct diagnosis. Such discoveries also contribute to our knowledge of gene function, gene regulation, development, and biological mechanisms that can be used for developing new therapeutics. As of February 2015, 2,937 genes underlying 4,163 Mendelian phenotypes have been discovered, but the genes underlying ∼50% (i.e., 3,152) of all known Mendelian phenotypes are still unknown, and many more Mendelian conditions have yet to be recognized. This is a formidable gap in biomedical knowledge. Accordingly, in December 2011, the NIH established the Centers for Mendelian Genomics (CMGs) to provide the collaborative framework and infrastructure necessary for undertaking large-scale whole-exome sequencing and discovery of the genetic variants responsible for Mendelian phenotypes. In partnership with 529 investigators from 261 institutions in 36 countries, the CMGs assessed 18,863 samples from 8,838 families representing 579 known and 470 novel Mendelian phenotypes as of January 2015. This collaborative effort has identified 956 genes, including 375 not previously associated with human health, that underlie a Mendelian phenotype. These results provide insight into study design and analytical strategies, identify novel mechanisms of disease, and reveal the extensive clinical variability of Mendelian phenotypes. Discovering the gene underlying every Mendelian phenotype will require tackling challenges such as worldwide ascertainment and phenotypic characterization of families affected by Mendelian conditions, improvement in sequencing and analytical techniques, and pervasive sharing of phenotypic and genomic data among researchers, clinicians, and families.

  7. Cation-poor complex metallic alloys in Ba(Eu)–Au–Al(Ga) systems: Identifying the keys that control structural arrangements and atom distributions at the atomic level

    DOE PAGES

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Steinberg, Simon; Mudryk, Yaroslav; ...

    2015-10-19

    Four complex intermetallic compounds BaAu6±xGa6±y (x = 1, y = 0.9) (I), BaAu6±xAl6±y (x = 0.9, y = 0.6) (II), EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III), and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV) have been synthesized, and their structures and homogeneity ranges have been determined by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. Whereas I and II originate from the NaZn13-type structure (cF104–112, Fm3C), III (tP52, P4/nbm) is derived from the tetragonal Ce2Ni17Si9-type, and IV (oP104, Pbcm) crystallizes in a new orthorhombic structure type. Both I and II feature formally anionic networks with completely mixed site occupation by Au and triel (Tr = Al, Ga) atoms, while a successivemore » decrease of local symmetry from the parental structures of I and II to III and, ultimately, to IV correlates with increasing separation of Au and Tr on individual crystallographic sites. Density functional theory-based calculations were employed to determine the crystallographic site preferences of Au and the respective triel element to elucidate reasons for the atom distribution (“coloring scheme”). Chemical bonding analyses for two different “EuAu6Tr6” models reveal maximization of the number of heteroatomic Au–Tr bonds as the driving force for atom organization. The Fermi levels fall in broad pseudogaps for both models allowing some electronic flexibility. Spin-polarized band structure calculations on the “EuAu6Tr6” models hint to singlet ground states for europium and long-range magnetic coupling for both EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III) and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV). This is substantiated by experimental evidence because both compounds show nearly identical magnetic behavior with ferromagnetic transitions at TC = 6 K and net magnetic moments of 7.35 μB/f.u. at 2 K. As a result, the effective moments of 8.3 μB/f.u., determined from Curie–Weiss fits, point to divalent oxidation states for europium in both III and IV.« less

  8. Phenotypic Signatures Arising from Unbalanced Bacterial Growth

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cheemeng; Smith, Robert Phillip; Tsai, Ming-Chi; Schwartz, Russell; You, Lingchong

    2014-01-01

    Fluctuations in the growth rate of a bacterial culture during unbalanced growth are generally considered undesirable in quantitative studies of bacterial physiology. Under well-controlled experimental conditions, however, these fluctuations are not random but instead reflect the interplay between intra-cellular networks underlying bacterial growth and the growth environment. Therefore, these fluctuations could be considered quantitative phenotypes of the bacteria under a specific growth condition. Here, we present a method to identifyphenotypic signatures” by time-frequency analysis of unbalanced growth curves measured with high temporal resolution. The signatures are then applied to differentiate amongst different bacterial strains or the same strain under different growth conditions, and to identify the essential architecture of the gene network underlying the observed growth dynamics. Our method has implications for both basic understanding of bacterial physiology and for the classification of bacterial strains. PMID:25101949

  9. Phenotyping maize for adaptation to drought

    PubMed Central

    Araus, Jose L.; Serret, María D.; Edmeades, Gregory O.

    2012-01-01

    The need of a better adaptation of crops to drought is an issue of increasing urgency. However, enhancing the tolerance of maize has, therefore, proved to be somewhat elusive in terms of plant breeding. In that context, proper phenotyping remains as one of the main factors limiting breeding advance. Topics covered by this review include the conceptual framework for identifying secondary traits associated with yield response to drought and how to measure these secondary traits in practice. PMID:22934056

  10. Phenotypic variation of erythrocyte linker histone H1.c in a pheasant (Phasianus colchicus L.) population.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Andrzej; Pa Yga, Jan; Górnicka-Michalska, Ewa; Bernacki, Zenon; Adamski, Marek

    2010-07-01

    Our goal was to characterize a phenotypic variation of the pheasant erythrocyte linker histone subtype H1.c. By using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis three histone H1.c phenotypes were identified. The differently migrating allelic variants H1.c1 and H1.c2 formed either two homozygous phenotypes, c1 and c2, or a single heterozygous phenotype, c1c2. In the pheasant population screened, birds with phenotype c2 were the most common (frequency 0.761) while individuals with phenotype c1 were rare (frequency 0.043).

  11. High-throughput mouse phenotyping.

    PubMed

    Gates, Hilary; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Brown, Steve D M

    2011-04-01

    Comprehensive phenotyping will be required to reveal the pleiotropic functions of a gene and to uncover the wider role of genetic loci within diverse biological systems. The challenge will be to devise phenotyping approaches to characterise the thousands of mutants that are being generated as part of international efforts to acquire a mutant for every gene in the mouse genome. In order to acquire robust datasets of broad based phenotypes from mouse mutants it is necessary to design and implement pipelines that incorporate standardised phenotyping platforms that are validated across diverse mouse genetics centres or mouse clinics. We describe here the rationale and methodology behind one phenotyping pipeline, EMPReSSslim, that was designed as part of the work of the EUMORPHIA and EUMODIC consortia, and which exemplifies some of the challenges facing large-scale phenotyping. EMPReSSslim captures a broad range of data on diverse biological systems, from biochemical to physiological amongst others. Data capture and dissemination is pivotal to the operation of large-scale phenotyping pipelines, including the definition of parameters integral to each phenotyping test and the associated ontological descriptions. EMPReSSslim data is displayed within the EuroPhenome database, where a variety of tools are available to allow the user to search for interesting biological or clinical phenotypes.

  12. EHR Big Data Deep Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Lenert, L.; Lopez-Campos, G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives Given the quickening speed of discovery of variant disease drivers from combined patient genotype and phenotype data, the objective is to provide methodology using big data technology to support the definition of deep phenotypes in medical records. Methods As the vast stores of genomic information increase with next generation sequencing, the importance of deep phenotyping increases. The growth of genomic data and adoption of Electronic Health Records (EHR) in medicine provides a unique opportunity to integrate phenotype and genotype data into medical records. The method by which collections of clinical findings and other health related data are leveraged to form meaningful phenotypes is an active area of research. Longitudinal data stored in EHRs provide a wealth of information that can be used to construct phenotypes of patients. We focus on a practical problem around data integration for deep phenotype identification within EHR data. The use of big data approaches are described that enable scalable markup of EHR events that can be used for semantic and temporal similarity analysis to support the identification of phenotype and genotype relationships. Conclusions Stead and colleagues’ 2005 concept of using light standards to increase the productivity of software systems by riding on the wave of hardware/processing power is described as a harbinger for designing future healthcare systems. The big data solution, using flexible markup, provides a route to improved utilization of processing power for organizing patient records in genotype and phenotype research. PMID:25123744

  13. Use of Arrott plots to identify Néel temperature (T{sub N}) in metamagnetic Ni{sub 48}Co{sub 6}Mn{sub 26}Al{sub 20} polycrystalline ribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Rohit; Kumar Srivastava, Saurabh; Chatterjee, Ratnamala E-mail: rmala@physics.iitd.ac.in; Nigam, Arun K.; Khovaylo, Vladimir V.; Varga, Lajos K.

    2013-12-28

    (Ni{sub 48}Co{sub 6})Mn{sub 26}Al{sub 20} polycrystalline ribbons with B2 structure at room temperature are investigated. Considering the presence of competing magnetic interactions, Arrott-plot analysis gives T{sub N} ∼ 170 K. A broad ferromagnetic-paramagnetic transition (T{sub C}) is observed at ∼200 K. H-T phase-diagram is used to validate the presence of competing exchange interactions that persist till very close to T{sub C}. Based on Néel theory, a cluster model is used to explain the presence of ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic clusters in the sample. Formation of ferromagnetic clusters can be understood in terms of positive exchange interactions among the Mn atoms that are neighboring Co atoms located at Ni sites.

  14. Cation-poor complex metallic alloys in Ba(Eu)–Au–Al(Ga) systems: Identifying the keys that control structural arrangements and atom distributions at the atomic level

    SciTech Connect

    Smetana, Volodymyr; Steinberg, Simon; Mudryk, Yaroslav; Pecharsky, Vitalij; Miller, Gordon J.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-10-19

    Four complex intermetallic compounds BaAu6±xGa6±y (x = 1, y = 0.9) (I), BaAu6±xAl6±y (x = 0.9, y = 0.6) (II), EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III), and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV) have been synthesized, and their structures and homogeneity ranges have been determined by single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction. Whereas I and II originate from the NaZn13-type structure (cF104–112, Fm3C), III (tP52, P4/nbm) is derived from the tetragonal Ce2Ni17Si9-type, and IV (oP104, Pbcm) crystallizes in a new orthorhombic structure type. Both I and II feature formally anionic networks with completely mixed site occupation by Au and triel (Tr = Al, Ga) atoms, while a successive decrease of local symmetry from the parental structures of I and II to III and, ultimately, to IV correlates with increasing separation of Au and Tr on individual crystallographic sites. Density functional theory-based calculations were employed to determine the crystallographic site preferences of Au and the respective triel element to elucidate reasons for the atom distribution (“coloring scheme”). Chemical bonding analyses for two different “EuAu6Tr6” models reveal maximization of the number of heteroatomic Au–Tr bonds as the driving force for atom organization. The Fermi levels fall in broad pseudogaps for both models allowing some electronic flexibility. Spin-polarized band structure calculations on the “EuAu6Tr6” models hint to singlet ground states for europium and long-range magnetic coupling for both EuAu6.2Ga5.8 (III) and EuAu6.1Al5.9 (IV). This is substantiated by experimental evidence because both compounds show nearly identical magnetic behavior with ferromagnetic transitions at TC = 6 K and net magnetic moments of 7.35 μB/f.u. at 2 K. As a result, the effective moments

  15. Association Tests of Multiple Phenotypes: ATeMP

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xiaobo; Li, Yixi; Ding, Xiaohu; He, Mingguang; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Joint analysis of multiple phenotypes has gained growing attention in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), especially for the analysis of multiple intermediate phenotypes which measure the same underlying complex human disorder. One of the multivariate methods, MultiPhen (O’ Reilly et al. 2012), employs the proportional odds model to regress a genotype on multiple phenotypes, hence ignoring the phenotypic distributions. Despite the flexibilities of MultiPhen, the properties and performance of MultiPhen are not well understood, especially when the phenotypic distributions are non-normal. In fact, it is well known in the statistical literature that the estimation is attenuated when the explanatory variables contain measurement errors. In this study, we first established an equivalence relationship between MultiPhen and the generalized Kendall tau association test, shedding light on why MultiPhen can perform well for joint association analysis of multiple phenotypes. Through the equivalence, we show that MultiPhen may lose power when the phenotypes are non-normal. To maintain the power, we propose two solutions (ATeMP-rn and ATeMP-or) to improve MultiPhen, and demonstrate their effectiveness through extensive simulation studies and a real case study from the Guangzhou Twin Eye Study. PMID:26479245

  16. Association Tests of Multiple Phenotypes: ATeMP.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaobo; Li, Yixi; Ding, Xiaohu; He, Mingguang; Wang, Xueqin; Zhang, Heping

    2015-01-01

    Joint analysis of multiple phenotypes has gained growing attention in genome-wide association studies (GWASs), especially for the analysis of multiple intermediate phenotypes which measure the same underlying complex human disorder. One of the multivariate methods, MultiPhen (O' Reilly et al. 2012), employs the proportional odds model to regress a genotype on multiple phenotypes, hence ignoring the phenotypic distributions. Despite the flexibilities of MultiPhen, the properties and performance of MultiPhen are not well understood, especially when the phenotypic distributions are non-normal. In fact, it is well known in the statistical literature that the estimation is attenuated when the explanatory variables contain measurement errors. In this study, we first established an equivalence relationship between MultiPhen and the generalized Kendall tau association test, shedding light on why MultiPhen can perform well for joint association analysis of multiple phenotypes. Through the equivalence, we show that MultiPhen may lose power when the phenotypes are non-normal. To maintain the power, we propose two solutions (ATeMP-rn and ATeMP-or) to improve MultiPhen, and demonstrate their effectiveness through extensive simulation studies and a real case study from the Guangzhou Twin Eye Study.

  17. Large-scale Phenotypic Profiling of Gene Deletion Mutants in Candida glabrata

    PubMed Central

    Tscherner, Michael; Kuchler, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Here, we describe a method enabling the phenotypic profiling of genome-scale deletion collections of fungal mutants to detect phenotypes for various stress conditions. These stress conditions include among many others antifungal drug susceptibility, temperature-induced and osmotic as well as heavy metal or oxidative stress. The protocol was extensively used to phenotype a collection of gene deletion mutants in the human fungal pathogen Candida glabrata (C. glabrata) (Schwarzmüller et al., 2014). PMID:27774498

  18. Developing Wide-Spectrum Antiproteotoxicity Agents to Treat ALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    phenotypes in C. elegans and mouse models of ALS. Progress Report Wang, Jiou 5 Overview: In this Aim, we hypothesize that increased HSF -1...2009a; Wang et al., 2009b). In a related finding, a reduction in HSF -1 activity dramatically precipitated neuronal toxicity in TDP-43 transgenic C...Fiesel et al., 2010; Sephton et al., 2010; Wu et al., 2010). Previously, we made an observation of genetic interaction between TDP-43 and HSF -1

  19. Plant Phenotype Characterization System

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

    2005-09-09

    This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

  20. Intrinsic Membrane Hyperexcitability of ALS Patient-Derived Motor Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wainger, Brian J.; Kiskinis, Evangelos; Mellin, Cassidy; Wiskow, Ole; Han, Steve S.W.; Sandoe, Jackson; Perez, Numa P.; Williams, Luis A.; Lee, Seungkyu; Boulting, Gabriella; Berry, James D.; Brown, Robert H.; Cudkowicz, Merit E.; Bean, Bruce P.; Eggan, Kevin; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease of the motor nervous system. We show using multi-electrode array and patch clamp recordings that hyperexcitability detected by clinical neurophysiological studies of ALS patients is recapitulated in induced pluripotent stem cell-derived motor neurons from ALS patients harboring superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), C9orf72 and fused-in-sarcoma mutations. Motor neurons produced from a genetically corrected, but otherwise isogenic, SOD1+/+ stem cell line do not display the hyperexcitability phenotype. SOD1A4V/+ ALS patient-derived motor neurons have reduced delayed-rectifier potassium current amplitudes relative to control-derived motor neurons, a deficit that may underlie their hyperexcitability. The Kv7 channel activator retigabine both blocks the hyperexcitability and improves motor neuron survival in vitro when tested in SOD1 mutant ALS cases. Therefore, electrophysiological characterization of human stem cell-derived neurons can reveal disease-related mechanisms and identify therapeutic candidates. PMID:24703839

  1. Bronchiectasis: Phenotyping a Complex Disease.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, James D

    2017-03-15

    Bronchiectasis is a long-neglected disease currently experiencing a surge in interest. It is a highly complex condition with numerous aetiologies, co-morbidities and a heterogeneous disease presentation and clinical course. The past few years have seen major advances in our understanding of the disease, primarily through large real-life cohort studies. The main outcomes of interest in bronchiectasis are symptoms, exacerbations, treatment response, disease progression and death. We are now more able to identify clearly the radiological, clinical, microbiological and inflammatory contributors to these outcomes. Over the past couple of years, multidimensional scoring systems such as the Bronchiectasis Severity Index have been introduced to predict disease severity and mortality. Although there are currently no licensed therapies for bronchiectasis, an increasing number of clinical trials are planned or ongoing. While this emerging evidence is awaited, bronchiectasis guidelines will continue to be informed largely by real-life evidence from observational studies and patient registries. Key developments in the bronchiectasis field include the establishment of international disease registries and characterisation of disease phenotypes using cluster analysis and biological data.

  2. Global phenotypic characterization of bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Bochner, Barry R

    2009-01-01

    The measure of the quality of a systems biology model is how well it can reproduce and predict the behaviors of a biological system such as a microbial cell. In recent years, these models have been built up in layers, and each layer has been growing in sophistication and accuracy in parallel with a global data set to challenge and validate the models in predicting the content or activities of genes (genomics), proteins (proteomics), metabolites (metabolomics), and ultimately cell phenotypes (phenomics). This review focuses on the latter, the phenotypes of microbial cells. The development of Phenotype MicroArrays, which attempt to give a global view of cellular phenotypes, is described. In addition to their use in fleshing out and validating systems biology models, there are many other uses of this global phenotyping technology in basic and applied microbiology research, which are also described. PMID:19054113

  3. The 1001 Arabidopsis DNA Methylomes: An Important Resource for Studying Natural Genetic, Epigenetic, and Phenotypic Variation.

    PubMed

    Lang, Zhaobo; Xie, Shaojun; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2016-11-01

    Intraspecific phenotypic diversity is controlled by natural genetic and epigenetic variation. Kawakatsu et al. recently sequenced the DNA methylomes of a global collection of over 1000 Arabidopsis accessions, and have thereby provided a comprehensive resource for studying natural genetic and epigenetic variation as well as the association of such variation with phenotypic diversity.

  4. Phenotypic Heterogeneity of Monogenic Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Benussi, Alberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a genetically and pathologically heterogeneous disorder characterized by personality changes, language impairment, and deficits of executive functions associated with frontal and temporal lobe degeneration. Different phenotypes have been defined on the basis of presenting clinical symptoms, i.e., the behavioral variant of FTD, the agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia, and the semantic variant of PPA. Some patients have an associated movement disorder, either parkinsonism, as in progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal syndrome, or motor neuron disease (FTD–MND). A family history of dementia is found in 40% of cases of FTD and about 10% have a clear autosomal-dominant inheritance. Genetic studies have identified several genes associated with monogenic FTD: microtubule-associated protein tau, progranulin, TAR DNA-binding protein 43, valosin-containing protein, charged multivesicular body protein 2B, fused in sarcoma, and the hexanucleotide repeat expansion in intron 1 of the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72. Patients often present with an extensive phenotypic variability, even among different members of the same kindred carrying an identical disease mutation. The objective of the present work is to review and evaluate available literature data in order to highlight recent advances in clinical, biological, and neuroimaging features of monogenic frontotemporal lobar degeneration and try to identify different mechanisms underlying the extreme phenotypic heterogeneity that characterizes this disease. PMID:26388768

  5. Mixture model for sub-phenotyping in GWAS.

    PubMed

    Warde-Farley, David; Brudno, Michael; Morris, Quaid; Goldenberg, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Genome Wide Association (GWA) studies resulted in discovery of genetic variants underlying several complex diseases including Chron's disease and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Still geneticists find that in majority of studies the size of the effect even if it is significant tends to be very small. There are several factors contributing to this problem such as rare variants, complex relationships among SNPs (epistatic effect), and heterogeneity of the phenotype. In this work we focus on addressing phenotypic heterogeneity. We introduce the problem of identifying, from GWAS data, separate genotypic markers from overlapping mixtures of clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. We propose a generative model for this scenario and derive an expectation-maximization (EM) procedure to fit the model to data, as well as a novel screening procedure designed to identify skew specific to certain phenotypic regimes. We present results on several simulated datasets as well as preliminary findings in applying the model to type 2 diabetes dataset.

  6. On identified predictive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bialasiewicz, Jan T.

    1993-01-01

    Self-tuning control algorithms are potential successors to manually tuned PID controllers traditionally used in process control applications. A very attractive design method for self-tuning controllers, which has been developed over recent years, is the long-range predictive control (LRPC). The success of LRPC is due to its effectiveness with plants of unknown order and dead-time which may be simultaneously nonminimum phase and unstable or have multiple lightly damped poles (as in the case of flexible structures or flexible robot arms). LRPC is a receding horizon strategy and can be, in general terms, summarized as follows. Using assumed long-range (or multi-step) cost function the optimal control law is found in terms of unknown parameters of the predictor model of the process, current input-output sequence, and future reference signal sequence. The common approach is to assume that the input-output process model is known or separately identified and then to find the parameters of the predictor model. Once these are known, the optimal control law determines control signal at the current time t which is applied at the process input and the whole procedure is repeated at the next time instant. Most of the recent research in this field is apparently centered around the LRPC formulation developed by Clarke et al., known as generalized predictive control (GPC). GPC uses ARIMAX/CARIMA model of the process in its input-output formulation. In this paper, the GPC formulation is used but the process predictor model is derived from the state space formulation of the ARIMAX model and is directly identified over the receding horizon, i.e., using current input-output sequence. The underlying technique in the design of identified predictive control (IPC) algorithm is the identification algorithm of observer/Kalman filter Markov parameters developed by Juang et al. at NASA Langley Research Center and successfully applied to identification of flexible structures.

