Science.gov

Sample records for alter glycerolipid metabolism

  1. Chemical modulation of glycerolipid signaling and metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Sarah A.; Mathews, Thomas P.; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Lindsley, Craig W.; Brown, H. Alex

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago, glycerolipids captured the attention of biochemical researchers as novel cellular signaling entities. We now recognize that these biomolecules occupy signaling nodes critical to a number of physiological and pathological processes. Thus, glycerolipid-metabolizing enzymes present attractive targets for new therapies. A number of fields—ranging from neuroscience and cancer to diabetes and obesity—have elucidated the signaling properties of glycerolipids. The biochemical literature teems with newly emerging small molecule inhibitors capable of manipulating glycerolipid metabolism and signaling. This ever-expanding pool of chemical modulators appears daunting to those interested in exploiting glycerolipid-signaling pathways in their model system of choice. This review distills the current body of literature surrounding glycerolipid metabolism into a more approachable format, facilitating the application of small molecule inhibitors to novel systems. PMID:24440821

  2. Chemical modulation of glycerolipid signaling and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Scott, Sarah A; Mathews, Thomas P; Ivanova, Pavlina T; Lindsley, Craig W; Brown, H Alex

    2014-08-01

    Thirty years ago, glycerolipids captured the attention of biochemical researchers as novel cellular signaling entities. We now recognize that these biomolecules occupy signaling nodes critical to a number of physiological and pathological processes. Thus, glycerolipid-metabolizing enzymes present attractive targets for new therapies. A number of fields-ranging from neuroscience and cancer to diabetes and obesity-have elucidated the signaling properties of glycerolipids. The biochemical literature teems with newly emerging small molecule inhibitors capable of manipulating glycerolipid metabolism and signaling. This ever-expanding pool of chemical modulators appears daunting to those interested in exploiting glycerolipid-signaling pathways in their model system of choice. This review distills the current body of literature surrounding glycerolipid metabolism into a more approachable format, facilitating the application of small molecule inhibitors to novel systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Tools to study lipid functions.

  3. Metabolism and Regulation of Glycerolipids in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Susan A.; Kohlwein, Sepp D.; Carman, George M.

    2012-01-01

    Due to its genetic tractability and increasing wealth of accessible data, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model system of choice for the study of the genetics, biochemistry, and cell biology of eukaryotic lipid metabolism. Glycerolipids (e.g., phospholipids and triacylglycerol) and their precursors are synthesized and metabolized by enzymes associated with the cytosol and membranous organelles, including endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, and lipid droplets. Genetic and biochemical analyses have revealed that glycerolipids play important roles in cell signaling, membrane trafficking, and anchoring of membrane proteins in addition to membrane structure. The expression of glycerolipid enzymes is controlled by a variety of conditions including growth stage and nutrient availability. Much of this regulation occurs at the transcriptional level and involves the Ino2–Ino4 activation complex and the Opi1 repressor, which interacts with Ino2 to attenuate transcriptional activation of UASINO-containing glycerolipid biosynthetic genes. Cellular levels of phosphatidic acid, precursor to all membrane phospholipids and the storage lipid triacylglycerol, regulates transcription of UASINO-containing genes by tethering Opi1 to the nuclear/endoplasmic reticulum membrane and controlling its translocation into the nucleus, a mechanism largely controlled by inositol availability. The transcriptional activator Zap1 controls the expression of some phospholipid synthesis genes in response to zinc availability. Regulatory mechanisms also include control of catalytic activity of glycerolipid enzymes by water-soluble precursors, products and lipids, and covalent modification of phosphorylation, while in vivo function of some enzymes is governed by their subcellular location. Genome-wide genetic analysis indicates coordinate regulation between glycerolipid metabolism and a broad spectrum of metabolic pathways. PMID:22345606

  4. The response to inositol: regulation of glycerolipid metabolism and stress response signaling in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Susan A.; Gaspar, Maria L.; Jesch, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    This article focuses on discoveries of the mechanisms governing the regulation of glycerolipid metabolism and stress response signaling in response to the phospholipid precursor, inositol. The regulation of glycerolipid lipid metabolism in yeast in response to inositol is highly complex, but increasingly well understood, and the roles of individual lipids in stress response are also increasingly well characterized. Discoveries that have emerged over several decades of genetic, molecular and biochemical analyses of metabolic, regulatory and signaling responses of yeast cells, both mutant and wild type, to the availability of the phospholipid precursor, inositol are discussed. PMID:24418527

  5. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-03

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway.

  6. Accumulation of very-long-chain fatty acids in membrane glycerolipids is associated with dramatic alterations in plant morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Millar, A A; Wrischer, M; Kunst, L

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the Arabidopsis FATTY ACID ELONGATION1 gene under the control of the 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus accumulated very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) throughout the plant. In some transformants, C20 and C22 VLCFAs accounted for >30% of the total fatty acids, accumulating at the expense of C16 and C18 fatty acids. These C20 and C22 fatty acids were incorporated into all of the major membrane glycerolipid classes. Plants with a high VLCFA content displayed a dramatically altered morphology, which included the failure of flowering shoots to elongate, a modified spatial pattern of siliques, an altered floral phenotype, and a large accumulation of anthocyanins. In addition, these plants also exhibited a unique alteration of the chloroplast membrane structure. We discuss a possible role for VLCFAs in establishing the shape/curvature of the membranes, which in turn may affect the shape of the cell and ultimately that of the whole plant. PMID:9811796

  7. Profiling of promoter occupancy by the SND1 transcriptional coactivator identifies downstream glycerolipid metabolic genes involved in TNFα response in human hepatoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Arretxe, Enara; Armengol, Sandra; Mula, Sarai; Chico, Yolanda; Ochoa, Begoña; Martínez, María José

    2015-01-01

    The NF-κB-inducible Staphylococcal nuclease and tudor domain-containing 1 gene (SND1) encodes a coactivator involved in inflammatory responses and tumorigenesis. While SND1 is known to interact with certain transcription factors and activate client gene expression, no comprehensive mapping of SND1 target genes has been reported. Here, we have approached this question by performing ChIP-chip assays on human hepatoma HepG2 cells and analyzing SND1 binding modulation by proinflammatory TNFα. We show that SND1 binds 645 gene promoters in control cells and 281 additional genes in TNFα-treated cells. Transcription factor binding site analysis of bound probes identified motifs for established partners and for novel transcription factors including HSF, ATF, STAT3, MEIS1/AHOXA9, E2F and p300/CREB. Major target genes were involved in gene expression and RNA metabolism regulation, as well as development and cellular metabolism. We confirmed SND1 binding to 21 previously unrecognized genes, including a set of glycerolipid genes. Knocking-down experiments revealed that SND1 deficiency compromises the glycerolipid gene reprogramming and lipid phenotypic responses to TNFα. Overall, our findings uncover an unexpected large set of potential SND1 target genes and partners and reveal SND1 to be a determinant downstream effector of TNFα that contributes to support glycerophospholipid homeostasis in human hepatocellular carcinoma during inflammation. PMID:26323317

  8. Transcriptomic and lipidomic profiles of glycerolipids during Arabidopsis flower development.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yuki; Teo, Norman Z W; Shui, Guanghou; Chua, Christine H L; Cheong, Wei-Fun; Parameswaran, Sriram; Koizumi, Ryota; Ohta, Hiroyuki; Wenk, Markus R; Ito, Toshiro

    2014-07-01

    Flower glycerolipids are the yet-to-be discovered frontier of the lipidome. Although ample evidence suggests important roles for glycerolipids in flower development, stage-specific lipid profiling in tiny Arabidopsis flowers is challenging. Here, we utilized a transgenic system to synchronize flower development in Arabidopsis. The transgenic plant PAP1::AP1-GR ap1-1 cal-5 showed synchronized flower development upon dexamethasone treatment, which enabled massive harvesting of floral samples of homogenous developmental stages for glycerolipid profiling. Glycerolipid profiling revealed a decrease in concentrations of phospholipids involved in signaling during the early development stages, such as phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol, and a marked increase in concentrations of nonphosphorous galactolipids during the late stage. Moreover, in the midstage, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate concentration was increased transiently, which suggests the stimulation of the phosphoinositide metabolism. Accompanying transcriptomic profiling of relevant glycerolipid metabolic genes revealed simultaneous induction of multiple phosphoinositide biosynthetic genes associated with the increased phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate concentration, with a high degree of differential expression patterns for genes encoding other glycerolipid-metabolic genes. The phosphatidic acid phosphatase mutant pah1 pah2 showed flower developmental defect, suggesting a role for phosphatidic acid in flower development. Our concurrent profiling of glycerolipids and relevant metabolic gene expression revealed distinct metabolic pathways stimulated at different stages of flower development in Arabidopsis.

  9. Alteration of glycerolipid and sphingolipid-derived second messenger kinetics in ras transformed 3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Laurenz, J C; Gunn, J M; Jolly, C A; Chapkin, R S

    1996-01-05

    The effect of ras transformation (rasB fibroblasts) on basal and serum-stimulated diacylglycerol (DAG) composition and mass was examined over time with respect to changes in membrane phospholipid composition and ceramide mass. RasB cells vs. nontransformed control cells (rasD and NR6) had chronically elevated DAG levels (up to 240 min) following serum stimulation, indicating a defect in the recovery phase of the intracellular DAG pulse. Ras transformation also had a dramatic effect on DAG composition. Molecular species analysis revealed that DAG from unstimulated rasB cells was enriched in the delta 9 desaturase fatty acyl species (monoenoate 18:1(n - 7) and 18:1(n - 9)), and depleted in arachidonic acid (20:4(n - 6)). With the exception of glycerophosphoinositol (GPI), DAG remodeling paralleled the compositional alterations in individual phospholipid classes. Importantly, ras transformation altered the fatty acyl composition of sphingomyelin, a precursor to the ceramide second messenger. With the addition of serum, control cells (rasD) had a progressive increase in ceramide mass with levels approximately 5-fold higher by 240 min. In contrast, ceramide levels did not increase in rasB cells at either 4 or 240 min. These results demonstrate that ras-oncogene, in addition to its effects on DAG metabolism, can also abolish the cellular increase in ceramide mass in response to serum stimulation. Since DAG and ceramide may have opposing biological functions, the prolonged elevation of DAG and the suppression of ceramide levels would be consistent with an enhanced proliferative capacity.

  10. Metabolic Interactions between the Lands Cycle and the Kennedy Pathway of Glycerolipid Synthesis in Arabidopsis Developing Seeds[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liping; Shen, Wenyun; Kazachkov, Michael; Chen, Guanqun; Chen, Qilin; Carlsson, Anders S.; Stymne, Sten; Weselake, Randall J.; Zou, Jitao

    2012-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that the primary function of the Lands cycle is to provide a route for acyl remodeling to modify fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids derived from the Kennedy pathway. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT) is an evolutionarily conserved key enzyme in the Lands cycle. In this study, we provide direct evidence that the Arabidopsis thaliana LPCATs, LPCAT1 and LPCAT2, participate in the Lands cycle in developing seeds. In spite of a substantially reduced initial rate of nascent FA incorporation into phosphatidylcholine (PC), the PC level in the double mutant lpcat1 lpcat2-2 remained unchanged. LPCAT deficiency triggered a compensatory response of de novo PC synthesis and a concomitant acceleration of PC turnover that were attributable at least in part to PC deacylation. Acyl-CoA profile analysis revealed complicated metabolic alterations rather than merely reduced acyl group shuffling from PC in the mutant. Shifts in FA stereo-specific distribution in triacylglycerol of the mutant seed suggested a preferential retention of saturated acyl chains at the stereospecific numbering (sn)-1 position from PC and likely a channeling of lysophosphatidic acid, derived from PC, into the Kennedy pathway. Our study thus illustrates an intricate relationship between the Lands cycle and the Kennedy pathway. PMID:23150634

  11. Glycerolipids in photosynthesis: composition, synthesis and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Boudière, Laurence; Michaud, Morgane; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Falconet, Denis; Bastien, Olivier; Roy, Sylvaine; Finazzi, Giovanni; Rolland, Norbert; Jouhet, Juliette; Block, Maryse A; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-04-01

    Glycerolipids constituting the matrix of photosynthetic membranes, from cyanobacteria to chloroplasts of eukaryotic cells, comprise monogalactosyldiacylglycerol, digalactosyldiacylglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylglycerol. This review covers our current knowledge on the structural and functional features of these lipids in various cellular models, from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. Their relative proportions in thylakoid membranes result from highly regulated and compartmentalized metabolic pathways, with a cooperation, in the case of eukaryotes, of non-plastidic compartments. This review also focuses on the role of each of these thylakoid glycerolipids in stabilizing protein complexes of the photosynthetic machinery, which might be one of the reasons for their fascinating conservation in the course of evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Dynamic and ultrastructure of bioenergetic membranes and their components.

  12. Altered Mitochondrial Signalling and Metabolism in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Esita; Roy, Bidyut

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria being the central organelle for metabolism and other cell signalling pathways have remained the topic of interest to tumour biologists. In spite of the wide acceptance of Warburg’s hypothesis, role of mitochondrial metabolism in cancer is still unclear. Uncontrolled growth and proliferation, hallmarks of tumour cells, are maintained when the cells adapt to metabolic reprogramming with the help of altered metabolism of mitochondria. This review has focussed on different aspects of mitochondrial metabolism and inter-related signalling pathways which have been found to be modified in cancer. PMID:28373964

  13. Glycerolipid biosynthesis in isolated pea root plastids

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Lingru; Sparace, S.A. )

    1990-05-01

    Plastids have been isolated from germinating pea (Pisum sativum L.) roots by differential centrifugation and purified on Percoll gradients. Marker enzymes (NADPH: cytochrome c reductase, fumarase and fatty acid synthesis) indicate that greater than 50% of the plastids are recovered essentially free from mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum contamination. Fatty acids synthesized from ({sup 14}C)acetate by Percoll-purified plastids are primarily 16:0, 16:1 and 18:1. ({sup 14}C)Acetate-labelled fatty acids and ({sup 14}C)glycerol-3-phosphate are both readily incorporated into glycerolipid. Approximately 12% of the total activity for glycerolipid biosynthesis from glycerol-3-phosphate is recovered in the purified plastid fraction. Glycerolipids synthesized from these precursors are primarily TAG, DAG, PE, PG, PC, PI and PA. Acyl-CoA's also accumulate when acetate is the precursor.

  14. Metabolic alterations in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Massari, Francesco; Ciccarese, Chiara; Santoni, Matteo; Brunelli, Matteo; Piva, Francesco; Modena, Alessandra; Bimbatti, Davide; Fantinel, Emanuela; Santini, Daniele; Cheng, Liang; Cascinu, Stefano; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2015-11-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a metabolic disease, being characterized by the dysregulation of metabolic pathways involved in oxygen sensing (VHL/HIF pathway alterations and the subsequent up-regulation of HIF-responsive genes such as VEGF, PDGF, EGF, and glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT4, which justify the RCC reliance on aerobic glycolysis), energy sensing (fumarate hydratase-deficient, succinate dehydrogenase-deficient RCC, mutations of HGF/MET pathway resulting in the metabolic Warburg shift marked by RCC increased dependence on aerobic glycolysis and the pentose phosphate shunt, augmented lipogenesis, and reduced AMPK and Krebs cycle activity) and/or nutrient sensing cascade (deregulation of AMPK-TSC1/2-mTOR and PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathways). We analyzed the key metabolic abnormalities underlying RCC carcinogenesis, highlighting those altered pathways that may represent potential targets for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies.

  15. Altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, P; Jing, Y; Collie, N D; Dean, B; Bilkey, D K; Zhang, H

    2016-01-01

    Previous research implicates altered metabolism of l-arginine, a versatile amino acid with a number of bioactive metabolites, in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. The present study, for we believe the first time, systematically compared the metabolic profile of l-arginine in the frontal cortex (Brodmann's area 8) obtained post-mortem from schizophrenic individuals and age- and gender-matched non-psychiatric controls (n=20 per group). The enzyme assays revealed no change in total nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity, but significantly increased arginase activity in the schizophrenia group. Western blot showed reduced endothelial NOS protein expression and increased arginase II protein level in the disease group. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometric assays confirmed significantly reduced levels of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), but increased agmatine concentration and glutamate/GABA ratio in the schizophrenia cases. Regression analysis indicated positive correlations between arginase activity and the age of disease onset and between l-ornithine level and the duration of illness. Moreover, cluster analyses revealed that l-arginine and its main metabolites l-citrulline, l-ornithine and agmatine formed distinct groups, which were altered in the schizophrenia group. The present study provides further evidence of altered brain arginine metabolism in schizophrenia, which enhances our understanding of the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and may lead to the future development of novel preventions and/or therapeutics for the disease. PMID:27529679

  16. Plant secondary metabolism in altered gravity.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, Lindsey K; Levine, Lanfang H; Musgrave, Mary E

    2009-01-01

    Plans by the space program to use plants for food supply and environmental regeneration have led to an examination of how plants grow in microgravity. Because secondary metabolic compounds are so important in determining the nutritional and flavor characteristics of plants-as well as making plants more resistant to biotic and abiotic stresses-their responses to altered gravity are now being studied. These experiments are technically challenging because temperature, humidity, atmospheric composition, light, and water status must be maintained around the plant while simultaneously altering the g-load, either in the free-fall of orbital spacecraft or on a centrifuge rotor. In general, plants have shown increased accumulation of small secondary metabolites in microgravity (<10(-3) g), while these have decreased in hypergravity (>1-g). Gravity-related changes in the plant environment as well as mechanical loading effects account for these responses.

  17. Diabetes and Altered Glucose Metabolism with Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Rita Rastogi; Egan, Josephine M.

    2013-01-01

    I. Synopsis Diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance affect a substantial proportion of older adults. While the aging process can be associated with alterations in glucose metabolism, including both relative insulin resistance and islet cell dysfunction, abnormal glucose metabolism is not a necessary component of aging. Instead, older adults with diabetes and altered glucose status likely represent a vulnerable subset of the population at high-risk for complications and adverse geriatric syndromes such as accelerated muscle loss, functional disability, frailty, and early mortality. Goals for treatment of diabetes in the elderly include control of hyperglycemia, prevention and treatment of diabetic complications, avoidance of hypoglycemia and preservation of quality of life. Given the heterogeneity of the elderly population with regards to the presence of comorbidities, life expectancy, and functional status, an individualized approach to diabetes management is often appropriate. A growing area of research seeks to explore associations of dysglycemia and insulin resistance with the development of adverse outcomes in the elderly and may ultimately inform guidelines on the use of future glucose-lowering therapies in this population. PMID:23702405

  18. Mifepristone treatment results in differential regulation of glycerolipid biosynthesis in baby hamster kidney cells expressing a mifepristone-inducible ABCA1.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Kristin D; Mitchell, Ryan W; Xu, Fred Y; Dembinski, Thomas; Mymin, David; Zha, Xiaohui; Choy, Patrick C; Hatch, Grant M

    2011-09-01

    ATP binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) transports cholesterol, phospholipids and lipophilic molecules to and across cellular membranes. We examined if ABCA1 expression altered cellular de novo glycerolipid biosynthesis in growing Baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells. Mock BHK cells or cells expressing a mifepristone-inducible ABCA1 (ABCA1) were incubated plus or minus mifepristone and then with [(3)H]serine or [(3)H]inositol or [(3)H]ethanolamine or [methyl-(3)H]choline or [(3)H]glycerol or [(14)C]oleate and radioactivity incorporated into glycerolipids determined. Mifepristone did not affect [1,3-(3)H]glycerol or [(14)C]oleate or [(3)H]ethanolamine or [methyl-(3)H]choline uptake in BHK cells. In contrast, [(3)H]glycerol and [(14)C]oleate incorporated into phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) were elevated 2.4-fold (p < 0.05) and 54% (p < 0.05), respectively, upon ABCA1 induction confirming increased PtdSer biosynthesis from these precursors. However, mifepristone inhibited [(3)H]serine uptake and incorporation into PtdSer indicating that PtdSer synthesis from serine in BHK cells is dependent on serine uptake. Mifepristone stimulated [(3)H]inositol uptake in mock and ABCA1 cells but not its incorporation into phosphatidylinositol indicating that its synthesis from inositol is independent of inositol uptake in BHK cells. [(3)H]glycerol and [(14)C]oleate incorporated into triacylglycerol were reduced and into diacylglycerol elevated only in mifepristone-induced ABCA1 expressing cells due to a decrease in diacylglycerol acyltransferase-1 (DGAT-1) activity. The presence of trichostatin A, a class I and II histone deacetylase inhibitor, reversed the ABCA1-mediated reduction in DGAT-1 activity but did not affect DGAT-1 mRNA expression. Thus, mifepristone has diverse effects on de novo glycerolipid synthesis. We suggest that caution should be exercised when using mifepristone-inducible systems for studies of glycerolipid metabolism in cells expressing glucocorticoid responsive receptors.

  19. Alterations of metabolic genes and metabolites in cancer.

    PubMed

    Oermann, Eric K; Wu, Jing; Guan, Kun-Liang; Xiong, Yue

    2012-06-01

    Altered metabolic regulation has long been observed in human cancer and broadly used in the clinic for tumor detection. Two recent findings--the direct regulation of metabolic enzymes by frequently mutated cancer genes and frequent mutations of several metabolic enzymes themselves in cancer--have renewed interest in cancer metabolism. Supporting a causative role of altered metabolic enzymes in tumorigenesis, abnormal levels of several metabolites have been found to play a direct role in cancer development. The alteration of metabolic genes and metabolites offer not only new biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis, but also potential new targets for cancer therapy.

  20. Warming alters the metabolic balance of ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel; Jones, J Iwan; Trimmer, Mark; Woodward, Guy; Montoya, Jose M

    2010-07-12

    The carbon cycle modulates climate change, via the regulation of atmospheric CO(2), and it represents one of the most important services provided by ecosystems. However, considerable uncertainties remain concerning potential feedback between the biota and the climate. In particular, it is unclear how global warming will affect the metabolic balance between the photosynthetic fixation and respiratory release of CO(2) at the ecosystem scale. Here, we present a combination of experimental field data from freshwater mesocosms, and theoretical predictions derived from the metabolic theory of ecology to investigate whether warming will alter the capacity of ecosystems to absorb CO(2). Our manipulative experiment simulated the temperature increases predicted for the end of the century and revealed that ecosystem respiration increased at a faster rate than primary production, reducing carbon sequestration by 13 per cent. These results confirmed our theoretical predictions based on the differential activation energies of these two processes. Using only the activation energies for whole ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration we provide a theoretical prediction that accurately quantified the precise magnitude of the reduction in carbon sequestration observed experimentally. We suggest the combination of whole-ecosystem manipulative experiments and ecological theory is one of the most promising and fruitful research areas to predict the impacts of climate change on key ecosystem services.

  1. Chemical Genetics in Dissecting Membrane Glycerolipid Functions.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Florian; Carrera, Laura Cuyàs; Nussaume, Laurent; Maréchal, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Chemical genetics has emerged as a powerful approach to dissect biological processes, based on the utilization of small molecules disturbing the function of specific target proteins. By analogy with classical genetics, 'reverse chemical genetics' refers to the utilization of drugs acting on a known target, enabling its functional characterization at the levels of the cells, tissues and organisms. Likewise, 'direct chemical genetics' refers to the utilization of a drug of unknown mode of action, but triggering a phenotype of interest. In that case, one has to identify the target(s) possibly blocked (or possibly activated) by the small molecule. This chapter illustrates both approaches, like the analysis of the elongation of fatty acids, the biosynthesis of galactoglycerolipids or the catabolism of phosphoglycerolipids by reverse chemical genetics or the study of the membrane glycerolipid remodeling triggered upon phosphate starvation, by direct chemical genetics.

  2. Metabolic alterations and hepatitis C: From bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Ling

    2016-01-28

    In addition to causing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatitis C virus (HCV) is thought to cause hypolipidemia, hepatic steatosis, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes. The viral life cycle of HCV depends on cholesterol metabolism in host cells. HCV core protein and nonstructural protein 5A perturb crucial lipid and glucose pathways, such as the sterol regulatory element-binding protein pathway and the protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin/S6 kinase 1 pathway. Although several lines of transgenic mice expressing core or full HCV proteins exhibit hepatic steatosis and/or dyslipidemia, whether they completely reflect the metabolic alterations in humans with HCV infection remains unknown. Many cross-sectional studies have demonstrated increased prevalences of metabolic alterations and cardiovascular events in patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC); however, conflicting results exist, primarily due to unavoidable individual variations. Utilizing anti-HCV therapy, most longitudinal cohort studies of CHC patients have demonstrated the favorable effects of viral clearance in attenuating metabolic alterations and cardiovascular risks. To determine the risks of HCV-associated metabolic alterations and associated complications in patients with CHC, it is necessary to adjust for crucial confounders, such as HCV genotype and host baseline glucose metabolism, for a long follow-up period after anti-HCV treatment. Adipose tissue is an important endocrine organ due to its release of adipocytokines, which regulate lipid and glucose metabolism. However, most data on HCV infection and adipocytokine alteration are inconclusive. A comprehensive overview of HCV-associated metabolic and adipocytokine alterations, from bench to bedside, is presented in this topic highlight.

  3. Computational identification of altered metabolism using gene expression and metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hojung; Lee, Jinwon; Lee, Doheon

    2009-07-01

    Understanding altered metabolism is an important issue because altered metabolism is often revealed as a cause or an effect in pathogenesis. It has also been shown to be an important factor in the manipulation of an organism's metabolism in metabolic engineering. Unfortunately, it is not yet possible to measure the concentration levels of all metabolites in the genome-wide scale of a metabolic network; consequently, a method that infers the alteration of metabolism is beneficial. The present study proposes a computational method that identifies genome-wide altered metabolism by analyzing functional units of KEGG pathways. As control of a metabolic pathway is accomplished by altering the activity of at least one rate-determining step enzyme, not all gene expressions of enzymes in the pathway demonstrate significant changes even if the pathway is altered. Therefore, we measure the alteration levels of a metabolic pathway by selectively observing expression levels of significantly changed genes in a pathway. The proposed method was applied to two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene expression profiles measured in very high-gravity (VHG) fermentation. The method identified altered metabolic pathways whose properties are related to ethanol and osmotic stress responses which had been known to be observed in VHG fermentation because of the high sugar concentration in growth media and high ethanol concentration in fermentation products. With the identified altered pathways, the proposed method achieved best accuracy and sensitivity rates for the Red Star (RS) strain compared to other three related studies (gene-set enrichment analysis (GSEA), significance analysis of microarray to gene set (SAM-GS), reporter metabolite), and for the CEN.PK 113-7D (CEN) strain, the proposed method and the GSEA method showed comparably similar performances.

  4. Depot risperidone-induced adverse metabolic alterations in female rats.

    PubMed

    Horska, Katerina; Ruda-Kucerova, Jana; Karpisek, Michal; Suchy, Pavel; Opatrilova, Radka; Kotolova, Hana

    2017-04-01

    Atypical antipsychotics are associated with adverse metabolic effects including weight gain, increased adiposity, dyslipidaemia, alterations in glucose metabolism and insulin resistance. Increasing evidence suggests that metabolic dysregulation precedes weight gain development. The aim of this study was to evaluate alterations in adipokines, hormones and basic serum biochemical parameters induced by chronic treatment with depot risperidone at two doses (20 and 40 mg/kg) in female Sprague-Dawley rats. Dose-dependent metabolic alterations induced by risperidone after 6 weeks of treatment were revealed. Concomitant to weight gain and increased liver weight, an adverse lipid profile with an elevated triglyceride level was observed in the high exposure group, administered a 40 mg/kg dose repeatedly, while the low dose exposure group, administered a 20 mg/kg dose, developed weight gain without alterations in the lipid profile and adipokine levels. An initial peak in leptin serum level after the higher dose was observed in the absence of weight gain. This finding may indicate that the metabolic alterations observed in this study are not consequent to body weight gain. Taken together, these data may support the primary effects of atypical antipsychotics on peripheral tissues.

  5. Gut microbiota drives metabolic disease in immunologically altered mice.

    PubMed

    Chassaing, Benoit; Aitken, Jesse D; Gewirtz, Andrew T; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian intestine harbors trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota, which can be viewed as an anaerobic metabolic organ that benefits the host in a number of ways. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is a prerequisite to maintaining host health by maximizing symbiotic interrelations and minimizing the risk of living in a close relationship. The cooperation between the innate and adaptive immune systems of the host maintains homeostasis of the microbiota. The dysregulation/alteration of microbiota in various immunodeficiency states including both innate and adaptive deficiency results in metabolic disease. This review examines the influence of microbiota on host metabolic health in immunologically altered mice. Accumulated data from a variety of immune-deficient murine models indicate that altered microbiota can play a key role in origination of metabolic diseases through the following potential mechanisms: (i) increasing calorie extraction resulting in adiposity, (ii) inducing low-grade chronic inflammation in the gut directly or increasing systemic loads of microbial ligands via leaky guts, (iii) generating toxic metabolites from dietary components, and (iv) inducing a switch from pro-metabolic to pro-immune phenotype that drives malabsorption of lipids resulting in muscle wastage and weight loss-particularly upon states of adaptive immune deficiency. Further, these murine models demonstrate that altered microbiota is not purely a consequence of metabolic disease but plays a key role in driving this disorder.

  6. Arabidopsis GPAT9 contributes to synthesis of intracellular glycerolipids but not surface lipids

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Stacy D.; Chen, Guanqun; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Tomasi, Pernell; Jayawardhane, Kethmi; Dyer, John M.; Weselake, Randall J.

    2016-01-01

    GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE ACYLTRANSFERASE (GPAT) genes encode enzymes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis in plants. Ten GPAT homologues have been identified in Arabidopsis. GPATs 4–8 have been shown to be involved in the production of extracellular lipid barrier polyesters. Recently, GPAT9 was reported to be essential for triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in developing Arabidopsis seeds. The enzymatic properties and possible functions of GPAT9 in surface lipid, polar lipid and TAG biosynthesis in non-seed organs, however, have not been investigated. Here we show that Arabidopsis GPAT9 exhibits sn-1 acyltransferase activity with high specificity for acyl-coenzyme A, thus providing further evidence that this GPAT is involved in storage lipid biosynthesis. We also confirm a role for GPAT9 in seed oil biosynthesis and further demonstrate that GPAT9 contributes to the biosynthesis of both polar lipids and TAG in developing leaves, as well as lipid droplet production in developing pollen grains. Conversely, alteration of constitutive GPAT9 expression had no obvious effects on surface lipid biosynthesis. Taken together, these studies expand our understanding of GPAT9 function to include modulation of several different intracellular glycerolipid pools in plant cells. PMID:27325892

  7. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; Chávez García, Ana Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela

    2012-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine disturbances such as hypogonadism, low levels of testosterone, and growth hormone have been reported. This eventually will result in consequences such as growth failure and delayed puberty in the case of childhood dystrophies. Other consequences may be reduced male fertility, reduced spermatogenesis, and oligospermia, both in childhood as well as in adult muscular dystrophies. These facts all suggest that there is a need for better comprehension of metabolic and endocrine implications for muscular dystrophies with the purpose of developing improved clinical treatments and/or improvements in the quality of life of patients with dystrophy. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about of metabolic and endocrine alterations in diverse types of dystrophinopathies, which will be divided into two groups: childhood and adult dystrophies which have different age of onset. PMID:22701119

  8. Altered glycosaminoglycan metabolism in injured arterial wall

    SciTech Connect

    Salisbury, B.G.; Hajjar, D.P.; Minick, C.R.

    1985-06-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAG) are believed to be important in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We have previously demonstrated that areas of injured aorta that have been re-endothelialized accumulate increased amounts of lipid and GAG when compared to areas remaining de-endothelialized. We have now examined the net incorporation of labeled precursors into the individual GAG present in both re-endothelialized and de-endothelialized areas of rabbit aorta. Aortic tissue was examined at 2-3 and 10-14 weeks after a denuding injury by incubating tissue minces with (/sup 3/H)glucosamine and sodium (/sup 35/S)sulfate for 24 hr. Following incubation, the aortic GAG were isolated and assayed for uronic acid concentration and radioactivity. Results indicate that the total GAG concentration was significantly greater in the re-endothelialized as compared to de-endothelialized areas. The concentration in uninjured aorta was 9.01. The difference between the injured tissues was attributable to increased concentrations of sulfated GAG. Hyaluronic acid and chondroitin sulfate were the most metabolically active of the GAG in either uninjured or injured aorta, together accounting for over 75% of the /sup 3/H label. The /sup 3/H specific radioactivities of the four GAG in the short-term, re-endothelialized subgroup were all increased nearly twice that found in uninjured and de-endothelialized tissues. With the exception of heparan sulfate, no significant differences were noted in the /sup 3/H specific radioactivities between the re-endothelialized and de-endothelialized areas in the long-term subgroup. These results indicate that, relative to adjacent areas of de-endothelialization, GAG preferentially accumulate in re-endothelialized areas even as early as 2-3 weeks following a denuding injury.

  9. Altered sucrose metabolism impacts plant biomass production and flower development.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather D; Beamish, Leigh; Reid, Anya; Park, Ji-Young; Mansfield, Shawn D

    2010-04-01

    Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco) was transformed with three genes involved in sucrose metabolism, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase, EC 2.7.7.9), sucrose synthase (SuSy, EC 2.4.1.13) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS, EC 2.4.1.14). Plants harbouring the single transgenes were subsequently crossed to produce double and triple transgenic lines, including: 2 x 35S::UGPase x SPS, 4CL::UGPase x SPS, 2 x 35S::SuSy x SPS, 4CL::SuSy x SPS, 2 x 35S::UGPase x SuSy x SPS, and 4CL::UGPase x SuSy x SPS. The ultimate aim of the study was to examine whether it is possible to alter cellulose production through the manipulation of sucrose metabolism genes. While altering sucrose metabolism using UGPase, SuSy and SPS does not have an end effect on cellulose production, their simultaneous overexpression resulted in enhanced primary growth as seen in an increase in height growth, in some cases over 50%. Furthermore, the pyramiding strategy of simultaneously altering the expression of multiple genes in combination resulted in increased time to reproductive bud formation as well as altered flower morphology and foliar stipule formation in 4CL lines. Upregulation of these sucrose metabolism genes appears to directly impact primary growth and therefore biomass production in tobacco.

  10. Altered erythropoiesis and iron metabolism in carriers of thalassemia

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Jacqueline S.; Cominal, Juçara G.; Silva-Pinto, Ana Cristina; Olbina, Gordana; Ginzburg, Yelena Z.; Nandi, Vijay; Westerman, Mark; Rivella, Stefano; de Souza, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    The thalassemia syndromes (α- and β-thalassemia) are the most common and frequent disorders associated with ineffective erythropoiesis. Imbalance of α- or β-globin chain production results in impaired red blood cell synthesis, anemia and more erythroid progenitors in the blood stream. While patients affected by these disorders show definitive altered parameters related to erythropoiesis, the relationship between the degree of anemia, altered erythropoiesis and dysfunctional iron metabolism have not been investigated in both α-thalassemia carriers (ATC) and β-thalassemia carriers (BTC). Here we demonstrate that ATC have a significantly reduced hepcidin and increased soluble transferrin receptor levels but relatively normal hematological findings. In contrast, BTC have several hematological parameters significantly different from controls, including increased soluble transferrin receptor and erythropoietin levels. These changings in both groups suggest an altered balance between erythropoiesis and iron metabolism. The index sTfR/log ferrin and (hepcidin/ferritin)/sTfR are respectively increased and reduced relative to controls, proportional to the severity of each thalassemia group. In conclusion, we showed in this study, for the first time in the literature, that thalassemia carriers have altered iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. PMID:25307880

  11. Choline Metabolism Alteration: A Focus on Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bagnoli, Marina; Granata, Anna; Nicoletti, Roberta; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Bhujwalla, Zaver M.; Canese, Rossella; Podo, Franca; Canevari, Silvana; Iorio, Egidio; Mezzanzanica, Delia

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal differentiated cells, cancer cells require a metabolic reprograming to support their high proliferation rates and survival. Aberrant choline metabolism is a fairly new metabolic hallmark reflecting the complex reciprocal interactions between oncogenic signaling and cellular metabolism. Alterations of the involved metabolic network may be sustained by changes in activity of several choline transporters as well as of enzymes such as choline kinase-alpha (ChoK-α) and phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipases C and D. Of note, the net outcome of these enzymatic alterations is an increase of phosphocholine and total choline-containing compounds, a “cholinic phenotype” that can be monitored in cancer by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. This review will highlight the molecular basis for targeting this pathway in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC), a highly heterogeneous and lethal malignancy characterized by late diagnosis, frequent relapse, and development of chemoresistance. Modulation of ChoK-α expression impairs only EOC but not normal ovarian cells, thus supporting the hypothesis that “cholinic phenotype” is a peculiar feature of transformed cells and indicating ChoK-α targeting as a novel approach to improve efficacy of standard EOC chemotherapeutic treatments. PMID:27446799

  12. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes In Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, Virginia E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2010-01-01

    Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism it is important to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver. Exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. This study is an effort to examine the effects of adaptive mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses. Using procedures approved by the JSC Animal Care & Use Committee, C57 male mice were exposed to Cs-137 in groups: controls, low dose (50 mGy), high dose (6Gy) and a fourth group that received both radiation doses separated by 24 hours. Animals were anesthetized and sacrificed 4 hours after their last radiation exposure. Livers were removed immediately and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen. Tissue was homogenized, RNA extracted and purified (Absolutely RNA, Agilent). Quality of RNA samples was evaluated (Agilent Bioanalyzer 2100). Complementary DNA was prepared from high-quality RNA samples, and used to run RT-qPCR screening arrays for DNA Repair and Drug Metabolism (SuperArray, SABiosciences/Qiagen; BioRad Cfx96 qPCR System). Of 91 drug metabolism genes examined, expression of 7 was altered by at least one treatment condition. Genes that had elevated expression include those that metabolize promethazine and steroids (4-8-fold), many that reduce oxidation products, and one that reduces heavy metal exposure (greater than 200-fold). Of the 91 DNA repair and general metabolism genes examined, expression of 14 was altered by at least one treatment condition. These gene expression changes are likely homeostatic and could lead to development of new radioprotective countermeasures.

  13. Soybean cotyledon starch metabolism is sensitive to altered gravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, C. S.; Piastuch, W. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1994-08-01

    We have demonstrated that etiolated soybean seedlings grown under the altered gravity conditions of clinorotation (1 rpm) and centrifugation (5xg) exhibit changes in starch metabolism. Cotyledon starch concentration was lower (-28%) in clinorotated plants and higher (+24%) in centrifuged plants than in vertical control plants. The activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in the cotyledons was affected in a similar way, i.e. lower (-37%) in the clinorotated plants and higher (+22%) in the centrifuged plants. Other starch metabolic enzyme activities, starch synthase, starch phosphorylase and total hydrolase were not affected by the altered gravity treatments. We conclude that the observed changes in starch concentrations were primarily due to gravity-mediated differences in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity.

  14. Soybean cotyledon starch metabolism is sensitive to altered gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. S.; Piastuch, W. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have demonstrated that etiolated soybean seedlings grown under the altered gravity conditions of clinorotation (1 rpm) and centrifugation (5xg) exhibit changes in starch metabolism. Cotyledon starch concentration was lower (-28%) in clinorotated plants and higher (+24%) in centrifuged plants than in vertical control plants. The activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in the cotyledons was affected in a similar way, i.e. lower (-37%) in the clinorotated plants and higher (+22%) in the centrifuged plants. Other starch metabolic enzyme activities, starch synthase, starch phosphorylase and total hydrolase were not affected by the altered gravity treatments. We conclude that the observed changes in starch concentrations were primarily due to gravity-mediated differences in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity.

  15. The Causes and Consequences of Altered Glucose Metabolism in Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-05

    Allalunis-Turner J, Haromy A, Beaulieu C, Thompson R, Lee CT, Lopaschuk GD, Puttagunta L, Bonnet S, Harry G, Hashimoto K, Porter CJ, Andrade MA, Thebaud B ...diagram). B . Diagram of the Warburg Effect. Even in the presence of normal oxygen conditions, many cancer cells convert pyruvate to lactate. The...mitochondria of these cells often appear to be functional, so it remains uncertain why this altered metabolism occurs. A. B . 5 conditions. Based on

  16. Altered oxidative stress and carbohydrate metabolism in canine mammary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Jayasri, K.; Padmaja, K.; Saibaba, M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Mammary tumors are the most prevalent type of neoplasms in canines. Even though cancer induced metabolic alterations are well established, the clinical data describing the metabolic profiles of animal tumors is not available. Hence, our present investigation was carried out with the aim of studying changes in carbohydrate metabolism along with the level of oxidative stress in canine mammary tumors. Materials and Methods: Fresh mammary tumor tissues along with the adjacent healthy tissues were collected from the college surgical ward. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), glutathione, protein, hexose, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphatase, fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) were analyzed in all the tissues. The results were analyzed statistically. Results: More than two-fold increase in TBARS and three-fold increase in glutathione levels were observed in neoplastic tissues. Hexokinase activity and hexose concentration (175%) was found to be increased, whereas glucose-6-phosphatase (33%), fructose-1, 6-bisphosphatase (42%), and G6PD (5 fold) activities were reduced in tumor mass compared to control. Conclusion: Finally, it was revealed that lipid peroxidation was increased with differentially altered carbohydrate metabolism in canine mammary tumors. PMID:28096627

  17. Body composition and risk for metabolic alterations in female adolescents

    PubMed Central

    de Faria, Eliane Rodrigues; Gontijo, Cristiana Araújo; Franceschini, Sylvia do Carmo C.; Peluzio, Maria do Carmo G.; Priore, Silvia Eloiza

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study anthropometrical and body composition variables as predictors of risk for metabolic alterations and metabolic syndrome in female adolescents. METHODS: Biochemical, clinical and corporal composition data of 100 adolescents from 14 to 17 years old, who attended public schools in Viçosa, Southeastern Brazil, were collected. RESULTS: Regarding nutritional status, 83, 11 and 6% showed eutrophia, overweight/obesity and low weight, respectively, and 61% presented high body fat percent. Total cholesterol presented the highest percentage of inadequacy (57%), followed by high-density lipoprotein (HDL - 50%), low-density lipoprotein (LDL - 47%) and triacylglycerol (22%). Inadequacy was observed in 11, 9, 3 and 4% in relation to insulin resistance, fasting insulin, blood pressure and glycemia, respectively. The highest values of the fasting insulin and the Homeostasis Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) were verified at the highest quartiles of body mass index (BMI), waist perimeter, waist-to-height ratio and body fat percent. Body mass index, waist perimeter, and waist-to-height ratio were the better predictors for high levels of HOMA-IR, blood glucose and fasting insulin. Waist-to-hip ratio was associated to arterial hypertension diagnosis. All body composition variables were effective in metabolic syndrome diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: Waist perimeter, BMI and waist-to-height ratio showed to be good predictors for metabolic alterations in female adolescents and then should be used together for the nutritional assessment in this age range. PMID:25119752

  18. Understanding Acyl Chain and Glycerolipid Metabolism in Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlrogge, John B.

    2013-11-05

    Progress is reported in these areas: acyl-editing in initial eukaryotic lipid assembly in soybean seeds; identification and characterization of two Arabidopsis thaliana lysophosphatidyl acyltransferases with preference for lysophosphatidylethanolamine; and characterization and subcellular distribution of lysolipid acyl transferase activity of pea leaves.

  19. Lipoxygenase- and cyclooxygenase-reaction products and incorporation into glycerolipids or radiolabeled arachidonic acid in the bovine retina

    SciTech Connect

    Birkle, D.L.; Bazan, N.G.

    1984-02-01

    The metabolism of radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) by the intact bovine retina in vitro has been studied. Synthesis of prostaglandins (PGs) and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and incorporation of AA into glycerolipids has been measured by reverse-phase and straight-phase high performance liquid chromatography with flow scintillation detection, and by thin-layer chromatography. AA was actively acylated into glycerolipids, particularly triglycerides, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. AA was also converted to the major PGs, PGF2 alpha, PGE2, PGD2, 6-keto-PGF1 alpha and TXB2, and to the lipoxygenase reaction products, 12-HETE, 5-HETE, and other monohydroxy isomers. Approximately 6% of the radiolabeled AA was converted to eicosanoids. The synthesis of HETEs was inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 . 8.3 nM) by nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA). PG synthesis was inhibited by aspirin (10 microM), indomethacin (1 microM) and NDGA (IC50 . 380 nM). Metabolism of AA via lipoxygenase, cyclooxygenase and activation-acylation was inhibited by boiling retinal tissue prior to incubation. These studies demonstrate an active system for the uptake and utilization of AA in the bovine retina, and provide the first evidence of lipoxygenase-mediated metabolism of AA, resulting in the synthesis of mono-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, in the retina.

  20. Membrane glycerolipid remodeling triggered by nitrogen and phosphorus starvation in Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    PubMed

    Abida, Heni; Dolch, Lina-Juana; Meï, Coline; Villanova, Valeria; Conte, Melissa; Block, Maryse A; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bastien, Olivier; Tirichine, Leïla; Bowler, Chris; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms constitute a major phylum of phytoplankton biodiversity in ocean water and freshwater ecosystems. They are known to respond to some chemical variations of the environment by the accumulation of triacylglycerol, but the relative changes occurring in membrane glycerolipids have not yet been studied. Our goal was first to define a reference for the glycerolipidome of the marine model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a necessary prerequisite to characterize and dissect the lipid metabolic routes that are orchestrated and regulated to build up each subcellular membrane compartment. By combining multiple analytical techniques, we determined the glycerolipid profile of P. tricornutum grown with various levels of nitrogen or phosphorus supplies. In different P. tricornutum accessions collected worldwide, a deprivation of either nutrient triggered an accumulation of triacylglycerol, but with different time scales and magnitudes. We investigated in depth the effect of nutrient starvation on the Pt1 strain (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa no. 1055/3). Nitrogen deprivation was the more severe stress, triggering thylakoid senescence and growth arrest. By contrast, phosphorus deprivation induced a stepwise adaptive response. The time scale of the glycerolipidome changes and the comparison with large-scale transcriptome studies were consistent with an exhaustion of unknown primary phosphorus-storage molecules (possibly polyphosphate) and a transcriptional control of some genes coding for specific lipid synthesis enzymes. We propose that phospholipids are secondary phosphorus-storage molecules broken down upon phosphorus deprivation, while nonphosphorus lipids are synthesized consistently with a phosphatidylglycerol-to-sulfolipid and a phosphatidycholine-to-betaine lipid replacement followed by a late accumulation of triacylglycerol.

  1. Membrane Glycerolipid Remodeling Triggered by Nitrogen and Phosphorus Starvation in Phaeodactylum tricornutum1

    PubMed Central

    Abida, Heni; Dolch, Lina-Juana; Meï, Coline; Villanova, Valeria; Conte, Melissa; Block, Maryse A.; Finazzi, Giovanni; Bastien, Olivier; Tirichine, Leïla; Bowler, Chris; Rébeillé, Fabrice; Petroutsos, Dimitris; Jouhet, Juliette; Maréchal, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Diatoms constitute a major phylum of phytoplankton biodiversity in ocean water and freshwater ecosystems. They are known to respond to some chemical variations of the environment by the accumulation of triacylglycerol, but the relative changes occurring in membrane glycerolipids have not yet been studied. Our goal was first to define a reference for the glycerolipidome of the marine model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum, a necessary prerequisite to characterize and dissect the lipid metabolic routes that are orchestrated and regulated to build up each subcellular membrane compartment. By combining multiple analytical techniques, we determined the glycerolipid profile of P. tricornutum grown with various levels of nitrogen or phosphorus supplies. In different P. tricornutum accessions collected worldwide, a deprivation of either nutrient triggered an accumulation of triacylglycerol, but with different time scales and magnitudes. We investigated in depth the effect of nutrient starvation on the Pt1 strain (Culture Collection of Algae and Protozoa no. 1055/3). Nitrogen deprivation was the more severe stress, triggering thylakoid senescence and growth arrest. By contrast, phosphorus deprivation induced a stepwise adaptive response. The time scale of the glycerolipidome changes and the comparison with large-scale transcriptome studies were consistent with an exhaustion of unknown primary phosphorus-storage molecules (possibly polyphosphate) and a transcriptional control of some genes coding for specific lipid synthesis enzymes. We propose that phospholipids are secondary phosphorus-storage molecules broken down upon phosphorus deprivation, while nonphosphorus lipids are synthesized consistently with a phosphatidylglycerol-to-sulfolipid and a phosphatidycholine-to-betaine lipid replacement followed by a late accumulation of triacylglycerol. PMID:25489020

  2. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-08-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states.

  3. Modelling chronotaxicity of cellular energy metabolism to facilitate the identification of altered metabolic states

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Gemma; Suprunenko, Yevhen F.; Jenkins, Kirsten; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2016-01-01

    Altered cellular energy metabolism is a hallmark of many diseases, one notable example being cancer. Here, we focus on the identification of the transition from healthy to abnormal metabolic states. To do this, we study the dynamics of energy production in a cell. Due to the thermodynamic openness of a living cell, the inability to instantaneously match fluctuating supply and demand in energy metabolism results in nonautonomous time-varying oscillatory dynamics. However, such oscillatory dynamics is often neglected and treated as stochastic. Based on experimental evidence of metabolic oscillations, we show that changes in metabolic state can be described robustly by alterations in the chronotaxicity of the corresponding metabolic oscillations, i.e. the ability of an oscillator to resist external perturbations. We also present a method for the identification of chronotaxicity, applicable to general oscillatory signals and, importantly, apply this to real experimental data. Evidence of chronotaxicity was found in glycolytic oscillations in real yeast cells, verifying that chronotaxicity could be used to study transitions between metabolic states. PMID:27483987

  4. Alterations in protein metabolism during space flight and inactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrando, Arny A.; Paddon-Jones, Doug; Wolfe, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight and the accompanying diminished muscular activity lead to a loss of body nitrogen and muscle function. These losses may affect crew capabilities and health in long-duration missions. Space flight alters protein metabolism such that the body is unable to maintain protein synthetic rates. A concomitant hypocaloric intake and altered anabolic/catabolic hormonal profiles may contribute to or exacerbate this problem. The inactivity associated with bedrest also reduces muscle and whole-body protein synthesis. For this reason, bedrest provides a good model for the investigation of potential exercise and nutritional countermeasures to restore muscle protein synthesis. We have demonstrated that minimal resistance exercise preserves muscle protein synthesis throughout bedrest. In addition, ongoing work indicates that an essential amino acid and carbohydrate supplement may ameliorate the loss of lean body mass and muscle strength associated with 28 d of bedrest. The investigation of inactivity-induced alterations in protein metabolism, during space flight or prolonged bedrest, is applicable to clinical populations and, in a more general sense, to the problems associated with the decreased activity that occur with aging.

  5. Metabolic flux prediction in cancer cells with altered substrate uptake.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Barber, Michael; Soons, Zita

    2015-12-01

    Proliferating cells, such as cancer cells, are known to have an unusual metabolism, characterized by an increased rate of glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. Our understanding of this phenomenon is limited but could potentially be used in order to develop new therapies. Computational modelling techniques, such as flux balance analysis (FBA), have been used to predict fluxes in various cell types, but remain of limited use to explain the unusual metabolic shifts and altered substrate uptake in human cancer cells. We implemented a new flux prediction method based on elementary modes (EMs) and structural flux (StruF) analysis and tested them against experimentally measured flux data obtained from (13)C-labelling in a cancer cell line. We assessed the quality of predictions using different objective functions along with different techniques in normalizing a metabolic network with more than one substrate input. Results show a good correlation between predicted and experimental values and indicate that the choice of cellular objective critically affects the quality of predictions. In particular, lactate gives an excellent correlation and correctly predicts the high flux through glycolysis, matching the observed characteristics of cancer cells. In contrast with FBA, which requires a priori definition of all uptake rates, often hard to measure, atomic StruFs (aStruFs) are able to predict uptake rates of multiple substrates.

  6. [Alteration of biological rhythms causes metabolic diseases and obesity].

    PubMed

    Saderi, Nadia; Escobar, Carolina; Salgado-Delgado, Roberto

    2013-07-16

    The incidence of obesity worldwide has become a serious, constantly growing public health issue that reaches alarming proportions in some countries. To date none of the strategies developed to combat obesity have proved to be decisive, and hence there is an urgent need to address the problem with new approaches. Today, studies in the field of chronobiology have shown that our physiology continually adapts itself to the cyclical changes in the environment, regard-less of whether they are daily or seasonal. This is possible thanks to the existence of a biological clock in our hypothalamus which regulates the expression and/or activity of enzymes and hormones involved in regulating our metabolism, as well as all the homeostatic functions. It has been observed that this clock can be upset as a result of today's modern lifestyle, which involves a drop in physical activity during the day and the abundant ingestion of food during the night, among other factors, which together promote metabolic syndrome and obesity. Hence, the aim of this review is to summarise the recent findings that show the effect that altering the circadian rhythms has on the metabolism and how this can play a part in the development of metabolic diseases.

  7. Alterations in metabolic pathways and networks in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kaddurah-Daouk, R; Zhu, H; Sharma, S; Bogdanov, M; Rozen, S G; Matson, W; Oki, N O; Motsinger-Reif, A A; Churchill, E; Lei, Z; Appleby, D; Kling, M A; Trojanowski, J Q; Doraiswamy, P M; Arnold, S E

    2013-04-09

    The pathogenic mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain largely unknown and clinical trials have not demonstrated significant benefit. Biochemical characterization of AD and its prodromal phase may provide new diagnostic and therapeutic insights. We used targeted metabolomics platform to profile cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from AD (n=40), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, n=36) and control (n=38) subjects; univariate and multivariate analyses to define between-group differences; and partial least square-discriminant analysis models to classify diagnostic groups using CSF metabolomic profiles. A partial correlation network was built to link metabolic markers, protein markers and disease severity. AD subjects had elevated methionine (MET), 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), vanillylmandelic acid, xanthosine and glutathione versus controls. MCI subjects had elevated 5-HIAA, MET, hypoxanthine and other metabolites versus controls. Metabolite ratios revealed changes within tryptophan, MET and purine pathways. Initial pathway analyses identified steps in several pathways that appear altered in AD and MCI. A partial correlation network showed total tau most directly related to norepinephrine and purine pathways; amyloid-β (Ab42) was related directly to an unidentified metabolite and indirectly to 5-HIAA and MET. These findings indicate that MCI and AD are associated with an overlapping pattern of perturbations in tryptophan, tyrosine, MET and purine pathways, and suggest that profound biochemical alterations are linked to abnormal Ab42 and tau metabolism. Metabolomics provides powerful tools to map interlinked biochemical pathway perturbations and study AD as a disease of network failure.

  8. Unpredictable Chronic Stress Alters Adenosine Metabolism in Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, F F; Altenhofen, S; Kist, L W; Leite, C E; Bogo, M R; Cognato, G P; Bonan, C D

    2016-05-01

    Stress is considered a risk factor for several human disorders. Despite the broad knowledge of stress responses in mammals, data on the relationship between unpredictable chronic stress (UCS) and its effects on purinergic signaling are limited. ATP hydrolysis by ectonucleotidases is an important source of adenosine, and adenosine deaminase (ADA) contributes to the control of the nucleoside concentrations. Considering that some stress models could affect signaling systems, the objective of this study was to investigate whether UCS alters ectonucleotidase and ADA pathway in zebrafish brain. Additionally, we analyzed ATP metabolism as well as ada1, ada2.1, ada2.2, adaL, and adaasi gene expression in zebrafish brain. Our results have demonstrated that UCS did not alter ectonucleotidase and soluble ADA activities. However, ecto-ADA activity was significantly decreased (26.8%) in brain membranes of animals exposed to UCS when compared to the control group. Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analysis did not show significant changes on ADA gene expression after the UCS exposure. The brain ATP metabolism showed a marked increase in adenosine levels (ADO) in animals exposed to UCS. These data suggest an increase on extracellular adenosine levels in zebrafish brain. Since this nucleoside has neuromodulatory and anxiolytic effects, changes in adenosine levels could play a role in counteracting the stress, which could be related to a compensatory mechanism in order to restore the homeostasis.

  9. Surfactant treatments alter endogenous surfactant metabolism in rabbit lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Oetomo, S.B.; Lewis, J.; Ikegami, M.; Jobe, A.H. )

    1990-04-01

    The effect of exogenous surfactant on endogenous surfactant metabolism was evaluated using a single-lobe treatment strategy to compare effects of treated with untreated lung within the same rabbit. Natural rabbit surfactant, Survanta, or 0.45% NaCl was injected into the left main stem bronchus by use of a Swan-Ganz catheter. Radiolabeled palmitic acid was then given by intravascular injection at two times after surfactant treatment, and the ratios of label incorporation and secretion in the left lower lobe to label incorporation and secretion in the right lung were compared. The treatment procedure resulted in a reasonably uniform surfactant distribution and did not disrupt lobar pulmonary blood flow. Natural rabbit surfactant increased incorporation of palmitate into saturated phosphatidylcholine (Sat PC) approximately 2-fold (P less than 0.01), and secretion of labeled Sat PC increased approximately 2.5-fold in the surfactant-treated left lower lobe relative to the right lung (P less than 0.01). Although Survanta did not alter incorporation, it did increase secretion but not to the same extent as rabbit surfactant (P less than 0.01). Alteration of endogenous surfactant Sat PC metabolism in vivo by surfactant treatments was different from that which would have been predicted by previous in vitro studies.

  10. Alteration of drug metabolizing enzymes in sulphite oxidase deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Tutuncu, Begum; Kuçukatay, Vural; Arslan, Sevki; Sahin, Barbaros; Semiz, Asli; Sen, Alaattin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible effects of sulphite oxidase (SOX, E.C. 1.8.3.1) deficiency on xenobiotic metabolism. For this purpose, SOX deficiency was produced in rats by the administration of a low molybdenum diet with concurrent addition of 200 ppm tungsten to their drinking water. First, hepatic SOX activity in deficient groups was measured to confirm SOX deficiency. Then, aminopyrine N-demethylase, aniline 4-hydroxylase, aromatase, caffeine N-demethylase, cytochrome b5 reductase, erythromycin N-demethylase, ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase, glutathione S-transferase, N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase and penthoxyresorufin O-deethylase activities were determined to follow changes in the activity of drug metabolizing enzymes in SOX-deficient rats. Our results clearly demonstrated that SOX deficiency significantly elevated A4H, caffeine N-demethylase, erythromycin N-demethylase and N-nitrosodimethylamine N-demethylase activities while decreasing ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and aromatase activities. These alterations in drug metabolizing enzymes can contribute to the varying susceptibility and response of sulphite-sensitive individuals to different drugs and/or therapeutics used for treatments. PMID:22798713

  11. Alterations in Lipid and Inositol Metabolisms in Two Dopaminergic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Hannah S.; Do, Kieu Trinh; Kastenmüller, Gabi; Wahl, Simone; Adamski, Jerzy; Peters, Annette; Krumsiek, Jan; Suhre, Karsten; Haslinger, Bernhard; Ceballos-Baumann, Andres; Gieger, Christian; Winkelmann, Juliane

    2016-01-01

    Background Serum metabolite profiling can be used to identify pathways involved in the pathogenesis of and potential biomarkers for a given disease. Both restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson`s disease (PD) represent movement disorders for which currently no blood-based biomarkers are available and whose pathogenesis has not been uncovered conclusively. We performed unbiased serum metabolite profiling in search of signature metabolic changes for both diseases. Methods 456 metabolites were quantified in serum samples of 1272 general population controls belonging to the KORA cohort, 82 PD cases and 95 RLS cases by liquid-phase chromatography and gas chromatography separation coupled with tandem mass spectrometry. Genetically determined metabotypes were calculated using genome-wide genotyping data for the 1272 general population controls. Results After stringent quality control, we identified decreased levels of long-chain (polyunsaturated) fatty acids of individuals with PD compared to both RLS (PD vs. RLS: p = 0.0001 to 5.80x10-9) and general population controls (PD vs. KORA: p = 6.09x10-5 to 3.45x10-32). In RLS, inositol metabolites were increased specifically (RLS vs. KORA: p = 1.35x10-6 to 3.96x10-7). The impact of dopaminergic drugs was reflected in changes in the phenylalanine/tyrosine/dopamine metabolism observed in both individuals with RLS and PD. Conclusions A first discovery approach using serum metabolite profiling in two dopamine-related movement disorders compared to a large general population sample identified significant alterations in the polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in PD and implicated the inositol metabolism in RLS. These results provide a starting point for further studies investigating new perspectives on factors involved in the pathogenesis of the two diseases as well as possible points of therapeutic intervention. PMID:26808974

  12. Metabolomics Analysis Reveals that AICAR Affects Glycerolipid, Ceramide and Nucleotide Synthesis Pathways in INS-1 Cells.

    PubMed

    ElAzzouny, Mahmoud A; Evans, Charles R; Burant, Charles F; Kennedy, Robert T

    2015-01-01

    AMPK regulates many metabolic pathways including fatty acid and glucose metabolism, both of which are closely associated with insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. Insulin secretion is regulated by metabolic coupling factors such as ATP/ADP ratio and other metabolites generated by the metabolism of nutrients such as glucose, fatty acid and amino acids. However, the connection between AMPK activation and insulin secretion in β-cells has not yet been fully elucidated at a metabolic level. To study the effect of AMPK activation on glucose stimulated insulin secretion, we applied the pharmacological activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) to an INS-1 (832/13) β-cell line. We measured the change in 66 metabolites in the presence or absence of AICAR using different stable isotopic labeled nutrients to probe selected pathways. AMPK activation by AICAR increased basal insulin secretion and reduced the glucose stimulation index. Although ATP/ADP ratios were not strongly affected by AICAR, several other metabolites and pathways important for insulin secretion were affected by AICAR treatment including long-chain CoAs, malonyl-CoA, 3-hydroxy-3 methylglutaryl CoA, diacylglycerol, and farnesyl pyrophosphate. Tracer studies using 13C-glucose revealed lower glucose flux in the purine and pyrimidine pathway and in the glycerolipid synthesis pathway. Untargeted metabolomics revealed reduction in ceramides caused by AICAR that may explain the beneficial role of AMPK in protecting β-cells from lipotoxicity. Taken together, the results provide an overall picture of the metabolic changes associated with AICAR treatment and how it modulates insulin secretion and β-cell survival.

  13. Altered arachidonic acid metabolism and platelet size in atopic subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Audera, C.; Rocklin, R.; Vaillancourt, R.; Jakubowski, J.A.; Deykin, D.

    1988-03-01

    The release and metabolism of endogenous arachidonic acid (AA) in physiologically activated platelets obtained from 11 atopic patients with allergic rhinitis and/or asthma was compared to that of sex- and age-matched nonatopic controls. Prelabeled (/sup 3/H)AA platelets were stimulated with thrombin or collagen and the amount of free (/sup 3/H)AA and radiolabeled metabolites released were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The results obtained indicate that although the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)AA into platelet phospholipids and total release of /sup 3/H-radioactivity upon stimulation were comparable in the two groups, the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released from platelets as free AA was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. The reduction in free (/sup 3/H)AA was accompanied by an increase (P less than 0.01) in the percentage of /sup 3/H-radioactivity released as cyclooxygenase products in atopic platelets (compared to nonatopic cells) after stimulation with 10 and 25 micrograms/ml collagen. The amount of platelet lipoxygenase product released was comparable between the two groups. Although the blood platelet counts were similar, the mean platelet volume was statistically higher (P less than 0.01) in the atopic group. These results indicate that arachidonic acid metabolism in atopic platelets is altered, the pathophysiological significance of which remains to be clarified.

  14. Metabolic maturation of white matter is altered in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Blüml, Stefan; Wisnowski, Jessica L; Nelson, Marvin D; Paquette, Lisa; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Significant physiological switches occur at birth such as the transition from fetal parallel blood flow to a two-circuit serial system with increased arterial oxygenation of blood delivered to all organs including the brain. In addition, the extra-uterine environment exposes premature infants to a host of stimuli. These events could conceivably alter the trajectory of brain development in premature infants. We used in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure absolute brain metabolite concentrations in term and premature-born infants without evidence of brain injury at equivalent post-conceptional age. Prematurity altered the developmental time courses of N-acetyl-aspartate, a marker for axonal and neuronal development, creatine, an energy metabolite, and choline, a membrane metabolite, in parietal white matter. Specifically, at term-equivalency, metabolic maturation in preterm infants preceded development in term infants, but then progressed at a slower pace and trajectories merged at ≈340-370 post-conceptional days. In parieto/occipital grey matter similar trends were noticed but statistical significance was not reached. The timing of white matter development and synchronization of white matter and grey matter maturation in premature-born infants is disturbed. This may contribute to the greater risk of long-term neurological problems of premature infants and to their higher risk for white matter injury.

  15. Metabolic profiling reveals altered sugar and secondary metabolism in response to UGPase overexpression in Populus

    SciTech Connect

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Jawdy, Sara; Sykes, Robert; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Kalluri, Udaya C.

    2014-10-07

    Background: UDP-glucose pyrophopharylase (UGPase) is a sugar metabolizing enzyme (E.C. 2.7.7.9) that catalyzes a reversible reaction of UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate from glucose-1-phosphate and uridine triphosphate glucose. UDP-glucose is a key intermediate sugar that is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways. The functional role of UGPase in woody plants such as Populus is poorly understood. Results: We characterized the functional role of UGPase in Populus deltoides by overexpressing a native gene. Overexpression of the native gene resulted in increased leaf area and leaf-to-shoot biomass ratio but decreased shoot and root growth. Metabolomic analyses showed that manipulation of UGPase results in perturbations in primary as well as secondary metabolism resulting in reduced sugar and starch levels and increased phenolics such as caffeoyl- and feruloyl conjugates. While cellulose and lignin levels in the cell walls were not significantly altered, the syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio was significantly reduced. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that UGPase plays a key role in the tightly coupled primary and secondary metabolic pathways and perturbation in its function results in pronounced effects on growth and metabolism outside of cell wall biosynthesis of Populus.

  16. Metabolic profiling reveals altered sugar and secondary metabolism in response to UGPase overexpression in Populus

    DOE PAGES

    Payyavula, Raja S.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Jawdy, Sara; ...

    2014-10-07

    Background: UDP-glucose pyrophopharylase (UGPase) is a sugar metabolizing enzyme (E.C. 2.7.7.9) that catalyzes a reversible reaction of UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate from glucose-1-phosphate and uridine triphosphate glucose. UDP-glucose is a key intermediate sugar that is channeled to multiple metabolic pathways. The functional role of UGPase in woody plants such as Populus is poorly understood. Results: We characterized the functional role of UGPase in Populus deltoides by overexpressing a native gene. Overexpression of the native gene resulted in increased leaf area and leaf-to-shoot biomass ratio but decreased shoot and root growth. Metabolomic analyses showed that manipulation of UGPase results in perturbations inmore » primary as well as secondary metabolism resulting in reduced sugar and starch levels and increased phenolics such as caffeoyl- and feruloyl conjugates. While cellulose and lignin levels in the cell walls were not significantly altered, the syringyl-to-guaiacyl ratio was significantly reduced. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that UGPase plays a key role in the tightly coupled primary and secondary metabolic pathways and perturbation in its function results in pronounced effects on growth and metabolism outside of cell wall biosynthesis of Populus.« less

  17. Ozone (O3): A Potential Contributor to Metabolic Syndrome through Altered Insulin Signaling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air pollutants have been associated with diabetes and metabolic syndrome, but the mechanisms remain to be elucidated. We hypothesized that acute O3 exposure will produce metabolic impairments through endoplasmic reticular stress (ER) stress and altered insulin signaling in liver,...

  18. Remodeling of Leaf Cellular Glycerolipid Composition under Drought and Re-hydration Conditions in Grasses from the Lolium-Festuca Complex.

    PubMed

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Sawikowska, Aneta; Krajewski, Paweł; Rapacz, Marcin; Eckhardt, Änne; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerant plant genotypes are able to maintain stability and integrity of cellular membranes in unfavorable conditions, and to regenerate damaged membranes after stress cessation. The profiling of cellular glycerolipids during drought stress performed on model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana does not fully cover the picture of lipidome in monocots, including grasses. Herein, two closely related introgression genotypes of Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) × Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) were used as a model for other grass species to describe lipid rearrangements during drought and re-hydration. The genotypes differed in their level of photosynthetic capacity during drought, and in their capacity for membrane regeneration after stress cessation. A total of 120 lipids, comprising the classes of monogalactosyldiacyloglycerol, digalactosyldiacyloglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, diacylglicerol, and triacylglicerol, were analyzed. The results clearly showed that water deficit had a significant impact on lipid metabolism in studied forage grasses. It was revealed that structural and metabolic lipid species changed their abundance during drought and re-watering periods and some crucial genotype-dependent differences were also observed. The introgression genotype characterized by an ability to regenerate membranes after re-hydration demonstrated a higher accumulation level of most chloroplast and numerous extra-chloroplast membrane lipid species at the beginning of drought. Furthermore, this genotype also revealed a significant reduction in the accumulation of most chloroplast lipids after re-hydration, compared with the other introgression genotype without the capacity for membrane regeneration. The potential influence of observed lipidomic alterations on a cellular membrane stability and photosynthetic capacity, are discussed

  19. Remodeling of Leaf Cellular Glycerolipid Composition under Drought and Re-hydration Conditions in Grasses from the Lolium-Festuca Complex

    PubMed Central

    Perlikowski, Dawid; Kierszniowska, Sylwia; Sawikowska, Aneta; Krajewski, Paweł; Rapacz, Marcin; Eckhardt, Änne; Kosmala, Arkadiusz

    2016-01-01

    Drought tolerant plant genotypes are able to maintain stability and integrity of cellular membranes in unfavorable conditions, and to regenerate damaged membranes after stress cessation. The profiling of cellular glycerolipids during drought stress performed on model species such as Arabidopsis thaliana does not fully cover the picture of lipidome in monocots, including grasses. Herein, two closely related introgression genotypes of Lolium multiflorum (Italian ryegrass) × Festuca arundinacea (tall fescue) were used as a model for other grass species to describe lipid rearrangements during drought and re-hydration. The genotypes differed in their level of photosynthetic capacity during drought, and in their capacity for membrane regeneration after stress cessation. A total of 120 lipids, comprising the classes of monogalactosyldiacyloglycerol, digalactosyldiacyloglycerol, sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, diacylglicerol, and triacylglicerol, were analyzed. The results clearly showed that water deficit had a significant impact on lipid metabolism in studied forage grasses. It was revealed that structural and metabolic lipid species changed their abundance during drought and re-watering periods and some crucial genotype-dependent differences were also observed. The introgression genotype characterized by an ability to regenerate membranes after re-hydration demonstrated a higher accumulation level of most chloroplast and numerous extra-chloroplast membrane lipid species at the beginning of drought. Furthermore, this genotype also revealed a significant reduction in the accumulation of most chloroplast lipids after re-hydration, compared with the other introgression genotype without the capacity for membrane regeneration. The potential influence of observed lipidomic alterations on a cellular membrane stability and photosynthetic capacity, are discussed

  20. Soy consumption alters endogenous estrogen metabolism in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Xu, X; Duncan, A M; Wangen, K E; Kurzer, M S

    2000-08-01

    Isoflavones are soy phytoestrogens that have been suggested to be anticarcinogenic. Our previous study in premenopausal women suggested that the mechanisms by which isoflavones exert cancer-preventive effects may involve modulation of estrogen metabolism away from production of potentially carcinogenic metabolites [16alpha-(OH) estrone, 4-(OH) estrone, and 4-(OH) estradiol] (X. Xu et al., Cancer Epidemiol. Biomark. Prev., 7: 1101-1108, 1998). To further evaluate this hypothesis, a randomized, cross-over soy isoflavone feeding study was performed in 18 healthy postmenopausal women. The study consisted of three diet periods, each separated by a washout of approximately 3 weeks. Each diet period lasted for 93 days, during which subjects consumed their habitual diets supplemented with soy protein isolate providing 0.1 (control), 1, or 2 mg isoflavones/kg body weight/day (7.1 +/- 1.1, 65 +/- 11, or 132 +/- 22 mg/day). A 72-h urine sample was collected 3 days before the study (baseline) and days 91-93 of each diet period. Urine samples were analyzed for 10 phytoestrogens and 15 endogenous estrogens and their metabolites by a capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Compared with the soy-free baseline and very low isoflavone control diet, consumption of 65 mg isoflavones increased the urinary 2/16alpha-(OH) estrone ratio, and consumption of 65 or 132 mg isoflavones decreased excretion of 4-(OH) estrone. When compared with baseline values, consumption of all three soy diets increased the ratio of 2/4-(OH) estrogens and decreased the ratio of genotoxic: total estrogens. These data suggest that both isoflavones and other soy constituents may exert cancer-preventive effects in postmenopausal women by altering estrogen metabolism away from genotoxic metabolites toward inactive metabolites.

  1. Metabolic alterations in bladder cancer: applications for cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Whyard, Terry; Waltzer, Wayne C; Waltzer, Douglas; Romanov, Victor

    2016-02-01

    Treatment planning, outcome and prognosis are strongly related to the adequate tumor staging for bladder cancer (BC). Unfortunately, a large discrepancy exists between the preoperative clinical and final pathologic staging. Therefore, an advanced imaging-based technique is crucial for adequate staging. Although Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently the best in vivo imaging technique for BC staging because of its excellent soft-tissue contrast and absence of ionizing radiation it lacks cancer-specificity. Tumor-specific positron emission tomography (PET), which is based on the Warburg effect (preferential uptake of glucose by cancer cells), exploits the radioactively-labeled glucose analogs, i.e., FDG. Although FDG-PET is highly cancer specific, it lacks resolution and contrast quality comparable with MRI. Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (CEST) MRI enables the detection of low concentrations of metabolites containing protons. BC is an attractive target for glucose CEST MRI because, in addition to the typical systemic administration, glucose might also be directly applied into the bladder to reduce toxicity-related complications. As a first stage of the development of a contrast-specific BC imaging technique we have studied glucose uptake by bladder epithelial cells and have observed that glucose is, indeed, consumed by BC cells with higher intensity than by non-transformed urothelial cells. This effect might be partly explained by increased expression of glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3 in transformed cells as compared to normal urothelium. We also detected higher lactate production by BC cells which is another cancer-specific manifestation of the Warburg effect. In addition, we have observed other metabolic alterations in BC cells as compared to non-transformed cells: in particular, increased pyruvate synthesis. When glucose was substituted by glutamine in culture media, preferential uptake of glutamine by BC cells was observed. The preferential

  2. Alteration in metabolic signature and lipid metabolism in patients with angina pectoris and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Yeon; Lee, Sang-Hak; Shin, Min-Jeong; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolites are indispensable regulators of physiological and pathological processes, including atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the complex changes in lipid metabolites and metabolism that occur in patients with these conditions are incompletely understood. We performed lipid profiling to identify alterations in lipid metabolism in patients with angina and myocardial infarction (MI). Global lipid profiling was applied to serum samples from patients with CAD (angina and MI) and age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy subjects using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis. A multivariate analysis showed a clear separation between the patients with CAD and normal controls. Lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (lysoPE) species containing unsaturated fatty acids and free fatty acids were associated with an increased risk of CAD, whereas species of lysoPC and lyso-alkyl PC containing saturated fatty acids were associated with a decreased risk. Additionally, PC species containing palmitic acid, diacylglycerol, sphingomyelin, and ceramide were associated with an increased risk of MI, whereas PE-plasmalogen and phosphatidylinositol species were associated with a decreased risk. In MI patients, we found strong positive correlation between lipid metabolites related to the sphingolipid pathway, sphingomyelin, and ceramide and acute inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein). The results of this study demonstrate altered signatures in lipid metabolism in patients with angina or MI. Lipidomic profiling could provide the information to identity the specific lipid metabolites under the presence of disturbed metabolic pathways in patients with CAD.

  3. Altered lipid metabolism in brain injury and disorders.

    PubMed

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Hatcher, J F

    2008-01-01

    Deregulated lipid metabolism may be of particular importance for CNS injuries and disorders, as this organ has the highest lipid concentration next to adipose tissue. Atherosclerosis (a risk factor for ischemic stroke) results from accumulation of LDL-derived lipids in the arterial wall. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha and IL-1), secretory phospholipase A2 IIA and lipoprotein-PLA2 are implicated in vascular inflammation. These inflammatory responses promote atherosclerotic plaques, formation and release of the blood clot that can induce ischemic stroke. TNF-alpha and IL-1 alter lipid metabolism and stimulate production of eicosanoids, ceramide, and reactive oxygen species that potentiate CNS injuries and certain neurological disorders. Cholesterol is an important regulator of lipid organization and the precursor for neurosteroid biosynthesis. Low levels of neurosteroids were related to poor outcome in many brain pathologies. Apolipoprotein E is the principal cholesterol carrier protein in the brain, and the gene encoding the variant Apolipoprotein E4 is a significant risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. Parkinson's disease is to some degree caused by lipid peroxidation due to phospholipases activation. Niemann-Pick diseases A and B are due to acidic sphingomyelinase deficiency, resulting in sphingomyelin accumulation, while Niemann-Pick disease C is due to mutations in either the NPC1 or NPC2 genes, resulting in defective cholesterol transport and cholesterol accumulation. Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune inflammatory demyelinating condition of the CNS. Inhibiting phospholipase A2 attenuated the onset and progression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. The endocannabinoid system is hypoactive in Huntington's disease. Ethyl-eicosapetaenoate showed promise in clinical trials. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis causes loss of motorneurons. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibition reduced spinal neurodegeneration in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis transgenic mice

  4. Hyperoxia exposure alters hepatic eicosanoid metabolism in newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Lynette K; Tipple, Trent E; Britt, Rodney D; Welty, Stephen E

    2010-02-01

    Prematurely born infants are often treated with supraphysiologic amounts of oxygen, which is associated with lung injury and the development of diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia. Complimentary responses between the lung and liver during the course of hyperoxic lung injury have been studied in adult animals, but little is known about this relationship in neonates. These studies tested the hypothesis that oxidant stress occurs in the livers of newborn mice in response to continuous hyperoxia exposure. Greater levels of glutathione disulfide and nitrotyrosine were detected in lung tissues but not liver tissues from newborn mice exposed to hyperoxia than in room air-exposed controls. However, early increases in 5-lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenases-2 protein levels and increases in total hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and prostaglandin levels were observed in the liver tissues of hyperoxia-exposed pups. These studies indicate that free radical oxidation occurs in the lungs of newborn pups exposed to hyperoxia, and alterations in lipid metabolism could be a primary response in the liver tissues. The findings of this study identify possible new mechanisms associated with hyperoxic lung injury in a newborn model of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and thus open opportunities for research.

  5. Altered chloride metabolism in cultured cystic fibrosis skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mattes, P.M.; Maloney, P.C.; Littlefield, J.W.

    1987-05-01

    An abnormal regulation of chloride permeability has been described for epithelial cells from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). To learn more about the biochemical basis of this inherited disease, the authors have studied chloride metabolism in cultured CF fibroblasts by comparing the efflux of /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ from matched pairs of CF and normal fibroblasts. The rate constants describing /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ efflux did not differ between the two cell types, but in each of the four pairs tested the amount of /sup 36/Cl/sup -/ contained within CF cells was consistently reduced, by 25-30%, relative to normal cells. Comparisons of cell water content and /sup 22/Na/sup +/ efflux showed no differences between the two cell types, suggesting that overall intracellular chloride concentration is lower than normal in CF fibroblasts. Such data suggest that the CF gene defect is expressed in skin fibroblasts and that this defect may alter the regulation of intracellular Cl/sup -/ concentration, perhaps through changes in Cl/sup -/ permeability.

  6. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryan W; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L; Ferrell, William D; Watt, Carl B; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease.

  7. Serum Metabolic Profiling Reveals Altered Metabolic Pathways in Patients with Post-traumatic Cognitive Impairments.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lunzhao; Shi, Shuting; Wang, Yang; Huang, Wei; Xia, Zi-an; Xing, Zhihua; Peng, Weijun; Wang, Zhe

    2016-02-17

    Cognitive impairment, the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related disability, adversely affects the quality of life of TBI patients, and exacts a personal and economic cost that is difficult to quantify. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is currently unknown, and an effective treatment of the disease has not yet been identified. This study aimed to advance our understanding of the mechanism of disease pathogenesis; thus, metabolomics based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), coupled with multivariate and univariate statistical methods were used to identify potential biomarkers and the associated metabolic pathways of post-TBI cognitive impairment. A biomarker panel consisting of nine serum metabolites (serine, pyroglutamic acid, phenylalanine, galactose, palmitic acid, arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, citric acid, and 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyrate) was identified to be able to discriminate between TBI patients with cognitive impairment, TBI patients without cognitive impairment and healthy controls. Furthermore, associations between these metabolite markers and the metabolism of amino acids, lipids and carbohydrates were identified. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify several serum metabolite markers and investigate the altered metabolic pathway that is associated with post-TBI cognitive impairment. These markers appear to be suitable for further investigation of the disease mechanisms of post-TBI cognitive impairment.

  8. Serum Metabolic Profiling Reveals Altered Metabolic Pathways in Patients with Post-traumatic Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lunzhao; Shi, Shuting; Wang, Yang; Huang, Wei; Xia, Zi-an; Xing, Zhihua; Peng, Weijun; Wang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, the leading cause of traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related disability, adversely affects the quality of life of TBI patients, and exacts a personal and economic cost that is difficult to quantify. The underlying pathophysiological mechanism is currently unknown, and an effective treatment of the disease has not yet been identified. This study aimed to advance our understanding of the mechanism of disease pathogenesis; thus, metabolomics based on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS), coupled with multivariate and univariate statistical methods were used to identify potential biomarkers and the associated metabolic pathways of post-TBI cognitive impairment. A biomarker panel consisting of nine serum metabolites (serine, pyroglutamic acid, phenylalanine, galactose, palmitic acid, arachidonic acid, linoleic acid, citric acid, and 2,3,4-trihydroxybutyrate) was identified to be able to discriminate between TBI patients with cognitive impairment, TBI patients without cognitive impairment and healthy controls. Furthermore, associations between these metabolite markers and the metabolism of amino acids, lipids and carbohydrates were identified. In conclusion, our study is the first to identify several serum metabolite markers and investigate the altered metabolic pathway that is associated with post-TBI cognitive impairment. These markers appear to be suitable for further investigation of the disease mechanisms of post-TBI cognitive impairment. PMID:26883691

  9. Annotation of genes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii: discovery of the betaine lipid synthase BTA1Cr.

    PubMed

    Riekhof, Wayne R; Sears, Barbara B; Benning, Christoph

    2005-02-01

    Lipid metabolism in flowering plants has been intensely studied, and knowledge regarding the identities of genes encoding components of the major fatty acid and membrane lipid biosynthetic pathways is very extensive. We now present an in silico analysis of fatty acid and glycerolipid metabolism in an algal model, enabled by the recent availability of expressed sequence tag and genomic sequences of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Genes encoding proteins involved in membrane biogenesis were predicted on the basis of similarity to proteins with confirmed functions and were organized so as to reconstruct the major pathways of glycerolipid synthesis in Chlamydomonas. This analysis accounts for the majority of genes predicted to encode enzymes involved in anabolic reactions of membrane lipid biosynthesis and compares and contrasts these pathways in Chlamydomonas and flowering plants. As an important result of the bioinformatics analysis, we identified and isolated the C. reinhardtii BTA1 (BTA1Cr) gene and analyzed the bifunctional protein that it encodes; we predicted this protein to be sufficient for the synthesis of the betaine lipid diacylglyceryl-N,N,N-trimethylhomoserine (DGTS), a major membrane component in Chlamydomonas. Heterologous expression of BTA1Cr led to DGTS accumulation in Escherichia coli, which normally lacks this lipid, and allowed in vitro analysis of the enzymatic properties of BTA1Cr. In contrast, in the bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides, two separate proteins, BtaARs and BtaBRs, are required for the biosynthesis of DGTS. Site-directed mutagenesis of the active sites of the two domains of BTA1Cr allowed us to study their activities separately, demonstrating directly their functional homology to the bacterial orthologs BtaARs and BtaBRs.

  10. Amino acid supplementation alters bone metabolism during simulated weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwart, S. R.; Davis-Street, J. E.; Paddon-Jones, D.; Ferrando, A. A.; Wolfe, R. R.; Smith, S. M.

    2005-01-01

    High-protein and acidogenic diets induce hypercalciuria. Foods or supplements with excess sulfur-containing amino acids increase endogenous sulfuric acid production and therefore have the potential to increase calcium excretion and alter bone metabolism. In this study, effects of an amino acid/carbohydrate supplement on bone resorption were examined during bed rest. Thirteen subjects were divided at random into two groups: a control group (Con, n = 6) and an amino acid-supplemented group (AA, n = 7) who consumed an extra 49.5 g essential amino acids and 90 g carbohydrate per day for 28 days. Urine was collected for n-telopeptide (NTX), deoxypyridinoline (DPD), calcium, and pH determinations. Bone mineral content was determined and potential renal acid load was calculated. Bone-specific alkaline phosphatase was measured in serum samples collected on day 1 (immediately before bed rest) and on day 28. Potential renal acid load was higher in the AA group than in the Con group during bed rest (P < 0.05). For all subjects, during bed rest urinary NTX and DPD concentrations were greater than pre-bed rest levels (P < 0.05). Urinary NTX and DPD tended to be higher in the AA group (P = 0.073 and P = 0.056, respectively). During bed rest, urinary calcium was greater than baseline levels (P < 0.05) in the AA group but not the Con group. Total bone mineral content was lower after bed rest than before bed rest in the AA group but not the Con group (P < 0.05). During bed rest, urinary pH decreased (P < 0.05), and it was lower in the AA group than the Con group. These data suggest that bone resorption increased, without changes in bone formation, in the AA group.

  11. Retinal Remodeling and Metabolic Alterations in Human AMD

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Bryan W.; Pfeiffer, Rebecca L.; Ferrell, William D.; Watt, Carl B.; Tucker, James; Marc, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a progressive retinal degeneration resulting in central visual field loss, ultimately causing debilitating blindness. AMD affects 18% of Americans from 65 to 74, 30% older than 74 years of age and is the leading cause of severe vision loss and blindness in Western populations. While many genetic and environmental risk factors are known for AMD, we currently know less about the mechanisms mediating disease progression. The pathways and mechanisms through which genetic and non-genetic risk factors modulate development of AMD pathogenesis remain largely unexplored. Moreover, current treatment for AMD is palliative and limited to wet/exudative forms. Retina is a complex, heterocellular tissue and most retinal cell classes are impacted or altered in AMD. Defining disease and stage-specific cytoarchitectural and metabolic responses in AMD is critical for highlighting targets for intervention. The goal of this article is to illustrate cell types impacted in AMD and demonstrate the implications of those changes, likely beginning in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), for remodeling of the the neural retina. Tracking heterocellular responses in disease progression is best achieved with computational molecular phenotyping (CMP), a tool that enables acquisition of a small molecule fingerprint for every cell in the retina. CMP uncovered critical cellular and molecular pathologies (remodeling and reprogramming) in progressive retinal degenerations such as retinitis pigmentosa (RP). We now applied these approaches to normal human and AMD tissues mapping progression of cellular and molecular changes in AMD retinas, including late-stage forms of the disease. PMID:27199657

  12. Metabolic monosaccharides altered cell responses to anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering has been used to manipulate the glycochemistry of cell surfaces and thus the cell/cell interaction, cell adhesion, and cell migration. However, potential application of glycoengineering in pharmaceutical sciences has not been studied until recently. Here, we reported that Ac(4)ManNAc, an analog of N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc), could affect cell responses to anticancer drugs. Although cells from different tissues and organs responded to Ac(4)ManNAc treatment differently, treated cells with increased sialic acid contents showed dramatically reduced sensitivity (up to 130 times) to anti-cancer drugs as tested on various drugs with distinct chemical structures and acting mechanisms. Neither increased P-glycoprotein activity nor decreased drug uptake was observed during the course of Ac(4)ManNAc treatment. However, greatly altered intracellular drug distributions were observed. Most intracellular daunorubicin was found in the perinuclear region, but not the expected nuclei in the Ac(4)ManNAc treated cells. Since sialoglycoproteins and gangliosides were synthesized in the Golgi, intracellular glycans affected intracellular signal transduction and drug distributions seem to be the main reason for Ac(4)ManNAc affected cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs. It was interesting to find that although Ac(4)ManNAc treated breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) maintained the same sensitivity to 5-Fluorouracil, the IC(50) value of 5-Fluorouracil to the same Ac(4)ManNAc treated normal cells (MCF-10A) was increased by more than 20 times. Thus, this Ac(4)ManNAc treatment enlarged drug response difference between normal and tumor cells provides a unique opportunity to further improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs.

  13. Metabolomic analysis reveals altered metabolic pathways in a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Jinping; Hu, Xiaomin; Shao, Wei; Ji, Tianhai; Yang, Wensheng; Zhuo, Huiqin; Jin, Zeyu; Huang, Huiying; Chen, Jiacheng; Huang, Caihua; Lin, Donghai

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most malignant tumors with a poor prognosis. Alterations in metabolic pathways are inextricably linked to GC progression. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. We performed NMR-based metabolomic analysis of sera derived from a rat model of gastric carcinogenesis, revealed significantly altered metabolic pathways correlated with the progression of gastric carcinogenesis. Rats were histologically classified into four pathological groups (gastritis, GS; low-grade gastric dysplasia, LGD; high-grade gastric dysplasia, HGD; GC) and the normal control group (CON). The metabolic profiles of the five groups were clearly distinguished from each other. Furthermore, significant inter-metabolite correlations were extracted and used to reconstruct perturbed metabolic networks associated with the four pathological stages compared with the normal stage. Then, significantly altered metabolic pathways were identified by pathway analysis. Our results showed that oxidative stress-related metabolic pathways, choline phosphorylation and fatty acid degradation were continually disturbed during gastric carcinogenesis. Moreover, amino acid metabolism was perturbed dramatically in gastric dysplasia and GC. The GC stage showed more changed metabolite levels and more altered metabolic pathways. Two activated pathways (glycolysis; glycine, serine and threonine metabolism) substantially contributed to the metabolic alterations in GC. These results lay the basis for addressing the molecular mechanisms underlying gastric carcinogenesis and extend our understanding of GC progression. PMID:27527852

  14. Chronic Alcohol Ingestion in Rats Alters Lung Metabolism, Promotes Lipid Accumulation, and Impairs Alveolar Macrophage Functions

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Freddy; Shah, Dilip; Duong, Michelle; Stafstrom, William; Hoek, Jan B.; Kallen, Caleb B.; Lang, Charles H.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic alcoholism impairs pulmonary immune homeostasis and predisposes to inflammatory lung diseases, including infectious pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Although alcoholism has been shown to alter hepatic metabolism, leading to lipid accumulation, hepatitis, and, eventually, cirrhosis, the effects of alcohol on pulmonary metabolism remain largely unknown. Because both the lung and the liver actively engage in lipid synthesis, we hypothesized that chronic alcoholism would impair pulmonary metabolic homeostasis in ways similar to its effects in the liver. We reasoned that perturbations in lipid metabolism might contribute to the impaired pulmonary immunity observed in people who chronically consume alcohol. We studied the metabolic consequences of chronic alcohol consumption in rat lungs in vivo and in alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages (AMs) in vitro. We found that chronic alcohol ingestion significantly alters lung metabolic homeostasis, inhibiting AMP-activated protein kinase, increasing lipid synthesis, and suppressing the expression of genes essential to metabolizing fatty acids (FAs). Furthermore, we show that these metabolic alterations promoted a lung phenotype that is reminiscent of alcoholic fatty liver and is characterized by marked accumulation of triglycerides and free FAs within distal airspaces, AMs, and, to a lesser extent, alveolar epithelial type II cells. We provide evidence that the metabolic alterations in alcohol-exposed rats are mechanistically linked to immune impairments in the alcoholic lung: the elevations in FAs alter AM phenotypes and suppress both phagocytic functions and agonist-induced inflammatory responses. In summary, our work demonstrates that chronic alcohol ingestion impairs lung metabolic homeostasis and promotes pulmonary immune dysfunction. These findings suggest that therapies aimed at reversing alcohol-related metabolic alterations might be effective for preventing and

  15. Differential CYP 2D6 metabolism alters primaquine pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Potter, Brittney M J; Xie, Lisa H; Vuong, Chau; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Ping; Duan, Dehui; Luong, Thu-Lan T; Bandara Herath, H M T; Dhammika Nanayakkara, N P; Tekwani, Babu L; Walker, Larry A; Nolan, Christina K; Sciotti, Richard J; Zottig, Victor E; Smith, Philip L; Paris, Robert M; Read, Lisa T; Li, Qigui; Pybus, Brandon S; Sousa, Jason C; Reichard, Gregory A; Marcsisin, Sean R

    2015-04-01

    Primaquine (PQ) metabolism by the cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2D family of enzymes is required for antimalarial activity in both humans (2D6) and mice (2D). Human CYP 2D6 is highly polymorphic, and decreased CYP 2D6 enzyme activity has been linked to decreased PQ antimalarial activity. Despite the importance of CYP 2D metabolism in PQ efficacy, the exact role that these enzymes play in PQ metabolism and pharmacokinetics has not been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, a series of PQ pharmacokinetic experiments were conducted in mice with differential CYP 2D metabolism characteristics, including wild-type (WT), CYP 2D knockout (KO), and humanized CYP 2D6 (KO/knock-in [KO/KI]) mice. Plasma and liver pharmacokinetic profiles from a single PQ dose (20 mg/kg of body weight) differed significantly among the strains for PQ and carboxy-PQ. Additionally, due to the suspected role of phenolic metabolites in PQ efficacy, these were probed using reference standards. Levels of phenolic metabolites were highest in mice capable of metabolizing CYP 2D6 substrates (WT and KO/KI 2D6 mice). PQ phenolic metabolites were present in different quantities in the two strains, illustrating species-specific differences in PQ metabolism between the human and mouse enzymes. Taking the data together, this report furthers understanding of PQ pharmacokinetics in the context of differential CYP 2D metabolism and has important implications for PQ administration in humans with different levels of CYP 2D6 enzyme activity.

  16. Altered glutamine metabolism in platinum resistant ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Chantelle D.; Savadelis, Alyssa; Nagaraj, Anil Belur; Joseph, Peronne; Avril, Stefanie; DiFeo, Analisa; Avril, Norbert

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is characterized by an increase in cellular energy metabolism, which is predominantly satisfied by glucose and glutamine. Targeting metabolic pathways is an attractive approach to enhance the therapeutic effectiveness and to potentially overcome drug resistance in ovarian cancer. In platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer cell lines the metabolism of both, glucose and glutamine was initially up-regulated in response to platinum treatment. In contrast, platinum-resistant cells revealed a significant dependency on the presence of glutamine, with an upregulated expression of glutamine transporter ASCT2 and glutaminase. This resulted in a higher oxygen consumption rate compared to platinum-sensitive cell lines reflecting the increased dependency of glutamine utilization through the tricarboxylic acid cycle. The important role of glutamine metabolism was confirmed by stable overexpression of glutaminase, which conferred platinum resistance. Conversely, shRNA knockdown of glutaminase in platinum resistant cells resulted in re-sensitization to platinum treatment. Importantly, combining the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES with platinum synergistically inhibited platinum sensitive and resistant ovarian cancers in vitro. Apoptotic induction was significantly increased using platinum together with BPTES compared to either treatment alone. Our findings suggest that targeting glutamine metabolism together with platinum based chemotherapy offers a potential treatment strategy particularly in drug resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:27191653

  17. Radiation Exposure Alters Expression of Metabolic Enzyme Genes in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wotring, V. E.; Mangala, L. S.; Zhang, Y.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    Most administered pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver. The health of the liver, especially the rate of its metabolic enzymes, determines the concentration of circulating drugs as well as the duration of their efficacy. Most pharmaceuticals are metabolized by the liver, and clinically-used medication doses are given with normal liver function in mind. A drug overdose can result in the case of a liver that is damaged and removing pharmaceuticals from the circulation at a rate slower than normal. Alternatively, if liver function is elevated and removing drugs from the system more quickly than usual, it would be as if too little drug had been given for effective treatment. Because of the importance of the liver in drug metabolism, we want to understand the effects of spaceflight on the enzymes of the liver and exposure to cosmic radiation is one aspect of spaceflight that can be modeled in ground experiments. Additionally, it has been previous noted that pre-exposure to small radiation doses seems to confer protection against later and larger radiation doses. This protective power of pre-exposure has been called a priming effect or radioadaptation. This study is an effort to examine the drug metabolizing effects of radioadaptation mechanisms that may be triggered by early exposure to low radiation doses.

  18. Genetic Variation in Choline-Metabolizing Enzymes Alters Choline Metabolism in Young Women Consuming Choline Intakes Meeting Current Recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Ganz, Ariel B.; Cohen, Vanessa V.; Swersky, Camille C.; Stover, Julie; Vitiello, Gerardo A.; Lovesky, Jessica; Chuang, Jasmine C.; Shields, Kelsey; Fomin, Vladislav G.; Lopez, Yusnier S.; Mohan, Sanjay; Ganti, Anita; Carrier, Bradley; Malysheva, Olga V.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2017-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in choline metabolizing genes are associated with disease risk and greater susceptibility to organ dysfunction under conditions of dietary choline restriction. However, the underlying metabolic signatures of these variants are not well characterized and it is unknown whether genotypic differences persist at recommended choline intakes. Thus, we sought to determine if common genetic risk factors alter choline dynamics in pregnant, lactating, and non-pregnant women consuming choline intakes meeting and exceeding current recommendations. Women (n = 75) consumed 480 or 930 mg choline/day (22% as a metabolic tracer, choline-d9) for 10–12 weeks in a controlled feeding study. Genotyping was performed for eight variant SNPs and genetic differences in metabolic flux and partitioning of plasma choline metabolites were evaluated using stable isotope methodology. CHKA rs10791957, CHDH rs9001, CHDH rs12676, PEMT rs4646343, PEMT rs7946, FMO3 rs2266782, SLC44A1 rs7873937, and SLC44A1 rs3199966 altered the use of choline as a methyl donor; CHDH rs9001 and BHMT rs3733890 altered the partitioning of dietary choline between betaine and phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the cytidine diphosphate (CDP)-choline pathway; and CHKA rs10791957, CHDH rs12676, PEMT rs4646343, PEMT rs7946 and SLC44A1 rs7873937 altered the distribution of dietary choline between the CDP-choline and phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) denovo pathway. Such metabolic differences may contribute to disease pathogenesis and prognosis over the long-term. PMID:28134761

  19. PEDF-induced alteration of metabolism leading to insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Carnagarin, Revathy; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam M; Dass, Crispin R

    2015-02-05

    Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) is an anti-angiogenic, immunomodulatory, and neurotrophic serine protease inhibitor protein. PEDF is evolving as a novel metabolic regulatory protein that plays a causal role in insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is the central pathogenesis of metabolic disorders such as obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovarian disease, and metabolic syndrome, and PEDF is associated with them. The current evidence suggests that PEDF administration to animals induces insulin resistance, whereas neutralisation improves insulin sensitivity. Inflammation, lipolytic free fatty acid mobilisation, and mitochondrial dysfunction are the proposed mechanism of PEDF-mediated insulin resistance. This review summarises the probable mechanisms adopted by PEDF to induce insulin resistance, and identifies PEDF as a potential therapeutic target in ameliorating insulin resistance.

  20. Diabetes-Induced Decrease in Renal Oxygen Tension: Effects of an Altered Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, Fredrik; Carlsson, Per-Ola; Fasching, Angelica; Hansell, Peter; Liss, Per

    During conditions with experimental diabetes mellitus, it is evident that several alterations in renal oxygen metabolism occur, including increased mitochondrial respiration and increased lactate accumulation in the renal tissue. Consequently, these alterations will contribute to decrease the interstitial pO2, preferentially in the renal medulla of animals with sustained long-term hyperglycemia.

  1. Antidepressants Alter Cerebrovascular Permeability and Metabolic Rate in Primates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preskorn, Sheldon H.; Raichle, Marcus E.; Hartman, Boyd K.

    1982-07-01

    External detection of the annihilation radiation produced by water labeled with oxygen-15 was used to measure cerebrovascular permeability and cerebral blood flow in six rhesus monkeys. Use of oxygen-15 also permitted assessment of cerebral metabolic rate in two of the monkeys. Amitriptyline produced a dose-dependent, reversible increase in permeability at plasma drug concentrations which are therapeutic for depressed patients. At the same concentrations the drug also produced a 20 to 30 percent reduction in cerebral metabolic rate. At higher doses normal autoregulation of cerebral blood flow was suspended, but responsivity to arterial carbon dioxide was normal.

  2. Arabidopsis GPAT9 contributes to synthesis of intracellular glycerolipids but not surface lipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE ACYLTRANSFERASE (GPAT) genes encode enzymes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis in plants. Ten GPAT homologues have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). GPATs 4-8 have been shown to be involved in the production of extracellular lipid barrier polyesters. Rece...

  3. Altered behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms in mice with disrupted NAD+ oscillation

    PubMed Central

    Sahar, Saurabh; Nin, Veronica; Barbosa, Maria Thereza; Chini, Eduardo Nunes; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The Intracellular levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) are rhythmic and controlled by the circadian clock. However, whether NAD+ oscillation in turn contributes to circadian physiology is not fully understood. To address this question we analyzed mice mutated for the NAD+ hydrolase CD38. We found that rhythmicity of NAD+ was altered in the CD38-deficient mice. The high, chronic levels of NAD+ results in several anomalies in circadian behavior and metabolism. CD38-null mice display a shortened period length of locomotor activity and alteration in the rest-activity rhythm. Several clock genes and, interestingly, genes involved in amino acid metabolism were deregulated in CD38-null livers. Metabolomic analysis identified alterations in the circadian levels of several amino acids, specifically tryptophan levels were reduced in the CD38-null mice at a circadian time paralleling with elevated NAD+ levels. Thus, CD38 contributes to behavioral and metabolic circadian rhythms and altered NAD+ levels influence the circadian clock. PMID:21937766

  4. Degeneration of Dopaminergic Neurons Due to Metabolic Alterations and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juhyun; Kim, Jongpil

    2016-01-01

    The rates of metabolic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), obesity, and cardiovascular disease (CVD), markedly increase with age. In recent years, studies have reported an association between metabolic changes and various pathophysiological mechanisms in the central nervous system (CNS) in patients with metabolic diseases. Oxidative stress and hyperglycemia in metabolic diseases lead to adverse neurophysiological phenomena, including neuronal loss, synaptic dysfunction, and improper insulin signaling, resulting in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In addition, several lines of evidence suggest that alterations of CNS environments by metabolic changes influence the dopamine neuronal loss, eventually affecting the pathogenesis of PD. Thus, we reviewed recent findings relating to degeneration of dopaminergic neurons during metabolic diseases. We highlight the fact that using a metabolic approach to manipulate degeneration of dopaminergic neurons can serve as a therapeutic strategy to attenuate pathology of PD. PMID:27065205

  5. Altered Circadian Rhythm and Metabolic Gene Profile in Rats Subjected to Advanced Light Phase Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Laura; Valcarcel, Lorea; da Silva, Crhistiane Andressa; Albert, Nerea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Cambras, Trinitat; Serra, Dolors

    2015-01-01

    The circadian clock regulates metabolic homeostasis and its disruption predisposes to obesity and other metabolic diseases. However, the effect of phase shifts on metabolism is not completely understood. We examined whether alterations in the circadian rhythm caused by phase shifts induce metabolic changes in crucial genes that would predispose to obesity. Three-month-old rats were maintained on a standard diet under lighting conditions with chronic phase shifts consisting of advances, delays or advances plus delays. Serum leptin, insulin and glucose levels decreased only in rats subjected to advances. The expression of the clock gene Bmal 1 increased in the hypothalamus, white adipose tissue (WAT), brown adipose tissue (BAT) and liver of the advanced group compared to control rats. The advanced group showed an increase in hypothalamic AgRP and NPY mRNA, and their lipid metabolism gene profile was altered in liver, WAT and BAT. WAT showed an increase in inflammation and ER stress and brown adipocytes suffered a brown-to-white transformation and decreased UCP-1 expression. Our results indicate that chronic phase advances lead to significant changes in neuropeptides, lipid metabolism, inflammation and ER stress gene profile in metabolically relevant tissues such as the hypothalamus, liver, WAT and BAT. This highlights a link between alteration of the circadian rhythm and metabolism at the transcriptional level. PMID:25837425

  6. Experimental ocean acidification alters the allocation of metabolic energy

    PubMed Central

    Pan, T.-C. Francis; Applebaum, Scott L.; Manahan, Donal T.

    2015-01-01

    Energy is required to maintain physiological homeostasis in response to environmental change. Although responses to environmental stressors frequently are assumed to involve high metabolic costs, the biochemical bases of actual energy demands are rarely quantified. We studied the impact of a near-future scenario of ocean acidification [800 µatm partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)] during the development and growth of an important model organism in developmental and environmental biology, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Size, metabolic rate, biochemical content, and gene expression were not different in larvae growing under control and seawater acidification treatments. Measurements limited to those levels of biological analysis did not reveal the biochemical mechanisms of response to ocean acidification that occurred at the cellular level. In vivo rates of protein synthesis and ion transport increased ∼50% under acidification. Importantly, the in vivo physiological increases in ion transport were not predicted from total enzyme activity or gene expression. Under acidification, the increased rates of protein synthesis and ion transport that were sustained in growing larvae collectively accounted for the majority of available ATP (84%). In contrast, embryos and prefeeding and unfed larvae in control treatments allocated on average only 40% of ATP to these same two processes. Understanding the biochemical strategies for accommodating increases in metabolic energy demand and their biological limitations can serve as a quantitative basis for assessing sublethal effects of global change. Variation in the ability to allocate ATP differentially among essential functions may be a key basis of resilience to ocean acidification and other compounding environmental stressors. PMID:25825763

  7. Experimental ocean acidification alters the allocation of metabolic energy.

    PubMed

    Pan, T-C Francis; Applebaum, Scott L; Manahan, Donal T

    2015-04-14

    Energy is required to maintain physiological homeostasis in response to environmental change. Although responses to environmental stressors frequently are assumed to involve high metabolic costs, the biochemical bases of actual energy demands are rarely quantified. We studied the impact of a near-future scenario of ocean acidification [800 µatm partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2)] during the development and growth of an important model organism in developmental and environmental biology, the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Size, metabolic rate, biochemical content, and gene expression were not different in larvae growing under control and seawater acidification treatments. Measurements limited to those levels of biological analysis did not reveal the biochemical mechanisms of response to ocean acidification that occurred at the cellular level. In vivo rates of protein synthesis and ion transport increased ∼50% under acidification. Importantly, the in vivo physiological increases in ion transport were not predicted from total enzyme activity or gene expression. Under acidification, the increased rates of protein synthesis and ion transport that were sustained in growing larvae collectively accounted for the majority of available ATP (84%). In contrast, embryos and prefeeding and unfed larvae in control treatments allocated on average only 40% of ATP to these same two processes. Understanding the biochemical strategies for accommodating increases in metabolic energy demand and their biological limitations can serve as a quantitative basis for assessing sublethal effects of global change. Variation in the ability to allocate ATP differentially among essential functions may be a key basis of resilience to ocean acidification and other compounding environmental stressors.

  8. Consumption of watercress fails to alter coumarin metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S E; Johnson, L M; Losey, L M; Carmella, S G; Hecht, S S

    2001-06-01

    Watercress is an excellent source of phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), an effective inhibitor of nitrosamine carcinogenesis in rodents. The mechanism of inhibition is believed to be due in part to inhibition of cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes. P450 2A6 is a catalyst for the metabolic activation of several nitrosamines. In this study, we investigated the effect of watercress consumption on coumarin 7-hydroxylation, a P450 2A6-specific reaction, in a group of 15 nonsmoking, healthy volunteers. The urinary excretion of 7-hydroxycoumarin (7OHC) was determined. For 6 of the 15 subjects, watercress consumption decreased the amount of 7OHC excreted in the first 2 h following coumarin administration. However, the mean 0- to 2-h excretion of 7OHC for all 15 subjects was not significantly lowered by the consumption of watercress, 2.8 +/- 0.78 versus 3.1 +/- 0.53 mg (+/-S.D.). The mean 7OHC excreted from 2 to 4 h (1.1 +/- 0.50 mg) was significantly higher (P = 0.027) during watercress consumption than before (0.77 +/- 0.22 mg), suggesting a delay in coumarin metabolism. Total excretion of 7OHC was unaffected by watercress consumption. Therefore, under the conditions of our study, PEITC and other constituents of watercress had at most a marginal inhibitory effect on P450 2A6-catalyzed coumarin 7-hydroxylation.

  9. Caloric Restriction and Rapamycin Differentially Alter Energy Metabolism in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung-Mi; Hong, Seok-Jin; van Deursen, Jan M; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Lee, Cheol-Koo

    2017-03-08

    Rapamycin (RM), a drug that inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway and responds to nutrient availability, seemingly mimics the effects of caloric restriction (CR) on healthy life span. However, the extent of the mechanistic overlap between RM and CR remains incompletely understood. Here, we compared the impact of CR and RM on cellular metabolic status. Both regimens maintained intracellular ATP through the chronological aging process and showed enhanced mitochondrial capacity. Comparative transcriptome analysis showed that CR had a stronger impact on global gene expression than RM. We observed a like impact on the metabolome and identified distinct metabolites affected by CR and RM. CR severely reduced the level of energy storage molecules including glycogen and lipid droplets, whereas RM did not. RM boosted the production of enzymes responsible for the breakdown of glycogen and lipid droplets. Collectively, these results provide insights into the distinct energy metabolism mechanisms induced by CR and RM, suggesting that these two anti-aging regimens might extend life span through distinctive pathways.

  10. Altered Cholesterol and Fatty Acid Metabolism in Huntington Disease

    PubMed Central

    Block, Robert C.; Dorsey, E. Ray; Beck, Christopher A.; Brenna, J. Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease. PMID:20802793

  11. Altered cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism in Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Block, Robert C; Dorsey, E Ray; Beck, Christopher A; Brenna, J Thomas; Shoulson, Ira

    2010-01-01

    Huntington disease is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder characterized by behavioral abnormalities, cognitive decline, and involuntary movements that lead to a progressive decline in functional capacity, independence, and ultimately death. The pathophysiology of Huntington disease is linked to an expanded trinucleotide repeat of cytosine-adenine-guanine (CAG) in the IT-15 gene on chromosome 4. There is no disease-modifying treatment for Huntington disease, and novel pathophysiological insights and therapeutic strategies are needed. Lipids are vital to the health of the central nervous system, and research in animals and humans has revealed that cholesterol metabolism is disrupted in Huntington disease. This lipid dysregulation has been linked to specific actions of the mutant huntingtin on sterol regulatory element binding proteins. This results in lower cholesterol levels in affected areas of the brain with evidence that this depletion is pathologic. Huntington disease is also associated with a pattern of insulin resistance characterized by a catabolic state resulting in weight loss and a lower body mass index than individuals without Huntington disease. Insulin resistance appears to act as a metabolic stressor attending disease progression. The fish-derived omega-3 fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid, have been examined in clinical trials of Huntington disease patients. Drugs that combat the dysregulated lipid milieu in Huntington disease may help treat this perplexing and catastrophic genetic disease.

  12. Altered phosphate metabolism in myocardial infarction: P-31 MR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bottomley, P.A.; Herfkens, R.J.; Smith, L.S.; Bashore, T.M.

    1987-12-01

    The high-energy myocardial phosphate metabolism of four patients with acute anterior myocardial infarction after coronary angioplasty and drug therapy was evaluated with cardiac-gated phosphorus magnetic resonance (MR) depth-resolved surface coil spectroscopy (DRESS) 5-9 days after the onset of symptoms. Significant reductions (about threefold) in the phosphocreatine (PCr) to inorganic phosphate (Pi) ratio and elevations in the Pi to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio were observed in endocardially or transmurally derived MR spectra when compared with values from epicardially displaced spectra and values from seven healthy volunteers (P less than .05). High-energy phosphate metabolites and Pi ratios did not vary significantly during the cardiac cycle in healthy volunteers. However, contamination of Pi resonances by phosphomonoester components, including blood 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, precluded accurate spectral quantification of Pi and pH. The results indicate that localized P-31 MR spectroscopy may be used to directly assess cellular energy reserve in clinical myocardial infarction and to evaluate metabolic response to interventions.

  13. Plant Interactions Alter the Predictions of Metabolic Scaling Theory

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yue; Berger, Uta; Grimm, Volker; Huth, Franka; Weiner, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic scaling theory (MST) is an attempt to link physiological processes of individual organisms with macroecology. It predicts a power law relationship with an exponent of −4/3 between mean individual biomass and density during density-dependent mortality (self-thinning). Empirical tests have produced variable results, and the validity of MST is intensely debated. MST focuses on organisms’ internal physiological mechanisms but we hypothesize that ecological interactions can be more important in determining plant mass-density relationships induced by density. We employ an individual-based model of plant stand development that includes three elements: a model of individual plant growth based on MST, different modes of local competition (size-symmetric vs. -asymmetric), and different resource levels. Our model is consistent with the observed variation in the slopes of self-thinning trajectories. Slopes were significantly shallower than −4/3 if competition was size-symmetric. We conclude that when the size of survivors is influenced by strong ecological interactions, these can override predictions of MST, whereas when surviving plants are less affected by interactions, individual-level metabolic processes can scale up to the population level. MST, like thermodynamics or biomechanics, sets limits within which organisms can live and function, but there may be stronger limits determined by ecological interactions. In such cases MST will not be predictive. PMID:23460884

  14. Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; Shardell, Michelle; Trehan, Indi; Moaddel, Ruin; Maleta, Kenneth M; Ordiz, M Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J

    2016-06-13

    Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increased intestinal permeability with serum metabolites in 315 children without acute malnutrition, aged 12-59 months, in rural Malawi. Increased gut permeability was associated with significant differences in circulating metabolites that included lower serum phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, tryptophan, ornithine, and citrulline, and elevated serum glutamate, taurine, and serotonin. Our findings suggest that environmental enteric dysfunction is characterized by alterations in important metabolites involved in growth and differentiation and gut function and integrity.

  15. Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Richard D.; Shardell, Michelle; Trehan, Indi; Moaddel, Ruin; Maleta, Kenneth M.; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increased intestinal permeability with serum metabolites in 315 children without acute malnutrition, aged 12–59 months, in rural Malawi. Increased gut permeability was associated with significant differences in circulating metabolites that included lower serum phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, tryptophan, ornithine, and citrulline, and elevated serum glutamate, taurine, and serotonin. Our findings suggest that environmental enteric dysfunction is characterized by alterations in important metabolites involved in growth and differentiation and gut function and integrity. PMID:27294788

  16. IDH1 mutations alter citric acid cycle metabolism and increase dependence on oxidative mitochondrial metabolism.

    PubMed

    Grassian, Alexandra R; Parker, Seth J; Davidson, Shawn M; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Green, Courtney R; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Murphy, Anne N; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M

    2014-06-15

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed (13)C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation.

  17. IDH1 Mutations Alter Citric Acid Cycle Metabolism and Increase Dependence on Oxidative Mitochondrial Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Grassian, Alexandra R.; Parker, Seth J.; Davidson, Shawn M.; Divakarun, Ajit S.; Green, Courtney R.; Zhang, Xiamei; Slocum, Kelly L.; Pu, Minying; Lin, Fallon; Vickers, Chad; Joud-Caldwell, Carol; Chung, Franklin; Yin, Hong; Handly, Erika D.; Straub, Christopher; Growney, Joseph D.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Murphy, Anne N.; Pagliarini, Raymond; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1/2) occur in several types of cancer, but the metabolic consequences of these genetic changes are not fully understood. In this study, we performed 13C metabolic flux analysis on a panel of isogenic cell lines containing heterozygous IDH1/2 mutations. We observed that under hypoxic conditions, IDH1-mutant cells exhibited increased oxidative tricarboxylic acid metabolism along with decreased reductive glutamine metabolism, but not IDH2-mutant cells. However, selective inhibition of mutant IDH1 enzyme function could not reverse the defect in reductive carboxylation activity. Furthermore, this metabolic reprogramming increased the sensitivity of IDH1-mutant cells to hypoxia or electron transport chain inhibition in vitro. Lastly, IDH1-mutant cells also grew poorly as subcutaneous xenografts within a hypoxic in vivo microenvironment. Together, our results suggest therapeutic opportunities to exploit the metabolic vulnerabilities specific to IDH1 mutation. PMID:24755473

  18. Metabolic alterations by indoxyl sulfate in skeletal muscle induce uremic sarcopenia in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Emiko; Mori, Takefumi; Mishima, Eikan; Suzuki, Arisa; Sugawara, Sanae; Kurasawa, Naho; Saigusa, Daisuke; Miura, Daisuke; Morikawa-Ichinose, Tomomi; Saito, Ritsumi; Oba-Yabana, Ikuko; Oe, Yuji; Kisu, Kiyomi; Naganuma, Eri; Koizumi, Kenji; Mokudai, Takayuki; Niwano, Yoshimi; Kudo, Tai; Suzuki, Chitose; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Sato, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaaki; Niwa, Toshimitsu; Ito, Sadayoshi

    2016-01-01

    Sarcopenia is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Pathogenic mechanism of skeletal muscle loss in CKD, which is defined as uremic sarcopenia, remains unclear. We found that causative pathological mechanism of uremic sarcopenia is metabolic alterations by uremic toxin indoxyl sulfate. Imaging mass spectrometry revealed indoxyl sulfate accumulated in muscle tissue of a mouse model of CKD. Comprehensive metabolomics revealed that indoxyl sulfate induces metabolic alterations such as upregulation of glycolysis, including pentose phosphate pathway acceleration as antioxidative stress response, via nuclear factor (erythroid-2-related factor)-2. The altered metabolic flow to excess antioxidative response resulted in downregulation of TCA cycle and its effected mitochondrial dysfunction and ATP shortage in muscle cells. In clinical research, a significant inverse association between plasma indoxyl sulfate and skeletal muscle mass in CKD patients was observed. Our results indicate that indoxyl sulfate is a pathogenic factor for sarcopenia in CKD. PMID:27830716

  19. Speeding up Growth: Selection for Mass-Independent Maximal Metabolic Rate Alters Growth Rates.

    PubMed

    Downs, Cynthia J; Brown, Jessi L; Wone, Bernard W M; Donovan, Edward R; Hayes, Jack P

    2016-03-01

    Investigations into relationships between life-history traits, such as growth rate and energy metabolism, typically focus on basal metabolic rate (BMR). In contrast, investigators rarely examine maximal metabolic rate (MMR) as a relevant metric of energy metabolism, even though it indicates the maximal capacity to metabolize energy aerobically, and hence it might also be important in trade-offs. We studied the relationship between energy metabolism and growth in mice (Mus musculus domesticus Linnaeus) selected for high mass-independent metabolic rates. Selection for high mass-independent MMR increased maximal growth rate, increased body mass at 20 weeks of age, and generally altered growth patterns in both male and female mice. In contrast, there was little evidence that the correlated response in mass-adjusted BMR altered growth patterns. The relationship between mass-adjusted MMR and growth rate indicates that MMR is an important mediator of life histories. Studies investigating associations between energy metabolism and life histories should consider MMR because it is potentially as important in understanding life history as BMR.

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Marina C.; Tavares, Luciana P.; Vago, Juliana P.; Batista, Nathália V.; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M.; Vieira, Angelica T.; Menezes, Gustavo B.; Sousa, Lirlândia P.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.; Teixeira, Mauro M.; Amaral, Flávio A.; Ferreira, Adaliene V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines. PMID:26742100

  1. Tumor Necrosis Factor, but Not Neutrophils, Alters the Metabolic Profile in Acute Experimental Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Marina C; Tavares, Luciana P; Vago, Juliana P; Batista, Nathália V; Queiroz-Junior, Celso M; Vieira, Angelica T; Menezes, Gustavo B; Sousa, Lirlândia P; van de Loo, Fons A J; Teixeira, Mauro M; Amaral, Flávio A; Ferreira, Adaliene V M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic alterations are associated with arthritis apart from obesity. However, it is still unclear which is the underlying process behind these metabolic changes. Here, we investigate the role of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in this process in an acute model of antigen-induced arthritis (AIA). Immunized male BALB/c mice received an intra-articular injection of PBS (control) or methylated bovine serum albumin (mBSA) into their knees, and were also pre-treated with different drugs: Etanercept, an anti-TNF drug, DF2156A, a CXCR1/2 receptor antagonist, or a monoclonal antibody RB6-8C5 to deplete neutrophils. Local challenge with mBSA evoked an acute neutrophil influx into the knee joint, and enhanced the joint nociception, along with a transient systemic metabolic alteration (higher levels of glucose and lipids, and altered adipocytokines). Pre-treatment with the conventional biological Etanercept, an inhibitor of TNF action, ameliorated the nociception and the acute joint inflammation dominated by neutrophils, and markedly improved many of the altered systemic metabolites (glucose and lipids), adipocytokines and PTX3. However, the lessening of metabolic changes was not due to diminished accumulation of neutrophils in the joint by Etanercept. Reduction of neutrophil recruitment by pre-treating AIA mice with DF2156A, or even the depletion of these cells by using RB6-8C5 reduced all of the inflammatory parameters and hypernociception developed after AIA challenge, but could not prevent the metabolic changes. Therefore, the induction of joint inflammation provoked acute metabolic alterations which were involved with TNF. We suggest that the role of TNF in arthritis-associated metabolic changes is not due to local neutrophils, which are the major cells present in this model, but rather due to cytokines.

  2. Alterations in cancer cell metabolism: the Warburg effect and metabolic adaptation.

    PubMed

    Asgari, Yazdan; Zabihinpour, Zahra; Salehzadeh-Yazdi, Ali; Schreiber, Falk; Masoudi-Nejad, Ali

    2015-05-01

    The Warburg effect means higher glucose uptake of cancer cells compared to normal tissues, whereas a smaller fraction of this glucose is employed for oxidative phosphorylation. With the advent of high throughput technologies and computational systems biology, cancer cell metabolism has been reinvestigated over the last decades toward identifying various events underlying "how" and "why" a cancer cell employs aerobic glycolysis. Significant progress has been shaped to revise the Warburg effect. In this study, we have integrated the gene expression of 13 different cancer cells with the genome-scale metabolic network of human (Recon1) based on the E-Flux method, and analyzed them based on constraint-based modeling. Results show that regardless of significant up- and down-regulated metabolic genes, the distribution of metabolic changes is similar in different cancer types. These findings support the theory that the Warburg effect is a consequence of metabolic adaptation in cancer cells.

  3. Oxidative stress and an altered methionine metabolism in alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Bleich, S; Spilker, K; Kurth, C; Degner, D; Quintela-Schneider, M; Javaheripour, K; Rüther, E; Kornhuber, J; Wiltfang, J

    2000-11-03

    The exact mechanism of brain atrophy in patients with chronic alcoholism remains unknown. There is growing evidence that chronic alcoholism is associated with oxidative stress and with a derangement in sulphur amino acid metabolism (e.g. ethanol-induced hyperhomocysteinemia). Furthermore, it has been reported that homocysteine induces neuronal cell death by stimulating N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors as well as by producing free radicals. To further evaluate this latter hypothesis we analysed serum levels of both homocysteine and markers of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) in alcoholic patients who underwent withdrawal from alcohol. Homocysteine and malondialdehyde were quantified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in serum samples of 35 patients (active drinkers). There was a significant correlation (P<0. 01) between blood alcohol concentration and elevated homocysteine (Spearman's r=0.71) and malondialdehyde (r=0.90) levels on admission. In addition, homocysteine and malondialdehyde levels were found to be significant decreased after 3 days of withdrawal treatment (Wilcoxon test: homocysteine, Z=-5.127; malondialdehyde, Z=-3.120; P<0.01). We postulate that excitatory neurotransmitters and mechanisms of oxidative stress in patients with chronic alcoholism may partly mediate excitotoxic neuronal damage and hereby cause brain shrinkage.

  4. Paternal nicotine exposure alters hepatic xenobiotic metabolism in offspring

    PubMed Central

    Vallaster, Markus P; Kukreja, Shweta; Bing, Xin Y; Ngolab, Jennifer; Zhao-Shea, Rubing; Gardner, Paul D; Tapper, Andrew R; Rando, Oliver J

    2017-01-01

    Paternal environmental conditions can influence phenotypes in future generations, but it is unclear whether offspring phenotypes represent specific responses to particular aspects of the paternal exposure history, or a generic response to paternal ‘quality of life’. Here, we establish a paternal effect model based on nicotine exposure in mice, enabling pharmacological interrogation of the specificity of the offspring response. Paternal exposure to nicotine prior to reproduction induced a broad protective response to multiple xenobiotics in male offspring. This effect manifested as increased survival following injection of toxic levels of either nicotine or cocaine, accompanied by hepatic upregulation of xenobiotic processing genes, and enhanced drug clearance. Surprisingly, this protective effect could also be induced by a nicotinic receptor antagonist, suggesting that xenobiotic exposure, rather than nicotinic receptor signaling, is responsible for programming offspring drug resistance. Thus, paternal drug exposure induces a protective phenotype in offspring by enhancing metabolic tolerance to xenobiotics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24771.001 PMID:28196335

  5. Mechanisms linking obesity to altered metabolism in mice colon carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nimri, Lili; Saadi, Janan; Peri, Irena; Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Schwartz, Betty

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of reports on obesity being a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer. Our goal in this study was to explore the metabolic networks and molecular signaling pathways linking obesity, adipose tissue and colon cancer. Using in-vivo experiments, we found that mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) and injected with MC38 colon cancer cells develop significantly larger tumors than their counterparts fed a control diet. In ex-vivo experiments, MC38 and CT26 colon cancer cells exposed to conditioned media (CM) from the adipose tissue of HFD-fed mice demonstrated significantly lower oxygen consumption rate as well as lower maximal oxygen consumption rate after carbonyl cyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenylhydrazone treatment. In addition, in-vitro assays showed downregulated expression of mitochondrial genes in colon cancer cells exposed to CM prepared from the visceral fat of HFD-fed mice or to leptin. Interestingly, leptin levels detected in the media of adipose tissue explants co-cultured with MC38 cancer cells were higher than in adipose tissue explants cultures, indicating cross talk between the adipose tissue and the cancer cells. Salient findings of the present study demonstrate that this crosstalk is mediated at least partially by the JNK/STAT3-signaling pathway. PMID:26472027

  6. Hormonal alterations in PCOS and its influence on bone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Abhaya; Muthusami, Sridhar

    2017-02-01

    According to the World Health Organization (WHO) polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) occurs in 4-8% of women worldwide. The prevalence of PCOS in Indian adolescents is 12.2% according to the Indian Council of Medical Research (ICMR). The National Institute of Health has documented that it affects approximately 5 million women of reproductive age in the United States. Hormonal imbalance is the characteristic of many women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). The influence of various endocrine changes in PCOS women and their relevance to bone remains to be documented. Hormones, which include gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH), insulin, the leutinizing/follicle-stimulating hormone (LH/FSH) ratio, androgens, estrogens, growth hormones (GH), cortisol, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcitonin are disturbed in PCOS women. These hormones influence bone metabolism in human subjects directly as well as indirectly. The imbalance in these hormones results in increased prevalence of osteoporosis in PCOS women. Limited evidence suggests that the drugs taken during the treatment of PCOS increase the risk of bone fracture in PCOS patients through endocrine disruption. This review is aimed at the identification of the relationship between bone mineral density and hormonal changes in PCOS subjects and identifies potential areas to study bone-related disorders in PCOS women.

  7. Alterations in Lipid Metabolism and Antioxidant Status in Lichen Planus

    PubMed Central

    Panchal, Falguni H; Ray, Somshukla; Munshi, Renuka P; Bhalerao, Supriya S; Nayak, Chitra S

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lichen planus (LP), a T-cell-mediated inflammatory disorder, wherein inflammation produces lipid metabolism disturbances, is linked to increase in cardiovascular (CV) risk with dyslipidemia. Increased reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxides have also been implicated in its pathogenesis. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate the status on lipid disturbances, oxidative stress, and inflammation in LP patients. Materials and Methods: The study was initiated after obtaining Institutional Ethics Committee permission and written informed consent from participants. The study included 125 patients (74 LP patients and 51 age and sex-matched controls) visiting the outpatient clinic in the dermatology department of our hospital. Variables analyzed included lipid profile, C-reactive protein (CRP), malondialdehyde (MDA), and catalase (CAT) activity. Results: Analysis of lipid parameters revealed significantly higher levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) along with decreased levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in LP patients as compared to their respective controls. LP patients also presented with a significantly higher atherogenic index that is, (TC/HDL-C) and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios than the controls. A significant increase in CRP levels was observed among the LP patients. There was a statistically significant increase in the serum levels of the lipid peroxidation product, MDA and a statistically significant decrease in CAT activity in LP patients as compared to their respective controls. A statistically significant positive correlation (r = 0.96) was observed between serum MDA levels and duration of LP whereas a significantly negative correlation (r = −0.76) was seen between CAT activity and LP duration. Conclusion: Chronic inflammation in patients with LP may explain the association with dyslipidemia and CV risk. Our findings also suggest that an increase in oxidative

  8. Carnosine metabolism in diabetes is altered by reactive metabolites.

    PubMed

    Peters, Verena; Lanthaler, Barbara; Amberger, Albert; Fleming, Thomas; Forsberg, Elisabete; Hecker, Markus; Wagner, Andreas H; Yue, Wyatt W; Hoffmann, Georg F; Nawroth, Peter; Zschocke, Johannes; Schmitt, Claus P

    2015-11-01

    Carnosinase 1 (CN1) contributes to diabetic nephropathy by cleaving histidine-dipeptides which scavenge reactive oxygen and carbonyl species and increase nitric oxide (NO) production. In diabetic mice renal CN1 activity is increased, the regulatory mechanisms are unknown. We therefore analysed the in vitro and in vivo regulation of CN1 activity using recombinant and human CN1, and the db/db mouse model of diabetes. Glucose, leptin and insulin did not modify recombinant and human CN1 activity in vitro, glucose did not alter renal CN1 activity of WT or db/db mice ex vivo. Reactive metabolite methylglyoxal and Fenton reagent carbonylated recombinant CN1 and doubled CN1 efficiency. NO S-nitrosylated CN1 and decreased CN1 efficiency for carnosine by 70 % (p < 0.01), but not for anserine. Both CN1 cysteine residues were nitrosylated, the cysteine at position 102 but not at position 229 regulated CN1 activities. In db/db mice, renal CN1 mRNA and protein levels were similar as in non-diabetic controls, CN1 efficiency 1.9 and 1.6 fold higher for carnosine and anserine. Renal carbonyl stress was strongly increased and NO production halved, CN1 highly carbonylated and less S-nitrosylated compared to WT mice. GSH and NO2/3 concentrations were reduced and inversely related with carnosine degradation rate (r = -0.82/-0.85). Thus, reactive metabolites of diabetes upregulate CN1 activity by post-translational modifications, and thus decrease the availability of reactive metabolite-scavenging histidine dipeptides in the kidney in a positive feedback loop. Interference with this vicious circle may represent a new therapeutic target for mitigation of DN.

  9. Saharan dust inputs and high UVR levels jointly alter the metabolic balance of marine oligotrophic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrerizo, Marco J.; Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; González-Olalla, Juan Manuel; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel; Carrillo, Presentación

    2016-10-01

    The metabolic balance of the most extensive bioma on the Earth is a controversial topic of the global-change research. High ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels by the shoaling of upper mixed layers and increasing atmospheric dust deposition from arid regions may unpredictably alter the metabolic state of marine oligotrophic ecosystems. We performed an observational study across the south-western (SW) Mediterranean Sea to assess the planktonic metabolic balance and a microcosm experiment in two contrasting areas, heterotrophic nearshore and autotrophic open sea, to test whether a combined UVR × dust impact could alter their metabolic balance at mid-term scales. We show that the metabolic state of oligotrophic areas geographically varies and that the joint impact of UVR and dust inputs prompted a strong change towards autotrophic metabolism. We propose that this metabolic response could be accentuated with the global change as remote-sensing evidence shows increasing intensities, frequencies and number of dust events together with variations in the surface UVR fluxes on SW Mediterranean Sea. Overall, these findings suggest that the enhancement of the net carbon budget under a combined UVR and dust inputs impact could contribute to boost the biological pump, reinforcing the role of the oligotrophic marine ecosystems as CO2 sinks.

  10. Saharan dust inputs and high UVR levels jointly alter the metabolic balance of marine oligotrophic ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Cabrerizo, Marco J.; Medina-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; González-Olalla, Juan Manuel; Villar-Argaiz, Manuel; Carrillo, Presentación

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic balance of the most extensive bioma on the Earth is a controversial topic of the global-change research. High ultraviolet radiation (UVR) levels by the shoaling of upper mixed layers and increasing atmospheric dust deposition from arid regions may unpredictably alter the metabolic state of marine oligotrophic ecosystems. We performed an observational study across the south-western (SW) Mediterranean Sea to assess the planktonic metabolic balance and a microcosm experiment in two contrasting areas, heterotrophic nearshore and autotrophic open sea, to test whether a combined UVR × dust impact could alter their metabolic balance at mid-term scales. We show that the metabolic state of oligotrophic areas geographically varies and that the joint impact of UVR and dust inputs prompted a strong change towards autotrophic metabolism. We propose that this metabolic response could be accentuated with the global change as remote-sensing evidence shows increasing intensities, frequencies and number of dust events together with variations in the surface UVR fluxes on SW Mediterranean Sea. Overall, these findings suggest that the enhancement of the net carbon budget under a combined UVR and dust inputs impact could contribute to boost the biological pump, reinforcing the role of the oligotrophic marine ecosystems as CO2 sinks. PMID:27775100

  11. Prenatal caffeine ingestion induces transgenerational neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in second generation rats

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Hanwen; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Lian; Shen, Lang; Kou, Hao; He, Zheng; Ping, Jie; Xu, Dan; Ma, Lu; Chen, Liaobin; Wang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that prenatal caffeine ingestion induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome with alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic phenotypes in adult first generation (F1) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rats, and the underlying mechanism is originated from a hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in utero. This study aims to investigate the transgenerational effects of this programming alteration in adult second generation (F2). Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120 mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. Four groups in F2 were set according to the cross-mating between control and caffeine-induced IUGR rats. F2 were subjected to a fortnight ice water swimming stimulus on postnatal month 4, and blood samples were collected before and after stress. Results showed that the majority of the activities of HPA axis and phenotypes of glucose and lipid metabolism were altered in F2. Particularly, comparing with the control group, caffeine groups had an enhanced corticosterone levels after chronic stress. Compared with before stress, the serum glucose levels were increased in some groups whereas the triglyceride levels were decreased. Furthermore, total cholesterol gain rates were enhanced but the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol gain rates were decreased in most caffeine groups after stress. These transgenerational effects were characterized partially with gender and parental differences. Taken together, these results indicate that the reproductive and developmental toxicities and the neuroendocrine metabolic programming mechanism by prenatal caffeine ingestion have transgenerational effects in rats, which may help to explain the susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases in F2. - Highlights: • Caffeine-induced neuroendocrine metabolic programming of HPA has hereditary effect. • Caffeine

  12. A combined clinical phenotype and lipidomic analysis reveals the impact of chronic kidney disease on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua; Chen, Lin; Liu, Dan; Chen, Dan-Qian; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Yu, Xiao-Yong; Zhang, Li; Su, Wei; Bai, Xu; Zhao, Ying-Yong

    2017-03-13

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) results in significant dyslipidemia and profound changes in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism. The associated dyslipidemia, in turn, contributes to progression of CKD and its cardiovascular complications. To gain an in-depth insight into the disorders of lipid metabolism in advanced CKD, we applied UPLC-HDMS-based lipidomics to measure serum lipid metabolites in 180 patients with advanced CKD and 120 age-matched healthy controls. We found significant increases in the levels of total free fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids in patients with CKD. The levels of free fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids directly correlated with the level of serum triglyceride, and inversely correlated with the levels of total cholesterol and eGFR. A total of 126 lipid species were identified from positive and negative ion modes. 113 out of 126 identified lipid species were significantly altered in patients with CKD based on the adjusted FDR method. These results point to profound disturbance of fatty acid and triglyceride metabolisms in patients with CKD. Logistic regression analysis showed strong correlations between serum methyl hexadecanoic acid, LPC(24:1), 3-oxooctadecanoic acid and PC(20:2/24:1) levels with eGFR and serum creatinine levels (R>0.8758). In conclusion application of UPLC-HDMS-based lipidomic technique revealed profound changes in lipid metabolites in patients with CKD. The observed increases in serum total fatty acids, glycerolipids and glycerophospholipids levels directly correlated with increased serum triglyceride level, and inversely correlated with the eGFR and triglyceride levels.

  13. Metabolic and Signaling Alterations in Dystrophin-Deficient Hearts Precede Overt Cardiomyopathy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cytoskeletal protein dystrophin has been implicated in hereditary and acquired forms of cardiomyopathy. However, much remains to be learned about the role of dystrophin in the heart. We hypothesized that the dystrophin-deficient heart displays early alterations in energy metabolism that precede ...

  14. Chromium supplementation alters the glucose and lipid metabolism of feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crossbreed steers (n = 20; 235 ± 4 kg) were fed 53 d during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brand Chromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0 (C...

  15. Chromium supplementation alters both glucose and lipid metabolism in feedlot cattle during the receiving period

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Crossbred steers (n = 20; 235 +/- 4 kg) were fed 53 days during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE®brandChromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries) would alter the glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0...

  16. Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary Ozone Exposure Alters Essential Metabolic Pathways involved in Glucose Homeostasis in the Liver D.B. Johnson, 1 W.O. Ward, 2 V.L. Bass, 2 M.C.J. Schladweiler, 2A.D. Ledbetter, 2 D. Andrews, and U.P. Kodavanti 2 1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC School of Medicine, Cha...

  17. Methyl-ß-cyclodextrin alters adipokine gene expression and glucose metabolism in swine adipose tissue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if metabolic stress as induced by methyl-ß-cyclodextrin (MCD) can alter cytokine expression in neonatal swine adipose tissue explants. Subcutaneous adipose tissue explants (100 ± 10 mg) were prepared from 21 day old pigs. Explants were incubated in medium 199 s...

  18. Maternal nutrition during the first 50 days of gestation alters bovine fetal hepatic metabolic transcriptome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that maternal nutrition during the first 50 d of gestation would alter the metabolic transcriptome of the bovine fetal liver. Fourteen beef heifers were estrus synchronized and assigned to 2 treatments at breeding (CON, 100% of requirements to gain 0.45kg/d; RES, 60% of CON). Heifers...

  19. Late-onset caloric restriction alters skeletal muscle metabolism by modulating pyruvate metabolism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiao-Nan Joyce; Lin, Shang-Ying; Liao, Yi-Hung; Li, Zhen-Jie; Wong, Alice May-Kuen

    2015-06-01

    Caloric restriction (CR) attenuates age-related muscle loss. However, the underlying mechanism responsible for this attenuation is not fully understood. This study evaluated the role of energy metabolism in the CR-induced attenuation of muscle loss. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to evaluate the effect of CR on energy metabolism and determine its relationship with muscle mass, and 2) to determine whether the effects of CR are age dependent. Young and middle-aged rats were randomized into either 40% CR or ad libitum (AL) diet groups for 14 wk. Major energy-producing pathways in muscles, i.e., glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), were examined. We found that the effects of CR were age dependent. CR improved muscle metabolism and normalized muscle mass in middle-aged animals but not young animals. CR decreased glycolysis and increased the cellular dependency for OXPHOS vs. glycolysis in muscles of middle-aged rats, which was associated with the improvement of normalized muscle mass. The metabolic reprogramming induced by CR was related to modulation of pyruvate metabolism and increased mitochondrial biogenesis. Compared with animals fed AL, middle-aged animals with CR had lower lactate dehydrogenase A content and greater mitochondrial pyruvate carrier content. Markers of mitochondrial biogenesis, including AMPK activation levels and SIRT1 and COX-IV content, also showed increased levels. In conclusion, 14 wk of CR improved muscle metabolism and preserved muscle mass in middle-aged animals but not in young developing animals. CR-attenuated age-related muscle loss is associated with reprogramming of the metabolic pathway from glycolysis to OXPHOS.

  20. Metformin Retards Aging in C. elegans by Altering Microbial Folate and Methionine Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Cabreiro, Filipe; Au, Catherine; Leung, Kit-Yi; Vergara-Irigaray, Nuria; Cochemé, Helena M.; Noori, Tahereh; Weinkove, David; Schuster, Eugene; Greene, Nicholas D.E.; Gems, David

    2013-01-01

    Summary The biguanide drug metformin is widely prescribed to treat type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, but its mode of action remains uncertain. Metformin also increases lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans cocultured with Escherichia coli. This bacterium exerts complex nutritional and pathogenic effects on its nematode predator/host that impact health and aging. We report that metformin increases lifespan by altering microbial folate and methionine metabolism. Alterations in metformin-induced longevity by mutation of worm methionine synthase (metr-1) and S-adenosylmethionine synthase (sams-1) imply metformin-induced methionine restriction in the host, consistent with action of this drug as a dietary restriction mimetic. Metformin increases or decreases worm lifespan, depending on E. coli strain metformin sensitivity and glucose concentration. In mammals, the intestinal microbiome influences host metabolism, including development of metabolic disease. Thus, metformin-induced alteration of microbial metabolism could contribute to therapeutic efficacy—and also to its side effects, which include folate deficiency and gastrointestinal upset. PaperClip PMID:23540700

  1. Altered Energy Metabolism Pathways in the Posterior Cingulate in Young Adult Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Michelle; Wolf, Andrew B.; Chavira, Bernardo; Shonebarger, Daniel; Meckel, J.P.; Leung, Lana; Ballina, Lauren; Ly, Sarah; Saini, Aman; Jones, T. Bucky; Vallejo, Johana; Jentarra, Garilyn; Valla, Jon

    2016-01-01

    The APOE gene, encoding apolipoprotein E, is the primary genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele (APOE4) carriers have alterations in brain structure and function (as measured by brain imaging) even as young adults. Examination of this population is valuable in further identifying details of these functional changes and their association with vulnerability to AD decades later. Previous work demonstrates functional declines in mitochondrial activity in the posterior cingulate cortex, a key region in the default mode network, which appears to be strongly associated with functional changes relevant to AD risk. Here, we demonstrate alterations in the pathways underlying glucose, ketone, and mitochondrial energy metabolism. Young adult APOE4 carriers displayed upregulation of specific glucose (GLUT1 & GLUT3) and monocarboxylate (MCT2) transporters, the glucose metabolism enzyme hexokinase, the SCOT & AACS enzymes involved in ketone metabolism, and complexes I, II, and IV of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. The monocarboxylate transporter (MCT4) was found to be downregulated in APOE4 carriers. These data suggest that widespread dysregulation of energy metabolism in this at-risk population, even decades before possible disease onset. Therefore, these findings support the idea that alterations in brain energy metabolism may contribute significantly to the risk that APOE4 confers for AD. PMID:27128370

  2. Metabolic alterations and neurodevelopmental outcome of infants with transposition of the great arteries.

    PubMed

    Park, I Sook; Yoon, S Young; Min, J Yeon; Kim, Y Hwue; Ko, J Kok; Kim, K Soo; Seo, D Man; Lee, J Hee

    2006-01-01

    Abnormal neurodevelopment has been reported for infants who were born with transposition of the great arteries (TGA) and underwent arterial switch operation (ASO). This study evaluates the cerebral metabolism of TGA infants at birth and before ASO and neurodevelopment 1 year after ASO. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) was performed on 16 full-term TGA brains before ASO within 3-6 days after birth. The brain metabolite ratios of [NAA/Cr], [Cho/Cr], and [mI/Cr] evaluated measured. Ten infants were evaluated at 1 year using the Bayley Scales of Infants Development II (BSED II). Cerebral metabolism of infants with TGA was altered in parietal white matter (PWM) and occipital gray matter (OGM) at birth before ASO. One year after ASO, [Cho/Cr] in PWM remained altered, but all metabolic ratios in OGM were normal. The results of BSID II at 1 year showed delayed mental and psychomotor development. This delayed neurodevelopmental outcome may reflect consequences of the altered cerebral metabolism in PWM measured by 1H-MRS. It is speculated that the abnormal hemodynamics due to TGA in utero may be responsible for the impaired cerebral metabolism and the subsequent neurodevelopmental deficit.

  3. Trehalose Alters Subcellular Trafficking and the Metabolism of the Alzheimer-associated Amyloid Precursor Protein.

    PubMed

    Tien, Nguyen T; Karaca, Ilker; Tamboli, Irfan Y; Walter, Jochen

    2016-05-13

    The disaccharide trehalose is commonly considered to stimulate autophagy. Cell treatment with trehalose could decrease cytosolic aggregates of potentially pathogenic proteins, including mutant huntingtin, α-synuclein, and phosphorylated tau that are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we demonstrate that trehalose also alters the metabolism of the Alzheimer disease-related amyloid precursor protein (APP). Cell treatment with trehalose decreased the degradation of full-length APP and its C-terminal fragments. Trehalose also reduced the secretion of the amyloid-β peptide. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed that trehalose alters the subcellular distribution and decreases the degradation of APP C-terminal fragments in endolysosomal compartments. Trehalose also led to strong accumulation of the autophagic marker proteins LC3-II and p62, and decreased the proteolytic activation of the lysosomal hydrolase cathepsin D. The combined data indicate that trehalose decreases the lysosomal metabolism of APP by altering its endocytic vesicular transport.

  4. Metabolic alterations induced in cultured skeletal muscle by stretch-relaxation activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatfaludy, Sophia; Shansky, Janet; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1989-01-01

    Muscle cells differentiated in vitro are repetitively stretched and relaxed in order to determine the presence of short- and long-term alterations occurring in glucose uptake and lactate efflux that are similar to the metabolic alterations occurring in stimulated organ-cultured muscle and in vivo skeletal muscle during the active state. It is observed that whereas mechanical stimulation increases these metabolic parameters within 4-6 h of starting activity, unstimulated basal rates in control cultures also increase during this period of time, and by 8 h, their rates have reached or exceeded the rates in continuously stimulated cells. Measurements of these parameters in media of different compositions show that activity-induced long-term alterations in the parameters occur independently of growth factors in serium and embryo extracts.