  7. Exome sequencing reveals VCP mutations as a cause of familial ALS

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Janel O.; Mandrioli, Jessica; Benatar, Michael; Abramzon, Yevgeniya; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Trojanowski, John Q.; Gibbs, J Raphael; Brunetti, Maura; Gronka, Susan; Wuu, Joanne; Ding, Jinhui; McCluskey, Leo; Martinez-Lage, Maria; Falcone, Dana; Hernandez, Dena G.; Arepalli, Sampath; Chong, Sean; Schymick, Jennifer C.; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Landi, Francesco; Wang, Michael; Calvo, Andrea; Mora, Gabriele; Sabatelli, Mario; Monsurrò, Maria Rosaria; Battistini, Stefania; Salvi, Fabrizio; Spataro, Rossella; Sola, Patrizia; Borghero, Giuseppe; Galassi, Giuliana; Scholz, Sonja W.; Taylor, J. Paul; Restagno, Gabriella; Chiò, Adriano; Traynor, Bryan J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Using exome sequencing, we identified a p.R191Q amino acid change in the valosin-containing protein (VCP) gene in an Italian family with autosomal dominantly inherited amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutations in VCP have previously been identified in families with Inclusion Body Myopathy, Paget’s disease and Frontotemporal Dementia (IBMPFD). Screening of VCP in a cohort of 210 familial ALS cases and 78 autopsy-proven ALS cases identified four additional mutations including a p.R155H mutation in a pathologically-proven case of ALS. VCP protein is essential for maturation of ubiquitin-containing autophagosomes, and mutant VCP toxicity is partially mediated through its effect on TDP-43 protein, a major constituent of ubiquitin inclusions that neuropathologically characterize ALS. Our data broaden the phenotype of IBMPFD to include motor neuron degeneration, suggest that VCP mutations may account for ~1–2% of familial ALS, and represent the first evidence directly implicating defects in the ubiquitination/protein degradation pathway in motor neuron degeneration. PMID:21145000

  8. Identification and outcomes of clinical phenotypes in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease: Australian National Motor Neuron Disease observational cohort

    PubMed Central

    Talman, Paul; Duong, Thi; Vucic, Steve; Mathers, Susan; Venkatesh, Svetha; Henderson, Robert; Rowe, Dominic; Schultz, David; Edis, Robert; Needham, Merrilee; Macdonnell, Richard; McCombe, Pamela; Birks, Carol; Kiernan, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Objective To capture the clinical patterns, timing of key milestones and survival of patients presenting with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease (ALS/MND) within Australia. Methods Data were prospectively collected and were timed to normal clinical assessments. An initial registration clinical report form (CRF) and subsequent ongoing assessment CRFs were submitted with a completion CRF at the time of death. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Participants 1834 patients with a diagnosis of ALS/MND were registered and followed in ALS/MND clinics between 2005 and 2015. Results 5 major clinical phenotypes were determined and included ALS bulbar onset, ALS cervical onset and ALS lumbar onset, flail arm and leg and primary lateral sclerosis (PLS). Of the 1834 registered patients, 1677 (90%) could be allocated a clinical phenotype. ALS bulbar onset had a significantly lower length of survival when compared with all other clinical phenotypes (p<0.004). There were delays in the median time to diagnosis of up to 12 months for the ALS phenotypes, 18 months for the flail limb phenotypes and 19 months for PLS. Riluzole treatment was started in 78–85% of cases. The median delays in initiating riluzole therapy, from symptom onset, varied from 10 to 12 months in the ALS phenotypes and 15–18 months in the flail limb phenotypes. Percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy was implemented in 8–36% of ALS phenotypes and 2–9% of the flail phenotypes. Non-invasive ventilation was started in 16–22% of ALS phenotypes and 21–29% of flail phenotypes. Conclusions The establishment of a cohort registry for ALS/MND is able to determine clinical phenotypes, survival and monitor time to key milestones in disease progression. It is intended to expand the cohort to a more population-based registry using opt-out methodology and facilitate data linkage to other national registries. PMID:27694488

  9. Genomic Analysis of the Opi− Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Leandria C.; Behta, Ryan P.; Lopes, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Most of the phospholipid biosynthetic genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are coordinately regulated in response to inositol and choline. Inositol affects the intracellular levels of phosphatidic acid (PA). Opi1p is a repressor of the phospholipid biosynthetic genes and specifically binds PA in the endoplasmic reticulum. In the presence of inositol, PA levels decrease, releasing Opi1p into the nucleus where it represses transcription. The opi1 mutant overproduces and excretes inositol into the growth medium in the absence of inositol and choline (Opi− phenotype). To better understand the mechanism of Opi1p repression, the viable yeast deletion set was screened to identify Opi− mutants. In total, 89 Opi− mutants were identified, of which 7 were previously known to have the Opi− phenotype. The Opi− mutant collection included genes with roles in phospholipid biosynthesis, transcription, protein processing/synthesis, and protein trafficking. Included in this set were all nonessential components of the NuA4 HAT complex and six proteins in the Rpd3p–Sin3p HDAC complex. It has previously been shown that defects in phosphatidylcholine synthesis (cho2 and opi3) yield the Opi− phenotype because of a buildup of PA. However, in this case the Opi− phenotype is conditional because PA can be shuttled through a salvage pathway (Kennedy pathway) by adding choline to the growth medium. Seven new mutants present in the Opi− collection (fun26, kex1, nup84, tps1, mrpl38, mrpl49, and opi10/yol032w) were also suppressed by choline, suggesting that these affect PC synthesis. Regulation in response to inositol is also coordinated with the unfolded protein response (UPR). Consistent with this, several Opi− mutants were found to affect the UPR (yhi9, ede1, and vps74). PMID:16582425

  10. Length of normal alleles of C9ORF72 GGGGCC repeat do not influence disease phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Nicola J.; Heckman, Michael G.; DeJesus-Hernandez, Mariely; Baker, Matt C.; Soto-Ortolaza, Alexandra I.; Rayaprolu, Sruti; Stewart, Heather; Finger, Elizabeth; Volkening, Kathryn; Seeley, William W.; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J.; Lomen-Hoerth, Catherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Bigio, Eileen H.; Lippa, Carol; Knopman, David S.; Kretzschmar, Hans A.; Neumann, Manuela; Caselli, Richard J.; White, Charles L.; Mackenzie, Ian R.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Strong, Michael J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Uitti, Ryan J.; Boylan, Kevin; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Ross, Owen A.; Rademakers, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Expansions of the non-coding GGGGCC hexanucleotide repeat in the chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 (C9ORF72) gene were recently identified as the long sought-after cause of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) on chromosome 9p. In this study we aimed to determine whether the length of the normal - unexpanded - allele of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 plays a role in the presentation of disease or affects age at onset in C9ORF72 mutation carriers. We also studied whether the GGGGCC repeat length confers risk or affects age at onset in FTD and ALS patients without C9ORF72 repeat expansions. C9ORF72 genotyping was performed in 580 FTD, 995 ALS and 160 FTD-ALS patients and 1444 controls, leading to the identification of 211 patients with pathogenic C9ORF72 repeat expansions and an accurate quantification of the length of the normal alleles in all patients and controls. No meaningful association between the repeat length of the normal alleles of the GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 and disease phenotype or age at onset was observed in C9ORF72 mutation carriers or non-mutation carriers. PMID:22840558

  11. Cohesin embraces new phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Krantz, Ian D

    2014-01-01

    A new study identifies homozygous missense mutations in SGOL1, which encodes a component of the cohesin complex, in a newly described disorder termed Chronic Atrial and Intestinal Dysrhythmia (CAID) syndrome. These findings implicate cohesin in the regulation of intrinsic cardiac and intestinal rhythm and further expand the growing group of disorders termed the cohesinopathies. PMID:25352100

  12. Sculpturing new muscle phenotypes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babij, P.; Booth, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    Changes in the pattern of muscle activity are followed by new patterns of protein synthesis, both in the contractile elements and in the enzymes of energy metabolism. Although the signal transducers have not been identified, techniques of molecular biology have clearly shown that the adaptive responses are the regulated consequence of differential gene expression.

  13. FTD and ALS: genetic ties that bind.

    PubMed

    Orr, Harry T

    2011-10-20

    Curiously, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), seemingly disparate neurodegenerative disorders, can be inherited together. Two groups (DeJesus-Hernandez et al. and Renton et al.) show that the long sought after ALS/FTD mutation on chromosomal region 9p is a hexanucleotide expansion in C90RF72. These studies, plus a study on X-linked ALS/FTD, provide molecular starting points for identifying pathways that link ALS and FTD pathogenesis.

  14. Spinal Cord Neuronal Precursors Generate Multiple Neuronal Phenotypes in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Anjali J.; Piper, David; Mujtaba, Tahmina; Lucero, Mary T.; Rao, Mahendra S.

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal restricted precursors (NRPs) (Mayer-Proschel et al., 1997) can generate multiple neurotransmitter phenotypes during maturation in culture. Undifferentiated E-NCAM+ (embryonic neural cell adhesion molecule) immunoreactive NRPs are mitotically active and electrically immature, and they express only a subset of neuronal markers. Fully mature cells are postmitotic, process-bearing cells that are neurofilament-M and synaptophysin immunoreactive, and they synthesize and respond to different subsets of neurotransmitter molecules. Mature neurons that synthesize and respond to glycine, glutamate, GABA, dopamine, and acetylcholine can be identified by immunocytochemistry, RT-PCR, and calcium imaging in mass cultures. Individual NRPs also generate heterogeneous progeny as assessed by neurotransmitter response and synthesis, demonstrating the multipotent nature of the precursor cells. Differentiation can be modulated by sonic hedgehog (Shh) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/4 molecules. Shh acts as a mitogen and inhibits differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). BMP-2 and BMP-4, in contrast, inhibit cell division and promote differentiation (including cholinergic differentiation). Thus, a single neuronal precursor cell can differentiate into multiple classes of neurons, and this differentiation can be modulated by environmental signals. PMID:9742154

  15. Finding Our Way through Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Deans, Andrew R.; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Huala, Eva; Anzaldo, Salvatore S.; Ashburner, Michael; Balhoff, James P.; Blackburn, David C.; Blake, Judith A.; Burleigh, J. Gordon; Chanet, Bruno; Cooper, Laurel D.; Courtot, Mélanie; Csösz, Sándor; Cui, Hong; Dahdul, Wasila; Das, Sandip; Dececchi, T. Alexander; Dettai, Agnes; Diogo, Rui; Druzinsky, Robert E.; Dumontier, Michel; Franz, Nico M.; Friedrich, Frank; Gkoutos, George V.; Haendel, Melissa; Harmon, Luke J.; Hayamizu, Terry F.; He, Yongqun; Hines, Heather M.; Ibrahim, Nizar; Jackson, Laura M.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; James-Zorn, Christina; Köhler, Sebastian; Lecointre, Guillaume; Lapp, Hilmar; Lawrence, Carolyn J.; Le Novère, Nicolas; Lundberg, John G.; Macklin, James; Mast, Austin R.; Midford, Peter E.; Mikó, István; Mungall, Christopher J.; Oellrich, Anika; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Parkinson, Helen; Ramírez, Martín J.; Richter, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.; Ruttenberg, Alan; Schulz, Katja S.; Segerdell, Erik; Seltmann, Katja C.; Sharkey, Michael J.; Smith, Aaron D.; Smith, Barry; Specht, Chelsea D.; Squires, R. Burke; Thacker, Robert W.; Thessen, Anne; Fernandez-Triana, Jose; Vihinen, Mauno; Vize, Peter D.; Vogt, Lars; Wall, Christine E.; Walls, Ramona L.; Westerfeld, Monte; Wharton, Robert A.; Wirkner, Christian S.; Woolley, James B.; Yoder, Matthew J.; Zorn, Aaron M.; Mabee, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility. PMID:25562316

  16. Finding our way through phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Deans, Andrew R; Lewis, Suzanna E; Huala, Eva; Anzaldo, Salvatore S; Ashburner, Michael; Balhoff, James P; Blackburn, David C; Blake, Judith A; Burleigh, J Gordon; Chanet, Bruno; Cooper, Laurel D; Courtot, Mélanie; Csösz, Sándor; Cui, Hong; Dahdul, Wasila; Das, Sandip; Dececchi, T Alexander; Dettai, Agnes; Diogo, Rui; Druzinsky, Robert E; Dumontier, Michel; Franz, Nico M; Friedrich, Frank; Gkoutos, George V; Haendel, Melissa; Harmon, Luke J; Hayamizu, Terry F; He, Yongqun; Hines, Heather M; Ibrahim, Nizar; Jackson, Laura M; Jaiswal, Pankaj; James-Zorn, Christina; Köhler, Sebastian; Lecointre, Guillaume; Lapp, Hilmar; Lawrence, Carolyn J; Le Novère, Nicolas; Lundberg, John G; Macklin, James; Mast, Austin R; Midford, Peter E; Mikó, István; Mungall, Christopher J; Oellrich, Anika; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Parkinson, Helen; Ramírez, Martín J; Richter, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N; Ruttenberg, Alan; Schulz, Katja S; Segerdell, Erik; Seltmann, Katja C; Sharkey, Michael J; Smith, Aaron D; Smith, Barry; Specht, Chelsea D; Squires, R Burke; Thacker, Robert W; Thessen, Anne; Fernandez-Triana, Jose; Vihinen, Mauno; Vize, Peter D; Vogt, Lars; Wall, Christine E; Walls, Ramona L; Westerfeld, Monte; Wharton, Robert A; Wirkner, Christian S; Woolley, James B; Yoder, Matthew J; Zorn, Aaron M; Mabee, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Despite a large and multifaceted effort to understand the vast landscape of phenotypic data, their current form inhibits productive data analysis. The lack of a community-wide, consensus-based, human- and machine-interpretable language for describing phenotypes and their genomic and environmental contexts is perhaps the most pressing scientific bottleneck to integration across many key fields in biology, including genomics, systems biology, development, medicine, evolution, ecology, and systematics. Here we survey the current phenomics landscape, including data resources and handling, and the progress that has been made to accurately capture relevant data descriptions for phenotypes. We present an example of the kind of integration across domains that computable phenotypes would enable, and we call upon the broader biology community, publishers, and relevant funding agencies to support efforts to surmount today's data barriers and facilitate analytical reproducibility.

  17. Targeting phenotypically tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Ben; Nathan, Carl

    2016-01-01

    While the immune system is credited with averting tuberculosis in billions of individuals exposed to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the immune system is also culpable for tempering the ability of antibiotics to deliver swift and durable cure of disease. In individuals afflicted with tuberculosis, host immunity produces diverse microenvironmental niches that support suboptimal growth, or complete growth arrest, of M. tuberculosis. The physiological state of nonreplication in bacteria is associated with phenotypic drug tolerance. Many of these host microenvironments, when modeled in vitro by carbon starvation, complete nutrient starvation, stationary phase, acidic pH, reactive nitrogen intermediates, hypoxia, biofilms, and withholding streptomycin from the streptomycin-addicted strain SS18b, render M. tuberculosis profoundly tolerant to many of the antibiotics that are given to tuberculosis patients in a clinical setting. Targeting nonreplicating persisters is anticipated to reduce the duration of antibiotic treatment and rate of post-treatment relapse. Some promising drugs to treat tuberculosis, such as rifampicin and bedaquiline, only kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis in vitro at concentrations far greater than their minimal inhibitory concentrations against replicating bacilli. There is an urgent demand to identify which of the currently used antibiotics, and which of the molecules in academic and corporate screening collections, have potent bactericidal action on nonreplicating M. tuberculosis. With this goal, we review methods of high throughput screening to target nonreplicating M. tuberculosis and methods to progress candidate molecules. A classification based on structures and putative targets of molecules that have been reported to kill nonreplicating M. tuberculosis revealed a rich diversity in pharmacophores. However, few of these compounds were tested under conditions that would exclude the impact of adsorbed compound acting during the recovery phase of

  18. Network motifs that stabilize the hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Jia, Dongya; Tripathi, Satyendra; Hanash, Samir; Mani, Sendurai; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    Epithelial to Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and its reverse - MET - are hallmarks of cancer metastasis. While transitioning between E and M phenotypes, cells can also attain a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (E/M) phenotype that enables collective cell migration as a cluster of Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs). These clusters can form 50-times more tumors than individually migrating CTCs, underlining their importance in metastasis. However, this hybrid E/M phenotype has been hypothesized to be only a transient one that is attained en route EMT. Here, via mathematically modeling, we identify certain `phenotypic stability factors' that couple with the core three-way decision-making circuit (miR-200/ZEB) and can maintain or stabilize the hybrid E/M phenotype. Further, we show experimentally that this phenotype can be maintained stably at a single-cell level, and knockdown of these factors impairs collective cell migration. We also show that these factors enable the association of hybrid E/M with high stemness or tumor-initiating potential. Finally, based on these factors, we deduce specific network motifs that can maintain the E/M phenotype. Our framework can be used to elucidate the effect of other players in regulating cellular plasticity during metastasis. This work was supported by NSF PHY-1427654 (Center for Theoretical Biological Physics) and the CPRIT Scholar in Cancer Research of the State of Texas at Rice University.

  19. The digital revolution in phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Oellrich, Anika; Collier, Nigel; Groza, Tudor; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich; Shah, Nigam; Bodenreider, Olivier; Boland, Mary Regina; Georgiev, Ivo; Liu, Hongfang; Livingston, Kevin; Luna, Augustin; Mallon, Ann-Marie; Manda, Prashanti; Robinson, Peter N.; Rustici, Gabriella; Simon, Michelle; Wang, Liqin; Winnenburg, Rainer; Dumontier, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes have gained increased notoriety in the clinical and biological domain owing to their application in numerous areas such as the discovery of disease genes and drug targets, phylogenetics and pharmacogenomics. Phenotypes, defined as observable characteristics of organisms, can be seen as one of the bridges that lead to a translation of experimental findings into clinical applications and thereby support ‘bench to bedside’ efforts. However, to build this translational bridge, a common and universal understanding of phenotypes is required that goes beyond domain-specific definitions. To achieve this ambitious goal, a digital revolution is ongoing that enables the encoding of data in computer-readable formats and the data storage in specialized repositories, ready for integration, enabling translational research. While phenome research is an ongoing endeavor, the true potential hidden in the currently available data still needs to be unlocked, offering exciting opportunities for the forthcoming years. Here, we provide insights into the state-of-the-art in digital phenotyping, by means of representing, acquiring and analyzing phenotype data. In addition, we provide visions of this field for future research work that could enable better applications of phenotype data. PMID:26420780

  20. Forbidden phenotypes and the limits of evolution

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Geerat J.

    2015-01-01

    Evolution has produced an astonishing array of organisms, but does it have limits and, if so, how are these overcome and how have they changed over the course of time? Here, I review models for describing and explaining existing diversity, and then explore parts of the evolutionary tree that remain empty. In an analysis of 32 forbidden states among eukaryotes, identified in major clades and in the three great habitat realms of water, land and air, I argue that no phenotypic constraint is absolute, that most constraints reflect a limited time–energy budget available to individual organisms, that natural selection is ultimately responsible for both imposing and overcoming constraints, including those normally ascribed to developmental patterns of construction and phylogenetic conservatism, and that increases in adaptive versatility in major clades together with accompanying new ecological opportunities have eliminated many constraints. Phenotypes that were inaccessible during the Early Palaeozoic era have evolved during later periods while very few adaptive states have disappeared. The filling of phenotypic space has proceeded cumulatively in three overlapping phases characterized by diversification at the biochemical, morphological and cultural levels. PMID:26640643

  1. The Ecology and Evolution of Stoichiometric Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Leal, Miguel C; Seehausen, Ole; Matthews, Blake

    2017-02-01

    Ecological stoichiometry has generated new insights into how the balance of elements affects ecological interactions and ecosystem processes, but little is known about the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of stoichiometric traits. Understanding the origins and drivers of stoichiometric trait variation between and within species will improve our understanding about the ecological responses of communities to environmental change and the ecosystem effects of organisms. In addition, studying the plasticity, heritability, and genetic basis of stoichiometric traits might improve predictions about how organisms adapt to changing environmental conditions, and help to identify interactions and feedbacks between phenotypic evolution and ecosystem processes.

  2. Fryns syndrome phenotype and trisomy 22

    SciTech Connect

    Ladonne, J.M.; Gaillard, D.; Carre-Pigeon, F.; Gabriel, R.