  5. Metabolic Alterations Induce Oxidative Stress in Diabetic and Failing Hearts: Different Pathways, Same Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Roul, David

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Several authors have proposed a link between altered cardiac energy substrate metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. A cogent evidence of this association has been found in diabetic cardiomyopathy (dCM); however, experimental findings in animal models of heart failure (HF) and in human myocardium also seem to support the coexistence of the two alterations in HF. Critical Issues: Two important questions remain open: whether pathological changes in metabolism play an important role in enhancing oxidative stress and whether there is a common pathway linking altered substrate utilization and activation of ROS-generating enzymes, independently of the underlying cardiac pathology. In this regard, the comparison between dCM and HF is intriguing, in that these pathological conditions display very different cardiac metabolic phenotypes. Recent Advances: Our literature review on this topic indicates that a vast body of knowledge is now available documenting the relationship between the metabolism of energy substrates and ROS generation in dCM. In some cases, biochemical mechanisms have been identified. On the other hand, only a few and relatively recent studies have explored this phenomenon in HF and their conclusions are not consistent. Future Directions: Better methods of investigation, especially in vivo, will be necessary to test whether the metabolic fate of certain substrates is causally linked to ROS production. If successful, these studies will place a new emphasis on the potential clinical relevance of metabolic modulators, which might indirectly mitigate cardiac oxidative stress in dCM, HF, and, possibly, in other pathological conditions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 1502–1514. PMID:25836025

  6. Alterations of hippocampal glucose metabolism by even versus uneven medium chain triglycerides

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Tanya S; Tan, Kah Ni; Hodson, Mark P; Borges, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) are used to treat neurologic disorders with metabolic impairments, including childhood epilepsy and early Alzheimer's disease. However, the metabolic effects of MCTs in the brain are still unclear. Here, we studied the effects of feeding even and uneven MCTs on brain glucose metabolism in the mouse. Adult mice were fed 35% (calories) of trioctanoin or triheptanoin (the triglycerides of octanoate or heptanoate, respectively) or a matching control diet for 3 weeks. Enzymatic assays and targeted metabolomics by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry were used to quantify metabolites in extracts from the hippocampal formations (HFs). Both oils increased the levels of β-hydroxybutyrate, but no other significant metabolic alterations were observed after triheptanoin feeding. The levels of glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 6-phosphate were increased in the HF of mice fed trioctanoin, whereas levels of metabolites further downstream in the glycolytic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway were reduced. This indicates that trioctanoin reduces glucose utilization because of a decrease in phosphofructokinase activity. Trioctanoin and triheptanoin showed similar anticonvulsant effects in the 6 Hz seizure model, but it remains unknown to what extent the anticonvulsant mechanism(s) are shared. In conclusion, triheptanoin unlike trioctanoin appears to not alter glucose metabolism in the healthy brain. PMID:24169853

  7. Altered Clock and Lipid Metabolism-Related Genes in Atherosclerotic Mice Kept with Abnormal Lighting Condition

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhu; Hua, Bingxuan; Shang, Zhanxian; Yuan, Gongsheng; Xu, Lirong; Li, Ermin; Li, Xiaobo; Yan, Zuoqin; Qian, Ruizhe

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk of atherosclerosis is elevated in abnormal lipid metabolism and circadian rhythm disorder. We investigated whether abnormal lighting condition would have influenced the circadian expression of clock genes and clock-controlled lipid metabolism-related genes in ApoE-KO mice. Methods. A mouse model of atherosclerosis with circadian clock genes expression disorder was established using ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO LD/DL mice) by altering exposure to light. C57 BL/6J mice (C57 mice) and ApoE-KO mice (ApoE-KO mice) exposed to normal day and night and normal diet served as control mice. According to zeitgeber time samples were acquired, to test atheromatous plaque formation, serum lipids levels and rhythmicity, clock genes, and lipid metabolism-related genes along with Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) levels and rhythmicity. Results. Atherosclerosis plaques were formed in the aortic arch of ApoE-KO LD/DL mice. The serum lipids levels and oscillations in ApoE-KO LD/DL mice were altered, along with the levels and diurnal oscillations of circadian genes, lipid metabolism-associated genes, and Sirt1 compared with the control mice. Conclusions. Abnormal exposure to light aggravated plaque formation and exacerbated disorders of serum lipids and clock genes, lipid metabolism genes and Sirt1 levels, and circadian oscillation. PMID:27631008

  8. Dysregulation of Npas2 leads to altered metabolic pathways in a murine knockout model.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Derek; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Mistretta, Toni-Ann; Su, Chunliu; Lane, Robert H; Aagaard, Kjersti M

    2013-11-01

    In our primate model of maternal high fat diet exposure, we have described that fetal epigenomic modifications to the peripheral circadian Npas2 are associated with persistent alterations in fetal hepatic metabolism and non-alcoholic fatty liver. As the interaction of circadian response with metabolism is not well understood, we employed a murine knockout model to characterize the molecular mechanisms with which Npas2 reprograms the fetal hepatic metabolic response. cDNA was generated from Npas2-/- and +/+ (wild type) livers at day 2 (newborn) and at 25 weeks (adult) of life. Newborn samples were analyzed by exon array (n = 3/cohort). Independent pathway analysis software determined that the primary dysregulated pathway(s) in the Npas2-/- animals uniformly converged on lipid metabolism. Of particular interest, Ppargc1a, which integrates circadian and metabolism pathways, was significantly (p < .01) over expressed in newborn (1.7 fold) and adult (1.8 fold) Npas2-/- animals. These findings are consistent with an essential role for Npas2 in programming the peripheral circadian response and hepatic metabolism, which has not been previously described.

  9. Enzymatic passaging of human embryonic stem cells alters central carbon metabolism and glycan abundance

    PubMed Central

    Badur, Mehmet G.; Zhang, Hui; Metallo, Christian M.

    2016-01-01

    To realize the potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in regenerative medicine and drug discovery applications, large numbers of cells that accurately recapitulate cell and tissue function must be robustly produced. Previous studies have suggested that genetic instability and epigenetic changes occur as a consequence of enzymatic passaging. However, the potential impacts of such passaging methods on the metabolism of hESCs have not been described. Using stable isotope tracing and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, we have explored how different passaging reagents impact hESC metabolism. Enzymatic passaging caused significant decreases in glucose utilization throughout central carbon metabolism along with attenuated de novo lipogenesis. In addition, we developed and validated a method for rapidly quantifying glycan abundance and isotopic labeling in hydrolyzed biomass. Enzymatic passaging reagents significantly altered levels of glycans immediately after digestion but surprisingly glucose contribution to glycans was not affected. These results demonstrate that there is an immediate effect on hESC metabolism after enzymatic passaging in both central carbon metabolism and biosynthesis. HESCs subjected to enzymatic passaging are routinely placed in a state requiring re-synthesis of biomass components, subtly influencing their metabolic needs in a manner that may impact cell performance in regenerative medicine applications. PMID:26289220

  10. Enzymatic passaging of human embryonic stem cells alters central carbon metabolism and glycan abundance.

    PubMed

    Badur, Mehmet G; Zhang, Hui; Metallo, Christian M

    2015-10-01

    To realize the potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in regenerative medicine and drug discovery applications, large numbers of cells that accurately recapitulate cell and tissue function must be robustly produced. Previous studies have suggested that genetic instability and epigenetic changes occur as a consequence of enzymatic passaging. However, the potential impacts of such passaging methods on the metabolism of hESCs have not been described. Using stable isotope tracing and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, we have explored how different passaging reagents impact hESC metabolism. Enzymatic passaging caused significant decreases in glucose utilization throughout central carbon metabolism along with attenuated de novo lipogenesis. In addition, we developed and validated a method for rapidly quantifying glycan abundance and isotopic labeling in hydrolyzed biomass. Enzymatic passaging reagents significantly altered levels of glycans immediately after digestion but surprisingly glucose contribution to glycans was not affected. These results demonstrate that there is an immediate effect on hESC metabolism after enzymatic passaging in both central carbon metabolism and biosynthesis. HESCs subjected to enzymatic passaging are routinely placed in a state requiring re-synthesis of biomass components, subtly influencing their metabolic needs in a manner that may impact cell performance in regenerative medicine applications.

  11. Myocardial Reloading After Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Kajimoto, Masaki; O'Kelly Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena R.; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy; Olson, Aaron K.; Rosiers, Christine Des; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart, providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. ECMO also induces stress which can adversely affect the ability to reload or wean the heart from the circuit. Metabolic impairments induced by altered loading and/or stress conditions may impact weaning. However, cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading with ECMO modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Methods and Results Sixteen immature piglets (7.8 to 15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8‐hour ECMO (UNLOAD) and postwean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused into the coronary artery [2‐13C]‐pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]‐L‐leucine as an indicator for amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis. Upon RELOAD, each functional parameter, which were decreased substantially by ECMO, recovered to near‐baseline level with the exclusion of minimum dP/dt. Accordingly, myocardial oxygen consumption was also increased, indicating that overall mitochondrial metabolism was reestablished. At the metabolic level, when compared to UNLOAD, RELOAD altered the contribution of various substrates/pathways to tissue pyruvate formation, favoring exogenous pyruvate versus glycolysis, and acetyl‐CoA formation, shifting away from pyruvate decarboxylation to endogenous substrate, presumably fatty acids. Furthermore, there was also a significant increase of tissue concentrations for all CAC intermediates (≈80%), suggesting enhanced anaplerosis, and of fractional protein synthesis rates (>70%). Conclusions RELOAD alters both cytosolic and mitochondrial energy substrate metabolism, while favoring leucine incorporation into protein synthesis rather than oxidation in the CAC. Improved understanding of factors governing these metabolic perturbations may

  12. Correlation of Diffusion and Metabolic Alterations in Different Clinical Forms of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Hannoun, Salem; Bagory, Matthieu; Durand-Dubief, Francoise; Ibarrola, Danielle; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Confavreux, Christian; Cotton, Francois; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provide greater sensitivity than conventional MRI to detect diffuse alterations in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients with different clinical forms. Therefore, the goal of this study is to combine DTI and MRSI measurements to analyze the relation between diffusion and metabolic markers, T2-weighted lesion load (T2-LL) and the patients clinical status. The sensitivity and specificity of both methods were then compared in terms of MS clinical forms differentiation. MR examination was performed on 71 MS patients (27 relapsing remitting (RR), 26 secondary progressive (SP) and 18 primary progressive (PP)) and 24 control subjects. DTI and MRSI measurements were obtained from two identical regions of interest selected in left and right centrum semioval (CSO) WM. DTI metrics and metabolic contents were significantly altered in MS patients with the exception of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and NAA/Choline (Cho) ratio in RR patients. Significant correlations were observed between diffusion and metabolic measures to various degrees in every MS patients group. Most DTI metrics were significantly correlated with the T2-LL while only NAA/Cr ratio was correlated in RR patients. A comparison analysis of MR methods efficiency demonstrated a better sensitivity/specificity of DTI over MRSI. Nevertheless, NAA/Cr ratio could distinguish all MS and SP patients groups from controls, while NAA/Cho ratio differentiated PP patients from controls. This study demonstrated that diffusivity changes related to microstructural alterations were correlated with metabolic changes and provided a better sensitivity to detect early changes, particularly in RR patients who are more subject to inflammatory processes. In contrast, the better specificity of metabolic ratios to detect axonal damage and demyelination may provide a better index for identification of PP patients. PMID:22479330

  13. Correlation of diffusion and metabolic alterations in different clinical forms of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hannoun, Salem; Bagory, Matthieu; Durand-Dubief, Francoise; Ibarrola, Danielle; Comte, Jean-Christophe; Confavreux, Christian; Cotton, Francois; Sappey-Marinier, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and MR spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) provide greater sensitivity than conventional MRI to detect diffuse alterations in normal appearing white matter (NAWM) of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients with different clinical forms. Therefore, the goal of this study is to combine DTI and MRSI measurements to analyze the relation between diffusion and metabolic markers, T2-weighted lesion load (T2-LL) and the patients clinical status. The sensitivity and specificity of both methods were then compared in terms of MS clinical forms differentiation. MR examination was performed on 71 MS patients (27 relapsing remitting (RR), 26 secondary progressive (SP) and 18 primary progressive (PP)) and 24 control subjects. DTI and MRSI measurements were obtained from two identical regions of interest selected in left and right centrum semioval (CSO) WM. DTI metrics and metabolic contents were significantly altered in MS patients with the exception of N-acetyl-aspartate (NAA) and NAA/Choline (Cho) ratio in RR patients. Significant correlations were observed between diffusion and metabolic measures to various degrees in every MS patients group. Most DTI metrics were significantly correlated with the T2-LL while only NAA/Cr ratio was correlated in RR patients. A comparison analysis of MR methods efficiency demonstrated a better sensitivity/specificity of DTI over MRSI. Nevertheless, NAA/Cr ratio could distinguish all MS and SP patients groups from controls, while NAA/Cho ratio differentiated PP patients from controls. This study demonstrated that diffusivity changes related to microstructural alterations were correlated with metabolic changes and provided a better sensitivity to detect early changes, particularly in RR patients who are more subject to inflammatory processes. In contrast, the better specificity of metabolic ratios to detect axonal damage and demyelination may provide a better index for identification of PP patients.

  14. Human longevity is characterised by high thyroid stimulating hormone secretion without altered energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, S. W.; Akintola, A. A.; Roelfsema, F.; van der Spoel, E.; Cobbaert, C. M.; Ballieux, B. E.; Egri, P.; Kvarta-Papp, Z.; Gereben, B.; Fekete, C.; Slagboom, P. E.; van der Grond, J.; Demeneix, B. A.; Pijl, H.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; van Heemst, D.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have included subjects with the propensity to reach old age in good health, with the aim to disentangle mechanisms contributing to staying healthier for longer. The hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis maintains circulating levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormone (TH) in an inverse relationship. Greater longevity has been associated with higher TSH and lower TH levels, but mechanisms underlying TSH/TH differences and longevity remain unknown. The HPT axis plays a pivotal role in growth, development and energy metabolism. We report that offspring of nonagenarians with at least one nonagenarian sibling have increased TSH secretion but similar bioactivity of TSH and similar TH levels compared to controls. Healthy offspring and spousal controls had similar resting metabolic rate and core body temperature. We propose that pleiotropic effects of the HPT axis may favour longevity without altering energy metabolism. PMID:26089239

  15. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-12

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells.

  16. Brain monoamine metabolism is altered in rats following spontaneous, long-distance running.

    PubMed

    Elam, M; Svensson, T H; Thorén, P

    1987-06-01

    Brain monoamine metabolism in rats was studied during spontaneous, long-term running in a microprocessor-controlled wheel cage. Immediately after heavy spontaneous exercise, DOPA accumulation was decreased in dopamine-rich brain regions such as the limbic forebrain and corpus striatum, indicating a decreased rate of synthesis of dopamine in brain. In contrast, DOPA accumulation was increased in the noradrenaline-predominated region of the brain stem, indicating an increased synthesis of noradrenaline in this region. Alterations in brain monoamine metabolism were normalized in exercising animals analysed 24 h after the last running period. Changes in brain monoamine metabolism may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the clinically observed psychological effects of physical exercise.

  17. Effects of independently altering body weight and body mass on the metabolic cost of running.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Lennart P J; Grabowski, Alena; Kram, Rodger

    2007-12-01

    The metabolic cost of running is substantial, despite the savings from elastic energy storage and return. Previous studies suggest that generating vertical force to support body weight and horizontal forces to brake and propel body mass are the major determinants of the metabolic cost of running. In the present study, we investigated how independently altering body weight and body mass affects the metabolic cost of running. Based on previous studies, we hypothesized that reducing body weight would decrease metabolic rate proportionally, and adding mass and weight would increase metabolic rate proportionally. Further, because previous studies show that adding mass alone does not affect the forces generated on the ground, we hypothesized that adding mass alone would have no substantial effect on metabolic rate. We manipulated the body weight and body mass of 10 recreational human runners and measured their metabolic rates while they ran at 3 m s(-1). We reduced weight using a harness system, increased mass and weight using lead worn about the waist, and increased mass alone using a combination of weight support and added load. We found that net metabolic rate decreased in less than direct proportion to reduced body weight, increased in slightly more than direct proportion to added load (added mass and weight), and was not substantially different from normal running with added mass alone. Adding mass alone was not an effective method for determining the metabolic cost attributable to braking/propelling body mass. Runners loaded with mass alone did not generate greater vertical or horizontal impulses and their metabolic costs did not substantially differ from those of normal running. Our results show that generating force to support body weight is the primary determinant of the metabolic cost of running. Extrapolating our reduced weight data to zero weight suggests that supporting body weight comprises at most 74% of the net cost of running. However, 74% is probably an

  18. Gold nanoparticles alter parameters of oxidative stress and energy metabolism in organs of adult rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela Kozuchovski; Cardoso, Eria; Vuolo, Francieli Silva; Michels, Monique; Zanoni, Elton Torres; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gomes, Lara Mezari; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza; Streck, Emilio L; Paula, Marcos Marques da Silva

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluated the parameters of oxidative stress and energy metabolism after the acute and long-term administration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs, 10 and 30 nm in diameter) in different organs of rats. Adult male Wistar rats received a single intraperitoneal injection or repeated injections (once daily for 28 days) of saline solution, GNPs-10 or GNPs-30. Twenty-four hours after the last administration, the animals were killed, and the liver, kidney, and heart were isolated for biochemical analysis. We demonstrated that acute administration of GNPs-30 increased the TBARS levels, and that GNPs-10 increased the carbonyl protein levels. The long-term administration of GNPs-10 increased the TBARS levels, and the carbonyl protein levels were increased by GNPs-30. Acute administration of GNPs-10 and GNPs-30 increased SOD activity. Long-term administration of GNPs-30 increased SOD activity. Acute administration of GNPs-10 decreased the activity of CAT, whereas long-term administration of GNP-10 and GNP-30 altered CAT activity randomly. Our results also demonstrated that acute GNPs-30 administration decreased energy metabolism, especially in the liver and heart. Long-term GNPs-10 administration increased energy metabolism in the liver and decreased energy metabolism in the kidney and heart, whereas long-term GNPs-30 administration increased energy metabolism in the heart. The results of our study are consistent with other studies conducted in our research group and reinforce the fact that GNPs can lead to oxidative damage, which is responsible for DNA damage and alterations in energy metabolism.

  19. Pronounced alterations of cellular metabolism and structure due to hyper- or hypo-osmosis.

    PubMed

    Mao, Lei; Hartl, Daniela; Nolden, Tobias; Koppelstätter, Andrea; Klose, Joachim; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Zabel, Claus

    2008-09-01

    Cell volume alteration represents an important factor contributing to the pathology of late-onset diseases. Previously, it was reported that protein biosynthesis and degradation are inversely (trans) regulated during cell volume regulation. Upon cell shrinkage, protein biosynthesis was up-regulated and protein degradation down-regulated. Cell swelling showed opposite regulation. Recent evidence suggests a decrease of protein biodegradation activity in many neurodegenerative diseases and even during aging; both also show prominent cell shrinkage. To clarify the effect of cell volume regulation on the overall protein turnover dynamics, we investigated mouse embryonic stem cells under hyper- and hypotonic osmotic conditions using a 2-D gel based proteomics approach. These conditions cause cell swelling and shrinkage, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the adaption to altered osmotic conditions and therefore cell volume alterations affects a broad spectrum of cellular pathways, including stress response, cytoskeleton remodeling and importantly, cellular metabolism and protein degradation. Interestingly, protein synthesis and degradation appears to be cis-regulated (same direction) on a global level. Our findings also support the hypothesis that protein alterations due to osmotic stress contribute to the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases due to a 60% expression overlap with proteins found altered in Alzheimer's, Huntington's, or Parkinson's disease. Eighteen percent of the proteins altered are even shared with all three disorders.

  20. Improved growth and stress tolerance in the Arabidopsis oxt1 mutant triggered by altered adenine metabolism.

    PubMed

    Sukrong, Suchada; Yun, Kil-Young; Stadler, Patrizia; Kumar, Charan; Facciuolo, Tony; Moffatt, Barbara A; Falcone, Deane L

    2012-11-01

    Plants perceive and respond to environmental stresses with complex mechanisms that are often associated with the activation of antioxidant defenses. A genetic screen aimed at isolating oxidative stress-tolerant lines of Arabidopsis thaliana has identified oxt1, a line that exhibits improved tolerance to oxidative stress and elevated temperature but displays no apparent deleterious growth effects under non-stress conditions. Oxt1 harbors a mutation that arises from the altered expression of a gene encoding adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APT1), an enzyme that converts adenine to adenosine monophosphate (AMP), indicating a link between purine metabolism, whole-plant growth responses, and stress acclimation. The oxt1 mutation results in decreased APT1 expression that leads to reduced enzymatic activity. Correspondingly, oxt1 plants possess elevated levels of adenine. Decreased APT enzyme activity directly correlates with stress resistance in transgenic lines that ectopically express APT1. The metabolic alteration in oxt1 plants also alters the expression of several antioxidant defense genes and the response of these genes to oxidative challenge. Finally, it is shown that manipulation of adenine levels can induce stress tolerance to wild-type plants. Collectively, these results show that alterations in cellular adenine levels can trigger stress tolerance and improve growth, leading to increases in plant biomass. The results also suggest that adenine might play a part in the signals that modulate responses to abiotic stress and plant growth.

  1. Insulin sensitivity of muscle protein metabolism is altered in patients with chronic kidney disease and metabolic acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Garibotto, Giacomo; Sofia, Antonella; Russo, Rodolfo; Paoletti, Ernesto; Bonanni, Alice; Parodi, Emanuele L; Viazzi, Francesca; Verzola, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    An emergent hypothesis is that a resistance to the anabolic drive by insulin may contribute to loss of strength and muscle mass in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). We tested whether insulin resistance extends to protein metabolism using the forearm perfusion method with arterial insulin infusion in 7 patients with CKD and metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate 19 mmol/l) and 7 control individuals. Forearm glucose balance and protein turnover (2H-phenylalanine kinetics) were measured basally and in response to insulin infused at different rates for 2 h to increase local forearm plasma insulin concentration by approximately 20 and 50 μU/ml. In response to insulin, forearm glucose uptake was significantly increased to a lesser extent (−40%) in patients with CKD than controls. In addition, whereas in the controls net muscle protein balance and protein degradation were decreased by both insulin infusion rates, in patients with CKD net protein balance and protein degradation were sensitive to the high (0.035 mU/kg per min) but not the low (0.01 mU/kg per min) insulin infusion. Besides blunting muscle glucose uptake, CKD and acidosis interfere with the normal suppression of protein degradation in response to a moderate rise in plasma insulin. Thus, alteration of protein metabolism by insulin may lead to changes in body tissue composition which may become clinically evident in conditions characterized by low insulinemia. PMID:26308671

  2. Diminished leptin signaling can alter circadian rhythm of metabolic activity and feeding.

    PubMed

    Hsuchou, Hung; Wang, Yuping; Cornelissen-Guillaume, Germaine G; Kastin, Abba J; Jang, Eunjin; Halberg, Franz; Pan, Weihong

    2013-10-01

    Leptin, a hormone mainly produced by fat cells, shows cell-specific effects to regulate feeding and metabolic activities. We propose that an important feature of metabolic dysregulation resulting in obesity is the loss of the circadian rhythm of biopotentials. This was tested in the pan-leptin receptor knockout (POKO) mice newly generated in our laboratory. In the POKO mice, leptin no longer induced pSTAT-3 signaling after intracerebroventricular injection. Three basic phenotypes were observed: the heterozygotes had similar weight and adiposity as the wild-type (WT) mice (>60% of the mice); the homozygotes were either fatter (∼30%), or rarely leaner (<5%) than the WT mice. By early adulthood, the POKO mice had higher average body weight and adiposity than their respective same-sex WT littermate controls, and this was consistent among different batches. The homozygote fat POKO showed significant reduction of midline estimating statistic of rhythm of circadian parameters, and shifts of ultradian rhythms. The blunted circadian rhythm of these extremely obese POKO mice was also seen in their physical inactivity, longer feeding bouts, and higher food intake. The extent of obesity correlated with the blunted circadian amplitude, accumulative metabolic and locomotor activities, and the severity of hyperphagia. This contrasts with the heterozygote POKO mice which showed little obesity and metabolic disturbance, and only subtle changes of the circadian rhythm of metabolic activity without alterations in feeding behavior. The results provide a novel aspect of leptin resistance, almost manifesting as an "all or none" phenomenon.

  3. Gender- and region-specific alterations in bone metabolism in Scarb1-null female mice.

    PubMed

    Martineau, Corine; Martin-Falstrault, Louise; Brissette, Louise; Moreau, Robert

    2014-08-01

    A positive correlation between plasma levels of HDL and bone mass has been reported by epidemiological studies. As scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), the gene product of Scarb1, is known to regulate HDL metabolism, we recently characterized bone metabolism in Scarb1-null mice. These mice display high femoral bone mass associated with enhanced bone formation. As gender differences have been reported in HDL metabolism and SR-BI function, we investigated gender-specific bone alterations in Scarb1-null mice by microtomography and histology. We found 16% greater relative bone volume and 39% higher bone formation rate in the vertebrae from 2-month-old Scarb1-null females. No such alteration was seen in males, indicating gender- and region-specific differences in skeletal phenotype. Total and HDL-associated cholesterol levels, as well as ACTH plasma levels, were increased in both Scarb1-null genders, the latter being concurrent to impaired corticosterone response to fasting. Plasma levels of estradiol did not differ between null and WT females, suggesting that the estrogen metabolism alteration is not relevant to the higher vertebral bone mass in female Scarb1-null mice. Constitutively, high plasma levels of leptin along with 2.5-fold increase in its expression in white adipose tissue were measured in female Scarb1-null mice only. In vitro exposure of bone marrow stromal cells to ACTH and leptin promoted osteoblast differentiation as evidenced by increased gene expression of osterix and collagen type I alpha. Our results suggest that hyperleptinemia may account for the gender-specific high bone mass seen in the vertebrae of female Scarb1-null mice.

  4. Acute alcohol exposure during mouse gastrulation alters lipid metabolism in placental and heart development: Folate prevention

    PubMed Central

    Han, Mingda

    2016-01-01

    Background Embryonic acute exposure to ethanol (EtOH), lithium, and homocysteine (HCy) induces cardiac defects at the time of exposure; folic acid (FA) supplementation protects normal cardiogenesis (Han et al., 2009, 2012; Serrano et al., 2010). Our hypothesis is that EtOH exposure and FA protection relate to lipid and FA metabolism during mouse cardiogenesis and placentation. Methods On the morning of conception, pregnant C57BL/6J mice were placed on either of two FA‐containing diets: a 3.3 mg health maintenance diet or a high FA diet of 10.5 mg/kg. Mice were injected a binge level of EtOH, HCy, or saline on embryonic day (E) 6.75, targeting gastrulation. On E15.5, cardiac and umbilical blood flow were examined by ultrasound. Embryonic cardiac tissues were processed for gene expression of lipid and FA metabolism; the placenta and heart tissues for neutral lipid droplets, or for medium chain acyl‐dehydrogenase (MCAD) protein. Results EtOH exposure altered lipid‐related gene expression on E7.5 in comparison to control or FA‐supplemented groups and remained altered on E15.5 similarly to changes with HCy, signifying FA deficiency. In comparison to control tissues, the lipid‐related acyl CoA dehydrogenase medium length chain gene and its protein MCAD were altered with EtOH exposure, as were neutral lipid droplet localization in the heart and placenta. Conclusion EtOH altered gene expression associated with lipid and folate metabolism, as well as neutral lipids, in the E15.5 abnormally functioning heart and placenta. In comparison to controls, the high FA diet protected the embryo and placenta from these effects allowing normal development. Birth Defects Research (Part A) 106:749–760, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Birth Defects Research Part A: Clinical and Molecular Teratology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27296863

  5. Acute dim light at night increases body mass, alters metabolism, and shifts core body temperature circadian rhythms.

    PubMed

    Borniger, Jeremy C; Maurya, Santosh K; Periasamy, Muthu; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    The circadian system is primarily entrained by the ambient light environment and is fundamentally linked to metabolism. Mounting evidence suggests a causal relationship among aberrant light exposure, shift work, and metabolic disease. Previous research has demonstrated deleterious metabolic phenotypes elicited by chronic (>4 weeks) exposure to dim light at night (DLAN) (∼ 5 lux). However, the metabolic effects of short-term (<2 weeks) exposure to DLAN are unspecified. We hypothesized that metabolic alterations would arise in response to just 2 weeks of DLAN. Specifically, we predicted that mice exposed to dim light would gain more body mass, alter whole body metabolism, and display altered body temperature (Tb) and activity rhythms compared to mice maintained in dark nights. Our data largely support these predictions; DLAN mice gained significantly more mass, reduced whole body energy expenditure, increased carbohydrate over fat oxidation, and altered temperature circadian rhythms. Importantly, these alterations occurred despite similar activity locomotor levels (and rhythms) and total food intake between groups. Peripheral clocks are potently entrained by body temperature rhythms, and the deregulation of body temperature we observed may contribute to metabolic problems due to "internal desynchrony" between the central circadian oscillator and temperature sensitive peripheral clocks. We conclude that even relatively short-term exposure to low levels of nighttime light can influence metabolism to increase mass gain.

  6. Short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Laureen A; Achterbergh, Roos; de Vries, Emmely M; van Nierop, F Samuel; Klümpen, Heinz-Josef; Soeters, Maarten R; Boelen, Anita; Romijn, Johannes A; Mathôt, Ron A A

    2015-06-01

    Experimental studies indicate that short-term fasting alters drug metabolism. However, the effects of short-term fasting on drug metabolism in humans need further investigation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of short-term fasting (36 h) on P450-mediated drug metabolism. In a randomized crossover study design, nine healthy subjects ingested a cocktail consisting of five P450-specific probe drugs [caffeine (CYP1A2), S-warfarin (CYP2C9), omeprazole (CYP2C19), metoprolol (CYP2D6), and midazolam (CYP3A4)] on two occasions (control study after an overnight fast and after 36 h of fasting). Blood samples were drawn for pharmacokinetic analysis using nonlinear mixed effects modeling. In addition, we studied in Wistar rats the effects of short-term fasting on hepatic mRNA expression of P450 isoforms corresponding with the five studied P450 enzymes in humans. In the healthy subjects, short-term fasting increased oral caffeine clearance by 20% (P = 0.03) and decreased oral S-warfarin clearance by 25% (P < 0.001). In rats, short-term fasting increased mRNA expression of the orthologs of human CYP1A2, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4 (P < 0.05), and decreased the mRNA expression of the ortholog of CYP2C9 (P < 0.001) compared with the postabsorptive state. These results demonstrate that short-term fasting alters cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in a nonuniform pattern. Therefore, short-term fasting is another factor affecting cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism in humans.

  7. Alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation in PPARalpha null mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Gélinas, Roselle; Labarthe, François; Bouchard, Bertrand; Mc Duff, Janie; Charron, Guy; Young, Martin E; Des Rosiers, Christine

    2008-04-01

    Although a shift from fatty acids (FAs) to carbohydrates (CHOs) is considered beneficial for the diseased heart, it is unclear why subjects with FA beta-oxidation defects are prone to cardiac decompensation under stress conditions. The present study investigated potential alterations in the myocardial utilization of CHOs for energy production and anaplerosis in 12-wk-old peroxisome proliferator-activating receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) null mice (a model of FA beta-oxidation defects). Carbon-13 methodology was used to assess substrate flux through energy-yielding pathways in hearts perfused ex vivo at two workloads with a physiological substrate mixture mimicking the fed state, and real-time RT-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to document the expression of selected metabolic genes. When compared with that from control C57BL/6 mice, isolated working hearts from PPARalpha null mice displayed an impaired capacity to withstand a rise in preload (mimicking an increased venous return as it occurs during exercise) as reflected by a 20% decline in the aortic flow rate. At the metabolic level, beyond the expected shift from FA (5-fold down) to CHO (1.5-fold up; P < 0.001) at both preloads, PPARalpha null hearts also displayed 1) a significantly greater contribution of exogenous lactate and glucose and/or glycogen (2-fold up) to endogenous pyruvate formation, whereas that of exogenous pyruvate remained unchanged and 2) marginal alterations in citric acid cycle-related parameters. The lactate production rate was the only measured parameter that was affected differently by preloads in control and PPARalpha null mouse hearts, suggesting a restricted reserve for the latter hearts to enhance glycolysis when the energy demand is increased. Alterations in the expression of some glycolysis-related genes suggest potential mechanisms involved in this defective CHO metabolism. Collectively, our data highlight the importance of metabolic alterations in CHO metabolism

  8. Metabolic and feeding behavior alterations provoked by prenatal exposure to aspartame.

    PubMed

    von Poser Toigo, E; Huffell, A P; Mota, C S; Bertolini, D; Pettenuzzo, L F; Dalmaz, C

    2015-04-01

    The use of artificial sweeteners has increased together with the epidemic growth of obesity. In addition to their widespread use in sodas, artificial sweeteners are added to nearly 6000 other products sold in the US, including baby foods, frozen dinners and even yogurts. It has been suggested that the use of nonnutritive sweeteners can lead to body weight gain and an altered metabolic profile. However, very few studies have evaluated the effects of maternal consumption of artificial non-caloric sweeteners on body weight, feeding behavior or the metabolism of offspring in adult life. In this study, we found that animals exposed to aspartame during the prenatal period presented a higher consumption of sweet foods during adulthood and a greater susceptibility to alterations in metabolic parameters, such as increased glucose, LDL and triglycerides. These effects were observed in both males and females, although they were more pronounced in males. Despite the preliminary nature of this study, and the need for further confirmation of these effects, our data suggest that the consumption of sweeteners during gestation may have deleterious long-term effects and should be used with caution.

  9. Lead (Pb)-inhibited radicle emergence in Brassica campestris involves alterations in starch-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder Pal; Kaur, Gurpreet; Batish, Daizy R; Kohli, Ravinder K

    2011-12-01

    Lead (Pb) is a toxic heavy metal released into the natural environment and known to cause oxidative damage and alter antioxidant mechanism in plants. However, not much is known about the interference of Pb with the biochemical processes and carbohydrate metabolism during seed germination. We, therefore, investigated the effect of Pb (50-500 μM) upon biochemical alterations in germinating seeds (at 24-h stage) of Brassica campestris L. Pb treatment significantly enhanced protein and carbohydrate contents that increased by ~43% and 200%, respectively, at 500-μM Pb over control. In contrast, the activities of starch/carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes--α-amylases, β-amylases, acid invertases, and acid phosphatases--decreased by ~54%, 60%, 74%, and 52%, respectively, over control. Activities of peroxidases and polyphenol oxidases, involved in stress acclimation, however, increased by ~1.2- to 3.9-folds and 0.4- to 1.4-folds upon 50-500-μM Pb treatment. Pb enhanced oxidizing ability by 10 to 16.7 times over control suggesting interference with emerging root's oxidizing capacity. The study concludes that Pb exposure inhibits radicle emergence from B. campestris by interfering with the biochemical processes linked to protein and starch metabolism.

  10. Alteration in metabolism and toxicity of acetaminophen upon repeated administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun J; Lee, Min Y; Kwon, Do Y; Kim, Sung Y; Kim, Young C

    2009-10-01

    Our previous studies showed that administration of a subtoxic dose of acetaminophen (APAP) to female rats increased generation of carbon monoxide from dichloromethane, a metabolic reaction catalyzed mainly by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 2E1. In this study we examined the changes in metabolism and toxicity of APAP upon repeated administration. An intraperitoneal dose of APAP (500 mg/kg) alone did not increase aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, or sorbitol dehydrogenase activity in serum, but was significantly hepatotoxic when the rats had been pretreated with an identical dose of APAP 18 h earlier. The concentrations and disappearance of APAP and its metabolites in plasma were monitored for 8 h after the treatment. APAP pretreatment reduced the elevation of APAP-sulfate, but increased APAP-cysteine concentrations in plasma. APAP or APAP-glucuronide concentrations were not altered. Administration of a single dose of APAP 18 h before sacrifice increased microsomal CYP activities measured with p-nitrophenol, p-nitroanisole, and aminopyrine as probes. Expression of CYP2E1, CYP3A, and CYP1A proteins in the liver was also elevated significantly. The results suggest that administration of APAP at a subtoxic dose may result in an induction of hepatic CYP enzymes, thereby altering metabolism and toxicological consequences of various chemical substances that are substrates for the same enzyme system.

  11. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guoxiang; Zhong, Wei; Li, Houkai; Li, Qiong; Qiu, Yunping; Zheng, Xiaojiao; Chen, Huiyuan; Zhao, Xueqing; Zhang, Shucha; Zhou, Zhanxiang; Zeisel, Steven H.; Jia, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of the bile acid metabolism is limited by the fact that previous analyses have primarily focused on a selected few circulating bile acids; the bile acid profiles of the liver and gastrointestinal tract pools are rarely investigated. Here, we determined how chronic ethanol consumption altered the bile acids in multiple body compartments (liver, gastrointestinal tract, and serum) of rats. Rats were fed a modified Lieber-DeCarli liquid diet with 38% of calories as ethanol (the amount equivalent of 4–5 drinks in humans). While conjugated bile acids predominated in the liver (98.3%), duodenum (97.8%), and ileum (89.7%), unconjugated bile acids comprised the largest proportion of measured bile acids in serum (81.2%), the cecum (97.7%), and the rectum (97.5%). In particular, taurine-conjugated bile acids were significantly decreased in the liver and gastrointestinal tract of ethanol-treated rats, while unconjugated and glycine-conjugated species increased. Ethanol consumption caused increased expression of genes involved in bile acid biosynthesis, efflux transport, and reduced expression of genes regulating bile acid influx transport in the liver. These results provide an improved understanding of the systemic modulations of bile acid metabolism in mammals through the gut-liver axis.—Xie, G., Zhong, W., Li, H., Li, Q., Qiu, Y., Zheng, X., Chen, H., Zhao, X., Zhang, S., Zhou, Z., Zeisel, S. H., Jia, W. Alteration of bile acid metabolism in the rat induced by chronic ethanol consumption. PMID:23709616

  12. Fetal rat metabonome alteration by prenatal caffeine ingestion probably due to the increased circulatory glucocorticoid level and altered peripheral glucose and lipid metabolic pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yansong; Xu, Dan; Feng, Jianghua; Kou, Hao; Liang, Gai; Yu, Hong; He, Xiaohua; Zhang, Baifang; Chen, Liaobin; Magdalou, Jacques; Wang, Hui

    2012-07-15

    The aims of this study were to clarify the metabonome alteration in fetal rats after prenatal caffeine ingestion and to explore the underlying mechanism pertaining to the increased fetal circulatory glucocorticoid (GC). Pregnant Wistar rats were daily intragastrically administered with different doses of caffeine (0, 20, 60 and 180 mg/kg) from gestational days (GD) 11 to 20. Metabonome of fetal plasma and amniotic fluid on GD20 were analyzed by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomics. Gene and protein expressions involved in the GC metabolism, glucose and lipid metabolic pathways in fetal liver and gastrocnemius were measured by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Fetal plasma metabonome were significantly altered by caffeine, which presents as the elevated α- and β‐glucose, reduced multiple lipid contents, varied apolipoprotein contents and increased levels of a number of amino acids. The metabonome of amniotic fluids showed a similar change as that in fetal plasma. Furthermore, the expressions of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD-2) were decreased, while the level of blood GC and the expressions of 11β-HSD-1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) were increased in fetal liver and gastrocnemius. Meanwhile, the expressions of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), IGF-1 receptor and insulin receptor were decreased, while the expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, leptin receptors and AMP-activated protein kinase α2 were increased after caffeine treatment. Prenatal caffeine ingestion characteristically change the fetal metabonome, which is probably attributed to the alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic pathways induced by increased circulatory GC, activated GC metabolism and enhanced GR expression in peripheral metabolic tissues. -- Highlights: ► Prenatal caffeine ingestion altered the metabonome of IUGR fetal rats. ► Caffeine altered the glucose and lipid metabolic pathways of IUGR fetal rats. ► Prenatal caffeine

  13. Meal time shift disturbs circadian rhythmicity along with metabolic and behavioral alterations in mice.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji-Ae; Han, Dong-Hee; Noh, Jong-Yun; Kim, Mi-Hee; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin; Kim, Chang-Ju; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Cho, Sehyung

    2012-01-01

    In modern society, growing numbers of people are engaged in various forms of shift works or trans-meridian travels. Such circadian misalignment is known to disturb endogenous diurnal rhythms, which may lead to harmful physiological consequences including metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and gastric disorders as well as other physical and mental disorders. However, the precise mechanism(s) underlying these changes are yet unclear. The present work, therefore examined the effects of 6 h advance or delay of usual meal time on diurnal rhythmicities in home cage activity (HCA), body temperature (BT), blood metabolic markers, glucose homeostasis, and expression of genes that are involved in cholesterol homeostasis by feeding young adult male mice in a time-restrictive manner. Delay of meal time caused locomotive hyperactivity in a significant portion (42%) of subjects, while 6 h advance caused a torpor-like symptom during the late scotophase. Accordingly, daily rhythms of blood glucose and triglyceride were differentially affected by time-restrictive feeding regimen with concurrent metabolic alterations. Along with these physiological changes, time-restrictive feeding also influenced the circadian expression patterns of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) as well as most LDLR regulatory factors. Strikingly, chronic advance of meal time induced insulin resistance, while chronic delay significantly elevated blood glucose levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that persistent shifts in usual meal time impact the diurnal rhythms of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms in addition to HCA and BT, thereby posing critical implications for the health and diseases of shift workers.

  14. Insulin deficiency alters the metabolic and endocrine responses to undernutrition in fetal sheep near term.

    PubMed

    Fowden, Abigail L; Forhead, Alison J

    2012-08-01

    Insulin deficiency affects the adult metabolic response to undernutrition, but its effects on the fetal response to maternal undernutrition remain unknown. This study examined the effects of maternal fasting for 48 h in late gestation on the metabolism of fetal sheep made insulin deficient by pancreatectomy (PX). The endocrine and metabolic responses to maternal fasting differed between intact, sham-operated and PX fetuses, despite a similar degree of hypoglycemia. Compared with intact fetuses, there was no increase in the plasma concentrations of cortisol or norepinephrine in PX fetuses during maternal fasting. In contrast, there was a significant fasting-induced rise in plasma epinephrine concentrations in PX but not intact fetuses. Umbilical glucose uptake decreased to a similar extent in both groups of fasted animals but was associated with a significant fall in glucose carbon oxidation only in intact fetuses. Pancreatectomized but not intact fetuses lowered their oxygen consumption rate by 15-20% during maternal fasting in association with increased uteroplacental oxygen consumption. Distribution of uterine oxygen uptake between the uteroplacental and fetal tissues therefore differed with fasting only in PX fetuses. Both groups of fetuses produced glucose endogenously after maternal fasting for 48 h, which prevented any significant fall in the rate of fetal glucose utilization. In intact but not PX fetuses, fasting-induced glucogenesis was accompanied by a lower hepatic glycogen content. Chronic insulin deficiency in fetal sheep therefore leads to changes in the counterregulatory endocrine response to hypoglycemia and an altered metabolic strategy in dealing with nutrient restriction in utero.

  15. Metabolic alterations in developing brain after injury – knowns and unknowns

    PubMed Central

    McKenna, Mary C.; Scafidi, Susanna; Robertson, Courtney L.

    2016-01-01

    Brain development is a highly orchestrated complex process. The developing brain utilizes many substrates including glucose, ketone bodies, lactate, fatty acids and amino acids for energy, cell division and the biosynthesis of nucleotides, proteins and lipids. Metabolism is crucial to provide energy for all cellular processes required for brain development and function including ATP formation, synaptogenesis, synthesis, release and uptake of neurotransmitters, maintaining ionic gradients and redox status, and myelination. The rapidly growing population of infants and children with neurodevelopmental and cognitive impairments and life-long disability resulting from developmental brain injury is a significant public health concern. Brain injury in infants and children can have devastating effects because the injury is superimposed on the high metabolic demands of the developing brain. Acute injury in the pediatric brain can derail, halt or lead to dysregulation of the complex and highly regulated normal developmental processes. This paper provides a brief review of metabolism in developing brain and alterations found clinically and in animal models of developmental brain injury. The metabolic changes observed in three major categories of injury that can result in life-long cognitive and neurological disabilities, including neonatal hypoxia-ischemia, pediatric traumatic brain injury, and brain injury secondary to prematurity are reviewed. PMID:26148530

  16. Systems-level metabolism of the altered Schaedler flora, a complete gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Matthew B; Medlock, Gregory L; Moutinho, Thomas J; Lees, Hannah J; Swann, Jonathan R; Kolling, Glynis L; Papin, Jason A

    2017-02-01

    The altered Schaedler flora (ASF) is a model microbial community with both in vivo and in vitro relevance. Here we provide the first characterization of the ASF community in vitro, independent of a murine host. We compared the functional genetic content of the ASF to wild murine metagenomes and found that the ASF functionally represents wild microbiomes better than random consortia of similar taxonomic composition. We developed a chemically defined medium that supported growth of seven of the eight ASF members. To elucidate the metabolic capabilities of these ASF species-including potential for interactions such as cross-feeding-we performed a spent media screen and analyzed the results through dynamic growth measurements and non-targeted metabolic profiling. We found that cross-feeding is relatively rare (32 of 3570 possible cases), but is enriched between Clostridium ASF356 and Parabacteroides ASF519. We identified many cases of emergent metabolism (856 of 3570 possible cases). These data will inform efforts to understand ASF dynamics and spatial distribution in vivo, to design pre- and probiotics that modulate relative abundances of ASF members, and will be essential for validating computational models of ASF metabolism. Well-characterized, experimentally tractable microbial communities enable research that can translate into more effective microbiome-targeted therapies to improve human health.

  17. Do altered energy metabolism or spontaneous locomotion ‘mediate’ decelerated senescence?

    PubMed Central

    Arum, Oge; Dawson, John Alexander; Smith, Daniel Larry; Kopchick, John J; Allison, David B; Bartke, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    That one or multiple measures of metabolic rate may be robustly associated with, or possibly even causative of, the progression of aging-resultant phenotypes such as lifespan is a long-standing, well-known mechanistic hypothesis. To broach this hypothesis, we assessed metabolic function and spontaneous locomotion in two genetic and one dietary mouse models for retarded aging, and subjected the data to mediation analyses to determine whether any metabolic or locomotor trait could be identified as a mediator of the effect of any of the interventions on senescence. We do not test the hypothesis of causality (which would require some experiments), but instead test whether the correlation structure of certain variables is consistent with one possible pathway model in which a proposed mediating variable has a causal role. Results for metabolic measures, including oxygen consumption and respiratory quotient, failed to support this hypothesis; similar negative results were obtained for three behavioral motion metrics. Therefore, our mediation analyses did not find support that any of these correlates of decelerated senescence was a substantial mediator of the effect of either of these genetic alterations (with or without caloric restriction) on longevity. Further studies are needed to relate the examined phenotypic characteristics to mechanisms of aging and control of longevity. PMID:25720347

  18. Metabolic Alterations Contribute to Enhanced Inflammatory Cytokine Production in Irgm1-deficient Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Elyse A; Fee, Brian E; Henry, Stanley C; Nichols, Amanda G; Shinohara, Mari L; Rathmell, Jeffrey C; MacIver, Nancie J; Coers, Jörn; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Koves, Timothy R; Taylor, Gregory A

    2017-03-17

    The immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) are a family of proteins that are induced by interferon (IFN)-γ and play pivotal roles in immune and inflammatory responses. IRGs ostensibly function as dynamin-like proteins that bind to intracellular membranes and promote remodeling and trafficking of those membranes. Prior studies have shown that loss of Irgm1 in mice leads to increased lethality to bacterial infections as well as enhanced inflammation to non-infectious stimuli; however, the mechanisms underlying these phenotypes are unclear. In the studies reported here, we found that uninfected Irgm1-deficient mice displayed high levels of serum cytokines typifying profound autoinflammation. Similar increases in cytokine production were also seen in cultured, IFN-γ-primed macrophages that lacked Irgm1. A series of metabolic studies indicated that the enhanced cytokine production was associated with marked metabolic changes in the Irgm1-deficient macrophages, including increased glycolysis and an accumulation of long chain acylcarnitines. Cells were exposed to the glycolytic inhibitor, 2-deoxyglucose, or fatty acid synthase inhibitors to perturb the metabolic alterations, which resulted in dampening of the excessive cytokine production. These results suggest that Irgm1 deficiency drives metabolic dysfunction in macrophages in a manner that is cell-autonomous and independent of infectious triggers. This may be a significant contributor to excessive inflammation seen in Irgm1-deficient mice in different contexts.

  19. Mycorrhizas alter sucrose and proline metabolism in trifoliate orange exposed to drought stress

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hui-Hui; Zou, Ying-Ning; Rahman, Mohammed Mahabubur; Ni, Qiu-Dan; Wu, Qiang-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can enhance drought tolerance in plants, whereas little is known regarding AMF contribution to sucrose and proline metabolisms under drought stress (DS). In this study, Funneliformis mosseae and Paraglomus occultum were inoculated into trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) under well watered and DS. Although the 71-days DS notably (P < 0.05) inhibited mycorrhizal colonization, AMF seedlings showed significantly (P < 0.05) higher plant growth performance and leaf relative water content, regardless of soil water status. AMF inoculation significantly (P < 0.05) increased leaf sucrose, glucose and fructose concentration under DS, accompanied with a significant increase of leaf sucrose phosphate synthase, neutral invertase, and net activity of sucrose-metabolized enzymes and a decrease in leaf acid invertase and sucrose synthase activity. AMF inoculation produced no change in leaf ornithine-δ-aminotransferase activity, but significantly (P < 0.05) increased leaf proline dehydrogenase activity and significantly (P < 0.05) decreased leaf both Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase and Δ1-pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase activity, resulting in lower proline accumulation in AMF plants under DS. Our results therefore suggest that AMF strongly altered leaf sucrose and proline metabolism through regulating sucrose- and proline-metabolized enzyme activities, which is important for osmotic adjustment of the host plant. PMID:28181575

  20. Respiratory, metabolic and cardiac functions are altered by disinhibition of subregions of the medial prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Sarah F; Cornish, Jennifer L; Goodchild, Ann K

    2013-01-01

    The prefrontal cortex (PFC) is referred to as the visceral motor cortex; however, little is known about whether this region influences respiratory or metabolic outflows. The aim of this study was to describe simultaneous changes in respiratory, metabolic and cardiovascular functions evoked by disinhibition of the medial PFC (mPFC) and adjacent lateral septal nucleus (LSN). In urethane-anaesthetized rats, bicuculline methiodide was microinjected (2 mm; GABA-A receptor antagonist) into 90 sites in the mPFC at 0.72–4.00 mm from bregma. Phrenic nerve amplitude and frequency, arterial pressure, heart rate, splanchnic and lumbar sympathetic nerve activities (SNA), expired CO2, and core and brown adipose tissue temperatures were measured. Novel findings included disturbances to respiratory rhythm evoked from all subregions of the mPFC. Injections into the cingulate cortex evoked reductions in central respiratory function exclusively, whereas in ventral sites, particularly the infralimbic region, increases in respiratory drive and frequency, and metabolic and cardiac outflows were evoked. Disinhibition of sites in surrounding regions revealed that the LSN could evoke cardiovascular changes accompanied by distinct oscillations in SNA, as well as increases in respiratory amplitude. We show that activation of neurons within the mPFC and LSN influence respiratory, metabolic and cardiac outflows in a site-dependent manner. This study has implications with respect to the altered PFC neuronal activity seen in stress-related and mental health disorders, and suggests how basic physiological systems may be affected. PMID:24042503

  1. Systems-level metabolism of the altered Schaedler flora, a complete gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Matthew B; Medlock, Gregory L; Moutinho, Thomas J; Lees, Hannah J; Swann, Jonathan R; Kolling, Glynis L; Papin, Jason A

    2017-01-01

    The altered Schaedler flora (ASF) is a model microbial community with both in vivo and in vitro relevance. Here we provide the first characterization of the ASF community in vitro, independent of a murine host. We compared the functional genetic content of the ASF to wild murine metagenomes and found that the ASF functionally represents wild microbiomes better than random consortia of similar taxonomic composition. We developed a chemically defined medium that supported growth of seven of the eight ASF members. To elucidate the metabolic capabilities of these ASF species—including potential for interactions such as cross-feeding—we performed a spent media screen and analyzed the results through dynamic growth measurements and non-targeted metabolic profiling. We found that cross-feeding is relatively rare (32 of 3570 possible cases), but is enriched between Clostridium ASF356 and Parabacteroides ASF519. We identified many cases of emergent metabolism (856 of 3570 possible cases). These data will inform efforts to understand ASF dynamics and spatial distribution in vivo, to design pre- and probiotics that modulate relative abundances of ASF members, and will be essential for validating computational models of ASF metabolism. Well-characterized, experimentally tractable microbial communities enable research that can translate into more effective microbiome-targeted therapies to improve human health. PMID:27824342

  2. Alteration of Plant Primary Metabolism in Response to Insect Herbivory1

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Shaoqun; Lou, Yann-Ru; Tzin, Vered; Jander, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Plants in nature, which are continuously challenged by diverse insect herbivores, produce constitutive and inducible defenses to reduce insect damage and preserve their own fitness. In addition to inducing pathways that are directly responsible for the production of toxic and deterrent compounds, insect herbivory causes numerous changes in plant primary metabolism. Whereas the functions of defensive metabolites such as alkaloids, terpenes, and glucosinolates have been studied extensively, the fitness benefits of changes in photosynthesis, carbon transport, and nitrogen allocation remain less well understood. Adding to the complexity of the observed responses, the feeding habits of different insect herbivores can significantly influence the induced changes in plant primary metabolism. In this review, we summarize experimental data addressing the significance of insect feeding habits, as related to herbivore-induced changes in plant primary metabolism. Where possible, we link these physiological changes with current understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms. Finally, we discuss the potential fitness benefits that host plants receive from altering their primary metabolism in response to insect herbivory. PMID:26378101

  3. Alterations of bone and mineral metabolism in diabetes mellitus. Part I. An overview.

    PubMed

    Hough, F S

    1987-07-18

    A critical review of the literature leads to the conclusion that alterations of bone and mineral metabolism occur both in diabetic patients and in animals with experimentally induced insulin deficiency syndromes. The coexistence of juvenile insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (type 1) and radiological evidence of decreased bone mass (osteopenia) appears to be firmly established. Available data support the view that these patients have an increased propensity to skeletal fracture. Adult-onset, non-insulin-dependent diabetic populations, more heterogeneous as regards the type of diabetes, the therapy and the presence of complications or coexistent disease, are characterised by subpopulations with either a decreased, a normal or an increased bone mass. The pathogenesis of diabetic osteopenia is multifactorial. Data obtained from studies employing appropriate animal models of chronic insulin deficiency indicate that various metabolic and hormonal abnormalities may be involved.

  4. Pioglitazone in adult rats reverses immediate postnatal overfeeding-induced metabolic, hormonal, and inflammatory alterations.

    PubMed

    Boullu-Ciocca, S; Tassistro, V; Dutour, A; Grino, M

    2015-12-01

    Immediate postnatal overfeeding in rats, obtained by reducing the litter size, results in early-onset obesity. Such experimental paradigm programs overweight, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, increased adipose glucocorticoid metabolism [up-regulation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1)], and overexpression of proinflammatory cytokines in mesenteric adipose tissue (MAT) in adulthood. We studied the effects of pioglitazone, a PPARγ agonist, treatment on the above-mentioned overfeeding-induced alterations. Nine-month-old rats normofed or overfed during the immediate postnatal period were given pioglitazone (3 mg/kg/day) for 6 weeks. Pioglitazone stimulated weight gain and induced a redistribution of adipose tissue toward epididymal location with enhanced plasma adiponectin. Treatment normalized postnatal overfeeding-induced metabolic alterations (increased fasting insulinemia and free fatty acids) and mesenteric overexpression of GR, 11β-HSD11, CD 68, and proinflammatory cytokines mRNAs, including plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1. Mesenteric GR mRNA levels correlated positively with mesenteric proinflammatory cytokines mRNA concentrations. In vitro incubation of MAT obtained from overfed rats demonstrated that pioglitazone induced a down-regulation of GR gene expression and normalized glucocorticoid-induced stimulation of 11β-HSD1 and plasminogen-activator inhibitor type 1 mRNAs. Our data show for the first time that the metabolic, endocrine, and inflammatory alterations induced by early-onset postnatal obesity can be reversed by pioglitazone at the adulthood. They demonstrate that pioglitazone, in addition to its well-established effect on adipose tissue redistribution and adiponectin secretion, reverses programing-induced adipose GR, 11β-HSD1, and proinflammatory cytokines overexpression, possibly through a GR-dependent mechanism.

  5. Metabolomics Reveals Metabolic Alterations by Intrauterine Growth Restriction in the Fetal Rabbit Brain

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Erwin; Eixarch, Elisenda; Illa, Miriam; Arbat-Plana, Ariadna; González-Tendero, Anna; Hogberg, Helena T.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas; Gratacos, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Background Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR) due to placental insufficiency occurs in 5–10% of pregnancies and is a major risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. The perinatal diagnosis of IUGR related abnormal neurodevelopment represents a major challenge in fetal medicine. The development of clinical biomarkers is considered a promising approach, but requires the identification of biochemical/molecular alterations by IUGR in the fetal brain. This targeted metabolomics study in a rabbit IUGR model aimed to obtain mechanistic insight into the effects of IUGR on the fetal brain and identify metabolite candidates for biomarker development. Methodology/Principal Findings At gestation day 25, IUGR was induced in two New Zealand rabbits by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn and the contralateral horn was used as control. At day 30, fetuses were delivered by Cesarian section, weighed and brains collected for metabolomics analysis. Results showed that IUGR fetuses had a significantly lower birth and brain weight compared to controls. Metabolomics analysis using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) and database matching identified 78 metabolites. Comparison of metabolite intensities using a t-test demonstrated that 18 metabolites were significantly different between control and IUGR brain tissue, including neurotransmitters/peptides, amino acids, fatty acids, energy metabolism intermediates and oxidative stress metabolites. Principle component and hierarchical cluster analysis showed cluster formations that clearly separated control from IUGR brain tissue samples, revealing the potential to develop predictive biomarkers. Moreover birth weight and metabolite intensity correlations indicated that the extent of alterations was dependent on the severity of IUGR. Conclusions IUGR leads to metabolic alterations in the fetal rabbit brain, involving neuronal viability, energy metabolism, amino acid levels, fatty

  6. Carbon and Nitrogen Provisions Alter the Metabolic Flux in Developing Soybean Embryos1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Doug K.; Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) seeds store significant amounts of their biomass as protein, levels of which reflect the carbon and nitrogen received by the developing embryo. The relationship between carbon and nitrogen supply during filling and seed composition was examined through a series of embryo-culturing experiments. Three distinct ratios of carbon to nitrogen supply were further explored through metabolic flux analysis. Labeling experiments utilizing [U-13C5]glutamine, [U-13C4]asparagine, and [1,2-13C2]glucose were performed to assess embryo metabolism under altered feeding conditions and to create corresponding flux maps. Additionally, [U-14C12]sucrose, [U-14C6]glucose, [U-14C5]glutamine, and [U-14C4]asparagine were used to monitor differences in carbon allocation. The analyses revealed that: (1) protein concentration as a percentage of total soybean embryo biomass coincided with the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio; (2) altered nitrogen supply did not dramatically impact relative amino acid or storage protein subunit profiles; and (3) glutamine supply contributed 10% to 23% of the carbon for biomass production, including 9% to 19% of carbon to fatty acid biosynthesis and 32% to 46% of carbon to amino acids. Seed metabolism accommodated different levels of protein biosynthesis while maintaining a consistent rate of dry weight accumulation. Flux through ATP-citrate lyase, combined with malic enzyme activity, contributed significantly to acetyl-coenzyme A production. These fluxes changed with plastidic pyruvate kinase to maintain a supply of pyruvate for amino and fatty acids. The flux maps were independently validated by nitrogen balancing and highlight the robustness of primary metabolism. PMID:23314943

  7. Chronic Intake of Japanese Sake Mediates Radiation-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Mouse Liver

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Tetsuo; Vares, Guillaume; Wang, Bing; Nenoi, Mitsuru

    2016-01-01

    Sake is a traditional Japanese alcoholic beverage that is gaining popularity worldwide. Although sake is reported to have beneficial health effects, it is not known whether chronic sake consumption modulates health risks due to radiation exposure or other factors. Here, the effects of chronic administration of sake on radiation-induced metabolic alterations in the livers of mice were evaluated. Sake (junmai-shu) was administered daily to female mice (C3H/He) for one month, and the mice were exposed to fractionated doses of X-rays (0.75 Gy/day) for the last four days of the sake administration period. For comparative analysis, a group of mice were administered 15% (v/v) ethanol in water instead of sake. Metabolites in the liver were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight mass spectrometry one day following the last exposure to radiation. The metabolite profiles of mice chronically administered sake in combination with radiation showed marked changes in purine, pyrimidine, and glutathione (GSH) metabolism, which were only partially altered by radiation or sake administration alone. Notably, the changes in GSH metabolism were not observed in mice treated with radiation following chronic administration of 15% ethanol in water. Changes in several metabolites, including methionine and valine, were induced by radiation alone, but were not detected in the livers of mice who received chronic administration of sake. In addition, the chronic administration of sake increased the level of serum triglycerides, although radiation exposure suppressed this increase. Taken together, the present findings suggest that chronic sake consumption promotes GSH metabolism and anti-oxidative activities in the liver, and thereby may contribute to minimizing the adverse effects associated with radiation. PMID:26752639

  8. The influence of altered gravity on carbohydrate metabolism in excised wheat leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenland, D. M.; Brown, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    We developed a system to study the influence of altered gravity on carbohydrate metabolism in excised wheat leaves by means of clinorotation. The use of excised leaves in our clinostat studies offered a number of advantages over the use of whole plants, most important of which were minimization of exogenous mechanical stress and a greater amount of carbohydrate accumulation during the time of treatment. We found that horizontal clinorotation of excised wheat leaves resulted in significant reductions in the accumulation of fructose, sucrose, starch and fructan relative to control, vertically clinorotated leaves. Photosynthesis, dark respiration and the extractable activities of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27), sucrose phosphate synthase (EC 2.4.4.14), sucrose sucrose fructosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.99), and fructan hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.80) were unchanged due to altered gravity treatment.

  9. Aquatic metabolism response to the hydrologic alteration in the Yellow River estuary, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiaomei; Sun, Tao; Liu, Fangfang; Xu, Jing; Pang, Aiping

    2015-06-01

    Successful artificial hydrologic regulation and environmental flow assessments for the ecosystem protection require an accurate understanding of the linkages between flow events and biotic responses. To explore an ecosystem's functional responses to hydrologic alterations, we analysed spatial and temporal variations in aquatic metabolism and the main factors influenced by artificial hydrologic alterations based on the data collected from 2009 to 2012 in the Yellow River estuary, China. Gross primary production (GPP) ranged from 0.002 to 8.488 mg O2 L-1 d-1. Ecosystem respiration (ER) ranged from 0.382 to 8.968 mg O2 L-1 d-1. Net ecosystem production (NEP) ranged from -5.792 to 7.293 mg O2 L-1 d-1 and the mean of NEP was -0.506 mg O2 L-1 d-1, which means that the trophic status of entire estuary was near to balance. The results showed that seasonal variations in the aquatic metabolism are influenced by the hydrologic alteration in the estuary. High water temperature and solar radiation in summer are associated with low turbidity and consequently high rates of GPP and ER, making the estuary net autotrophic in summer, and that also occurred after water-sediment regulation in August. Turbidity and water temperature were identified as two particularly important factors that influenced the variation in the metabolic balance. As a result, metabolism rate did not decrease but increased after the regulation. ER increased significantly in summer and autumn and reached a maximum after the water-sediment regulation in September. GPP and NEP reached a maximum value after the water-sediment regulation in August, and then decreased in autumn. Estuarine ecosystem shifted from net heterotrophy in spring to net autotrophy in summer, and then to net heterotrophy in autumn. Our study indicated that estuarine metabolism may recover to a high level faster in summer than that in other seasons after the short-term water-sediment regulation due to higher water temperature and nutrients.

  10. Lipid Classes, Fatty Acid Composition, and Glycerolipid Molecular Species of the Red Alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla, a Prostaglandin-Producing Seaweed.

    PubMed

    Honda, Masaki; Ishimaru, Takashi; Itabashi, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    The red alga Gracilaria vermiculophylla is a well-known producer of prostaglandins, such as PGE2 and PGF2α. In this study, the characteristics of glycerolipids as substrates of prostaglandin production were clarified, and the lipid classes, fatty acid composition, and glycerolipid molecular species were investigated in detail. The major lipid classes were monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG), digalactosyldiacylglycerol (DGDG), and sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol (SQDG), as well as phosphatidylcholine (PC), which accounted for 43.0% of the total lipid profile. Arachidonic acid (20:4n-6), a prostaglandin precursor, and palmitic acid (16:0) were the predominant fatty acids in the total lipid profile. The 20:4n-6 content was significantly high in MGDG and PC (more than 60%), and the 16:0 content was significantly high in DGDG and SQDG (more than 50%). Chiral-phase high-performance liquid chromatography determined that fatty acids were esterified at the sn-1 and sn-2 positions of those lipids. The main glycerolipid molecular species were 20:4n-6/20:4n-6 (sn-1/sn-2) for MGDG (56.5%) and PC (40.0%), and 20:4n-6/16:0 for DGDG (75.4%) and SQDG (58.4%). Thus, it was considered that the glycerolipid molecular species containing one or two 20:4n-6 were the major substrates for prostaglandin production in G. vermiculophylla.

  11. Methionine Metabolism Alters Oxidative Stress Resistance via the Pentose Phosphate Pathway.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Nutrient uptake and metabolism have a significant impact on the way cells respond to stress. The amino acid methionine is, in particular, a key player in the oxidative stress response, and acting as a reactive oxygen species scavenger, methionine is implicated in caloric restriction phenotypes and aging. We here provide evidence that some effects of methionine in stress situations are indirect and caused by altered activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) producing oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both methionine prototrophic (MET15) and auxotrophic (met15Δ) cells supplemented with methionine showed an increase in PPP metabolite concentrations downstream of the NADPH producing enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Proteomics revealed this enzyme to also increase in expression compared to methionine self-synthesizing cells. Oxidant tolerance was increased in cells preincubated with methionine; however, this effect was abolished when flux through the oxidative PPP was prevented by deletion of its rate limiting enzyme, ZWF1. Stress resistance phenotypes that follow methionine supplementation hence involve the oxidative PPP. Effects of methionine on oxidative metabolism, stress signaling, and aging have thus to be seen in the context of an altered activity of this NADP reducing pathway.

  12. Altered Dopamine and Serotonin Metabolism in Motorically Asymptomatic R6/2 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mochel, Fanny; Durant, Brandon; Durr, Alexandra; Schiffmann, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    The pattern of cerebral dopamine (DA) abnormalities in Huntington disease (HD) is complex, as reflected by the variable clinical benefit of both DA antagonists and agonists in treating HD symptoms. In addition, little is known about serotonin metabolism despite the early occurrence of anxiety and depression in HD. Post-mortem enzymatic changes are likely to interfere with the in vivo profile of biogenic amines. Hence, in order to reliably characterize the regional and chronological profile of brain neurotransmitters in a HD mouse model, we used a microwave fixation system that preserves in vivo concentrations of dopaminergic and serotoninergic amines. DA was decreased in the striatum of R6/2 mice at 8 and 12 weeks of age while DA metabolites, 3-methoxytyramine and homovanillic acid, were already significantly reduced in 4-week-old motorically asymptomatic R6/2 mice. In the striatum, hippocampus and frontal cortex of 4, 8 and 12-week-old R6/2 mice, serotonin and its metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid were significantly decreased in association with a decreased turnover of serotonin. In addition, automated high-resolution behavioural analyses displayed stress-like behaviours such as jumping and grooming and altered spatial learning in R6/2 mice at age 4 and 6 weeks respectively. Therefore, we describe the earliest alterations of DA and serotonin metabolism in a HD murine model. Our findings likely underpin the neuropsychological symptoms at time of disease onset in HD. PMID:21483838

  13. Altered Hypoxic-Adenosine Axis and Metabolism in Group III Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Morales, Luis J; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Luo, Fayong; Davies, Jonathan; Philip, Kemly; Volcik, Kelly A; Melicoff, Ernestina; Amione-Guerra, Javier; Bunge, Raquel R; Bruckner, Brian A; Loebe, Matthias; Eltzschig, Holger K; Pandit, Lavannya M; Blackburn, Michael R; Karmouty-Quintana, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Group III pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a highly prevalent and deadly lung disorder with limited treatment options other than transplantation. Group III PH affects patients with ongoing chronic lung injury, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Between 30 and 40% of patients with IPF are diagnosed with PH. The diagnosis of PH has devastating consequences to these patients, leading to increased morbidity and mortality, yet the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of PH in patients with chronic lung disease remain elusive. Our hypothesis was that the hypoxic-adenosinergic system is enhanced in patients with group III PH compared with patients with IPF with no PH. Explanted lung tissue was analyzed for markers of the hypoxic-adenosine axis, including expression levels of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1A, adenosine A2B receptor, CD73, and equilibrative nucleotide transporter-1. In addition, we assessed whether altered mitochondrial metabolism was present in these samples. Increased expression of HIF-1A was observed in tissues from patients with group III PH. These changes were consistent with increased evidence of adenosine accumulation in group III PH. A novel observation of our study was of evidence suggesting altered mitochondrial metabolism in lung tissue from group III PH leading to increased succinate levels that are able to further stabilize HIF-1A. Our data demonstrate that the hypoxic-adenosine axis is up-regulated in group III PH and that subsequent succinate accumulation may play a part in the development of group III PH.

  14. Cancer cachexia and diabetes: similarities in metabolic alterations and possible treatment.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Stéphanie; Farsijani, Samaneh

    2014-06-01

    Cancer cachexia is a metabolic syndrome featuring many alterations typical of type 2 diabetes (T2D). While muscle wasting is a hallmark of cachexia, epidemiological evidence also supports an accelerated age-related muscle loss in T2D. Insulin resistance manifests in both conditions and impairs glucose disposal and protein anabolism by tissues. A greater contribution of gluconeogenesis to glucose production may limit amino acid availability for muscle protein synthesis, further aggravating muscle loss. In the context of inter-dependence between glucose and protein metabolism, the present review summarizes the current state of knowledge on alterations that may lead to muscle wasting in human cancer. By highlighting the similarities with T2D, a disease that has been more extensively studied, the objective of this review is to provide a better understanding of the pathophysiology of cancer cachexia and to consider potential treatments usually targeted for T2D. Nutritional approaches aimed at stimulating protein anabolism might include specially formulated food with optimal protein and amino acid composition. Because the gradual muscle loss in T2D may be attenuated by diabetes treatment, anti-diabetic drugs might be considered in cachexia treatment. Metformin emerges as a choice candidate as it acts both on reducing gluconeogenesis and improving insulin sensitivity, and has demonstrated tumour suppressor properties in multiple cancer types. Such a multimodal approach to slow or reverse muscle wasting in cachexia warrants further investigation.

  15. The effect of alterations in total coenzyme A on metabolic pathways in the liver and heart

    SciTech Connect

    Schlosser, C.A.S.

    1989-01-01

    The first set of experiments involved in vitro experiments using primary cultures of rat hepatocytes. A range of conditions were developed which resulted in cell cultures with variations in total CoA over a range of 1.3 to 2.9 nmol/mg protein with identical hormonal activation which simulated metabolic stress. Elevations of total CoA levels above that of controls due to preincubation with cyanamide plus pantothenate were correlated with diminished rates of total ketone body production, 3-hydroxybutyrate production and ratios of 3 hydroxybutyrate/acetoactetate with palmitate as substrate. In contrast, cells with elevated total CoA levels had higher rates of ({sup 14}C) CO{sub 2} production from radioactive palmitate which implied greater flux of acetyl CoA units into the TCA cycle and less to the pathway of ketogenesis. The second set of experiments were designed to alter total CoA levels in vivo by maintaining rats on a chronic ethanol diet with or without pantothenate-supplementation. The effect of alterations of CoA on mitochondrial metabolism was evaluated by measuring substrate oxidation rates in liver and heat mitochondria as well as ketone body production with palmitoyl-1-carnitine as substrate.

  16. Altered metal metabolism in patients with HCV-related cirrhosis and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Marano, Massimo; Vespasiani Gentilucci, Umberto; Altamura, Claudia; Siotto, Mariacristina; Squitti, Rosanna; Bucossi, Serena; Quintiliani, Livia; Migliore, Simone; Greco, Federico; Scarciolla, Laura; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Picardi, Antonio; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2015-12-01

    Dysfunctional metal homeostasis contributes to oxidative stress and neuronal damage. These have been implicated in hepatic encephalopathy pathogenesis. To investigate whether altered metal metabolism is associated with hepatic encephalopathy. Twenty-one controls and 34 HCV-cirrhotic patients (ENC/NEC patients according to presence/absence of previous overt episodes of hepatic encephalopathy) and a control group were studied. Serum iron, copper, ceruloplasmin, ceruloplasmin activity, transferrin, and ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio were determined. Neuropsychological tests were performed by the repeatable battery of neuropsychological status. Magnetic resonance assessed basal ganglia volumes and metal deposition (pallidal index and T2*). Cirrhotic patients performed worse than controls at cognitive tests, especially ENC patients,. At biochemical analysis copper concentrations, ceruloplasmin activity and transferrin levels were lower in ENC than in NEC patients and controls (p < 0.05 and p < 0.01, respectively). Ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio was higher in ENC compared to NEC patients (p < 0.05), and controls (p < 0.01). By brain magnetic resonance, ENC patients showed reduced caudate and globus pallidus volumes compared to controls (p < 0.05), and ENC and NEC patients an increased pallidal index compared to controls (p < 0.01). In ENC patients, ceruloplasmin activity correlated with caudate volume and pallidal index (ρ = 0.773 and ρ = -0.683, p < 0.05). Altered metal metabolism likely contributes to cirrhotic hepatic encephalopathy.

  17. CARD9 impacts colitis by altering gut microbiota metabolism of tryptophan into aryl hydrocarbon receptor ligands.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Bruno; Richard, Mathias L; Leducq, Valentin; Pham, Hang-Phuong; Michel, Marie-Laure; Da Costa, Gregory; Bridonneau, Chantal; Jegou, Sarah; Hoffmann, Thomas W; Natividad, Jane M; Brot, Loic; Taleb, Soraya; Couturier-Maillard, Aurélie; Nion-Larmurier, Isabelle; Merabtene, Fatiha; Seksik, Philippe; Bourrier, Anne; Cosnes, Jacques; Ryffel, Bernhard; Beaugerie, Laurent; Launay, Jean-Marie; Langella, Philippe; Xavier, Ramnik J; Sokol, Harry

    2016-06-01

    Complex interactions between the host and the gut microbiota govern intestinal homeostasis but remain poorly understood. Here we reveal a relationship between gut microbiota and caspase recruitment domain family member 9 (CARD9), a susceptibility gene for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that functions in the immune response against microorganisms. CARD9 promotes recovery from colitis by promoting interleukin (IL)-22 production, and Card9(-/-) mice are more susceptible to colitis. The microbiota is altered in Card9(-/-) mice, and transfer of the microbiota from Card9(-/-) to wild-type, germ-free recipients increases their susceptibility to colitis. The microbiota from Card9(-/-) mice fails to metabolize tryptophan into metabolites that act as aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) ligands. Intestinal inflammation is attenuated after inoculation of mice with three Lactobacillus strains capable of metabolizing tryptophan or by treatment with an AHR agonist. Reduced production of AHR ligands is also observed in the microbiota from individuals with IBD, particularly in those with CARD9 risk alleles associated with IBD. Our findings reveal that host genes affect the composition and function of the gut microbiota, altering the production of microbial metabolites and intestinal inflammation.

  18. Liver disease alters high-density lipoprotein composition, metabolism and function.

    PubMed

    Trieb, Markus; Horvath, Angela; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Spindelboeck, Walter; Stadlbauer, Vanessa; Taschler, Ulrike; Curcic, Sanja; Stauber, Rudolf E; Holzer, Michael; Pasterk, Lisa; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2016-07-01

    High-density lipoproteins (HDL) are important endogenous inhibitors of inflammatory responses. Functional impairment of HDL might contribute to the excess mortality experienced by patients with liver disease, but the effect of cirrhosis on HDL metabolism and function remain elusive. To get an integrated measure of HDL quantity and quality, we assessed several metrics of HDL function using apolipoprotein (apo) B-depleted sera from patients with compensated cirrhosis, patients with acutely decompensated cirrhosis and healthy controls. We observed that sera of cirrhotic patients showed reduced levels of HDL-cholesterol and profoundly suppressed activities of several enzymes involved in HDL maturation and metabolism. Native gel electrophoresis analyses revealed that cirrhotic serum HDL shifts towards the larger HDL2 subclass. Proteomic assessment of isolated HDL identified several proteins, including apoA-I, apoC-III, apoE, paraoxonase 1 and acute phase serum amyloid A to be significantly altered in cirrhotic patients. With regard to function, these alterations in levels, composition and structure of HDL were strongly associated with metrics of function of apoB-depleted sera, including cholesterol efflux capability, paraoxonase activity, the ability to inhibit monocyte production of cytokines and endothelial regenerative activities. Of particular interest, cholesterol efflux capacity appeared to be strongly associated with liver disease mortality. Our findings may be clinically relevant and improve our ability to monitor cirrhotic patients at high risk.

  19. Methionine Metabolism Alters Oxidative Stress Resistance via the Pentose Phosphate Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kate; Vowinckel, Jakob; Keller, Markus A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Nutrient uptake and metabolism have a significant impact on the way cells respond to stress. The amino acid methionine is, in particular, a key player in the oxidative stress response, and acting as a reactive oxygen species scavenger, methionine is implicated in caloric restriction phenotypes and aging. We here provide evidence that some effects of methionine in stress situations are indirect and caused by altered activity of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) producing oxidative part of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both methionine prototrophic (MET15) and auxotrophic (met15Δ) cells supplemented with methionine showed an increase in PPP metabolite concentrations downstream of the NADPH producing enzyme, 6-phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. Proteomics revealed this enzyme to also increase in expression compared to methionine self-synthesizing cells. Oxidant tolerance was increased in cells preincubated with methionine; however, this effect was abolished when flux through the oxidative PPP was prevented by deletion of its rate limiting enzyme, ZWF1. Stress resistance phenotypes that follow methionine supplementation hence involve the oxidative PPP. Effects of methionine on oxidative metabolism, stress signaling, and aging have thus to be seen in the context of an altered activity of this NADP reducing pathway. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 543–547. PMID:26596469

  20. [Alterations of bone metabolism in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1].

    PubMed

    Pater, Agnieszka; Odrowąż-Sypniewska, Grażyna

    2011-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 1 is one of the most common chronic diseases in children and adolescents. The incidence of diabetes mellitus type 1 is increasing rapidly worldwide. Recently, the largest rate of increase is observed in children aged 0-4 years. Chronic hyperglycemia leads to microvascular and macrovascular complications including retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy and cardiomyopathy. Pathological changes occur in the bone structure. The lack of diagnosis and treatment of alterations of the bone tIssue metabolism may lead to osteoporosis, which is characterized by much reduced bone mineral density and changes in the microarchitecture of the bone tIssue, which in consequence results in increased susceptibility to fractures. Diabetes mellitus type 1 most often starts before achieving peak bone mass, which constitutes a point of reference for predicting risk of fractures in a later period of life. Mechanisms responsible for loss of the bone tIssue in diabetes of type 1 still remain unexplained. Many research findings indicate the anabolic role of insulin and insulin-like growth factors, mainly IGF-1. The aim of this manuscript is to review recent papers about alterations of bone metabolism in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1.

  1. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters methyl metabolism and programs serotonin transporter and glucocorticoid receptor expression in brain.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Ying Fai; Sulistyoningrum, Dian C; O'Neill, Ryan; Innis, Sheila M; Weinberg, Joanne; Devlin, Angela M

    2015-09-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) programs the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, resulting in HPA dysregulation and hyperresponsiveness to stressors in adulthood. Molecular mechanisms mediating these alterations are not fully understood. Disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, a source of methyl donors for epigenetic processes, contributes to alcoholic liver disease. We assessed whether PAE affects one-carbon metabolism (including Mtr, Mat2a, Mthfr, and Cbs mRNA) and programming of HPA function genes (Nr3c1, Nr3c2, and Slc6a4) in offspring from ethanol-fed (E), pair-fed (PF), and ad libitum-fed control (C) dams. At gestation day 21, plasma total homocysteine and methionine concentrations were higher in E compared with C dams, and E fetuses had higher plasma methionine concentrations and lower whole brain Mtr and Mat2a mRNA compared with C fetuses. In adulthood (55 days), hippocampal Mtr and Cbs mRNA was lower in E compared with C males, whereas Mtr, Mat2a, Mthfr, and Cbs mRNA were higher in E compared with C females. We found lower Nr3c1 mRNA and lower nerve growth factor inducible protein A (NGFI-A) protein in the hippocampus of E compared with PF females, whereas hippocampal Slc6a4 mRNA was higher in E than C males. By contrast, hypothalamic Slc6a4 mRNA was lower in E males and females compared with C offspring. This was accompanied by higher hypothalamic Slc6a4 mean promoter methylation in E compared with PF females. These findings demonstrate that PAE is associated with alterations in one-carbon metabolism and has long-term and region-specific effects on gene expression in the brain. These findings advance our understanding of mechanisms of HPA dysregulation associated with PAE.

  2. Aluminum stress inhibits root growth and alters physiological and metabolic responses in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.).

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Sharma, Parul

    2014-12-01

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) roots were treated with aluminum (Al3+) in calcium chloride (CaCl2) solution (pH 4.7) and growth responses along with physiological and metabolic changes were investigated. Al3+ treatment for 7d resulted in a dose dependent decline of seed germination and inhibition of root growth. A significant (p ≤ 0.05) decline in fresh and dry biomass were observed after 7d of Al3+ stress.The root growth (length) was inhibited after 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) with respect to control in Al3+ treated roots. The hematoxylin and Evans blue assay indicated significant (p ≤ 0.05) accumulation of Al3+ in the roots and loss of plasma membrane integrity respectively. The time-course evaluation of lipid peroxidation showed increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) after 12, 24 and 48 h of stress imposition. Al3+ treatment did not alter the MDA levels after 2 or 4 h of stress, however, a minor increase was observed after 6 and 10 h of treatment. The proton (1H) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the perchloric acid extracts showed variation in the abundance of metabolites and suggested a major metabolic shift in chickpea root during Al3+ stress. The key differences that were observed include changes in energy metabolites. Accumulation of phenolic compounds suggested its possible role in Al3+ exclusion in roots during stress. The results suggested that Al3+ alters growth pattern in chickpea and induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that causes physiological and metabolic changes.

  3. Prenatal alcohol exposure alters methyl metabolism and programs serotonin transporter and glucocorticoid receptor expression in brain

    PubMed Central

    Ngai, Ying Fai; Sulistyoningrum, Dian C.; O'Neill, Ryan; Innis, Sheila M.; Weinberg, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) programs the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, resulting in HPA dysregulation and hyperresponsiveness to stressors in adulthood. Molecular mechanisms mediating these alterations are not fully understood. Disturbances in one-carbon metabolism, a source of methyl donors for epigenetic processes, contributes to alcoholic liver disease. We assessed whether PAE affects one-carbon metabolism (including Mtr, Mat2a, Mthfr, and Cbs mRNA) and programming of HPA function genes (Nr3c1, Nr3c2, and Slc6a4) in offspring from ethanol-fed (E), pair-fed (PF), and ad libitum-fed control (C) dams. At gestation day 21, plasma total homocysteine and methionine concentrations were higher in E compared with C dams, and E fetuses had higher plasma methionine concentrations and lower whole brain Mtr and Mat2a mRNA compared with C fetuses. In adulthood (55 days), hippocampal Mtr and Cbs mRNA was lower in E compared with C males, whereas Mtr, Mat2a, Mthfr, and Cbs mRNA were higher in E compared with C females. We found lower Nr3c1 mRNA and lower nerve growth factor inducible protein A (NGFI-A) protein in the hippocampus of E compared with PF females, whereas hippocampal Slc6a4 mRNA was higher in E than C males. By contrast, hypothalamic Slc6a4 mRNA was lower in E males and females compared with C offspring. This was accompanied by higher hypothalamic Slc6a4 mean promoter methylation in E compared with PF females. These findings demonstrate that PAE is associated with alterations in one-carbon metabolism and has long-term and region-specific effects on gene expression in the brain. These findings advance our understanding of mechanisms of HPA dysregulation associated with PAE. PMID:26180184

  4. Chronic unpredictive mild stress leads to altered hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hong-mei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Meng; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hong-wu; Ding, Gang; Shang, Hai; Zou, Zhong-mei

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a complex disease characterized by a series of pathological changes. Research on depression is mainly focused on the changes in brain, but not on liver. Therefore, we initially explored the metabolic profiles of hepatic extracts from rats treated with chronic unpredictive mild stress (CUMS) by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS. Using multivariate statistical analysis, a total of 26 altered metabolites distinguishing CUMS-induced depression from normal control were identified. Using two-stage receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, 18 metabolites were recognized as potential biomarkers related to CUMS-induced depression via 12 metabolic pathways. Subsequently, we detected the mRNA expressions levels of apoptosis-associated genes such as Bax and Bcl-2 and four key enzymes including Pla2g15, Pnpla6, Baat and Gad1 involved in phospholipid and primary bile acid biosynthesis in liver tissues of CUMS rats by real-time qRT-PCR assay. The expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, Pla2g15, Pnpla6 and Gad1 mRNA were 1.43,1.68, 1.74, 1.67 and 1.42-fold higher, and those of Baat, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio mRNA were 0.83, 0.85-fold lower in CUMS rats compared with normal control. Results of liver-targeted metabonomics and mRNA expression demonstrated that CUMS-induced depression leads to variations in hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression, and ultimately results in liver injury. PMID:27006086

  5. The Immunosuppressant Mycophenolic Acid Alters Nucleotide and Lipid Metabolism in an Intestinal Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Heischmann, Svenja; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Hansen, Kirk; Leibfritz, Dieter; Christians, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    The study objective was to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the negative effects of mycophenolic acid (MPA) on human intestinal cells. Effects of MPA exposure and guanosine supplementation on nucleotide concentrations in LS180 cells were assessed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Proteomics analysis was carried out using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture combined with gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and lipidome analysis using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Despite supplementation, depletion of guanosine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 and 72 h; 5, 100, and 250 μM MPA) and upregulation of uridine and cytidine nucleotides (p < 0.001 at 24 h; 5 μM MPA) occurred after exposure to MPA. MPA significantly altered 35 proteins mainly related to nucleotide-dependent processes and lipid metabolism. Cross-reference with previous studies of MPA-associated protein changes widely corroborated these results, but showed differences that may be model- and/or method-dependent. MPA exposure increased intracellular concentrations of fatty acids, cholesterol, and phosphatidylcholine (p < 0.01 at 72 h; 100 μM MPA) which corresponded to the changes in lipid-metabolizing proteins. MPA affected intracellular nucleotide levels, nucleotide-dependent processes, expression of structural proteins, fatty acid and lipid metabolism in LS180 cells. These changes may compromise intestinal membrane integrity and contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity. PMID:28327659

  6. Methoxychlor reduces estradiol levels by altering steroidogenesis and metabolism in mouse antral follicles in vitro.

    PubMed

    Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S; Craig, Zelieann R; Hernández-Ochoa, Isabel; Paulose, Tessie; Leslie, Traci C; Flaws, Jodi A

    2011-06-15

    The organochlorine pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is a known endocrine disruptor that affects adult rodent females by causing reduced fertility, persistent estrus, and ovarian atrophy. Since MXC is also known to target antral follicles, the major producer of sex steroids in the ovary, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that MXC decreases estradiol (E₂) levels by altering steroidogenic and metabolic enzymes in the antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mouse ovaries and cultured with either dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or MXC. Follicle growth was measured every 24 h for 96 h. In addition, sex steroid hormone levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes as well as the E₂ metabolic enzyme Cyp1b1 were measured using qPCR. The results indicate that MXC decreased E₂, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone (P₄) levels compared to DMSO. In addition, MXC decreased expression of aromatase (Cyp19a1), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd17b1), 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (Cyp17a1), 3β hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd3b1), cholesterol side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1), steroid acute regulatory protein (Star), and increased expression of Cyp1b1 enzyme levels. Thus, these data suggest that MXC decreases steroidogenic enzyme levels, increases metabolic enzyme expression and this in turn leads to decreased sex steroid hormone levels.

  7. Alteration of growth and metabolic activity of cells in the presence of propranolol and metoprolol.

    PubMed

    Lodowska, Jolanta; Wilczok, Adam; Tam, Irena; Cwalina, Beata; Swiatkowska, Longina; Wilczok, Tadeusz

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms of action at the cellular level of a variety of drugs and xenobiotics may be assessed using Chlorella vulgaris cells. Synchronous culture, which consists of cells at the same phase of development, provides the most convenient model for studying processes at the cellular level. Stability of metabolic activity of synchronously growing cells is achieved by conducting cell culturing under strictly controlled conditions. The aim of the present study was to determine to what extent propranolol and metoprolol alter the Chlorella vulgaris metabolic activity, expressed by the number of progeny cells, the culture absorbance at lambda = 680 nm and the amount of selected photosynthetic pigments (chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b, antheraxanthin, lutein, violaxanthin and beta-carotene). Three different concentrations (10(-4), 10(-5) and 10(-6) M) of propranolol and metoprolol were administered to the Chlorella vulgaris cultures. It has been demonstrated that the higher the propranolol and metoprolol concentrations (from 10(-6) M to 10(-4) M) the lower the number of progeny cells in the cultures, expressed by the lower values of division coefficient. Both the propranolol and metoprolol caused a decrease in the photosynthetic pigments production in the mother cells. This effect was more important in the propranolol-treated cultures. The higher values of photosynthetic pigments concentrations in the progeny cells grown under the presence of a drug indicate that both the drugs tested influence mainly the cell growth and in a lower manner--their metabolic activity, expressed by the production of photosynthetic pigments.

  8. Insulin resistance is associated with altered amino acid metabolism and adipose tissue dysfunction in normoglycemic women

    PubMed Central

    Wiklund, Petri; Zhang, Xiaobo; Pekkala, Satu; Autio, Reija; Kong, Lingjia; Yang, Yifan; Keinänen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Alen, Markku; Cheng, Sulin

    2016-01-01

    Insulin resistance is associated adiposity, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to identify early metabolic alterations associated with insulin resistance in normoglycemic women with varying degree of adiposity. One-hundred and ten young and middle-aged women were divided into low and high IR groups based on their median HOMA-IR (0.9 ± 0.4 vs. 2.8 ± 1.2). Body composition was assessed using DXA, skeletal muscle and liver fat by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, serum metabolites by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and adipose tissue and skeletal muscle gene expression by microarrays. High HOMA-IR subjects had higher serum branched-chain amino acid concentrations (BCAA) (p < 0.05 for both). Gene expression analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue revealed significant down-regulation of genes related to BCAA catabolism and mitochondrial energy metabolism and up-regulation of several inflammation-related pathways in high HOMA-IR subjects (p < 0.05 for all), but no differentially expressed genes in skeletal muscle were found. In conclusion, in normoglycemic women insulin resistance was associated with increased serum BCAA concentrations, down-regulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism and increased expression of inflammation-related genes in the adipose tissue. PMID:27080554

  9. Chronic social stress in puberty alters appetitive male sexual behavior and neural metabolic activity.

    PubMed

    Bastida, Christel C; Puga, Frank; Gonzalez-Lima, Francisco; Jennings, Kimberly J; Wommack, Joel C; Delville, Yvon

    2014-07-01

    Repeated social subjugation in early puberty lowers testosterone levels. We used hamsters to investigate the effects of social subjugation on male sexual behavior and metabolic activity within neural systems controlling social and motivational behaviors. Subjugated animals were exposed daily to aggressive adult males in early puberty for postnatal days 28 to 42, while control animals were placed in empty clean cages. On postnatal day 45, they were tested for male sexual behavior in the presence of receptive female. Alternatively, they were tested for mate choice after placement at the base of a Y-maze containing a sexually receptive female in one tip of the maze and an ovariectomized one on the other. Social subjugation did not affect the capacity to mate with receptive females. Although control animals were fast to approach females and preferred ovariectomized individuals, subjugated animals stayed away from them and showed no preference. Cytochrome oxidase activity was reduced within the preoptic area and ventral tegmental area in subjugated hamsters. In addition, the correlation of metabolic activity of these areas with the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and anterior parietal cortex changed significantly from positive in controls to negative in subjugated animals. These data show that at mid-puberty, while male hamsters are capable of mating, their appetitive sexual behavior is not fully mature and this aspect of male sexual behavior is responsive to social subjugation. Furthermore, metabolic activity and coordination of activity in brain areas related to sexual behavior and motivation were altered by social subjugation.

  10. Glucose metabolism during fasting is altered in experimental porphobilinogen deaminase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Collantes, María; Serrano-Mendioroz, Irantzu; Benito, Marina; Molinet-Dronda, Francisco; Delgado, Mercedes; Vinaixa, María; Sampedro, Ana; Enríquez de Salamanca, Rafael; Prieto, Elena; Pozo, Miguel A; Peñuelas, Iván; Corrales, Fernando J; Barajas, Miguel; Fontanellas, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    Porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) haploinsufficiency (acute intermittent porphyria, AIP) is characterized by neurovisceral attacks when hepatic heme synthesis is activated by endogenous or environmental factors including fasting. While the molecular mechanisms underlying the nutritional regulation of hepatic heme synthesis have been described, glucose homeostasis during fasting is poorly understood in porphyria. Our study aimed to analyse glucose homeostasis and hepatic carbohydrate metabolism during fasting in PBGD-deficient mice. To determine the contribution of hepatic PBGD deficiency to carbohydrate metabolism, AIP mice injected with a PBGD-liver gene delivery vector were included. After a 14 h fasting period, serum and liver metabolomics analyses showed that wild-type mice stimulated hepatic glycogen degradation to maintain glucose homeostasis while AIP livers activated gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis due to their inability to use stored glycogen. The serum of fasted AIP mice showed increased concentrations of insulin and reduced glucagon levels. Specific over-expression of the PBGD protein in the liver tended to normalize circulating insulin and glucagon levels, stimulated hepatic glycogen catabolism and blocked ketone body production. Reduced glucose uptake was observed in the primary somatosensorial brain cortex of fasted AIP mice, which could be reversed by PBGD-liver gene delivery. In conclusion, AIP mice showed a different response to fasting as measured by altered carbohydrate metabolism in the liver and modified glucose consumption in the brain cortex. Glucose homeostasis in fasted AIP mice was efficiently normalized after restoration of PBGD gene expression in the liver.

  11. NF-Y activates genes of metabolic pathways altered in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Benatti, Paolo; Chiaramonte, Maria Luisa; Lorenzo, Mariangela; Hartley, John A.; Hochhauser, Daniel; Gnesutta, Nerina; Mantovani, Roberto; Imbriano, Carol; Dolfini, Diletta

    2016-01-01

    The trimeric transcription factor NF-Y binds to the CCAAT box, an element enriched in promoters of genes overexpressed in tumors. Previous studies on the NF-Y regulome identified the general term metabolism as significantly enriched. We dissect here in detail the targeting of metabolic genes by integrating analysis of NF-Y genomic binding and profilings after inactivation of NF-Y subunits in different cell types. NF-Y controls de novo biosynthetic pathways of lipids, teaming up with the master SREBPs regulators. It activates glycolytic genes, but, surprisingly, is neutral or represses mitochondrial respiratory genes. NF-Y targets the SOCG (Serine, One Carbon, Glycine) and Glutamine pathways, as well as genes involved in the biosynthesis of polyamines and purines. Specific cancer-driving nodes are generally under NF-Y control. Altogether, these data delineate a coherent strategy to promote expression of metabolic genes fuelling anaerobic energy production and other anabolic pathways commonly altered in cancer cells. PMID:26646448

  12. Short-term cigarette smoke exposure leads to metabolic alterations in lung alveolar cells.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Amit R; Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2014-08-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS)-induced alveolar destruction and energy metabolism changes are known contributors to the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This study examines the effect of CS exposure on metabolism in alveolar type II cells. Male A/J mice (8 wk old) were exposed to CS generated from a smoking machine for 4 or 8 weeks, and a recovery group was exposed to CS for 8 weeks and allowed to recover for 2 weeks. Alveolar type II cells were isolated from air- or CS- exposed mice. Acute CS exposure led to a reversible airspace enlargement in A/J mice as measured by the increase in mean linear intercept, indicative of alveolar destruction. The effect of CS exposure on cellular respiration was studied using the XF Extracellular Flux Analyzer. A decrease in respiration while metabolizing glucose was observed in the CS-exposed group, indicating altered glycolysis that was compensated by an increase in palmitate utilization; palmitate utilization was accompanied by an increase in the expression of CD36 and carnitine-palmitoyl transferase 1 in type II alveolar cells for the transport of palmitate into the cells and into mitochondria, respectively. The increase in palmitate use for energy production likely affects the surfactant biosynthesis pathway, as evidenced by the decrease in phosphatidylcholine levels and the increase in phospholipase A2 activity after CS exposure. These findings help our understanding of the mechanism underlying the surfactant deficiency observed in smokers and provide a target to delay the onset of COPD.

  13. Altered cerebral glucose metabolism in an animal model of diabetes insipidus: a micro-PET study.

    PubMed

    Idbaih, Ahmed; Burlet, Arlette; Adle-Biassette, Homa; Boisgard, Raphaël; Coulon, Christine; Paris, Sophie; Marie, Yannick; Donadieu, Jean; Hoang-Xuan, Khê; Ribeiro, Maria-Joao

    2007-07-16

    The Brattleboro rat is an animal model of genetically induced central diabetes insipidus. These rats show cognitive and behavioral disorders, but no neurodegenerative disease has been observed. We studied brain glucose uptake, a marker of neuronal activity, in 6 Brattleboro rats, in comparison with 6 matched Long-Evans (LE) control rats. A group of 3 Brattleboro rats and 3 Long-Evans rats was studied in vivo and another group of animals was studied ex vivo. In vivo studies were performed using fluorodeoxyglucose labeled with fluorine 18 ((18)F-FDG) and a dedicated small-animal PET device. At 30 min and 60 min p.i., (18)F-FDG uptake was significantly higher in the frontal cortex, striatum, thalamus and cerebellum of Brattleboro rats than in LE rats when measured by PET in vivo (p<0.05), but only a trend towards higher values was found ex vivo. Our results show for the first time that brain glucose metabolism is modified in Brattleboro rats. This altered brain glucose metabolism in Brattleboro rats may be related to the observed cognitive and behavioral disorders. Functional analyses of brain metabolism are promising to investigate cognitive behavioral disturbances observed in Brattleboro rats and their link to diabetes insipidus.

  14. Chronic unpredictive mild stress leads to altered hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hong-Mei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Chao; Yu, Meng; Yang, Yong; Zhang, Hong-Wu; Ding, Gang; Shang, Hai; Zou, Zhong-Mei

    2016-03-23

    Depression is a complex disease characterized by a series of pathological changes. Research on depression is mainly focused on the changes in brain, but not on liver. Therefore, we initially explored the metabolic profiles of hepatic extracts from rats treated with chronic unpredictive mild stress (CUMS) by UPLC-Q-TOF/MS. Using multivariate statistical analysis, a total of 26 altered metabolites distinguishing CUMS-induced depression from normal control were identified. Using two-stage receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, 18 metabolites were recognized as potential biomarkers related to CUMS-induced depression via 12 metabolic pathways. Subsequently, we detected the mRNA expressions levels of apoptosis-associated genes such as Bax and Bcl-2 and four key enzymes including Pla2g15, Pnpla6, Baat and Gad1 involved in phospholipid and primary bile acid biosynthesis in liver tissues of CUMS rats by real-time qRT-PCR assay. The expression levels of Bax, Bcl-2, Pla2g15, Pnpla6 and Gad1 mRNA were 1.43,1.68, 1.74, 1.67 and 1.42-fold higher, and those of Baat, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio mRNA were 0.83, 0.85-fold lower in CUMS rats compared with normal control. Results of liver-targeted metabonomics and mRNA expression demonstrated that CUMS-induced depression leads to variations in hepatic metabolic profile and gene expression, and ultimately results in liver injury.

  15. Genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with an altered redox metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bro, Christoffer; Regenberg, Birgitte; Nielsen, Jens

    2004-02-05

    The genome-wide transcriptional response of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain deleted in GDH1 that encodes a NADP(+)-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase was compared to a wild-type strain under anaerobic steady-state conditions. The GDH1-deleted strain has a significantly reduced NADPH requirement, and therefore, an altered redox metabolism. Identification of genes with significantly changed expression using a t-test and a Bonferroni correction yielded only 16 transcripts when accepting two false-positives, and 7 of these were Open Reading Frames (ORFs) with unknown function. Among the 16 transcripts the only one with a direct link to redox metabolism was GND1, encoding phosphogluconate dehydrogenase. To extract additional information we analyzed the transcription data for a gene subset consisting of all known genes encoding metabolic enzymes that use NAD(+) or NADP(+). The subset was analyzed for genes with significantly changed expression again with a t-test and correction for multiple testing. This approach was found to enrich the analysis since GND1, ZWF1 and ALD6, encoding the most important enzymes for regeneration of NADPH under anaerobic conditions, were down-regulated together with eight other genes encoding NADP(H)-dependent enzymes. This indicates a possible common redox-dependent regulation of these genes. Furthermore, we showed that it might be necessary to analyze the expression of a subset of genes to extract all available information from global transcription analysis.

  16. Dose-Dependent Metabolic Alterations in Human Cells Exposed to Gamma Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Yong-Kook; Ha, In Jin; Bae, Hyun-Whee; Jang, Won Gyo; Yun, Hyun Jin; Kim, So Ra; Lee, Eun Kyeong; Kang, Chang-Mo; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Radiation exposure is a threat to public health because it causes many diseases, such as cancers and birth defects, due to genetic modification of cells. Compared with the past, a greater number of people are more frequently exposed to higher levels of radioactivity today, not least due to the increased use of diagnostic and therapeutic radiation-emitting devices. In this study, ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS)-based metabolic profiling was used to investigate radiation- induced metabolic changes in human fibroblasts. After exposure to 1 and 5 Gy of γ-radiation, the irradiated fibroblasts were harvested at 24, 48, and 72 h and subjected to global metabolite profiling analysis. Mass spectral peaks of cell extracts were analyzed by pattern recognition using principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). The results showed that the cells irradiated with 1 Gy returned to control levels at 72 h post radiation, whereas cells irradiated with 5 Gy were quite unlike the controls; therefore, cells irradiated with 1 Gy had recovered, whereas those irradiated with 5 Gy had not. Lipid and amino acid levels increased after the higher-level radiation, indicating degradation of membranes and proteins. These results suggest that MS-based metabolite profiling of γ-radiation-exposed human cells provides insight into the global metabolic alterations in these cells. PMID:25419661

  17. Oxygen exchange and energy metabolism in erythrocytes of Rett syndrome and their relationships with respiratory alterations.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Chiara; Di Pierro, Donato; Sbardella, Diego; Tundo, Grazia Raffaella; Curatolo, Paolo; Galasso, Cinzia; Santarone, Marta Elena; Casasco, Maurizio; Cozza, Paola; Cortelazzo, Alessio; Rossi, Marcello; De Felice, Claudio; Hayek, Joussef; Coletta, Massimo; Marini, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder, mainly affecting females, which is associated to a mutation on the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene. In the pathogenesis and progression of classic RTT, red blood cell (RBC) morphology has been shown to be an important biosensor for redox imbalance and chronic hypoxemia. Here we have evaluated the impact of oxidation and redox imbalance on several functional properties of RTT erythrocytes. In particular, we report for the first time a stopped-flow measurement of the kinetics of oxygen release by RBCs and the analysis of the intrinsic affinity of the hemoglobin (Hb). According to our experimental approach, RBCs from RTT patients do not show any intrinsic difference with respect to those from healthy controls neither in Hb's oxygen-binding affinity nor in O2 exchange processes at 37 °C. Therefore, these factors do not contribute to the observed alteration of the respiratory function in RTT patients. Moreover, the energy metabolism of RBCs, from both RTT patients and controls, was evaluated by ion-pairing HPLC method and related to the level of malondialdehyde and to the oxidative radical scavenging capacity of red cells. Results have clearly confirmed significant alterations in antioxidant defense capability, adding important informations concerning the high-energy compound levels in RBCs of RTT subjects, underlying possible correlations with inflammatory tissue alterations.

  18. The glycerolipid receptor for Helicobacter pylori (and exoenzyme S) is phosphatidylethanolamine.

    PubMed Central

    Lingwood, C A; Huesca, M; Kuksis, A

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that Helicobacter pylori specifically binds to a glycerolipid species preferentially found in the antrum of the human stomach. We now show by high-pressure liquid chromatographic analysis that this species is a form of phosphatidylethanolamine and that H. pylori specifically binds to bona fide phosphatidylethanolamine as detected by a thin-layer chromatogram overlay procedure. Considerable variation in the binding of H. pylori to phosphatidylethanolamine from different sources was observed, however, suggesting the importance of the nature of the long-chain hydrophobic moiety. A similar binding specificity was shown by exoenzyme S from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, consistent with our hypothesis that that an exoenzyme S-like adhesin is responsible for the binding of H. pylori to its lipid receptors. Images PMID:1587616

  19. Glycerolipid biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: sn-glycerol-3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate acyltransferase activities.

    PubMed Central

    Schlossman, D M; Bell, R M

    1978-01-01

    Yeast acyl-coenzyme A:dihydroxyacetone-phosphate O-acyltransferase (DHAP acyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.42) was investigated to (i) determine whether its activity and that of acyl-coenzyme A:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase (glycerol-P acyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.15) represent dual catalytic functions of a single membranous enzyme, (ii) estimate the relative contributions of the glycerol-P and DHAP pathways for yeast glycerolipid synthesis, and (iii) evaluate the suitability of yeast for future genetic investigations of the eucaryotic glycerol-P and DHAP acyltransferase activities. The membranous DHAP acyltransferase activity showed an apparent Km of 0.79 mM for DHAP, with a Vmax of 5.3 nmol/min per mg, whereas the glycerol-P acyltransferase activity showed an apparent Km of 0.05 mM for glycerol-P, with a Vmax of 3.4 nmol/min per mg. Glycerol-P was a competitive inhibitor (Ki, 0.07 mM) of the DHAP acyltransferase activity, and DHAP was a competitive inhibitor (Ki, 0.91 mM) of the glycerol-P acyltransferase activity. The two acyltransferase activities exhibited marked similarities in their pH dependence, acyl-coenzyme A chain length preference and substrate concentration dependencies, thermolability, and patterns of inactivation by N-ethylmaleimide, trypsin, and detergents. Thus, the data strongly suggest that yeast glycerol-P and DHAP acyltransferase activities represent dual catalytic functions of a single membrane-bound enzyme. Furthermore, since no acyl-DHAP oxidoreductase activity could be detected in yeast membranes, the DHAP pathway for glycerolipid synthesis may not operate in yeast. PMID:25265

  20. Methylglyoxal alters glucose metabolism and increases AGEs content in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Fernanda; de Souza, Daniela Fraga; Silveira, Simone da Luz; Hoefel, Ana Lúcia; Fontoura, Júlia Bijoldo; Tramontina, Ana Carolina; Bobermin, Larissa Daniele; Leite, Marina Concli; Perry, Marcos Luiz Santos; Gonçalves, Carlos Alberto

    2012-12-01

    Methylglyoxal is a dicarbonyl compound that is physiologically produced by enzymatic and non-enzymatic reactions. It can lead to cytotoxicity, which is mainly related to Advanced Glycation End Products (AGEs) formation. Methylglyoxal and AGEs are involved in the pathogenesis of Neurodegenerative Diseases (ND) and, in these situations, can cause the impairment of energetic metabolism. Astroglial cells play critical roles in brain metabolism and the appropriate functioning of astrocytes is essential for the survival and function of neurons. However, there are only a few studies evaluating the effect of methylglyoxal on astroglial cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of methylglyoxal exposure, over short (1 and 3 h) and long term (24 h) periods, on glucose, glycine and lactate metabolism in C6 glioma cells, as well as investigate the glyoxalase system and AGEs formation. Glucose uptake and glucose oxidation to CO(2) increased in 1 h and the conversion of glucose to lipids increased at 3 h. In addition, glycine oxidation to CO(2) and conversion of glycine to lipids increased at 1 h, whereas the incorporation of glycine in proteins decreased at 1 and 3 h. Methylglyoxal decreased glyoxalase I and II activities and increased AGEs content within 24 h. Lactate oxidation and lactate levels were not modified by methylglyoxal exposure. These data provide evidence that methylglyoxal may impair glucose metabolism and can affect glyoxalase activity. In periods of increased methylglyoxal exposure, such alterations could be exacerbated, leading to further increases in intracellular methylglyoxal and AGEs, and therefore triggering and/or worsening ND.

  1. Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Ivy N.; Zee, Phyllis C.; Shalman, Dov; Malkani, Roneil G.; Kang, Joseph; Reid, Kathryn J.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (<20lux). Participants were randomized to 3 hours of blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism. PMID:27191727

  2. Morning and Evening Blue-Enriched Light Exposure Alters Metabolic Function in Normal Weight Adults.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ivy N; Zee, Phyllis C; Shalman, Dov; Malkani, Roneil G; Kang, Joseph; Reid, Kathryn J

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence points to associations between light-dark exposure patterns, feeding behavior, and metabolism. This study aimed to determine the acute effects of 3 hours of morning versus evening blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light on hunger, metabolic function, and physiological arousal. Nineteen healthy adults completed this 4-day inpatient protocol under dim light conditions (<20lux). Participants were randomized to 3 hours of blue-enriched light exposure on Day 3 starting either 0.5 hours after wake (n = 9; morning group) or 10.5 hours after wake (n = 10; evening group). All participants remained in dim light on Day 2 to serve as their baseline. Subjective hunger and sleepiness scales were collected hourly. Blood was sampled at 30-minute intervals for 4 hours in association with the light exposure period for glucose, insulin, cortisol, leptin, and ghrelin. Homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and area under the curve (AUC) for insulin, glucose, HOMA-IR and cortisol were calculated. Comparisons relative to baseline were done using t-tests and repeated measures ANOVAs. In both the morning and evening groups, insulin total area, HOMA-IR, and HOMA-IR AUC were increased and subjective sleepiness was reduced with blue-enriched light compared to dim light. The evening group, but not the morning group, had significantly higher glucose peak value during blue-enriched light exposure compared to dim light. There were no other significant differences between the morning or the evening groups in response to blue-enriched light exposure. Blue-enriched light exposure acutely alters glucose metabolism and sleepiness, however the mechanisms behind this relationship and its impacts on hunger and appetite regulation remain unclear. These results provide further support for a role of environmental light exposure in the regulation of metabolism.

  3. Untargeted Metabolomics Reveals Predominant Alterations in Lipid Metabolism Following Light Exposure in Broccoli Sprouts

    PubMed Central

    Maldini, Mariateresa; Natella, Fausta; Baima, Simona; Morelli, Giorgio; Scaccini, Cristina; Langridge, James; Astarita, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The consumption of vegetables belonging to the family Brassicaceae (e.g., broccoli and cauliflower) is linked to a reduced incidence of cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The molecular composition of such plants is strongly affected by growing conditions. Here we developed an unbiased metabolomics approach to investigate the effect of light and dark exposure on the metabolome of broccoli sprouts and we applied such an approach to provide a bird’s-eye view of the overall metabolic response after light exposure. Broccoli seeds were germinated and grown hydroponically for five days in total darkness or with a light/dark photoperiod (16 h light/8 h dark cycle). We used an ultra-performance liquid-chromatography system coupled to an ion-mobility, time-of-flight mass spectrometer to profile the large array of metabolites present in the sprouts. Differences at the metabolite level between groups were analyzed using multivariate statistical analyses, including principal component analysis and correlation analysis. Altered metabolites were identified by searching publicly available and in-house databases. Metabolite pathway analyses were used to support the identification of subtle but significant changes among groups of related metabolites that may have gone unnoticed with conventional approaches. Besides the chlorophyll pathway, light exposure activated the biosynthesis and metabolism of sterol lipids, prenol lipids, and polyunsaturated lipids, which are essential for the photosynthetic machinery. Our results also revealed that light exposure increased the levels of polyketides, including flavonoids, and oxylipins, which play essential roles in the plant’s developmental processes and defense mechanism against herbivores. This study highlights the significant contribution of light exposure to the ultimate metabolic phenotype, which might affect the cellular physiology and nutritional value of broccoli sprouts. Furthermore, this study highlights the potential of an

  4. Methoxychlor reduces estradiol levels by altering steroidogenesis and metabolism in mouse antral follicles in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Basavarajappa, Mallikarjuna S. Craig, Zelieann R. Hernandez-Ochoa, Isabel Paulose, Tessie Leslie, Traci C. Flaws, Jodi A.

    2011-06-15

    The organochlorine pesticide methoxychlor (MXC) is a known endocrine disruptor that affects adult rodent females by causing reduced fertility, persistent estrus, and ovarian atrophy. Since MXC is also known to target antral follicles, the major producer of sex steroids in the ovary, the present study was designed to test the hypothesis that MXC decreases estradiol (E{sub 2}) levels by altering steroidogenic and metabolic enzymes in the antral follicles. To test this hypothesis, antral follicles were isolated from CD-1 mouse ovaries and cultured with either dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or MXC. Follicle growth was measured every 24 h for 96 h. In addition, sex steroid hormone levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and mRNA expression levels of steroidogenic enzymes as well as the E{sub 2} metabolic enzyme Cyp1b1 were measured using qPCR. The results indicate that MXC decreased E{sub 2}, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone (P{sub 4}) levels compared to DMSO. In addition, MXC decreased expression of aromatase (Cyp19a1), 17{beta}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd17b1), 17{alpha}-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (Cyp17a1), 3{beta} hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 (Hsd3b1), cholesterol side-chain cleavage (Cyp11a1), steroid acute regulatory protein (Star), and increased expression of Cyp1b1 enzyme levels. Thus, these data suggest that MXC decreases steroidogenic enzyme levels, increases metabolic enzyme expression and this in turn leads to decreased sex steroid hormone levels. - Highlights: > MXC inhibits steroidogenesis > MXC inhibits steroidogenic enzymes > MXC induces metabolic enzymes

  5. Nighttime feeding likely alters morning metabolism but not exercise performance in female athletes.

    PubMed

    Ormsbee, Michael J; Gorman, Katherine A; Miller, Elizabeth A; Baur, Daniel A; Eckel, Lisa A; Contreras, Robert J; Panton, Lynn B; Spicer, Maria T

    2016-07-01

    The timing of morning endurance competition may limit proper pre-race fueling and resulting performance. A nighttime, pre-sleep nutritional strategy could be an alternative method to target the metabolic and hydrating needs of the early morning athlete without compromising sleep or gastrointestinal comfort during exercise. Therefore, the purpose of this investigation was to examine the acute effects of pre-sleep chocolate milk (CM) ingestion on next-morning running performance, metabolism, and hydration status. Twelve competitive female runners and triathletes (age, 30 ± 7 years; peak oxygen consumption, 53 ± 4 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) randomly ingested either pre-sleep CM or non-nutritive placebo (PL) ∼30 min before sleep and 7-9 h before a morning exercise trial. Resting metabolic rate (RMR) was assessed prior to exercise. The exercise trial included a warm-up, three 5-min incremental workloads at 55%, 65%, and 75% peak oxygen consumption, and a 10-km treadmill time trial (TT). Physiological responses were assessed prior, during (incremental and TT), and postexercise. Paired t tests and magnitude-based inferences were used to determine treatment differences. TT performances were not different ("most likely trivial" improvement with CM) between conditions (PL: 52.8 ± 8.4 min vs CM: 52.8 ± 8.0 min). RMR was "likely" increased (4.8%) and total carbohydrate oxidation (g·min(-1)) during exercise was "possibly" or likely increased (18.8%, 10.1%, 9.1% for stage 1-3, respectively) with CM versus PL. There were no consistent changes to hydration indices. In conclusion, pre-sleep CM may alter next-morning resting and exercise metabolism to favor carbohydrate oxidation, but effects did not translate to 10-km running performance improvements.

  6. Meal Time Shift Disturbs Circadian Rhythmicity along with Metabolic and Behavioral Alterations in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Jong-Yun; Kim, Mi-Hee; Son, Gi Hoon; Kim, Kyungjin; Kim, Chang-Ju; Pak, Youngmi Kim; Cho, Sehyung

    2012-01-01

    In modern society, growing numbers of people are engaged in various forms of shift works or trans-meridian travels. Such circadian misalignment is known to disturb endogenous diurnal rhythms, which may lead to harmful physiological consequences including metabolic syndrome, obesity, cancer, cardiovascular disorders, and gastric disorders as well as other physical and mental disorders. However, the precise mechanism(s) underlying these changes are yet unclear. The present work, therefore examined the effects of 6 h advance or delay of usual meal time on diurnal rhythmicities in home cage activity (HCA), body temperature (BT), blood metabolic markers, glucose homeostasis, and expression of genes that are involved in cholesterol homeostasis by feeding young adult male mice in a time-restrictive manner. Delay of meal time caused locomotive hyperactivity in a significant portion (42%) of subjects, while 6 h advance caused a torpor-like symptom during the late scotophase. Accordingly, daily rhythms of blood glucose and triglyceride were differentially affected by time-restrictive feeding regimen with concurrent metabolic alterations. Along with these physiological changes, time-restrictive feeding also influenced the circadian expression patterns of low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) as well as most LDLR regulatory factors. Strikingly, chronic advance of meal time induced insulin resistance, while chronic delay significantly elevated blood glucose levels. Taken together, our findings indicate that persistent shifts in usual meal time impact the diurnal rhythms of carbohydrate and lipid metabolisms in addition to HCA and BT, thereby posing critical implications for the health and diseases of shift workers. PMID:22952870

  7. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts reveal a distinct intracellular metabolic profile with alterations in NAD+ and nicotinamide metabolism

    PubMed Central

    James, Emma L.; Lane, James A. E.; Michalek, Ryan D.; Karoly, Edward D.; Parkinson, E. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Cellular senescence occurs by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or following multiple cellular stresses but had not previously been subject to detailed metabolomic analysis. Therefore, we compared PEsen fibroblasts with proliferating and transiently growth arrested controls using a combination of different mass spectroscopy techniques. PEsen cells showed many specific alterations in both the NAD+ de novo and salvage pathways including striking accumulations of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) in the amidated salvage pathway despite no increase in nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase or in the NR transport protein, CD73. Extracellular nicotinate was depleted and metabolites of the deamidated salvage pathway were reduced but intracellular NAD+ and nicotinamide were nevertheless maintained. However, sirtuin 1 was downregulated and so the accumulation of NMN and NR was best explained by reduced flux through the amidated arm of the NAD+ salvage pathway due to reduced sirtuin activity. PEsen cells also showed evidence of increased redox homeostasis and upregulated pathways used to generate energy and cellular membranes; these included nucleotide catabolism, membrane lipid breakdown and increased creatine metabolism. Thus PEsen cells upregulate several different pathways to sustain their survival which may serve as pharmacological targets for the elimination of senescent cells in age-related disease. PMID:27924925

  8. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts reveal a distinct intracellular metabolic profile with alterations in NAD+ and nicotinamide metabolism.

    PubMed

    James, Emma L; Lane, James A E; Michalek, Ryan D; Karoly, Edward D; Parkinson, E Kenneth

    2016-12-07

    Cellular senescence occurs by proliferative exhaustion (PEsen) or following multiple cellular stresses but had not previously been subject to detailed metabolomic analysis. Therefore, we compared PEsen fibroblasts with proliferating and transiently growth arrested controls using a combination of different mass spectroscopy techniques. PEsen cells showed many specific alterations in both the NAD+ de novo and salvage pathways including striking accumulations of nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) and nicotinamide riboside (NR) in the amidated salvage pathway despite no increase in nicotinamide phosphoribosyl transferase or in the NR transport protein, CD73. Extracellular nicotinate was depleted and metabolites of the deamidated salvage pathway were reduced but intracellular NAD+ and nicotinamide were nevertheless maintained. However, sirtuin 1 was downregulated and so the accumulation of NMN and NR was best explained by reduced flux through the amidated arm of the NAD+ salvage pathway due to reduced sirtuin activity. PEsen cells also showed evidence of increased redox homeostasis and upregulated pathways used to generate energy and cellular membranes; these included nucleotide catabolism, membrane lipid breakdown and increased creatine metabolism. Thus PEsen cells upregulate several different pathways to sustain their survival which may serve as pharmacological targets for the elimination of senescent cells in age-related disease.

  9. Chromium supplementation alters both glucose and lipid metabolism in feedlot cattle during the receiving period.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, B C; Burdick, N C; Rathmann, R J; Carroll, J A; Finck, D N; Jennings, M A; Young, T R; Johnson, B J

    2012-12-01

    Crossbred steers (n = 20; 235 ± 4 kg) were fed for 53 d during a receiving period to determine if supplementing chromium (Cr; KemTRACE Chromium Propionate 0.04%, Kemin Industries, Des Moines, IA) would alter glucose or lipid metabolism of newly received cattle. Chromium premixes were supplemented to add 0 (Con) or 0.2 mg/kg of Cr to the total diet on a DM basis. Cattle were fitted with jugular catheters on d 52. A glucose tolerance test (GTT) and an insulin sensitivity test (IST) were conducted on d 53. Blood samples were collected from -60 to 150 min relative to each infusion. Serum was isolated to determine glucose, insulin, and NEFA concentrations. Throughout GTT, no differences were detected in glucose concentrations, glucose clearance rates (k), or preinfusion insulin concentrations (P > 0.50), but insulin concentrations postinfusion tended (P = 0.06) to be greater for the Cr-supplemented steers. This caused an increase in the insulin to glucose ratio (I:G) from 0 to 150 min postinfusion for the Cr-supplemented steers (P = 0.03). In addition, NEFA concentrations during GTT were lower (P ≤ 0.01) for Cr-supplemented steers both preinfusion and postinfusion. During IST, there was no treatment effect on glucose concentrations preinfusion (P = 0.38), but postinfusion glucose concentrations were greater (P< 0.01) in the Cr-supplemented steers. The k of Cr-supplemented steers tended (P = 0.06) to be faster than Con steers from 30 to 45 min postinfusion. During the same test, there was no treatment effect detected for insulin concentrations (P > 0.33). The I:G were not affected by treatment (P > 0.40).Concentrations of NEFA were reduced (P < 0.01) both preinfusion and postinfusion during IST for Cr-supplemented steers. Results of this study indicate that supplementation of Cr can significantly alter lipid metabolism. This suggests that these steers had less dependence on lipid metabolism for energy or sensitivity of adipose tissue to antilipolytic signals was

  10. Fetal PCB syndrome: clinical features, intrauterine growth retardation and possible alteration in calcium metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, F; Hayashi, M

    1985-01-01

    Pregnant mothers with yusho in Fukuoka, Nagasaki and Kochi Prefectures delivered babies with a peculiar clinical manifestation which will be called fetal PCB syndrome (FPS). The birth rate incidences were 3.6% (Fukuoka Prefecture), 4% (Nagasaki Prefecture), 2.9% (Kochi Prefecture) and 3.9% (total). The manifestations consisted of dark brown pigmentation of the skin and the mucous membrane, gingival hyperplasia, exophthalmic edematous eye, dentition at birth, abnormal calcification of the skull as demonstrated by X-ray, rocker bottom heel and high incidence of light for date (low birth weight) babies. We suggest that there may be a possible alteration in calcium metabolism in these babies, related to the fragile egg shells observed in PCB-contaminated birds and to the female hormone-enhancing effect of PCB. The high incidence of low birth weight among these newborns and two other similar studies indicated that PCBs suppress fetal growth. PMID:3921362

  11. Microbial metabolism alters pore water chemistry and increases consolidation of oil sands tailings.

    PubMed

    Arkell, Nicholas; Kuznetsov, Petr; Kuznetsova, Alsu; Foght, Julia M; Siddique, Tariq

    2015-01-01

    Tailings produced during bitumen extraction from surface-mined oil sands ores (tar sands) comprise an aqueous suspension of clay particles that remain dispersed for decades in tailings ponds. Slow consolidation of the clays hinders water recovery for reuse and retards volume reduction, thereby increasing the environmental footprint of tailings ponds. We investigated mechanisms of tailings consolidation and revealed that indigenous anaerobic microorganisms altered porewater chemistry by producing CO and CH during metabolism of acetate added as a labile carbon amendment. Entrapped biogenic CO decreased tailings pH, thereby increasing calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) cations and bicarbonate (HCO) concentrations in the porewater through dissolution of carbonate minerals. Soluble ions increased the porewater ionic strength, which, with higher exchangeable Ca and Mg, decreased the diffuse double layer of clays and increased consolidation of tailings compared with unamended tailings in which little microbial activity was observed. These results are relevant to effective tailings pond management strategies.

  12. Fetal PCB syndrome: clinical features, intrauterine growth retardation and possible alteration in calcium metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, F.; Hayashi, M.

    1985-02-01

    Pregnant mothers with Yusho in Fukuoka, Nagasaki and Kochi Prefectures delivered babies with a peculiar clinical manifestation which will be called fetal PCB syndrome (FPS). The birth rate incidences were 3.6% (Fukuoka Prefecture), 4% (Nagasaki Prefecture), 2.9% (Kochi Prefecture) and 3.9% (total). The manifestations consisted of dark brown pigmentation of the skin and the mucous membrane, gingival hyperplasia, exophthalmic edematous eye, dentition at birth, abnormal calcification of the skull as demonstrated by X-ray, rocker bottom heel and high incidence of light for date (low birth weight) babies. The authors suggest that there may be a possible alteration in calcium metabolism in these babies, related to the fragile egg shells observed in PCB-contaminated birds and to the female hormone-enhancing effect of PCB. The high incidence of low birth weight among these newborns and two other similar studies indicated that PCBs suppress fetal growth.

  13. Altered carbohydrate, lipid, and xenobiotic metabolism by liver from rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, A. H. Jr; Hoel, M.; Wang, E.; Mullins, R. E.; Hargrove, J. L.; Jones, D. P.; Popova, I. A.; Merrill AH, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1990-01-01

    To determine the possible biochemical effects of prolonged weightlessness on liver function, samples of liver from rats that had flown aboard Cosmos 1887 were analyzed for protein, glycogen, and lipids as well as the activities of a number of key enzymes involved in metabolism of these compounds and xenobiotics. Among the parameters measured, the major differences were elevations in the glycogen content and hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase activities for the rats flown on Cosmos 1887 and decreases in the amount of microsomal cytochrome P-450 and the activities of aniline hydroxylase and ethylmorphine N-demethylase, cytochrome P-450-dependent enzymes. These results support the earlier finding of differences in these parameters and suggest that altered hepatic function could be important during spaceflight and/or the postflight recovery period.

  14. Alterations of amino acid metabolism in osteoarthritis: its implications for nutrition and health.

    PubMed

    Li, Yusheng; Xiao, Wenfeng; Luo, Wei; Zeng, Chao; Deng, Zhenhan; Ren, Wenkai; Wu, Guoyao; Lei, Guanghua

    2016-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common form of arthritis in humans. It has long been regarded as a non-inflammatory disease, but a degree of inflammation is now recognized as being a vital inducer of subpopulation of OA. Besides inflammation, the establishment and development of OA are associated with alterations in metabolism and profiles of amino acids (AA), including glutamate- and arginine-family AA as well as their related metabolites (e.g., creatinine, hydroxyproline, γ-aminobutyrate, dimethylarginines and homoarginine). Functional AA (e.g., glutamine, arginine, glutamate, glycine, proline, and tryptophan) have various benefits (i.e., anti-inflammation and anti-oxidation) in treatment of inflammation-associated diseases, including OA. Thus, these AA have potential as immunomodulatory nutrients for patients with inflammation-induced OA.

  15. Hepatic alteration of tryptophan metabolism in an acute porphyria model Its relation with gluconeogenic blockage.

    PubMed

    Lelli, Sandra M; Mazzetti, Marta B; San Martín de Viale, Leonor C

    2008-02-01

    This study focuses on the alterations suffered by the serotoninergic and kinurenergic routes of tryptophan (TRP) metabolism in liver, and their relation with gluconeogenic phosphoenolpyruvate-carboxykinase (PEPCK) blockage in experimental acute porphyria. This porphyria was induced in rats by a combined treatment of 2-allyl-2-isopropylacetamide (100, 250, 500 mg/kg bw) and 3,5-dietoxicarbonil 1,4-dihydrocollidine (constant 50 mg/kg bw dose). Results showed a marked dose-dependent increase of all TRP pyrrolase (TRPp) forms, active (holo, total) and inactive (apo), and a decrease in the degree of enzyme saturation by heme. Increases for holo, total, and apo-TRPp were 90, 150, and 230%, respectively, at the highest dose assayed (H). The treatment also impaired the serotoninergic route of TRP metabolism in liver, causing a decrease in serotonin level (H, 38%), and a concomitant enhancement in TRP content (H, 23%). The porphyrinogenic treatment promoted a blockage in PEPCK activity (H, 30%). This occurred in correlation to the development of porphyria, to TRPp alterations and to the production of hepatic microsomal thiobarbituric acid reactive substances. Porphyria was estimated through increases in 5-aminolevulinic acid-synthase (ALA-S) activity, ALA and porphobilinogen contents, and a decrease in ferrochelatase activity. Thus, the TRP kynurenine route was augmented whereas the serotoninergic route was reduced. PEPCK blockage could be partly attributed to quinolinate generated from TRP by the increase of TRPp activity, which would be due to the effect of porphyrinogenic drugs on TRP. The contribution of ROS to PEPCK blockage is analyzed. Likewise, the implication of these results in the control of porphyrias by glucose is discussed.

  16. Altered folate metabolism modifies cell proliferation and progesterone secretion in human placental choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Carolyne; Ross, Nikia; Jolette, Philippe; MacFarlane, Amanda J

    2015-09-28

    Folate is an essential B vitamin required for de novo purine and thymidylate synthesis, and for the remethylation of homocysteine to form methionine. Folate deficiency has been associated with placenta-related pregnancy complications, as have SNP in genes of the folate-dependent enzymes, methionine synthase (MTR) and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1). We aimed to determine the effect of altered folate metabolism on placental cell proliferation, viability and invasive capacity and on progesterone and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) secretion. Human placental choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cells cultured in low folic acid (FA) (2 nM) demonstrated 13% (P<0.001) and 26% (P<0.001) lower proliferation, 5.5% (P=0.025) and 7.5% (P=0.004) lower invasion capacity, and 5 to 7.5% (P=0.004-0.025) lower viability compared with control (20 nM) or supplemented (100 nM) cells, respectively. FA concentration had no effect on progesterone or hCG secretion. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of MTR gene and protein expression resulted in 17.7% (P<0.0001) lower proliferation and 61% (P=0.014) higher progesterone secretion, but had no effect on cell invasion and hCG secretion. siRNA knockdown of MTHFD1 gene expression in the absence of detectable changes in protein expression resulted in 10.3% (P=0.001) lower cell proliferation, but had no effect on cell invasion and progesterone or hCG secretion. Our data indicate that impaired folate metabolism can result in lower trophoblast proliferation, and could alter viability, invasion capacity and progesterone secretion, which may explain in part the observed associations between folate and placenta-related complications.

  17. Multifunctional Roles of Enolase in Alzheimer Disease Brain: Beyond Altered Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, D. Allan; Bader Lange, Miranda L.

    2015-01-01

    Enolase enzymes are abundantly expressed, cytosolic carbon-oxygen lyases known for their role in glucose metabolism. Recently, enolase has been shown to possess a variety of different regulatory functions, beyond glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, associated with hypoxia, ischemia, and Alzheimer disease (AD). AD is an age-associated neurodegenerative disorder characterized pathologically by elevated oxidative stress and subsequent damage to proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids, appearance of neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques, and loss of synapse and neuronal cells. It is unclear if development of a hypometabolic environment is a consequence of or contributes to AD pathology, since there is not only a significant decline in brain glucose levels in AD, but also there is an increase in proteomics identified oxidatively modified glycolytic enzymes that are rendered inactive, including enolase. Previously, our laboratory identified α-enolase as one the most frequently up-regulated and oxidatively modified proteins in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI), early-onset AD (EOAD), and AD. However, the glycolytic conversion of 2-phosphoglycerate to phosphoenolpyruvate catalyzed by enolase does not directly produce ATP or NADH; therefore it is surprising that, among all glycolytic enzymes, α-enolase was one of only two glycolytic enzymes consistently up-regulated from MCI to AD. These findings suggest enolase is involved with more than glucose metabolism in AD brain, but may possess other functions, normally necessary to preserve brain function. This review examines potential altered function(s) of brain enolase in MCI, EOAD, and AD, alterations that may contribute to the biochemical, pathological, clinical characteristics, and progression of this dementing disorder. PMID:19780894

  18. Cytochrome P450-mediated metabolic alterations in preeclampsia evaluated by quantitative steroid signatures.

    PubMed

    Moon, Ju-Yeon; Moon, Myeong Hee; Kim, Ki Tae; Jeong, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young Nam; Chung, Bong Chul; Choi, Man Ho

    2014-01-01

    Although preeclampsia has been suggested potential risk factors including placental and systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, and abnormal steroid metabolism during pregnancy, the pathogenesis of preeclampsia has not fully been elucidated, particularly in steroid metabolism. The association between various cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated steroid metabolic markers and preeclampsia risk was therefore investigated. The serum levels of 54 CYP-mediated regioselective hydroxysteroids and their substrates were quantitatively evaluated from both pregnant women with preeclampsia (n=30; age, 30.8±4.5 years) and normotensive controls (n=30; age, 31.0±3.5 years), who were similar with respect to maternal age, gestational age, and body mass index. The levels of 6ß-, 7a-, and 11ß-hydroxymetabolites of androgens and corticoids were significantly increased in women with preeclampsia. In addition, the levels of oxysterols, including 7a-, 7ß-, 4ß-, 20a-, 24S-, and 27-hydroxycholesterol, were markedly higher, while the levels of 16a-OH-DHEA, 16a-OH-androstenedione, and cholesterol were significantly decreased in patients. The 6ß-hydroxylation of androgens and corticoids by CYP3A4 (P<0.01), the activation of 20,22-desmolase (a cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme) by CYP11A1 (P<0.00001), and the multi-hydroxylation of cholesterol at C-4ß, C-7a, C-7ß, C-24S, C-27, and C-20a (P<0.0001) by catalytic or enzymatic reaction (e.g. CYP3A4, CYP7A1, CYP27A1, and CYP46A1) were differed between preeclamptic women and control subjects. In particular, an increased oxysterols (induction>2.0-fold) were positively correlated with the conditions of preeclampsia. Our metabolic profiling suggests the CYP-mediated alterations in steroid metabolism and hydroxylation in pregnancy-induced hypertension. These multiple markers could serve as background information for improved clinical diagnosis and management during pregnancy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Pregnancy and

  19. Metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells and induced a time-dependent metabolic and transcriptional alteration.

    PubMed

    He, Jiaojiao; Wang, Ke; Zheng, Ningning; Qiu, Yunping; Xie, Guoxiang; Su, Mingming; Jia, Wei; Li, Houkai

    2015-11-30

    Metformin is a widely used anti-diabetic drug with potential anti-tumor activity. However, little is known about its global metabolic and transcriptional impacts on tumor cells. In current study, we performed a metabolic profiling on human-derived colon cancer LoVo cells treated by 10 mM metformin for 8, 24 and 48 h. An obvious time-dependent metabolic alteration was observed from 8 to 48 h, prior to the reduction of cell viability. A total of 47, 45 and 66 differential metabolites were identified between control and metformin-treated cells at three time points. Most of the metabolites were up-regulated at 8 h, but down-regulated at 24 and 48 h by metformin. These metabolites were mainly involved in carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, vitamins and nucleotides metabolism pathways. Meanwhile, the transcirptomic profile revealed 134 and 3061 differentially expressed genes at 8 and 24 h by metformin. In addition to the cancer signaling pathways, expression of genes involved in cell energy metabolism pathways was significantly altered, which were further validated with genes in glucose metabolism pathway. Altogether, our current data indicate that metformin suppressed the proliferation of LoVo cells, which may be due to the modulation on cell energy metabolism at both metabolic and transcriptional levels in a time-dependent way.

  20. Nesting of colon and ovarian cancer cells in the endothelial niche is associated with alterations in glycan and lipid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Halama, Anna; Guerrouahen, Bella S.; Pasquier, Jennifer; Satheesh, Noothan J.; Suhre, Karsten; Rafii, Arash

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic phenotype of a cancer cell is determined by its genetic makeup and microenvironment, which dynamically modulates the tumor landscape. The endothelial cells provide both a promoting and protective microenvironment – a niche for cancer cells. Although metabolic alterations associated with cancer and its progression have been fairly defined, there is a significant gap in our understanding of cancer metabolism in context of its microenvironment. We deployed an in vitro co-culture system based on direct contact of cancer cells with endothelial cells (E4+EC), mimicking the tumor microenvironment. Metabolism of colon (HTC15 and HTC116) and ovarian (OVCAR3 and SKOV3) cancer cell lines was profiled with non-targeted metabolic approaches at different time points in the first 48 hours after co-culture was established. We found significant, coherent and non-cell line specific changes in fatty acids, glycerophospholipids and carbohydrates over time, induced by endothelial cell contact. The metabolic patterns pinpoint alterations in hexosamine biosynthetic pathway, glycosylation and lipid metabolism as crucial for cancer – endothelial cells interaction. We demonstrated that “Warburg effect” is not modulated in the initial stage of nesting of cancer cell in the endothelial niche. Our study provides novel insight into cancer cell metabolism in the context of the endothelial microenvironment. PMID:28051182

  1. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-06-01

    Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the inter-relationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPC(KD)) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers.

  2. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations through NOX-1 activation-mediated reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Benard, Giovanni; Tang, Xiuwei; Yang, Hee Seung; Jouary, Thomas; de Verneuil, Hubert; Taïeb, Alain; Kim, Arianna L.; Mazurier, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cancer cells utilize complex mechanisms to remodel their bioenergetic properties. We exploited the intrinsic genomic stability of xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) to understand the interrelationships between genomic instability, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and metabolic alterations during neoplastic transformation. We showed that knockdown of XPC (XPCKD) in normal human keratinocytes results in metabolism remodeling through NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX-1) activation, which in turn leads to increased ROS levels. While enforcing antioxidant defenses by overexpressing catalase, CuZnSOD, or MnSOD could not block the metabolism remodeling, impaired NOX-1 activation abrogates both alteration in ROS levels and modifications of energy metabolism. As NOX-1 activation is observed in human squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), the blockade of NOX-1 could be a target for the prevention and the treatment of skin cancers. PMID:21167810

  3. A physiological increase in maternal cortisol alters uteroplacental metabolism in the pregnant ewe

    PubMed Central

    Davies, K. L.; Ward, J. W.; de Blasio, M. J.; Fowden, A. L.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Fetal nutrient supply is dependent, in part, upon the transport capacity and metabolism of the placenta.The stress hormone, cortisol, alters metabolism in the adult and fetus but it is not known whether cortisol in the pregnant mother affects metabolism of the placenta.In this study, when cortisol concentrations were raised in pregnant sheep by infusion, proportionately more of the glucose taken up by the uterus was consumed by the uteroplacental tissues while less was transferred to the fetus, despite an increased placental glucose transport capacity. Concomitantly, the uteroplacental tissues produced lactate at a greater rate.The results show that maternal cortisol concentrations regulate uteroplacental glycolytic metabolism, producing lactate for use in utero.Prolonged increases in placental lactate production induced by cortisol overexposure may contribute to the adverse effects of maternal stress on fetal wellbeing. Abstract Fetal nutrition is determined by maternal availability, placental transport and uteroplacental metabolism of carbohydrates. Cortisol affects maternal and fetal metabolism, but whether maternal cortisol concentrations within the physiological range regulate uteroplacental carbohydrate metabolism remains unknown. This study determined the effect of maternal cortisol infusion (1.2 mg kg−1 day−1 i.v. for 5 days, n = 20) on fetal glucose, lactate and oxygen supplies in pregnant ewes on day ∼130 of pregnancy (term = 145 days). Compared to saline infusion (n = 21), cortisol infusion increased maternal, but not fetal, plasma cortisol (P < 0.05). Cortisol infusion also raised maternal insulin, glucose and lactate concentrations, and blood pH, PCO2 and HCO3 − concentration. Although total uterine glucose uptake determined by Fick's principle was unaffected, a greater proportion was consumed by the uteroplacental tissues, so net fetal glucose uptake was 29% lower in cortisol‐infused than control ewes (P < 0

  4. Genome wide expression analysis in HPV16 Cervical Cancer: identification of altered metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Vázquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; López-Romero, Ricardo; Piña-Sanchez, Patricia; Moreno, José; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2007-01-01

    Background Cervical carcinoma (CC) is a leading cause of death among women worldwide. Human papilloma virus (HPV) is a major etiological factor in CC and HPV 16 is the more frequent viral type present. Our aim was to characterize metabolic pathways altered in HPV 16 tumor samples by means of transcriptome wide analysis and bioinformatics tools for visualizing expression data in the context of KEGG biological pathways. Results We found 2,067 genes significantly up or down-modulated (at least 2-fold) in tumor clinical samples compared to normal tissues, representing ~3.7% of analyzed genes. Cervical carcinoma was associated with an important up-regulation of Wnt signaling pathway, which was validated by in situ hybridization in clinical samples. Other up-regulated pathways were those of calcium signaling and MAPK signaling, as well as cell cycle-related genes. There was down-regulation of focal adhesion, TGF-β signaling, among other metabolic pathways. Conclusion This analysis of HPV 16 tumors transcriptome could be useful for the identification of genes and molecular pathways involved in the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma. Understanding the possible role of these proteins in the pathogenesis of CC deserves further studies. PMID:17822553

  5. Dysregulation of Ezrin phosphorylation prevents metastasis and alters cellular metabolism in osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Ling; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Chen, Qing-Rong; Briggs, Joseph; Cassavaugh, Jessica; Srinivasan, Satish; Lizardo, Michael M.; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Xia, Ashley Y.; Avadhani, Narayan; Khan, Javed; Khanna, Chand

    2013-01-01

    Ezrin links the plasma membrane to the actin cytoskeleton where it plays a pivotal role in the metastatic progression of several human cancers (1, 2), however, the precise mechanistic basis for its role remains unknown. Here we define transitions between active (phosphorylated open) and inactive (dephosphorylated closed) forms of Ezrin that occur during metastatic progression in osteosarcoma. In our evaluation of these conformations we expressed C-terminal mutant forms of Ezrin that are open (phosphomimetic T567D) or closed (phosphodeficient T567A) and compared their biological characteristics to full length wild-type Ezrin in osteosarcoma cells. Unexpectedly, cells expressing open, active Ezrin could form neither primary orthotopic tumors nor lung metastases. In contrast, cells expressing closed, inactive Ezrin were also deficient in metastasis but were unaffected in their capacity for primary tumor growth. By imaging single metastatic cells in the lung, we found that cells expressing either open or closed Ezrin displayed increased levels of apoptosis early after their arrival in the lung. Gene expression analysis suggested dysregulation of genes that are functionally linked to carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. In particular, cells expressing closed, inactive Ezrin exhibited reduced lactate production and basal or ATP-dependent oxygen consumption. Collectively, our results suggest that dynamic regulation of Ezrin phosphorylation at amino acid T567 that controls structural transitions of this protein plays a pivotal role in tumor progression and metastasis, possibly in part by altering cellular metabolism. PMID:22147261

  6. Analysis of metabolic alterations in Arabidopsis following changes in the carbon dioxide and oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Florian, Alexandra; Timm, Stefan; Nikoloski, Zoran; Tohge, Takayuki; Bauwe, Hermann; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2014-09-01

    As sessile organisms, plants are subject to a multitude of environmental variations including several which directly affect their interaction with the atmosphere. Given the indiscriminant nature of Rubisco, the relative rates of photosynthesis and photorespiration are known to be responsive to changes in gas composition. However, comprehensive profiling methods have not yet been applied in order to characterize the wider consequences of these changes on primary metabolism in general. Moreover, although transcriptional profiling has revealed that a subset of photorespiratory enzymes are co-expressed, whether transcriptional responses play a role in short-term responses to atmospheric compositional changes remains unknown. To address these questions, plants Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) ecotype Columbia (Col-O) grown under normal air conditions were transferred to different CO2 and O2 concentrations and characterized at the physiological, molecular, and metabolic levels following this transition. The results reveal alterations in the components, which are directly involved in, or supporting, photorespiration, including transcripts and metabolite levels. The results further highlight that the majority of the regulation of these pathways is not mediated at the level of transcription and that the photorespiratory pathway is essential also in conditions in which flux through the pathway is minimized, yet suggest that flux through this pathway is not mediated at the level of transcription.

  7. Oral MSG administration alters hepatic expression of genes for lipid and nitrogen metabolism in suckling piglets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Yuzhe; Liao, Peng; Li, Tiejun; Chen, Lixiang; Yin, Yulong; Wang, Jinquan; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of oral administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG) on expression of genes for hepatic lipid and nitrogen metabolism in piglets. A total of 24 newborn pigs were assigned randomly into one of four treatments (n = 6/group). The doses of oral MSG administration, given at 8:00 and 18:00 to sow-reared piglets between 0 and 21 days of age, were 0 (control), 0.06 (low dose), 0.5 (intermediate dose), and 1 (high dose) g/kg body weight/day. At the end of the 3-week treatment, serum concentrations of total protein and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the intermediate dose group were elevated than those in the control group (P < 0.05). Hepatic mRNA levels for fatty acid synthase, acetyl-coA carboxylase, insulin-like growth factor-1, glutamate-oxaloacetate transaminase, and glutamate-pyruvate transaminase were higher in the middle-dose group (P < 0.05), compared with the control group. MSG administration did not affect hepatic mRNA levels for hormone-sensitive lipase or carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1. We conclude that oral MSG administration alters hepatic expression of certain genes for lipid and nitrogen metabolism in suckling piglets.