    1996-01-02

    Trisomy 22 was detected in a 32-week-old fetus born to an overweight mother with hypertension. Severe intrauterine growth retardation was associated with phenotypic manifestations of Fryns Syndrome: Diaphragmatic hernia, facial defects, and nail hypoplasia with short distal fifth phalanges. This is the second report of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in trisomy 22. This case demonstrates the importance of karyotyping malformed fetuses or newborns, even if a nonchromosome syndrome seems identifiable on clinical grounds. To date, at least 10 cases of Fryns syndrome have been reported without chromosome analysis. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  3. Revealing the Genetic Basis of Natural Bacterial Phenotypic Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Freddolino, Peter L.; Goodarzi, Hani

    2014-01-01

    Divergent phenotypes for distantly related strains of bacteria, such as differing antibiotic resistances or organic solvent tolerances, are of keen interest both from an evolutionary perspective and for the engineering of novel microbial organisms and consortia in synthetic biology applications. A prerequisite for any practical application of this phenotypic diversity is knowledge of the genetic determinants for each trait of interest. Sequence divergence between strains is often so extensive as to make brute-force approaches to identifying the loci contributing to a given trait impractical. Here we describe a global linkage analysis approach, GLINT, for rapid discovery of the causal genetic variants underlying phenotypic divergence between distantly related strains of Escherichia coli. This general strategy will also be usable, with minor modifications, for revealing genotype-phenotype associations between naturally occurring strains of other bacterial species. PMID:24317396

  4. A genetic screen identifies Tor as an interactor of VAPB in a Drosophila model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Deivasigamani, Senthilkumar; Verma, Hemant Kumar; Ueda, Ryu; Ratnaparkhi, Anuradha; Ratnaparkhi, Girish S

    2014-10-31

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by selective death of motor neurons. In 5-10% of the familial cases, the disease is inherited because of mutations. One such mutation, P56S, was identified in human VAPB that behaves in a dominant negative manner, sequestering wild type protein into cytoplasmic inclusions. We have conducted a reverse genetic screen to identify interactors of Drosophila VAPB. We screened 2635 genes and identified 103 interactors, of which 45 were enhancers and 58 were suppressors of VAPB function. Interestingly, the screen identified known ALS loci - TBPH, alsin2 and SOD1. Also identified were genes involved in cellular energetics and homeostasis which were used to build a gene regulatory network of VAPB modifiers. One key modifier identified was Tor, whose knockdown reversed the large bouton phenotype associated with VAP(P58S) expression in neurons. A similar reversal was seen by over-expressing Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (Tsc1,2) that negatively regulates TOR signaling as also by reduction of S6K activity. In comparison, the small bouton phenotype associated with VAP(wt) expression was reversed with Tsc1 knock down as well as S6K-CA expression. Tor therefore interacts with both VAP(wt) and VAP(P58S), but in a contrasting manner. Reversal of VAP(P58S) bouton phenotypes in larvae fed with the TOR inhibitor Rapamycin suggests upregulation of TOR signaling in response to VAP(P58S) expression. The VAPB network and further mechanistic understanding of interactions with key pathways, such as the TOR cassette, will pave the way for a better understanding of the mechanisms of onset and progression of motor neuron disease.

  5. Phenotypes and echocardiographic characteristics of a European population of domestic shorthair cats with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Brizard, D; Amberger, C; Hartnack, S; Doherr, M; Lombard, C

    2009-11-01

    111 Domestic Shorthair cats with idiopathic hypertrophic cardiomyopathy were reviewed retrospectively. Two-dimensional echocardiography was used to classify cases in 6 established phenotypes. Hypertrophy was diffuse in 61 % of cats and involved major portions of the ventricular septum and the left ventricular free wall (phenotype D). In the remaining cats, distribution of hypertrophy was more segmental and was identified on the papillary muscles exclusively (phenotype A, 6 %), on the anterior and basal portion of the ventricular septum (phenotype B, 12 %), on the entire septum (phenotype C, 14 %), or on the left ventricular free wall (phenotype E, 7 %). Echocardiographic characteristics and clinical findings were determined for each phenotype to study the correlation between distribution of hypertrophy and clinical implications. 31 cats demonstrated systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve, 75 % of them belonged to phenotype C of hypertrophy. Left ventricular-outflow turbulences were identified more frequently with patterns of hypertrophy involving the ventricular septum (65.5 %), while prevalence of mitral regurgitation was higher when hypertrophy included the papillary muscles (phenotypes A and E, 85 % and 87 %, respectively). Left atrial dilatation occurred more frequently when hypertrophy was diffuse or confined to the left ventricular free wall (61 % of cats with phenotype D or E) rather than to the ventricular septum (31 % of cats with phenotype B or C).

  6. Evolution of cooperation in a multidimensional phenotype space.

    PubMed

    Kroumi, Dhaker; Lessard, Sabin

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of cooperation in populations of selfish individuals is a fascinating topic that has inspired much theoretical work. An important model to study cooperation is the phenotypic model, where individuals are characterized by phenotypic properties that are visible to others. The phenotype of an individual can be represented for instance by a vector x = (x1,…,xn), where x1,…,xn are integers. The population can be well mixed in the sense that everyone is equally likely to interact with everyone else, but the behavioral strategies of the individuals can depend on their distance in the phenotype space. A cooperator can choose to help other individuals exhibiting the same phenotype and defects otherwise. Cooperation is said to be favored by selection if it is more abundant than defection in the stationary state. This means that the average frequency of cooperators in the stationary state strictly exceeds 1/2. Antal et al. (2009c) found conditions that ensure that cooperation is more abundant than defection in a one-dimensional (i.e. n = 1) and an infinite-dimensional (i.e. n = ∞) phenotype space in the case of the Prisoner's Dilemma under weak selection. However, reality lies between these two limit cases. In this paper, we derive the corresponding condition in the case of a phenotype space of any finite dimension. This is done by applying a perturbation method to study a mutation-selection equilibrium under weak selection. This condition is obtained in the limit of a large population size by using the ancestral process. The best scenario for cooperation to be more likely to evolve is found to be a high population-scaled phenotype mutation rate, a low population-scaled strategy mutation rate and a high phenotype space dimension. The biological intuition is that a high population-scaled phenotype mutation rate reduces the quantity of interactions between cooperators and defectors, while a high population-scaled strategy mutation rate introduces newly

  7. Stability of the hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Mohit Kumar; Mooney, Steven M.; Celiktas, Muge; Hanash, Samir M.; Mani, Sendurai A.; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Levine, Herbert

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT) and its reverse – Mesenchymal to Epithelial Transition (MET) – are hallmarks of cellular plasticity during embryonic development and cancer metastasis. During EMT, epithelial cells lose cell-cell adhesion and gain migratory and invasive traits either partially or completely, leading to a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal (hybrid E/M) or a mesenchymal phenotype respectively. Mesenchymal cells move individually, but hybrid E/M cells migrate collectively as observed during gastrulation, wound healing, and the formation of tumor clusters detected as Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs). Typically, the hybrid E/M phenotype has largely been tacitly assumed to be transient and ‘metastable’. Here, we identify certain ‘phenotypic stability factors’ (PSFs) such as GRHL2 that couple to the core EMT decision-making circuit (miR-200/ZEB) and stabilize hybrid E/M phenotype. Further, we show that H1975 lung cancer cells can display a stable hybrid E/M phenotype and migrate collectively, a behavior that is impaired by knockdown of GRHL2 and another previously identified PSF - OVOL. In addition, our computational model predicts that GRHL2 can also associate hybrid E/M phenotype with high tumor-initiating potential, a prediction strengthened by the observation that the higher levels of these PSFs may be predictive of poor patient outcome. Finally, based on these specific examples, we deduce certain network motifs that can stabilize the hybrid E/M phenotype. Our results suggest that partial EMT, i.e. a hybrid E/M phenotype, need not be ‘metastable’, and strengthen the emerging notion that partial EMT, but not necessarily a complete EMT, is associated with aggressive tumor progression. PMID:27008704

  8. PhenoMiner: from text to a database of phenotypes associated with OMIM diseases

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Nigel; Groza, Tudor; Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N.; Oellrich, Anika; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of scientific and clinical phenotypes reported in the experimental literature has been curated manually to build high-quality databases such as the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM). However, the identification and harmonization of phenotype descriptions struggles with the diversity of human expressivity. We introduce a novel automated extraction approach called PhenoMiner that exploits full parsing and conceptual analysis. Apriori association mining is then used to identify relationships to human diseases. We applied PhenoMiner to the BMC open access collection and identified 13 636 phenotype candidates. We identified 28 155 phenotype-disorder hypotheses covering 4898 phenotypes and 1659 Mendelian disorders. Analysis showed: (i) the semantic distribution of the extracted terms against linked ontologies; (ii) a comparison of term overlap with the Human Phenotype Ontology (HP); (iii) moderate support for phenotype-disorder pairs in both OMIM and the literature; (iv) strong associations of phenotype-disorder pairs to known disease-genes pairs using PhenoDigm. The full list of PhenoMiner phenotypes (S1), phenotype-disorder associations (S2), association-filtered linked data (S3) and user database documentation (S5) is available as supplementary data and can be downloaded at http://github.com/nhcollier/PhenoMiner under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 license. Database URL: phenominer.mml.cam.ac.uk PMID:26507285

  9. New outbred colony derived from Mus musculus castaneus to identify skin tumor susceptibility loci.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kyoko; Wie, Benjamin; Elliott, Rosemary; Nagase, Hiroki

    2010-07-01

    Susceptibility to tumor development varies among mice strains. Using inbred NIH and wild-derived outbred Mus spretus backcrosses, skin cancer-susceptibility loci were mapped [Nagase et al. 1995. Nat Genet 10: 424-429; Nagase et al. 1999. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 96: 15032-15037], and Skts13 was identified as the Aurka gene using a conventional linkage in conjunction with haplotype analysis [Ewart-Toland et al. 2003. Nat Genet 34: 403-412]. In the present study, we examined another wild-derived outbred Mus musculus castaneus in which 10.3% of the analyzed SNPs showed heterogeneity among the colony. All mice examined were completely resistant to the two-stage skin carcinogenesis protocol using 7.12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and this resistant phenotype was dominant when we crossed them with the highly susceptible strain FVB. By scanning F1 backcross progeny between M. m. castaneus and FVB, we found a highly significant linkage for tumor multiplicity on Chromosome 4, which was overlapped with the Skts-fp1 locus, found in the previous study using FVB and PWK cross [Fujiwara et al. 2007. BMC Genet 8: 39]. The linkage was observed in all pedigrees from the five F1 founders, while the linkage for papilloma size on Chromosome 4 was mapped only in pedigrees from founders 1 and 2. By scanning the whole Chromosome 4 of the five F1 founders, founders 1- and 2-specific haplotype block was found between D4Mit293 (20.6 Mbp) and D4Mit171 (22.4 Mbp). In this study we exploited the outbred nature of M. m. castaneus stock to identify a haplotype contributing to papilloma size on mouse Chromosome 4. These data illustrate the strength of using outbred mice in identification of the genetic component of a mouse complex trait such as the skin cancer-susceptibility phenotype.

  10. Two Clinical Phenotypes in Polycythemia Vera

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Jerry L.; Considine, Michael; Williams, Donna M.; Talbot, Conover C.; Rogers, Ophelia; Moliterno, Alison R.; Jie, Chunfa; Ochs, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Polycythemia vera is the ultimate phenotypic consequence of the V617F mutation in Janus kinase 2 (encoded by JAK2), but the extent to which this mutation influences the behavior of the involved CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells is unknown. METHODS We analyzed gene expression in CD34+ peripheral-blood cells from 19 patients with polycythemia vera, using oligonucleotide microarray technology after correcting for potential confounding by sex, since the phenotypic features of the disease differ between men and women. RESULTS Men with polycythemia vera had twice as many up-regulated or down-regulated genes as women with polycythemia vera, in a comparison of gene expression in the patients and in healthy persons of the same sex, but there were 102 genes with differential regulation that was concordant in men and women. When these genes were used for class discovery by means of unsupervised hierarchical clustering, the 19 patients could be divided into two groups that did not differ significantly with respect to age, neutrophil JAK2 V617F allele burden, white-cell count, platelet count, or clonal dominance. However, they did differ significantly with respect to disease duration; hemoglobin level; frequency of thromboembolic events, palpable splenomegaly, and splenectomy; chemotherapy exposure; leukemic transformation; and survival. The unsupervised clustering was confirmed by a supervised approach with the use of a top-scoring-pair classifier that segregated the 19 patients into the same two phenotypic groups with 100% accuracy. CONCLUSIONS Removing sex as a potential confounder, we identified an accurate molecular method for classifying patients with polycythemia vera according to disease behavior, independently of their JAK2 V617F allele burden, and identified previously unrecognized molecular pathways in polycythemia vera outside the canonical JAK2 pathway that may be amenable to targeted therapy. PMID:25162887

  11. Pattern of ubiquilin pathology in ALS and FTLD indicates presence of C9ORF72 hexanucleotide expansion

    PubMed Central

    Brettschneider, Johannes; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M.; Robinson, John L.; Kwong, Linda; Lee, Edward B.; Ali, Yousuf O.; Safren, Nathaniel; Monteiro, Mervyn J.; Toledo, Jon B.; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Irwin, David J.; Grossman, Murray; Molina-Porcel, Laura; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2012-01-01

    C9OF72-hexanucleotide repeat expansions and ubiquilin-2 (UBQLN2) mutations are recently identified genetic markers in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). We investigate the relationship between C9ORF72 expansions and the clinical phenotype and neuropathology of ALS and FTLD. Genetic analysis and immunohistochemistry (1HC) were performed on autopsy-confirmed ALS (N = 75), FTLD-TDP (N = 30), AD (N = 14), and controls (N = 11). IHC for neurodegenerative disease pathology consisted of C9ORF72, UBQLN, p62, and TDP-43. A C9ORF72 expansion was identified in 19.4 % of ALS and 31 % of FTLD-TDP cases. ALS cases with C9ORF72 expansions frequently showed a bulbar onset of disease (57 %) and more rapid disease progression to death compared to non-expansion cases. Staining with C9ORF72 antibodies did not yield specific pathology. UBQLN pathology showed a highly distinct pattern in ALS and FTLD-TDP cases with the C9ORF72 expansion, with UBQLN-positive cytoplasmic inclusions in the cerebellar granular layer and extensive UBQLN-positive aggregates and dystrophic neurites in the hippocampal molecular layer and CA regions. These UBQLN pathologies were sufficiently unique to allow correct prediction of cases that were later confirmed to have C9ORF72 expansions by genetic analysis. UBQLN pathology partially co-localized with p62, and to a minor extent with TDP-43 positive dystrophic neurites and spinal cord skein-like inclusions. Our data indicate a pathophysiological link between C9ORF72 expansions and UBQLN proteins in ALS and FTLD-TDP that is associated with a highly characteristic pattern of UBQLN pathology. Our study indicates that this pathology is associated with alterations in clinical phenotype, and suggests that the presence of C9ORF72 repeat expansions may indicate a worse prognosis in ALS. PMID:22426854

  12. In pursuit of taste phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Green, Barry G

    2013-05-01

    Notable progress has been made relating individual differences in bitter taste sensitivity to specific alleles and TAS2R receptors, but psychophysical evidence of reliable phenotypes for other tastes has been more elusive. In this issue, Wise and Breslin report a study of individual differences in threshold sensitivity to sour and salty taste, which, though failing to find clear phenotypes, exemplifies the type of approach and analysis necessary to disentangle sources of variance inherent in the psychophysical measures applied from those attributable to true differences in sensitivity. Methodological and theoretical lessons that can be taken from this work are discussed in the context of the early and dramatic evidence of chemosensory phenotypes that belied the complexity of taste receptor genetics and focused attention solely on peripheral determinants of sensitivity.

  13. Optofluidic Detection for Cellular Phenotyping

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yi-Chung; Huang, Nien-Tsu; Oh, Bo-Ram; Patra, Bishnubrata; Pan, Chi-Chun; Qiu, Teng; Paul, K. Chu; Zhang, Wenjun; Kurabayashi, Katsuo

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the output of processes and molecular interactions within a single cell is highly critical to the advancement of accurate disease screening and personalized medicine. Optical detection is one of the most broadly adapted measurement methods in biological and clinical assays and serves cellular phenotyping. Recently, microfluidics has obtained increasing attention due to several advantages, such as small sample and reagent volumes, very high throughput, and accurate flow control in the spatial and temporal domains. Optofluidics, which is the attempt to integrate optics with microfluidic, shows great promise to enable on-chip phenotypic measurements with high precision, sensitivity, specificity, and simplicity. This paper reviews the most recent developments of optofluidic technologies for cellular phenotyping optical detection. PMID:22854915

  14. Phenotypic variability in ARCA2 and identification of a core ataxic phenotype with slow progression

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal recessive cerebellar ataxia 2 (ARCA2) is a recently identified recessive ataxia due to ubiquinone deficiency and biallelic mutations in the ADCK3 gene. The phenotype of the twenty-one patients reported worldwide varies greatly. Thus, it is difficult to decide which ataxic patients are good candidates for ADCK3 screening without evidence of ubiquinone deficiency. We report here the clinical and molecular data of 10 newly diagnosed patients from seven families and update the disease history of four additional patients reported in previous articles to delineate the clinical spectrum of ARCA2 phenotype and to provide a guide to the molecular diagnosis. First signs occurred before adulthood in all 14 patients. Cerebellar atrophy appeared in all instances. The progressivity and severity of ataxia varied greatly, but no patients had the typical inexorable ataxic course that characterizes other childhood-onset recessive ataxias. The ataxia was frequently associated with other neurological signs. Importantly, stroke-like episodes contributed to significant deterioration of the neurological status in two patients. Ubidecarenone therapy markedly improved the movement disorders, including ataxia, in two other patients. The 7 novel ADCK3 mutations found in the 10 new patients were two missense and five truncating mutations. There was no apparent correlation between the genotype and the phenotype. Our series reveals that the clinical spectrum of ARCA2 encompasses a range of ataxic phenotypes. On one end, it may manifest as a pure ataxia with very slow progressivity and, on the other end, as a severe infantile encephalopathy with cerebellar atrophy. The phenotype of most patients, however, lies in between. It is characterized by a very slowly progressive or apparently stable ataxia associated with other signs of central nervous system involvement. We suggest undergoing the molecular analysis of ADCK3 in patients with this phenotype and in those with cerebellar atrophy

  15. Mechanisms of developmental regression in autism and the broader phenotype: a neural network modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael S C; Knowland, Victoria C P; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2011-10-01

    Loss of previously established behaviors in early childhood constitutes a markedly atypical developmental trajectory. It is found almost uniquely in autism and its cause is currently unknown (Baird et al., 2008). We present an artificial neural network model of developmental regression, exploring the hypothesis that regression is caused by overaggressive synaptic pruning and identifying the mechanisms involved. We used a novel population-modeling technique to investigate developmental deficits, in which both neurocomputational parameters and the learning environment were varied across a large number of simulated individuals. Regression was generated by the atypical setting of a single pruning-related parameter. We observed a probabilistic relationship between the atypical pruning parameter and the presence of regression, as well as variability in the onset, severity, behavioral specificity, and recovery from regression. Other neurocomputational parameters that varied across the population modulated the risk that an individual would show regression. We considered a further hypothesis that behavioral regression may index an underlying anomaly characterizing the broader autism phenotype. If this is the case, we show how the model also accounts for several additional findings: shared gene variants between autism and language impairment (Vernes et al., 2008); larger brain size in autism but only in early development (Redcay & Courchesne, 2005); and the possibility of quasi-autism, caused by extreme environmental deprivation (Rutter et al., 1999). We make a novel prediction that the earliest developmental symptoms in the emergence of autism should be sensory and motor rather than social and review empirical data offering preliminary support for this prediction.

  16. Testing evolutionary hypotheses for phenotypic divergence using landscape genetics.

    PubMed

    Funk, W Chris; Murphy, Melanie A

    2010-02-01

    Understanding the evolutionary causes of phenotypic variation among populations has long been a central theme in evolutionary biology. Several factors can influence phenotypic divergence, including geographic isolation, genetic drift, divergent natural or sexual selection, and phenotypic plasticity. But the relative importance of these factors in generating phenotypic divergence in nature is still a tantalizing and unresolved problem in evolutionary biology. The origin and maintenance of phenotypic divergence is also at the root of many ongoing debates in evolutionary biology, such as the extent to which gene flow constrains adaptive divergence (Garant et al. 2007) and the relative importance of genetic drift, natural selection, and sexual selection in initiating reproductive isolation and speciation (Coyne & Orr 2004). In this issue, Wang & Summers (2010) test the causes of one of the most fantastic examples of phenotypic divergence in nature: colour pattern divergence among populations of the strawberry poison frog (Dendrobates pumilio) in Panama and Costa Rica (Fig. 1). This study provides a beautiful example of the use of the emerging field of landscape genetics to differentiate among hypotheses for phenotypic divergence. Using landscape genetic analyses, Wang & Summers were able to reject the hypotheses that colour pattern divergence is due to isolation-by-distance (IBD) or landscape resistance. Instead, the hypothesis left standing is that colour divergence is due to divergent selection, in turn driving reproductive isolation among populations with different colour morphs. More generally, this study provides a wonderful example of how the emerging field of landscape genetics, which has primarily been applied to questions in conservation and ecology, now plays an essential role in evolutionary research.

  17. Phenomenology of COPD: interpreting phenotypes with the ECLIPSE study.

    PubMed

    Papi, Alberto; Magnoni, Maria Sandra; Muzzio, Carmelo Caio; Benso, Gianmarco; Rizzi, Andrea

    2016-10-14

    The Evaluation of COPD Longitudinally to Identify Predictive Surrogate End-points (ECLIPSE) study was a large 3-year observational multicentre international study aimed at defining COPD phenotypes and identifying biomarkers and/or genetic parameters that help to predict disease progression. The study has contributed to a better understanding of COPD heterogeneity, with the characterization of clinically important subtypes/phenotypes of patients, such as the frequent exacerbators or patient with persistent systemic inflammation, who may have different prognosis or treatment requirements. Because of the big amount of information that is starting to be produced from metabolomic, proteomic and genomic approaches, one of the biggest challenges is the integration of data in a biological prospective such as clinical prognosis and response to medicinal products. In this article we highlight some of the progress in phenotyping the heterogeneity of the disease that have been made thanks to the analyses of this longitudinal study.

  18. Phenotype of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 Ser351Cys mutation: Pfeiffer syndrome type III.

    PubMed

    Gripp, K W; Stolle, C A; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Markowitz, R I; Bartlett, S P; Katowitz, J A; Muenke, M; Zackai, E H

    1998-07-24

    We present a patient with pansynostosis, hydrocephalus, seizures, extreme proptosis with luxation of the eyes out of the lids, apnea and airway obstruction, intestinal non-rotation, and severe developmental delay. His skeletal abnormalities include bilateral elbow ankylosis, radial head dislocation, and unilateral broad and deviated first toe. The phenotype of this patient is consistent with that previously reported in Pfeiffer syndrome type III, but is unusual for the lack of broad thumbs. Our patient most closely resembles the case described by Kerr et al. [1996: Am J Med Genet 66:138-143] as Pfeiffer syndrome type III with normal thumbs. Mutations in the genes for fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR) 1 and 2 have previously been seen in patients with Pfeiffer syndrome type I. The mutation identified in our patient, Ser351Cys in FGFR2, represents the first reported cause of Pfeiffer syndrome type III. An identical mutation was described once previously by Pulleyn et al., in a patient whose brief clinical description included cloverleaf skull, significant developmental delay, and normal hands and feet [Eur. J. Hum. Genet. 4: 283-291, 1996]. In our patient, previously performed single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis failed to detect a band shift; the mutation was identified only after independent sequence analysis.