  8. Overexpression of a type-A response regulator alters rice morphology and cytokinin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Naoya; Makita, Nobue; Kojima, Mikiko; Kamada-Nobusada, Tomoe; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Genome-wide analyses of rice (Oryza sativa L.) cytokinin (CK)-responsive genes using the Affymetrix GeneChip(R) rice genome array were conducted to define the spectrum of genes subject to regulation by CK in monocotyledonous plants. Application of trans-zeatin modulated the expression of a wide variety of genes including those involved in hormone signaling and metabolism, transcriptional regulation, macronutrient transport and protein synthesis. To understand further the function of CK in rice plants, we examined the effects of in planta manipulation of a putative CK signaling factor on morphology, CK metabolism and expression of CK-responsive genes. Overexpression of the CK-inducible type-A response regulator OsRR6 abolished shoot regeneration, suggesting that OsRR6 acts as a negative regulator of CK signaling. Transgenic lines overexpressing OsRR6 (OsRR6-ox) had dwarf phenotypes with poorly developed root systems and panicles. Increased content of trans-zeatin-type CKs in OsRR6-ox lines indicates that homeostatic control of CK levels is regulated by OsRR6 signaling. Expression of genes encoding CK oxidase/dehydrogenase decreased in OsRR6-ox plants, possibly accounting for elevated CK levels in transgenic lines. Expression of a number of stress response genes was also altered in OsRR6-ox plants.

  9. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment alters cerebral metabolism in dopaminergic reward regions. Bromocriptine enhances recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Clow, D.W.; Hammer, R.P. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    2-(14C)deoxyglucose autoradiography was used to determine local cerebral glucose utilization (lCGU) in rats following chronic cocaine treatment and subsequent abstinence. lCGU was examined in 43 discrete brain regions in animals which had received daily injections of cocaine for 14 days (10 mg/kg) followed by 3 days of saline or bromocriptine (10 mg/kg) treatment. Cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment significantly reduced lCGU in several regions including mesocorticolimbic structures such as ventral tegmental area, medial prefrontal cortex, and nucleus accumbens (NAc). Within the NAc, however, only the rostral pole showed significant reduction. In contrast, when bromocriptine treatment accompanied abstinence, lCGU was no longer reduced in mesocorticolimbic and most other regions, implying that metabolic recovery was enhanced by bromocriptine treatment during early abstinence following chronic cocaine treatment. These data suggest that cerebral metabolism is decreased during cocaine abstinence following chronic treatment in critical brain regions, and that this alteration can be prevented by treatment with direct-acting dopamine agonists such as bromocriptine.

  10. Dietary live yeast alters metabolic profiles, protein biosynthesis and thermal stress tolerance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Colinet, Hervé; Renault, David

    2014-04-01

    The impact of nutritional factors on insect's life-history traits such as reproduction and lifespan has been excessively examined; however, nutritional determinant of insect's thermal tolerance has not received a lot of attention. Dietary live yeast represents a prominent source of proteins and amino acids for laboratory-reared drosophilids. In this study, Drosophila melanogaster adults were fed on diets supplemented or not with live yeast. We hypothesized that manipulating nutritional conditions through live yeast supplementation would translate into altered physiology and stress tolerance. We verified how live yeast supplementation affected body mass characteristics, total lipids and proteins, metabolic profiles and cold tolerance (acute and chronic stress). Females fed with live yeast had increased body mass and contained more lipids and proteins. Using GC/MS profiling, we found distinct metabolic fingerprints according to nutritional conditions. Metabolite pathway enrichment analysis corroborated that live yeast supplementation was associated with amino acid and protein biosyntheses. The cold assays revealed that the presence of dietary live yeast greatly promoted cold tolerance. Hence, this study conclusively demonstrates a significant interaction between nutritional conditions and thermal tolerance.

  11. Bacillus subtilis attachment to Aspergillus niger hyphae results in mutually altered metabolism.

    PubMed

    Benoit, Isabelle; van den Esker, Marielle H; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Mattern, Derek J; Blei, Felix; Zhou, Miaomiao; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Brakhage, Axel A; Kuipers, Oscar P; de Vries, Ronald P; Kovács, Ákos T

    2015-06-01

    Interaction between microbes affects the growth, metabolism and differentiation of members of the microbial community. While direct and indirect competition, like antagonism and nutrient consumption have a negative effect on the interacting members of the population, microbes have also evolved in nature not only to fight, but in some cases to adapt to or support each other, while increasing the fitness of the community. The presence of bacteria and fungi in soil results in various interactions including mutualism. Bacilli attach to the plant root and form complex communities in the rhizosphere. Bacillus subtilis, when grown in the presence of Aspergillus niger, interacts similarly with the fungus, by attaching and growing on the hyphae. Based on data obtained in a dual transcriptome experiment, we suggest that both fungi and bacteria alter their metabolism during this interaction. Interestingly, the transcription of genes related to the antifungal and putative antibacterial defence mechanism of B. subtilis and A. niger, respectively, are decreased upon attachment of bacteria to the mycelia. Analysis of the culture supernatant suggests that surfactin production by B. subtilis was reduced when the bacterium was co-cultivated with the fungus. Our experiments provide new insights into the interaction between a bacterium and a fungus.

  12. Alteration of Fatty-Acid-Metabolizing Enzymes Affects Mitochondrial Form and Function in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia

    PubMed Central

    Tesson, Christelle; Nawara, Magdalena; Salih, Mustafa A.M.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Zaki, Maha S.; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Schule, Rebecca; Mignot, Cyril; Obre, Emilie; Bouhouche, Ahmed; Santorelli, Filippo M.; Durand, Christelle M.; Oteyza, Andrés Caballero; El-Hachimi, Khalid H.; Al Drees, Abdulmajeed; Bouslam, Naima; Lamari, Foudil; Elmalik, Salah A.; Kabiraj, Mohammad M.; Seidahmed, Mohammed Z.; Esteves, Typhaine; Gaussen, Marion; Monin, Marie-Lorraine; Gyapay, Gabor; Lechner, Doris; Gonzalez, Michael; Depienne, Christel; Mochel, Fanny; Lavie, Julie; Schols, Ludger; Lacombe, Didier; Yahyaoui, Mohamed; Al Abdulkareem, Ibrahim; Zuchner, Stephan; Yamashita, Atsushi; Benomar, Ali; Goizet, Cyril; Durr, Alexandra; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Darios, Frederic; Brice, Alexis; Stevanin, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) is considered one of the most heterogeneous groups of neurological disorders, both clinically and genetically. The disease comprises pure and complex forms that clinically include slowly progressive lower-limb spasticity resulting from degeneration of the corticospinal tract. At least 48 loci accounting for these diseases have been mapped to date, and mutations have been identified in 22 genes, most of which play a role in intracellular trafficking. Here, we identified mutations in two functionally related genes (DDHD1 and CYP2U1) in individuals with autosomal-recessive forms of HSP by using either the classical positional cloning or a combination of whole-genome linkage mapping and next-generation sequencing. Interestingly, three subjects with CYP2U1 mutations presented with a thin corpus callosum, white-matter abnormalities, and/or calcification of the basal ganglia. These genes code for two enzymes involved in fatty-acid metabolism, and we have demonstrated in human cells that the HSP pathophysiology includes alteration of mitochondrial architecture and bioenergetics with increased oxidative stress. Our combined results focus attention on lipid metabolism as a critical HSP pathway with a deleterious impact on mitochondrial bioenergetic function. PMID:23176821

  13. A forage-only diet alters the metabolic response of horses in training.

    PubMed

    Jansson, A; Lindberg, J E

    2012-12-01

    Most athletic horses are fed a high-starch diet despite the risk of health problems. Replacing starch concentrate with high-energy forage would alleviate these health problems, but could result in a shift in major substrates for muscle energy supply from glucose to short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) due to more hindgut fermentation of fibre. Dietary fat inclusion has previously been shown to promote aerobic energy supply during exercise, but the contribution of SCFA to exercise metabolism has received little attention. This study compared metabolic response with exercise and lactate threshold (VLa4) in horses fed a forage-only diet (F) and a more traditional high-starch, low-energy forage diet (forage-concentrate diet - FC). The hypothesis was that diet F would increase plasma acetate concentration and increase VLa4 compared with diet FC. Six Standardbred geldings in race training were used in a 29-day change-over experiment. Plasma acetate, non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA), lactate, glucose and insulin concentrations and venous pH were measured in samples collected before, during and after a treadmill exercise test (ET, day 25) and muscle glycogen concentrations before and after ET. Plasma acetate concentration was higher before and after exercise in horses on diet F compared with diet FC, and there was a tendency (P = 0.09) for increased VLa4 on diet F. Venous pH and plasma glucose concentrations during exercise were higher in horses on diet F than diet FC, as was plasma NEFA on the day after ET. Plasma insulin and muscle glycogen concentrations were lower for diet F, but glycogen utilisation was similar for the two diets. The results show that a high-energy, forage-only diet alters the metabolic response to exercise and, with the exception of lowered glycogen stores, appears to have positive rather than negative effects on performance traits.

  14. Caffeine ingestion does not alter carbohydrate or fat metabolism in human skeletal muscle during exercise

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Terry E; Helge, Jorn W; MacLean, David A; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik A

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the effect of ingesting caffeine (6 mg kg−1) on muscle carbohydrate and fat metabolism during steady-state exercise in humans. Young male subjects (n = 10) performed 1 h of exercise (70 % maximal oxygen consumption (V̇O2,max)) on two occasions (after ingestion of placebo and caffeine) and leg metabolism was quantified by the combination of direct Fick measures and muscle biopsies. Following caffeine ingestion serum fatty acid and glycerol concentration increased (P ≤ 0.05) at rest, suggesting enhanced adipose tissue lipolysis. In addition circulating adrenaline concentration was increased (P ≤ 0.05) at rest following caffeine ingestion and this, as well as leg noradrenaline spillover, was elevated (P ≤ 0.05) above placebo values during exercise. Caffeine resulted in a modest increase (P ≤ 0.05) in leg vascular resistance, but no difference was found in leg blood flow. Arterial lactate and glucose concentrations were increased (P ≤ 0.05) by caffeine, while the rise in plasma potassium was dampened (P ≤ 0.05). There were no differences in respiratory exchange ratio or in leg glucose uptake, net muscle glycogenolysis, leg lactate release or muscle lactate, or glucose 6-phosphate concentration. Similarly there were no differences between treatments in leg fatty acid uptake, glycerol release or muscle acetyl CoA concentration. These findings indicate that caffeine ingestion stimulated the sympathetic nervous system but did not alter the carbohydrate or fat metabolism in the monitored leg. Other tissues must have been involved in the changes in circulating potassium, fatty acids, glucose and lactate. PMID:11118510

  15. Inflammatory and Metabolic Alterations of Kager's Fat Pad in Chronic Achilles Tendinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Fredberg, Ulrich; Kjær, Søren G.; Quistorff, Bjørn; Langberg, Henning; Hansen, Jacob B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Achilles tendinopathy is a painful inflammatory condition characterized by swelling, stiffness and reduced function of the Achilles tendon. Kager’s fat pad is an adipose tissue located in the area anterior to the Achilles tendon. Observations reveal a close physical interplay between Kager’s fat pad and its surrounding structures during movement of the ankle, suggesting that Kager’s fat pad may stabilize and protect the mechanical function of the ankle joint. Aim The aim of this study was to characterize whether Achilles tendinopathy was accompanied by changes in expression of inflammatory markers and metabolic enzymes in Kager’s fat pad. Methods A biopsy was taken from Kager’s fat pad from 31 patients with chronic Achilles tendinopathy and from 13 healthy individuals. Gene expression was measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR. Focus was on genes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism. Results Expression of the majority of analyzed inflammatory marker genes was increased in patients with Achilles tendinopathy compared to that in healthy controls. Expression patterns of the patient group were consistent with reduced lipolysis and increased fatty acid β-oxidation. In the fat pad, the pain-signaling neuropeptide substance P was found to be present in one third of the subjects in the Achilles tendinopathy group but in none of the healthy controls. Conclusion Gene expression changes in Achilles tendinopathy patient samples were consistent with Kager’s fat pad being more inflamed than in the healthy control group. Additionally, the results indicate an altered lipid metabolism in Kager’s fat pad of Achilles tendinopathy patients. PMID:25996876

  16. Altered cellular metabolism of HepG2 cells caused by microcystin-LR.

    PubMed

    Ma, Junguo; Feng, Yiyi; Jiang, Siyu; Li, Xiaoyu

    2017-03-21

    This study aimed to evaluate the possible effects of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) exposure on the metabolism and drug resistance of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. For this purpose, we first conducted an experiment to make sure that MC-LR could penetrate the HepG2 cell membrane effectively. The transcriptional levels of phase I (such as CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP26B1) and phase II (such as EPHX1, SULTs, and GSTM) enzymes and export pump genes (such as MRP1 and MDR1) were altered by MC-LR-exposure for 24 h, indicating that MC-LR treatment may destabilize the metabolism of HepG2 cells. Further research showed that the CYP inducers omeprazole, ethanol, and rifampicin inhibited cell viability, in particular, ethanol, a CYP2E1 inducer, induced ROS generation, lipid peroxidation, and apoptosis in HepG2 cells treated with MC-LR. The CYP2E1 inhibitor chlormethiazole inhibited ROS generation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, caspase-3 activity, and cytotoxicity caused by MC-LR. Meanwhile, the results also showed that co-incubation with the ROS scavenger l-ascorbic acid and MC-LR decreased ROS levels and effectively prevented apoptosis. These findings provide an interesting mechanistic explanation of cellular metabolism associated with MC-LR, i.e., MC-LR-exposure exerted toxicity on HepG2 cells and induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells via promoting CYP2E1 expression and inducing excessive ROS in HepG2 cells.

  17. Repeated intraarticular injections of triamcinolone acetonide alter cartilage matrix metabolism measured by biomarkers in synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Céleste, Christophe; Ionescu, Mirela; Robin Poole, A; Laverty, Sheila

    2005-05-01

    Although intraarticular (IA) corticosteroids are frequently used to treat joint disease, the effects of their repeated use on articular cartilage remains controversial. The aim of our study was to determine the effects of a clinically recommended dose of IA triamcinolone acetonide (TA), on synovial fluid (SF) biomarkers of cartilage metabolism. Ten adult horses, free of osteoarthritis (OA) in their radiocarpal joints, were studied. One radiocarpal joint of each horse was randomly chosen for treatment and the contralateral anatomically paired joint acted as the control. Aseptic arthrocentesis was performed weekly on both joints for 13 weeks. The initial results from the first 3 weeks of the experimental period established baseline untreated control marker levels for each joint, each being its own control. On weeks 3, 5, and 7, a sterile suspension of 12 mg of TA was injected into the treated joint and an equivalent volume of sterile saline solution (0.9%) was injected into the control joint. SF was immunoassayed for biomarkers of aggrecan turnover (CS 846 & KS), types I and II collagen cleavage (C1,2C) and type II collagen synthesis (CPII). In treated joints, there was a significant increase in CS 846, KS, C1,2C and CPII epitope concentrations following IA TA injections when compared to baseline levels. There was also a significant increase in C1,2C and CPII epitope concentrations in the contralateral control joints following IA TA injections in the treated joint. Significant differences were observed between treated and control joints for all markers except CPII. These findings indicate that TA alters articular cartilage and collagen metabolism in treated and, interestingly, also in control joints, suggesting a systemic effect of the drug. Though intuitively the observed findings would favor the hypothesis that long-term IA TA treatment changes joint metabolism and this may have detrimental effects; further studies would be necessary to confirm this.

  18. Neurophysiological activity underlying altered brain metabolism in epileptic encephalopathies with CSWS.

    PubMed

    De Tiège, Xavier; Trotta, Nicola; Op de Beeck, Marc; Bourguignon, Mathieu; Marty, Brice; Wens, Vincent; Nonclercq, Antoine; Goldman, Serge; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the neurophysiological correlate of altered regional cerebral glucose metabolism observed in children with epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves during sleep (CSWS) by using a multimodal approach combining time-sensitive magnetic source imaging (MSI) and positron emission tomography with [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET). Six patients (4 boys and 2 girls, age range: 4-8 years, 3 patients with Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS), 3 patients with atypical rolandic epilepsy (ARE)) were investigated by FDG-PET and MSI at the acute phase of CSWS. In all patients, the onset(s) of spike-waves discharges were associated with significant focal hypermetabolism. The propagation of epileptic discharges to other brain areas was associated with focal hypermetabolism (five patients), hypometabolism (one patient) or the absence of any significant metabolic change (one patient). Interestingly, most of the hypometabolic areas were not involved in the epileptic network per se. This study shows that focal hypermetabolism observed at the acute phase of CSWS are related to the onset or propagation sites of spike-wave discharges. Spike-wave discharges propagation can be associated to other types of metabolic changes, suggesting the occurrence of various neurophysiological mechanisms at the cellular level. Most of the hypometabolic areas are not involved in the epileptic network as such and are probably related to a mechanism of remote inhibition. These findings highlight the critical value of combining FDG-PET with time-sensitive functional neuroimaging approaches such as MSI to assess CSWS epileptic network when surgery is considered as a therapeutic approach.

  19. Histopathological findings on Carassius auratus hepatopancreas upon exposure to acrylamide: correlation with genotoxicity and metabolic alterations.

    PubMed

    Larguinho, Miguel; Costa, Pedro M; Sousa, Gonçalo; Costa, Maria H; Diniz, Mário S; Baptista, Pedro V

    2014-12-01

    Acrylamide is an amide used in several industrial applications making it easily discharged to aquatic ecosystems. The toxicity of acrylamide to aquatic organisms is scarcely known, although previous studies with murine models provided evidence for deleterious effects. To assess the effects of acrylamide to freshwater fish, goldfish (Carassius auratus L.) were exposed to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide and analysed for genotoxic damage, alterations to detoxifying enzymes and histopathology. Results revealed a dose-dependent increase in total DNA strand breakage, the formation of erythrocytic nuclear abnormalities and in the levels of hepatic cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity. In addition, acrylamide induced more histopathological changes to pancreatic acini than to the hepatic parenchyma, regardless of exposure concentration, whereas hepatic tissue only endured significant alterations at higher concentrations of exposure. Thus, results confirm the genotoxic potential of acrylamide to fish and its ability to induce CYP1A, probably as a direct primary defence mechanism. This strongly suggests the substance's pro-mutagenic potential in fish, similarly to what is known for rodents. However, the deleterious effects observed in the pancreatic acini, more severe than in the liver, could indicate a specific, albeit unknown toxic mechanism of acrylamide to fish that overran the organism's metabolic defences against a chemical agent rather than causing a general systemic failure.

  20. Inducible Arginase 1 Deficiency in Mice Leads to Hyperargininemia and Altered Amino Acid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    St. Amand, Tim; Kyriakopoulou, Lianna; Schulze, Andreas; Funk, Colin D.

    2013-01-01

    Arginase deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder resulting from a loss of the liver arginase isoform, arginase 1 (ARG1), which is the final step in the urea cycle for detoxifying ammonia. ARG1 deficiency leads to hyperargininemia, characterized by progressive neurological impairment, persistent growth retardation and infrequent episodes of hyperammonemia. Using the Cre/loxP-directed conditional gene knockout system, we generated an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model by crossing “floxed” Arg1 mice with CreERT2 mice. The resulting mice (Arg-Cre) die about two weeks after tamoxifen administration regardless of the starting age of inducing the knockout. These treated mice were nearly devoid of Arg1 mRNA, protein and liver arginase activity, and exhibited symptoms of hyperammonemia. Plasma amino acid analysis revealed pronounced hyperargininemia and significant alterations in amino acid and guanidino compound metabolism, including increased citrulline and guanidinoacetic acid. Despite no alteration in ornithine levels, concentrations of other amino acids such as proline and the branched-chain amino acids were reduced. In summary, we have generated and characterized an inducible Arg1-deficient mouse model exhibiting several pathologic manifestations of hyperargininemia. This model should prove useful for exploring potential treatment options of ARG1 deficiency. PMID:24224027

  1. Presymptomatic alterations in energy metabolism and oxidative stress in the APP23 mouse model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Daniela; Schuldt, Victoria; Forler, Stephanie; Zabel, Claus; Klose, Joachim; Rohe, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Glucose hypometabolism is the earliest symptom observed in the brains of Alzheimer disease (AD) patients. In a former study, we analyzed the cortical proteome of the APP23 mouse model of AD at presymptomatic age (1 month) using a 2-D electrophoresis-based approach. Interestingly, long before amyloidosis can be observed in APP23 mice, proteins associated with energy metabolism were predominantly altered in transgenic as compared to wild-type mice indicating presymptomatic changes in energy metabolism. In the study presented here, we analyzed whether the observed changes were associated with oxidative stress and confirmed our previous findings in primary cortical neurons, which exhibited altered ADP/ATP levels if transgenic APP was expressed. Reactive oxygen species produced during energy metabolism have important roles in cell signaling and homeostasis as they modify proteins. We observed an overall up-regulation of protein oxidation status as shown by increased protein carbonylation in the cortex of presymptomatic APP23 mice. Interestingly, many carbonylated proteins, such as Vilip1 and Syntaxin were associated to synaptic plasticity. This demonstrates an important link between energy metabolism and synaptic function, which is altered in AD. In summary, we demonstrate that changes in cortical energy metabolism and increased protein oxidation precede the amyloidogenic phenotype in a mouse model for AD. These changes might contribute to synaptic failure observed in later disease stages, as synaptic transmission is particularly dependent on energy metabolism.

  2. GC-MS metabolomic analysis reveals significant alterations in cerebellar metabolic physiology in a mouse model of adult onset hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Caterina; Chrysanthopoulos, Panagiotis K; Margarity, Marigoula; Klapa, Maria I

    2011-02-04

    Although adult-onset hypothyroidism (AOH) has been connected to neural activity alterations, including movement, behavioral, and mental dysfunctions, the underlying changes in brain metabolic physiology have not been investigated in a systemic and systematic way. The current knowledge remains fragmented, referring to different experimental setups and recovered from various brain regions. In this study, we developed and applied a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics protocol to obtain a holistic view of the cerebellar metabolic physiology in a Balb/cJ mouse model of prolonged adult-onset hypothyroidism induced by a 64-day treatment with 1% potassium perchlorate in the drinking water of the animals. The high-throughput analysis enabled the correlation between multiple parallel-occurring metabolic phenomena; some have been previously related to AOH, while others implicated new pathways, designating new directions for further research. Specifically, an overall decline in the metabolic activity of the hypothyroid compared to the euthyroid cerebellum was observed, characteristically manifested in energy metabolism, glutamate/glutamine metabolism, osmolytic/antioxidant capacity, and protein/lipid synthesis. These alterations provide strong evidence that the mammalian cerebellum is metabolically responsive to AOH. In light of the cerebellum core functions and its increasingly recognized role in neurocognition, these findings further support the known phenotypic manifestations of AOH into movement and cognitive dysfunctions.

  3. Supplementation with a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product alters the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide challenge in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if feeding a Lactobacillus acidophilus fermentation product to weaned pigs would alter the metabolic response following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pigs (n=30; 6.4+/-0.1 kg BW) were housed individually with ad libitum access to feed and water. Pigs were...

  4. Alteration of cellular lipids and lipid metabolism markers in RTL-W1 cells exposed to model endocrine disrupters.

    PubMed

    Dimastrogiovanni, Giorgio; Córdoba, Marlon; Navarro, Isabel; Jáuregui, Olga; Porte, Cinta

    2015-08-01

    This work investigates the suitability of the rainbow trout liver cell line (RTL-W1) as an in-vitro model to study the ability of model endocrine disrupters, namely TBT, TPT, 4-NP, BPA and DEHP, to act as metabolic disrupters by altering cellular lipids and markers of lipid metabolism. Among the tested compounds, BPA and DEHP significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAGs), while all the compounds -apart from TPT-, altered membrane lipids - phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and plasmalogen PCs - indicating a strong interaction of the toxicants with cell membranes and cell signaling. RTL-W1 expressed a number of genes involved in lipid metabolism that were modulated by exposure to BPA, TBT and TPT (up-regulation of FATP1 and FAS) and 4-NP and DEHP (down-regulation of FAS and LPL). Multiple and complex modes of action of these chemicals were observed in RTL-W1 cells, both in terms of expression of genes related to lipid metabolism and alteration of cellular lipids. Although further characterization is needed, this might be a useful model for the detection of chemicals leading to steatosis or other diseases associated with lipid metabolism in fish.

  5. Altered Mitochondria, Protein Synthesis Machinery, and Purine Metabolism Are Molecular Contributors to the Pathogenesis of Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease.

    PubMed

    Ansoleaga, Belén; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Llorens, Franc; Hernández-Ortega, Karina; Carmona Tech, Margarita; Antonio Del Rio, José; Zerr, Inga; Ferrer, Isidro

    2016-06-12

    Neuron loss, synaptic decline, and spongiform change are the hallmarks of sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), and may be related to deficiencies in mitochondria, energy metabolism, and protein synthesis. To investigate these relationships, we determined the expression levels of genes encoding subunits of the 5 protein complexes of the electron transport chain, proteins involved in energy metabolism, nucleolar and ribosomal proteins, and enzymes of purine metabolism in frontal cortex samples from 15 cases of sCJD MM1 and age-matched controls. We also assessed the protein expression levels of subunits of the respiratory chain, initiation and elongation translation factors of protein synthesis, and localization of selected mitochondrial components. We identified marked, generalized alterations of mRNA and protein expression of most subunits of all 5 mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes in sCJD cases. Expression of molecules involved in protein synthesis and purine metabolism were also altered in sCJD. These findings point to altered mRNA and protein expression of components of mitochondria, protein synthesis machinery, and purine metabolism as components of the pathogenesis of CJD.

  6. Prenatal Hyperandrogenization Induces Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations Which Depend on the Levels of Testosterone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Amalfi, Sabrina; Velez, Leandro Martín; Heber, María Florencia; Vighi, Susana; Ferreira, Silvana Rocío; Orozco, Adriana Vega; Pignataro, Omar; Motta, Alicia Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    Prenatal hyperandrogenism is able to induce polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) in rats. The aim of the present study was to establish if the levels of prenatal testosterone may determine the extent of metabolic and endocrine alterations during the adult life. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were prenatally injected with either 2 or 5 mg free testosterone (groups T2 and T5 respectively) from day 16 to day 19 day of gestation. Female offspring from T2 and T5 displayed different phenotype of PCOS during adult life. Offspring from T2 showed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and ovulatory cycles whereas those from T5 displayed hyperandrogenism, ovarian cysts and anovulatory cycles. Both group showed increased circulating glucose levels after the intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test (IPGTT; an evaluation of insulin resistance). IPGTT was higher in T5 rats and directly correlated with body weight at prepubertal age. However, the decrease in the body weight at prepubertal age was compensated during adult life. Although both groups showed enhanced ovarian steroidogenesis, it appears that the molecular mechanisms involved were different. The higher dose of testosterone enhanced the expression of both the protein that regulates cholesterol availability (the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)) and the protein expression of the transcriptional factor: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma). Prenatal hyperandrogenization induced an anti-oxidant response that prevented a possible pro-oxidant status. The higher dose of testosterone induced a pro-inflammatory state in ovarian tissue mediated by increased levels of prostaglandin E (PG) and the protein expression of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2, the limiting enzyme of PGs synthesis). In summary, our data show that the levels of testosterone prenatally injected modulate the uterine environment and that this, in turn, would be responsible for the endocrine and metabolic abnormalities and the phenotype of PCOS

  7. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men.

  8. Altered Response to Neuroendocrine Challenge Linked to Indices of the Metabolic Syndrome in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tyrka, A. R.; Walters, O. C.; Price, L. H.; Anderson, G. M.; Carpenter, L. L.

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterized by central obesity, hypertension, insulin resistance, and hypercholesterolemia. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity is frequently abnormal in MetS, and excessive cortisol exposure may be implicated in metabolic derangements. We investigated the hypothesis that cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) responses to a standardized neuroendocrine challenge test would be associated with indices of MetS in a community sample of healthy adults. Healthy adults, 125 men and 170 women, without significant medical problems or chronic medications were recruited from the community. Participants completed the dexamethasone/corticotropin-releasing hormone (Dex/CRH) test, and anthropometric measurements, blood pressure, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and cholesterol were measured. Participants reported on their history of early life stress and recent stress, as well as mood and anxiety symptoms. Cortisol and ACTH responses to the Dex/CRH test were negatively associated with measures of central adiposity (p < 0.001) and blood pressure (p < 0.01), and positively associated with HDL cholesterol (p < 0.01). These findings remained significant after controlling for body mass index (BMI). Measures of stress and anxiety and depressive symptoms were negatively correlated with cortisol and ACTH responses in the Dex/CRH test but were not related to MetS indices. That altered HPA axis function is linked to MetS components even in a healthy community sample suggests that these processes may be involved in the pathogenesis of MetS. Identification of premorbid risk processes might allow for detection and intervention prior to the development of disease. PMID:22549400

  9. Resistance to chemotherapy is associated with altered glucose metabolism in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    SONG, KUI; LI, MIN; XU, XIAOJUN; XUAN, LI; HUANG, GUINIAN; LIU, QIFA

    2016-01-01

    Altered glucose metabolism has been described as a cause of chemoresistance in multiple tumor types. The present study aimed to identify the expression profile of glucose metabolism in drug-resistant acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells and provide potential strategies for the treatment of drug-resistant AML. Bone marrow and serum samples were obtained from patients with AML that were newly diagnosed or had relapsed. The messenger RNA expression of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α, glucose transporter (GLUT)1, and hexokinase-II was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The levels of LDH and β subunit of human F1-F0 adenosine triphosphate synthase (β-F1-ATPase) were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent and western blot assays. The HL-60 and HL-60/ADR cell lines were used to evaluate glycolytic activity and effect of glycolysis inhibition on cellular proliferation and apoptosis. Drug-resistant HL-60/ADR cells exhibited a significantly increased level of glycolysis compared with the drug-sensitive HL-60 cell line. The expression of HIF-1α, hexokinase-II, GLUT1 and LDH were increased in AML patients with no remission (NR), compared to healthy control individuals and patients with complete remission (CR) and partial remission. The expression of β-F1-ATPase in patients with NR was decreased compared with the expression in the CR group. Treatment of HL-60/ADR cells with 2-deoxy-D-glucose or 3-bromopyruvate increased in vitro sensitivity to Adriamycin (ADR), while treatment of HL-60 cells did not affect drug cytotoxicity. Subsequent to treatment for 24 h, apoptosis in these two cell lines showed no significant difference. However, glycolytic inhibitors in combination with ADR increased cellular necrosis. These findings indicate that increased glycolysis and low efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation may contribute to drug resistance. Targeting glycolysis is a viable strategy for modulating chemoresistance in AML. PMID:27347147

  10. Altered mineral metabolism as a mechanism underlying fetal alcohol syndrome in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Zidenberg-Cherr, S.; Hurley, L.S.; Keen, C.L.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have observed that consumption of EtOH by dams fed diets low in Zn can result in small fetuses and a high incidence of fetal abnormalities. To test the hypothesis that EtOH alters maternal and fetal mineral metabolism, virgin female rats were fed liquid diets containing Zn at 2 ..mu..g/ml (low;LZn) 30 ..mu..g/ml (adequate;AZn), or 300 ..mu..g/ml (supplemented;SZn); EtOH contributed 0% kcals or 36% of kcals (EtOH). After 4 weeks females were bred and fed the same diets. Rats were killed on d21 of gestation; maternal and fetal tissues were collected. EtOH and fed AZn dams had plasma Zn levels which were 10% lower than their controls. Plasma Zn was similar between LZn and LZnEtOH dams; levels were 80% lower than in AZn dams. Plasma Cu was higher in EtOH fed dams than their controls; dams fed the SZn diets had low plasma Cu levels compared to all other groups. Fetal Zn increased with dietary Zn; levels were affected by EtOH only in the SZn group as levels were lower than their controls. Fetal Cu levels were not consistently affected by EtOH; levels were lower in the SZn groups than all other groups. Fetal Fe levels were higher in EtOH groups than their controls. These results show that EtOH affects fetal mineral metabolism supporting the hypothesis that this may be a mechanism underlying FAS. While induced Zn deficiency may be one component of this disorder it is evident that excess Zn supplementation may also be deleterious to the conceptus.

  11. Altered glutamatergic metabolism associated with punctate white matter lesions in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Wisnowski, Jessica L; Blüml, Stefan; Paquette, Lisa; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Nelson, Marvin D; Painter, Michael J; Damasio, Hanna; Gilles, Floyd; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Preterm infants (∼10% of all births) are at high-risk for long-term neurodevelopmental disabilities, most often resulting from white matter injury sustained during the neonatal period. Glutamate excitotoxicity is hypothesized to be a key mechanism in the pathogenesis of white matter injury; however, there has been no in vivo demonstration of glutamate excitotoxicity in preterm infants. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), we tested the hypothesis that glutamate and glutamine, i.e., markers of glutamatergic metabolism, are altered in association with punctate white matter lesions and "diffuse excessive high signal intensity" (DEHSI), the predominant patterns of preterm white matter injury. We reviewed all clinically-indicated MRS studies conducted on preterm infants at a single institution during a six-year period and determined the absolute concentration of glutamate, glutamine, and four other key metabolites in the parietal white matter in 108 of those infants after two investigators independently evaluated the studies for punctate white matter lesions and DEHSI. Punctate white matter lesions were associated with a 29% increase in glutamine concentration (p = 0.002). In contrast, there were no differences in glutamatergic metabolism in association with DEHSI. Severe DEHSI, however, was associated with increased lactate concentration (p = 0.001), a marker of tissue acidosis. Findings from this study support glutamate excitotoxicity in the pathogenesis of punctate white matter lesions, but not necessarily in DEHSI, and suggest that MRS provides a useful biomarker for determining the pathogenesis of white matter injury in preterm infants during a period when neuroprotective agents may be especially effective.

  12. Plant polyphenols alter a pathway of energy metabolism by inhibiting fecal Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xue, Bin; Xie, Jinli; Huang, Jiachen; Chen, Long; Gao, Lijuan; Ou, Shiyi; Wang, Yong; Peng, Xichun

    2016-03-01

    The function of plant polyphenols in controlling body weight has been in focus for a long time. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of plant polyphenols on fecal microbiota utilizing oligosaccharides. Three plant polyphenols, quercetin, catechin and puerarin, were added into liquid media for fermenting for 24 h. The pH values, OD600 of the cultures and the content of carbohydrates at 0, 6, 10, 14, 18 and 24 h were determined. The abundance of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes in each culture was quantified with qPCR after 10 h of fermentation, and the bacterial composition was analyzed using the software Quantitative Insights Into Microbial Ecology. The results revealed that all three plant polyphenols could significantly inhibit the growth of Bacteroidetes (P < 0.01) and Firmicutes (P < 0.01) while at the same time down-regulate the ratio of Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes (P < 0.01). But the fecal bacteria could maintain the ability to hydrolyze fructo-oligosaccharide (FOS) in vitro. Among the tested polyphenols, catechin presented the most intense inhibitory activity towards the growth of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and quercetin was the second. Only the samples with catechin had a significantly lower energy metabolism (P < 0.05). In conclusion, plant polyphenols can change the pathway of degrading FOS or even energy metabolism in vivo by altering gut microbiota composition. It may be one of the mechanisms in which plant polyphenols can lead to body weight loss. It's the first report to study in vitro gastrointestinal microbiota fermenting dietary fibers under the intervention of plant polyphenols.

  13. Heme oxygenase 1 improves glucoses metabolism and kidney histological alterations in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Ptilovanciv, Ellen On; Fernandes, Gabryelle S; Teixeira, Luciana C; Reis, Luciana A; Pessoa, Edson A; Convento, Marcia B; Simões, Manuel J; Albertoni, Guilherme A; Schor, Nestor; Borges, Fernanda T

    2013-01-16

    One important concern in the treatment of diabetes is the maintenance of glycemic levels and the prevention of diabetic nephropathy. Inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a rate-limiting enzyme thought to have antioxidant and cytoprotective roles. The goal of the present study was to analyze the effect of HO-1 induction in chronically hyperglycemic rats. The hyperglycemic rats were divided into two groups: one group, called STZ, was given a single injection of streptozotocin; and the other group was given a single streptozotocin injection as well as daily injections of hemin, an HO-1 inducer, over 60 days (STZ + HEME). A group of normoglycemic, untreated rats was used as the control (CTL).Body weight, diuresis, serum glucose levels, microalbuminuria, creatinine clearance rate, urea levels, sodium excretion, and lipid peroxidation were analyzed. Histological alterations and immunohistochemistry for HO-1 and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were assessed. After 60 days, the STZ group exhibited an increase in blood glucose, diuresis, urea, microalbuminuria, and sodium excretion. There was no weight gain, and there was a decrease in creatinine clearance in comparison to the CTL group. In the STZ + HEME group there was an improvement in the metabolic parameters and kidney function, a decrease in blood glucose, serum urea, and microalbuminuria, and an increase of creatinine clearance, in comparison to the STZ group.There was glomerulosclerosis, collagen deposition in the STZ rats and increase in iNOS and HO-1 expression. In the STZ + HEME group, the glomerulosclerosis and fibrosis was prevented and there was an increase in the expression of HO-1, but decrease in iNOS expression and lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, our data suggest that chronic induction of HO-1 reduces hyperglycemia, improves glucose metabolism and, at least in part, protects the renal tissue from hyperglycemic injury, possibly through the antioxidant activity of HO-1.

  14. Can chronic maternal drug therapy alter the nursing infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme pattern?

    PubMed

    Toddywalla, V S; Patel, S B; Betrabet, S S; Kulkarni, R D; Kombo, I; Saxena, B N

    1995-10-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether minute quantities of maternal drugs ingested over an extended period of time by a breast-feeding infant can alter the activity pattern of the infant's hepatic drug metabolizing enzyme (HDME). The HDME activity patterns of 12 breast-fed infants whose mothers were not on drug therapy were compared with those of 11 infants whose mothers had been taking 30 micrograms levo-norgesterel daily for 90 to 195 days (oral contraceptives group) and of 10 infants whose mothers had been taking ethambutol and isoniazid daily since pregnancy (tuberculosis group). As 6 beta hydroxycortisol in urine is considered to be a good and acceptable reflector of HDME activity, it was estimated from the infants' urine using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) technique. A comparison of the patterns between 90 days of age and 195 days of age of the infants in the control group and the two study groups indicated an increase from 36.6 ng/mL to 58.4 ng/mL at 195 days in the control group. An initial decrease from 36.6 ng/mL to 26.2 ng/mL was noted with commencement of maternal levo-norgesterel therapy, followed by a slow and steady rise to 47.8 ng/mL at 195 days of age, with a shift in the peak from 120 to 135 days of infants age in the oral contraceptive group. A suppressed pattern with decreased levels of 6 beta hydroxycortisol ranging from 19.3 ng/mL to 26.5 ng/mL at 195 days was found in the tuberculosis group. The data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) coupled with Duncan's Multiple range test. Both treatment group showed significant differences from the control group at the 0.050 level. The HDME plays an important role in determining the final outcome of any drug in humans, as it controls the metabolism of drugs. Hence, alterations in its activity caused by the transfer of maternal drugs over a prolonged period of time could pose a serious problem to nurslings when they require drugs for their own benefit.

  15. Alterations in the brain adenosine metabolism cause behavioral and neurological impairment in ADA-deficient mice and patients

    PubMed Central

    Sauer, Aisha V.; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Fumagalli, Francesca; Bianchi, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro L.; Dallatomasina, Chiara; Riboni, Elisa; Politi, Letterio S.; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Casiraghi, Miriam; Carriglio, Nicola; Cominelli, Manuela; Forcellini, Carlo Alberto; Barzaghi, Federica; Ferrua, Francesca; Minicucci, Fabio; Medaglini, Stefania; Leocani, Letizia; la Marca, Giancarlo; Notarangelo, Lucia D.; Azzari, Chiara; Comi, Giancarlo; Baldoli, Cristina; Canale, Sabrina; Sessa, Maria; D’Adamo, Patrizia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an autosomal recessive variant of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by systemic accumulation of ADA substrates. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities observed in ADA-SCID patients surviving after stem cell transplantation or gene therapy represent an unresolved enigma in the field. We found significant neurological and cognitive alterations in untreated ADA-SCID patients as well as in two groups of patients after short- and long-term enzyme replacement therapy with PEG-ADA. These included motor dysfunction, EEG alterations, sensorineural hypoacusia, white matter and ventricular alterations in MRI as well as a low mental development index or IQ. Ada-deficient mice were significantly less active and showed anxiety-like behavior. Molecular and metabolic analyses showed that this phenotype coincides with metabolic alterations and aberrant adenosine receptor signaling. PEG-ADA treatment corrected metabolic adenosine-based alterations, but not cellular and signaling defects, indicating an intrinsic nature of the neurological and behavioral phenotype in ADA deficiency. PMID:28074903

  16. Alterations in the brain adenosine metabolism cause behavioral and neurological impairment in ADA-deficient mice and patients.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Aisha V; Hernandez, Raisa Jofra; Fumagalli, Francesca; Bianchi, Veronica; Poliani, Pietro L; Dallatomasina, Chiara; Riboni, Elisa; Politi, Letterio S; Tabucchi, Antonella; Carlucci, Filippo; Casiraghi, Miriam; Carriglio, Nicola; Cominelli, Manuela; Forcellini, Carlo Alberto; Barzaghi, Federica; Ferrua, Francesca; Minicucci, Fabio; Medaglini, Stefania; Leocani, Letizia; la Marca, Giancarlo; Notarangelo, Lucia D; Azzari, Chiara; Comi, Giancarlo; Baldoli, Cristina; Canale, Sabrina; Sessa, Maria; D'Adamo, Patrizia; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2017-01-11

    Adenosine Deaminase (ADA) deficiency is an autosomal recessive variant of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) caused by systemic accumulation of ADA substrates. Neurological and behavioral abnormalities observed in ADA-SCID patients surviving after stem cell transplantation or gene therapy represent an unresolved enigma in the field. We found significant neurological and cognitive alterations in untreated ADA-SCID patients as well as in two groups of patients after short- and long-term enzyme replacement therapy with PEG-ADA. These included motor dysfunction, EEG alterations, sensorineural hypoacusia, white matter and ventricular alterations in MRI as well as a low mental development index or IQ. Ada-deficient mice were significantly less active and showed anxiety-like behavior. Molecular and metabolic analyses showed that this phenotype coincides with metabolic alterations and aberrant adenosine receptor signaling. PEG-ADA treatment corrected metabolic adenosine-based alterations, but not cellular and signaling defects, indicating an intrinsic nature of the neurological and behavioral phenotype in ADA deficiency.

  17. Role of hormonal factors in plasma K alterations in acute respiratory and metabolic alkalosis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Hishida, A; Ohishi, K; Kimura, M; Honda, N

    1990-02-01

    Studies were performed on previously nephrectomized dogs to examine roles of hormonal factors in plasma potassium alterations in acute alkalosis. Respiratory and metabolic alkalosis were induced by hyperventilation and intravenous NaHCO3 or tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) infusion, respectively. Respiratory and NaHCO3-induced alkalosis provoked decreases in plasma potassium from the control value of 5.12 +/- 0.68 (SE) to 4.21 +/- 0.55 meq/l (P less than 0.01) and from 4.65 +/- 0.26 to 3.91 +/- 0.16 meq/l (P less than 0.01) within 180 min, respectively. In contrast, Tris-induced alkalosis elicited an increase in plasma potassium from the control value of 4.56 +/- 0.30 to 5.31 +/- 0.30 meq/l (P less than 0.01). Hypokalemia in respiratory alkalosis was associated with a decrease in the plasma norepinephrine concentration from the control level of 377 +/- 104 to 155 +/- 41 pg/ml (P less than 0.05) but not with changes in plasma levels of epinephrine, insulin, glucagon, cortisol, and aldosterone. However, this hypokalemia was not affected by phentolamine. Also, somatostatin did not modify the hypokalemic response. NaHCO3-induced hypokalemia was associated with a decline in the plasma aldosterone and norepinephrine concentrations. The decline in plasma norepinephrine in NaHCO3-induced alkalosis followed the decrease in plasma potassium. In Tris-induced alkalosis, plasma insulin increased but norepinephrine decreased. The findings do not suggest fundamental roles of the hormonal factors in the plasma potassium alterations in bilaterally nephrectomized dogs with acute alkalosis.

  18. Identification of altered metabolic pathways in plasma and CSF in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease using metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Trushina, Eugenia; Dutta, Tumpa; Persson, Xuan-Mai T; Mielke, Michelle M; Petersen, Ronald C

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's Disease (AD) currently affects more than 5 million Americans, with numbers expected to grow dramatically as the population ages. The pathophysiological changes in AD patients begin decades before the onset of dementia, highlighting the urgent need for the development of early diagnostic methods. Compelling data demonstrate that increased levels of amyloid-beta compromise multiple cellular pathways; thus, the investigation of changes in various cellular networks is essential to advance our understanding of early disease mechanisms and to identify novel therapeutic targets. We applied a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics approach to determine global metabolic changes in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from the same individuals with different AD severity. Metabolic profiling detected a total of significantly altered 342 plasma and 351 CSF metabolites, of which 22% were identified. Based on the changes of >150 metabolites, we found 23 altered canonical pathways in plasma and 20 in CSF in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) vs. cognitively normal (CN) individuals with a false discovery rate <0.05. The number of affected pathways increased with disease severity in both fluids. Lysine metabolism in plasma and the Krebs cycle in CSF were significantly affected in MCI vs. CN. Cholesterol and sphingolipids transport was altered in both CSF and plasma of AD vs. CN. Other 30 canonical pathways significantly disturbed in MCI and AD patients included energy metabolism, Krebs cycle, mitochondrial function, neurotransmitter and amino acid metabolism, and lipid biosynthesis. Pathways in plasma that discriminated between all groups included polyamine, lysine, tryptophan metabolism, and aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis; and in CSF involved cortisone and prostaglandin 2 biosynthesis and metabolism. Our data suggest metabolomics could advance our understanding of the early disease mechanisms shared in progression from CN to MCI and to AD.

  19. Exposure to sorbitol during lactation causes metabolic alterations and genotoxic effects in rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Felipe S; Araujo-Lima, Carlos F; Aiub, Claudia A F; Felzenszwalb, Israel

    2016-10-17

    Sorbitol is a polyol used by the food industry as a sweetener. Women are consuming diet and light products containing sorbitol during pregnancy and in the postnatal period to prevent themselves from excessive weight gain and maintain a slim body. Although there is no evidence for the genotoxicity of sorbitol in the perinatal period, this study focused on evaluating the effects of the maternal intake of sorbitol on the biochemical and toxicological parameters of lactating Wistar rat offspring after 14days of mother-to-offspring exposure. A dose-dependent reduction of offspring length was observed. An increase in sorbitol levels determined in the milk was also observed. However, we detected an inverse relationship between the exposition dose in milk fructose and triacylglycerols concentrations. There was an increase in the plasmatic levels of ALT, AST and LDLc and a decrease in proteins, cholesterol and glucose levels in the offspring. Sorbitol exposure caused hepatocyte genotoxicity, including micronuclei induction. Maternal sorbitol intake induced myelotoxicity and myelosuppression in their offspring. The Comet assay of the blood cells detected a dose-dependent genotoxic response within the sorbitol-exposed offspring. According to our results, sorbitol is able to induce important metabolic alterations and genotoxic responses in the exposed offspring.

  20. Evidence of Insulin Resistance and Other Metabolic Alterations in Boys with Duchenne or Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Sanchez, Raúl; Escobar, Rosa E.; Cruz-Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; López-Alarcón, Mardia; Bernabe García, Mariela; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón; Matute, Guadalupe; Velázquez Wong, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Our aim was (1) to determine the frequency of insulin resistance (IR) in patients with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD), (2) to identify deleted exons of DMD gene associated with obesity and IR, and (3) to explore some likely molecular mechanisms leading to IR. Materials and Methods. In 66 patients with DMD/BMD without corticosteroids treatment, IR, obesity, and body fat mass were evaluated. Molecules involved in glucose metabolism were analyzed in muscle biopsies. Results show that 18.3%, 22.7%, and 68% were underweight, overweight, or obese, and with high adiposity, respectively; 48.5% and 36.4% presented hyperinsulinemia and IR, respectively. Underweight patients (27.3%) exhibited hyperinsulinemia and IR. Carriers of deletions in exons 45 (OR = 9.32; 95% CI = 1.16–74.69) and 50 (OR = 8.73; 95% CI = 1.17–65.10) from DMD gene presented higher risk for IR than noncarriers. We observed a greater staining of cytoplasmic aggregates for GLUT4 in muscle biopsies than healthy muscle tissue. Conclusion. Obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and IR were observed in DMD/BMD patients and are independent of corticosteroids treatment. Carriers of deletion in exons 45 or 50 from DMD gene are at risk for developing IR. It is suggested that alteration in GLUT4 in muscle fibers from DMD patients could be involved in IR. PMID:26089900

  1. Evidence of Insulin Resistance and Other Metabolic Alterations in Boys with Duchenne or Becker Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Sanchez, Raúl; Escobar, Rosa E; Cruz-Guzmán, Oriana Del Rocío; López-Alarcón, Mardia; Bernabe García, Mariela; Coral-Vázquez, Ramón; Matute, Guadalupe; Velázquez Wong, Ana Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Aim. Our aim was (1) to determine the frequency of insulin resistance (IR) in patients with Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (DMD/BMD), (2) to identify deleted exons of DMD gene associated with obesity and IR, and (3) to explore some likely molecular mechanisms leading to IR. Materials and Methods. In 66 patients with DMD/BMD without corticosteroids treatment, IR, obesity, and body fat mass were evaluated. Molecules involved in glucose metabolism were analyzed in muscle biopsies. Results show that 18.3%, 22.7%, and 68% were underweight, overweight, or obese, and with high adiposity, respectively; 48.5% and 36.4% presented hyperinsulinemia and IR, respectively. Underweight patients (27.3%) exhibited hyperinsulinemia and IR. Carriers of deletions in exons 45 (OR = 9.32; 95% CI = 1.16-74.69) and 50 (OR = 8.73; 95% CI = 1.17-65.10) from DMD gene presented higher risk for IR than noncarriers. We observed a greater staining of cytoplasmic aggregates for GLUT4 in muscle biopsies than healthy muscle tissue. Conclusion. Obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and IR were observed in DMD/BMD patients and are independent of corticosteroids treatment. Carriers of deletion in exons 45 or 50 from DMD gene are at risk for developing IR. It is suggested that alteration in GLUT4 in muscle fibers from DMD patients could be involved in IR.

  2. Alteration of heme metabolism in a cellular model of Diamond-Blackfan anemia.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Sonia; Aspesi, Anna; Silengo, Lorenzo; Altruda, Fiorella; Dianzani, Irma; Chiabrando, Deborah

    2016-04-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a congenital pure red cell aplasia often associated with skeletal malformations. Mutations in ribosomal protein coding genes, mainly in RPS19, account for the majority of DBA cases. The molecular mechanisms underlying DBA pathogenesis are still not completely understood. Alternative spliced isoforms of FLVCR1 (feline leukemia virus subgroup C receptor 1) transcript coding for non-functional proteins have been reported in some DBA patients. Consistently, a phenotype very close to DBA has been described in animal models of FLVCR1 deficiency. FLVCR1 gene codes for two proteins: the plasma membrane heme exporter FLVCR1a and the mitochondrial heme exporter FLVCR1b. The coordinated expression of both FLVCR1 isoforms regulates an intracellular heme pool, necessary for proper expansion and differentiation of erythroid precursors. Here, we investigate the role of FLVCR1 isoforms in a cellular model of DBA. RPS19-downregulated TF1 cells show reduced FLVCR1a and FLVCR1b mRNA levels associated with heme overload. The downregulation of FLVCR1 isoforms affects cell cycle progression and apoptosis in differentiating K562 cells, a phenotype similar to DBA. Taken together, these data suggest that alteration of heme metabolism could play a role in the pathogenesis of DBA.

  3. Cardiac Autonomic Alteration and Metabolic Syndrome: An Ambulatory ECG-based Study in A General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yan; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Ahn, Andrew; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Ho, Yi-Lwun; Chen, Ming-Fong; Peng, Chung-Kang

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has been associated with chronic damage to the cardiovascular system. This study aimed to evaluate early stage cardiac autonomic dysfunction with electrocardiography (ECG)-based measures in MetS subjects. During 2012–2013, 175 subjects with MetS and 226 healthy controls underwent ECG recordings of at least 4 hours starting in the morning with ambulatory one-lead ECG monitors. MetS was diagnosed using the criteria defined in the Adult Treatment Panel III, with a modification of waist circumference for Asians. Conventional heart rate variability (HRV) analysis, and complexity index (CI1–20) calculated from 20 scales of entropy (multiscale entropy, MSE), were compared between subjects with MetS and controls. Compared with the healthy controls, subjects with MetS had significantly reduced HRV, including SDNN and pNN20 in time domain, VLF, LF and HF in frequency domain, as well as SD2 in Poincaré analysis. MetS subjects have significantly lower complexity index (CI1–20) than healthy subjects (1.69 ± 0.18 vs. 1.77 ± 0.12, p < 0.001). MetS severity was inversely associated with the CI1–20 (r = −0.27, p < 0.001). MetS is associated with significant alterations in heart rate dynamics, including HRV and complexity. PMID:28290487

  4. Acute nephropathy induced by gold sodium thiomalate: alterations in renal heme metabolism and morphology.

    PubMed

    Eiseman, J L; Ribas, J L; Knight, E; Alvares, A P

    1987-11-01

    Gold compounds are used clinically in rheumatoid arthritis therapy. Acute renal toxicity is observed in some patients receiving chrysotherapy. The present study addresses morphofunctional and biochemical changes in rat kidneys during the first 8 days following a single ip injection of gold sodium thiomalate (AuTM), one of the gold compounds presently in clinical use. Compared to controls, AuTM pretreatment resulted in increased urine output and elevated serum creatinine and urea nitrogen concentrations. Also, by Day 8, treated rats had decreased body weights and increased kidney weights. Postmortem examination on Day 1 showed pale and mottled kidneys and diffusely pale inner cortex. Microscopically, there was severe coagulative necrosis of the proximal tubular epithelium. Epithelial regeneration was prominent by Day 4 and was nearly complete by Day 8. The regenerating epithelium was hyperplastic with basophilic cytoplasm and pleomorphic nuclei. Alterations in renal heme biosynthesis and drug metabolism paralleled the morphologic changes. The activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase and benzo[a]pyrene hydroxylase were inhibited on Days 1, 2, and 4 following AuTM administration. Decreases in monooxygenase activity were accompanied by decreases in renal cytochrome P-450 levels. In contrast, renal microsomal heme oxygenase activity was elevated 9.5-fold on Day 1 and 2.5-fold on Day 2. By Day 8, all renal enzymatic activities assayed for were similar to those obtained with untreated rats.

  5. Metabolic and histopathological alterations in the marine bivalve Mytilus galloprovincialis induced by chronic exposure to acrylamide.

    PubMed

    Larguinho, Miguel; Cordeiro, Ana; Diniz, Mário S; Costa, Pedro M; Baptista, Pedro V

    2014-11-01

    Although the neurotoxic and genotoxic potential of acrylamide has been established in freshwater fish, the full breadth of the toxicological consequences induced by this xenobiotic has not yet been disclosed, particularly in aquatic invertebrates. To assess the effects of acrylamide on a bivalve model, the Mediterranean mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis), two different setups were accomplished: 1) acute exposure to several concentrations of waterborne acrylamide to determine lethality thresholds of the substance and 2) chronic exposure to more reduced acrylamide concentrations to survey phases I and II metabolic endpoints and to perform a whole-body screening for histopathological alterations. Acute toxicity was low (LC50≈400mg/L). However, mussels were responsive to prolonged exposure to chronic concentrations of waterborne acrylamide (1-10mg/L), yielding a significant increase in lipid peroxidation plus EROD and GST activities. Still, total anti-oxidant capacity was not exceeded. In addition, no neurotoxic effects could be determined through acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity. The findings suggest aryl-hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr)-dependent responses in mussels exposed to acrylamide, although reduced comparatively to vertebrates. No significant histological damage was found in digestive gland or gills but female gonads endured severe necrosis and oocyte atresia. Altogether, the results indicate that acrylamide may induce gonadotoxicity in mussels, although the subject should benefit from further research. Altogether, the findings suggest that the risk of acrylamide to aquatic animals, especially molluscs, may be underestimated.

  6. Alterations in glucose and protein metabolism in animals subjected to simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Rodnick, K. J.; Azhar, S.; Reaven, G. M.; Dolkas, C. B.

    1992-01-01

    Reduction of physical activity due to disease or environmental restraints, such as total bed rest or exposure to spaceflight, leads to atrophy of skeletal muscle and is frequently accompanied by alterations in food intake and the concentration of metabolic regulatory hormones such as insulin. Hindlimb suspension of laboratory rats, as a model for microgravity, also shows marked atrophy of gravity-dependent muscles along with a reduced gain in body weight. Suspended rats exhibit enhanced sensitivity to insulin-induced glucose uptake when compared with normal control rats and resistance to insulin action when compared with control rats matched similarly for reduced body weight gain. These changes are accompanied by decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in soleus but not plantaris muscle, unchanged glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb and decreased sensitivity but not responsiveness to insulin-induced suppression of net proteolysis in hindlimb skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that loss of insulin sensitivity during muscle atrophy is associated with decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in atrophied soleus muscle along with decreased sensitivity to the effects of insulin on suppressing net protein breakdown but not on enhancing glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb.

  7. Skin ceramide alterations in first-episode schizophrenia indicate abnormal sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Smesny, Stefan; Schmelzer, Christian E H; Hinder, Anke; Köhler, Alexandra; Schneider, Christiane; Rudzok, Maria; Schmidt, Ulrike; Milleit, Berko; Milleit, Christine; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Neubert, Reinhard H H; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2013-07-01

    There is considerable evidence for specific pathology of lipid metabolism in schizophrenia, affecting polyunsaturated fatty acids and in particular sphingolipids. These deficits are assumed to interfere with neuronal membrane functioning and the development and maintenance of myelin sheaths. Recent studies suggest that some of these lipid pathologies might also be detected in peripheral skin tests. In this study, we examined different skin lipids and their relation to schizophrenia. We assessed epidermal lipid profiles in 22 first-episode antipsychotic-naïve schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls matched for age and gender using a hexan/ethanol extraction technique and combined high-performance thin-layer chromatography/gas-chromatography. We found highly significant increase of ceramide AH and NH/AS classes in patients and decrease of EOS and NP ceramide classes. This is the first demonstration of specific peripheral sphingolipid alterations in schizophrenia. The results support recent models of systemic lipid pathology and in particular of specific sphingolipids, which are crucial in neuronal membrane integrity. Given recent findings showing amelioration of psychopathology using fatty acid supplementation, our findings also bear relevance for sphingolipids as potential biomarkers of the disease.

  8. Altered macrophage arachidonic acid metabolism induced by endotoxin tolerance: characterization and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.S.

    1986-01-01

    Altered macrophage arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism may play a role in endotoxic shock and the phenomenon of endotoxin tolerance induced by repeated injections of endotoxin. Studies were initiated to characterize both lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolite formation by endotoxin tolerant and non-tolerant macrophages in response to 4 different stimuli, i.e., endotoxin, glucan, zymosan, and the calcium ionophore A23187. In contrast to previous reports of decreased prostaglandin synthesis by tolerant macrophages, A23187-stimulated immunoreactive (i) leukotriene (LT) C/sub 4/D/sub 4/ and prostaglandin (PG) E/sub 2/ production by tolerant cells was greater than that by non-tolerant controls (p <0.001). However, A23187-stimulated i6-keto PGF/sub 1a/ levels were lower in tolerant macrophages compared to controls (P < 0.05). iL TC/sub 4/D/sub 4/ production was not significantly stimulated by endotoxin or glucan, but was stimulated by zymosan in non-tolerant cells. Synthesis of iLTB/sub 4/ by control macrophages was stimulated by endotoxin (p <0.01). The effect of tolerance on factors that affect AA release was investigated by measuring /sup 14/C-AA incorporation and release and phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity

  9. Alterations in glucose and protein metabolism in animals subjected to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondon, C. E.; Rodnick, K. J.; Dolkas, C. B.; Azhar, S.; Reaven, G. M.

    1992-09-01

    Reduction of physical activity due to disease or environmental restraints, such as total bed rest or exposure to spaceflight, leads to atrophy of skeletal muscle and is frequently accompanied by alterations in food intake and the concentration of metabolic regulatory hormones such as insulin. Hindlimb suspension of laboratory rats, as a model for microgravity, also shows marked atrophy of gravity dependent muscles along with a reduced gain in body weight. Suspended rats exhibit enhanced sensitivity to insulin-induced glucose uptake when compared with normal control rats and resistance to insulin action when compared with control rats matched similarly for reduced body weight gain. These changes are accompanied by decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in soleus but not plantaris muscle, unchanged glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb and decreased sensitivity but not responsiveness to insulin-induced suppression of net proteolysis in hindlimb skeletal muscle. These findings suggest that loss of insulin sensitivity during muscle atrophy is associated with decreased insulin binding and tyrosine kinase activity in atrophied soleus muscle along with decreased sensitivity to the effects of insulin on suppressing net protein breakdown but not on enhancing glucose uptake by perfused hindlimb.

  10. Dried plum's unique capacity to reverse bone loss and alter bone metabolism in postmenopausal osteoporosis model.

    PubMed

    Rendina, Elizabeth; Hembree, Kelsey D; Davis, McKale R; Marlow, Denver; Clarke, Stephen L; Halloran, Bernard P; Lucas, Edralin A; Smith, Brenda J

    2013-01-01

    Interest in dried plum has increased over the past decade due to its promise in restoring bone and preventing bone loss in animal models of osteoporosis. This study compared the effects of dried plum on bone to other dried fruits and further explored the potential mechanisms of action through which dried plum may exert its osteoprotective effects. Adult osteopenic ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6 mice were fed either a control diet or a diet supplemented with 25% (w/w) dried plum, apple, apricot, grape or mango for 8 weeks. Whole body and spine bone mineral density improved in mice consuming the dried plum, apricot and grape diets compared to the OVX control mice, but dried plum was the only fruit to have an anabolic effect on trabecular bone in the vertebra and prevent bone loss in the tibia. Restoration of biomechanical properties occurred in conjunction with the changes in trabecular bone in the spine. Compared to other dried fruits in this study, dried plum was unique in its ability to down-regulate osteoclast differentiation coincident with up-regulating osteoblast and glutathione (GPx) activity. These alterations in bone metabolism and antioxidant status compared to other dried fruits provide insight into dried plum's unique effects on bone.

  11. Cpt1a gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells as an early biomarker of diet-related metabolic alterations

    PubMed Central

    Díaz-Rúa, Rubén; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2016-01-01

    Background Research on biomarkers that provide early information about the development of future metabolic alterations is an emerging discipline. Gene expression analysis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is a promising tool to identify subjects at risk of developing diet-related diseases. Objective We analysed PBMC expression of key energy homeostasis-related genes in a time-course analysis in order to find out early markers of metabolic alterations due to sustained intake of high-fat (HF) and high-protein (HP) diets. Design We administered HF and HP diets (4 months) to adult Wistar rats in isocaloric conditions to a control diet, mainly to avoid overweight associated with the intake of hyperlipidic diets and, thus, to be able to characterise markers of metabolically obese normal-weight (MONW) syndrome. PBMC samples were collected at different time points of dietary treatment and expression of relevant energy homeostatic genes analysed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Serum parameters related with metabolic syndrome, as well as fat deposition in liver, were also analysed. Results The most outstanding results were those obtained for the expression of the lipolytic gene carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1a (Cpt1a). Cpt1a expression in PBMC increased after only 1 month of exposure to both unbalanced diets, and this increased expression was maintained thereafter. Interestingly, in the case of the HF diet, Cpt1a expression was altered even in the absence of increased body weight but correlated with alterations such as higher insulin resistance, alteration of serum lipid profile and, particularly, increased fat deposition in liver, a feature characteristic of metabolic syndrome, which was even observed in animals fed with HP diet. Conclusions We propose Cpt1a gene expression analysis in PBMC as an early biomarker of metabolic alterations associated with MONW phenotype due to the intake of isocaloric HF diets, as well as a marker of

  12. Metabolism of Fructooligosaccharides in Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III via Differential Gene Transcription and Alteration of Cell Membrane Fluidity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen; Zhao, Guozhong

    2015-01-01

    Although fructooligosaccharides (FOS) can selectively stimulate the growth and activity of probiotics and beneficially modulate the balance of intestinal microbiota, knowledge of the molecular mechanism for FOS metabolism by probiotics is still limited. Here a combined transcriptomic and physiological approach was used to survey the global alterations that occurred during the logarithmic growth of Lactobacillus plantarum ST-III using FOS or glucose as the sole carbon source. A total of 363 genes were differentially transcribed; in particular, two gene clusters were induced by FOS. Gene inactivation revealed that both of the clusters participated in the metabolism of FOS, which were transported across the membrane by two phosphotransferase systems (PTSs) and were subsequently hydrolyzed by a β-fructofuranosidase (SacA) in the cytoplasm. Combining the measurements of the transcriptome- and membrane-related features, we discovered that the genes involved in the biosynthesis of fatty acids (FAs) were repressed in cells grown on FOS; as a result, the FA profiles were altered by shortening of the carbon chains, after which membrane fluidity increased in response to FOS transport and utilization. Furthermore, incremental production of acetate was observed in both the transcriptomic and the metabolic experiments. Our results provided new insights into gene transcription, the production of metabolites, and membrane alterations that could explain FOS metabolism in L. plantarum. PMID:26319882

  13. Genetic Variant in Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Alters Lipid Metabolism in Laying Hens in a Diet-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Long, Cheng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Yanan; Wang, Hao; Yue, Hongyuan; Wang, Xiaocui; Wu, Shugeng; Qi, Guanghai

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variant T329S in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) impairs trimethylamine (TMA) metabolism in birds. The TMA metabolism that under complex genetic and dietary regulation, closely linked to cardiovascular disease risk. We determined whether the genetic defects in TMA metabolism may change other metabolic traits in birds, determined whether the genetic effects depend on diets, and to identify genes or gene pathways that underlie the metabolic alteration induced by genetic and diet factors. We used hens genotyped as FMO3 c.984 A>T as well as those with the homozygous normal genotype. For each genotype, hens were provided with either a corn-soybean meal basal diets (SM), which contains lower levels of TMA precursor, or the basal diets supplemented with 21% of rapeseed meal (RM), which contains higher levels of TMA precursor. An integrative analysis of metabolomic and transcriptomic was used to explore the metabolic patterns of FMO3 genetic variant in hens that were fed the two defined diets. In birds that consumed SM diets, the T329S mutation increased levels of plasma TMA and lipids, FMO3 mRNA levels, and the expression of genes involved in long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. In birds that consumed RM diets, the T329S mutation induced fishy odor syndrome, a repression in LXR pathway and a reciprocal change in lipid metabolism. Variations in TMA and lipid metabolism were linked to the genetic variant in FMO3 in a diet-specific manner, which suggest FMO3 functions in TMA metabolism and lipid homeostasis. LXR pathway and polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism are two possible mechanisms of FMO3 action in response to dietary TMA precursor. PMID:27877090

  14. NMR-based metabolomics reveals brain region-specific metabolic alterations in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats with cognitive dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hong; Lin, Qiuting; Wang, Dan; Xu, Pengtao; Zhao, Liangcai; Hu, Wenyi; Bai, Guanghui; Yan, Zhihan; Gao, Hongchang

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) can result in cognitive dysfunction, but its potential metabolic mechanisms remain unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the metabolite profiling in eight different brain regions of the normal rats and the streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats accompanied by cognitive dysfunction using a (1)H NMR-based metabolomic approach. A mixed linear model analysis was performed to assess the effects of DM, brain region and their interaction on metabolic changes. We found that different brain regions in rats displayed significant metabolic differences. In addition, the hippocampus was more susceptible to DM compared with other brain regions in rats. More interestingly, significant interaction effects of DM and brain region were observed on alanine, creatine/creatine-phosphate, lactate, succinate, aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glycine, choline, N-acetylaspartate, myo-inositol and taurine. Based on metabolic pathway analysis, we speculate that cognitive dysfunction in the STZ-induced diabetic rats may be associated with brain region-specific metabolic alterations involving energy metabolism, neurotransmitters, membrane metabolism and osmoregulation.

  15. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  16. Temperament alters the metabolic response to glucose and insulin challenges and feed restriction in steers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recently the dramatic metabolic differences between Temperamental and Calm cattle have been elucidated; Temperamental cattle maintain greater circulating concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) when compared to Calm cattle, which may influence other metabolic parameters including glucos...

  17. Altered Transport and Metabolism of Phenolic Compounds in Obesity and Diabetes: Implications for Functional Food Development and Assessment.

    PubMed

    Redan, Benjamin W; Buhman, Kimberly K; Novotny, Janet A; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2016-11-01

    Interest in the application of phenolic compounds from the diet or supplements for the prevention of chronic diseases has grown substantially, but the efficacy of such approaches in humans is largely dependent on the bioavailability and metabolism of these compounds. Although food and dietary factors have been the focus of intense investigation, the impact of disease states such as obesity or diabetes on their absorption, metabolism, and eventual efficacy is important to consider. These factors must be understood in order to develop effective strategies that leverage bioactive phenolic compounds for the prevention of chronic disease. The goal of this review is to discuss the inducible metabolic systems that may be influenced by disease states and how these effects impact the bioavailability and metabolism of dietary phenolic compounds. Because current studies generally report that obesity and/or diabetes alter the absorption and excretion of these compounds, this review includes a description of the absorption, conjugation, and excretion pathways for phenolic compounds and how they are potentially altered in disease states. A possible mechanism that will be discussed related to the modulation of phenolic bioavailability and metabolism may be linked to increased inflammatory status from increased amounts of adipose tissue or elevated plasma glucose concentrations. Although more studies are needed, the translation of benefits derived from dietary phenolic compounds to individuals with obesity or diabetes may require the consideration of dosing strategies or be accompanied by adjunct therapies to improve the bioavailability of these compounds.