  19. The NCBI dbGaP database of genotypes and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Mailman, Matthew D; Feolo, Michael; Jin, Yumi; Kimura, Masato; Tryka, Kimberly; Bagoutdinov, Rinat; Hao, Luning; Kiang, Anne; Paschall, Justin; Phan, Lon; Popova, Natalia; Pretel, Stephanie; Ziyabari, Lora; Lee, Moira; Shao, Yu; Wang, Zhen Y; Sirotkin, Karl; Ward, Minghong; Kholodov, Michael; Zbicz, Kerry; Beck, Jeffrey; Kimelman, Michael; Shevelev, Sergey; Preuss, Don; Yaschenko, Eugene; Graeff, Alan; Ostell, James; Sherry, Stephen T

    2007-10-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information has created the dbGaP public repository for individual-level phenotype, exposure, genotype and sequence data and the associations between them. dbGaP assigns stable, unique identifiers to studies and subsets of information from those studies, including documents, individual phenotypic variables, tables of trait data, sets of genotype data, computed phenotype-genotype associations, and groups of study subjects who have given similar consents for use of their data.

  20. OPTN 691_692insAG is a founder mutation causing recessive ALS and increased risk in heterozygotes

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Orly; Nayshool, Omri; Nefussy, Beatrice; Traynor, Bryan J.; Renton, Alan E.; Gana-Weisz, Mali; Drory, Vivian E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To detect genetic variants underlying familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Methods: We analyzed 2 founder Jewish populations of Moroccan and Ashkenazi origins and ethnic matched controls. Exome sequencing of 2 sisters with ALS from Morocco was followed by genotyping the identified causative null mutation in 379 unrelated patients with ALS and 1,000 controls. The shared risk haplotype was characterized using whole-genome single nucleotide polymorphism array. Results: We identified 5 unrelated patients with ALS homozygous for the null 691_692insAG mutation in the optineurin gene (OPTN), accounting for 5.8% of ALS of Moroccan origin and 0.3% of Ashkenazi. We also identified a high frequency of heterozygous carriers among patients with ALS, 8.7% and 2.9%, respectively, compared to 0.75% and 1.0% in controls. The risk of carriers for ALS was significantly increased, with odds ratio of 13.46 and 2.97 in Moroccan and Ashkenazi Jews, respectively. We determined that 691_692insAG is a founder mutation in the tested populations with a minimal risk haplotype of 58.5 Kb, encompassing the entire OPTN gene. Conclusions: Our data show that OPTN 691_692insAG mutation is a founder mutation in Moroccan and Ashkenazi Jews. This mutation causes autosomal recessive ALS and significantly increases the risk to develop the disease in heterozygous carriers, suggesting both a recessive mode of inheritance and a dominant with incomplete penetrance. These data emphasize the important role of OPTN in ALS pathogenesis, and demonstrate the complex genetics of ALS, as the same mutation leads to different phenotypes and appears in 2 patterns of inheritance. PMID:26740678

  1. Reciprocal phenotypic plasticity in a predator-prey interaction between larval amphibians.

    PubMed

    Kishida, Osamu; Mizuta, Yuuki; Nishimura, Kinya

    2006-06-01

    In biological interactions, phenotypic change in interacting organisms induced by their interaction partners causes a substantial shift in some environmental factor of the partners, which may subsequently change their phenotype in response to that modified environmental factor. Few examples of such arms-race-like plastic responses, known as reciprocal phenotypic plasticity, have been identified in predator-prey interactions. We experimentally identified a reciprocal defensive plastic response of a prey species against a predator with a predaceous phenotype using a model system of close predator-prey interaction. Rana pirica tadpoles (the prey species) were reared with larvae of the salamander Hynobius retardatus (the predator species) having either a predaceous or a typical, nonpredaceous phenotype. The H. retardatus larvae with the predaceous phenotype, which is known to be induced by the presence of R. pirica tadpoles, induced a more defensive phenotype in the tadpoles than did larvae with the typical phenotype. The result suggests that the reciprocal phenotypic plasticity of R. pirica tadpoles is in response to a phenotype-specific signal under a close-signal recognition process.

  2. ELECTRORETINOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF THE RETINOPATHY, GLOBE ENLARGED (RGE) CHICK PHENOTYPE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A manuscript examines the retinal changes in an avian model of inherited loss of vision. Avian models of eye diseases that affect humans have previously been identified. Characterizing the phenotype of the rge strain is a necessary step in determining whether the loss of vision...

  3. Identifying Mutations of the Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain 37 (TTC37) Gene in Infants With Intractable Diarrhea and a Comparison of Asian and Non-Asian Phenotype and Genotype: A Global Case-report Study of a Well-Defined Syndrome With Immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wen-I; Huang, Jing-Long; Chen, Chien-Chang; Lin, Ju-Li; Wu, Ren-Chin; Jaing, Tang-Her; Ou, Liang-Shiou

    2016-03-01

    Syndromic diarrhea/tricho-hepato-enteric syndrome (SD/THE) is a rare, autosomal recessive and severe bowel disorder mainly caused by mutations in the tetratricopeptide repeat domain 37 (TTC37) gene which act as heterotetrameric cofactors to enhance aberrant mRNAs decay. The phenotype and immune profiles of SD/THE overlap those of primary immunodeficiency diseases (PIDs). Neonates with intractable diarrhea underwent immunologic assessments including immunoglobulin levels, lymphocyte subsets, lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling function. Candidate genes for PIDs predisposing to inflammatory bowel disease were sequencing in this study. Two neonates, born to nonconsanguineous parents, suffered from intractable diarrhea, recurrent infections, and massive hematemesis from esopharyngeal varices due to liver cirrhosis or accompanying Trichorrhexis nodosa that developed with age and thus guided the diagnosis of SD/THE compatible to TTC37 mutations (homozygous DelK1155H, Fs*2; heterozygous Y1169Ter and InsA1143, Fs*3). Their immunologic evaluation showed normal mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation, superoxide production, and IL-10 signaling, but low IgG levels, undetectable antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen and decreased antigen-stimulated lymphocyte proliferation. A PubMed search for bi-allelic TTC37 mutations and phenotypes were recorded in 14 Asian and 12 non-Asian cases. They had similar presentations of infantile onset refractory diarrhea, facial dysmorphism, hair anomalies, low IgG, low birth weight, and consanguinity. A higher incidence of heart anomalies (8/14 vs 2/12; P = 0.0344, Chi-square), nonsense mutations (19 in 28 alleles), and hot-spot mutations (W936Ter, 2779-2G>A, and Y1169Ter) were found in the Asian compared with the non-Asian patients. Despite immunoglobulin therapy in 20 of the patients, 4 died from liver cirrhosis and 1 died from sepsis. Patients of all ethnicities with SD/THE with the characteristic

  4. RNA-binding proteins with prion-like domains in ALS and FTLD-U.

    PubMed

    Gitler, Aaron D; Shorter, James

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease) is a debilitating, and universally fatal, neurodegenerative disease that devastates upper and lower motor neurons. The causes of ALS are poorly understood. A central role for RNA-binding proteins and RNA metabolism in ALS has recently emerged. The RNA-binding proteins, TDP-43 and FUS, are principal components of cytoplasmic inclusions found in motor neurons of ALS patients and mutations in TDP-43 and FUS are linked to familial and sporadic ALS. Pathology and genetics also connect TDP-43 and FUS with frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions (FTLD-U). It was unknown whether mechanisms of FUS aggregation and toxicity were similar or different to those of TDP-43. To address this issue, we have employed yeast models and pure protein biochemistry to define mechanisms underlying TDP-43 and FUS aggregation and toxicity, and to identify genetic modifiers relevant for human disease. We have identified prion-like domains in FUS and TDP-43 and provide evidence that these domains are required for aggregation. Our studies have defined key similarities as well as important differences between the two proteins. Collectively, however, our findings lead us to suggest that FUS and TDP-43, though similar RNA-binding proteins, likely aggregate and confer disease phenotypes via distinct mechanisms.

  5. Modeling the Autism Spectrum Disorder Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    McCray, Alexa T.; Trevvett, Philip; Frost, H. Robert

    2013-01-01

    Background Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is highly heritable, and although there has been active research in an attempt to discover the genetic factors underlying ASD, diagnosis still depends heavily on behavioral assessments. Recently, several large-scale initiatives, including those of the Autism Consortium, have contributed to the collection of extensive information from families affected by ASD. Purpose Our goal was to develop an ontology that can be used 1) to provide improved access to the data collected by those who study ASD and other neurodevelopmental disorders, and 2) to assess and compare the characteristics of the instruments that are used in the assessment of ASD. Materials and Methods We analyzed two dozen instruments used to assess ASD, studying the nature of the questions asked and items assessed, the method of delivery, and the overall scope of the content. These data together with the extensive literature on ASD contributed to our iterative development of an ASD phenotype ontology. Results The final ontology comprises 283 concepts distributed across three high-level classes, ‘Personal Traits’, ‘Social Competence’, and ‘Medical History’. The ontology is fully integrated with the Autism Consortium database, allowing researchers to pose ontology-based questions. The ontology also allows researchers to assess the degree of overlap among a set of candidate instruments according to several objective criteria. Conclusions The ASD phenotype ontology has promise for use in research settings where extensive phenotypic data have been collected, allowing a concept-based approach to identifying behavioral features of importance and for correlating these with genotypic data. PMID:24163114

  6. Molecular Basis of KELnull Phenotype in Brazilians

    PubMed Central

    Boturão-Neto, Edmir; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Chiba, Akemi Kuroda; Kimura, Elisa Yuriko Sugano; de Oliveira, Maria do Carmo Valgueiro Costa; do Monte Barretto, Cláudia Lumack; Nunes, Mércia Maria Alves; Albuquerque, Sérgio Roberto Lopes; de Deus Santos, Marcos Daniel; Bordin, José Orlando

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background KELnull (K0) persons can produce clinically significant anti-KEL5 antibody after transfusion and/or pregnancy, requiring K0 blood transfusion when indicated. 37 K0 alleles have been reported in studies over different populations, but none in Amerindian-Caucasian descendants from South America. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular basis of K0 phenotype in Brazilians. Methods We investigated three K0 samples from different Brazilian blood banks (Recife, Manaus, and Vila Velha) in women with anti-KEL5. KEL antigen typing was performed by serologic techniques, and the K0 status was confirmed by flow cytometry. PCR-RFLP and DNA sequencing of the KEL coding and exon-intron regions were also performed. Results RBCs of the 3 patients were phenotyped as KEL:-1,−2,−3,−4,−7. The 3 patients had the same KEL*02/02 genotype and were negative for KEL*02.03 and KEL*02.06 alleles. The Recife K0 patient was homozygous for IVS16 + 1g>a mutation (KEL*02N.31 allele). The flow cytometry with anti-KEL1, anti-KEL2, anti-KEL3, anti-KEL4, and anti-CD238 confirmed the K0 phenotype. In addition, we found the c.10423C>T mutation (KEL*02N.04 allele) in both the Manaus K0 and the Vila Velha K0 patients. Conclusion This report represents the first study of K0 molecular basis performed in Amerindian-Caucasian descendants from South America. PMID:25960716

  7. Use of a Machine Learning-Based High Content Analysis Approach to Identify Photoreceptor Neurite Promoting Molecules.

    PubMed

    Fuller, John A; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Inglese, James; Zack, Donald J

    2016-01-01

    High content analysis (HCA) has become a leading methodology in phenotypic drug discovery efforts. Typical HCA workflows include imaging cells using an automated microscope and analyzing the data using algorithms designed to quantify one or more specific phenotypes of interest. Due to the richness of high content data, unappreciated phenotypic changes may be discovered in existing image sets using interactive machine-learning based software systems. Primary postnatal day four retinal cells from the photoreceptor (PR) labeled QRX-EGFP reporter mice were isolated, seeded, treated with a set of 234 profiled kinase inhibitors and then cultured for 1 week. The cells were imaged with an Acumen plate-based laser cytometer to determine the number and intensity of GFP-expressing, i.e. PR, cells. Wells displaying intensities and counts above threshold values of interest were re-imaged at a higher resolution with an INCell2000 automated microscope. The images were analyzed with an open source HCA analysis tool, PhenoRipper (Rajaram et al., Nat Methods 9:635-637, 2012), to identify the high GFP-inducing treatments that additionally resulted in diverse phenotypes compared to the vehicle control samples. The pyrimidinopyrimidone kinase inhibitor CHEMBL-1766490, a pan kinase inhibitor whose major known targets are p38α and the Src family member lck, was identified as an inducer of photoreceptor neuritogenesis by using the open-source HCA program PhenoRipper. This finding was corroborated using a cell-based method of image analysis that measures quantitative differences in the mean neurite length in GFP expressing cells. Interacting with data using machine learning algorithms may complement traditional HCA approaches by leading to the discovery of small molecule-induced cellular phenotypes in addition to those upon which the investigator is initially focusing.

  8. The transition of smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a migratory, phagocytic phenotype: direct demonstration of phenotypic modulation

    PubMed Central

    Sandison, Mairi E.; Dempster, John

    2016-01-01

    Key points Smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotypic conversion from a contractile to a migratory phenotype is proposed to underlie cardiovascular disease but its contribution to vascular remodelling and even its existence have recently been questioned.Tracking the fate of individual SMCs is difficult as no specific markers of migratory SMCs exist.This study used a novel, prolonged time‐lapse imaging approach to continuously track the behaviour of unambiguously identified, fully differentiated SMCs.In response to serum, highly‐elongated, contractile SMCs initially rounded up, before spreading and migrating and these migratory cells displayed clear phagocytic activity.This study provides a direct demonstration of the transition of fully contractile SMCs to a non‐contractile, migratory phenotype with phagocytic capacity that may act as a macrophage‐like cell. Abstract Atherosclerotic plaques are populated with smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and macrophages. SMCs are thought to accumulate in plaques because fully differentiated, contractile SMCs reprogramme into a ‘synthetic’ migratory phenotype, so‐called phenotypic modulation, whilst plaque macrophages are thought to derive from blood‐borne myeloid cells. Recently, these views have been challenged, with reports that SMC phenotypic modulation may not occur during vascular remodelling and that plaque macrophages may not be of haematopoietic origin. Following the fate of SMCs is complicated by the lack of specific markers for the migratory phenotype and direct demonstrations of phenotypic modulation are lacking. Therefore, we employed long‐term, high‐resolution, time‐lapse microscopy to track the fate of unambiguously identified, fully‐differentiated, contractile SMCs in response to the growth factors present in serum. Phenotypic modulation was clearly observed. The highly elongated, contractile SMCs initially rounded up, for 1–3 days, before spreading outwards. Once spread, the SMCs became motile and

  9. Phenotypic Screening of Primary Human Cell Culture Systems to Identify Potential for Compound Toxicity (CHI Phenotypic Screening)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Addressing safety aspects of drugs and environmental chemicals has historically been undertaken through animal testing. However, the quantity of chemicals needing assessment and the challenge of species extrapolation require development of alternative approaches. Assessing phenot...

  10. Phenotype and function of nasal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haekyung; Ruane, Darren; Law, Kenneth; Ho, Yan; Garg, Aakash; Rahman, Adeeb; Esterházy, Daria; Cheong, Cheolho; Goljo, Erden; Sikora, Andrew G.; Mucida, Daniel; Chen, Benjamin; Govindraj, Satish; Breton, Gaëlle; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal vaccination generates immunity across local, regional and distant sites. However, nasal dendritic cells (DC), pivotal for the induction of intranasal vaccine- induced immune responses, have not been studied in detail. Here, using a variety of parameters, we define nasal DCs in mice and humans. Distinct subsets of “classical” DCs, dependent on the transcription factor zbtb46 were identified in the murine nose. The murine nasal DCs were FLT3 ligand-responsive and displayed unique phenotypic and functional characteristics including the ability to present antigen, induce an allogeneic T cell response and migrate in response to LPS or live bacterial pathogens. Importantly, in a cohort of human volunteers, BDCA-1+ DCs were observed to be the dominant nasal DC population at steady state. During chronic inflammation, the frequency of both BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3hi DCs was reduced in the nasal tissue, associating the loss of these immune sentinels with chronic nasal inflammation. The present study is the first detailed description of the phenotypic, ontogenetic and functional properties of nasal DCs and will inform the design of preventative immunization strategies as well as therapeutic modalities against chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25669151

  11. Phenotypic Integration of Neurocranium and Brain

    PubMed Central

    RICHTSMEIER, JOAN T.; ALDRIDGE, KRISTINA; DeLEON, VALERIE B.; PANCHAL, JAYESH; KANE, ALEX A.; MARSH, JEFFREY L.; YAN, PENG; COLE, THEODORE M.

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary history of Mammalia provides strong evidence that the morphology of skull and brain change jointly in evolution. Formation and development of brain and skull co-occur and are dependent upon a series of morphogenetic and patterning processes driven by genes and their regulatory programs. Our current concept of skull and brain as separate tissues results in distinct analyses of these tissues by most researchers. In this study, we use 3D computed tomography and magnetic resonance images of pediatric individuals diagnosed with premature closure of cranial sutures (craniosynostosis) to investigate phenotypic relationships between the brain and skull. It has been demonstrated previously that the skull and brain acquire characteristic dysmorphologies in isolated craniosynostosis, but relatively little is known of the developmental interactions that produce these anomalies. Our comparative analysis of phenotypic integration of brain and skull in premature closure of the sagittal and the right coronal sutures demonstrates that brain and skull are strongly integrated and that the significant differences in patterns of association do not occur local to the prematurely closed suture. We posit that the current focus on the suture as the basis for this condition may identify a proximate, but not the ultimate cause for these conditions. Given that premature suture closure reduces the number of cranial bones, and that a persistent loss of skull bones is demonstrated over the approximately 150 million years of synapsid evolution, craniosynostosis may serve as an informative model for evolution of the mammalian skull. PMID:16526048

  12. Kernel methods for phenotyping complex plant architecture.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Koji; Hibrand-Saint Oyant, Laurence; Foucher, Fabrice; Thouroude, Tatiana; Loustau, Sébastien

    2014-02-07

    The Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) mapping of plant architecture is a critical step for understanding the genetic determinism of plant architecture. Previous studies adopted simple measurements, such as plant-height, stem-diameter and branching-intensity for QTL mapping of plant architecture. Many of these quantitative traits were generally correlated to each other, which give rise to statistical problem in the detection of QTL. We aim to test the applicability of kernel methods to phenotyping inflorescence architecture and its QTL mapping. We first test Kernel Principal Component Analysis (KPCA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM) over an artificial dataset of simulated inflorescences with different types of flower distribution, which is coded as a sequence of flower-number per node along a shoot. The ability of discriminating the different inflorescence types by SVM and KPCA is illustrated. We then apply the KPCA representation to the real dataset of rose inflorescence shoots (n=1460) obtained from a 98 F1 hybrid mapping population. We find kernel principal components with high heritability (>0.7), and the QTL analysis identifies a new QTL, which was not detected by a trait-by-trait analysis of simple architectural measurements. The main tools developed in this paper could be use to tackle the general problem of QTL mapping of complex (sequences, 3D structure, graphs) phenotypic traits.

  13. A hypothesis to phenotype COPD exacerbations by aetiology.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Martin; Beasley, Richard W; Irving, Louis; Bardin, Philip G

    2011-02-01

    COPD exacerbations have traditionally been defined on the basis of symptoms or health-care utilization without specific reference to the suspected aetiology. Consequently, the term 'exacerbation' has been used to include all patients experiencing an acute deterioration of symptoms associated with COPD. However, exacerbations are known to result from a variety of causes and do not necessarily constitute an equivalent event in the same patient, between different patients or between individual research studies. We therefore hypothesize that phenotyping exacerbations by aetiology may identify exacerbation subgroups, clarify benefits of therapeutic intervention in the subgroups and overall improve clinical care. An acronym is proposed to facilitate phenotyping COPD exacerbations.

  14. Phenotypic Differences in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder Born Preterm and at Term Gestation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowers, Katherine; Wink, Logan K.; Pottenger, Amy; McDougle, Christopher J.; Erickson, Craig

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to characterize the phenotype of males and females with autism spectrum disorder born preterm versus those born at term. Descriptive statistical analyses identified differences between male and female autism spectrum disorder subjects born preterm compared to term for several phenotypic characteristics and…

  15. Fringe phenotypes in autism: a review of clinical, biochemical and cognitive studies.

    PubMed

    Goussé, Véronique; Plumet, Marie Hélène; Chabane, Nadia; Mouren-Siméoni, Marie-Christine; Ferradian, Nathalie; Leboyer, Marion

    2002-05-01

    Progress in identifying the genetic vulnerability factors in autism requires correct identification of the inherited phenotype(s). This can be achieved not only by the accurate description of the affected subject but also by the identification of vulnerability traits in non-affected relatives of autistic probands. This review will focus on this last strategy and principally on clinical, biochemical and cognitive traits.