  18. Virus-Induced Alterations in Primary Metabolism Modulate Susceptibility to Tobacco rattle virus in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calvino, Lourdes; Osorio, Sonia; Hernández, M. Luisa; Hamada, Ignacio B.; del Toro, Francisco J.; Donaire, Livia; Yu, Agnés; Bustos, Regla; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Martínez-Rivas, José M.; Llave, César

    2014-01-01

    During compatible virus infections, plants respond by reprogramming gene expression and metabolite content. While gene expression studies are profuse, our knowledge of the metabolic changes that occur in the presence of the virus is limited. Here, we combine gene expression and metabolite profiling in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) infected with Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) in order to investigate the influence of primary metabolism on virus infection. Our results revealed that primary metabolism is reconfigured in many ways during TRV infection, as reflected by significant changes in the levels of sugars and amino acids. Multivariate data analysis revealed that these alterations were particularly conspicuous at the time points of maximal accumulation of TRV, although infection time was the dominant source of variance during the process. Furthermore, TRV caused changes in lipid and fatty acid composition in infected leaves. We found that several Arabidopsis mutants deficient in branched-chain amino acid catabolism or fatty acid metabolism possessed altered susceptibility to TRV. Finally, we showed that increments in the putrescine content in TRV-infected plants correlated with enhanced tolerance to freezing stress in TRV-infected plants and that impairment of putrescine biosynthesis promoted virus multiplication. Our results thus provide an interesting overview for a better understanding of the relationship between primary metabolism and virus infection. PMID:25358898

  19. Presence of TMPRSS2-ERG is associated with alterations of the metabolic profile in human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Ailin Falkmo; Sandsmark, Elise; Rye, Morten Beck; Wright, Alan J.; Bertilsson, Helena; Richardsen, Elin; Viset, Trond; Bofin, Anna M.; Angelsen, Anders; Selnæs, Kirsten M.; Bathen, Tone Frost; Tessem, May-Britt

    2016-01-01

    TMPRSS2-ERG has been proposed to be a prognostic marker for prostate cancer. The aim of this study was to identify changes in metabolism, genes and biochemical recurrence related to TMPRSS2-ERG by using an integrated approach, combining metabolomics, transcriptomics, histopathology and clinical data in a cohort of 129 human prostate samples (41 patients). Metabolic analyses revealed lower concentrations of citrate and spermine comparing ERGhigh to ERGlow samples, suggesting an increased cancer aggressiveness of ERGhigh compared to ERGlow. These results could be validated in a separate cohort, consisting of 40 samples (40 patients), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging (MRSI) indicated an in vivo translational potential. Alterations of gene expression levels associated with key enzymes in the metabolism of citrate and polyamines were in consistence with the metabolic results. Furthermore, the metabolic alterations between ERGhigh and ERGlow were more pronounced in low Gleason samples than in high Gleason samples, suggesting it as a potential tool for risk stratification. However, no significant difference in biochemical recurrence was detected, although a trend towards significance was detected for low Gleason samples. Using an integrated approach, this study suggests TMPRSS2-ERG as a potential risk stratification tool for inclusion of active surveillance patients. PMID:27276682

  20. Genetic alterations in fatty acid transport and metabolism genes are associated with metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Aritro; Chan, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Reprogramming of cellular metabolism is a hallmark feature of cancer cells. While a distinct set of processes drive metastasis when compared to tumorigenesis, it is yet unclear if genetic alterations in metabolic pathways are associated with metastatic progression of human cancers. Here, we analyzed the mutation, copy number variation and gene expression patterns of a literature-derived model of metabolic genes associated with glycolysis (Warburg effect), fatty acid metabolism (lipogenesis, oxidation, lipolysis, esterification) and fatty acid uptake in >9000 primary or metastatic tumor samples from the multi-cancer TCGA datasets. Our association analysis revealed a uniform pattern of Warburg effect mutations influencing prognosis across all tumor types, while copy number alterations in the electron transport chain gene SCO2, fatty acid uptake (CAV1, CD36) and lipogenesis (PPARA, PPARD, MLXIPL) genes were enriched in metastatic tumors. Using gene expression profiles, we established a gene-signature (CAV1, CD36, MLXIPL, CPT1C, CYP2E1) that strongly associated with epithelial-mesenchymal program across multiple cancers. Moreover, stratification of samples based on the copy number or expression profiles of the genes identified in our analysis revealed a significant effect on patient survival rates, thus confirming prominent roles of fatty acid uptake and metabolism in metastatic progression and poor prognosis of human cancers. PMID:26725848

  1. Metabolic dysfunction and altered mitochondrial dynamics in the utrophin-dystrophin deficient mouse model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pant, Meghna; Sopariwala, Danesh H; Bal, Naresh C; Lowe, Jeovanna; Delfín, Dawn A; Rafael-Fortney, Jill; Periasamy, Muthu

    2015-01-01

    The utrophin-dystrophin deficient (DKO) mouse model has been widely used to understand the progression of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). However, it is unclear as to what extent muscle pathology affects metabolism. Therefore, the present study was focused on understanding energy expenditure in the whole animal and in isolated extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle and to determine changes in metabolic enzymes. Our results show that the 8 week-old DKO mice consume higher oxygen relative to activity levels. Interestingly the EDL muscle from DKO mouse consumes higher oxygen per unit integral force, generates less force and performs better in the presence of pyruvate thus mimicking a slow twitch muscle. We also found that the expression of hexokinase 1 and pyruvate kinase M2 was upregulated several fold suggesting increased glycolytic flux. Additionally, there is a dramatic increase in dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp 1) and mitofusin 2 protein levels suggesting increased mitochondrial fission and fusion, a feature associated with increased energy demand and altered mitochondrial dynamics. Collectively our studies point out that the dystrophic disease has caused significant changes in muscle metabolism. To meet the increased energetic demand, upregulation of metabolic enzymes and regulators of mitochondrial fusion and fission is observed in the dystrophic muscle. A better understanding of the metabolic demands and the accompanied alterations in the dystrophic muscle can help us design improved intervention therapies along with existing drug treatments for the DMD patients.

  2. Choline and methionine differentially alter methyl carbon metabolism in bovine neonatal hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Tawny L.

    2017-01-01

    Intersections in hepatic methyl group metabolism pathways highlights potential competition or compensation of methyl donors. The objective of this experiment was to examine the expression of genes related to methyl group transfer and lipid metabolism in response to increasing concentrations of choline chloride (CC) and DL-methionine (DLM) in primary neonatal hepatocytes that were or were not exposed to fatty acids (FA). Primary hepatocytes isolated from 4 neonatal Holstein calves were maintained as monolayer cultures for 24 h before treatment with CC (61, 128, 2028, and 4528 μmol/L) and DLM (16, 30, 100, 300 μmol/L), with or without a 1 mmol/L FA cocktail in a factorial arrangement. After 24 h of treatment, media was collected for quantification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), and cell lysates were collected for quantification of gene expression. No interactions were detected between CC, DLM, or FA. Both CC and DLM decreased the expression of methionine adenosyltransferase 1A (MAT1A). Increasing CC did not alter betaine-homocysteine S-methyltranferase (BHMT) but did increase 5-methyltetrahydrofolate-homocysteine methyltransferase (MTR) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) expression. Increasing DLM decreased expression of BHMT and MTR, but did not affect MTHFR. Expression of both phosphatidylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PEMT) and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) were decreased by increasing CC and DLM, while carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1A) was unaffected by either. Treatment with FA decreased the expression of MAT1A, MTR, MTHFR and tended to decrease PEMT but did not affect BHMT and MTTP. Treatment with FA increased CPT1A expression. Increasing CC increased secretion of VLDL and decreased the accumulation of ROS in media. Within neonatal bovine hepatocytes, choline and methionine differentially regulate methyl carbon pathways and suggest that choline may play a critical role in

  3. Acute doxorubicin cardiotoxicity alters cardiac cytochrome P450 expression and arachidonic acid metabolism in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zordoky, Beshay N.M.; Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Aboutabl, Mona E.

    2010-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a potent anti-neoplastic antibiotic used to treat a variety of malignancies; however, its use is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Moreover, there is a strong correlation between cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated arachidonic acid metabolites and the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, in the current study, we have investigated the effect of acute DOX toxicity on the expression of several CYP enzymes and their associated arachidonic acid metabolites in the heart of male Sprague-Dawley rats. Acute DOX toxicity was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of 15 mg/kg of the drug. Our results showed that DOX treatment for 24 h caused a significant induction of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2C11, CYP2J3, CYP4A1, CYP4A3, CYP4F1, CYP4F4, and EPHX2 gene expression in the heart of DOX-treated rats as compared to the control. Similarly, there was a significant induction of CYP1A1, CYP1B1, CYP2C11, CYP2J3, CYP4A, and sEH proteins after 24 h of DOX administration. In the heart microsomes, acute DOX toxicity significantly increased the formation of 20-HETE which is consistent with the induction of the major CYP omega-hydroxylases: CYP4A1, CYP4A3, CYP4F1, and CYP4F4. On the other hand, the formation of 5,6-, 8,9-, 11,12-, and 14,15-epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) was significantly reduced, whereas the formation of their corresponding dihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids was significantly increased. The decrease in the cardioprotective EETs can be attributed to the increase of sEH activity parallel to the induction of the EPHX2 gene expression in the heart of DOX-treated rats. In conclusion, acute DOX toxicity alters the expression of several CYP and sEH enzymes with a consequent alteration in arachidonic acid metabolism. These results may represent a novel mechanism by which this drug causes progressive cardiotoxicity.

  4. Autism as a disorder of deficiency of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and altered metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Das, Undurti N

    2013-10-01

    Autism has a strong genetic and environmental basis in which inflammatory markers and factors concerned with synapse formation, nerve transmission, and information processing such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): arachidonic (AA), eicosapentaenoic (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) and their products and neurotransmitters: dopamine, serotonin, acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, and catecholamines and cytokines are altered. Antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, and trace elements are needed for the normal metabolism of neurotrophic factors, eicosanoids, and neurotransmitters, supporting reports of their alterations in autism. But, the exact relationship among these factors and their interaction with genes and proteins concerned with brain development and growth is not clear. It is suggested that maternal infections and inflammation and adverse events during intrauterine growth of the fetus could lead to alterations in the gene expression profile and proteomics that results in dysfunction of the neuronal function and neurotransmitters, alteration(s) in the metabolism of PUFAs and their metabolites resulting in excess production of proinflammatory eicosanoids and cytokines and a deficiency of anti-inflammatory cytokines and bioactive lipids that ultimately results in the development of autism. Based on these evidences, it is proposed that selective delivery of BDNF and methods designed to augment the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and eicosanoids and PUFAs may prevent, arrest, or reverse the autism disease process.

  5. Genetic alterations and oxidative metabolism in sporadic colorectal tumors from a Spanish community.

    PubMed

    Oliva, M R; Ripoll, F; Muñiz, P; Iradi, A; Trullenque, R; Valls, V; Drehmer, E; Sáez, G T

    1997-04-01

    Deletions of loci on chromosomes 5q, 17p, 18q, and 22q, together with the incidence of p53 mutations and amplification of the double minute-2 gene were investigated in the sporadic colorectal tumors of 44 patients from a Spanish community. Chromosome deletions were analyzed by means of loss of heterozygosity analysis using a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay. Allelic losses were also detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of a polymorphic site in intron 2 of the p53 gene. The percentages of genetic deletions on the screened chromosomes were 39.3% (5q), 58.3% (17p), 40.9% (18q), and 40% (22q). Mutations in p53 exons 2-9 were examined by PCR-SSCP analysis and direct sequencing of the mutated region. Twenty of 44 tumor samples (45.45%) showed mutations at various exons except for exons 2, 3, and 9, the most frequent changes being G-->T transversion and C-->T transition. Because oxygen-free radicals play a role in the carcinogenesis process, we evaluated the oxidative status of the colorectal tumors. Antioxidant activities, lipid peroxidation, and DNA-damaged product concentrations in colon tumors and normal mucosa were compared. In tumor tissues, superoxide dismutase and catalase decreased fourfold and twofold, respectively, whereas glutathione peroxidase and reduced glutathione increased threefold. Malondialdehyde and 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) levels were twofold higher in colorectal tumors than in normal mucosa. Seven of 10 DNA tumor samples (70%) showing higher values of 8-OHdG also had genetic alterations at different chromosomal loci. In these samples, the p53 gene was deleted or mutated in 71.4% of cases. We concluded that the observed changes in the oxidative metabolism of the tumor cells and the consecutive increase in DNA damage may potentiate the genomic instability of different chromosomal regions, leading to further cell malignancy and tumor expansion.

  6. Alloxan diabetes in spontaneously hypertensive rats: gravimetric, metabolic and histopathological alterations.

    PubMed Central

    Iams, S. G.; Wexler, B. C.

    1977-01-01

    In order to investigate the combined effects of diabetes and hypertension on the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease, adult male and female SHR rats which develop hypertension spontaneously were given a single, 10 mg or 15 mg/100 g body wt. injection of alloxan s.c. to induce moderate or severe diabetes. Insulin was deliberately withheld. Animals were examined by autopsy daily for 7 days post-alloxan and after 4 and 8 weeks. Mortality was high--only 52% of the males survived as against 80% of the females. Most deaths occurred on Day 5 and were associated with adrenal haemorrhage and hyperplasia, thymus galnd involution, fatty liver and marked hypotension despite elevated aldosterone levels. During the first week, corticosterone levels increased significantly in the male; in females they showed little change. After 4 weeks, the severly diabetic animals became emaciated and moribund; corticosterone and aldosterone levels fell to very low levels despite adrenal hyperplasia. The beta cells of the moderately diabetic animals eventually lost their ability to secrete insulin and these animals too became cachetic and moribund with concomitant elevation of lipid, glucose and BUN levels, as well as myocardial infarction, fatty liver, and generalized hyalin arteriolo-, arterio-, and nephrosclerosis. It is suggested that the combined hormonal and metabolic alterations of diabetes and hypertension reinforced one another in these spontaneously hypertensive rats, leading to intense stimulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal system, the exacerbation of those cardiovascular degenerative changes known to be associated with uncontrolled diabetes or hypertension, eventual impaired adrenocortical steroidogenesis, hypotension and death. Images Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 PMID:861167

  7. Proteinuria, not altered albumin metabolism, affects hyperlipidemia in the nephrotic rat.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, R W; Staprans, I; Hutchison, F N; Kaysen, G A

    1990-01-01

    It has been established previously that nephrotic hyperlipidemia is characterized by both an increase in lipid synthesis and a defect in removal of lipoproteins. The relationship between these defects and altered albumin metabolism is uncertain. One hypothesis is that hepatic lipogenesis increases in parallel with albumin synthesis. To test this hypothesis, albumin synthesis was increased in nephrotic rats fed an 8.5% protein diet (LPN) by increasing dietary protein to 40% (HPN). Proteinuria was modulated in half of the rats fed 40% protein by enalapril (HPE). Albumin synthesis was the same in both HPN and HPE, but proteinuria was reduced in HPE compared to HPN, and so were serum cholesterol and triglycerides (TG). To examine the effect of serum albumin on lipid clearance in the absence of proteinuria, plasma clearance of chylomicrons (CM) and VLDL was measured in Nagase analbuminemic rats (NAR) and found to be no different than in normal SD rats. When proteinuria was induced in NAR and in SD rats, a severe and identical defect in both CM and VLDL clearance was acquired in both groups and blood lipid levels were increased to a similar degree in both groups. Neither hyperlipidemia nor defective removal of lipoproteins from the circulation are linked to albumin synthesis or serum albumin concentration but result, at least in part, from proteinuria. Postheparin lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was reduced slightly in nephrotic animals compared to nonnephrotic controls, but the most striking finding was a highly significant decrease in postheraprin LPL activity in normal NAR compared to SD rats (P less than 0.001), suggesting that reduced LPL activity is not responsible for reduced clearance of CM and VLDL in nephrotic rats. PMID:2384606

  8. Severe pulmonary hypertension is associated with altered right ventricle metabolic substrate uptake

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Mickael, Claudia; Sanders, Linda; Gebreab, Liya; Huber, Kendra M.; Perez, Mario; Smith-Jones, Peter; Serkova, Natalie J.; Tuder, Rubin M.

    2015-01-01

    In severe pulmonary hypertension (SPH), prior studies have shown an increase in right ventricle (RV) uptake of glucose, but it is unclear whether there is a change in the relative utilization of fatty acids. We hypothesized that in the RV in SPH, as in left ventricular (LV) failure, there is altered substrate utilization, with increased glucose uptake and decreased fatty acid uptake. SPH was induced in rats by treatment with the VEGF receptor inhibitor SU5416 and 3 wk of hypoxia (10% FiO2), followed by an additional 4 wk of normoxia (SU-Hx group). Control rats were treated with carboxymethylcellulose vehicle and 7 wk of normoxia (CMC-Nx group). The rodents then underwent positron emission tomography with sequential administration of two radiotracers, 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoroglucose (18F-FDG) and 14-(R,S)-[18F]fluoro-6-thia-heptadecanoic acid (18F-FTHA), analogs of glucose and fatty acid, respectively. Five CMC-Nx and 3 SU-Hx rats completed the entire experimental protocol. In the RV, there was a mild increase in 18F-FDG uptake (1.35-fold, P = 0.085) and a significant decrease in 18F-FTHA uptake (−2.1-fold, P < 0.05) in the SU-Hx rats relative to the CMC-Nx rats. In the LV, SU-Hx rats had less uptake of both radiotracers compared with CMC-Nx rats. Less RV fatty acid uptake in SPH was corroborated by decreased fatty acid transporters and enzymes in the RV tissue, and specifically a decrease in lipoprotein lipase. In the RV in rats with SPH, there is a major shift in metabolic substrate preference, largely due to decreased fatty acid uptake. PMID:26115672

  9. Ripening, storage temperature, ethylene action, and oxidative stress alter apple peel phytosterol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Rudell, David R; Buchanan, David A; Leisso, Rachel S; Whitaker, Bruce D; Mattheis, James P; Zhu, Yanmin; Varanasi, Vijay

    2011-08-01

    The chilling conditions of apple cold storage can provoke an economically significant necrotic peel disorder called superficial scald (scald) in susceptible cultivars. Disorder development can be reduced by inhibiting ethylene action or oxidative stress as well as intermittent warming. It was previously demonstrated that scald is preceded by a metabolomic shift that results in altered levels of various classes of triterpenoids, including metabolites with mass spectral features similar to β-sitosterol. In this study, a key class of phytosterol metabolites was identified. Changes in peel tissue levels of conjugates of β-sitosterol and campesterol, including acylated steryl glycosides (ASG), steryl glycosides (SG) and steryl esters (SE), as well as free sterols (FS), were determined during the period of scald development. Responses to pre-storage treatment with the ethylene action inhibitor, 1-methylcyclopropene, or an antioxidant (diphenylamine), rapid temperature elevation, and cold acclimation using intermittent warming treatments were evaluated. Diphenylamine, 1-MCP, and intermittent warming all reduced or prevented scald development. ASG levels increased and SE levels decreased in untreated control fruit during storage. Removing fruit from cold storage to ambient temperature induced rapid shifts in ASG and SE fatty acyl moieties from unsaturated to saturated. FS and SG levels remained relatively stable during storage but SG levels increased following a temperature increase after storage. ASG, SE, and SG levels did not increase during 6 months cold storage in fruit subjected to intermittent warming treatment. Overall, the results show that apple peel phytosteryl conjugate metabolism is influenced by storage duration, oxidative stress, ethylene action/ripening, and storage temperature.

  10. Loss of FTO in adipose tissue decreases Angptl4 translation and alters triglyceride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Yung; Shie, Shian-Sen; Wen, Ming-Shien; Hung, Kuo-Chun; Hsieh, I-Chang; Yeh, Ta-Sen; Wu, Delon

    2015-12-15

    A common variant of the FTO (fat mass- and obesity-associated) gene is a risk factor for obesity. We found that mice with an adipocyte-specific deletion of FTO gained more weight than control mice on a high-fat diet. Analysis of mice lacking FTO in adipocytes fed a normal diet or adipocytes from these mice revealed alterations in triglyceride metabolism that would be expected to favor increased fatty acid storage by adipose tissue. Mice lacking FTO in adipocytes showed increased serum triglyceride breakdown and clearance, which was associated with lower serum triglyceride concentrations. In addition, lipolysis in response to β-adrenergic stimulation was decreased in adipocytes and ex vivo adipose explants from the mutant mice. FTO is a nucleic acid demethylase that removes N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) from mRNAs. We found that FTO bound to Angptl4, which encodes an adipokine that stimulates intracellular lipolysis in adipocytes. Unexpectedly, the adipose tissue of fasted or fed mice lacking FTO in adipocytes had greater Angptl4 mRNA abundance. However, after high-fat feeding, the mutant mice had less Angptl4 protein and more m(6)A-modified Angptl4 than control mice, suggesting that lack of FTO prevented the translation of Angptl4. Injection of Angptl4-encoding adenovirus into mice lacking FTO in adipocytes restored serum triglyceride concentrations and lipolysis to values similar to those in control mice and abolished excessive weight gain from a high-fat diet. These results reveal that FTO regulates fatty acid mobilization in adipocytes and thus body weight in part through posttranscriptional regulation of Angptl4.

  11. Polyamine metabolism is altered in unpollinated parthenocarpic pat-2 tomato ovaries.

    PubMed

    Fos, Mariano; Proaño, Karina; Alabadí, David; Nuez, Fernando; Carbonell, Juan; García-Martínez, José L

    2003-01-01

    Facultative parthenocarpy induced by the recessive mutation pat-2 in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) depends on gibberellins (GAs) and is associated with changes in GA content in unpollinated ovaries. Polyamines (PAs) have also been proposed to play a role in early tomato fruit development. We therefore investigated whether PAs are able to induce parthenocarpy and whether the pat-2 mutation alters the content and metabolism of PAs in unpollinated ovaries. Application of putrescine, spermidine, and spermine to wild-type unpollinated tomato ovaries (cv Madrigal [MA/wt]) induced partial parthenocarpy. Parthenocarpic growth of MA/pat-2 (a parthenocarpic near-isogenic line to MA/wt) ovaries was negated by paclobutrazol (GA biosynthesis inhibitor), and this inhibition was counteracted by spermidine. Application of alpha-difluoromethyl-ornithine (-Orn) and/or alpha-difluoromethyl-arginine (-Arg), irreversible inhibitors of the putrescine biosynthesis enzymes Orn decarboxylase (ODC) and Arg decarboxylase, respectively, prevented growth of unpollinated MA/pat-2 ovaries. Alpha-difluoromethyl-Arg inhibition was counteracted by putrescine and GA(3), whereas that of alpha-difluoromethyl-Orn was counteracted by GA(3) but not by putrescine or spermidine. In unpollinated MA/pat-2 ovaries, the content of free spermine was significantly higher than in MA/wt ovaries. ODC activity was higher in pat-2 ovaries than in MA/wt. Transcript levels of genes encoding ODC and spermidine synthase were also higher in MA/pat-2. All together, these results strongly suggest that the parthenocarpic ability of pat-2 mutants depends on elevated PAs levels in unpollinated mutant ovaries, which correlate with an activation of the ODC pathway, probably as a consequence of elevated GA content in unpollinated pat-2 tomato ovaries.

  12. A High-Fat Diet Causes Impairment in Hippocampal Memory and Sex-Dependent Alterations in Peripheral Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Erica L.; Thompson, Lucien T.

    2016-01-01

    While high-fat diets are associated with rising incidence of obesity/type-2 diabetes and can induce metabolic and cognitive deficits, sex-dependent comparisons are rarely systematically made. Effects of exclusive consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) on systemic metabolism and on behavioral measures of hippocampal-dependent memory were compared in young male and female LE rats. Littermates were fed from weaning either a HFD or a control diet (CD) for 12 wk prior to testing. Sex-different effects of the HFD were observed in classic metabolic signs associated with type-2 diabetes. Males fed the HFD became obese, and had elevated fasted blood glucose levels, elevated corticosterone, and impaired glucose-tolerance, while females on the HFD exhibited only elevated corticosterone. Regardless of peripheral metabolism alteration, rats of both sexes fed the HFD were equally impaired in a spatial object recognition memory task associated with impaired hippocampal function. While the metabolic changes reported here have been characterized previously in males, the set of diet-induced effects observed here in females are novel. Impaired memory can have significant cognitive consequences, over the short-term and over the lifespan. A significant need exists for comparative research into sex-dependent differences underlying obesity and metabolic syndromes relating systemic, cognitive, and neural plasticity mechanisms. PMID:26819773

  13. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution.

    PubMed

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments.

  14. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  15. Supplementation of zilpaterol hydrochloride does not significantly alter the serum metabolic profile and metabolic enzyme profile of finishing heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supplementation of zilpaterol hydrochloride (ZH; Zilmax®) to cattle has been implicated as having a negative impact on the well-being of cattle. However, there is no data to support or refute these claims. This study was designed to determine if differences exist in the serum metabolic profile and m...

  16. Improved metabolic health alters host metabolism in parallel with changes in systemic xeno-metabolites of gut origin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Novel plasma metabolite patterns reflective of improved metabolic health (insulin sensitivity, fitness, reduced body weight) were identified before and after a 14-17 wk weight loss and exercise intervention in sedentary, obese insulin-resistant women. To control for potential confounding effects of...

  17. Integration of Cytokine Biology and Lipid Metabolism in Stroke**

    PubMed Central

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Dempsey, R.; Hatcher, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Cytokines regulate the innate and adaptive immune responses and are pleiotropic, redundant and multifunctional. Expression of most cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1α/ß, is very low in normal brain. Metabolism of lipids is of particular interest due to their high concentration in the brain. Inflammatory response after stroke suggests that cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1 α/ß, IL-6), affect the phospholipid metabolism and subsequent production of eicosanoids, ceramide, and ROS that may potentiate brain injury. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin are source for lipid messengers. Sphingomyelin synthase serves as a bridge between metabolism of glycerolipids and sphingolipids. TNF-α and IL-1 α/ß can induce phospholipases (A2, C, and D) and sphingomyelinases, and concomitantly proteolyse phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin synthesizing enzymes. Together, these alterations contribute to loss of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin after stroke that can be attenuated by inhibiting TNF-α or IL-1 α/ß signaling. Inflammatory responses are instrumental in the formation and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. Secretory PLA2 IIA is found in human atherosclerotic lesions and is implicated in initiation, progression and maturation of atherosclerosis, a risk factor for stroke. Lipoprotein-PLA2, part of apolipoprotein B-100 of LDL, plays a role in vascular inflammation and coronary endothelial dysfunction. Cytokine antagonism attenuated secretory PLA2 IIA actions, suggesting cytokine-lipid integration studies will lead to new concepts contributing to bench-to-bedside transition for stroke therapy. PMID:17981627

  18. Mayaro virus infection alters glucose metabolism in cultured cells through activation of the enzyme 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase.

    PubMed

    El-Bacha, Tatiana; Menezes, Maíra M T; Azevedo e Silva, Melissa C; Sola-Penna, Mauro; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2004-11-01

    Although it is well established that cellular transformation with tumor virus leads to changes on glucose metabolism, the effects of cell infection by non-transforming virus are far to be completely elucidated. In this study, we report the first evidence that cultured Vero cells infected with the alphavirus Mayaro show several alterations on glucose metabolism. Infected cells presented a two fold increase on glucose consumption, accompanied by an increment in lactate production. This increase in glycolytic flux was also demonstrated by a significant increase on the activity of 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase, one of the regulatory enzymes of glycolysis. Analysis of the kinetic parameters revealed that the regulation of 6-phosphofructo 1-kinase is altered in infected cells, presenting an increase in Vmax along with a decrease in Km for fructose-6-phosphate. Another fact contributing to an increase in enzyme activity was the decrease in ATP levels observed in infected cells. Additionally, the levels of fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, a potent activator of this enzyme, was significantly reduced in infected cells. These observations suggest that the increase in PFK activity may be a compensatory cellular response to the viral-induced metabolic alterations that could lead to an impairment of the glycolytic flux and energy production.

  19. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones.

    PubMed

    Pichette, Jennifer; Gagnon, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed.

  20. Implications of Hydrogen Sulfide in Glucose Regulation: How H2S Can Alter Glucose Homeostasis through Metabolic Hormones

    PubMed Central

    Pichette, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its comorbidities continue to be a major health problem worldwide. Understanding the precise mechanisms that control glucose homeostasis and their dysregulation during diabetes are a major research focus. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important regulator of glucose homeostasis. This is achieved through its production and action in several metabolic and hormone producing organs including the pancreas, liver, and adipose. Of importance, H2S production and signaling in these tissues are altered during both type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This review first examines how H2S is produced both endogenously and by gastrointestinal microbes, with a particular focus on the altered production that occurs during obesity and diabetes. Next, the action of H2S on the metabolic organs with key roles in glucose homeostasis, with a particular focus on insulin, is described. Recent work has also suggested that the effects of H2S on glucose homeostasis goes beyond its role in insulin secretion. Several studies have demonstrated important roles for H2S in hepatic glucose output and adipose glucose uptake. The mechanism of H2S action on these metabolic organs is described. In the final part of this review, future directions examining the roles of H2S in other metabolic and glucoregulatory hormone secreting tissues are proposed. PMID:27478532

  1. Experimental Periodontitis Results in Prediabetes and Metabolic Alterations in Brain, Liver and Heart: Global Untargeted Metabolomic Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ilievski, Vladimir; Kinchen, Jason M; Prabhu, Ramya; Rim, Fadi; Leoni, Lara; Unterman, Terry G.; Watanabe, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Results from epidemiological studies suggest that there is an association between periodontitis and prediabetes, however, causality is not known. The results from our previous studies suggest that induction of periodontitis leads to hyperinsulinemia glucose intolerance and insulin resistance, all hallmarks of prediabetes. However, global effects of periodontitis on critical organs in terms of metabolic alterations are unknown. We determined the metabolic effects of periodontitis on brain, liver, heart and plasma resulting from Porphyromonas gingivalis induced periodontitis in mice. Periodontitis was induced by oral application of the periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis for 22 weeks. Global untargeted biochemical profiles in samples from these organs/plasma were determined by liquid and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and compared between controls and animals with periodontitis. Oral application of Porphyromonas gingivalis induced chronic periodontitis and hallmarks of prediabetes. The results of sample analyses indicated a number of changes in metabolic readouts, including changes in metabolites related to glucose and arginine metabolism, inflammation and redox homeostasis. Changes in biochemicals suggested subtle systemic effects related to periodontal disease, with increases in markers of inflammation and oxidative stress most prominent in the liver. Signs of changes in redox homeostasis were also seen in the brain and heart. Elevated bile acids in liver were suggestive of increased biosynthesis, which may reflect changes in liver function. Interestingly, signs of decreasing glucose availability were seen in the brain. In all three organs and plasma, there was a significant increase in the microbiome-derived bioactive metabolite 4-ethylphenylsulfate sulfate in animals with periodontitis. The results of metabolic profiling suggest that periodontitis/bacterial products alter metabolomic signatures of brain, heart, liver, and plasma in the

  2. Effects of liver diseases on drug-metabolizing enzymes: implications for drug fate alterations and nano-therapeutic openings.

    PubMed

    Lu, L; Shi, J; Li, Q; Peng, X; Dong, L; Li, Y; Dai, P; Wang, Y; Guo, E; Zhou, F; Liu, Z

    2014-01-01

    Metabolizing and eliminating toxic chemicals in the liver are key processes in the body's defense system. Drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) play central roles in such processes. The activity and expression of several key DMEs are changed in various liver diseases and thus lead to significantly altered drug disposition. This phenomenon severely affects the pharmacotherapy of clinical medications in terms of the safety and efficacy of drug responses. This review highlights liver physiological functions, altered DMEs, and altered drug disposition in liver diseases. Moreover, the implications of changes in DMEs on the fate of clinically relevant drugs are also discussed. Pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor are two liver-enriched nuclear receptors originally defined as xenobiotic sensors that affect regulation of DMEs. Altered regulation of DMEs in liver diseases contributes to the development of powerful in vitro and in vivo tools to predict drug responses and options for improved drug delivery and development. Although a number of treatment drugs are available for liver diseases, they are limited by their low drug concentration in the target site, presence of side effects, and instability in the human body. The nanoparticle drug delivery system has recently attracted research attention because of its potential to offer solutions to current obstacles that involve the use of therapeutic drugs for liver diseases. Conclusively, this review aims to improve understanding on the regulation of DMEs in liver diseases and on corresponding implications in drug disposition, including novel therapeutic medications.

  3. Dietary selenomethionine exposure alters swimming performance, metabolic capacity and energy homeostasis in juvenile fathead minnow.

    PubMed

    McPhee, D Landon; Janz, David M

    2014-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is known to cause chronic toxicity in aquatic species. In particular, dietary exposure of fish to selenomethionine (SeMet), the primary form of Se in the diet, is of concern. Recent studies suggest that chronic exposure to elevated dietary SeMet alters energy and endocrine homeostasis in adult fish. However, little is known about the direct effects of dietary SeMet exposure in juvenile fish. The objective of the present study was to investigate sublethal physiological effects of dietary SeMet exposure in juvenile fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas). Twenty days-post-hatch fathead minnow were exposed for 60 days to different measured concentrations (2.8, 5.4, 9.9, 26.5 μg Se/g dry mass [dm]) of Se in food in the form of SeMet. After exposure, samples were collected for Se analysis and fish were subjected to a swimming performance challenge to assess critical swim speed (Ucrit), tail beat frequency and tail beat amplitude, oxygen consumption (MO2), cost of transport (COT), standard metabolic rate (SMR), active metabolic rate (AMR), and factorial aerobic scope (F-AS). Ucrit was decreased in the 26.5 μg Se/g dm exposure group compared to the control group. Tail beat frequency and tail beat amplitude were significantly reduced in fish fed 9.9 and 26.5 μg Se/g. An increase in MO2 and COT was observed in the 9.9 and 26.5 μg Se/g exposure groups compared to the control group. While the AMR of the high dose group was increased relative to control, there were no significant differences in SMR and F-AS. Energy storage capacity was measured via whole body triglyceride and glycogen concentrations. Triglyceride concentrations in non-swam fish were elevated in the 5.4 μg Se/g group relative to controls. Fatigued (swam) fish had significantly lower whole body triglycerides than non-swam fish. All non-swam SeMet exposure groups had significantly decreased whole body glycogen concentrations compared to controls, while the 5.4 and 26.5 μg Se/g exposure groups had

  4. Akkermansia muciniphila inversely correlates with the onset of inflammation, altered adipose tissue metabolism and metabolic disorders during obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Marc; Everard, Amandine; Gómez-Valadés, Alicia G; Matamoros, Sébastien; Ramírez, Sara; Delzenne, Nathalie M; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc; Cani, Patrice D

    2015-11-13

    Recent evidence indicates that the gut microbiota plays a key role in the pathophysiology of obesity. Indeed, diet-induced obesity (DIO) has been associated to substantial changes in gut microbiota composition in rodent models. In the context of obesity, enhanced adiposity is accompanied by low-grade inflammation of this tissue but the exact link with gut microbial community remains unknown. In this report, we studied the consequences of high-fat diet (HFD) administration on metabolic parameters and gut microbiota composition over different periods of time. We found that Akkermansia muciniphila abundance was strongly and negatively affected by age and HFD feeding and to a lower extend Bilophila wadsworthia was the only taxa following an opposite trend. Different approaches, including multifactorial analysis, showed that these changes in Akkermansia muciniphila were robustly correlated with the expression of lipid metabolism and inflammation markers in adipose tissue, as well as several circulating parameters (i.e., glucose, insulin, triglycerides, leptin) from DIO mice. Thus, our data shows the existence of a link between gut Akkermansia muciniphila abundance and adipose tissue homeostasis on the onset of obesity, thus reinforcing the beneficial role of this bacterium on metabolism.

  5. Features of an altered AMPK metabolic pathway in Gilbert’s Syndrome, and its role in metabolic health

    PubMed Central

    Mölzer, Christine; Wallner, Marlies; Kern, Carina; Tosevska, Anela; Schwarz, Ursula; Zadnikar, Rene; Doberer, Daniel; Marculescu, Rodrig; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2016-01-01

    Energy metabolism, involving the ATP-dependent AMPK-PgC-Ppar pathway impacts metabolic health immensely, in that its impairment can lead to obesity, giving rise to disease. Based on observations that individuals with Gilbert’s syndrome (GS; UGT1A1*28 promoter mutation) are generally lighter, leaner and healthier than controls, specific inter-group differences in the AMPK pathway regulation were explored. Therefore, a case-control study involving 120 fasted, healthy, age- and gender matched subjects with/without GS, was conducted. By utilising intra-cellular flow cytometry (next to assessing AMPKα1 gene expression), levels of functioning proteins (phospho-AMPK α1/α2, PgC 1 α, Ppar α and γ) were measured in PBMCs (peripheral blood mononucleated cells). In GS individuals, rates of phospho-AMPK α1/α2, -Ppar α/γ and of PgC 1α were significantly higher, attesting to a boosted fasting response in this condition. In line with this finding, AMPKα1 gene expression was equal between the groups, possibly stressing the post-translational importance of boosted fasting effects in GS. In reflection of an apparently improved health status, GS individuals had significantly lower BMI, glucose, insulin, C-peptide and triglyceride levels. Herewith, we propose a new theory to explain why individuals having GS are leaner and healthier, and are therefore less likely to contract metabolic diseases or die prematurely thereof. PMID:27444220

  6. Activation of CAR and PXR by Dietary, Environmental and Occupational Chemicals Alters Drug Metabolism, Intermediary Metabolism, and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, J.P.; Mota, L.C.; Baldwin, W.S.

    2010-01-01

    The constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane × receptor (PXR) are activated by a variety of endogenous and exogenous ligands, such as steroid hormones, bile acids, pharmaceuticals, and environmental, dietary, and occupational chemicals. In turn, they induce phase I–III detoxification enzymes and transporters that help eliminate these chemicals. Because many of the chemicals that activate CAR and PXR are environmentally-relevant (dietary and anthropogenic), studies need to address whether these chemicals or mixtures of these chemicals may increase the susceptibility to adverse drug interactions. In addition, CAR and PXR are involved in hepatic proliferation, intermediary metabolism, and protection from cholestasis. Therefore, activation of CAR and PXR may have a wide variety of implications for personalized medicine through physiological effects on metabolism and cell proliferation; some beneficial and others adverse. Identifying the chemicals that activate these promiscuous nuclear receptors and understanding how these chemicals may act in concert will help us predict adverse drug reactions (ADRs), predict cholestasis and steatosis, and regulate intermediary metabolism. This review summarizes the available data on CAR and PXR, including the environmental chemicals that activate these receptors, the genes they control, and the physiological processes that are perturbed or depend on CAR and PXR action. This knowledge contributes to a foundation that will be necessary to discern interindividual differences in the downstream biological pathways regulated by these key nuclear receptors. PMID:20871735

  7. Controlled atmosphere storage, temperature conditioning, and antioxidant treatment alter postharvest 'Honeycrisp' metabolism

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The physiology and metabolism characterizing postharvest chilling and CO2 injury in apple has important implications for postharvest management of soft scald and soggy breakdown. This research assessed differences of primary metabolism related to soggy breakdown (cortex chilling injury) and CO2 cor...

  8. Human Mesenchymal stem cells program macrophage plasticity by altering their metabolic status via a PGE2-dependent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Vasandan, Anoop Babu; Jahnavi, Sowmya; Shashank, Chandanala; Prasad, Priya; Kumar, Anujith; Prasanna, S. Jyothi

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are speculated to act at macrophage-injury interfaces to mediate efficient repair. To explore this facet in-depth this study evaluates the influence of MSCs on human macrophages existing in distinct functional states. MSCs promoted macrophage differentiation, enhanced respiratory burst and potentiated microbicidal responses in naïve macrophages (Mφ). Functional attenuation of inflammatory M1 macrophages was associated with a concomitant shift towards alternatively activated M2 state in MSC-M1 co-cultures. In contrast, alternate macrophage (M2) activation was enhanced in MSC-M2 co-cultures. Elucidation of key macrophage metabolic programs in Mo/MSC, M1/MSC and M2/MSC co-cultures indicated changes in Glucose transporter1 (GLUT1 expression/glucose uptake, IDO1 protein/activity, SIRTUIN1 and alterations in AMPK and mTOR activity, reflecting MSC-instructed metabolic shifts. Inability of Cox2 knockdown MSCs to attenuate M1 macrophages and their inefficiency in instructing metabolic shifts in polarized macrophages establishes a key role for MSC-secreted PGE2 in manipulating macrophage metabolic status and plasticity. Functional significance of MSC-mediated macrophage activation shifts was further validated on human endothelial cells prone to M1 mediated injury. In conclusion, we propose a novel role for MSC secreted factors induced at the MSC-macrophage interface in re-educating macrophages by manipulating metabolic programs in differentially polarized macrophages. PMID:27910911

  9. Gentamicin differentially alters cellular metabolism of cochlear hair cells as revealed by NAD(P)H fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zholudeva, Lyandysha V.; Ward, Kristina G.; Nichols, Michael G.; Smith, Heather Jensen

    2015-05-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics are implicated as culprits of hearing loss in more than 120,000 individuals annually. Research has shown that the sensory cells, but not supporting cells, of the cochlea are readily damaged and/or lost after use of such antibiotics. High-frequency outer hair cells (OHCs) show a greater sensitivity to antibiotics than high- and low-frequency inner hair cells (IHCs). We hypothesize that variations in mitochondrial metabolism account for differences in susceptibility. Fluorescence lifetime microscopy was used to quantify changes in NAD(P)H in sensory and supporting cells from explanted murine cochleae exposed to mitochondrial uncouplers, inhibitors, and an ototoxic antibiotic, gentamicin (GM). Changes in metabolic state resulted in a redistribution of NAD(P)H between subcellular fluorescence lifetime pools. Supporting cells had a significantly longer lifetime than sensory cells. Pretreatment with GM increased NAD(P)H intensity in high-frequency sensory cells, as well as the NAD(P)H lifetime within IHCs. GM specifically increased NAD(P)H concentration in high-frequency OHCs, but not in IHCs or pillar cells. Variations in NAD(P)H intensity in response to mitochondrial toxins and GM were greatest in high-frequency OHCs. These results demonstrate that GM rapidly alters mitochondrial metabolism, differentially modulates cell metabolism, and provides evidence that GM-induced changes in metabolism are significant and greatest in high-frequency OHCs.

  10. Functional Metabolomics Uncovers Metabolic Alterations Associated to Severe Oxidative Stress in MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells Exposed to Ascididemin

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Marine natural products are a source of promising agents for cancer treatment. However, there is a need to improve the evaluation of their mechanism of action in tumors. Metabolomics of the response to anti-tumor agents is a tool to reveal candidate biomarkers and metabolic targets. We used two-dimensional high-resolution magic angle spinning proton-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics to investigate the response of MCF7 breast cancer cells to ascididemin, a marine alkaloid and lead molecule for anti-cancer treatment. Ascididemin induced severe oxidative stress and apoptosis within 48 h of exposure. Thirty-three metabolites were quantified. Metabolic response involved downregulation of glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and phospholipid metabolism alterations. Candidate metabolic biomarkers of the response of breast cancer cells to ascididemin were proposed including citrate, gluconate, polyunsaturated fatty acids, glycerophospho-choline and -ethanolamine. In addition, candidate metabolic targets were identified. Overall, the response to Asc could be related to severe oxidative stress and anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24152560

  11. Disruption of MRG19 results in altered nitrogen metabolic status and defective pseudohyphal development in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Das, Maitreyi; Bhat, Paike Jayadeva

    2005-01-01

    It was previously shown that MRG19 downregulates carbon metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae upon glucose exhaustion, and that the gene is glucose repressed. Here, it is shown that glucose repression of MRG19 is overcome upon nitrogen withdrawal, suggesting that MRG19 is a regulator of carbon and nitrogen metabolism. beta-Galactosidase activity fostered by the promoter of GDH1/3, which encode anabolic enzymes of nitrogen metabolism, was altered in an MRG19 disruptant. As compared to the wild-type strain, the MRG19 disruptant showed a decrease in the ratio of 2-oxoglutarate to glutamate under nitrogen-limited conditions. MRG19 disruptants showed reduced pseudohyphal formation and enhanced sporulation, a phenomenon that occurs under conditions of both nitrogen and carbon withdrawal. These studies revealed that MRG19 regulates carbon and nitrogen metabolism, as well as morphogenetic changes, suggesting that MRG19 is a component of the link between the metabolic status of the cell and the corresponding developmental pathway.

  12. Association of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus related SNP genotypes with altered serum adipokine levels and metabolic syndrome phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Al-Attas, Omar S; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Mohammed, Abdul Khader; Alenad, Amal M; Chrousos, George P; Alokail, Majed S

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of T2DM involves secretion of several pro-inflammatory molecules by the dramatically increased adipocytes, both by number and size, and associated macrophages of adipose tissue. Since T2DM is usually preceded by obesity and chronic systemic inflammation, the objective of this study was to explore for any association between genetic variants of previously established 36 T2DM-associated SNPs and altered serum adipocytokine levels and metabolic syndrome phenotypes. Study consisted of 566 subjects (284 males and 282 females) of whom 147 were T2DM patients and 419 healthy controls. Study subjects were genotyped for 36 T2DM-linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the KASPar SNP Genotyping System and grouped into different genotypes for each SNP. Various anthropometric and biochemical parameters were measured following standard procedures. The mean values of serum levels of individual adipocytokines and the presence/absence of metabolic syndrome phenotypes corresponding to various genotypes were compared by determining the odds ratios. Genotypic variants of five and seven of the 36 T2DM-related SNPs were significantly associated with altered serum levels of adiponectin and aPAI, respectively. Six variants of the 36 SNPs were associated with metabolic syndrome manifestations. This study identified positive associations between genotypic variants of five and seven of the 36 T2DM related SNPs and altered serum levels of adiponectin and aPAI, respectively. Six of 36 SNPs were also associated with metabolic syndrome in the studied population. The relation between specific SNPs and individual phenotypic traits may be useful in explaining the causal mechanisms of hereditary component of T2DM. PMID:26064370

  13. Identification of the metabolic alterations associated with the multidrug resistant phenotype in cancer and their intercellular transfer mediated by extracellular vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Di Luca, Alessio; Mleczko, Justyna; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Pesic, Milica; Cabrera, Diana; van Liempd, Sebastiaan; Lima, Raquel T.; O’Connor, Robert; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Vasconcelos, M. Helena

    2017-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious obstacle to efficient cancer treatment. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a significant role in MDR. Recent studies proved that targeting cellular metabolism could sensitize MDR cells. In addition, metabolic alterations could affect the extracellular vesicles (EVs) cargo and release. This study aimed to: i) identify metabolic alterations in P-gp overexpressing cells that could be involved in the development of MDR and, ii) identify a potential role for the EVs in the acquisition of the MDR. Two different pairs of MDR and their drug-sensitive counterpart cancer cell lines were used. Our results showed that MDR (P-gp overexpressing) cells have a different metabolic profile from their drug-sensitive counterparts, demonstrating decreases in the pentose phosphate pathway and oxidative phosphorylation rate; increases in glutathione metabolism and glycolysis; and alterations in the methionine/S-adenosylmethionine pathway. Remarkably, EVs from MDR cells were capable of stimulating a metabolic switch in the drug-sensitive cancer cells, towards a MDR phenotype. In conclusion, obtained results contribute to the growing knowledge about metabolic alterations in MDR cells and the role of EVs in the intercellular transfer of MDR. The specific metabolic alterations identified in this study may be further developed as targets for overcoming MDR. PMID:28303926

  14. Identification of the metabolic alterations associated with the multidrug resistant phenotype in cancer and their intercellular transfer mediated by extracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Rodrigues, Vanessa; Di Luca, Alessio; Mleczko, Justyna; Meleady, Paula; Henry, Michael; Pesic, Milica; Cabrera, Diana; van Liempd, Sebastiaan; Lima, Raquel T; O'Connor, Robert; Falcon-Perez, Juan M; Vasconcelos, M Helena

    2017-03-17

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a serious obstacle to efficient cancer treatment. Overexpression of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a significant role in MDR. Recent studies proved that targeting cellular metabolism could sensitize MDR cells. In addition, metabolic alterations could affect the extracellular vesicles (EVs) cargo and release. This study aimed to: i) identify metabolic alterations in P-gp overexpressing cells that could be involved in the development of MDR and, ii) identify a potential role for the EVs in the acquisition of the MDR. Two different pairs of MDR and their drug-sensitive counterpart cancer cell lines were used. Our results showed that MDR (P-gp overexpressing) cells have a different metabolic profile from their drug-sensitive counterparts, demonstrating decreases in the pentose phosphate pathway and oxidative phosphorylation rate; increases in glutathione metabolism and glycolysis; and alterations in the methionine/S-adenosylmethionine pathway. Remarkably, EVs from MDR cells were capable of stimulating a metabolic switch in the drug-sensitive cancer cells, towards a MDR phenotype. In conclusion, obtained results contribute to the growing knowledge about metabolic alterations in MDR cells and the role of EVs in the intercellular transfer of MDR. The specific metabolic alterations identified in this study may be further developed as targets for overcoming MDR.

  15. Alterations in creatine metabolism observed in experimental autoimmune myocarditis using ex vivo proton magic angle spinning MRS.

    PubMed

    Muench, Frédéric; Retel, Joren; Jeuthe, Sarah; O h-Ici, Darach; van Rossum, Barth; Wassilew, Katharina; Schmerler, Patrick; Kuehne, Titus; Berger, Felix; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Messroghli, Daniel R

    2015-12-01

    Experimental autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) in rodents is an accepted model of myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Altered metabolism is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of DCM and heart failure (HF). Study of the metabolism may provide new diagnostic information and insights into the mechanisms of myocarditis and HF. Proton MRS ((1)H-MRS) has not yet been used to study the changes occurring in myocarditis and subsequent HF. We aimed to explore the changes in creatine metabolism using this model and compare them with the findings in healthy animals. Myocardial function of male young Lewis rats with EAM was quantified by performing left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) analysis in short-axis cine images throughout the whole heart. Inflammatory cellular infiltrate was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Myocardial tissue was analyzed using ex vivo proton magic angle spinning MRS ((1)H-MAS-MRS). Myocarditis was confirmed histologically by the presence of an inflammatory cellular infiltrate and CD68 positive staining. A significant increase in the metabolic ratio of Tau/tCr (taurine/total creatine) obtained by (1)H-MAS-MRS was observed in myocarditis compared with healthy controls (21 d acute EAM, 4.38 (±0.23); 21 d control, 2.84 (±0.08); 35 d chronic EAM, 4.47 (±0.83); 35 d control, 2.59 (±0.38); P < 0.001). LVEF was reduced in diseased animals (EAM, 55.2% (±11.3%); control, 72.6% (±3.8%); P < 0.01) and correlated with Tau/tCr ratio (R = 0.937, P < 0.001). Metabolic alterations occur acutely with the development of myocarditis. Myocardial Tau/tCr ratio as detected by (1)H-MRS correlates with LVEF and is able to differentiate between healthy myocardium and myocardium from rats with EAM.

  16. Metabolic changes and DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum are associated with behavioral alterations in mice exposed to trichloroethylene postnatally

    SciTech Connect

    Blossom, Sarah J.; Cooney, Craig A.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Rau, Jenny L.; Swearingen, Christopher J.; Wessinger, William D.

    2013-06-15

    Previous studies demonstrated that low-level postnatal and early life exposure to the environmental contaminant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of MRL +/+ mice altered glutathione redox homeostasis and increased biomarkers of oxidative stress indicating a more oxidized state. Plasma metabolites along the interrelated transmethylation pathway were also altered indicating impaired methylation capacity. Here we extend these findings to further characterize the impact of TCE exposure in mice exposed to water only or two doses of TCE in the drinking water (0, 2, and 28 mg/kg/day) postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the cerebellum. In addition, pathway intermediates involved in methyl metabolism and global DNA methylation patterns were examined in cerebellar tissue. Because the cerebellum is functionally important for coordinating motor activity, including exploratory and social approach behaviors, these parameters were evaluated in the present study. Mice exposed to 28 mg/kg/day TCE exhibited increased locomotor activity over time as compared with control mice. In the novel object exploration test, these mice were more likely to enter the zone with the novel object as compared to control mice. Similar results were obtained in a second test when an unfamiliar mouse was introduced into the testing arena. The results show for the first time that postnatal exposure to TCE causes key metabolic changes in the cerebellum that may contribute to global DNA methylation deficits and behavioral alterations in TCE-exposed mice. - Highlights: • We exposed male mice to low-level trichloroethylene from postnatal days 1 through 42. • This exposure altered redox potential and increased oxidative stress in cerebellum. • This exposure altered metabolites important in cellular methylation in cerebellum. • This exposure promoted DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum. • This exposure enhanced locomotor

  17. Transcriptional Signature of an Altered Purine Metabolism in the Skeletal Muscle of a Huntington's Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mielcarek, Michal; Smolenski, Ryszard T.; Isalan, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein (HTT). HD has a peripheral component to its pathology: skeletal muscles are severely affected, leading to atrophy, and malfunction in both pre-clinical and clinical settings. We previously used two symptomatic HD mouse models to demonstrate the impairment of the contractile characteristics of the hind limb muscles, which was accompanied by a significant loss of function of motor units. The mice displayed a significant reduction in muscle force, likely because of deteriorations in energy metabolism, decreased oxidation, and altered purine metabolism. There is growing evidence suggesting that HD-related skeletal muscle malfunction might be partially or completely independent of CNS degeneration. The pathology might arise from mutant HTT within muscle (loss or gain of function). Hence, it is vital to identify novel peripheral biomarkers that will reflect HD skeletal muscle atrophy. These will be important for upcoming clinical trials that may target HD peripherally. In order to identify potential biomarkers that might reflect muscle metabolic changes, we used qPCR to validate key gene transcripts in different skeletal muscle types. Consequently, we report a number of transcript alterations that are linked to HD muscle pathology. PMID:28303108

  18. Altered metabolism of copper, zinc, and magnesium is associated with increased levels of glycated hemoglobin in patients with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Viktorínová, Alena; Toserová, Eva; Krizko, Marián; Duracková, Zdenka

    2009-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with the alterations in the metabolism of copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and magnesium (Mg). The aim of the present study was to investigate plasma levels of these elements in patients with DM and in healthy subjects. Association between glycated hemoglobin and levels of metals was also evaluated. We studied 36 subjects with DM (type 1, 11; type 2, 25) and 34 healthy subjects matched for age, sex, and duration of diabetes. Plasma concentrations of Cu, Zn, and Mg were measured by atomic absorption spectrometry. An imbalance in the levels of studied metals was observed in both type 1 and type 2 DM. We found higher levels of Cu (P < .001) and Cu/Zn ratio (P < .0001) and decreased levels of Zn (P < .01) and Mg (P < .0001) in patients with DM when compared with controls. Negative correlation between Cu and Zn (r = -0.626, P < .0001) was found in patients with DM. Glycated hemoglobin levels were positively correlated with Cu (r = 0.709, P < .001) and Cu/Zn ratio (r = 0.777, P < .001) and inversely correlated with Zn (r = - 0.684, P < .001) and Mg (r = -0.646, P < .001). In conclusion, patients with DM had altered metabolism of Cu, Zn, and Mg; and this may be related to increased values of glycated hemoglobin. We concluded that impaired metabolism of these elements may contribute to the progression of DM and diabetic complications.

  19. Alterations in the energy metabolism of the isolated perfused frog heart during calcium depletion and subsequent repletion.

    PubMed

    Touraki, M; Beis, I

    1991-01-01

    The changes in myocardial energy metabolism of isolated perfused Rana ridibunda hearts subjected to prolonged calcium depletion and reperfusion with calcium-containing medium were studied. Calcium-free perfusion resulted in an increase in the concentrations of glucose, glucose-6-phosphate, alpha-ketoglutarate and malate. The myocardial contents of high-energy phosphates were maintained while concentrations of key amino acids were significantly altered. During the reperfusion period the tissue high-energy phosphate content fell abruptly. A marked increase in glycolytic flux and lactate production was observed. The tissue contents of citric acid cycle intermediates and key amino acids decreased. Examination of the activities of marker enzymes during the calcium-free and reperfusion periods showed that only cytoplasmic enzymes are lost during reperfusion, while the activities of other enzymes remained unchanged. The results suggest that the fluxes of both glycolysis and the citric acid cycle are significantly altered during calcium depletion and following repletion in the amphibian heart. The major characteristics of calcium paradox-induced damage in Rana ridibunda heart are the depletion of high-energy stores, the impairment of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism, and a significant increase in anaerobic metabolism.

  20. Region-specific metabolic alterations in the brain of the APP/PS1 transgenic mice of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Raúl; García-Barrera, Tamara; Vitorica, Javier; Gómez-Ariza, José Luis

    2014-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder worldwide, but its etiology is still not completely understood. The identification of underlying pathological mechanisms is becoming increasingly important for the discovery of biomarkers and therapies, for which metabolomics presents a great potential. In this work, we studied metabolic alterations in different brain regions of the APP/PS1 mice by using a high-throughput metabolomic approach based on the combination of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Multivariate statistics showed that metabolomic perturbations are widespread, affecting mainly the hippocampus and the cortex, but are also present in regions not primarily associated with AD such as the striatum, cerebellum and olfactory bulbs. Multiple metabolic pathways could be linked to the development of AD-type disorders in this mouse model, including abnormal purine metabolism, bioenergetic failures, dyshomeostasis of amino acids and disturbances in membrane lipids, among others. Interestingly, region-specific alterations were observed for some of the potential markers identified, associated with abnormal fatty acid composition of phospholipids and sphingomyelins, or differential regulation of neurotransmitter amino acids (e.g. glutamate, glycine, serine, N-acetyl-aspartate), not previously described to our knowledge. Therefore, these findings could provide a new insight into brain pathology in Alzheimer's disease.

  1. Metabolic alterations in the sera of Chinese patients with mild persistent asthma: a GC-MS-based metabolomics analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chun; Guo, Zhi-guo; He, Bei; Yao, Wan-zhen

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To character the specific metabolomics profiles in the sera of Chinese patients with mild persistent asthma and to explore potential metabolic biomarkers. Methods: Seventeen Chinese patients with mild persistent asthma and age- and sex-matched healthy controls were enrolled. Serum samples were collected, and serum metabolites were analyzed using GC-MS coupled with a series of multivariate statistical analyses. Results: Clear intergroup separations existed between the asthmatic patients and control subjects. A list of differential metabolites and several top altered metabolic pathways were identified. The levels of succinate (an intermediate in tricarboxylic acid cycle) and inosine were highly upregulated in the asthmatic patients, suggesting a greater effort to breathe during exacerbation and hypoxic stress due to asthma. Other differential metabolites, such as 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid and phenylalanine, were also identified. Furthermore, the differential metabolites possessed higher values of area under the ROC curve (AUC), suggesting an excellent clinical ability for the prediction of asthma. Conclusion: Metabolic activity is significantly altered in the sera of Chinese patients with mild persistent asthma. The data might be helpful for identifying novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets for asthma. PMID:26526201

  2. Cell wall, cell membrane, and volatile metabolism are altered by antioxidant treatment, temperature shifts, and peel necrosis during apple fruit storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transition from cold storage to ambient temperature alters apple quality through accelerated softening, flavor and color changes, and symptom development of physiological peel disorders, such as superficial scald, in susceptible cultivars. To reveal global metabolism associated with the transit...

  3. ALTERATIONS IN A11 TRANS RETINOIC ACID METABOLISM IN LIVER MICROSOMES FROM MICE TREATED WITH HEPATOTUMORIGENIC AND NON-HEPATOTUMORIGENIC CONAZOLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are fungicides used in crop protection and as pharmaceuticals. Triadimefon and propiconazole are hepatotumorigenic in mice, while myclobutanil is not. Previous toxicogenomic studies suggest that alteration of the retinoic acid metabolism pathway may be a key event in co...

  4. Good and bad consequences of altered fatty acid metabolism in heart failure: evidence from mouse models.

    PubMed

    Abdurrachim, Desiree; Luiken, Joost J F P; Nicolay, Klaas; Glatz, Jan F C; Prompers, Jeanine J; Nabben, Miranda

    2015-05-01

    The shift in substrate preference away from fatty acid oxidation (FAO) towards increased glucose utilization in heart failure has long been interpreted as an oxygen-sparing mechanism. Inhibition of FAO has therefore evolved as an accepted approach to treat heart failure. However, recent data indicate that increased reliance on glucose might be detrimental rather than beneficial for the failing heart. This review discusses new insights into metabolic adaptations in heart failure. A particular focus lies on data obtained from mouse models with modulations of cardiac FA metabolism at different levels of the FA metabolic pathway and how these differently affect cardiac function. Based on studies in which these mouse models were exposed to ischaemic and non-ischaemic heart failure, we discuss whether and when modulations in FA metabolism are protective against heart failure.

  5. Metabolic changes and DNA hypomethylation in cerebellum are associated with behavioral alterations in mice exposed to trichloroethylene postnatally

    PubMed Central

    Blossom, Sarah J.; Cooney, Craig A.; Melnyk, Stepan B.; Rau, Jenny L.; Swearingen, Christopher J.; Wessinger, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that low-level postnatal and early life exposure to the environmental contaminant, trichloroethylene (TCE), in the drinking water of MRL+/+ mice altered glutathione redox homeostasis and increased biomarkers of oxidative stress indicating a more oxidized state. Plasma metabolites along the interrelated transmethylation pathway were also altered indicating impaired methylation capacity. Here we extend these findings to further characterize the impact of TCE exposure in mice exposed to water only or two doses of TCE in the drinking water (0, 2, and 28 mg/kg/day) postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the cerebellum. In addition, pathway intermediates involved in methyl metabolism and global DNA methylation patterns were examined in cerebellar tissue. Because the cerebellum is functionally important for coordinating motor activity, including exploratory and social approach behaviors, these parameters were evaluated in the present study. Mice exposed to 28 mg/kg/day TCE exhibited increased locomotor activity over time as compared with control mice. In the novel object exploration test, these mice were more likely to enter the zone with the novel object as compared to control mice Similar results were obtained in a second test when an unfamiliar mouse was introduced into the testing arena. The results show for the first time that postnatal exposure to TCE causes key metabolic changes in the cerebellum that may contribute to global DNA methylation deficits and behavioral alterations in TCE-exposed mice. PMID:23566951

  6. Plasma lipids, lipoprotein metabolism and HDL lipid transfers are equally altered in metabolic syndrome and in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vanessa M; Vinagre, Carmen G C; Dallan, Luis A O; Chacra, Ana P M; Maranhão, Raul C

    2014-07-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) refers to states of insulin resistance that predispose to development of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). The aim was to investigate whether plasma lipids and lipid metabolism differ in MetS patients compared to those with T2DM with poor glycemic control (glycated hemoglobin > 7.0). Eighteen patients with T2DM, 18 with MetS and 14 controls, paired for age (40-70 years) and body mass index (BMI), were studied. Plasma lipids and the kinetics of a triacylglycerol-rich emulsion labeled with [(3)H]-triolein ([(3)H]-TAG) and [(14)C]-cholesteryl esters ([(14)C]-CE) injected intravenously followed by one-hour blood sampling were determined. Lipid transfers from an artificial nanoemulsion donor to high-density lipoprotien (HDL) were assayed in vitro. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and HDL cholesterol (mg/dl) were not different in T2DM (128 ± 7; 42 ± 7) and MetS (142 ± 6; 39 ± 3), but triacylglycerols were even higher in MetS (215 ± 13) than in T2DM (161 ±11, p < 0.05). Fractional clearance rate (FCR, in min(1)) of [(3)H]-TAG and [(14)C]-CE were equal in T2DM (0.008 ± 0.018; 0.005 ± 0.024) and MetS (0.010 ± 0.016; 0.006 ± 0.013), and both were reduced compared to controls. The transfer of non-esterified cholesterol, phospholipids and triacylglycerols to HDL was higher in MetS and T2DM than in controls (p < 0.01). Cholesteryl ester transfer and HDL size were equal in all groups. Results imply that MetS is equal to poorly controlled T2DM concerning the disturbances of plasma lipid metabolism examined here, and suggest that there are different thresholds for the insulin action on glucose and lipids. These findings highlight the magnitude of the lipid disturbances in MetS, and may have implications in the prevention of cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Whole Grain Products, Fish and Bilberries Alter Glucose and Lipid Metabolism in a Randomized, Controlled Trial: The Sysdimet Study

    PubMed Central

    Lankinen, Maria; Schwab, Ursula; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Paananen, Jussi; Poutanen, Kaisa; Mykkänen, Hannu; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Gylling, Helena; Uusitupa, Matti; Orešič, Matej

    2011-01-01

    Background Due to the growing prevalence of type 2 diabetes, new dietary solutions are needed to help improve glucose and lipid metabolism in persons at high risk of developing the disease. Herein we investigated the effects of low-insulin-response grain products, fatty fish, and berries on glucose metabolism and plasma lipidomic profiles in persons with impaired glucose metabolism. Methodology/Principal Findings Altogether 106 men and women with impaired glucose metabolism and with at least two other features of the metabolic syndrome were included in a 12-week parallel dietary intervention. The participants were randomized into three diet intervention groups: (1) whole grain and low postprandial insulin response grain products, fatty fish three times a week, and bilberries three portions per day (HealthyDiet group), (2) Whole grain enriched diet (WGED) group, which includes principally the same grain products as group (1), but with no change in fish or berry consumption, and (3) refined wheat breads (Control). Oral glucose tolerance, plasma fatty acids and lipidomic profiles were measured before and after the intervention. Self-reported compliance with the diets was good and the body weight remained constant. Within the HealthyDiet group two hour glucose concentration and area-under-the-curve for glucose decreased and plasma proportion of (n-3) long-chain PUFAs increased (False Discovery Rate p-values <0.05). Increases in eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid associated curvilinearly with the improved insulin secretion and glucose disposal. Among the 364 characterized lipids, 25 changed significantly in the HealthyDiet group, including multiple triglycerides incorporating the long chain (n-3) PUFA. Conclusions/Significance The results suggest that the diet rich in whole grain and low insulin response grain products, bilberries, and fatty fish improve glucose metabolism and alter the lipidomic profile. Therefore, such a diet may have a beneficial effect

  8. Vaccinium virgatum fruit extract as an important adjuvant in biochemical and behavioral alterations observed in animal model of metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Pathise Souto; Gazal, Marta; Flores, Natália Porto; Zimmer, Aline Rigon; Chaves, Vitor Clasen; Reginatto, Flávio Henrique; Kaster, Manuella Pinto; Tavares, Rejane Giacomelli; Spanevello, Roselia Maria; Lencina, Claiton Leoneti; Stefanello, Francieli Moro

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of blueberry (Vaccinium virgatum) fruit extract on metabolic, behavioral and oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of mice submitted to an experimental model of metabolic syndrome induced by a highly palatable diet (HPD). Mice C57BL/6 were divided into 4 experimental groups: (1) received standard chow and saline orally, (2) received standard chow and blueberry hydroalcoholic extract, (3) received HPD and saline orally, (4) received HPD and blueberry hydroalcoholic extract. The animals were treated for 150days. Our results showed that the animals fed with HPD presented insulin resistance, increased body weight, visceral fat, glucose, triglycerides, and total cholesterol when compared to the control group. The blueberry extract prevented the increase of these metabolic parameters. Also, the extract was able to reduce the levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of animals submitted to HPD. In contrast, no differences were observed in the total thiol content, activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase. In addition, the HPD fed animals showed a significant increase in immobility time in the forced swimming test and blueberry prevented this alteration, although no changes were observed in the ambulatory behavior, as well as in the anxiolytic profile of these animals. Overall, our findings suggest that chronic consumption of blueberry extract exhibits hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, antidepressant-like and antiperoxidative effects in an animal model of metabolic syndrome.

  9. Metabolites involved in Glycolysis and Amino Acid Metabolism are Altered in Short Children Born Small for Gestational Age

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Philip G; Butcher, Imogen; Dunn, Warwick B; Stevens, Adam; Perchard, Reena; Hanson, Daniel; Whatmore, Andrew; Westwood, Melissa; Clayton, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    Background Later life metabolic dysfunction is a well-recognised consequence of being born Small for Gestational Age (SGA). This study has applied metabolomics to identify whether there are changes in these pathways in pre-pubertal short SGA children and aimed to compare the intracellular and extracellular metabolome in fibroblasts derived from healthy children and SGA children with post-natal growth impairment. Methods Skin fibroblast cell lines were established from eight SGA children (age 1.8 -10.3 years) with failure of catch-up growth and from three healthy control children. Confluent cells were incubated in serum free media and the spent growth medium (metabolic footprint) and intracellular metabolome (metabolic fingerprint) were analysed by gas-chromatography mass spectrometry. Results 19 metabolites were significantly altered between SGA and control cell lines. The greatest fold difference (FD) was seen for alanine (fingerprint FD, SGA: control) 0.3, p=0.01 and footprint FD=0.19, p=0.01), aspartic acid (fingerprint FD=5.21, p=0.01) and cystine (footprint FD=1.66, p=0.02). Network analysis of the differentially expressed metabolites predicted inhibition of insulin and activation of ERK/AKT/PI3K signalling in SGA cells. Conclusions This study indicates that changes in cellular metabolism associated with both growth failure and insulin insensitivity are present in pre-pubertal short children born SGA. PMID:27057740

  10. Altering metabolic profiles of drugs by precision deuteration: reducing mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2D6 by paroxetine.

    PubMed

    Uttamsingh, Vinita; Gallegos, Richard; Liu, Julie F; Harbeson, Scott L; Bridson, Gary W; Cheng, Changfu; Wells, David S; Graham, Philip B; Zelle, Robert; Tung, Roger

    2015-07-01

    Selective deuterium substitution as a means of ameliorating clinically relevant pharmacokinetic drug interactions is demonstrated in this study. Carbon-deuterium bonds are more stable than corresponding carbon-hydrogen bonds. Using a precision deuteration platform, the two hydrogen atoms at the methylenedioxy carbon of paroxetine were substituted with deuterium. The new chemical entity, CTP-347 [(3S,4R)-3-((2,2-dideuterobenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yloxy)methyl)-4-(4-fluorophenyl)piperidine], demonstrated similar selectivity for the serotonin receptor, as well as similar neurotransmitter uptake inhibition in an in vitro rat synaptosome model, as unmodified paroxetine. However, human liver microsomes cleared CTP-347 faster than paroxetine as a result of decreased inactivation of CYP2D6. In phase 1 studies, CTP-347 was metabolized more rapidly in humans and exhibited a lower pharmacokinetic accumulation index than paroxetine. These alterations in the metabolism profile resulted in significantly reduced drug-drug interactions between CTP-347 and two other CYP2D6-metabolized drugs: tamoxifen (in vitro) and dextromethorphan (in humans). Our results show that precision deuteration can improve the metabolism profiles of existing pharmacotherapies without affecting their intrinsic pharmacologies.

  11. Metabonomic Analysis Reveals Efficient Ameliorating Effects of Acupoint Stimulations on the Menopause-caused Alterations in Mammalian Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Limin; Wang, Yulan; Xu, Yunxiang; Lei, Hehua; Zhao, Ying; Li, Huihui; Lin, Xiaosheng; Chen, Guizhen; Tang, Huiru

    2014-01-01

    Acupoint stimulations are effective in ameliorating symptoms of menopause which is an unavoidable ageing consequence for women. To understand the mechanistic aspects of such treatments, we systematically analyzed the effects of acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding on the ovariectomy-induced rat metabolic changes using NMR and GC-FID/MS methods. Results showed that ovariectomization (OVX) caused comprehensive metabolic changes in lipid peroxidation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, choline and amino acid metabolisms. Both acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding ameliorated the OVX-caused metabonomic changes more effectively than hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with nilestriol. Such effects of acupoint stimulations were highlighted in alleviating lipid peroxidation, restoring glucose homeostasis and partial reversion of the OVX-altered amino acid metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the menopause effects on mammalian biochemistry and beneficial effects of acupoint stimulations in comparison with HRT, demonstrating metabonomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in disease prognosis and developments of effective therapies.

  12. Metabonomic Analysis Reveals Efficient Ameliorating Effects of Acupoint Stimulations on the Menopause-caused Alterations in Mammalian Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Limin; Wang, Yulan; Xu, Yunxiang; Lei, Hehua; Zhao, Ying; Li, Huihui; Lin, Xiaosheng; Chen, Guizhen; Tang, Huiru

    2014-01-01

    Acupoint stimulations are effective in ameliorating symptoms of menopause which is an unavoidable ageing consequence for women. To understand the mechanistic aspects of such treatments, we systematically analyzed the effects of acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding on the ovariectomy-induced rat metabolic changes using NMR and GC-FID/MS methods. Results showed that ovariectomization (OVX) caused comprehensive metabolic changes in lipid peroxidation, glycolysis, TCA cycle, choline and amino acid metabolisms. Both acupoint laser-irradiation and catgut-embedding ameliorated the OVX-caused metabonomic changes more effectively than hormone replacement therapy (HRT) with nilestriol. Such effects of acupoint stimulations were highlighted in alleviating lipid peroxidation, restoring glucose homeostasis and partial reversion of the OVX-altered amino acid metabolism. These findings provided new insights into the menopause effects on mammalian biochemistry and beneficial effects of acupoint stimulations in comparison with HRT, demonstrating metabonomics as a powerful approach for potential applications in disease prognosis and developments of effective therapies. PMID:24407431

  13. Alteration of media composition and light conditions change morphology, metabolic profile, and beauvericin biosynthesis in Cordyceps bassiana mycelium.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sun-Hee; Lee, Seok-Young; Park, Shin Jung; Kim, Da Yeon; Chun, Young-Jin; Sung, Gi-Ho; Kim, Seong Hwan; Choi, Hyung-Kyoon

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic alterations of Cordyceps bassiana mycelium were investigated under the following culture medium and light conditions: dextrose agar supplemented with 0.5% yeast extract (SDAY) medium with light (SL), SDAY medium without light (SD), nut medium without light (ND), and iron-supplemented SDAY medium without light (FD). The levels of asparagine, aspartic acid, glutamic acid, glutamine, histidine, lysine, ornithine, and proline were significantly higher under SD and SL conditions. The levels of most of the alcohols, saturated fatty acids, unsaturated fatty acids, fatty acid esters, sterols, and terpenes were higher under the ND condition than in the other conditions, but beauvericin was not detectable under the ND condition. The FD condition was favorable for the enhanced production of aminomalonic acid, malic acid, mannonic acid, and erythritol. Thus, the metabolic characteristics of C. bassiana can be manipulated by varying the cultivation conditions, rendering this fungus potentially favorable as a nutraceutical and medicinal resource.

  14. Ectopic lipid accumulation: A potential cause for metabolic disturbances and a contributor to the alteration of kidney function.

    PubMed

    Guebre-Egziabher, Fitsum; Alix, Pascaline M; Koppe, Laetitia; Pelletier, Caroline C; Kalbacher, Emilie; Fouque, Denis; Soulage, Christophe O

    2013-11-01

    Ectopic lipid accumulation is now known to be a mechanism that contributes to organ injury in the context of metabolic diseases. In muscle and liver, accumulation of lipids impairs insulin signaling. This hypothesis accounts for the mechanism of insulin resistance in obesity, type 2 diabetes, aging and lipodystrophy. Increasing data suggest that lipid accumulation in the kidneys could also contribute to the alteration of kidney function in the context of metabolic syndrome and obesity. Furthermore and more unexpectedly, animal models of kidney disease exhibit a decreased adiposity and ectopic lipid redistribution suggesting that kidney disease may be a state of lipodystrophy. However, whether this abnormal lipid partitioning during chronic kidney disease (CKD) may have any functional impact in these tissues needs to be investigated. Here, we provide a perspective by defining the problem and analyzing the possible causes and consequences. Further human studies are required to strengthen these observations, and provide novel therapeutic approaches.

  15. Metabolomics reveals trichloroacetate as a major contributor to trichloroethylene-induced metabolic alterations in mouse urine and serum.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhong-Ze; Krausz, Kristopher W; Tanaka, Naoki; Li, Fei; Qu, Aijuan; Idle, Jeffrey R; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2013-11-01

    Trichloroethylene (TCE)-induced liver toxicity and carcinogenesis is believed to be mediated in part by activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα). However, the contribution of the two TCE metabolites, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA) to the toxicity of TCE, remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to determine the metabolite profiles in serum and urine upon exposure of mice to TCE, to aid in determining the metabolic response to TCE exposure and the contribution of DCA and TCA to TCE toxicity. C57BL/6 mice were administered TCE, TCA, or DCA, and urine and serum subjected to ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-QTOFMS)-based global metabolomics analysis. The ions were identified through searching metabolomics databases and by comparison with authentic standards, and quantitated using multiple reactions monitoring. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction of mRNA, biochemical analysis, and liver histology were also performed. TCE exposure resulted in a decrease in urine of metabolites involved in fatty acid metabolism, resulting from altered expression of PPARα target genes. TCE treatment also induced altered phospholipid homeostasis in serum, as revealed by increased serum lysophosphatidylcholine 18:0 and 18:1, and phosphatidylcholine metabolites. TCA administration revealed similar metabolite profiles in urine and serum upon TCE exposure, which correlated with a more robust induction of PPARα target gene expression associated with TCA than DCA treatment. These data show the metabolic response to TCE exposure and demonstrate that TCA is the major contributor to TCE-induced metabolite alterations observed in urine and serum.

  16. PGC1-α over-expression prevents metabolic alterations and soleus muscle atrophy in hindlimb unloaded mice

    PubMed Central

    Cannavino, Jessica; Brocca, Lorenza; Sandri, Marco; Bottinelli, Roberto; Pellegrino, Maria Antonietta

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged skeletal muscle inactivity causes muscle fibre atrophy. Redox imbalance has been considered one of the major triggers of skeletal muscle disuse atrophy, but whether redox imbalance is actually the major cause or simply a consequence of muscle disuse remains of debate. Here we hypothesized that a metabolic stress mediated by PGC-1α down-regulation plays a major role in disuse atrophy. First we studied the adaptations of soleus to mice hindlimb unloading (HU) in the early phase of disuse (3 and 7 days of HU) with and without antioxidant treatment (trolox). HU caused a reduction in cross-sectional area, redox status alteration (NRF2, SOD1 and catalase up-regulation), and induction of the ubiquitin proteasome system (MuRF-1 and atrogin-1 mRNA up-regulation) and autophagy (Beclin1 and p62 mRNA up-regulation). Trolox completely prevented the induction of NRF2, SOD1 and catalase mRNAs, but not atrophy or induction of catabolic systems in unloaded muscles, suggesting that oxidative stress is not a major cause of disuse atrophy. HU mice showed a marked alteration of oxidative metabolism. PGC-1α and mitochondrial complexes were down-regulated and DRP1 was up-regulated. To define the link between mitochondrial dysfunction and disuse muscle atrophy we unloaded mice overexpressing PGC-1α. Transgenic PGC-1α animals did not show metabolic alteration during unloading, preserving muscle size through the reduction of autophagy and proteasome degradation. Our results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a major role in disuse atrophy and that compounds inducing PGC-1α expression could be useful to treat/prevent muscle atrophy. PMID:25128574

  17. Cellular and metabolic alterations in the hippocampus caused by insulin signalling dysfunction and its association with cognitive impairment during aging and Alzheimer's disease: studies in animal models.

    PubMed

    Calvo-Ochoa, Erika; Arias, Clorinda

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of animal and epidemiological studies suggest that metabolic diseases such as obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus are associated with the development of cognitive impairment, dementia and Alzheimer's disease, particularly in aging. Several lines of evidence suggest that insulin signalling dysfunction produces these metabolic alterations and underlie the development of these neurodegenerative diseases. In this article, we address normal insulin function in the synapse; we review and discuss the physiopathological hallmarks of synaptic insulin signalling dysfunction associated with metabolic alterations. Additionally, we describe and review the major animal models of obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The comprehensive knowledge of the molecular mechanisms behind the association of metabolic alterations and cognitive impairment could facilitate the early detection of neurodegenerative diseases in patients with metabolic alterations, with treatment that focus on neuroprotection. It could also help in the development of metabolic-based therapies and drugs for using in dementia and Alzheimer's disease patients to alleviate their symptoms in a more efficient and comprehensive way.

  18. Deletion of Kinin B2 Receptor Alters Muscle Metabolism and Exercise Performance

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Felipe C. G.; Haro, Anderson S.; Bacurau, Aline V. N.; Hirabara, Sandro M.; Wasinski, Frederick; Ormanji, Milene S.; Moreira, José B. N.; Kiyomoto, Beatriz H.; Bertoncini, Clelia R. A.; Brum, Patricia C.; Curi, Rui; Bader, Michael; Bacurau, Reury F. P.; Pesquero, João B.; Araújo, Ronaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic risk factors such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Mitochondria is the main site of ATP production and its dysfunction leads to decreased oxidative phosphorylation, resulting in lipid accumulation and insulin resistance. Our group has demonstrated that kinins can modulate glucose and lipid metabolism as well as skeletal muscle mass. By using B2 receptor knockout mice (B2R-/-) we investigated whether kinin action affects weight gain and physical performance of the animals. Our results show that B2R-/- mice are resistant to high fat diet-induced obesity, have higher glucose tolerance as well as increased mitochondrial mass. These features are accompanied by higher energy expenditure and a lower feed efficiency associated with an increase in the proportion of type I fibers and intermediary fibers characterized by higher mitochondrial content and increased expression of genes related to oxidative metabolism. Additionally, the increased percentage of oxidative skeletal muscle fibers and mitochondrial apparatus in B2R-/- mice is coupled with a higher aerobic exercise performance. Taken together, our data give support to the involvement of kinins in skeletal muscle fiber type distribution and muscle metabolism, which ultimately protects against fat-induced obesity and improves aerobic exercise performance. PMID:26302153

  19. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E; Lamers, Wouter H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Verlander, Jill W; Weiner, I David

    2016-06-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4 (+) with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na(+)-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression.

  20. Alterations of Hepatic Metabolism in Chronic Kidney Disease via D-box-binding Protein Aggravate the Renal Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Kengo; Matsunaga, Naoya; Ikeda, Eriko; Kondo, Hideaki; Ikeyama, Hisako; Tokushige, Kazutaka; Itcho, Kazufumi; Furuichi, Yoko; Yoshida, Yuya; Matsuda, Masaki; Yasuda, Kaori; Doi, Atsushi; Yokota, Yoshifumi; Amamoto, Toshiaki; Aramaki, Hironori; Irino, Yasuhiro; Koyanagi, Satoru; Ohdo, Shigehiro

    2016-03-04

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with an increase in serum retinol; however, the underlying mechanisms of this disorder are poorly characterized. Here, we found that the alteration of hepatic metabolism induced the accumulation of serum retinol in 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx) mice. The liver is the major organ responsible for retinol metabolism; accordingly, microarray analysis revealed that the hepatic expression of most CYP genes was changed in 5/6Nx mice. In addition, D-box-binding protein (DBP), which controls the expression of several CYP genes, was significantly decreased in these mice. Cyp3a11 and Cyp26a1, encoding key proteins in retinol metabolism, showed the greatest decrease in expression in 5/6Nx mice, a process mediated by the decreased expression of DBP. Furthermore, an increase of plasma transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in 5/6Nx mice led to the decreased expression of the Dbp gene. Consistent with these findings, the alterations of retinol metabolism and renal dysfunction in 5/6Nx mice were ameliorated by administration of an anti-TGF-β1 antibody. We also show that the accumulation of serum retinol induced renal apoptosis in 5/6Nx mice fed a normal diet, whereas renal dysfunction was reduced in mice fed a retinol-free diet. These findings indicate that constitutive Dbp expression plays an important role in mediating hepatic dysfunction under CKD. Thus, the aggravation of renal dysfunction in patients with CKD might be prevented by a recovery of hepatic function, potentially through therapies targeting DBP and retinol.

  1. Altered HBK3 expression affects glutathione and ascorbate metabolism during the early phases of Norway spruce (Picea abies) somatic embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Belmonte, Mark F; Stasolla, Claudio

    2009-10-01

    Plant homeobox genes play an important role in plant development, including embryogenesis. Recently, the function of a class I homeobox of knox 3 gene, HBK3, has been characterized in the conifer Picea abies (L.) Karst (Norway spruce) [8]. During somatic embryogenesis, expression of HBK3 is required for the proper differentiation of proembryogenic masses into somatic embryos. This transition, fundamental for the overall embryogenic process, is accelerated in sense lines over-expressing HBK3 (HBK3-S) but precluded in antisense lines (HBK3-AS) where the expression of this gene is experimentally reduced. Altered HBK3 expression resulted in major changes of ascorbate and glutathione metabolism. During the initial phases of embryogeny the level of reduced GSH was higher in the HBK3-S lines compared to their control counterpart. An opposite profile was observed for the HBK3-AS lines where the glutathione redox state, i.e. GSH/GSH + GSSG, switched towards its oxidized form, i.e. GSSG. Very similar metabolic fluctuations were also measured for ascorbate, especially during the transition of proembryogenic masses into somatic embryos (7 days into hormone-free medium). At this stage the level of reduced ascorbate (ASC) in the HBK3-AS lines was about 75% lower compare to the untransformed line causing a switch of the ascorbate redox state, i.e. ASC/ASC + DHA + AFR, towards its oxidized forms, i.e. DHA + AFR. Changes in activities of several ascorbate and glutathione redox enzymes, including dehydroascorbate reductase (EC 1.8.5.1), ascorbate free radical reductase (EC 1.6.5.4) and glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2) were responsible for these metabolic differences. Data presented here suggest that HBK3 expression might regulate somatic embryo yield through alterations in glutathione and ascorbate metabolism, which have been previously implicated in controlling embryo development and maturation both in vivo and in vitro.

  2. Oral tungstate treatment improves only transiently alteration of glucose metabolism in a new rat model of type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Fierabracci, Vanna; De Tata, Vincenzo; Pocai, Alessandro; Novelli, Michela; Barberà, Albert; Masiello, Pellegrino

    2002-11-01

    It has been shown that tungstate is an effective hypoglycemic agent in several animal models of diabetes. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of oral tungstate treatment in a new experimental diabetic syndrome, induced by streptozotocin (STZ) and nicotinamide in adult rats, that shares several features with human type 2 diabetes. Sodium tungstate was administered in the drinking water (2 mg/mL) of control and diabetic rats for 15, 30, 60, and 90 d. Glucose metabolism was explored in vivo by intravenous glucose tolerance test. Insulin secretion and action were assessed in vitro in the isolated perfused pancreas and isolated adipocytes, respectively. Two weeks of tungstate treatment did not modify the moderate hyperglycemia of diabetic rats but reduced their intolerance to glucose, owing to an enhancement of postloading insulin secretion. However, this effect was transient, since it declined after 30 d and vanished after 60 and 90 d of tungstate administration, whereas a trend toward a reduction in basal hyperglycemia was observed on prolonged treatment. Oral tungstate was unable to modify glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in the isolated perfused pancreas, as well as muscle glycogen levels, hepatic glucose metabolism, and insulin-stimulated lipogenesis in isolated adipocytes. Nevertheless, the decreased insulin content of pancreatic islets of diabetic rats was partially restored on prolonged tungstate treatment. In conclusion, in the STZ-nicotinamide model of diabetes, tungstate was unable to permanently correct the alterations in glucose metabolism, despite some indirect evidence of a trophic effect on beta-cells. The ineffectiveness of tungstate could be related to the absence, in this diabetic syndrome, of relevant metabolic alterations in the liver, which thus appear to constitute the major target of tungstate action.

  3. Ichthyosiform dermatosis with superficial blister formation and peeling: evidence for a desmosomal anomaly and altered epidermal vitamin A metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mevorah, B; Salomon, D; Siegenthaler, G; Hohl, D; Meier, M L; Saurat, J H; Frenk, E

    1996-02-01

    We describe a man with generalized congenital ichthyosiform dermatosis, severe cheilitis, and palmar and plantar hyperkeratosis with superficial blistering. Low-dose acitretin therapy induced areas of peeling skin, similar to that seen in the peeling skin syndrome. Histologically, the skin was moderately hyperkeratotic and the palmar blisters were subcorneal. Electron microscopy revealed that the splitting occurred within the desmosomal plaque. Ultrastructural and biochemical investigations indicated epidermal hypervitaminosis A, probably related to alteration of epidermal retinoic acid metabolism. This disease is proposed as a hitherto unreported variant of the peeling skin syndrome.

  4. Alterations in the metabolism of endogenous trace metals due to cadmium, manganese and nickel - effect of partial hepatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, R.C.; Ahmad, I.; Kaur, G.; Hasan, S.K.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of cadmium, manganese and nickel on the levels of copper, manganese, iron and zinc in liver was studied in sham operated and partially hepatectomized rats, 72 hrs after metal administration. Partial hepatectomy produced significant increase in the level of zinc and decrease in the levels of copper, iron and manganese. The metabolic disposition of these essential micronutrients were significantly altered as a result of cadmium administration in both the groups. Manganese and nickel had little effect and only induced the level of zinc.

  5. Tissue lipid metabolism and hepatic metabolomic profiling in response to supplementation of fermented cottonseedmeal in the diets of broiler chickens*

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Cun-xi; Zhang, Wen-ju; Wang, Yong-qiang; Liu, Yan-feng; Ge, Wen-xia; Liu, Jian-cheng

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of fermented cottonseed meal (FCSM) on lipid metabolites, lipid metabolism-related gene expression in liver tissues and abdominal adipose tissues, and hepatic metabolomic profiling in broiler chickens. One hundred and eighty 21-d-old broiler chickens were randomly divided into three diet groups with six replicates of 10 birds in each group. The three diets consisted of a control diet supplemented with unfermented cottonseed meal, an experimental diet of cottonseed meal fermented by Candida tropicalis, and a second experimental diet of cottonseed meal fermented by C. tropicalis plus Saccharomyces cerevisae. The results showed that FCSM intake significantly decreased the levels of abdominal fat and hepatic triglycerides (P<0.05 for both). Dietary FCSM supplementation down-regulated the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase and acetyl CoA carboxylase in liver tissues and the lipoprotein lipase expression in abdominal fat tissues (P<0.05 for both). FCSM intake resulted in significant metabolic changes of multiple pathways in the liver involving the tricarboxylic acid cycle, synthesis of fatty acids, and the metabolism of glycerolipid and amino acids. These findings indicated that FCSM regulated lipid metabolism by increasing or decreasing the expression of the lipid-related gene and by altering multiple endogenous metabolites. Lipid metabolism regulation is a complex process, this discovery provided new essential information about the effects of FCSM diets in broiler chickens and demonstrated the great potential of nutrimetabolomics in researching complex nutrients added to animal diets. PMID:26055906

  6. Plasma lipidomics discloses metabolic syndrome with a specific HDL phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Naudí, Alba; Portero-Otin, Manuel; Cabré, Rosanna; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Bañuls, Celia; Rocha, Milagros; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio; Victor, Victor M; Pamplona, Reinald

    2014-12-01

    Lipidomics reveals a remarkable diversity of lipids in human plasma. In this study, we have performed an in-depth lipidomic analysis of human plasma from healthy individuals and subjects with metabolic syndrome (MetS) in order to determine the lipidomic profile that allows prognosis of a pathological subpopulation with altered high-density lipoprotein (HDL) metabolism. The MetS population was categorized as having pathological or nonpathological HDL. Anthropometric parameters, cardiovascular risk markers, and lipoprotein subclasses of HDL and low-density lipoproteins were also evaluated. Lipidomic analysis revealed 357 differential molecules that were clustered (k means) in the two groups. The molecules identified in the whole lipidome showed that MetS subjects presented lower levels of glycerolipids and higher levels of glycerophospholipids with respect to control subjects. In contrast, when only statistically differential lipids were taken into account, differences were found between the two groups in almost cases. Furthermore, levels of saturated fatty acids were higher in patients with pathological HDL levels than in controls, whereas levels of unsaturated fatty acids were lower. These results highlight the potential of lipidomics as a clinical tool for risk assessment and monitoring of disease.

  7. Quercetin ameliorates glucose and lipid metabolism and improves antioxidant status in postnatally monosodium glutamate-induced metabolic alterations.

    PubMed

    Seiva, Fábio R F; Chuffa, Luiz Gustavo A; Braga, Camila Pereira; Amorim, João Paulo A; Fernandes, Ana Angélica H

    2012-10-01

    We reported the effects of quercetin on metabolic and hormonal profile as well as serum antioxidant activities in a model of MSG (monosodium glutamate)-induced obesity. Rats were divided into 4 groups: MSG group, submitted to neonatal treatment with high doses of MSG, administrated subcutaneously during 10 days, from 2 day-old; control groups, which received the same volume of saline. After completing 30 day-old, these groups were subdivided into 4 groups: control and MSG groups treated and non-treated with quercetin at doses of 75 mg/kg body weight (i.p.) over 42 days. BW gain and food consumption were higher in MSG treated rats and quercetin significantly reduced BW by 25%. While MSG increased triacylglycerol, total cholesterol and fractions, and reduced HDL concentrations, administration of quercetin normalized HDL-cholesterol and reduced others lipids. Insulin, leptin, glucose and creatinine levels were raised in MSG-treated rats and reduced after quercetin treatment. Alanine transaminase, aspartate transaminase, lactate dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase activities were lower after MSG-quercetin combination compared to rats given only MSG. MSG-quercetin combination augmented total protein and urea levels as well as glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in contrast to MSG-treated animals. Quercetin normalized serum lipid and glucose profile and minimized the MSG-related toxic effects, which was associated to its antioxidant properties.

  8. Water limitation and rootstock genotype interact to alter grape berry metabolism through transcriptome reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Berdeja, Mariam; Nicolas, Philippe; Kappel, Christian; Dai, Zhan Wu; Hilbert, Ghislaine; Peccoux, Anthony; Lafontaine, Magali; Ollat, Nathalie; Gomès, Eric; Delrot, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Grapevine is a perennial crop often cultivated by grafting a scion cultivar on a suitable rootstock. Rootstocks influence scions, particularly with regard to water uptake and vigor. Therefore, one of the possibilities to adapt viticulture to the extended drought stress periods is to select rootstocks conferring increased tolerance to drought. However, the molecular mechanisms associated with the ability of rootstock/scion combination to influence grape berry metabolism under drought stress are still poorly understood. The transcriptomic changes induced by drought stress in grape berries (cv. Pinot noir) from vines grafted on either 110R (drought-tolerant) or 125AA (drought-sensitive) rootstock were compared. The experiments were conducted in the vineyard for two years and two grape berry developmental stages (50% and 100% veraison). The genome-wide microarray approach showed that water stress strongly impacts gene expression in the berries, through ontology categories that cover cell wall metabolism, primary and secondary metabolism, signaling, stress, and hormones, and that some of these effects strongly depend on the rootstock genotype. Indeed, under drought stress, berries from vines grafted on 110R displayed a different transcriptional response compared to 125AA-concerning genes related to jasmonate (JA), phenylpropanoid metabolism, and pathogenesis-related proteins. The data also suggest a link between JA and secondary metabolism in water-stressed berries. Overall, genes related to secondary metabolism and JA are more induced and/or less repressed by drought stress in the berries grafted on the drought-sensitive rootstock 125AA. These rootstock-dependent gene expression changes are relevant for berry composition and sensory properties. PMID:26504567

  9. Testosterone alters iron metabolism and stimulates red blood cell production independently of dihydrotestosterone.

    PubMed

    Beggs, Luke A; Yarrow, Joshua F; Conover, Christine F; Meuleman, John R; Beck, Darren T; Morrow, Matthew; Zou, Baiming; Shuster, Jonathan J; Borst, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    Testosterone (T) stimulates erythropoiesis and regulates iron homeostasis. However, it remains unknown whether the (type II) 5α-reduction of T to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) mediates these androgenic effects, as it does in some other tissues. Our purpose was to determine whether inhibition of type II 5α-reductase (via finasteride) alters red blood cell (RBC) production and serum markers of iron homeostasis subsequent to testosterone-enanthate (TE) administration in older hypogonadal men. Sixty men aged ≥60 yr with serum T <300 ng/dl or bioavailable T <70 ng/dl received treatment with TE (125 mg/wk) vs. vehicle paired with finasteride (5 mg/day) vs. placebo using a 2 × 2 factorial design. Over the course of 12 mo, TE increased RBC count 9%, hematocrit 4%, and hemoglobin 8% while suppressing serum hepcidin 57% (P < 0.001 for all measurements). Most of the aforementioned changes occurred in the first 3 mo of treatment, and finasteride coadministration did not significantly alter any of these effects. TE also reduced serum ferritin 32% (P = 0.002) within 3 mo of treatment initiation without altering iron, transferrin, or transferrin saturation. We conclude that TE stimulates erythropoiesis and alters iron homeostasis independently of the type II 5α-reductase enzyme. These results demonstrate that elevated DHT is not required for androgen-mediated erythropoiesis or for alterations in iron homeostasis that would appear to support iron incorporation into RBCs.

  10. Orally Administered Berberine Modulates Hepatic Lipid Metabolism by Altering Microbial Bile Acid Metabolism and the Intestinal FXR Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Runbin; Yang, Na; Kong, Bo; Cao, Bei; Feng, Dong; Yu, Xiaoyi; Ge, Chun; Huang, Jingqiu; Shen, Jianliang; Wang, Pei; Feng, Siqi; Fei, Fei; Guo, Jiahua; He, Jun; Aa, Nan; Chen, Qiang; Pan, Yang; Schumacher, Justin D; Yang, Chung S; Guo, Grace L; Aa, Jiye; Wang, Guangji

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies suggest that the lipid-lowering effect of berberine (BBR) involves actions on the low-density lipoprotein receptor and the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathways. However, the implication of these mechanisms is unclear because of the low bioavailability of BBR. Because the main action site of BBR is the gut and intestinal farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays a pivotal role in the regulation of lipid metabolism, we hypothesized that the effects of BBR on intestinal FXR signaling pathway might account for its pharmacological effectiveness. Using wild type (WT) and intestine-specific FXR knockout (FXR(int-/-)) mice, we found that BBR prevented the development of high-fat-diet-induced obesity and ameliorated triglyceride accumulation in livers of WT, but not FXR(int-/-) mice. BBR increased conjugated bile acids in serum and their excretion in feces. Furthermore, BBR inhibited bile salt hydrolase (BSH) activity in gut microbiota, and significantly increased the levels of tauro-conjugated bile acids, especially tauro-cholic acid(TCA), in the intestine. Both BBR and TCA treatment activated the intestinal FXR pathway and reduced the expression of fatty-acid translocase Cd36 in the liver. These results indicate that BBR may exert its lipid-lowering effect primarily in the gut by modulating the turnover of bile acids and subsequently the ileal FXR signaling pathway. In summary, we provide the first evidence to suggest a new mechanism of BBR action in the intestine that involves, sequentially, inhibiting BSH, elevating TCA, and activating FXR, which lead to the suppression of hepatic expression of Cd36 that results in reduced uptake of long-chain fatty acids in the liver.

  11. Arginine supplementation does not alter nitrogen metabolism of beef steers during a lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for Arg is reported to increase during immune challenge. This study evaluated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and abomasal Arg infusion on N metabolism and immune response of 20 ruminally cannulated steers (369 ± 46 kg BW) in a randomized block design. Each block was 20 d and consiste...

  12. Arginine supplementation does not alter nitrogen metabolism of beef steers during a lipopolysaccharide challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Demand for arginine (Arg) is reported to increase during immune challenges. This study evaluated effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and abomasal Arg infusion on nitrogen (N) metabolism and immune response of 20 ruminally cannulated steers (369 ± 46 kg BW) in a randomized block design. Each block co...

  13. Alterations in brain metabolism during the first year of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong-Ki; Kim, Hyun; Soulas, Caroline; Lee, Vallent; Venna, Nagagopal; Halpern, Elkan F.; Rosenberg, Eric S.; Williams, Kenneth; González, R. G.

    2013-01-01

    Migration of both uninfected and infected monocytes into the brain during acute HIV infection likely initiates metabolic changes that can be observed with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Herein, we measured changes in brain metabolism during the first year of HIV infection and examined the relationship of these metabolite levels to CD16+ monocyte populations measured in the blood. MRS was performed on nine HIV+ subjects identified during acute HIV infection and nine seronegative control subjects. HIV+ subjects were examined within 90 days of an indeterminate Western blot, then again 2 and 6 months later, during early infection. Blood samples were collected for plasma viral RNA and monocyte subset quantification. HIV+ subjects were identified with acute viral ailment and did not display severe cognitive deficits such as dementia or minor cognitive motor disorder. Changes in lipid membrane metabolism (choline levels) in the frontal cortex and white matter were observed during the initial year of HIV infection. Greater numbers of CD16+ monocytes were associated with lower N-acetylaspartate levels and higher choline levels in the brain. These results suggest that HIV infection induces metabolic changes in the brain early during infection and that these changes may be related to monocyte dynamics in the periphery. PMID:21494901

  14. Altered gut microbial energy and metabolism in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Michail, Sonia; Lin, Malinda; Frey, Mark R; Fanter, Rob; Paliy, Oleg; Hilbush, Brian; Reo, Nicholas V

    2015-02-01

    Obesity is becoming the new pediatric epidemic. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequently associated with obesity and has become the most common cause of pediatric liver disease. The gut microbiome is the major metabolic organ and determines how calories are processed, serving as a caloric gate and contributing towards the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The goal of this study is to examine gut microbial profiles in children with NAFLD using phylogenetic, metabolomic, metagenomic and proteomic approaches. Fecal samples were obtained from obese children with or without NAFLD and healthy lean children. Stool specimens were subjected to 16S rRNA gene microarray, shotgun sequencing, mass spectroscopy for proteomics and NMR spectroscopy for metabolite analysis. Children with NAFLD had more abundant Gammaproteobacteria and Prevotella and significantly higher levels of ethanol, with differential effects on short chain fatty acids. This group also had increased genomic and protein abundance for energy production with a reduction in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and urea cycle and urea transport systems. The metaproteome and metagenome showed similar findings. The gut microbiome in pediatric NAFLD is distinct from lean healthy children with more alcohol production and pathways allocated to energy metabolism over carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, which would contribute to development of disease.

  15. A Txnrd1-dependent metabolic switch alters hepatic lipogenesis, glycogen storage, and detoxification.

    PubMed

    Iverson, Sonya V; Eriksson, Sofi; Xu, Jianqiang; Prigge, Justin R; Talago, Emily A; Meade, Tesia A; Meade, Erin S; Capecchi, Mario R; Arnér, Elias S J; Schmidt, Edward E

    2013-10-01

    Besides helping to maintain a reducing intracellular environment, the thioredoxin (Trx) system impacts bioenergetics and drug metabolism. We show that hepatocyte-specific disruption of Txnrd1, encoding Trx reductase-1 (TrxR1), causes a metabolic switch in which lipogenic genes are repressed and periportal hepatocytes become engorged with glycogen. These livers also overexpress machinery for biosynthesis of glutathione and conversion of glycogen into UDP-glucuronate; they stockpile glutathione-S-transferases and UDP-glucuronyl-transferases; and they overexpress xenobiotic exporters. This realigned metabolic profile suggested that the mutant hepatocytes might be preconditioned to more effectively detoxify certain xenobiotic challenges. Hepatocytes convert the pro-toxin acetaminophen (APAP, paracetamol) into cytotoxic N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). APAP defenses include glucuronidation of APAP or glutathionylation of NAPQI, allowing removal by xenobiotic exporters. We found that NAPQI directly inactivates TrxR1, yet Txnrd1-null livers were resistant to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. Txnrd1-null livers did not have more effective gene expression responses to APAP challenge; however, their constitutive metabolic state supported more robust GSH biosynthesis, glutathionylation, and glucuronidation systems. Following APAP challenge, this effectively sustained the GSH system and attenuated damage.

  16. Alteration of basal metabolic rate in Holstein steers during fescue toxicosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The results of this study indicate that consumption of E+ tall fescue by cattle results in a reduction in basal metabolic rate. Six ruminally cannulated steers were weight-matched and pair-fed during a two period crossover experiment. Each period consisted of two temperatures (22°C and 30°C). During...

  17. Protective effect of energy metabolism regulators in alteration of gravitation load under experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Mazina, N K; Larina, I M; Khazanov, V A; Shenkman, B S; Tsapok, P I; Zaitsev, V B; Khorobrykh, V G; Veselova, O M; Tret'yakov, V S

    2006-10-01

    Mitochondrial substrate-based preparations corrected disorders, caused by long-term exposure to abnormal gravitation vector in head-down tilt (hanging) test in rats. The preparations produced systemic and polyorgan protective effects consisting in correction of the blood prooxidant/antioxidant balance, energy metabolism in musculus soleus, and minimization of morphological changes in the liver and kidneys.

  18. Beta-cell metabolic alterations under chronic nutrient overload in rat and human islets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aim of this study was to assess multifactorial Beta-cell responses to metabolic perturbations in primary rat and human islets. Treatment of dispersed rat islet cells with elevated glucose and free fatty acids (FFAs, oleate:palmitate = 1:1 v/v) resulted in increases in the size and the number of ...

  19. Altered gut microbial energy and metabolism in children with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Michail, Sonia; Lin, Malinda; Frey, Mark R.; Fanter, Rob; Paliy, Oleg; Hilbush, Brian; Reo, Nicholas V.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is becoming the new pediatric epidemic. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is frequently associated with obesity and has become the most common cause of pediatric liver disease. The gut microbiome is the major metabolic organ and determines how calories are processed, serving as a caloric gate and contributing towards the pathogenesis of NAFLD. The goal of this study is to examine gut microbial profiles in children with NAFLD using phylogenetic, metabolomic, metagenomic and proteomic approaches. Fecal samples were obtained from obese children with or without NAFLD and healthy lean children. Stool specimens were subjected to 16S rRNA gene microarray, shotgun sequencing, mass spectroscopy for proteomics and NMR spectroscopy for metabolite analysis. Children with NAFLD had more abundant Gammaproteobacteria and Prevotella and significantly higher levels of ethanol, with differential effects on short chain fatty acids. This group also had increased genomic and protein abundance for energy production with a reduction in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism and urea cycle and urea transport systems. The metaproteome and metagenome showed similar findings. The gut microbiome in pediatric NAFLD is distinct from lean healthy children with more alcohol production and pathways allocated to energy metabolism over carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, which would contribute to development of disease. PMID:25764541

  20. Metabolism-related enzyme alterations identified by proteomic analysis in human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zejun; Yao, Yuqin; Song, Qi; Yang, Jinliang; Zhao, Xiangfei; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    The renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common types of kidney neoplasia in Western countries; it is relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Metabolic disorders have a profound effect on the degree of malignancy and treatment resistance of the tumor. However, the molecular characteristics related to impaired metabolism leading to the initiation of RCC are still not very clear. In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectra (MS) technologies were utilized to identify the proteins involved in energy metabolism of RCC. A total of 73 proteins that were differentially expressed in conventional RCC, in comparison with the corresponding normal kidney tissues, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis has shown that these proteins are involved in glycolysis, urea cycle, and the metabolic pathways of pyruvate, propanoate, and arginine/proline. In addition, some were also involved in the signaling network of p53 and FAS. These results provide some clues for new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies of RCC. PMID:27022288

  1. Agricultural land use alters the seasonality and magnitude of stream metabolism

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streams are active processors of organic carbon; however, spatial and temporal variation in the rates and controls on metabolism are not well quantified in streams draining intensively-farmed landscapes. We present a comprehensive dataset of gross primary production (GPP) and ec...

  2. Prenatal transportation alters the metabolic response of Brahman bull calves exposed to a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine if prenatal transportation influences the metabolic response to a postnatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. Pregnant Brahman cows (n=96) matched by age and parity were separated into transported (TRANS; n=48; transported for 2 hours on gestational day 60, 80,...

  3. Yeast supplementation altered the metabolic response to a combined viral-bacterial challenge in feedlot heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two treatments were evaluated in feedlot heifers to determine the effects of feeding a yeast supplement on metabolic responses to a combined viral-bacterial respiratory disease challenge. Thirty-two beef heifers (325 +/- 19.2 kg) were selected and randomly assigned to one of two treatments: 1) Contr...

  4. Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide in Utero Alters the Postnatal Metabolic Response in Heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was designed to determine the effect of prenatal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposure on the postnatal metabolic response to an LPS challenge in beef heifers. Pregnant crossbred cows (n = 50) were assigned to a prenatal immune stimulation (PIS; n = 25; administered 0.1 micrograms/kg BW LPS s...

  5. Yeast cell wall supplementation alters the metabolic responses of crossbred heifers to an endotoxin challenge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study examined the effect of feeding yeast cell wall (YCW) products on the metabolic responses of newly-received heifers to endotoxin challenge. Heifers (n = 24; 219 ± 2.4 kg) were separated into treatment groups receiving a Control diet (n = 8), YCW-A (2.5 grams/heifer/d; n = 8) or YCW-C (2.5 ...

  6. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tremaine, Mary; Hebert, Alexander S.; Myers, Kevin S.; Sardi, Maria; Dickinson, Quinn; Reed, Jennifer L.; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J.; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P.; Landick, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism. PMID:27741250

  7. Directed Evolution Reveals Unexpected Epistatic Interactions That Alter Metabolic Regulation and Enable Anaerobic Xylose Use by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sato, Trey K; Tremaine, Mary; Parreiras, Lucas S; Hebert, Alexander S; Myers, Kevin S; Higbee, Alan J; Sardi, Maria; McIlwain, Sean J; Ong, Irene M; Breuer, Rebecca J; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; McGee, Mick A; Dickinson, Quinn; La Reau, Alex; Xie, Dan; Tian, Mingyuan; Reed, Jennifer L; Zhang, Yaoping; Coon, Joshua J; Hittinger, Chris Todd; Gasch, Audrey P; Landick, Robert

    2016-10-01

    The inability of native Saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert xylose from plant biomass into biofuels remains a major challenge for the production of renewable bioenergy. Despite extensive knowledge of the regulatory networks controlling carbon metabolism in yeast, little is known about how to reprogram S. cerevisiae to ferment xylose at rates comparable to glucose. Here we combined genome sequencing, proteomic profiling, and metabolomic analyses to identify and characterize the responsible mutations in a series of evolved strains capable of metabolizing xylose aerobically or anaerobically. We report that rapid xylose conversion by engineered and evolved S. cerevisiae strains depends upon epistatic interactions among genes encoding a xylose reductase (GRE3), a component of MAP Kinase (MAPK) signaling (HOG1), a regulator of Protein Kinase A (PKA) signaling (IRA2), and a scaffolding protein for mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis (ISU1). Interestingly, the mutation in IRA2 only impacted anaerobic xylose consumption and required the loss of ISU1 function, indicating a previously unknown connection between PKA signaling, Fe-S cluster biogenesis, and anaerobiosis. Proteomic and metabolomic comparisons revealed that the xylose-metabolizing mutant strains exhibit altered metabolic pathways relative to the parental strain when grown in xylose. Further analyses revealed that interacting mutations in HOG1 and ISU1 unexpectedly elevated mitochondrial respiratory proteins and enabled rapid aerobic respiration of xylose and other non-fermentable carbon substrates. Our findings suggest a surprising connection between Fe-S cluster biogenesis and signaling that facilitates aerobic respiration and anaerobic fermentation of xylose, underscoring how much remains unknown about the eukaryotic signaling systems that regulate carbon metabolism.

  8. Cholesterol metabolism is altered in Rett syndrome: a study on plasma and primary cultured fibroblasts derived from patients.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Marco; Trapani, Laura; Di Tunno, Ilenia; Sticozzi, Claudia; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Hayek, Joussef; Pallottini, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Rett (RTT) syndrome is a severe neurological disorder that affects almost exclusively females. Several detectable mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) are responsible for the onset of the disease. MeCP2 is a key transcription regulator involved in gene silencing via methylation-dependent remodeling of chromatin. Recent data highlight that lipid metabolism is perturbed in brains and livers of MECP2-null male mice. In addition, altered plasma lipid profile in RTT patients has been observed. Thus, the aim of the work is to investigate the protein network involved in cholesterol homeostasis maintenance on freshly isolated fibroblasts and plasma from both RTT and healthy donors. To this end, protein expression of 3-hydroxy-3methyl glutaryl Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) and scavenger receptor B-1 (SRB-1) was assessed in cultured skin fibroblasts from unaffected individuals and RTT patients. In addition, lipid profile and the abundance of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) were analyzed on plasma samples. The obtained results demonstrate that the main proteins belonging to cholesterol regulatory network are altered in RTT female patients, providing the proof of principle that cholesterol metabolism may be taken into account as a new target for the treatment of specific features of RTT pathology.

  9. Cholesterol Metabolism Is Altered in Rett Syndrome: A Study on Plasma and Primary Cultured Fibroblasts Derived from Patients

    PubMed Central

    Segatto, Marco; Trapani, Laura; Di Tunno, Ilenia; Sticozzi, Claudia; Valacchi, Giuseppe; Hayek, Joussef; Pallottini, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Rett (RTT) syndrome is a severe neurological disorder that affects almost exclusively females. Several detectable mutations in the X-linked methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2) are responsible for the onset of the disease. MeCP2 is a key transcription regulator involved in gene silencing via methylation-dependent remodeling of chromatin. Recent data highlight that lipid metabolism is perturbed in brains and livers of MECP2-null male mice. In addition, altered plasma lipid profile in RTT patients has been observed. Thus, the aim of the work is to investigate the protein network involved in cholesterol homeostasis maintenance on freshly isolated fibroblasts and plasma from both RTT and healthy donors. To this end, protein expression of 3-hydroxy-3methyl glutaryl Coenzyme A reductase (HMGR), sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) and scavenger receptor B-1 (SRB-1) was assessed in cultured skin fibroblasts from unaffected individuals and RTT patients. In addition, lipid profile and the abundance of proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) were analyzed on plasma samples. The obtained results demonstrate that the main proteins belonging to cholesterol regulatory network are altered in RTT female patients, providing the proof of principle that cholesterol metabolism may be taken into account as a new target for the treatment of specific features of RTT pathology. PMID:25118178

  10. Alterations in the Vaginal Microbiome by Maternal Stress Are Associated With Metabolic Reprogramming of the Offspring Gut and Brain.

    PubMed

    Jašarević, Eldin; Howerton, Christopher L; Howard, Christopher D; Bale, Tracy L

    2015-09-01

    The neonate is exposed to the maternal vaginal microbiota during parturition, providing the primary source for normal gut colonization, host immune maturation, and metabolism. These early interactions between the host and microbiota occur during a critical window of neurodevelopment, suggesting early life as an important period of cross talk between the developing gut and brain. Because perturbations in the prenatal environment such as maternal stress increase neurodevelopmental disease risk, disruptions to the vaginal ecosystem could be a contributing factor in significant and long-term consequences for the offspring. Therefore, to examine the hypothesis that changes in the vaginal microbiome are associated with effects on the offspring gut microbiota and on the developing brain, we used genomic, proteomic and metabolomic technologies to examine outcomes in our mouse model of early prenatal stress. Multivariate modeling identified broad proteomic changes to the maternal vaginal environment that influence offspring microbiota composition and metabolic processes essential for normal neurodevelopment. Maternal stress altered proteins related to vaginal immunity and abundance of Lactobacillus, the prominent taxa in the maternal vagina. Loss of maternal vaginal Lactobacillus resulted in decreased transmission of this bacterium to offspring. Further, altered microbiota composition in the neonate gut corresponded with changes in metabolite profiles involved in energy balance, and with region- and sex-specific disruptions of amino acid profiles in the developing brain. Taken together, these results identify the vaginal microbiota as a novel factor by which maternal stress may contribute to reprogramming of the developing brain that may predispose individuals to neurodevelopmental disorders.

  11. Comprehensive Plasma Metabolomic Analyses of Atherosclerotic Progression Reveal Alterations in Glycerophospholipid and Sphingolipid Metabolism in Apolipoprotein E-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Vi T.; Huang, Aric; Zhong, Lexy H.; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major underlying cause of most cardiovascular diseases. Despite recent advances, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of atherogenesis are not clear. In this study, comprehensive plasma metabolomics were used to investigate early-stage atherosclerotic development and progression in chow-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice at 5, 10 and 15 weeks of age. Comprehensive plasma metabolomic profiles, based on 4365 detected metabolite features, differentiate atherosclerosis-prone from atherosclerosis-resistant models. Metabolites in the sphingomyelin pathway were significantly altered prior to detectable lesion formation and at all subsequent time-points. The cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol pathway was up-regulated during stage I of atherosclerosis, while metabolites in the phosphatidylethanolamine and glycosphingolipid pathways were augmented in mice with stage II lesions. These pathways, involving glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, were also significantly affected during the course of atherosclerotic progression. Our findings suggest that distinct plasma metabolomic profiles can differentiate the different stages of atherosclerotic progression. This study reveals that alteration of specific, previously unreported pathways of glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism are associated with atherosclerosis. The clear difference in the level of several metabolites supports the use of plasma lipid profiling as a diagnostic tool of atherogenesis. PMID:27721472

  12. Endotoxin-induced basal respiration alterations of renal HK-2 cells: A sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Quoilin, C.; Mouithys-Mickalad, A.; Duranteau, J.; Gallez, B.; Hoebeke, M.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A HK-2 cells model of inflammation-induced acute kidney injury. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two oximetry methods: high resolution respirometry and ESR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxygen consumption rates of renal cells decrease when treated with LPS. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cells do not recover normal respiration when the LPS treatment is removed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This basal respiration alteration is a sign of pathologic metabolism down-regulation. -- Abstract: To study the mechanism of oxygen regulation in inflammation-induced acute kidney injury, we investigate the effects of a bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS) on the basal respiration of proximal tubular epithelial cells (HK-2) both by high-resolution respirometry and electron spin resonance spectroscopy. These two complementary methods have shown that HK-2 cells exhibit a decreased oxygen consumption rate when treated with LPS. Surprisingly, this cellular respiration alteration persists even after the stress factor was removed. We suggested that this irreversible decrease in renal oxygen consumption after LPS challenge is related to a pathologic metabolic down-regulation such as a lack of oxygen utilization by cells.

  13. Alterations in carbohydrate metabolism and its regulation in PPARalpha null mouse hearts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although a shift from fatty acids (FAs) to carbohydrates (CHOs) is considered beneficial for the diseased heart, it is unclear why subjects with FA beta-oxidation defects are prone to cardiac decompensation under stress conditions. The present study investigated potential alterations in the myocardi...

  14. Altered Retinoic Acid Metabolism in Diabetic Mouse Kidney Identified by 18O Isotopic Labeling and 2D Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Starkey, Jonathan M.; Zhao, Yingxin; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Haidacher, Sigmund J.; LeJeune, Wanda S.; Dey, Nilay; Luxon, Bruce A.; Kane, Maureen A.; Napoli, Joseph L.; Denner, Larry; Tilton, Ronald G.

    2010-01-01

    Background Numerous metabolic pathways have been implicated in diabetes-induced renal injury, yet few studies have utilized unbiased systems biology approaches for mapping the interconnectivity of diabetes-dysregulated proteins that are involved. We utilized a global, quantitative, differential proteomic approach to identify a novel retinoic acid hub in renal cortical protein networks dysregulated by type 2 diabetes. Methodology/Principal Findings Total proteins were extracted from renal cortex of control and db/db mice at 20 weeks of age (after 12 weeks of hyperglycemia in the diabetic mice). Following trypsinization, 18O- and 16O-labeled control and diabetic peptides, respectively, were pooled and separated by two dimensional liquid chromatography (strong cation exchange creating 60 fractions further separated by nano-HPLC), followed by peptide identification and quantification using mass spectrometry. Proteomic analysis identified 53 proteins with fold change ≥1.5 and p≤0.05 after Benjamini-Hochberg adjustment (out of 1,806 proteins identified), including alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (RALDH1/ALDH1A1). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified altered retinoic acid as a key signaling hub that was altered in the diabetic renal cortical proteome. Western blotting and real-time PCR confirmed diabetes-induced upregulation of RALDH1, which was localized by immunofluorescence predominantly to the proximal tubule in the diabetic renal cortex, while PCR confirmed the downregulation of ADH identified with mass spectrometry. Despite increased renal cortical tissue levels of retinol and RALDH1 in db/db versus control mice, all-trans-retinoic acid was significantly decreased in association with a significant decrease in PPARβ/δ mRNA. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that retinoic acid metabolism is significantly dysregulated in diabetic kidneys, and suggest that a shift in all-trans-retinoic acid metabolism is a novel feature in

  15. Methods to evaluate alterations in polyamine metabolism caused by Helicobacter pylori infection

    PubMed Central

    Gobert, Alain P.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Wilson, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a Gram-negative bacteria that infects the human stomach of half of the world’s population. Colonization is followed by infiltration of the gastric mucosa by lymphocytes and myeloid cells. These cells are activated by various bacterial factors, causing them to release immune/inflammatory mediators, including reactive nitrogen species and polyamines that contribute to cellular damage and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated gastric cancer. In vitro experiments have revealed that H. pylori induces macrophage polyamine production by upregulation of the arginase 2/ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) metabolic pathway and enhances hydrogen peroxide synthesis through the activity of spermidine oxidase (SMO). In this chapter, we present a survey of the methods used to analyze the induction and the role of the enzymes related to polyamine metabolism, i.e. arginase, ODC, and SMO in H. pylori-infected macrophages. PMID:21318889

  16. Intensity-dependent and sex-specific alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism in mice following acute exercise.

    PubMed

    Tuazon, Marc A; McConnell, Taylor R; Wilson, Gabriel J; Anthony, Tracy G; Henderson, Gregory C

    2015-01-01

    Precise regulation of hepatic triglyceride (TG) metabolism and secretion is critical for health, and exercise could play a significant role. We compared one session of high-intensity interval exercise (HIIE) vs. continuous exercise (CE) on hepatic TG metabolism. Female and male mice were assigned to CE, HIIE, or sedentary control (CON). HIIE was a 30-min session of 30-s running intervals (30 m/min) interspersed with 60-s walking periods (5 m/min). CE was a distance- and duration-matched run at 13.8 m/min. Hepatic content of TG and TG secretion rates, as well as expression of relevant genes/proteins, were measured at 3 h (day 1) and 28 h (day 2) postexercise. On day 1, hepatic [TG] in CE and HIIE were both elevated vs. CON in both sexes with an approximately twofold greater elevation in HIIE vs. CE in females. In both sexes, hepatic perilipin 2 (PLIN2) protein on day 1 was increased significantly by both exercise types with a significantly greater increase with HIIE than CE, whereas the increase in mRNA reached significance only after HIIE. On day 2 in both sexes the increases in hepatic TG and PLIN2 with exercise declined toward CON levels. Only HIIE on day 2 resulted in reduced hepatic TG secretion by ∼20% in females with no effect in males. Neither exercise modality altered AMPK signaling or microsomal triglyceride transfer protein expression. Females exhibited higher hepatic TG secretion than males in association with different expression levels of related metabolic enzymes. These intensity-dependent and sex-specific alterations following exercise may have implications for sex-based exercise prescription.

  17. Altered white matter metabolism in delayed neurologic sequelae after carbon monoxide poisoning: A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Hiroshi; Fujihara, Kazuo; Mugikura, Shunji; Takahashi, Shoki; Kushimoto, Shigeki; Aoki, Masashi

    2016-01-15

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was recently used to examine altered metabolism in the white matter (WM) of patients experiencing carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning; however, only a small number of patients with delayed neurologic sequelae (DNS) were analyzed. We aimed to detect altered metabolism in the WM of patients with DNS using (1)H-MRS; to explore its clinical relevance in the management of patients experiencing CO poisoning. Patients experiencing acute CO poisoning underwent (1)H-MRS and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination within 1week and at 1month after acute poisoning. Metabolites including choline-containing compounds (Cho), creatine (Cr), N-acetylaspartate (NAA), and lactate were measured from the periventricular WM. Myelin basic protein (MBP) concentrations were measured in CSF. Fifty-two patients experiencing acute CO poisoning (15 with DNS, 37 without DNS; median age, 49years; 65% males) underwent (1)H-MRS. Within 1week, NAA/Cr ratios, reflecting neuroaxonal viability, were lower in patients with DNS than in those without DNS (P<0.05). At 1month, when 9 of 15 patients (60%) developed DNS, Cho/Cr ratios were higher, and NAA/Cr and NAA/Cho ratios lower in patients with DNS (P=0.0001, <0.0001, and <0.0001, respectively), indicating increased membrane metabolism and decreased neuroaxonal viability. (1)H-MRS parameter abnormalities correlated with the elevation of MBP in CSF. The presence of a lactate peak was a predictor for a poor long-term outcome. (1)H-MRS within 1week may be useful for predicting DNS development; (1)H-MRS at 1month may be useful for discriminating patients with DNS and predicting long-term outcomes.

  18. Role of metabolic modulator Bet-CA in altering mitochondrial hyperpolarization to suppress cancer associated angiogenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Suchandrima; Ghosh, Monisankar; Dutta, Samir Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumors characteristically reflect a metabolic switching from glucose oxidation to glycolysis that plays a fundamental role in angiogenesis and metastasis to facilitate aggressive tumor outcomes. Hyperpolarized mitochondrial membrane potential is a manifestation of malignant cells that compromise the intrinsic pathways of apoptosis and confer a suitable niche to promote the cancer associated hallmark traits. We have previously reported that co-drug Bet-CA selectively targets cancer cells by inducing metabolic catastrophe without a manifest in toxicity. Here we report that the same molecule at a relatively lower concentration deregulates the cardinal phenotypes associated with angiogenesis and metastasis. In mice syngeneic 4T1 breast cancer model, Bet-CA exhibited effective abrogation of angiogenesis and concomitantly obliterated lung metastasis consistent with altered mitochondrial bioenergetics. Furthermore, Bet-CA significantly lowered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels and obviated matrix metalloproteases (MMP-2/9) production directly to the criterion where abrogation of autocrine VEGF/VEGFR2 signalling loop was documented. In vitro studies anticipatedly documented the role of Bet-CA in inhibiting actin remodeling, lamellipodia formation and cell membrane ruffling to constitutively suppress cell motility and invasion. Results comprehensively postulate that Bet-CA, a mitochondria targeting metabolic modulator may serve as an excellent candidate for combating angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:27003027

  19. Sperm metabolism is altered during storage by female insects: evidence from two-photon autofluorescence lifetime measurements in bedbugs

    PubMed Central

    Reinhardt, Klaus; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    We explore the possibility of characterizing sperm cells without the need to stain them using spectral and fluorescence lifetime analyses after multi-photon excitation in an insect model. The autofluorescence emission spectrum of sperm of the common bedbug, Cimex lectularius, was consistent with the presence of flavins and NAD(P)H. The mean fluorescence lifetimes showed smaller variation in sperm extracted from the male (tau m, τm = 1.54–1.84 ns) than in that extracted from the female sperm storage organ (tau m, τm = 1.26–2.00 ns). The fluorescence lifetime histograms revealed four peaks. These peaks (0.18, 0.92, 2.50 and 3.80 ns) suggest the presence of NAD(P)H and flavins and show that sperm metabolism can be characterized using fluorescence lifetime imaging. The difference in fluorescence lifetime variation between the sexes is consistent with the notion that female animals alter the metabolism of sperm cells during storage. It is not consistent, however, with the idea that sperm metabolism represents a sexually selected character that provides females with information about the male genotype. PMID:26333813

  20. Sperm metabolism is altered during storage by female insects: evidence from two-photon autofluorescence lifetime measurements in bedbugs.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, Klaus; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten

    2015-09-06

    We explore the possibility of characterizing sperm cells without the need to stain them using spectral and fluorescence lifetime analyses after multi-photon excitation in an insect model. The autofluorescence emission spectrum of sperm of the common bedbug, Cimex lectularius, was consistent with the presence of flavins and NAD(P)H. The mean fluorescence lifetimes showed smaller variation in sperm extracted from the male (tau m, τm = 1.54-1.84 ns) than in that extracted from the female sperm storage organ (tau m, τm = 1.26-2.00 ns). The fluorescence lifetime histograms revealed four peaks. These peaks (0.18, 0.92, 2.50 and 3.80 ns) suggest the presence of NAD(P)H and flavins and show that sperm metabolism can be characterized using fluorescence lifetime imaging. The difference in fluorescence lifetime variation between the sexes is consistent with the notion that female animals alter the metabolism of sperm cells during storage. It is not consistent, however, with the idea that sperm metabolism represents a sexually selected character that provides females with information about the male genotype.

  1. Incorporation and metabolism of dietary trans isomers of linolenic acid alter the fatty acid profile of rat tissues.

    PubMed

    Loï, C; Chardigny, J M; Almanza, S; Leclere, L; Ginies, C; Sébédio, J L

    2000-10-01

    To study the influence on lipid metabolism and platelet aggregation of the fatty acid isomerization that occurs during heat treatment, weanling rats were fed for 8 wk a diet enriched with 5% isomerized (experimental group) or normal (control group) canola oil. Geometrical isomers of alpha-linolenic acid representing 0.2 g/100 g of the experimental diet were incorporated into liver, platelets, aorta and heart, at the expense of their cis homologue and of 18:2(n-6). The major isomer, 9c,12c,15t-18:3, was also metabolized to 5c,8c,11c,14c,17t-20:5 and to an unknown compound, found in liver, platelets and aorta, which has been identified tentatively as 7c, 10c,13c,16c,19t-22:5. The greater 20:4(n-6)/18:2(n-6) ratio in the liver, platelets and heart of the experimental group than the control group indicated an enhancement of desaturation activities. This induced a higher content of long-chain (n-6) fatty acids in the experimental group. Platelet aggregation tended to be slightly higher (P: = 0.065) in the experimental group. We conclude that 0.2 g of trans isomers of alpha-linolenic acid per 100 g of diet was sufficient to be incorporated and metabolized, thus altering the fatty acid profile of rat tissues.

  2. Neurodegeneration Alters Metabolic Profile and Sirt 1 Signaling in High-Fat-Induced Obese Mice.

    PubMed

    Lima, Leandro Ceotto Freitas; Saliba, Soraya Wilke; Andrade, João Marcus Oliveira; Cunha, Maria Luisa; Cassini-Vieira, Puebla; Feltenberger, John David; Barcelos, Lucíola Silva; Guimarães, André Luiz Sena; de-Paula, Alfredo Mauricio Batista; de Oliveira, Antônio Carlos Pinheiro; Santos, Sérgio Henrique Sousa

    2016-05-16

    Different factors may contribute to the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Among them, metabolic syndrome (MS), which has reached epidemic proportions, has emerged as a potential element that may be involved in neurodegeneration. Furthermore, studies have shown the importance of the sirtuin family in neuronal survival and MS, which opens the possibility of new pharmacological targets. This study investigates the influence of sirtuin metabolic pathways by examining the functional capacities of glucose-induced obesity in an excitotoxic state induced by a quinolinic acid (QA) animal model. Mice were divided into two groups that received different diets for 8 weeks: one group received a regular diet, and the other group received a high-fat diet (HF) to induce MS. The animals were submitted to a stereotaxic surgery and subdivided into four groups: Standard (ST), Standard-QA (ST-QA), HF and HF-QA. The QA groups were given a 250 nL quinolinic acid injection in the right striatum and PBS was injected in the other groups. Obese mice presented with a weight gain of 40 % more than the ST group beyond acquiring an insulin resistance. QA induced motor impairment and neurodegeneration in both ST-QA and HF-QA, although no difference was observed between these groups. The HF-QA group showed a reduction in adiposity when compared with the groups that received PBS. Therefore, the HF-QA group demonstrated a commitment-dependent metabolic pathway. The results suggest that an obesogenic diet does not aggravate the neurodegeneration induced by QA. However, the excitotoxicity induced by QA promotes a sirtuin pathway impairment that contributes to metabolic changes.

  3. Global Loss of Bmal1 Expression Alters Adipose Tissue Hormones, Gene Expression and Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Kennaway, David John; Varcoe, Tamara Jayne; Voultsios, Athena; Boden, Michael James

    2013-01-01

    The close relationship between circadian rhythm disruption and poor metabolic status is becoming increasingly evident, but role of adipokines is poorly understood. Here we investigated adipocyte function and the metabolic status of mice with a global loss of the core clock gene Bmal1 fed either a normal or a high fat diet (22% by weight). Bmal1 null mice aged 2 months were killed across 24 hours and plasma adiponectin and leptin, and adipose tissue expression of Adipoq, Lep, Retn and Nampt mRNA measured. Glucose, insulin and pyruvate tolerance tests were conducted and the expression of liver glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzyme mRNA determined. Bmal1 null mice displayed a pattern of increased plasma adiponectin and plasma leptin concentrations on both control and high fat diets. Bmal1 null male and female mice displayed increased adiposity (1.8 fold and 2.3 fold respectively) on the normal diet, but the high fat diet did not exaggerate these differences. Despite normal glucose and insulin tolerance, Bmal1 null mice had increased production of glucose from pyruvate, implying increased liver gluconeogenesis. The Bmal1 null mice had arrhythmic clock gene expression in epigonadal fat and liver, and loss of rhythmic transcription of a range of metabolic genes. Furthermore, the expression of epigonadal fat Adipoq, Retn, Nampt, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2 and liver Pfkfb3 mRNA were down-regulated. These results show for the first time that global loss of Bmal1, and the consequent arrhythmicity, results in compensatory changes in adipokines involved in the cellular control of glucose metabolism. PMID:23750248

  4. Redox state and energy metabolism during liver regeneration: alterations produced by acute ethanol administration.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Salinas, J; Miranda-Garduño, L; Trejo-Izquierdo, E; Díaz-Muñoz, M; Vidrio, S; Morales-González, J A; Hernández-Muñoz, R

    1999-12-01

    Ethanol metabolism can induce modifications in liver metabolic pathways that are tightly regulated through the availability of cellular energy and through the redox state. Since partial hepatectomy (PH)-induced liver proliferation requires an oversupply of energy for enhanced syntheses of DNA and proteins, the present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of acute ethanol administration on the PH-induced changes in cellular redox and energy potentials. Ethanol (5 g/kg body weight) was administered to control rats and to two-thirds hepatectomized rats. Quantitation of the liver content of lactate, pyruvate, beta-hydroxybutyrate, acetoacetate, and adenine nucleotides led us to estimate the cytosolic and mitochondrial redox potentials and energy parameters. Specific activities in the liver of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes also were measured in these animals. Liver regeneration had no effect on cellular energy availability, but induced a more reduced cytosolic redox state accompanied by an oxidized mitochondrial redox state during the first 48 hr of treatment; the redox state normalized thereafter. Administration of ethanol did not modify energy parameters in PH rats, but this hepatotoxin readily blocked the PH-induced changes in the cellular redox state. In addition, proliferating liver promoted decreases in the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and of cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1); ethanol treatment prevented the PH-induced diminution of ADH activity. In summary, our data suggest that ethanol could minimize the PH-promoted metabolic adjustments mediated by redox reactions, probably leading to an ineffective preparatory event that culminates in compensatory liver growth after PH in the rat.

  5. Oral pathobiont induces systemic inflammation and metabolic changes associated with alteration of gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Arimatsu, Kei; Yamada, Hitomi; Miyazawa, Haruna; Minagawa, Takayoshi; Nakajima, Mayuka; Ryder, Mark I; Gotoh, Kazuyoshi; Motooka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shota; Iida, Tetsuya; Yamazaki, Kazuhisa

    2014-05-06

    Periodontitis has been implicated as a risk factor for metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes, atherosclerotic vascular diseases, and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Although bacteremias from dental plaque and/or elevated circulating inflammatory cytokines emanating from the inflamed gingiva are suspected mechanisms linking periodontitis and these diseases, direct evidence is lacking. We hypothesize that disturbances of the gut microbiota by swallowed bacteria induce a metabolic endotoxemia leading metabolic disorders. To investigate this hypothesis, changes in the gut microbiota, insulin and glucose intolerance, and levels of tissue inflammation were analysed in mice after oral administration of Porphyromonas gingivalis, a representative periodontopathogens. Pyrosequencing revealed that the population belonging to Bacteroidales was significantly elevated in P. gingivalis-administered mice which coincided with increases in insulin resistance and systemic inflammation. In P. gingivalis-administered mice blood endotoxin levels tended to be higher, whereas gene expression of tight junction proteins in the ileum was significantly decreased. These results provide a new paradigm for the interrelationship between periodontitis and systemic diseases.

  6. Propionate Increases Hepatic Pyruvate Cycling and Anaplerosis and Alters Mitochondrial Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Perry, Rachel J; Borders, Candace B; Cline, Gary W; Zhang, Xian-Man; Alves, Tiago C; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Rothman, Douglas L; Kibbey, Richard G; Shulman, Gerald I

    2016-06-03

    In mammals, pyruvate kinase (PK) plays a key role in regulating the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; however, in vivo regulation of PK flux by gluconeogenic hormones and substrates is poorly understood. To this end, we developed a novel NMR-liquid chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to directly assess pyruvate cycling relative to mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism (VPyr-Cyc/VMito) in vivo using [3-(13)C]lactate as a tracer. Using this approach, VPyr-Cyc/VMito was only 6% in overnight fasted rats. In contrast, when propionate was infused simultaneously at doses previously used as a tracer, it increased VPyr-Cyc/VMito by 20-30-fold, increased hepatic TCA metabolite concentrations 2-3-fold, and increased endogenous glucose production rates by 20-100%. The physiologic stimuli, glucagon and epinephrine, both increased hepatic glucose production, but only glucagon suppressed VPyr-Cyc/VMito These data show that under fasting conditions, when hepatic gluconeogenesis is stimulated, pyruvate recycling is relatively low in liver compared with VMito flux and that liver metabolism, in particular pyruvate cycling, is sensitive to propionate making it an unsuitable tracer to assess hepatic glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and mitochondrial metabolism in vivo.

  7. 3-Bromopyruvate treatment induces alterations of metabolic and stress-related pathways in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chiasserini, Davide; Davidescu, Magdalena; Orvietani, Pier Luigi; Susta, Federica; Macchioni, Lara; Petricciuolo, Maya; Castigli, Emilia; Roberti, Rita; Binaglia, Luciano; Corazzi, Lanfranco

    2017-01-30

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive brain tumour of adults. The metabolic phenotype of GBM cells is highly dependent on glycolysis; therefore, therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with glycolytic pathways are under consideration. 3-Bromopyruvate (3BP) is a potent antiglycolytic agent, with a variety of targets and possible effects on global cell metabolism. Here we analyzed the changes in protein expression on a GBM cell line (GL15 cells) caused by 3BP treatment using a global proteomic approach. Validation of differential protein expression was performed with immunoblotting and enzyme activity assays in GL15 and U251 cell lines. The results show that treatment of GL15 cells with 3BP leads to extensive changes in the expression of glycolytic enzymes and stress related proteins. Importantly, other metabolisms were also affected, including pentose phosphate pathway, aminoacid synthesis, and glucose derivatives production. 3BP elicited the activation of stress response proteins, as shown by the phosphorylation of HSPB1 at serine 82, caused by the concomitant activation of the p38 pathway. Our results show that inhibition of glycolysis in GL15 cells by 3BP influences different but interconnected pathways. Proteome analysis may help in the molecular characterization of the glioblastoma response induced by pharmacological treatment with antiglycolytic agents.

  8. Tissue taurine depletion alters metabolic response to exercise and reduces running capacity in mice.

    PubMed

    Ito, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Natsumi; Schaffer, Stephen W; Azuma, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid found in very high concentration in skeletal muscle. Taurine deficient mice engineered by knocking out the taurine transporter gene exhibit skeletal muscle wasting, structural defects, and exercise intolerance. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the development of metabolic abnormalities and exercise intolerance in muscle of the TauTKO phenotype. Running speed and endurance time of TauTKO mice were lower than those of control mice. Blood lactate level was elevated by >3-fold during treadmill running in TauTKO mice but remained largely unaltered by exercise in WT mice. Blood glucose was cleared faster during treadmill running in TauTKO mice than WT mice. AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) β-2 subunit was reduced in TauTKO muscle concomitant with a reduction in α1 and α2 subunits of AMPK. The level of PPARα and its targets, Gpx3, Cpt2, and Echs1, were also decreased in TauTKO muscle. Collectively, taurine depletion impairs metabolic adaptation to exercise in skeletal muscle, a phenomenon associated with a downregulation of AMPK and diminished NADH utilization by the mitochondrial respiratory chain. These findings suggest a crucial role of taurine in regulating energy metabolism in skeletal muscle of exercising TauTKO mice, changes that contribute to impaired exercise endurance.

  9. Butenolide inhibits marine fouling by altering the primary metabolism of three target organisms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Fan; Zhang, Huoming; He, Lisheng; Liu, Changdong; Xu, Ying; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-06-15

    Butenolide is a very promising antifouling compound that inhibits ship hull fouling by a variety of marine organisms, but its antifouling mechanism was previously unknown. Here we report the first study of butenolide's molecular targets in three representative fouling organisms. In the barnacle Balanus (=Amphibalanus) amphitrite, butenolide bound to acetyl-CoA acetyltransferase 1 (ACAT1), which is involved in ketone body metabolism. Both the substrate and the product of ACAT1 increased larval settlement under butenolide treatment, suggesting its functional involvement. In the bryozoan Bugula neritina, butenolide bound to very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACADVL), actin, and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs). ACADVL is the first enzyme in the very long chain fatty acid β-oxidation pathway. The inhibition of this primary pathway for energy production in larvae by butenolide was supported by the finding that alternative energy sources (acetoacetate and pyruvate) increased larval attachment under butenolide treatment. In marine bacterium Vibrio sp. UST020129-010, butenolide bound to succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (SCSβ) and inhibited bacterial growth. ACAT1, ACADVL, and SCSβ are all involved in primary metabolism for energy production. These findings suggest that butenolide inhibits fouling by influencing the primary metabolism of target organisms.

  10. Altered lipid metabolism in the aging kidney identified by three layered omic analysis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Fabian; Rinschen, Markus M; Bartels, Valerie; Frommolt, Peter; Habermann, Bianca; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Schumacher, Björn; Dollé, Martijn E T; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Kurschat, Christine E

    2016-03-01

    Aging-associated diseases and their comorbidities affect the life of a constantly growing proportion of the population in developed countries. At the center of these comorbidities are changes of kidney structure and function as age-related chronic kidney disease predisposes to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure. To detect molecular mechanisms involved in kidney aging, we analyzed gene expression profiles of kidneys from adult and aged wild-type mice by transcriptomic, proteomic and targeted lipidomic methodologies. Interestingly, transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed differential expression of genes primarily involved in lipid metabolism and immune response. Additional lipidomic analyses uncovered significant age-related differences in the total amount of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins as well as in subspecies of phosphatidylserines and ceramides with age. By integration of these datasets we identified Aldh1a1, a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism specifically expressed in the medullary ascending limb, as one of the most prominent upregulated proteins in old kidneys. Moreover, ceramidase Asah1 was highly expressed in aged kidneys, consistent with a decrease in ceramide C16. In summary, our data suggest that changes in lipid metabolism are involved in the process of kidney aging and in the development of chronic kidney disease.

  11. Tissue Taurine Depletion Alters Metabolic Response to Exercise and Reduces Running Capacity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Natsumi; Schaffer, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    Taurine is a sulfur-containing amino acid found in very high concentration in skeletal muscle. Taurine deficient mice engineered by knocking out the taurine transporter gene exhibit skeletal muscle wasting, structural defects, and exercise intolerance. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism underlying the development of metabolic abnormalities and exercise intolerance in muscle of the TauTKO phenotype. Running speed and endurance time of TauTKO mice were lower than those of control mice. Blood lactate level was elevated by >3-fold during treadmill running in TauTKO mice but remained largely unaltered by exercise in WT mice. Blood glucose was cleared faster during treadmill running in TauTKO mice than WT mice. AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) β-2 subunit was reduced in TauTKO muscle concomitant with a reduction in α1 and α2 subunits of AMPK. The level of PPARα and its targets, Gpx3, Cpt2, and Echs1, were also decreased in TauTKO muscle. Collectively, taurine depletion impairs metabolic adaptation to exercise in skeletal muscle, a phenomenon associated with a downregulation of AMPK and diminished NADH utilization by the mitochondrial respiratory chain. These findings suggest a crucial role of taurine in regulating energy metabolism in skeletal muscle of exercising TauTKO mice, changes that contribute to impaired exercise endurance. PMID:25478210

  12. Spatial reorganization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae enolase to alter carbon metabolism under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Miura, Natsuko; Shinohara, Masahiro; Tatsukami, Yohei; Sato, Yasuhiko; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2013-08-01

    Hypoxia has critical effects on the physiology of organisms. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, glycolytic enzymes, including enolase (Eno2p), formed cellular foci under hypoxia. Here, we investigated the regulation and biological functions of these foci. Focus formation by Eno2p was inhibited temperature independently by the addition of cycloheximide or rapamycin or by the single substitution of alanine for the Val22 residue. Using mitochondrial inhibitors and an antioxidant, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was shown to participate in focus formation. Focus formation was also inhibited temperature dependently by an SNF1 knockout mutation. Interestingly, the foci were observed in the cell even after reoxygenation. The metabolic turnover analysis revealed that [U-(13)C]glucose conversion to pyruvate and oxaloacetate was accelerated in focus-forming cells. These results suggest that under hypoxia, S. cerevisiae cells sense mitochondrial ROS and, by the involvement of SNF1/AMPK, spatially reorganize metabolic enzymes in the cytosol via de novo protein synthesis, which subsequently increases carbon metabolism. The mechanism may be important for yeast cells under hypoxia, to quickly provide both energy and substrates for the biosynthesis of lipids and proteins independently of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and also to fit changing environments.

  13. Mild copper deficiency alters gene expression of proteins involved in iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Auclair, Sylvain; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Coudray, Charles; Schneider, Susanne; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Mazur, Andrzej

    2006-01-01

    Iron and copper homeostasis share common proteins and are therefore closely linked to each other. For example, copper-containing proteins like ceruloplasmin and hephaestin oxidize Fe(2+) during cellular export processes for transport in the circulation bound to transferrin. Indeed, copper deficiency provokes iron metabolism disorders leading to anemia and liver iron accumulation. The aim of the present work was to understand the cross-talk between copper status and iron metabolism. For this purpose we have established dietary copper deficiency in C57BL6 male mice during twelve weeks. Hematological parameters, copper and iron status were evaluated. cDNA microarray studies were performed to investigate gene expression profiles of proteins involved in iron metabolism in the liver, duodenum and spleen. Our results showed that copper deficiency induces microcytic and hypochromic anemia as well as liver iron overload. Gene expression profiles, however, indicate that hepatic and intestinal mRNA expression neither compensates for hepatic iron overload nor the anemia observed in this mouse model. Instead, major modifications of gene expression occurred in the spleen. We observed increased mRNA levels of the transferrin receptors 1 and 2 and of several proteins involved in the heme biosynthesis pathway (ferrochelatase, UroD, UroS,...). These results suggest that copper-deficient mice respond to the deficiency induced anemia by an adaptation leading to an increase in erythrocyte synthesis.

  14. Propionate Increases Hepatic Pyruvate Cycling and Anaplerosis and Alters Mitochondrial Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Rachel J.; Borders, Candace B.; Cline, Gary W.; Zhang, Xian-Man; Alves, Tiago C.; Petersen, Kitt Falk; Rothman, Douglas L.; Kibbey, Richard G.; Shulman, Gerald I.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, pyruvate kinase (PK) plays a key role in regulating the balance between glycolysis and gluconeogenesis; however, in vivo regulation of PK flux by gluconeogenic hormones and substrates is poorly understood. To this end, we developed a novel NMR-liquid chromatography/tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method to directly assess pyruvate cycling relative to mitochondrial pyruvate metabolism (VPyr-Cyc/VMito) in vivo using [3-13C]lactate as a tracer. Using this approach, VPyr-Cyc/VMito was only 6% in overnight fasted rats. In contrast, when propionate was infused simultaneously at doses previously used as a tracer, it increased VPyr-Cyc/VMito by 20–30-fold, increased hepatic TCA metabolite concentrations 2–3-fold, and increased endogenous glucose production rates by 20–100%. The physiologic stimuli, glucagon and epinephrine, both increased hepatic glucose production, but only glucagon suppressed VPyr-Cyc/VMito. These data show that under fasting conditions, when hepatic gluconeogenesis is stimulated, pyruvate recycling is relatively low in liver compared with VMito flux and that liver metabolism, in particular pyruvate cycling, is sensitive to propionate making it an unsuitable tracer to assess hepatic glycolytic, gluconeogenic, and mitochondrial metabolism in vivo. PMID:27002151

  15. Diet modification and its influence on metabolic and related pathological alterations in the SHR/NDmcr-cp rat, an animal model of the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Kouji; Sakairi, Tetsuya; Harada, Shuichi; Shinozuka, Junko; Ide, Mika; Sato, Hiroko; Tanaka, Masaharu; Toriumi, Wataru; Kume, Eisuke

    2012-05-01

    SHR/NDmcr-cp (SHR/NDcp) rats, which carry a nonsense mutation of the leptin receptor gene, are known to spontaneously develop hypertension, obesity and hyperlipidemia, and have therefore found use as an animal model of the metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes. However, some recent studies on SHR/NDcp rats revealed only mild elevation of blood glucose levels. To investigate whether metabolic factors including blood glucose and histopathological alterations of SHR/NDcp rats deteriorate with a diabetogenic diet, biochemical and histopathological examinations were conducted with animals fed normal or diabetogenic diets for 20 weeks. SHR/NDcp rats receiving the normal diet displayed obesity, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and mild elevation of blood glucose and HbA1c levels. Urinary glucose excretion was noted in only 1 out of 6 animals. Histologically, macro- and micro-vesicular steatosis in the liver, glomerular and tubular damages in the kidney and islet hyperplasia mainly of beta cells in the pancreas were characteristically noted. In SHR/NDcp rats fed the diabetogenic diet, obesity was more severe, with higher blood glucose and HbA1c levels, increased numbers of animals with urinary glucose excretion, and more pronounced hepatic steatosis and renal tubular changes. However, elevation of blood glucose levels and urinary glucose excretion proved transient. These observations indicate that the diabetic state and associated histopathological alterations in SHR/NDcp rats are exacerbated by feeding a diabetogenic diet, but the effects are limited. Elevated islet function with compensative insulin secretion might be related to amelioration of the hyperglycemic state. Further diet modification could be needed to induce a more prominent and persistent diabetic state in SHR/NDcp rats.