  16. Racial Identity, Phenotype, and Self-Esteem among Biracial Polynesian/White Individuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, G. E. Kawika; Garriott, Patton O.; Reyes, Carla J.; Hsieh, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    This study examined racial identity, self-esteem, and phenotype among biracial Polynesian/White adults. Eighty-four Polynesian/White persons completed the Biracial Identity Attitude Scale, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Inventory, and a Polynesian phenotype scale. Profile analyses showed participants identified more with their Polynesian parent. A…

  17. Forward Genetic Screen in Caenorhabditis elegans Suggests F57A10.2 and acp-4 As Suppressors of C9ORF72 Related Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Hao, Limin; Saur, Taixiang; Joyal, Katelyn; Zhao, Ying; Zhai, Desheng; Li, Jie; Pribadi, Mochtar; Coppola, Giovanni; Cohen, Bruce M.; Buttner, Edgar A.

    2016-01-01

    An abnormally expanded GGGGCC repeat in C9ORF72 is the most frequent causal mutation associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)/frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Both gain-of-function (gf) and loss-of-function (lf) mechanisms have been involved in C9ORF72 related ALS/FTLD. The gf mechanism of C9ORF72 has been studied in various animal models but not in C. elegans. In the present study, we described mutant C9ORF72 modeling in C. elegans and report the finding of two suppressor genes. We made transgenes containing 9 or 29 repeats of GGGGCC in C9ORF72, driven by either the hsp-16 promoters or the unc-119 promoter. Transgenic worms were made to carry such transgenes. Phenotypic analysis of those animals revealed that Phsp−16::(G4C2)29::GFP transgenic animals (EAB 135) displayed severe paralysis by the second day of adulthood, followed by lethality, which phenotypes were less severe in Phsp−16::(G4C2)9::GFP transgenic animals (EAB242), and absent in control strains expressing empty vectors. Suppressor genes of this locomotor phenotype were pursued by introducing mutations with ethyl methanesulfonate in EAB135, screening mutant strains that moved faster than EAB135 by a food-ring assay, identifying mutations by whole-genome sequencing and testing the underlying mechanism of the suppressor genes either by employing RNA interference studies or C. elegans genetics. Three mutant strains, EAB164, EAB165 and EAB167, were identified. Eight suppressor genes carrying nonsense/canonical splicing site mutations were confirmed, among which a nonsense mutation of F57A10.2/VAMP was found in all three mutant strains, and a nonsense mutation of acp-4/ACP2 was only found in EAB164. Knock down/out of those two genes in EAB135 animals by feeding RNAi/introducing a known acp-4 null allele phenocopied the suppression of the C9ORF72 variant related movement defect in the mutant strains. Translational conformation in a mammalian system is required, but our worm data

  18. Geno- and phenotypic resistance tests.

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    There are two types of experimental drug resistance tests, genotypic and phenotypic, that may be able to determine a person's level of resistance to certain HIV drugs. Genotypic resistance testing seeks mutations in the genetic structure of HIV. The analysis is typically conducted from a blood test, and several methods may be used to read the blood sample including a machine that reads gene sequences, a line probe assay, and the GeneChip, which scans blood samples into a computer. Phenotypic resistance testing assesses the quantity of a drug necessary to suppress the virus in a laboratory setting. Both tests require a patient to have a viral load over 1,000 HIV RNA copies, and both are relatively expensive. Neither test can predict which treatments will definitely be successful, as the results are likely to be subjective, depending on the laboratory. Pros and cons for each type of test are listed. Availability, cost, and contact information are provided.

  19. Identification of Candida spp. by phenotypic tests and PCR

    PubMed Central

    Marinho, Sandra Aparecida; Teixeira, Alice Becker; Santos, Otávio Silveira; Cazanova, Ricardo Flores; Ferreira, Carlos Alexandre Sanchez; Cherubini, Karen; de Oliveira, Sílvia Dias

    2010-01-01

    The correct identification of Candida species is of great importance, as it presents prognostic and therapeutical significance, allowing an early and appropriate antifungical therapy. The purpose of this study was to identify isolates of Candida spp. from oral mucosa of 38 patients with oral candidosis evaluated in 2004 by phenotypic methods and PCR, discriminating C. albicans from the other Candida species. The tests used for phenotypic analysis were germ-tube and chlamydoconidia production, culture in CHROMAgar™ Candida, carbohydrate assimilation test, growth at 45ºC and culture in Tween 80 agar. Genotypic confirmation was performed by PCR. Phenotypic tests showed that 63.2% strains formed germ-tubes, 73.7% produced chlamydoconidia, and 63.2% showed green colonies in chromogenic medium, presumptively indicating C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. The carbohydrate assimilation test confirmed these results. A total of 21% strains were identified as C. krusei and 13.2% were indicative of C. tropicalis. Of these later strains, three produced chlamydoconidia. The association of other phenotypic tests with culture in Tween 80 agar identified 95.8% of strains as C. albicans and 4.2% as C. dubliniensis. All 24 strains indicative of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis were confirmed by PCR as C. albicans. PMID:24031493

  20. Microenvironmental Regulation of the Sinusoidal Endothelial Cell Phenotype In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    March, Sandra; Hui, Elliot E.; Underhill, Gregory H.; Khetani, Salman; Bhatia, Sangeeta N.

    2010-01-01

    Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells (LSEC) differ, both structurally and functionally, from endothelial cells (EC) lining blood vessels of other tissues. For example, in contrast to other EC, LSEC posses fenestrations, have low detectable levels of PECAM-1 expression, and in rat tissue, they distinctively express a cell surface marker recognized by the SE-1 antibody. These unique phenotypic characteristics seen in hepatic tissue are lost over time upon culture in vitro; therefore, this study sought to systematically examine the effects of microenvironmental stimuli, namely, extracellular matrix (ECM) and neighboring cells, on the LSEC phenotype in vitro. In probing the role of the underlying extracellular matrix, we identified collagen I and collagen III as well as mixtures of collagen I/collagen IV/fibronectin as having a positive effect on LSEC survival. Furthermore, using a stable hepatocellular model (hepatocyte-fibroblast) we were able to prolong the expression of both SE-1 and phenotypic functions of LSEC such as Factor VIII activity in co-cultured LSECs through the production of short-range paracrine signals. In the course of these experiments, we identified the antigen recognized by SE-1 as CD32b. Collectively, this study has identified several microenvironmental regulators of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells that prolong their phenotypic functions for up to 2 weeks in culture, enabling the development of better in vitro models of liver physiology and disease. PMID:19585615

  1. Unexplained early onset epileptic encephalopathy: Exome screening and phenotype expansion.

    PubMed

    Allen, Nicholas M; Conroy, Judith; Shahwan, Amre; Lynch, Bryan; Correa, Raony G; Pena, Sergio D J; McCreary, Dara; Magalhães, Tiago R; Ennis, Sean; Lynch, Sally A; King, Mary D

    2016-01-01

    Early onset epileptic encephalopathies (EOEEs) represent a significant diagnostic challenge. Newer genomic approaches have begun to elucidate an increasing number of responsible single genes as well as emerging diagnostic strategies. In this single-center study, we aimed to investigate a cohort of children with unexplained EOEE. We performed whole-exome sequencing (WES), targeting a list of 137 epilepsy-associated genes on 50 children with unexplained EOEE. We characterized all phenotypes in detail and classified children according to known electroclinical syndromes where possible. Infants with previous genetic diagnoses, causative brain malformations, or inborn errors of metabolism were excluded. We identified disease-causing variants in 11 children (22%) in the following genes: STXBP1 (n = 3), KCNB1 (n = 2), KCNT1, SCN1A, SCN2A, GRIN2A, DNM1, and KCNA2. We also identified two further variants (in GRIA3 and CPA6) in two children requiring further investigation. Eleven variants were de novo, and in one paternal testing was not possible. Phenotypes were broadened for some variants identified. This study demonstrates that WES is a clinically useful screening tool for previously investigated unexplained EOEE and allows for reanalysis of data as new genes are being discovered. Detailed phenotyping allows for expansion of specific gene disorders leading to epileptic encephalopathy and emerging sub-phenotypes.

  2. Phenotypic variation in LADD syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, E; Pembrey, M; Graham, J M

    1985-01-01

    A mother and son are reported with chronic dacrocystitis, cup shaped ears, hearing loss, abnormal teeth, and poor formation of saliva and tears. They are similar to previously reported cases of lacrimo-auriculo-dento-digital (LADD) syndrome. The variability of expression of this autosomal dominant syndrome is discussed, and it is suggested that poor saliva and tear formation be added to the phenotype. Images PMID:4078868

  3. Wine Expertise Predicts Taste Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hayes, John E; Pickering, Gary J

    2012-03-01

    Taste phenotypes have long been studied in relation to alcohol intake, dependence, and family history, with contradictory findings. However, on balance - with appropriate caveats about populations tested, outcomes measured and psychophysical methods used - an association between variation in taste responsiveness and some alcohol behaviors is supported. Recent work suggests super-tasting (operationalized via propylthiouracil (PROP) bitterness) not only associates with heightened response but also with more acute discrimination between stimuli. Here, we explore relationships between food and beverage adventurousness and taste phenotype. A convenience sample of wine drinkers (n=330) were recruited in Ontario and phenotyped for PROP bitterness via filter paper disk. They also filled out a short questionnaire regarding willingness to try new foods, alcoholic beverages and wines as well as level of wine involvement, which was used to classify them as a wine expert (n=110) or wine consumer (n=220). In univariate logisitic models, food adventurousness predicted trying new wines and beverages but not expertise. Likewise, wine expertise predicted willingness to try new wines and beverages but not foods. In separate multivariate logistic models, willingness to try new wines and beverages was predicted by expertise and food adventurousness but not PROP. However, mean PROP bitterness was higher among wine experts than wine consumers, and the conditional distribution functions differed between experts and consumers. In contrast, PROP means and distributions did not differ with food adventurousness. These data suggest individuals may self-select for specific professions based on sensory ability (i.e., an active gene-environment correlation) but phenotype does not explain willingness to try new stimuli.

  4. Phenotyping jasmonate regulation of senescence.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Martin A; Berger, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Osmotic stress induces several senescence-like processes in leaves, such as specific changes in gene expression and yellowing. These processes are dependent on the accumulation of jasmonates and on intact jasmonate signaling. This chapter describes the treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves with sorbitol as an osmotic stress agent and the determination of the elicited phenotypes encompassing chlorophyll loss, degradation of plastidial membrane lipids, and induction of genes regulated by senescence and jasmonate.

  5. Identification and individualized prediction of clinical phenotypes in bipolar disorders using neurocognitive data, neuroimaging scans and machine learning.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mon-Ju; Mwangi, Benson; Bauer, Isabelle E; Passos, Ives C; Sanches, Marsal; Zunta-Soares, Giovana B; Meyer, Thomas D; Hasan, Khader M; Soares, Jair C

    2017-01-15

    Diagnosis, clinical management and research of psychiatric disorders remain subjective - largely guided by historically developed categories which may not effectively capture underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of dysfunction. Here, we report a novel approach of identifying and validating distinct and biologically meaningful clinical phenotypes of bipolar disorders using both unsupervised and supervised machine learning techniques. First, neurocognitive data were analyzed using an unsupervised machine learning approach and two distinct clinical phenotypes identified namely; phenotype I and phenotype II. Second, diffusion weighted imaging scans were pre-processed using the tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS) method and 'skeletonized' white matter fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) maps extracted. The 'skeletonized' white matter FA and MD maps were entered into the Elastic Net machine learning algorithm to distinguish individual subjects' phenotypic labels (e.g. phenotype I vs. phenotype II). This calculation was performed to ascertain whether the identified clinical phenotypes were biologically distinct. Original neurocognitive measurements distinguished individual subjects' phenotypic labels with 94% accuracy (sensitivity=92%, specificity=97%). TBSS derived FA and MD measurements predicted individual subjects' phenotypic labels with 76% and 65% accuracy respectively. In addition, individual subjects belonging to phenotypes I and II were distinguished from healthy controls with 57% and 92% accuracy respectively. Neurocognitive task variables identified as most relevant in distinguishing phenotypic labels included; Affective Go/No-Go (AGN), Cambridge Gambling Task (CGT) coupled with inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and callosal white matter pathways. These results suggest that there may exist two biologically distinct clinical phenotypes in bipolar disorders which can be identified from healthy controls with high accuracy and at an

  6. Phenotypic Alteration of Neutrophils in the Blood of HIV Seropositive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cloke, Tom; Munder, Markus; Bergin, Philip; Herath, Shanthi; Modolell, Manuel; Taylor, Graham; Müller, Ingrid; Kropf, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    We have recently identified a novel population of activated low-density granulocytes (LDGs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV seropositive patients. LDGs have a similar morphology to normal density granulocytes (NDGs), but are phenotypically different. Here we measured the expression levels of different phenotypic markers of granulocytes in the blood of HIV seropositive patients at different stages of HIV infection to determine whether the phenotype of NDGs and LDGs are affected by disease severity. Our results reveal that the phenotype of NDGs, but not that of LDGs, varies according to the severity of the disease. PMID:24039734

  7. Longitudinal imaging in C9orf72 mutation carriers: Relationship to phenotype.

    PubMed

    Floeter, Mary Kay; Bageac, Devin; Danielian, Laura E; Braun, Laura E; Traynor, Bryan J; Kwan, Justin Y

    2016-01-01

    Expansion mutations in the C9orf72 gene may cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), frontotemporal dementia (FTD), or mixtures of the two clinical phenotypes. Different imaging findings have been described for C9orf72-associated diseases in comparison with sporadic patients with the same phenotypes, but it is uncertain whether different phenotypes have a common genotype-associated imaging signature. To address this question, 27 unrelated C9orf72 expansion mutation carriers (C9 +) with varied phenotypes, 28 age-matched healthy controls and 22 patients with sporadic ALS (sALS) underwent 3T MRI scanning and clinical phenotyping. Measures of brain volumes and cortical thickness were extracted from T1 images. Compared to healthy controls and sALS patients, symptomatic C9 + subjects had greater ventricular volume loss and thalamic atrophy for age, with diffuse, patchy cortical thinning. Asymptomatic carriers did not differ from controls. C9 + ALS and ALS-FTD patients had less thinning of the motor cortex than sALS patients, but more thinning in extramotor regions, particularly in frontal and temporal lobes. C9 + ALS patients differed from sporadic ALS patients in the thickness of the superior frontal gyrus and lateral orbitofrontal cortex. Thickness of the precentral gyrus was weakly correlated with the revised ALS functional rating scale. Thickness of many cortical regions, including several frontal and temporal regions, was moderately correlated with letter fluency scores. Letter fluency scores were weakly correlated with ventricular and thalamic volume. To better understand how imaging findings are related to disease progression, nineteen C9 + subjects and 23 healthy controls were scanned approximately 6 months later. Ventricular volume increased in C9 + patients with FTD and ALS-FTD phenotypes and remained stable in asymptomatic C9 + subjects. We conclude that diffuse atrophy is a common underlying feature of disease associated with C9orf72 mutations

  8. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  9. Rare Variants in Neurodegeneration Associated Genes Revealed by Targeted Panel Sequencing in a German ALS Cohort.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Stefanie; Battke, Florian; Sprecher, Andrea; Munz, Marita; Synofzik, Matthis; Schöls, Ludger; Gasser, Thomas; Grehl, Torsten; Prudlo, Johannes; Biskup, Saskia

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive fatal multisystemic neurodegenerative disorder caused by preferential degeneration of upper and lower motor neurons. To further delineate the genetic architecture of the disease, we used comprehensive panel sequencing in a cohort of 80 German ALS patients. The panel covered 39 confirmed ALS genes and candidate genes, as well as 238 genes associated with other entities of the neurodegenerative disease spectrum. In addition, we performed repeat length analysis for C9orf72. Our aim was to (1) identify potentially disease-causing variants, to (2) assess a proposed model of polygenic inheritance in ALS and to (3) connect ALS with other neurodegenerative entities. We identified 79 rare potentially pathogenic variants in 27 ALS associated genes in familial and sporadic cases. Five patients had pathogenic C9orf72 repeat expansions, a further four patients harbored intermediate length repeat expansions. Our findings demonstrate that a genetic background of the disease can actually be found in a large proportion of seemingly sporadic cases and that it is not limited to putative most frequently affected genes such as C9orf72 or SOD1. Assessing the polygenic nature of ALS, we identified 15 patients carrying at least two rare potentially pathogenic variants in ALS associated genes including pathogenic or intermediate C9orf72 repeat expansions. Multiple variants might influence severity or duration of disease or could account for intrafamilial phenotypic variability or reduced penetrance. However, we could not observe a correlation with age of onset in this study. We further detected potentially pathogenic variants in other neurodegeneration associated genes in 12 patients, supporting the hypothesis of common pathways in neurodegenerative diseases and linking ALS to other entities of the neurodegenerative spectrum. Most interestingly we found variants in GBE1 and SPG7 which might represent differential diagnoses. Based on our

  10. Polydactyly: phenotypes, genetics and classification.

    PubMed

    Malik, S

    2014-03-01

    Polydactyly is one of the most common hereditary limb malformations featuring additional digits in hands and/or feet. It constituted the highest proportion among the congenital limb defects in various epidemiological surveys. Polydactyly, primarily presenting as an additional pre-axial or post-axial digit of autopod, is a highly heterogeneous condition and depicts broad inter- and intra-familial clinical variability. There is a plethora of polydactyly classification methods reported in the medical literature which approach the heterogeneity in polydactyly in various ways. In this communication, well-characterized, non-syndromic polydactylies in humans are reviewed. The cardinal features, phenotypic variability and molecular advances of each type have been presented. Polydactyly at cellular and developmental levels is mainly a failure in the control of digit number. Interestingly, GLI3 and SHH (ZRS/SHH enhancer), two antagonistic factors known to modulate digit number and identity during development, have also been implicated in polydactyly. Mutations in GLI3 and ZRS/SHH cause overlapping polydactyly phenotypes highlighting shared molecular cascades in the etiology of additional digits, and thus suggesting the lumping of at least six distinct polydactyly entities. However, owing to the extreme phenotypic and clinical heterogeneity witnessed in polydactyly a substantial genetic heterogeneity is expected across different populations and ethnic groups.

  11. Adaptive evolution of molecular phenotypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, Torsten; Nourmohammad, Armita; Lässig, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Molecular phenotypes link genomic information with organismic functions, fitness, and evolution. Quantitative traits are complex phenotypes that depend on multiple genomic loci. In this paper, we study the adaptive evolution of a quantitative trait under time-dependent selection, which arises from environmental changes or through fitness interactions with other co-evolving phenotypes. We analyze a model of trait evolution under mutations and genetic drift in a single-peak fitness seascape. The fitness peak performs a constrained random walk in the trait amplitude, which determines the time-dependent trait optimum in a given population. We derive analytical expressions for the distribution of the time-dependent trait divergence between populations and of the trait diversity within populations. Based on this solution, we develop a method to infer adaptive evolution of quantitative traits. Specifically, we show that the ratio of the average trait divergence and the diversity is a universal function of evolutionary time, which predicts the stabilizing strength and the driving rate of the fitness seascape. From an information-theoretic point of view, this function measures the macro-evolutionary entropy in a population ensemble, which determines the predictability of the evolutionary process. Our solution also quantifies two key characteristics of adapting populations: the cumulative fitness flux, which measures the total amount of adaptation, and the adaptive load, which is the fitness cost due to a population's lag behind the fitness peak.

  12. Phenotyping Clinical Disorders: Lessons Learned From Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jennifer M.; Ward, Renée M.; Allen-Brady, Kristina L.; Edwards, Todd L.; Norton, Peggy A.; Hartmann, Katherine E.; Hauser, Elizabeth R.; Velez Edwards, Digna R.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic epidemiology, the study of genetic contributions to risk for disease, is an innovative area in medicine. While research in this arena has advanced in other disciplines, few genetic epidemiologic studies have been conducted in obstetrics and gynecology. It is crucial that we study the genetic susceptibility for issues in women’s health, as this information will shape the new frontier of “personalized medicine.” To date, preterm birth may be one of the best examples of genetic susceptibility in obstetrics and gynecology, but many areas are being evaluated including endometriosis, fibroids, polycystic ovarian syndrome and pelvic floor disorders. An essential component to genetic epidemiologic studies is to characterize, or “phenotype,” the disorder in order to identify genetic effects. Given the growing importance of genomics and genetic epidemiology, we discuss the importance of accurate phenotyping of clinical disorders and highlight critical considerations and opportunities in phenotyping, using pelvic organ prolapse as a clinical example. PMID:23200709

  13. Meloidogyne partityla on Pecan Isozyme Phenotypes and Other Host.

    PubMed

    Starr, J L; Tomaszewski, E K; Mundo-Ocampo, M; Baldwin, J G

    1996-12-01

    Meloidogyne sp. from five pecan (Carya illinoensis) orchards in Texas were distinctive in host range and iszoyme profiles from common species of Meloidogyne but were morphologically congruent with Meloidogyne partityla Kleynhans, a species previously known only in South Africa. In addition to pecan, species of walnut (Juglans hindsii and J. regia) and hickory (C. ovata) also were hosts. No reproduction was observed on 15 other plant species from nine families, including several common hosts of other Meloidogyne spp. Three esterase phenotypes and two malate dehydrogenase phenotypes of M. partityla were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Each of these isozyme phenotypes was distinct from those of the more common species M. arenaria, M. hapla, M. incognita, and M. javanica.

  14. Meloidogyne partityla on Pecan Isozyme Phenotypes and Other Host

    PubMed Central

    Starr, J. L.; Tomaszewski, E. K.; Mundo-Ocampo, M.; Baldwin, J. G.

    1996-01-01

    Meloidogyne sp. from five pecan (Carya illinoensis) orchards in Texas were distinctive in host range and iszoyme profiles from common species of Meloidogyne but were morphologically congruent with Meloidogyne partityla Kleynhans, a species previously known only in South Africa. In addition to pecan, species of walnut (Juglans hindsii and J. regia) and hickory (C. ovata) also were hosts. No reproduction was observed on 15 other plant species from nine families, including several common hosts of other Meloidogyne spp. Three esterase phenotypes and two malate dehydrogenase phenotypes of M. partityla were identified by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Each of these isozyme phenotypes was distinct from those of the more common species M. arenaria, M. hapla, M. incognita, and M. javanica. PMID:19277175

  15. Mycobacterial mistranslation is necessary and sufficient for rifampicin phenotypic resistance

    PubMed Central

    Javid, Babak; Sorrentino, Flavia; Toosky, Melody; Zheng, Wen; Pinkham, Jessica T.; Jain, Nina; Pan, Miaomiao; Deighan, Padraig; Rubin, Eric J.

    2014-01-01

    Errors are inherent in all biological systems. Errors in protein translation are particularly frequent giving rise to a collection of protein quasi-species, the diversity of which will vary according to the error rate. As mistranslation rates rise, these new proteins could produce new phenotypes, although none have been identified to date. Here, we find that mycobacteria substitute glutamate for glutamine and aspartate for asparagine at high rates under specific growth conditions. Increasing the substitution rate results in remarkable phenotypic resistance to rifampicin, whereas decreasing mistranslation produces increased susceptibility to the antibiotic. These phenotypic changes are reflected in differential susceptibility of RNA polymerase to the drug. We propose that altering translational fidelity represents a unique form of environmental adaptation. PMID:24395793

  16. Phenotyping for drought tolerance of crops in the genomics era

    PubMed Central

    Tuberosa, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Improving crops yield under water-limited conditions is the most daunting challenge faced by breeders. To this end, accurate, relevant phenotyping plays an increasingly pivotal role for the selection of drought-resilient genotypes and, more in general, for a meaningful dissection of the quantitative genetic landscape that underscores the adaptive response of crops to drought. A major and universally recognized obstacle to a more effective translation of the results produced by drought-related studies into improved cultivars is the difficulty in properly phenotyping in a high-throughput fashion in order to identify the quantitative trait loci that govern yield and related traits across different water regimes. This review provides basic principles and a broad set of references useful for the management of phenotyping practices for the study and genetic dissection of drought tolerance and, ultimately, for the release of drought-tolerant cultivars. PMID:23049510

  17. Phenotyping transgenic wheat for drought resistance.

    PubMed

    Saint Pierre, Carolina; Crossa, José L; Bonnett, David; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Reynolds, Matthew P

    2012-03-01

    Realistic experimental protocols to screen for drought adaptation in controlled conditions are crucial if high throughput phenotyping is to be used for the identification of high performance lines, and is especially important in the evaluation of transgenes where stringent biosecurity measures restrict the frequency of open field trials. Transgenic DREB1A-wheat events were selected under greenhouse conditions by evaluating survival and recovery under severe drought (SURV) as well as for water use efficiency (WUE). Greenhouse experiments confirmed the advantages of transgenic events in recovery after severe water stress. Under field conditions, the group of transgenic lines did not generally outperform the controls in terms of grain yield under water deficit. However, the events selected for WUE were identified as lines that combine an acceptable yield-even higher yield (WUE-11) under well irrigated conditions-and stable performance across the different environments generated by the experimental treatments.

  18. Cluster Analysis and Clinical Asthma Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Dominic E.; Berry, Michael A.; Thomas, Michael; Brightling, Christopher E.; Wardlaw, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Heterogeneity in asthma expression is multidimensional, including variability in clinical, physiologic, and pathologic parameters. Classification requires consideration of these disparate domains in a unified model. Objectives To explore the application of a multivariate mathematical technique, k-means cluster analysis, for identifying distinct phenotypic groups. Methods We performed k-means cluster analysis in three independent asthma populations. Clusters of a population managed in primary care (n = 184) with predominantly mild to moderate disease, were compared with a refractory asthma population managed in secondary care (n = 187). We then compared differences in asthma outcomes (exacerbation frequency and change in corticosteroid dose at 12 mo) between clusters in a third population of 68 subjects with predominantly refractory asthma, clustered at entry into a randomized trial comparing a strategy of minimizing eosinophilic inflammation (inflammation-guided strategy) with standard care. Measurements and Main Results Two clusters (early-onset atopic and obese, noneosinophilic) were common to both asthma populations. Two clusters characterized by marked discordance between symptom expression and eosinophilic airway inflammation (early-onset symptom predominant and late-onset inflammation predominant) were specific to refractory asthma. Inflammation-guided management was superior for both discordant subgroups leading to a reduction in exacerbation frequency in the inflammation-predominant cluster (3.53 [SD, 1.18] vs. 0.38 [SD, 0.13] exacerbation/patient/yr, P = 0.002) and a dose reduction of inhaled corticosteroid in the symptom-predominant cluster (mean difference, 1,829 μg beclomethasone equivalent/d [95% confidence interval, 307–3,349 μg]; P = 0.02). Conclusions Cluster analysis offers a novel multidimensional approach for identifying asthma phenotypes that exhibit differences in clinical response to treatment algorithms. PMID:18480428

  19. Glucose metabolic phenotype of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Anthony KC; Bruce, Jason IE; Siriwardena, Ajith K

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To construct a global “metabolic phenotype” of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) reflecting tumour-related metabolic enzyme expression. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was performed using OvidSP and PubMed databases using keywords “pancreatic cancer” and individual glycolytic and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (MOP) enzymes. Both human and animal studies investigating the oncological effect of enzyme expression changes and inhibitors in both an in vitro and in vivo setting were included in the review. Data reporting changes in enzyme expression and the effects on PDAC cells, such as survival and metastatic potential, were extracted to construct a metabolic phenotype. RESULTS: Seven hundred and ten papers were initially retrieved, and were screened to meet the review inclusion criteria. 107 unique articles were identified as reporting data involving glycolytic enzymes, and 28 articles involving MOP enzymes in PDAC. Data extraction followed a pre-defined protocol. There is consistent over-expression of glycolytic enzymes and lactate dehydrogenase in keeping with the Warburg effect to facilitate rapid adenosine-triphosphate production from glycolysis. Certain isoforms of these enzymes were over-expressed specifically in PDAC. Altering expression levels of HK, PGI, FBA, enolase, PK-M2 and LDA-A with metabolic inhibitors have shown a favourable effect on PDAC, thus identifying these as potential therapeutic targets. However, the Warburg effect on MOP enzymes is less clear, with different expression levels at different points in the Krebs cycle resulting in a fundamental change of metabolite levels, suggesting that other essential anabolic pathways are being stimulated. CONCLUSION: Further characterisation of the PDAC metabolic phenotype is necessary as currently there are few clinical studies and no successful clinical trials targeting metabolic enzymes. PMID:27022229

  20. Atypical Ligon Lintless-2 Phenotype in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mutant Li2 is reported to be a dominant single gene mutation in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. It has normal vegetative phenotypic morphology and the phenotype of the seed cotton is reported to be fuzzy seed with short fibers. The objective of this research was to report on atypical phenotypes ob...

  1. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    DOE PAGES

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; ...

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, inmore » Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.« less

  2. Towards an informative mutant phenotype for every bacterial gene

    SciTech Connect

    Deutschbauer, Adam; Price, Morgan N.; Wetmore, Kelly M.; Tarjan, Daniel R.; Xu, Zhuchen; Shao, Wenjen; Leon, Dacia; Arkin, Adam P.; Skerker, Jeffrey M.

    2014-08-11

    Mutant phenotypes provide strong clues to the functions of the underlying genes and could allow annotation of the millions of sequenced yet uncharacterized bacterial genes. However, it is not known how many genes have a phenotype under laboratory conditions, how many phenotypes are biologically interpretable for predicting gene function, and what experimental conditions are optimal to maximize the number of genes with a phenotype. To address these issues, we measured the mutant fitness of 1,586 genes of the ethanol-producing bacterium Zymomonas mobilis ZM4 across 492 diverse experiments and found statistically significant phenotypes for 89% of all assayed genes. Thus, in Z. mobilis, most genes have a functional consequence under laboratory conditions. We demonstrate that 41% of Z. mobilis genes have both a strong phenotype and a similar fitness pattern (cofitness) to another gene, and are therefore good candidates for functional annotation using mutant fitness. Among 502 poorly characterized Z. mobilis genes, we identified a significant cofitness relationship for 174. For 57 of these genes without a specific functional annotation, we found additional evidence to support the biological significance of these gene-gene associations, and in 33 instances, we were able to predict specific physiological or biochemical roles for the poorly characterized genes. Last, we identified a set of 79 diverse mutant fitness experiments in Z. mobilis that are nearly as biologically informative as the entire set of 492 experiments. Therefore, our work provides a blueprint for the functional annotation of diverse bacteria using mutant fitness.

  3. Strategy Revealing Phenotypic Differences among Synthetic Oscillator Designs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in identifying and characterizing the component parts of genetic oscillators, which play central roles in all organisms. Nonlinear interaction among components is sufficiently complex that mathematical models are required to elucidate their elusive integrated behavior. Although natural and synthetic oscillators exhibit common architectures, there are numerous differences that are poorly understood. Utilizing synthetic biology to uncover basic principles of simpler circuits is a way to advance understanding of natural circadian clocks and rhythms. Following this strategy, we address the following questions: What are the implications of different architectures and molecular modes of transcriptional control for the phenotypic repertoire of genetic oscillators? Are there designs that are more realizable or robust? We compare synthetic oscillators involving one of three architectures and various combinations of the two modes of transcriptional control using a methodology that provides three innovations: a rigorous definition of phenotype, a procedure for deconstructing complex systems into qualitatively distinct phenotypes, and a graphical representation for illuminating the relationship between genotype, environment, and the qualitatively distinct phenotypes of a system. These methods provide a global perspective on the behavioral repertoire, facilitate comparisons of alternatives, and assist the rational design of synthetic gene circuitry. In particular, the results of their application here reveal distinctive phenotypes for several designs that have been studied experimentally as well as a best design among the alternatives that has yet to be constructed and tested. PMID:25019938

  4. Hereditary deafness and phenotyping in humans.

    PubMed

    Bitner-Glindzicz, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Hereditary deafness has proved to be extremely heterogeneous genetically with more than 40 genes mapped or cloned for non-syndromic dominant deafness and 30 for autosomal recessive non-syndromic deafness. In spite of significant advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of hearing loss, identifying the precise genetic cause in an individual remains difficult. Consequently, it is important to exclude syndromic causes of deafness by clinical and special investigation and to use all available phenotypic clues for diagnosis. A clinical approach to the aetiological investigation of individuals with hearing loss is suggested, which includes ophthalmology review, renal ultrasound scan and neuro-imaging of petrous temporal bone. Molecular screening of the GJB2 (Connexin 26) gene should be undertaken in all cases of non-syndromic deafness where the cause cannot be identified, since it is a common cause of recessive hearing impairment, the screening is straightforward, and the phenotype unremarkable. By the same token, mitochondrial inheritance of hearing loss should be considered in all multigeneration families, particularly if there is a history of exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics, since genetic testing of specific mitochondrial genes is technically feasible. Most forms of non-syndromic autosomal recessive hearing impairment cause a prelingual hearing loss, which is generally severe to profound and not associated with abnormal radiology. Exceptions to this include DFNB2 (MYO7A), DFNB8/10 (TMPRSS3) and DFNB16 (STRC) where age of onset may sometimes be later on in childhood, DFNB4 (SLC26A4) where there may be dilated vestibular aqueducts and endolymphatic sacs, and DFNB9 (OTOF) where there may also be an associated auditory neuropathy. Unusual phenotypes in autosomal dominant forms of deafness, include low frequency hearing loss in DFNA1 (HDIA1) and DFNA6/14/38 (WFS1), mid-frequency hearing loss in DFNA8/12 (TECTA), DFNA13 (COL11A2) and vestibular symptoms

  5. Focality, stochasticity and neuroanatomic propagation in ALS pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ravits, John

    2014-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) phenotypes such as limb ALS, bulbar ALS, primary lateral sclerosis and primary muscular atrophy are highly heterogeneous and exist on a continuum. These are largely determined by the neuroanatomy of the underlying pathological changes, which can be clinically imputed. Deconstructing these early in disease, before temporal-spatial summation induces complexity, shows that ALS begins focally at a seemingly random location and progresses contiguously. This suggests that focality and anatomic propagation of pathology are significant parts of pathogenesis-disease propagates over space as well as progresses over time. Focality and neuroanatomic propagation can explain how dominant genetic traits manifest with heterogeneous phenotypes, since the anatomic site of outbreak is a prime determinant of phenotype. Focality and neuroanatomic propagation can also explain why frontotemporal dementia (FTD), a neurodegeneration closely related to ALS, has heterogeneous phenotypes, since here too the anatomic site of the outbreak is a prime determinant of phenotype. There are two distinct types of neuroanatomic propagation: contiguous propagation, which occurs side-to-side regionally through the extracellular matrix independent of synaptic connection; and network propagation, which occurs end-to-end dependent on synaptic connections and axonal transmission in connected neuronal networks. The molecular basis of neuroanatomic propagation is unknown, although prion-like misfolding and templating of pathogenic proteins is a compelling unifying hypothesis.

  6. Phenotypic, genetic, and environmental properties of the portrait values questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Schermer, Julie Aitken; Feather, N T; Zhu, Gu; Martin, Nicholas G

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the 10 value types from the Portrait Values Questionnaire (PVQ; Schwartz et al., 2001) both at the phenotypic (observed) level as well as the genetic and environmental level. Australian twins (N = 695) completed the PVQ as part of a larger questionnaire battery. Nine of the value types were found to have a genetic component with heritability estimates ranging from 10.8% for power to 38% for conformity. The achievement scale was best explained by environmental factors. The interscale correlations were found to range from -.02 to .70 at the phenotypic level. Of these 45 correlations, 16 were found to be explained by overlapping genetic factors and almost all (41) were found to have significant unique environment correlations.

  7. Phenotype of normal hairline maturation.

    PubMed

    Rassman, William R; Pak, Jae P; Kim, Jino

    2013-08-01

    Hairlines change shape with age, starting at birth. A good head of hair is frequently present some time after ages 3 to 5 years. The look of childhood has its corresponding hairline, and, as the child grows and develops into adulthood, facial morphology migrate changes from a childlike look to a more mature look. This article discusses the dynamics of hairline evolution and the phenotypic variations of the front and side hairlines in men and women. A modeling system is introduced that provides a common language to define the various anatomic points of the full range of hairlines.

  8. Rapid Progression of Sporadic ALS in a Patient Carrying SOD1 p.Gly13Arg Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Jin; Bae, Jae-Han; Kim, Jeong-Min; Kim, Hye Ryoun; Yoon, Byung-Nam; Sung, Jung-Joon

    2016-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most common adult onset motor neuron disease, is pathologically characterized by progressive loss of the upper and lower motor neurons. Mutations in the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene (SOD1) account for about 20% of familial ALS cases and a small percentage of sporadic ALS (SALS) cases, and have revealed a validated genotype-phenotype correlation. Herein, we report a p.Gly13Arg mutation in SOD1 exon 1 in a patient with SALS who presented with a rapidly progressive course, predominantly affecting the lower motor neurons. A 48-year-old man presented with progressive weakness and muscle atrophy of the left upper and lower limbs, followed by muscle fasciculation and cramping. The clinical features of the patient were clearly suggestive of ALS, and implied a sporadic form with rapid progression, predominantly affecting the lower motor neurons. Sequencing of the SOD1 gene by PCR revealed a missense mutation of G to C (c.37G>C) in exon 1, and amino acid substitution of glycine by arginine (p.Gly13Arg). This is the first case identifying the p.Gly13Arg mutation of SOD1 in the Korean population, and clinical assessments of this patient revealed a different phenotype compared with other cases. PMID:28035186

  9. Distinct clinical phenotypes of airways disease defined by cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Weatherall, M; Travers, J; Shirtcliffe, P M; Marsh, S E; Williams, M V; Nowitz, M R; Aldington, S; Beasley, R

    2009-10-01

    Airways disease is currently classified using diagnostic labels such as asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. The current definitions of these classifications may not reflect the phenotypes of airways disease in the community, which may have differing disease processes, clinical features or responses to treatment. The aim of the present study was to use cluster analysis to explore clinical phenotypes in a community population with airways disease. A random population sample of 25-75-yr-old adults underwent detailed investigation, including a clinical questionnaire, pulmonary function tests, nitric oxide measurements, blood tests and chest computed tomography. Cluster analysis was performed on the subgroup with current respiratory symptoms or obstructive spirometric results. Subjects with a complete dataset (n = 175) were included in the cluster analysis. Five clusters were identified with the following characteristics: cluster 1: severe and markedly variable airflow obstruction with features of atopic asthma, chronic bronchitis and emphysema; cluster 2: features of emphysema alone; cluster 3: atopic asthma with eosinophilic airways inflammation; cluster 4: mild airflow obstruction without other dominant phenotypic features; and cluster 5: chronic bronchitis in nonsmokers. Five distinct clinical phenotypes of airflow obstruction were identified. If confirmed in other populations, these findings may form the basis of a modified taxonomy for the disorders of airways obstruction.

  10. Iris phenotypes and pigment dispersion caused by genes influencing pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Michael G; Hawes, Norman L; Trantow, Colleen M; Chang, Bo; John, Simon W M

    2008-10-01

    Spontaneous mutations altering mouse coat colors have been a classic resource for discovery of numerous molecular pathways. Although often overlooked, the mouse iris is also densely pigmented and easily observed, thus representing a similarly powerful opportunity for studying pigment cell biology. Here, we present an analysis of iris phenotypes among 16 mouse strains with mutations influencing melanosomes. Many of these strains exhibit biologically and medically relevant phenotypes, including pigment dispersion, a common feature of several human ocular diseases. Pigment dispersion was identified in several strains with mutant alleles known to influence melanosomes, including beige, light, and vitiligo. Pigment dispersion was also detected in the recently arising spontaneous coat color variant, nm2798. We have identified the nm2798 mutation as a missense mutation in the Dct gene, an identical re-occurrence of the slaty light mutation. These results suggest that dysregulated events of melanosomes can be potent contributors to the pigment dispersion phenotype. Combined, these findings illustrate the utility of studying iris phenotypes as a means of discovering new pathways, and re-linking old ones, to processes of pigmented cells in health and disease.

  11. Analysis of the human diseasome using phenotype similarity between common, genetic, and infectious diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2015-06-01

    Phenotypes are the observable characteristics of an organism arising from its response to the environment. Phenotypes associated with engineered and natural genetic variation are widely recorded using phenotype ontologies in model organisms, as are signs and symptoms of human Mendelian diseases in databases such as OMIM and Orphanet. Exploiting these resources, several computational methods have been developed for integration and analysis of phenotype data to identify the genetic etiology of diseases or suggest plausible interventions. A similar resource would be highly useful not only for rare and Mendelian diseases, but also for common, complex and infectious diseases. We apply a semantic text-mining approach to identify the phenotypes (signs and symptoms) associated with over 6,000 diseases. We evaluate our text-mined phenotypes by demonstrating that they can correctly identify known disease-associated genes in mice and humans with high accuracy. Using a phenotypic similarity measure, we generate a human disease network in which diseases that have similar signs and symptoms cluster together, and we use this network to identify closely related diseases based on common etiological, anatomical as well as physiological underpinnings.

  12. Genetic mapping of quantitative phenotypic traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Thevelein, Johan M; Nevoigt, Elke

    2012-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has become a favorite production organism in industrial biotechnology presenting new challenges to yeast engineers in terms of introducing advantageous traits such as stress tolerances. Exploring subspecies diversity of S. cerevisiae has identified strains that bear industrially relevant phenotypic traits. Provided that the genetic basis of such phenotypic traits can be identified inverse engineering allows the targeted modification of production strains. Most phenotypic traits of interest in S. cerevisiae strains are quantitative, meaning that they are controlled by multiple genetic loci referred to as quantitative trait loci (QTL). A straightforward approach to identify the genetic basis of quantitative traits is QTL mapping which aims at the allocation of the genetic determinants to regions in the genome. The application of high-density oligonucleotide arrays and whole-genome re-sequencing to detect genetic variations between strains has facilitated the detection of large numbers of molecular markers thus allowing high-resolution QTL mapping over the entire genome. This review focuses on the basic principle and state of the art of QTL mapping in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore we discuss several approaches developed during the last decade that allow down-scaling of the regions identified by QTL mapping to the gene level. We also emphasize the particular challenges of QTL mapping in nonlaboratory strains of S. cerevisiae.

  13. Phenotypic plasticity in bacterial plasmids.

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Paul E

    2004-01-01

    Plasmid pB15 was previously shown to evolve increased horizontal (infectious) transfer at the expense of reduced vertical (intergenerational) transfer and vice versa, a key trade-off assumed in theories of parasite virulence. Whereas the models predict that susceptible host abundance should determine which mode of transfer is selectively favored, host density failed to mediate the trade-off in pB15. One possibility is that the plasmid's transfer deviates from the assumption that horizontal spread (conjugation) occurs in direct proportion to cell density. I tested this hypothesis using Escherichia coli/pB15 associations in laboratory serial culture. Contrary to most models of plasmid transfer kinetics, my data show that pB15 invades static (nonshaking) bacterial cultures only at intermediate densities. The results can be explained by phenotypic plasticity in traits governing plasmid transfer. As cells become more numerous, the plasmid's conjugative transfer unexpectedly declines, while the trade-off between transmission routes causes vertical transfer to increase. Thus, at intermediate densities the plasmid's horizontal transfer can offset selection against plasmid-bearing cells, but at high densities pB15 conjugates so poorly that it cannot invade. I discuss adaptive vs. nonadaptive causes for the phenotypic plasticity, as well as potential mechanisms that may lead to complex transfer dynamics of plasmids in liquid environments. PMID:15166133

  14. Phenotyping bananas for drought resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Iyyakkutty; Uma, Subbaraya; Vaganan, Muthu Mayil; Mustaffa, Mohamed M.

    2012-01-01

    Drought has emerged as one of the major constraints in banana production. Its effects are pronounced substantially in the tropics and sub-tropics of the world due to climate change. Bananas are quite sensitive to drought; however, genotypes with “B” genome are more tolerant to abiotic stresses than those solely based on “A” genome. In particular, bananas with “ABB” genomes are more tolerant to drought and other abiotic stresses than other genotypes. A good phenotyping plan is a prerequisite for any improvement program for targeted traits. In the present article, known drought tolerant traits of other crop plants are validated in bananas with different genomic backgrounds and presented. Since, banana is recalcitrant to breeding, strategies for making hybrids between different genomic backgrounds are also discussed. Stomatal conductance, cell membrane stability (CMS), leaf emergence rate, rate of leaf senescence, RWC, and bunch yield under soil moisture deficit stress are some of the traits associated with drought tolerance. Among these stress bunch yield under drought should be given top priority for phenotyping. In the light of recently released Musa genome draft sequence, the molecular breeders may have interest in developing molecular markers for drought resistance. PMID:23443573

  15. Genotype versus phenotype in families with androgen insensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Boehmer, A L; Brinkmann, O; Brüggenwirth, H; van Assendelft, C; Otten, B J; Verleun-Mooijman, M C; Niermeijer, M F; Brunner, H G; Rouwé, C W; Waelkens, J J; Oostdijk, W; Kleijer, W J; van der Kwast, T H; de Vroede, M A; Drop, S L

    2001-09-01

    Androgen insensitivity syndrome encompasses a wide range of phenotypes, which are caused by numerous different mutations in the AR gene. Detailed information on the genotype/phenotype relationship in androgen insensitivity syndrome is important for sex assignment, treatment of androgen insensitivity syndrome patients, genetic counseling of their families, and insight into the functional domains of the AR. The commonly accepted concept of dependence on fetal androgens of the development of Wolffian ducts was studied in complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) patients. In a nationwide survey in The Netherlands, all cases (n = 49) with the presumptive diagnosis androgen insensitivity syndrome known to pediatric endocrinologists and clinical geneticists were studied. After studying the clinical phenotype, mutation analysis and functional analysis of mutant receptors were performed using genital skin fibroblasts and in vitro expression studies. Here we report the findings in families with multiple affected cases. Fifty-nine percent of androgen insensitivity syndrome patients had other affected relatives. A total of 17 families were studied, seven families with CAIS (18 patients), nine families with partial androgen insensitivity (24 patients), and one family with female prepubertal phenotypes (two patients). No phenotypic variation was observed in families with CAIS. However, phenotypic variation was observed in one-third of families with partial androgen insensitivity resulting in different sex of rearing and differences in requirement of reconstructive surgery. Intrafamilial phenotypic variation was observed for mutations R846H, M771I, and deletion of amino acid N682. Four newly identified mutations were found. Follow-up in families with different AR gene mutations provided information on residual androgen action in vivo and the development of the prepubertal and adult phenotype. Patients with a functional complete defective AR had some pubic hair, Tanner

  16. Phenotypic Correlates of HIV-1 Macrophage Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Arrildt, Kathryn T.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Joseph, Sarah B.; Dukhovlinova, Elena N.; Graham, William D.; Ping, Li-Hua; Schnell, Gretja; Sturdevant, Christa B.; Kincer, Laura P.; Mallewa, Macpherson; Heyderman, Robert S.; Van Rie, Annelies; Cohen, Myron S.; Spudich, Serena; Price, Richard W.; Montefiori, David C.

    2015-01-01

    evolve and differ from CCR5-using T cell-tropic viruses may provide insights into viral evolution and pathogenesis within the central nervous system. We characterized the HIV-1 env viral entry gene from subject-matched macrophage-tropic and T cell-tropic viruses to identify entry features of macrophage-tropic viruses. We observed several differences between T cell-tropic and macrophage-tropic Env proteins, including functional differences with host CD4 receptor engagement and possible changes in the CD4 binding site and V1/V2 region. We also identified viruses with phenotypes between that of “true” macrophage-tropic and T cell-tropic viruses, which may represent evolutionary intermediates in a multistep process to macrophage tropism. PMID:26339058

  17. ALS and Oxidative Stress: The Neurovascular Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Keshav; Gupta, Pawan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress and angiogenic factors have been placed as the prime focus of scientific investigations after an establishment of link between vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGF), hypoxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) pathogenesis. Deletion of the hypoxia-response element in the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter and mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) which are characterised by atrophy and muscle weakness resulted in phenotype resembling human ALS in mice. This results in lower motor neurodegeneration thus establishing an important link between motor neuron degeneration, vasculature, and angiogenic molecules. In this review, we have presented human, animal, and in vitro studies which suggest that molecules like VEGF have a therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic potential in ALS. Involvement of vascular growth factors and hypoxia response elements also highlights the converging role of oxidative stress and neurovascular network for understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders like ALS. PMID:24367722

  18. Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Luis; Chisholm, Rebecca; Clairambault, Jean; Escargueil, Alexandre; Lorenzi, Tommaso; Lorz, Alexander; Trélat, Emmanuel

    2016-06-01

    Phenotype heterogeneity in cancer cell populations, be it of genetic, epigenetic or stochastic origin, has been identified as a main source of resistance to drug treatments and a major source of therapeutic failures in cancers. The molecular mechanisms of drug resistance are partly understood at the single cell level (e.g., overexpression of ABC transporters or of detoxication enzymes), but poorly predictable in tumours, where they are hypothesised to rely on heterogeneity at the cell population scale, which is thus the right level to describe cancer growth and optimise its control by therapeutic strategies in the clinic. We review a few results from the biological literature on the subject, and from mathematical models that have been published to predict and control evolution towards drug resistance in cancer cell populations. We propose, based on the latter, optimisation strategies of combined treatments to limit emergence of drug resistance to cytotoxic drugs in cancer cell populations, in the monoclonal situation, which limited as it is still retains consistent features of cell population heterogeneity. The polyclonal situation, that may be understood as "bet hedging" of the tumour, thus protecting itself from different sources of drug insults, may lie beyond such strategies and will need further developments. In the monoclonal situation, we have designed an optimised therapeutic strategy relying on a scheduled combination of cytotoxic and cytostatic treatments that can be adapted to different situations of cancer treatments. Finally, we review arguments for biological theoretical frameworks proposed at different time and development scales, the so-called atavistic model (diachronic view relying on Darwinian genotype selection in the coursof billions of years) and the Waddington-like epigenetic landscape endowed with evolutionary quasi-potential (synchronic view relying on Lamarckian phenotype instruction of a given genome by reversible mechanisms), to

  19. Phenotypic plasticity: molecular mechanisms and adaptive significance.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Scott A; Panhuis, Tami M; Stoehr, Andrew M

    2012-04-01

    Phenotypic plasticity can be broadly defined as the ability of one genotype to produce more than one phenotype when exposed to different environments, as the modification of developmental events by the environment, or as the ability of an individual organism to alter its phenotype in response to changes in environmental conditions. Not surprisingly, the study of phenotypic plasticity is innately interdisciplinary and encompasses aspects of behavior, development, ecology, evolution, genetics, genomics, and multiple physiological systems at various levels of biological organization. From an ecological and evolutionary perspective, phenotypic plasticity may be a powerful means of adaptation and dramatic examples of phenotypic plasticity include predator avoidance, insect wing polymorphisms, the timing of metamorphosis in amphibians, osmoregulation in fishes, and alternative reproductive tactics in male vertebrates. From a human health perspective, documented examples of plasticity most commonly include the results of exercise, training, and/or dieting on human morphology and physiology. Regardless of the discipline, phenotypic plasticity has increasingly become the target of a plethora of investigations with the methodological approaches utilized ranging from the molecular to whole organsimal. In this article, we provide a brief historical outlook on phenotypic plasticity; examine its potential adaptive significance; emphasize recent molecular approaches that provide novel insight into underlying mechanisms, and highlight examples in fishes and insects. Finally, we highlight examples of phenotypic plasticity from a human health perspective and underscore the use of mouse models as a powerful tool in understanding the genetic architecture of phenotypic plasticity.

  20. Identification of Loci Modulating the Cardiovascular and Skeletal Phenotypes of Marfan Syndrome in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Gustavo R.; Massironi, Silvia M. G.; Pereira, Lygia V.

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant disease of the connective tissue, affecting mostly the skeletal, ocular and cardiovascular systems, caused by mutations in the FBN1 gene. The existence of modifier genes has been postulated based on the wide clinical variability of manifestations in patients, even among those with the same FBN1 mutation. Although isogenic mouse models of the disease were fundamental in dissecting the molecular mechanism of pathogenesis, they do not address the effect of genetic background on the disease phenotype. Here, we use a new mouse model, mgΔloxPneo, which presents different phenotype severity dependent on the genetic backgrounds, to identify genes involved in modulating MFS phenotype. F2 heterozygotes showed wide phenotypic variability, with no correlations between phenotypic severities of the different affected systems, indicating that each has its specific set of modifier genes. Individual analysis of the phenotypes, with SNP microarrays, identified two suggestive QTL each to the cardiovascular and skeletal, and one significant QTL to the skeletal phenotype. Epistatic interactions between the QTL account for 47.4% and 53.5% of variation in the skeletal and cardiovascular phenotypes, respectively. This is the first study that maps modifier loci for MFS, showing the complex genetic architecture underlying the disease. PMID:26927851

  1. EuroPhenome: a repository for high-throughput mouse phenotyping data.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Hugh; Beck, Tim; Blake, Andrew; Gates, Hilary; Adams, Niels; Debouzy, Guillaume; Leblanc, Sophie; Lengger, Christoph; Maier, Holger; Melvin, David; Meziane, Hamid; Richardson, Dave; Wells, Sara; White, Jacqui; Wood, Joe; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Brown, Steve D M; Hancock, John M; Mallon, Ann-Marie

    2010-01-01

    The broad aim of biomedical science in the postgenomic era is to link genomic and phenotype information to allow deeper understanding of the processes leading from genomic changes to altered phenotype and disease. The EuroPhenome project (http://www.EuroPhenome.org) is a comprehensive resource for raw and annotated high-throughput phenotyping data arising from projects such as EUMODIC. EUMODIC is gathering data from the EMPReSSslim pipeline (http://www.empress.har.mrc.ac.uk/) which is performed on inbred mouse strains and knock-out lines arising from the EUCOMM project. The EuroPhenome interface allows the user to access the data via the phenotype or genotype. It also allows the user to access the data in a variety of ways, including graphical display, statistical analysis and access to the raw data via web services. The raw phenotyping data captured in EuroPhenome is annotated by an annotation pipeline which automatically identifies statistically different mutants from the appropriate baseline and assigns ontology terms for that specific test. Mutant phenotypes can be quickly identified using two EuroPhenome tools: PhenoMap, a graphical representation of statistically relevant phenotypes, and mining for a mutant using ontology terms. To assist with data definition and cross-database comparisons, phenotype data is annotated using combinations of terms from biological ontologies.

  2. Co-clustering phenome–genome for phenotype classification and disease gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, TaeHyun; Atluri, Gowtham; Xie, MaoQiang; Dey, Sanjoy; Hong, Changjin; Kumar, Vipin; Kuang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the categorization of human diseases is critical for reliably identifying disease causal genes. Recently, genome-wide studies of abnormal chromosomal locations related to diseases have mapped >2000 phenotype–gene relations, which provide valuable information for classifying diseases and identifying candidate genes as drug targets. In this article, a regularized non-negative matrix tri-factorization (R-NMTF) algorithm is introduced to co-cluster phenotypes and genes, and simultaneously detect associations between the detected phenotype clusters and gene clusters. The R-NMTF algorithm factorizes the phenotype–gene association matrix under the prior knowledge from phenotype similarity network and protein–protein interaction network, supervised by the label information from known disease classes and biological pathways. In the experiments on disease phenotype–gene associations in OMIM and KEGG disease pathways, R-NMTF significantly improved the classification of disease phenotypes and disease pathway genes compared with support vector machines and Label Propagation in cross-validation on the annotated phenotypes and genes. The newly predicted phenotypes in each disease class are highly consistent with human phenotype ontology annotations. The roles of the new member genes in the disease pathways are examined and validated in the protein–protein interaction subnetworks. Extensive literature review also confirmed many new members of the disease classes and pathways as well as the predicted associations between disease phenotype classes and pathways. PMID:22735708

  3. Clinical phenotypes in adult patients with bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Aliberti, Stefano; Lonni, Sara; Dore, Simone; McDonnell, Melissa J; Goeminne, Pieter C; Dimakou, Katerina; Fardon, Thomas C; Rutherford, Robert; Pesci, Alberto; Restrepo, Marcos I; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Chalmers, James D

    2016-04-01

    Bronchiectasis is a heterogeneous disease. This study aimed at identifying discrete groups of patients with different clinical and biological characteristics and long-term outcomes.This was a secondary analysis of five European databases of prospectively enrolled adult outpatients with bronchiectasis. Principal component and cluster analyses were performed using demographics, comorbidities, and clinical, radiological, functional and microbiological variables collected during the stable state. Exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during a 3-year follow-up were recorded. Clusters were externally validated in an independent cohort of patients with bronchiectasis, also investigating inflammatory markers in sputum.Among 1145 patients (median age 66 years; 40% male), four clusters were identified driven by the presence of chronic infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosaor other pathogens and daily sputum: "Pseudomonas" (16%), "Other chronic infection" (24%), "Daily sputum" (33%) and "Dry bronchiectasis" (27%). Patients in the four clusters showed significant differences in terms of quality of life, exacerbations, hospitalisations and mortality during follow-up. In the validation cohort, free neutrophil elastase activity, myeloperoxidase activity and interleukin-1β levels in sputum were significantly different among the clusters.Identification of four clinical phenotypes in bronchiectasis could favour focused treatments in future interventional studies designed to alter the natural history of the disease.

  4. Genotype-Phenotype Correlations in Autosomal Dominant Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Ben Amor, I. Mouna; Glorieux, Francis H.; Rauch, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta, discussed in Baldridge et al. 2008 is an inherited bone fragility disorder with a wide range of clinical severity that in the majority of cases is caused by mutations in COL1A1 or COL1A2, the genes that encode the two collagen type I alpha chains. Here we describe genotype-phenotype correlations in OI patients who have mutations affecting collagen type I. This paper is based on findings in a large single-centre OI population and a review of the literature. PMID:21912751

  5. Reply to Gopalswamy et al.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.

    2003-01-01

    The comment of Gopalswamy et al. (thereafter GMY) relates to a letter discussing coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary ejecta and geomagnetic storms. GMY contend that Cane et al. incorrectly identified ejecta (interplanetary CMEs) and hypothesize that this is because Cane et al. fail to understand how to separate ejecta from "shock sheaths" when interpreting solar wind and energetic particle data sets. They (GMY) are wrong be cause the relevant section of the paper was concerned with the propagation time to 1 AU of any potentially geoeffective structures caused by CMEs, i.e. upstream compression regions with or without shocks, or ejecta. In other words, the travel times used by Cane et al. were purposefully and deliberately distinct from ejecta travel times (except for those slow ejecta, approx. 30% of their events, which generated no upstream features), and no error in identification was involved. The confusion of GMY stems from the description did not characterize the observations sufficiently clearly.

  6. An insulin-to-insulin regulatory network orchestrates phenotypic specificity in development and physiology.

    PubMed

    Fernandes de Abreu, Diana Andrea; Caballero, Antonio; Fardel, Pascal; Stroustrup, Nicholas; Chen, Zhunan; Lee, Kyunghwa; Keyes, William D; Nash, Zachary M; López-Moyado, Isaac F; Vaggi, Federico; Cornils, Astrid; Regenass, Martin; Neagu, Anca; Ostojic, Ivan; Liu, Chang; Cho, Yongmin; Sifoglu, Deniz; Shen, Yu; Fontana, Walter; Lu, Hang; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Murphy, Coleen T; Antebi, Adam; Blanc, Eric; Apfeld, Javier; Zhang, Yun; Alcedo, Joy; Ch'ng, Queelim

    2014-03-01

    Insulin-like peptides (ILPs) play highly conserved roles in development and physiology. Most animal genomes encode multiple ILPs. Here we identify mechanisms for how the forty Caenorhabditis elegans ILPs coordinate diverse processes, including development, reproduction, longevity and several specific stress responses. Our systematic studies identify an ILP-based combinatorial code for these phenotypes characterized by substantial functional specificity and diversity rather than global redundancy. Notably, we show that ILPs regulate each other transcriptionally, uncovering an ILP-to-ILP regulatory network that underlies the combinatorial phenotypic coding by the ILP family. Extensive analyses of genetic interactions among ILPs reveal how their signals are integrated. A combined analysis of these functional and regulatory ILP interactions identifies local genetic circuits that act in parallel and interact by crosstalk, feedback and compensation. This organization provides emergent mechanisms for phenotypic specificity and graded regulation for the combinatorial phenotypic coding we observe. Our findings also provide insights into how large hormonal networks regulate diverse traits.

  7. What Is ALS?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Javits, actor David Niven, “Sesame Street” creator Jon Stone, boxing champion Ezzard Charles, NBA Hall of Fame ... Help for People with ALS and Caregivers Read stories from families living with ALS Forms of ALS ...

  8. Phenotypic checkpoints regulate neuronal development.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ari, Yehezkel; Spitzer, Nicholas C

    2010-11-01

    Nervous system development proceeds by sequential gene expression mediated by cascades of transcription factors in parallel with sequences of patterned network activity driven by receptors and ion channels. These sequences are cell type- and developmental stage-dependent and modulated by paracrine actions of substances released by neurons and glia. How and to what extent these sequences interact to enable neuronal network development is not understood. Recent evidence demonstrates that CNS development requires intermediate stages of differentiation providing functional feedback that influences gene expression. We suggest that embryonic neuronal functions constitute a series of phenotypic checkpoint signatures; neurons failing to express these functions are delayed or developmentally arrested. Such checkpoints are likely to be a general feature of neuronal development and constitute presymptomatic signatures of neurological disorders when they go awry.

  9. Phenotypic plasticity and experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Garland, Theodore; Kelly, Scott A

    2006-06-01

    Natural or artificial selection that favors higher values of a particular trait within a given population should engender an evolutionary response that increases the mean value of the trait. For this prediction to hold, the phenotypic variance of the trait must be caused in part by additive effects of alleles segregating in the population, and also the trait must not be too strongly genetically correlated with other traits that are under selection. Another prediction, rarely discussed in the literature, is that directional selection should favor alleles that increase phenotypic plasticity in the direction of selection, where phenotypic plasticity is defined as the ability of one genotype to produce more than one phenotype when exposed to different environments. This prediction has received relatively little empirical attention. Nonetheless, many laboratory experiments impose selection regimes that could allow for the evolution of enhanced plasticity (e.g. desiccation trials with Drosophila that last for several hours or days). We review one example that involved culturing of Drosophila on lemon for multiple generations and then tested for enhanced plasticity of detoxifying enzymes. We also review an example with vertebrates that involves selective breeding for high voluntary activity levels in house mice, targeting wheel-running behavior on days 5+6 of a 6-day wheel exposure. This selection regime allows for the possibility of wheel running itself or subordinate traits that support such running to increase in plasticity over days 1-4 of wheel access. Indeed, some traits, such as the concentration of the glucose transporter GLUT4 in gastrocnemius muscle, do show enhanced plasticity in the selected lines over a 5-6 day period. In several experiments we have housed mice from both the Selected (S) and Control (C) lines with or without wheel access for several weeks to test for differences in plasticity (training effects). A variety of patterns were observed, including

  10. Evolution of phenotypic plasticity in colonizing species.

    PubMed

    Lande, Russell

    2015-05-01

    I elaborate an hypothesis to explain inconsistent empirical findings comparing phenotypic plasticity in colonizing populations or species with plasticity from their native or ancestral range. Quantitative genetic theory on the evolution of plasticity reveals that colonization of a novel environment can cause a transient increase in plasticity: a rapid initial increase in plasticity accelerates evolution of a new optimal phenotype, followed by slow genetic assimilation of the new phenotype and reduction of plasticity. An association of colonization with increased plasticity depends on the difference in the optimal phenotype between ancestral and colonized environments, the difference in mean, variance and predictability of the environment, the cost of plasticity, and the time elapsed since colonization. The relative importance of these parameters depends on whether a phenotypic character develops by one-shot plasticity to a constant adult phenotype or by labile plasticity involving continuous and reversible development throughout adult life.

  11. Epithelial phenotype in total sclerocornea

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Lung-Kun; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chang, Anna Marie; Ho, Yi-Ju; Chang, Shirley H.L.; Yang, Unique

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To understand whether the epithelial phenotype in total sclerocornea is corneal or conjunctival in origin. Methods Four cases of total sclerocornea (male:female = 1:3; mean age = 5.4±4.3; 1–11 years old) who received penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) at our hospital between 2008 and 2011 were included. Corneal buttons obtained during PKP were used for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as immunoconfocal microscopy for cytokeratins 3, 12, and 13, goblet cell mucin MUC5AC, connexin 43, stem cell markers p63 and ABCG2, laminin-5, and fibronectin. Results After a mean follow-up period of 38.8±14.0 (12–54) months, the grafts remained clear in half of the patients. TEM examination revealed a markedly attenuated Bowman’s layer in the scleralized corneas, with irregular and variably thinned collagen lamellar layers, and disorganization and random distribution of collagen fibrils, which were much larger in diameter compared with a normal cornea. Immunoconfocal microscopy showed that keratin 3 was expressed in all four patients, while p63, ABCG2, and MUC5AC were all absent. Cornea-specific keratin 12 was universally expressed in Patients 1 to 3, while mucosa (including conjunctiva)-specific keratin 13 was negative in these patients. Interestingly, keratin 12 and 13 were expressed in Patient 4 in a mutually exclusive manner. Linear expression of laminin-5 in the basement membrane zone and similar expression of fibronectin were observed. Conclusions The epithelia in total sclerocornea are essentially corneal in phenotype, but in the event of massive corneal angiogenesis, invasion by the conjunctival epithelium is possible. PMID:24744607

  12. The cognitive phenotype of spina bifida meningomyelocele.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Maureen; Barnes, Marcia A

    2010-01-01

    A cognitive phenotype is a product of both assets and deficits that specifies what individuals with spina bifida meningomyelocele (SBM) can and cannot do and why they can or cannot do it. In this article, we review the cognitive phenotype of SBM and describe the processing assets and deficits that cut within and across content domains, sensory modality, and material, including studies from our laboratory and other investigations. We discuss some implications of the SBM cognitive phenotype for assessment, rehabilitation, and research.

  13. Phenotypic screening: the future of antibody discovery.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Munoz, Andrea L; Minter, Ralph R; Rust, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Most antibody therapeutics have been isolated from high throughput target-based screening. However, as the number of validated targets diminishes and the target space becomes increasingly competitive, alternative strategies, such as phenotypic screening, are gaining momentum. Here, we review successful phenotypic screens, including those used to isolate antibodies against cancer and infectious agents. We also consider exciting advances in the expression and phenotypic screening of antibody repertoires in single cell autocrine systems. As technologies continue to develop, we believe that antibody phenotypic screening will increase further in popularity and has the potential to provide the next generation of therapeutic antibodies.

  14. Evolution and diversity of the mechanisms endowing resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate-synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.).

    PubMed

    Délye, Christophe; Pernin, Fanny; Scarabel, Laura

    2011-02-01

    We investigated the diversity of mechanisms conferring resistance to herbicides inhibiting acetolactate synthase (ALS) in corn poppy (Papaver rhoeas L.) and the processes underlying the selection for resistance. Six mutant ALS alleles, Arg₁₉₇, His₁₉₇, Leu₁₉₇, Ser₁₉₇, Thr₁₉₇ and Leu₅₇₄ were identified in five Italian populations. Different alleles were found in a same population or a same plant. Comparison of individual plant phenotype (herbicide sensitivity) and genotype (amino-acid substitution(s) at codon 197) showed that all mutant ALS alleles conferred dominant resistance to the field rate of the sulfonylurea tribenuron and moderate or no resistance to the field rate of the triazolopyrimidine florasulam. Depending on the allele, dominant or partially dominant resistance to the field rate of the imidazolinone imazamox was observed. Putative non-target-site resistance mechanisms were also likely present in the populations investigated. The derived Cleaved Amplified Polymorphic Sequence assays targeting ALS codons crucial for herbicide sensitivity developed in this work will facilitate the detection of resistance due to mutant ALS alleles. Nucleotide variation around codon 197 indicated that mutant ALS alleles evolved by multiple, independent appearances. Resistance to ALS inhibitors in P. rhoeas clearly evolved by redundant evolution of a set of mutant ALS alleles and likely of non-target-site mechanisms.

  15. Behavioral Genetic Toolkits: Toward the Evolutionary Origins of Complex Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Rittschof, C C; Robinson, G E

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of toolkit genes, which are highly conserved genes that consistently regulate the development of similar morphological phenotypes across diverse species, is one of the most well-known observations in the field of evolutionary developmental biology. Surprisingly, this phenomenon is also relevant for a wide array of behavioral phenotypes, despite the fact that these phenotypes are highly complex and regulated by many genes operating in diverse tissues. In this chapter, we review the use of the toolkit concept in the context of behavior, noting the challenges of comparing behaviors and genes across diverse species, but emphasizing the successes in identifying genetic toolkits for behavior; these successes are largely attributable to the creative research approaches fueled by advances in behavioral genomics. We have two general goals: (1) to acknowledge the groundbreaking progress in this field, which offers new approaches to the difficult but exciting challenge of understanding the evolutionary genetic basis of behaviors, some of the most complex phenotypes known, and (2) to provide a theoretical framework that encompasses the scope of behavioral genetic toolkit studies in order to clearly articulate the research questions relevant to the toolkit concept. We emphasize areas for growth and highlight the emerging approaches that are being used to drive the field forward. Behavioral genetic toolkit research has elevated the use of integrative and comparative approaches in the study of behavior, with potentially broad implications for evolutionary biologists and behavioral ecologists alike.

  16. Behavioral phenotypes in genetic syndromes: genetic clues to human behavior.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Suzanne B; Morris, Colleen A

    2002-01-01

    A behavioral phenotype is the characteristic cognitive, personality, behavioral, and psychiatric pattern that typifies a disorder. A number of genetic syndromes have been identified as having this type of distinctive and consistent behavior pattern. It may act as an important diagnostic sign, like a malformation or characteristic facial appearance. Such patterns are also useful for the physician's anticipatory guidance from an educational, rehabilitative, and parenting perspective. In addition, because they are the consequences of known genetic alterations, behavioral phenotypes can be potentially highly valuable clues to the identification of genes in the population that are important to determination of cognitive skills or deficits, personality determinants, behavioral abnormalities, or psychiatric disorders. The nature of a behavioral phenotype and its potential for genetic insight can be appreciated through the examples of Williams syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, and Angelman syndrome. The cognitive and behavioral characteristics of these disorders are distinctive. Williams syndrome is known for its association with remarkable conversational verbal abilities and excessive empathy, whereas Prader-Willi syndrome is known for temper tantrums and obsessive-compulsive features, and Angelman syndrome is associated with a constantly happy affect and hyperactivity. The genetic basis for each of these disorders is known, and the pathophysiology and genotype-phenotype correlations are beginning to provide insight into genes responsible for personality characteristics and behavioral abnormalities.

  17. PHOCOS: inferring multi-feature phenotypic crosstalk networks

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Yue; Altschuler, Steven J.; Wu, Lani F.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Quantification of cellular changes to perturbations can provide a powerful approach to infer crosstalk among molecular components in biological networks. Existing crosstalk inference methods conduct network-structure learning based on a single phenotypic feature (e.g. abundance) of a biomarker. These approaches are insufficient for analyzing perturbation data that can contain information about multiple features (e.g. abundance, activity or localization) of each biomarker. Results: We propose a computational framework for inferring phenotypic crosstalk (PHOCOS) that is suitable for high-content microscopy or other modalities that capture multiple phenotypes per biomarker. PHOCOS uses a robust graph-learning paradigm to predict direct effects from potential indirect effects and identify errors owing to noise or missing links. The result is a multi-feature, sparse network that parsimoniously captures direct and strong interactions across phenotypic attributes of multiple biomarkers. We use simulated and biological data to demonstrate the ability of PHOCOS to recover multi-attribute crosstalk networks from cellular perturbation assays. Availability and implementation: PHOCOS is available in open source at https://github.com/AltschulerWu-Lab/PHOCOS Contact: steven.altschuler@ucsf.edu or lani.wu@ucsf.edu PMID:27307643

  18. A standardized clinical evaluation of phenotypic diversity in diabetic polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Joachim; Rathmell, James P; David, William S; Chad, David A; Broderick, Alithia C; Perros, Stephen G; Shin, Naomi S; Wells, Jenna L; Davis, John B; DiMaggio, Charles J; Wang, Shuang; Tate, Simon N

    2016-10-01

    Diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN) is a major cause of neuropathic pain and a frequent target condition in analgesic treatment trials. Differences in the clinical symptoms and signs associated with DPN suggest distinct pathophysiological mechanisms underlying nerve damage and dysfunction that are likely to have therapeutic relevance. The aim of this study was to develop a tool for the bedside assessment of painful neuropathies such as DPN that captures the diversity of phenotypes. Sixty-one patients with type 2 diabetes and painful neuropathy, 19 patients with painless DPN, 25 patients with type 2 diabetes but no clinical evidence of neuropathy, and 20 healthy control subjects completed a structured interview (47 items) and a standardized physical examination (39 items). After analyzing critical features of pain and painless symptoms and examining the outcome of physical tests of sensory function, we determined principal components of the phenotypic variance among patients. Increased sensitivity to mechanical or thermal stimuli and, to a lesser extent, the sensory quality of pain or paresthesia were the most discriminating elements of DPN phenotypes. Correlation patterns of symptoms and signs indicated the involvement of functionally distinct nerve fiber populations. We combined interview questions and physical tests identifying these differences in a shortened assessment protocol that we named Standardized Evaluation of Pain and Somatosensory Function (StEPS). The protocol StEPS generates a phenotypic profile of patients with neuropathy. Separate intensity ratings for spontaneous painful symptoms and pain evoked by standard stimuli support a detailed documentation of neuropathic pain and its response to analgesic treatment.

  19. A new case of acromegaloid facial appearance (AFA) syndrome with an expanded phenotype.

    PubMed

    Zelante, L; Gasparini, P; Savoia, A; Lomuto, M; Pellicano, R

    2000-07-01

    A patient presenting with the findings of Acromegaloid Facial Appearance (AFA) syndrome is reported. This case also shows pericardial effusion and skin lesions that both enlarge the spectrum of the phenotype and lump AFA syndrome with another proposed distinct condition [Irvine et al., (1996) J med Genet 33:972-974].

  20. HMGB2 holds the key to the senescence-associated secretory phenotype.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Ana; Gil, Jesús

    2016-11-07

    The senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) is a hallmark of senescence with an important physiological impact, but how it is established is unclear. In this issue, Aird et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. https://doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201608026) describe how chromatin-bound HMGB2 fine tunes SASP expression by avoiding heterochromatin spreading.

  1. The Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire: Mothers versus Fathers of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidman, Ifat; Yirmiya, Nurit; Milshtein, Shahaf; Ebstein, Richard P.; Levi, Shlomit

    2012-01-01

    Parents of individuals with autism were examined using the Broad Autism Phenotype Questionnaire (BAPQ; Hurley et al. in "J Autism Dev Disord" 37:1679-1690, 2007) assessing BAP-related personality and language characteristics. The BAPQ was administered to parents as a self-report and as an informant (spouse)-based measure. Results indicated the…

  2. A simple regression-based method to map quantitative trait loci underlying function-valued phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Il-Youp; Moore, Candace R; Spalding, Edgar P; Broman, Karl W

    2014-08-01

    Most statistical methods for quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping focus on a single phenotype. However, multiple phenotypes are commonly measured, and recent technological advances have greatly simplified the automated acquisition of numerous phenotypes, including function-valued phenotypes, such as growth measured over time. While methods exist for QTL mapping with function-valued phenotypes, they are generally computationally intensive and focus on single-QTL models. We propose two simple, fast methods that maintain high power and precision and are amenable to extensions with multiple-QTL models using a penalized likelihood approach. After identifying multiple QTL by these approaches, we can view the function-valued QTL effects to provide a deeper understanding of the underlying processes. Our methods have been implemented as a package for R, funqtl.

  3. Abu al-Layth al-Libi

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Introduction In the tradition of post-9/11 senior Arab militant figures operating in Khurasan (the Afghanistan-Pakistan region), there is little doubt as to...the standing of Libyan jihadi commander Abu al-Layth al-Libi. If Usama bin Ladin and Ayman al-Zawahiri came to be the most prominent Arab -Afghan...Libi, a longtime leader of the Libyan Islamic Fighting Group (LIFG), who rapidly established himself as the champion of the Arab -Afghan milieu after

  4. Gang Identifiers and Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Mary Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Provides lists of gang identifiers and terminology. Suggests that, to find out names and associated identifiers of local gangs, readers should talk to their local police. Included in listing are descriptions of gang-related symbols, physical signals, graffiti, slogans, right-left rules, colors, clothing, jewelry, hair styles, and fingernails. Also…

  5. Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    utilizing mouse intestinal cells and rat fibroblasts suggest that PTK6 may be required for cell death triggered by specific stimuli such as DNA damage [41...Parallel data of 12 normal breast organoids RNA samples and 7 bulk normal breast tissue specimens were used as normal control. Array probe data were...JJ, Tyner AL (2009) Induction of protein tyrosine kinase 6 in mouse intestinal crypt epithelial cells promotes DNA damage-induced apoptosis

  6. Genetic and Phenotypic Characterization of a Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis Emerging Strain with Superior Intra-macrophage Replication Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Shomer, Inna; Avisar, Alon; Desai, Prerak; Azriel, Shalhevet; Smollan, Gill; Belausov, Natasha; Keller, Nathan; Glikman, Daniel; Maor, Yasmin; Peretz, Avi; McClelland, Michael; Rahav, Galia; Gal-Mor, Ohad

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (S. Enteritidis) is one of the ubiquitous Salmonella serovars worldwide and a major cause of food-born outbreaks, which are often associated with poultry and poultry derivatives. Here we report a nation-wide S. Enteritidis clonal outbreak that occurred in Israel during the last third of 2015. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis and whole genome sequencing identified genetically related strains that were circulating in Israel as early as 2008. Global comparison linked this outbreak strain to several clinical and marine environmental isolates that were previously isolated in California and Canada, indicating that similar strains are prevalent outside of Israel. Phenotypic comparison between the 2015 outbreak strain and other clinical and reference S. Enteritidis strains showed only limited intra-serovar phenotypic variation in growth in rich medium, invasion into Caco-2 cells, uptake by J774.1A macrophages, and host cell cytotoxicity. In contrast, significant phenotypic variation was shown among different S. Enteritidis isolates when biofilm-formation, motility, invasion into HeLa cells and uptake by THP-1 human macrophages were studied. Interestingly, the 2015 outbreak clone was found to possess superior intra-macrophage replication ability within both murine and human macrophages in comparison to the other S. Enteritidis strains studied. This phenotype is likely to play a role in the virulence and host-pathogen interactions of this emerging clone. PMID:27695450

  7. Automated pipeline for anatomical phenotyping of mouse embryos using micro-CT.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael D; Maezawa, Yoshiro; Lerch, Jason P; Henkelman, R Mark

    2014-06-01

    The International Mouse Phenotyping Consortium (IMPC) plans to phenotype 20,000 single-gene knockout mice to gain an insight into gene function. Approximately 30% of these knockout mouse lines will be embryonic or perinatal lethal. The IMPC has selected three-dimensional (3D) imaging to phenotype these mouse lines at relevant stages of embryonic development in an attempt to discover the cause of lethality using detailed anatomical information. Rate of throughput is paramount as IMPC production centers have been given the ambitious task of completing this phenotyping project by 2021. Sifting through the wealth of data within high-resolution 3D mouse embryo data sets by trained human experts is infeasible at this scale. Here, we present a phenotyping pipeline that identifies statistically significant anatomical differences in the knockout, in comparison with the wild type, through a computer-automated image registration algorithm. This phenotyping pipeline consists of three analyses (intensity, deformation, and atlas based) that can detect missing anatomical structures and differences in volume of whole organs as well as on the voxel level. This phenotyping pipeline was applied to micro-CT images of two perinatal lethal mouse lines: a hypomorphic mutation of the Tcf21 gene (Tcf21-hypo) and a knockout of the Satb2 gene. With the proposed pipeline we were able to identify the majority of morphological phenotypes previously published for both the Tcf21-hypo and Satb2 mutant mouse embryos in addition to novel phenotypes. This phenotyping pipeline is an unbiased, automated method that highlights only those structural abnormalities that survive statistical scrutiny and illustrates them in a straightforward fashion.

  8. Single amino acid mutations in the capsid switch the neutralization phenotype of porcine circovirus 2.

    PubMed

    Saha, Dipongkor; Lefebvre, David J; Ooms, Karen; Huang, Liping; Delputte, Peter L; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-07-01

    Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) is the causative agent of porcine circovirus-associated diseases in pigs. Previously, it was demonstrated that mAbs 16G12, 38C1, 63H3 and 94H8 directed against the PCV2 capsid protein recognize PCV2 strains Stoon-1010 (PCV2a), 48285 (PCV2b), 1121 (PCV2a), 1147 (PCV2b) and II9F (PCV2b), but only neutralize Stoon-1010 and 48285. This points to the existence of two distinct PCV2 neutralization phenotypes: phenotype α (mAb recognition with neutralization; Stoon-1010 and 48285) and phenotype β (mAb recognition without neutralization; 1121, 1147 and II9F). In the present study, amino acids that are important in determining the neutralization phenotype were identified in the capsid. Mutation of T at position 190 to A in strain 48285 (phenotype α) resulted in a capsid resembling that of strain 1147 (phenotype β) and caused a loss of neutralization (switch from α to β). Mutations of P at position 151 to T and A at position 190 to T in strain II9F (phenotype β) resulted in a capsid resembling that of strain 48285 (phenotype α) and gave a gain of neutralization (switch from β to α). Mutations of T at position 131 to P and of E at position 191 to R in Stoon-1010 (phenotype α) changed the capsid into that of 1121 (phenotype β) and reduced neutralization (switch from α to β). This study demonstrated that single amino acid changes in the capsid result in a phenotypic switch from α to β or β to α.

  9. Analysis of graft survival in a trial of stem cell transplant in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Tezeta; Gearing, Marla; Senitzer, David; Saxe, Debra; Brat, Daniel J; Bray, Robert; Gebel, Howard; Hill, Charles; Boulis, Nicholas; Riley, Jonathan; Feldman, Eva; Johe, Karl; Hazel, Thomas; Polak, Meraida; Bordeau, Jane; Federici, Thais; Glass, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Objective The first US Food and Drug Administration–approved clinical trial to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with neural stem cell–based therapy is in progress. The goal of the current study was to identify and assess the survival of human spinal cord–derived neural stem cells (HSSCs) transplanted into the spinal cord in patients with ALS. Methods Spinal cords transplanted with HSSCs were examined from six autopsy cases. Homogenized tissues were interrogated for the presence of donor versus recipient DNA using real-time PCR methods (qPCR). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using DNA probes for XY chromosomes to identify male donor HSSCs in one female case, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to characterize the identified donor cells. Results Genomic DNA from donor HSSCs was identified in all cases, comprising 0.67–5.4% of total tissue DNA in patients surviving 196 to 921 days after transplantation. In the one female patient a “nest” of cells identified on H&E staining were XY-positive by FISH, confirming donor origin. A subset of XY-positive cells labeled for the neuronal marker NeuN and stem cell marker SOX2. Interpretation This is the first study to identify human neural stem cells transplanted into a human spinal cord. Transplanted HSSCs survived up to 2.5 years posttransplant. Some cells differentiated into neurons, while others maintained their stem cell phenotype. This work is a proof of concept of the survival and differentiation of human stems cell transplanted into the spinal cord of ALS patients. PMID:25540804

  10. The Neuroanatomy of the Autistic Phenotype

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahim, Cherine; Meguid, Nagwa A.; Nashaat, Neveen H.; Yoon, Uicheul; Mancini-Marie, Adham; Evans, Alan C.

    2012-01-01

    The autism phenotype is associated with an excess of brain volume due in part to decreased pruning during development. Here we aimed at assessing brain volume early in development to further elucidate previous findings in autism and determine whether this pattern is restricted to idiopathic autism or shared within the autistic phenotype (fragile X…

  11. Daddy issues: paternal effects on phenotype.

    PubMed

    Rando, Oliver J

    2012-11-09

    The once popular and then heretical idea that ancestral environment can affect the phenotype of future generations is coming back into vogue due to advances in the field of epigenetic inheritance. How paternal environmental conditions influence the phenotype of progeny is now a tractable question, and researchers are exploring potential mechanisms underlying such effects.

  12. Emerging semantics to link phenotype and environment

    DOE PAGES

    Thessen, Anne E.; Bunker, Daniel E.; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; ...

    2015-12-14

    Understanding the interplay between environmental conditions and phenotypes is a fundamental goal of biology. Unfortunately, data that include observations on phenotype and environment are highly heterogeneous and thus difficult to find and integrate. One approach that is likely to improve the status quo involves the use of ontologies to standardize and link data about phenotypes and environments. Specifying and linking data through ontologies will allow researchers to increase the scope and flexibility of large-scale analyses aided by modern computing methods. Investments in this area would advance diverse fields such as ecology, phylogenetics, and conservation biology. While several biological ontologies aremore » well-developed, using them to link phenotypes and environments is rare because of gaps in ontological coverage and limits to interoperability among ontologies and disciplines. Lastly, in this manuscript, we present (1) use cases from diverse disciplines to illustrate questions that could be answered more efficiently using a robust linkage between phenotypes and environments, (2) two proof-of-concept analyses that show the value of linking phenotypes to environments in fishes and amphibians, and (3) two proposed example data models for linking phenotypes and environments using the extensible observation ontology (OBOE) and the Biological Collections Ontology (BCO); these provide a starting point for the development of a data model linking phenotypes and environments.« less

  13. Emerging semantics to link phenotype and environment

    SciTech Connect

    Thessen, Anne E.; Bunker, Daniel E.; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Cooper, Laurel D.; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Domisch, Sami; Franz, Nico M.; Jaiswal, Pankaj; Lawrence-Dill, Carolyn J.; Midford, Peter E.; Mungall, Christopher J.; Ramirez, Martin J.; Specht, Chelsea D.; Vogt, Lars; Vos, Rutger Aldo; Walls, Ramona L.; White, Jeffrey W.; Zhang, Guanyang; Deans, Andrew R.; Huala, Eva; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Mabee, Paula M.

    2015-12-14

    Understanding the interplay between environmental conditions and phenotypes is a fundamental goal of biology. Unfortunately, data that include observations on phenotype and environment are highly heterogeneous and thus difficult to find and integrate. One approach that is likely to improve the status quo involves the use of ontologies to standardize and link data about phenotypes and environments. Specifying and linking data through ontologies will allow researchers to increase the scope and flexibility of large-scale analyses aided by modern computing methods. Investments in this area would advance diverse fields such as ecology, phylogenetics, and conservation biology. While several biological ontologies are well-develo