  16. Impaired metabolism of senescent muscle satellite cells is associated with oxidative modifications of glycolytic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Baraibar, Martin; Hyzewicz, Janek; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Bulteau, Anne-Laure; Prip-Buus, Carina; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Friguet, Bertrand

    2014-10-01

    Accumulation of damaged macromolecules, including irreversibly oxidized proteins, is a hallmark of cellular and organismal ageing. Failure of protein homesotasis is a major contributor to the age-related accumulation of damaged proteins. In skeletal muscle, tissue maintenance and regeneration is assured by resident adult stem cells known as satellite cells. During senescence their replication and differentiation is compromised contributing to sarcopenia. In this study we have addressed the impact of oxidatively modified proteins in the impaired metabolism of senescent human satellite cells. By using a targeted proteomics analysis we have found that proteins involved in protein quality control and glycolytic enzymes are the main targets of oxidation (carbonylation) and modification with advanced glycation/lipid peroxidation end products during replicative senescence of satellite cells. Inactivation of the proteasome in aged cells appeared as a key contributor to the accumulation of such damaged proteins. Untargeted metabolomic profiling and functional analyses indicated glucose metabolism impairment in senescent cells, although mitochondrial respiration remained unaffected. A metabolic shift leading to increased mobilization of non-carbohydrate substrates as branched chain amino acids or long chain fatty acids was observed in senescent cells. In addition, phospho-and glycerolipids metabolism was altered. Increased levels of acyl-carnitines indicated augmented turnover of storage and membrane lipids for energy production. Such changes reflect alterations in membrane composition and dysregulation of sphingolipids signaling during senescence. This study establishes a new concept connecting oxidative protein modifications with the altered cellular metabolism associated with the senescent phenotype. In addition, these findings highlight the molecular mechanisms implicated in satellite cells dysfunction during ageing, paving the road for future therapeutic interventions

  17. Chronic imipramine treatment differentially alters the brain and plasma amino acid metabolism in Wistar and Wistar Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Mao; Otsuka, Tsuyoshi; Yasuo, Shinobu; Furuse, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-05

    In the present study, the amino acids which have the possibility for the therapeutic efficacy of imipramine were explored and compared between Wistar Kyoto rats, an animal model of depression, and Wistar rats as a normal model. The antidepressant-like effect caused by chronic imipramine treatment was confirmed by decreased immobility in the forced swimming test. Chronic imipramine administration altered the amino acid dynamics in the brain. In the striatum, the concentrations of asparagine, glutamine and methionine were significantly increased by chronic imipramine administration. In the thalamus and hypothalamus, chronic imipramine administration significantly decreased the valine concentration. On the other hand, no amino acid was altered by chronic imipramine administration in the hippocampus, brain stem and cerebellum. In addition, lower concentration of asparagine in the prefrontal cortex of WKY rats was improved by chronic imipramine administration. This amelioration only in WKY rats may be a specific effect of chronic imipramine administration under the depressive state. In conclusion, chronic imipramine administration altered the several amino acid dynamics in the brain. Modification of the amino acid metabolism in the brain may provide a new strategy in the development of therapeutic treatment of major depression.

  18. Aluminium induced structural, metabolic alterations and protective effects of desferrioxamine in the brain tissue of mice: An FTIR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivakumar, S.; Sivasubramanian, J.; Raja, B.

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we intended to made a new approach to evaluate aluminium induced metabolic changes in mice brain tissue using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Results demonstrate that FTIR can successfully indicate the molecular changes that occur in all groups. The overall findings demonstrate the alterations on the major biochemical constituents, such as lipids, proteins and nucleic acids of the brain tissues of mice. The significant decrease in the area value of amide A peak and Olefinicdbnd CH stretching band suggests an alteration in the protein profile and lipid levels due to aluminium exposure, respectively. The significant shift in the amide I and amide II protein peaks may indicate the progression of aluminium induced Alzheimer's disease. Further the administration of DFO significantly improved the level of protein and brought back the amide I and II peaks nearer to the control value. Histopathological results also revealed impairment of Aluminium induced alterations in brain tissue. The results of the FTIR study were found to be in agreement with biochemical studies.

  19. Metabolic syndrome-associated sperm alterations in an experimental rabbit model: relation with metabolic profile, testis and epididymis gene expression and effect of tamoxifen treatment.

    PubMed

    Marchiani, Sara; Vignozzi, Linda; Filippi, Sandra; Gurrieri, Bruna; Comeglio, Paolo; Morelli, Annamaria; Danza, Giovanna; Bartolucci, Gianluca; Maggi, Mario; Baldi, Elisabetta

    2015-02-05

    The influence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) on sperm quality and function is debated. Using a well-established high fat diet (HFD) rabbit model resembling human MetS, including development of hypogonadism, we demonstrate that HFD decreased sperm motility, morphology and acrosome reaction in response to progesterone and increased sperm cholesterol content. All the above parameters were associated with most MetS features, its severity and plasma testosterone (T) at univariate analysis. After T adjustment, sperm morphology and motility retained a significant association, respectively, with mean arterial pressure and circulating cholesterol levels. MetS modified the expression of inflammatory and tissue remodelling genes in the testis and of aquaporins in the epididymis. In a multivariate analysis, sperm morphology resulted associated with testis expression of fibronectin and collagen type 1 genes, whereas motility with epididymis aquaporin 1 gene. Administration of tamoxifen, used in the treatment of idiopathic male infertility, to HFD rabbits partially restored motility, but further decreased morphology and increased spontaneous acrosome reaction, without restoring responsiveness to progesterone. Overall our results indicate that development of MetS produces detrimental effects on sperm quality and functionality by inducing metabolic disorders leading to alterations in testis and epididymis functions and evidence a role of hypertension as a new determinant of abnormal sperm morphology, in line with a previous human study from our group.

  20. Female Flinders Sensitive Line rats show estrous cycle-independent depression-like behavior and altered tryptophan metabolism.

    PubMed

    Eskelund, Amanda; Budac, David P; Sanchez, Connie; Elfving, Betina; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-08-04

    Clinical studies suggest a link between depression and dysfunctional tryptophan (TRP) metabolism. Even though depression is twice as prevalent in women as men, the impact of the estrous cycle on TRP metabolism is not well-understood. Here we investigated 13 kynurenine and serotonin metabolites in female Flinders Sensitive Line (FSL) rats, a genetic rat model of depression. FSL rats and controls (Flinders Resistant Line rats), 12-20weeks old, were subject to the forced swim test (FST), a commonly used measure of depression-like behavior. Open field was used to evaluate locomotor ability and agoraphobia. Subsequently, plasma and hemispheres were collected and analyzed for their content of TRP metabolites using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Vaginal saline lavages were obtained daily for ⩾2 cycles. To estimate the effects of sex and FST we included plasma from unhandled, naïve male FSL and FRL rats. Female FSL rats showed a depression-like phenotype with increased immobility in the FST, not confounded by anxiety. In the brain, 3-hydroxykynurenine was increased whereas anthranilate and 5-hydroxytryptophan were decreased. In plasma, anthranilate and quinolinate levels were lower in FSL rats compared to the control line, independent of sex and FST. The estrous cycle neither impacted behavior nor TRP metabolite levels in the FSL rat. In conclusion, the female FSL rat is an interesting preclinical model of depression with altered TRP metabolism, independent of the estrous cycle. The status of the pathway in brain was not reflected in the plasma, which may indicate that an inherent local, cerebral regulation of TRP metabolism occurs.

  1. Effects of Altered Catecholamine Metabolism on Pigmentation and Physical Properties of Sclerotized Regions in the Silkworm Melanism Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofan; He, Songzhen; Tong, Xiaoling; Wu, Songyuan; Hu, Hai; Wang, Rixin; Hu, Hongwei; Chen, Lushi; Zhang, Li; Wu, Jie; Dai, Fangyin; Lu, Cheng; Xiang, Zhonghuai

    2012-01-01

    Catecholamine metabolism plays an important role in the determination of insect body color and cuticle sclerotization. To date, limited research has focused on these processes in silkworm. In the current study, we analyzed the interactions between catecholamines and melanin genes and their effects on the pigmentation patterns and physical properties of sclerotized regions in silkworm, using the melanic mutant melanism (mln) silkworm strain as a model. Injection of β-alanine into mln mutant silkworm induced a change in catecholamine metabolism and turned its body color yellow. Further investigation of the catecholamine content and expression levels of the corresponding melanin genes from different developmental stages of Dazao-mln (mutant) and Dazao (wild-type) silkworm revealed that at the larval and adult stages, the expression patterns of melanin genes precipitated dopamine accumulation corresponding to functional loss of Bm-iAANAT, a repressive effect of excess NBAD on ebony, and upregulation of tan in the Dazao-mln strain. During the early pupal stage, dopamine did not accumulate in Dazao-mln, since upregulation of ebony and black genes led to conversion of high amounts of dopamine into NBAD, resulting in deep yellow cuticles. Scanning electron microscope analysis of a cross-section of adult dorsal plates from both wild-type and mutant silkworm disclosed the formation of different layers in Dazao-mln owing to lack of NADA, compared to even and dense layers in Dazao. Analysis of the mechanical properties of the anterior wings revealed higher storage modulus and lower loss tangent in Dazao-mln, which was closely associated with the altered catecholamine metabolism in the mutant strain. Based on these findings, we conclude that catecholamine metabolism is crucial for the color pattern and physical properties of cuticles in silkworm. Our results should provide a significant contribution to Lepidoptera cuticle tanning research. PMID:22937004

  2. The CB₁ receptor antagonist SR141716A reverses adult male mice overweight and metabolic alterations induced by early stress.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Carina A; Castillo, Valeska A; Aguirre, Carolina A; Ronco, Ana M; Llanos, Miguel N

    2011-01-01

    Perinatal stress may cause metabolic and hormonal disruptions during adulthood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of early postnatal nociceptive stimulation (NS) on body weight and other metabolic parameters during adulthood and to determine whether CB₁ endocannabinoid receptors (CB₁Rs) may be involved in these effects. Male mice were subjected to NS during lactation with a daily subcutaneous injection of saline solution. Subsequently, both control and NS-mice were treated from day 40 to 130, with an oral dose (1 µg/g body weight) of SR141716A, a specific CB₁R antagonist/inverse agonist. Mice body weight and food intake was periodically evaluated. Adult animals were then killed to evaluate epididymal fat pads and metabolic parameters. NS did not influence food intake in adult animals, but caused significant increases in body weight, epididymal fat pads, and circulating levels of leptin, corticosterone, and triglycerides (TGs). Chronic treatment with SR141716A normalized these parameters, with the exception of corticosterone levels. This treatment also reduced plasma levels of glucose, insulin, and total cholesterol in both adult control and NS-mice. In addition, fatty acid (FA) amide hydrolase (FAAH) activity (the enzyme able to hydrolyze endocannabinoids) from liver and epididymal fat of adult NS-mice was decreased by 40-50% in comparison to activities found in same tissues of control mice. Results suggest that overactive liver and epididymal fat CB₁R due to early NS may be involved in late metabolic alterations, which are sensitive to chronic treatment with SR141716A.

  3. Increasing serotonin concentrations alter calcium and energy metabolism in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laporta, Jimena; Moore, Spencer A E; Weaver, Samantha R; Cronick, Callyssa M; Olsen, Megan; Prichard, Austin P; Schnell, Brian P; Crenshaw, Thomas D; Peñagaricano, Francisco; Bruckmaier, Rupert M; Hernandez, Laura L

    2015-07-01

    A 4×4 Latin square design in which varied doses (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/kg) of 5-hydroxy-l-tryptophan (5-HTP, a serotonin precursor) were intravenously infused into late-lactation, non-pregnant Holstein dairy cows was used to determine the effects of serotonin on calcium and energy metabolism. Infusion periods lasted 4 days, with a 5-day washout between periods. Cows were infused at a constant rate for 1 h each day. Blood was collected pre- and 5, 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 min post-infusion, urine was collected pre- and post-infusion, and milk was collected daily. All of the 5-HTP doses increased systemic serotonin as compared to the 0 mg/kg dose, and the 1.0 and 1.5 mg/kg doses increased circulating glucose and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) and decreased beta-hydroxybutyrate (βHBA) concentrations. Treatment of cows with either 1.0 or 1.5 mg/kg 5-HTP doses decreased urine calcium elimination, and the 1.5 mg/kg dose increased milk calcium concentrations. No differences were detected in the heart rates, respiration rates, or body temperatures of the cows; however, manure scores and defecation frequency were affected. Indeed, cows that received 5-HTP defecated more, and the consistency of their manure was softer. Treatment of late-lactation dairy cows with 5-HTP improved energy metabolism, decreased loss of calcium into urine, and increased calcium secretion into milk. Further research should target the effects of increasing serotonin during the transition period to determine any benefits for post-parturient calcium and glucose metabolism.

  4. Tyrosine kinase inhibition in leukemia induces an altered metabolic state sensitive to mitochondrial perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Calderon, Francesca; Gregory, Mark A.; Pham-Danis, Catherine; DeRyckere, Deborah; Stevens, Brett M.; Zaberezhnyy, Vadym; Hill, Amanda A.; Gemta, Lelisa; Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Vijay; Wempe, Michael F.; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Jordan, Craig T.; Serkova, Natalie J.; Graham, Douglas K.; DeGregori, James

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Although tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) can be effective therapies for leukemia, they fail to fully eliminate leukemic cells and achieve durable remissions for many patients with advanced BCR-ABL+ leukemias or acute myeloid leukemias (AML). Through a large-scale synthetic lethal RNAi screen, we identified pyruvate dehydrogenase, the limiting enzyme for pyruvate entry into the mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid cycle, as critical for the survival of chronic myeloid leukemia cells upon BCR-ABL inhibition. Here we examined the role of mitochondrial metabolism in the survival of Ph+ leukemia and AML upon TK inhibition. Experimental Design Ph+ cancer cell lines, AML cell lines, leukemia xenografts, cord blood, patient samples were examined. Results We showed that the mitochondrial ATP-synthase inhibitor oligomycin-A greatly sensitized leukemia cells to TKI in vitro. Surprisingly, oligomycin-A sensitized leukemia cells to BCR-ABL inhibition at concentrations 100–1000-fold below those required for inhibition of respiration. Oligomycin-A treatment rapidly led to mitochondrial membrane depolarization and reduced ATP levels, and promoted superoxide production and leukemia cell apoptosis when combined with TKI. Importantly, oligomycin-A enhanced elimination of BCR-ABL+ leukemia cells by TKI in a mouse model and in primary blast crisis CML samples. Moreover, oligomycin-A also greatly potentiated the elimination of FLT3-dependent AML cells when combined with a FLT3 TKI, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions TKI therapy in leukemia cells creates a novel metabolic state that is highly sensitive to particular mitochondrial perturbations. Targeting mitochondrial metabolism as an adjuvant therapy could therefore improve therapeutic responses to TKI for patients with BCR-ABL+ and FLT3ITD leukemias. PMID:25547679

  5. The fatty liver dystrophy (fld) mutation: Developmentally related alterations in hepatic triglyceride metabolism and protein expression

    SciTech Connect

    Reue, K.; Rehnmark, S.; Cohen, R.D.; Leete, T.H.; Doolittle, M.H. |; Giometti, C.S.; Mishler, K.; Slavin, B.G.

    1997-07-01

    Fatty liver dystrophy (fld) is an autosomal recessive mutation in mice characterized by hypertriglyceridemia and development of a fatty liver in the early neonatal period. Also associated with the fld phenotype is a tissue-specific deficiency in the expression of lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase, as well as elevations in hepatic apolipoprotein A-IV and apolipoprotein C-II mRNA levels. Although these lipid abnormalities resolve at the age of weaning, adult mutant mice exhibit a peripheral neuropathy associated with abnormal myelin formation. The fatty liver in fld/fld neonates is characterized by the accumulation of large triglyceride droplets within the parenchymal cells, and these droplets persist within isolated hepatocytes maintained in culture for several days. To identify the metabolic defect that leads to lipid accumulation, the authors investigated several aspects of cellular triglyceride metabolism. The mutant mice exhibited normal activity of acid triacylglycerol lipase, an enzyme thought to be responsible for hydrolysis of dietary triglycerides in the liver. Metabolic labeling studies performed with oleic acid revealed that free fatty acids accumulate in the liver of 3 day old fld/fld mice, but not in adults. This accumulation in liver was mirrored by elevated free fatty acid levels in plasma of fld/fld neonates, with levels highest in very young mice and returning to normal by the age of one month. Quantitation of fatty acid oxidation in cells isolated from fld/fld neonates revealed that oxidation rate is reduced 60% in hepatocytes and 40% in fibroblasts; hepatocytes from adult fld/fld mice exhibited an oxidation rate similar to those from wild-type mice.

  6. Metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Metabolic changes on hypokinetic rats were measured. Two groups of animals were studied: (1) weight bearing control which were tail casted but allowed to walk on all four limbs, and (2) hypokinetic with no load bearing of the hindlimbs. The control and hypokinetic rats gained weight at a steady and similar rate over 6 days. Hypokinesia for 6 days led to significantly lower relative weights of the soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles. Hypokinesia did not effect the relative mass of the anterior tibialis or extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscles.

  7. Age-Related Alterations in the Metabolic Profile in the Hippocampus of the Senescence-Accelerated Mouse Prone 8: A Spontaneous Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hualong; Lian, Kaoqi; Han, Bing; Wang, Yanyong; Kuo, Sheng-Han; Geng, Yuan; Qiang, Jing; Sun, Meiyu; Wang, Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-dependent neurodegenerative disorder, produces a progressive decline in cognitive function. The metabolic mechanism of AD has emerged in recent years. In this study, we used multivariate analyses of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry measurements to determine that learning and retention-related metabolic profiles are altered during aging in the hippocampus of the senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8). Alterations in 17 metabolites were detected in mature and aged mice compared to young mice (13 decreased and 4 increased metabolites), including metabolites related to dysfunctional lipid metabolism (significantly increased cholesterol, oleic acid, and phosphoglyceride levels), decreased amino acid (alanine, serine, glycine, aspartic acid, glutamate, and gamma-aminobutyric acid), and energy-related metabolite levels (malic acid, butanedioic acid, fumaric acid, and citric acid), and other altered metabolites (increased N-acetyl-aspartic acid and decreased pyroglutamic acid, urea, and lactic acid) in the hippocampus. All of these alterations indicated that the metabolic mechanisms of age-related cognitive impairment in SAMP8 mice were related to multiple pathways and networks. Lipid metabolism, especially cholesterol metabolism, appears to play a distinct role in the hippocampus in AD. PMID:24284365

  8. Inhalation exposure of rats to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures alters pulmonary xenobiotic metabolism pathways without lung injury.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y C; Rengasamy, Apavoo; Frazer, Dave; Barger, Mark W; Hubbs, Ann F; Battelli, Lori; Tomblyn, Seith; Stone, Samuel; Castranova, Vince

    2003-01-01

    Asphalt fumes are complex mixtures of various organic compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAHs require bioactivation by the cytochrome P-450 monooxygenase system to exert toxic/carcinogenic effects. The present study was carried out to characterize the acute pulmonary inflammatory responses and the alterations of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways in rats exposed to asphalt fumes by inhalation. Rats were exposed at various doses and time periods to air or to asphalt fumes generated at paving temperatures. To assess the acute damage and inflammatory responses, differential cell counts, acellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, and protein content of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were determined. Alveolar macrophage (AM) function was assessed by monitoring generation of chemiluminescence and production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1. Alteration of pulmonary xenobiotic pathways was determined by monitoring the protein levels and activities of P-450 isozymes (CYP1A1 and CYP2B1), glutathioneS-transferase (GST), and NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (QR). The results show that acute asphalt fume exposure did not cause neutrophil infiltration, alter LDH activity or protein content, or affect AM function, suggesting that short-term asphalt fume exposure did not induce acute lung damage or inflammation. However, acute asphalt fume exposure significantly increased the activity and protein level of CYP1A1 whereas it markedly reduced the activity and protein level of CYP2B1 in the lung. The induction of CYP1A1 was localized in nonciliated bronchiolar epithelial (Clara) cells, alveolar septa, and endothelial cells by immunofluorescence microscopy. Cytosolic QR activity was significantly elevated after asphalt fume exposure, whereas GST activity was not affected by the exposure. This induction of CYP1A1 and QR with the concomitant down-regulation of CYP2B1 after asphalt fume exposure could alter PAH metabolism and may lead to potential

  9. Dietary rescue of altered metabolism gene reveals unexpected Drosophila mating cues[S

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, François; Chauvel, Isabelle; Flaven-Pouchon, Justin; Farine, Jean-Pierre; Ferveur, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    To develop and reproduce, animals need long-chain MUFAs and PUFAs. Although some unsaturated FAs (UFAs) can be synthesized by the organism, others must be provided by the diet. The gene, desat1, involved in Drosophila melanogaster UFA metabolism, is necessary for both larval development and for adult sex pheromone communication. We first characterized desat1 expression in larval tissues. Then, we found that larvae in which desat1 expression was knocked down throughout development died during the larval stages when raised on standard food. By contrast pure MUFAs or PUFAs, but not saturated FAs, added to the larval diet rescued animals to adulthood with the best effect being obtained with oleic acid (C18:1). Male and female mating behavior and fertility were affected very differently by preimaginal UFA-rich diet. Adult diet also strongly influenced several aspects of reproduction: flies raised on a C18:1-rich diet showed increased mating performance compared with flies raised on standard adult diet. Therefore, both larval and adult desat1 expression control sex-specific mating signals. A similar nutrigenetics approach may be useful in other metabolic mutants to uncover cryptic effects otherwise masked by severe developmental defects. PMID:26759364

  10. Food deprivation alters osmoregulatory and metabolic responses to salinity acclimation in gilthead sea bream Sparus auratus.

    PubMed

    Polakof, Sergio; Arjona, Francisco J; Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Martín del Río, María P; Mancera, Juan M; Soengas, José L

    2006-06-01

    The influence of acclimation to different environmental salinities (low salinity water, LSW; seawater, SW; and hyper saline water, HSW) and feeding conditions (fed and food deprived) for 14 days was assessed on osmoregulation and energy metabolism of several tissues of gilthead sea bream Sparus auratus. Fish were randomly assigned to one of six treatments: fed fish in LSW, SW, and HSW, and food-deprived fish in LSW, SW, and HSW. After 14 days, plasma, liver, gills, kidney and brain were taken for the assessment of plasma osmolality, plasma cortisol, metabolites and the activity of several enzymes involved in energy metabolism. Food deprivation abolished or attenuated the increase in gill Na+,K+-ATPase activity observed in LSW- and HSW-acclimated fish, respectively. In addition, a linear relationship between renal Na+,K+-ATPase activity and environmental salinity was observed after food deprivation, but values decreased with respect to fed fish. Food-deprived fish acclimated to extreme salinities increased production of glucose through hepatic gluconeogenesis, and the glucose produced was apparently exported to other tissues and served to sustain plasma glucose levels. Salinity acclimation to extreme salinities enhanced activity of osmoregulatory organs, which is probably sustained by higher glucose use in fed fish but by increased use of other fuels, such as lactate and amino acids in food-deprived fish.

  11. Increased Retinal Oxygen Metabolism Precedes Microvascular Alterations in Type 1 Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenzhong; Wang, Shoujian; Soetikno, Brian; Yi, Ji; Zhang, Kevin; Chen, Siyu; Linsenmeier, Robert A.; Sorenson, Christine M.; Sheibani, Nader; Zhang, Hao F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate inner retinal oxygen metabolic rate (IRMRO2) during early stages of type 1 diabetes in a transgenic mouse model. Methods In current study, we involved seven diabetic mice (Akita/+, TSP1−/−) and seven control mice (TSP1−/−), and applied visible-light optical coherence tomography (vis-OCT) to image functional parameters including retinal blood flow rate, oxygen saturation (sO2) and the IRMRO2 value longitudinally from 5 weeks of age to 13 weeks of age. After imaging at 13 weeks of age, we analyzed the imaging results, and examined histology of mouse retina. Results Between diabetic mice and the control group, we observed significant differences in venous sO2 from 9 weeks of age (P = 0.006), and significant increment in IRMRO2 from 11 weeks of age (P = 0.001) in diabetic mice compared with control group. We did not find significant differences in retinal blood flow rate as well as arterial sO2 during imaging between diabetic and control mice. Histologic examination of diabetic and control mice at 13 weeks of age also revealed no anatomical retinal alternations. Conclusions In diabetic retinopathy, complications in retinal oxygen metabolism may occur before changes of retinal anatomical structure.

  12. Alterations in glycosaminoglycan metabolism in β-aminopropionitrile-treated chick embryos

    PubMed Central

    Elders, M. Joycelyn; Smith, James D.; Smith, W. Grady; Hughes, Edwin R.

    1973-01-01

    1. Na235SO4, [1-14C]glucosamine and [1-14C]acetate were used as precursors of the sulphated glycosaminoglycans to study the biochemical effect of β-aminopropionitrile in chick embryos. The incorporation of all three precursors was decreased in the treated embryos between days 7 and 10 of embryonic development. No inhibition of incorporation of these precursors occurred between days 16 and 20 of embryonic development at the dosages of β-aminopropionitrile used. 2. β-Aminopropionitrile treatment also decreased the amount of N-acetylhexosamines in the chick embryo and decreased the percentage of the hexosamine esterified by nucleotides. Respiration was decreased by homogenates prepared from treated embryos. Likewise, UDP-xylosyl- and UDP-galactosyl-transferase activities were decreased in treated embryos and cartilage from embryos and growing chicks. 3. The data suggest that β-aminopropionitrile, in addition to the known lathyrogenic activity, either is or gives rise to a potent metabolic poison that interferes with basic cellular metabolism. The results are consistent with a decreased rate of ATP generation as an explanation for the decrease in glycosaminoglycan synthesis. PMID:4274379

  13. Myocardial Reloading after Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Alters Substrate Metabolism While Promoting Protein Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Priddy, Colleen M.; Ledee, Dolena; Xu, Chun; Isern, Nancy G.; Olson, Aaron; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-08-19

    Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) unloads the heart providing a bridge to recovery in children after myocardial stunning. Mortality after ECMO remains high.Cardiac substrate and amino acid requirements upon weaning are unknown and may impact recovery. We assessed the hypothesis that ventricular reloading modulates both substrate entry into the citric acid cycle (CAC) and myocardial protein synthesis. Fourteen immature piglets (7.8-15.6 kg) were separated into 2 groups based on ventricular loading status: 8 hour-ECMO (UNLOAD) and post-wean from ECMO (RELOAD). We infused [2-13C]-pyruvate as an oxidative substrate and [13C6]-L-leucine, as a tracer of amino acid oxidation and protein synthesis into the coronary artery. RELOAD showed marked elevations in myocardial oxygen consumption above baseline and UNLOAD. Pyruvate uptake was markedly increased though RELOAD decreased pyruvate contribution to oxidative CAC metabolism.RELOAD also increased absolute concentrations of all CAC intermediates, while maintaining or increasing 13C-molar percent enrichment. RELOAD also significantly increased cardiac fractional protein synthesis rates by >70% over UNLOAD. Conclusions: RELOAD produced high energy metabolic requirement and rebound protein synthesis. Relative pyruvate decarboxylation decreased with RELOAD while promoting anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation and amino acid incorporation into protein rather than to the CAC for oxidation. These perturbations may serve as therapeutic targets to improve contractile function after ECMO.

  14. Landscape context alters cost of living in honeybee metabolism and feeding.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Sean; Dixon, Kingsley W; Didham, Raphael K; Bradshaw, S Donald

    2017-02-08

    Field metabolic rate (FMR) links the energy budget of an animal with the constraints of its ecosystem, but is particularly difficult to measure for small organisms. Landscape degradation exacerbates environmental adversity and reduces resource availability, imposing higher costs of living for many organisms. Here, we report a significant effect of landscape degradation on the FMR of free-flying Apis mellifera, estimated using (86)Rb radio-isotopic turnover. We validated the relationship between (86)Rb kb and metabolic rate for worker bees in the laboratory using flow-through respirometry. We then released radioisotopically enriched individuals into a natural woodland and a heavily degraded and deforested plantation. FMRs of worker bees in natural woodland vegetation were significantly higher than in a deforested landscape. Nectar consumption, estimated using (22)Na radio-isotopic turnover, also differed significantly between natural and degraded landscapes. In the deforested landscape, we infer that the costs of foraging exceeded energetic availability, and honeybees instead foraged less and depended more on stored resources in the hive. If this is generally the case with increasing landscape degradation, this will have important implications for the provision of pollination services and the effectiveness and resilience of ecological restoration practice.

  15. Metabolic phenotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with altered trehalose 6-phosphate dynamics.

    PubMed

    Walther, Thomas; Mtimet, Narjes; Alkim, Ceren; Vax, Amélie; Loret, Marie-Odile; Ullah, Azmat; Gancedo, Carlos; Smits, Gertien J; François, Jean Marie

    2013-09-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, synthesis of T6P (trehalose 6-phosphate) is essential for growth on most fermentable carbon sources. In the present study, the metabolic response to glucose was analysed in mutants with different capacities to accumulate T6P. A mutant carrying a deletion in the T6P synthase encoding gene, TPS1, which had no measurable T6P, exhibited impaired ethanol production, showed diminished plasma membrane H⁺-ATPase activation, and became rapidly depleted of nearly all adenine nucleotides which were irreversibly converted into inosine. Deletion of the AMP deaminase encoding gene, AMD1, in the tps1 strain prevented inosine formation, but did not rescue energy balance or growth on glucose. Neither the 90%-reduced T6P content observed in a tps1 mutant expressing the Tps1 protein from Yarrowia lipolytica, nor the hyperaccumulation of T6P in the tps2 mutant had significant effects on fermentation rates, growth on fermentable carbon sources or plasma membrane H⁺-ATPase activation. However, intracellular metabolite dynamics and pH homoeostasis were strongly affected by changes in T6P concentrations. Hyperaccumulation of T6P in the tps2 mutant caused an increase in cytosolic pH and strongly reduced growth rates on non-fermentable carbon sources, emphasizing the crucial role of the trehalose pathway in the regulation of respiratory and fermentative metabolism.

  16. Ethanol Metabolism Alters Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation In Liver Cells

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    The proteasome is a major enzyme that cleaves proteins for antigen presentation. Cleaved peptides traffic to the cell surface, where they are presented in the context of MHC class I. Recognition of these complexes by cytotoxic T lymphocytes is crucial for elimination of cells bearing “non-self” proteins. Our previous studies revealed that ethanol suppresses proteasome function in ethanol-metabolizing liver cells. We hypothesized that proteasome suppression reduces the hydrolysis of antigenic peptides, thereby decreasing the presentation of the peptide-MHC class I-complexes on the cell surface. To test this, we used the mouse hepatocyte cell line (CYP2E1/ADH-transfected HepB5 cells) or primary mouse hepatocytes, both derived from livers of C57Bl/6 mice, which present the ovalbumin peptide, SIINFEKL, complexed with H2Kb. To induce H2Kb expression, HepB5 cells were treated with interferon gamma (IFNγ) and then exposed to ethanol. In these cells, ethanol metabolism decreased not only proteasome activity, but also hydrolysis of the C-extended peptide, SIINFEKL-TE and the presentation of SIINFEKL-H2Kb complexes measured after the delivery of SIINFEKL-TE to cytoplasm. The suppressive effects of ethanol were, in part, attributed to ethanol-elicited impairment of IFNγ signaling. However, in primary hepatocytes, even in the absence of IFNγ, we observed a similar decline in proteasome activity and antigen presentation after ethanol exposure. We conclude that proteasome function is directly suppressed by ethanol metabolism and indirectly, by preventing the activating effects of IFNγ. Ethanol-elicited reduction in proteasome activity contributes to the suppression of SIINFEKL-H2Kb presentation on the surface of liver cells. Immune response to viral antigens plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C or B viral infections (HCV and HBV, respectively). Professional antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages) are responsible for priming the

  17. Marked rapid alterations in nocturnal pineal serotonin metabolism in mice and rats exposed to weak intermittent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Lerchl, A.; Nonaka, K.O.; Stokkan, K.A.; Reiter, R.J. )

    1990-05-31

    Adult AMES mice and male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to an artificial magnetic field, generated by Helmholtz coils. 3.5 hours after the onset of darkness the coils were activated for one hour resulting in an inversion of the horizontal component of the earth's magnetic field. The coils were activated and deactivated at 5 min intervals during the 1 hour exposure period. In both mice and rats, the levels of serotonin in the pineal were markedly increased by the exposure. In rats, an increase of pineal 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid and a decrease of the activity of the pineal enzyme serotonin-N-acetyltransferase also was observed. However, pineal and serum melatonin levels were not altered. The results indicate that the metabolism of serotonin in the pineal is quickly affected by the exposure of animals to a magnetic field.

  18. Altered energy metabolism in an irradiated population of lizards at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, K.A.; Medica, P.A.

    1985-07-01

    Field metabolic rates (via doubly labeled water), body compartmentalization of energy stores, and energy assimilation efficiencies were measured to assess all avenues of energy utilization in Uta stansburiana living in a low-level ..gamma..-irradiated plot in Rock Valley, Nevada. Comparison of energy budgets for radiation-sterilized females with those of nonirradiated control lizards revealed several substantial differences. Sterile females were heavier, mainly because they had extraordinarily large energy (fat) storage depots. Sterile females had much lower rates of energy expenditure via respiration and lower rates of energy intake by feeding. These differences are interpreted as indirect responses to radiation-induced sterility. There is little evidence of direct radiation effects on physiological functions other than reproduction.

  19. Transferrin Receptor 2 Dependent Alterations of Brain Iron Metabolism Affect Anxiety Circuits in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Rosa Maria; Boda, Enrica; Montarolo, Francesca; Boero, Martina; Mezzanotte, Mariarosa; Saglio, Giuseppe; Buffo, Annalisa; Roetto, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    The Transferrin Receptor 2 (Tfr2) modulates systemic iron metabolism through the regulation of iron regulator Hepcidin (Hepc) and Tfr2 inactivation causes systemic iron overload. Based on data demonstrating Tfr2 expression in brain, we analysed Tfr2-KO mice in order to examine the molecular, histological and behavioural consequences of Tfr2 silencing in this tissue. Tfr2 abrogation caused an accumulation of iron in specific districts in the nervous tissue that was not accompanied by a brain Hepc response. Moreover, Tfr2-KO mice presented a selective overactivation of neurons in the limbic circuit and the emergence of an anxious-like behaviour. Furthermore, microglial cells showed a particular sensitivity to iron perturbation. We conclude that Tfr2 is a key regulator of brain iron homeostasis and propose a role for Tfr2 alpha in the regulation of anxiety circuits. PMID:27477597

  20. Tadalafil alters energy metabolism in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Stefania; Sgrò, Paolo; Duranti, Guglielmo; Ceci, Roberta; Di Luigi, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a family of enzymes that hydrolyze cyclic nucleotides, thereby modulating cell functions. Three highly selective PDE5 inhibitors (PDE5i), sildenafil, vardenafil and tadalafil, have been developed for treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). Experimental evidence showed that chronic treatment with sildenafil PDE5i in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance improved insulin action and decreased circulating fatty acid levels. It has recently been shown that healthy athletes use PDE5i as performance enhancers, hence in the present study we investigated whether the long-lasting PDE5i tadalafil influences energy metabolism in C2C12 skeletal muscle cells by evaluating lactate production, glucose consumption, and citrate synthase and 3-OH acyl CoA dehydrogenase activities. Our data demonstrate that tadalafil is able to modulate energy homeostasis in mouse skeletal muscle cells, depending on the treatment length and dose.

  1. Altered muscle energy metabolism in post-absorptive patients with chronic renal failure.

    PubMed

    Pastoris, O; Aquilani, R; Foppa, P; Bovio, G; Segagni, S; Baiardi, P; Catapano, M; Maccario, M; Salvadeo, A; Dossena, M

    1997-06-01

    Skeletal muscle biopsies were performed on 12 healthy sedentary subjects and on 22 non-dyalized chronic renal failure patients (CRF) on a free diet and after overnight fasting. Parathormone, glucagon and insulin were determined at the same time of biopsies. CRF patients showed significantly low ATP and creatine phosphate levels. Regarding enzyme activities, a high hexokinase Vmax was found, while the pyruvate kinase activity was lower than in the control group. For the tricarboxylic acid cycle, citrate synthase, succinate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase activities were higher; total NADH cytochrome c reductase activity was also high, while cytochrome oxidase activity was slightly lower. Both alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities were considerably high in comparison with the control group. In conclusion, our study revealed a hypermetabolic TCA cycle, but impaired oxidative phosphorylation, which partly explained the reduced ATP concentration. Excessive protein intake and hormonal derangements may play a role in these metabolic changes.

  2. Regulation of Stem Cell Fate by ROS-mediated Alteration of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jung Min; Lee, Hyun Jik; Jung, Young Hyun; Lee, Ki Hoon; Kim, Dah Ihm; Kim, Jeong Yeon; Ko, So Hee; Choi, Gee Euhn; Chai, Ing Ing; Song, Eun Ju; Oh, Ji Young; Lee, Sei-Jung; Han, Ho Jae

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells have attracted much attention due to their distinct features that support infinite self-renewal and differentiation into the cellular derivatives of three lineages. Recent studies have suggested that many stem cells both embryonic and adult stem cells reside in a specialized niche defined by hypoxic condition. In this respect, distinguishing functional differences arising from the oxygen concentration is important in understanding the nature of stem cells and in controlling stem cell fate for therapeutic purposes. ROS act as cellular signaling molecules involved in the propagation of signaling and the translation of environmental cues into cellular responses to maintain cellular homeostasis, which is mediated by the coordination of various cellular processes, and to adapt cellular activity to available bioenergetic sources. Thus, in this review, we describe the physiological role of ROS in stem cell fate and its effect on the metabolic regulation of stem cells. PMID:26019752

  3. Metabolic alterations in the anterior cingulate cortex and related cognitive deficits in late adolescent methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun E; Kim, Geon Ha; Hwang, Jaeuk; Kim, Jung Yoon; Renshaw, Perry F; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A; Kim, Binna; Kang, Ilhyang; Jeon, Saerom; Ma, Jiyoung; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Yoon, Sujung

    2016-11-04

    The adolescent brain, with ongoing prefrontal maturation, may be more vulnerable to drug use-related neurotoxic changes as compared to the adult brain. We investigated whether the use of methamphetamine (MA), a highly addictive psychostimulant, during adolescence affect metabolic and cognitive functions of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). In adolescent MA users (n = 44) and healthy adolescents (n = 53), the levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), a neuronal marker, were examined in the ACC using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The Stroop color-word task was used to assess Stroop interference, which may reflect cognitive functions of behavior monitoring and response selection that are mediated by the ACC. Adolescent MA users had lower NAA levels in the ACC (t = -2.88, P = 0.005) and relatively higher interference scores (t = 2.03, P = 0.045) than healthy adolescents. Moreover, there were significant relationships between lower NAA levels in the ACC and worse interference scores in adolescent MA users (r = -0.61, P < 0.001). Interestingly, early onset of MA use, as compared to late onset, was related to both lower NAA levels in the ACC (t = -2.24, P = 0.03) as well as lower performance on interference measure of the Stroop color-word task (t = 2.25, P = 0.03). The current findings suggest that metabolic dysfunction in the ACC and its related cognitive impairment may play an important role in adolescent-onset addiction, particularly during early adolescence.

  4. Acclimation of S aurata to various salinities alters energy metabolism of osmoregulatory and nonosmoregulatory organs.

    PubMed

    Sangiao-Alvarellos, Susana; Laiz-Carrión, Raúl; Guzmán, José M; Martin del Río, Mariá P; Miguez, Jesús M; Mancera, Juan M; Soengas, José L

    2003-10-01

    The impact of different environmental salinities on the energy metabolism of gills, kidney, liver, and brain was assessed in gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) acclimated to brackish water [BW, 12 parts/thousand (ppt)], seawater (SW, 38 ppt) and hyper saline water (HSW, 55 ppt) for 14 days. Plasma osmolality and levels of sodium and chloride presented a clear direct relationship with environmental salinities. A general activation of energy metabolism was observed under different osmotic conditions. In liver, an enhancement of glycogenolytic and glycolytic potential was observed in fish acclimated to BW and HSW compared with those in SW. In plasma, an increased availability of glucose, lactate, and protein was observed in parallel with the increase in salinity. In gills, an increased Na+-K+-ATPase activity, a clear decrease in the capacity for use of exogenous glucose and the pentose phosphate pathway, as well as an increased glycolytic potential were observed in parallel with the increased salinity. In kidney, Na+-K+-ATPase activity and lactate levels increased in HSW, whereas the capacity for the use of exogenous glucose decreased in BW- and HSW- acclimated fish compared with SW-acclimated fish. In brain, fish acclimated to BW or HSW displayed an enhancement in their potential for glycogenolysis, use of exogenous glucose, and glycolysis compared with SW-acclimated fish. Also in brain, lactate and ATP levels decreased in parallel with the increase in salinity. The data are discussed in the context of energy expenditure associated with osmotic acclimation to different environmental salinities in fish euryhaline species.

  5. Different Narrow-Band Light Ranges Alter Plant Secondary Metabolism and Plant Defense Response to Aphids.

    PubMed

    Rechner, Ole; Neugart, Susanne; Schreiner, Monika; Wu, Sasa; Poehling, Hans-Michael

    2016-10-01

    Light of different wavelengths affects various physiological processes in plants. Short-wavelength radiation (like UV) can activate defense pathways in plants and enhance the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites (such as flavonoids and glucosinolates) responsible for resistance against certain herbivorous insects. The intensity of light-induced, metabolite-based resistance is plant- and insect species-specific and depends on herbivore feeding guild and specialization. In this study, broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica) plants were grown for 4 weeks in a climate chamber under conventional fluorescent tubes and were additionally treated with UV-B (310 nm), UV-A (365 or 385 nm), or violet (420 nm) light generated with UV-B tubes or light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The objective was to determine the influence of narrow bandwidths of light (from UV-B to violet) on plant secondary metabolism and on the performance of the cabbage aphid Brevicoryne brassicae (a specialist) and the green peach aphid Myzus persicae (a generalist). Among flavonol glycosides, specific quercetin and kaempferol glycosides increased markedly under UV-B, while among glucosinolates only 4-methoxy-3-indolylmethyl showed a 2-fold increase in plants exposed to UV-B and UV-A. The concentration of 3-indolylmethyl glucosinolate in broccoli plants increased with UV-B treatment. Brevicoryne brassicae adult weights and fecundity were lower on UV-B treated plants compared to UV-A or violet light-treated plants. Adult weights and fecundity of M. persicae were increased under UV-B and UV-A treatments. When specific light wavelengths are used to induce metabolic changes in plants, the specificity of the induced effects on herbivores should be considered.

  6. Proteomic Analysis Reveals That Iron Availability Alters the Metabolic Status of the Pathogenic Fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Parente, Ana F. A.; Bailão, Alexandre M.; Borges, Clayton L.; Parente, Juliana A.; Magalhães, Adriana D.; Ricart, Carlos A. O.; Soares, Célia M. A.

    2011-01-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is a thermodimorphic fungus and the causative agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM). The ability of P. brasiliensis to uptake nutrients is fundamental for growth, but a reduction in the availability of iron and other nutrients is a host defense mechanism many pathogenic fungi must overcome. Thus, fungal mechanisms that scavenge iron from host may contribute to P. brasiliensis virulence. In order to better understand how P. brasiliensis adapts to iron starvation in the host we compared the two-dimensional (2D) gel protein profile of yeast cells during iron starvation to that of iron rich condition. Protein spots were selected for comparative analysis based on the protein staining intensity as determined by image analysis. A total of 1752 protein spots were selected for comparison, and a total of 274 out of the 1752 protein spots were determined to have changed significantly in abundance due to iron depletion. Ninety six of the 274 proteins were grouped into the following functional categories; energy, metabolism, cell rescue, virulence, cell cycle, protein synthesis, protein fate, transcription, cellular communication, and cell fate. A correlation between protein and transcript levels was also discovered using quantitative RT-PCR analysis from RNA obtained from P. brasiliensis under iron restricting conditions and from yeast cells isolated from infected mouse spleens. In addition, western blot analysis and enzyme activity assays validated the differential regulation of proteins identified by 2-D gel analysis. We observed an increase in glycolytic pathway protein regulation while tricarboxylic acid cycle, glyoxylate and methylcitrate cycles, and electron transport chain proteins decreased in abundance under iron limiting conditions. These data suggest a remodeling of P. brasiliensis metabolism by prioritizing iron independent pathways. PMID:21829521

  7. Indirect Stimulation of Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells Through Alterations in Isoprenoid Metabolism1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Sarikonda, Ghanashyam; Puan, Kia-Joo; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Feng, Ju; Giner, José-Luis; Cao, Rong; Mönkkönen, Jukka; Oldfield, Eric; Morita, Craig T.

    2011-01-01

    Human Vγ2Vδ2 T cells monitor isoprenoid metabolism by recognizing (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methyl-but-2-enyl pyrophosphate (HMBPP), an intermediate in the 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate pathway used by microbes, and isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP), an intermediate in the mevalonate pathway used by humans. Aminobisphosphonates and alkylamines indirectly stimulate Vγ2Vδ2 cells by inhibiting farnesyl diphosphate synthase (FDPS) in the mevalonate pathway, thereby increasing IPP/ApppI that directly stimulate. In this study, we further characterize stimulation by these compounds, and define pathways used by new classes of compounds. Consistent with FDPS inhibition, stimulation of Vγ2Vδ2 cells by aminobisphosphonates and alkylamines was much more sensitive to statin inhibition than stimulation by prenyl pyrophosphates. However, the continuous presence of aminobisphosphonates was toxic for T cells, and blocked their proliferation. Aminobisphosphonate stimulation was rapid and prolonged, independent of known antigen presenting molecules, and resistant to fixation. New classes of stimulatory compounds–mevalonate, the alcohol of HMBPP, and alkenyl phosphonates–likely stimulate differently. Mevalonate, a rate-limiting metabolite, appears to enter cells to increase IPP levels whereas the alcohol of HMBPP and alkenyl phosphonates are directly recognized. The critical chemical feature of bisphosphonates is the amino moiety, because its loss switched aminobisphosphonates to direct antigens. Transfection of APC with siRNA downregulating FDPS rendered them stimulatory for Vγ2Vδ2 cells, and increased cellular IPP. siRNAs for isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase functioned similarly. Our results show that a variety of manipulations affecting isoprenoid metabolism lead to stimulation of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells and that pulsing aminobisphosphonates would be more effective for the ex vivo expansion of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. PMID:22013129

  8. Prevention of metabolic alterations caused by suspension hypokinesia in leg muscles of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, M. E.; Jaspers, S. R.; Fagan, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Rats were subjected to tail-cast suspension hypokinesia for 6 days with one leg immobilized in dorsal flexion by casting. Control animals were also tail-casted. The soleus, gastrocnemius and plantaris muscles of uncasted hypokinetic legs were smaller than control muscles. Dorsal flexion prevented atrophy of these muscles and caused the soleus to hypertrophy. The anterior muscles were unaffected by hypokinesia. The smaller size of the soleus of the uncasted leg relative to the dorsal flexed and weight bearing limbs correlated with slower protein synthesis and faster proteolysis. The capacity of this muscle to synthesize glutamine (gln), which carries nitrogenous waste from muscle was also measured. Although tissue homogenates showed higher activities of gln synthetase, the rate of de novo synthesis was not altered in intact muscle but the tissue ratio of gln/glutamate was decreased. Glutamate and ATP were not limiting for gln synthesis, but availability of ammonia may be a limiting factor for this process in hypokinesia.

  9. Intravenous lipopolysaccharide challenge alters ruminal bacterial microbiota and disrupts ruminal metabolism in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Jing, Longhui; Zhang, Ruiyang; Liu, Yujie; Zhu, Weiyun; Mao, Shengyong

    2014-07-28

    In the present study, three primiparous lactating Holstein cows (260-285 d in lactation) were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design to assess the effects of three doses (0.0, 0.4 and 0.8 μg/kg body weight) of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, Escherichia coli 0111:B4) on changes in ruminal microbiota and ruminal fermentation. Ruminal pH was linearly decreased (P< 0.001) by LPS challenge, and the concentrations of acetate, propionate, butyrate, total volatile fatty acids and amino N increased linearly (P< 0.001) according to the LPS dose. LPS infusion linearly decreased (P< 0.001) the organic matter degradability of alfalfa hay and soyabean meal in the rumen, but did not affect (P>0.10) the gene expression of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase and monocarboxylic acid transporter-1, -2 and -4. A plot of principal coordinate analysis based on unweighted UniFrac values and analysis of molecular variance revealed that the structure of ruminal bacterial communities in the control was distinct from that of the ruminal microbiota in the cattle exposed to LPS. At the phylum level, when compared with the control group, LPS infusion in the tested cows linearly increased (P< 0.05) the abundance of Firmicutes, and linearly decreased (P< 0.05) the percentage of Bacteroidetes, Tenericutes, Spirochaetes, Chlorobi and Lentisphaerae. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that intravenously LPS challenge altered the ruminal bacterial microbiota and fermentation profiles. The present data suggest that systemic LPS could alter ruminal environment and ruminal microbiota composition, leading to a general decrease in fermentative activity.

  10. Oleanolic acid alters bile acid metabolism and produces cholestatic liver injury in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Yuan-Fu; Zhang, Youcai; Wu, Kai Connie; Fan, Fang; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2013-11-01

    Oleanolic acid (OA) is a triterpenoids that exists widely in plants. OA is effective in protecting against hepatotoxicants. Whereas a low dose of OA is hepatoprotective, higher doses and longer-term use of OA produce liver injury. This study characterized OA-induced liver injury in mice. Adult C57BL/6 mice were given OA at doses of 0, 22.5, 45, 90, and 135 mg/kg, s.c., daily for 5 days, and liver injury was observed at doses of 90 mg/kg and above, as evidenced by increases in serum activities of alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase, increases in serum total bilirubin, as well as by liver histopathology. OA-induced cholestatic liver injury was further evidenced by marked increases of both unconjugated and conjugated bile acids (BAs) in serum. Gene and protein expression analysis suggested that livers of OA-treated mice had adaptive responses to prevent BA accumulation by suppressing BA biosynthetic enzyme genes (Cyp7a1, 8b1, 27a1, and 7b1); lowering BA uptake transporters (Ntcp and Oatp1b2); and increasing a BA efflux transporter (Ostβ). OA increased the expression of Nrf2 and its target gene, Nqo1, but decreased the expression of AhR, CAR and PPARα along with their target genes, Cyp1a2, Cyp2b10 and Cyp4a10. OA had minimal effects on PXR and Cyp3a11. Taken together, the present study characterized OA-induced liver injury, which is associated with altered BA homeostasis, and alerts its toxicity potential. - Highlights: • Oleanolic acid at higher doses and long-term use may produce liver injury. • Oleanolic acid increased serum ALT, ALP, bilirubin and bile acid concentrations. • OA produced feathery degeneration, inflammation and cell death in the liver. • OA altered bile acid homeostasis, affecting bile acid synthesis and transport.

  11. Relation between blood pH and ionized calcium during acute metabolic alteration of the acid-base balance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Gaiter, A M; Bonfant, G; Manes, M; Belfanti, P; Alloatti, S

    1997-07-01

    We induced metabolic alkalosis and acidosis in 10 healthy volunteers in order to analyse in vivo relation between pH and ionized calcium (cCa2+). In the alkalinization test, 2.7 mol/kg NaHCO3 was injected. In the acidification test, volunteers took 4 mmol/kg NH4Cl. Blood pH and cCa2+ (mmol/l) mean values (SD) baseline, after alkalinization and acidification tests, were: 7.363 (0.018), 7.456 (0.031), 7.244 (0.031), 1.27 (0.03), 1.14 (0.03) and 1.38 (0.04). Mean slope of regression log cCa2+/pH was -0.39 (SD 0.11). Such a slope differs after in vivo or in vitro changes, due to the in vivo rapid restoration of equilibrium between the plasmatic and interstitial compartments following changes in water and electrolyte concentrations. The type of acid-base alteration-respiratory or metabolic-influences pH changes, and consequently the regression slope. The in vivo slope for log cCa2+/pH in normal subjects (-0.21) is much the same as in acute respiratory alterations (-0.17), whereas it differs in acute metabolic alterations (present study). Bicarbonates play different roles: the same changes in pH cause greater changes in cCa2+ after acute metabolic rather than respiratory alterations. Ca2+ homeostasis is maintained in acute respiratory acid-base imbalance, despite wide shifts in pH, whereas in acute metabolic alterations even small pH changes have striking repercussions on cCa2+. The experimental angular coefficient for in vivo acute metabolic acid-base alterations differs from the theoretical one calculated by Thode's differential equation (-0.25).

  12. Peanut protein reduces body protein mass and alters skeletal muscle contractile properties and lipid metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Hélène; Leblanc, Nadine; Papineau, Roxanne; Richard, Denis; Côté, Claude H

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that diets high in nuts or peanuts favourably affect plasma lipid concentrations. However, few studies have examined the effects of nut and peanut protein (PP) on body composition and skeletal muscle properties. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of dietary PP compared with two animal proteins, casein (C) and cod protein (CP) on body composition, skeletal muscle contractile properties and lipid metabolism in rats. Thirty-two male rats were assigned to one of the following four diets containing either C, CP, PP or C+peanut protein (CPP, 50:50) mixture. After 28 d of ad libitum feeding and after 12-h fast, blood, liver and muscle were collected for measurements of plasma and hepatic cholesterol and TAG, plasma glucose and insulin and contractile properties. Rats fed with the low-quality protein, PP, had lower body weight gain, body protein mass, soleus mass and liver weight than those fed with the high-quality dietary proteins, C and CP. PP also caused a deficit in contractile properties in soleus. Likewise, PP increased plasma cholesterol and body fat mass compared with CP. However, these elevations were accompanied with increased hepatic TAG concentrations and lowered intestinal fat excretion. These results show that PP intake alters body composition by reducing skeletal muscle mass and liver weight as well as muscle contractility and lipid metabolism. Adding a complete protein such as C might partially counteract these adverse effects.

  13. Differential Cysteine Labeling and Global Label-Free Proteomics Reveals an Altered Metabolic State in Skeletal Muscle Aging

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging and associated sarcopenia have been linked to an altered oxidative status of redox-sensitive proteins. Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generated by contracting skeletal muscle are necessary for optimal protein function, signaling, and adaptation. To investigate the redox proteome of aging gastrocnemius muscles from adult and old male mice, we developed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach that includes a differential cysteine labeling step. The approach allows simultaneous identification of up- and downregulated proteins between samples in addition to the identification and relative quantification of the reversible oxidation state of susceptible redox cysteine residues. Results from muscles of adult and old mice indicate significant changes in the content of chaperone, glucose metabolism, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, including Protein DJ-1, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein, and a reduction in the number of redox-responsive proteins identified in muscle of old mice. Results demonstrate skeletal muscle aging causes a reduction in redox-sensitive proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. Data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001054. PMID:25181601

  14. Interferon-driven alterations of the host’s amino acid metabolism in the pathogenesis of typhoid fever

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Claire; Waddington, Claire S.; Zhou, Liqing; Hill, Jennifer; Clare, Simon; Mukhopadhyay, Subhankar; Schreiber, Fernanda; Roumeliotis, Theodoros I.; Yu, Lu; Ramilo, Octavio; Sztein, Marcelo B.; Kingsley, Robert A.; Levine, Myron M.

    2016-01-01

    Enteric fever, caused by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi, is an important public health problem in resource-limited settings and, despite decades of research, human responses to the infection are poorly understood. In 41 healthy adults experimentally infected with wild-type S. Typhi, we detected significant cytokine responses within 12 h of bacterial ingestion. These early responses did not correlate with subsequent clinical disease outcomes and likely indicate initial host–pathogen interactions in the gut mucosa. In participants developing enteric fever after oral infection, marked transcriptional and cytokine responses during acute disease reflected dominant type I/II interferon signatures, which were significantly associated with bacteremia. Using a murine and macrophage infection model, we validated the pivotal role of this response in the expression of proteins of the host tryptophan metabolism during Salmonella infection. Corresponding alterations in tryptophan catabolites with immunomodulatory properties in serum of participants with typhoid fever confirmed the activity of this pathway, and implicate a central role of host tryptophan metabolism in the pathogenesis of typhoid fever. PMID:27217537

  15. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations that drive the formation of squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Kim, Arianna L.; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Daly, Meaghan; Mahfouf, Walid; Bellance, Nadège; Taïeb, Alain; de Verneuil, Hubert; Mazurier, Frédéric; Bickers, David R.

    2010-01-01

    DNA damage is a well-known initiator of tumorigenesis. Studies have shown that most cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for their bioenergetics. We sought to identify a molecular link between genomic mutations and metabolic alterations in neoplastic transformation. We took advantage of the intrinsic genomic instability arising in xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC). The XPC protein plays a key role in recognizing DNA damage in nucleotide excision repair, and patients with XPC deficiency have increased incidence of skin cancer and other malignancies. In cultured human keratinocytes, we showed that lentivirus-mediated knockdown of XPC reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increased glycolysis, recapitulating cancer cell metabolism. Accumulation of unrepaired DNA following XPC silencing increased DNA-dependent protein kinase activity, which subsequently activated AKT1 and NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX1), resulting in ROS production and accumulation of specific deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) over time. Subcutaneous injection of XPC-deficient keratinocytes into immunodeficient mice led to squamous cell carcinoma formation, demonstrating the tumorigenic potential of transduced cells. Conversely, simultaneous knockdown of either NOX1 or AKT1 blocked the neoplastic transformation induced by XPC silencing. Our results demonstrate that genomic instability resulting from XPC silencing results in activation of AKT1 and subsequently NOX1 to induce ROS generation, mtDNA deletions, and neoplastic transformation in human keratinocytes. PMID:21123941

  16. Metabolic Alterations Due to Caloric Restriction and Every Other Day Feeding in Normal and Growth Hormone Receptor Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mutations causing decreased somatotrophic signaling are known to increase insulin sensitivity and extend life span in mammals. Caloric restriction and every other day (EOD) dietary regimens are associated with similar improvements to insulin signaling and longevity in normal mice; however, these interventions fail to increase insulin sensitivity or life span in growth hormone receptor knockout (GHRKO) mice. To investigate the interactions of the GHRKO mutation with caloric restriction and EOD dietary interventions, we measured changes in the metabolic parameters oxygen consumption (VO2) and respiratory quotient produced by either long-term caloric restriction or EOD in male GHRKO and normal mice. GHRKO mice had increased VO2, which was unaltered by diet. In normal mice, EOD diet caused a significant reduction in VO2 compared with ad libitum (AL) mice during fed and fasted conditions. In normal mice, caloric restriction increased both the range of VO2 and the difference in minimum VO2 between fed and fasted states, whereas EOD diet caused a relatively static VO2 pattern under fed and fasted states. No diet significantly altered the range of VO2 of GHRKO mice under fed conditions. This provides further evidence that longevity-conferring diets cause major metabolic changes in normal mice, but not in GHRKO mice. PMID:23833202

  17. XPC silencing in normal human keratinocytes triggers metabolic alterations that drive the formation of squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Rezvani, Hamid Reza; Kim, Arianna L; Rossignol, Rodrigue; Ali, Nsrein; Daly, Meaghan; Mahfouf, Walid; Bellance, Nadège; Taïeb, Alain; de Verneuil, Hubert; Mazurier, Frédéric; Bickers, David R

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage is a well-known initiator of tumorigenesis. Studies have shown that most cancer cells rely on aerobic glycolysis for their bioenergetics. We sought to identify a molecular link between genomic mutations and metabolic alterations in neoplastic transformation. We took advantage of the intrinsic genomic instability arising in xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC). The XPC protein plays a key role in recognizing DNA damage in nucleotide excision repair, and patients with XPC deficiency have increased incidence of skin cancer and other malignancies. In cultured human keratinocytes, we showed that lentivirus-mediated knockdown of XPC reduced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and increased glycolysis, recapitulating cancer cell metabolism. Accumulation of unrepaired DNA following XPC silencing increased DNA-dependent protein kinase activity, which subsequently activated AKT1 and NADPH oxidase-1 (NOX1), resulting in ROS production and accumulation of specific deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) over time. Subcutaneous injection of XPC-deficient keratinocytes into immunodeficient mice led to squamous cell carcinoma formation, demonstrating the tumorigenic potential of transduced cells. Conversely, simultaneous knockdown of either NOX1 or AKT1 blocked the neoplastic transformation induced by XPC silencing. Our results demonstrate that genomic instability resulting from XPC silencing results in activation of AKT1 and subsequently NOX1 to induce ROS generation, mtDNA deletions, and neoplastic transformation in human keratinocytes.

  18. Differential cysteine labeling and global label-free proteomics reveals an altered metabolic state in skeletal muscle aging.

    PubMed

    McDonagh, Brian; Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Smith, Neil T; Brownridge, Philip; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2014-11-07

    The molecular mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle aging and associated sarcopenia have been linked to an altered oxidative status of redox-sensitive proteins. Reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generated by contracting skeletal muscle are necessary for optimal protein function, signaling, and adaptation. To investigate the redox proteome of aging gastrocnemius muscles from adult and old male mice, we developed a label-free quantitative proteomic approach that includes a differential cysteine labeling step. The approach allows simultaneous identification of up- and downregulated proteins between samples in addition to the identification and relative quantification of the reversible oxidation state of susceptible redox cysteine residues. Results from muscles of adult and old mice indicate significant changes in the content of chaperone, glucose metabolism, and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins, including Protein DJ-1, cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II, 78 kDa glucose regulated protein, and a reduction in the number of redox-responsive proteins identified in muscle of old mice. Results demonstrate skeletal muscle aging causes a reduction in redox-sensitive proteins involved in the generation of precursor metabolites and energy metabolism, indicating a loss in the flexibility of the redox energy response. Data is available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001054.

  19. Mimp/Mtch2, an Obesity Susceptibility Gene, Induces Alteration of Fatty Acid Metabolism in Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tsarfaty, Galia; Kaufman, Dafna; Horev, Judith; Resau, James H.; Tsarfaty, Ilan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Metabolic dysfunctions, such as fatty liver, obesity and insulin resistance, are among the most common contemporary diseases worldwide, and their prevalence is continuously rising. Mimp/Mtch2 is a mitochondrial carrier protein homologue, which localizes to the mitochondria and induces mitochondrial depolarization. Mimp/Mtch2 single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with obesity in humans and its loss in mice muscle protects from obesity. Our aim was to study the effects of Mimp/Mtch2 overexpression in vivo. Methods Transgenic mice overexpressing Mimp/Mtch2-GFP were characterized and monitored for lipid accumulation, weight and blood glucose levels. Transgenic mice liver and kidneys were used for gene expression analysis. Results Mimp/Mtch2-GFP transgenic mice express high levels of fatty acid synthase and of β-oxidation genes and develop fatty livers and kidneys. Moreover, high-fat diet–fed Mimp/Mtch2 mice exhibit high blood glucose levels. Our results also show that Mimp/Mtch2 is involved in lipid accumulation and uptake in cells and perhaps in human obesity. Conclusions Mimp/Mtch2 alters lipid metabolism and may play a role in the onset of obesity and development of insulin resistance. PMID:27359329

  20. Time-resolved optical imaging provides a molecular snapshot of altered metabolic function in living human cancer cell models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sud, Dhruv; Zhong, Wei; Beer, David G.; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2006-05-01

    A fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) method was developed and applied to investigate metabolic function in living human normal esophageal (HET-1) and Barrett’s adenocarcinoma (SEG-1) cells. In FLIM, image contrast is based on fluorophore excited state lifetimes, which reflect local biochemistry and molecular activity. Unique FLIM system attributes, including variable ultrafast time gating (≥ 200 ps), wide spectral tunability (337.1 - 960 nm), large temporal dynamic range (≥ 600 ps), and short data acquisition and processing times (15 s), enabled the study of two key molecules consumed at the termini of the oxidative phosphorylation pathway, NADH and oxygen, in living cells under controlled and calibrated environmental conditions. NADH is an endogenous cellular fluorophore detectable in living human tissues that has been shown to be a quantitative biomarker of dysplasia in the esophagus. Lifetime calibration of an oxygen-sensitive, ruthenium-based cellular stain enabled in vivo oxygen level measurements with a resolution of 8 μM over the entire physiological range (1 - 300 μM). Starkly higher intracellular oxygen and NADH levels in living SEG-1 vs. HET-1 cells were detected by FLIM and attributed to altered metabolic pathways in malignant cells.

  1. Vision changes after spaceflight are related to alterations in folate- and vitamin B-12-dependent one-carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Sara R; Gibson, C Robert; Mader, Thomas H; Ericson, Karen; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Heer, Martina; Smith, Scott M

    2012-03-01

    Approximately 20% (7 of 38) of astronauts on International Space Station (ISS) missions have developed measurable ophthalmic changes after flight. This study was conducted to determine if the folate- and vitamin B-12-dependent 1-carbon metabolic pathway is altered in these individuals. Since 2006, we have conducted experiments on the ISS to evaluate nutritional status and related biochemical indices of astronauts before, during, and after flight. Data were modeled to evaluate differences between individuals with ophthalmic changes (n = 5) and those without them (n = 15), all of whom were on ISS missions of 48-215 d. We also determined whether mean preflight serum concentrations of the 1-carbon metabolites and changes in measured cycloplegic refraction after flight were associated. Serum homocysteine (Hcy), cystathionine, 2-methylcitric acid (2MCA), and methylmalonic acid concentrations were 25-45% higher (P < 0.001) in astronauts with ophthalmic changes than in those without them. These differences existed before, during, and after flight. Preflight serum concentrations of Hcy and cystathionine, and mean in-flight serum folate, were correlated with change (postflight relative to preflight) values in refraction (P < 0.05), and preflight serum concentrations of 2MCA tended to be associated (P = 0.06) with ophthalmic changes. The biochemical differences observed in crewmembers with vision issues strongly suggest that their folate- and vitamin B-12-dependent 1-carbon transfer metabolism was affected before and during flight. The consistent differences in markers of 1-carbon metabolism between those who did and those who did not develop changes in vision suggest that polymorphisms in enzymes of this pathway may interact with microgravity to cause these pathophysiologic changes.

  2. A Methionine Deficient Diet Enhances Adipose Tissue Lipid Metabolism and Alters Anti-Oxidant Pathways in Young Growing Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Castellano, Rosa; Perruchot, Marie-Hélène; Conde-Aguilera, José Alberto; van Milgen, Jaap; Collin, Anne; Tesseraud, Sophie; Mercier, Yves; Gondret, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Methionine is a rate-limiting amino-acid for protein synthesis but non-proteinogenic roles on lipid metabolism and oxidative stress have been demonstrated. Contrary to rodents where a dietary methionine deficiency led to a lower adiposity, an increased lipid accretion rate has been reported in growing pigs fed a methionine deficient diet. This study aimed to clarify the effects of a dietary methionine deficiency on different aspects of tissue lipid metabolism and anti-oxidant pathways in young pigs. Post-weaned pigs (9.8 kg initial body weight) were restrictively-fed diets providing either an adequate (CTRL) or a deficient methionine supply (MD) during 10 days (n=6 per group). At the end of the feeding trial, pigs fed the MD diet had higher lipid content in subcutaneous adipose tissue. Expression levels of genes involved in glucose uptake, lipogenesis but also lipolysis, and activities of NADPH enzyme suppliers were generally higher in subcutaneous and perirenal adipose tissues of MD pigs, suggesting an increased lipid turnover in those pigs. Activities of the anti-oxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione reductase were increased in adipose tissues and muscle of MD pigs. Expression level and activity of the glutathione peroxidase were also higher in liver of MD pigs, but hepatic contents in the reduced and oxidized forms of glutathione and glutathione reductase activity were lower compared with control pigs. In plasma, superoxide dismutase activity was higher but total anti-oxidant power was lower in MD pigs. These results show that a dietary methionine deficiency resulted in increased levels of lipogenesis and lipolytic indicators in porcine adipose tissues. Decreased glutathione content in the liver and coordinated increase of enzymatic antioxidant activities in adipose tissues altered the cellular redox status of young pigs fed a methionine-deficient diet. These findings illustrate that a rapidly growing animal differently adapts tissue

  3. A combined chemometric and quantitative NMR analysis of HIV/AIDS serum discloses metabolic alterations associated with disease status.

    PubMed

    McKnight, Tracy R; Yoshihara, Hikari A I; Sitole, Lungile J; Martin, Jeffery N; Steffens, Francois; Meyer, Debra

    2014-11-01

    Individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often suffer from concomitant metabolic complications. Treatment with antiretroviral therapy has also been shown to alter the metabolism of patients. Although chemometric analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of human sera can distinguish normal sera (HIVneg) from HIV-infected sera (HIVpos) and sera from HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART), quantitative analysis of the discriminating metabolites and their relationship to disease status has yet to be determined. The objectives of the study were to analyze NMR spectra of HIVneg, HIVpos, and ART serum samples with a combination of chemometric and quantitative methods and to compare the NMR data with disease status as measured by viral load and CD4 count. High-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS) NMR spectroscopy was performed on HIVneg (N = 10), HIVpos (N = 10), and ART (N = 10) serum samples. Chemometric linear discriminant analysis classified the three groups of spectra with 100% accuracy. Concentrations of 12 metabolites were determined with a semi-parametric metabolite quantification method named high-resolution quantum estimation (HR-QUEST). CD4 count was directly associated with alanine (p = 0.008), and inversely correlated with both glutamine (p = 0.017) and glucose (p = 0.022) concentrations. A multivariate linear model using alanine, glutamine and glucose as covariates demonstrated an association with CD4 count (p = 0.038). The combined chemometric and quantitative analysis of the data disclosed previously unknown associations between specific metabolites and disease status. The observed associations with CD4 count are consistent with metabolic disorders that are commonly seen in HIV-infected patients.

  4. Silencing an N-Acyltransferase-Like Involved in Lignin Biosynthesis in Nicotiana attenuata Dramatically Alters Herbivory-Induced Phenolamide Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Onkokesung, Nawaporn; Galis, Ivan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2013-01-01

    In a transcriptomic screen of Manduca sexta-induced N-acyltransferases in leaves of Nicotiana attenuata, we identified an N-acyltransferase gene sharing a high similarity with the tobacco lignin-biosynthetic hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate/quinate hydroxycinnamoyl transferase (HCT) gene whose expression is controlled by MYB8, a transcription factor that regulates the production of phenylpropanoid polyamine conjugates (phenolamides, PAs). To evaluate the involvement of this HCT-like gene in lignin production as well as the resulting crosstalk with PA metabolism during insect herbivory, we transiently silenced (by VIGs) the expression of this gene and performed non-targeted (UHPLC-ESI/TOF-MS) metabolomics analyses. In agreement with a conserved function of N. attenuata HCT-like in lignin biogenesis, HCT-silenced plants developed weak, soft stems with greatly reduced lignin contents. Metabolic profiling demonstrated large shifts (up to 12% deregulation in total extracted ions in insect-attacked leaves) due to a large diversion of activated coumaric acid units into the production of developmentally and herbivory-induced coumaroyl-containing PAs (N′,N′′-dicoumaroylspermidine, N′,N′′-coumaroylputrescine, etc) and to minor increases in the most abundant free phenolics (chlorogenic and cryptochlorogenic acids), all without altering the production of well characterized herbivory-responsive caffeoyl- and feruloyl-based putrescine and spermidine PAs. These data are consistent with a strong metabolic tension, exacerbated during herbivory, over the allocation of coumaroyl-CoA units among lignin and unusual coumaroyl-containing PAs, and rule out a role for HCT-LIKE in tuning the herbivory-induced accumulation of other PAs. Additionally, these results are consistent with a role for lignification as an induced anti-herbivore defense. PMID:23704878

  5. Efficacy of Trigonella foenum-graecum Seed Extract in Reducing Metabolic and Inflammatory Alterations Associated With Menopause

    PubMed Central

    Abedinzade, Mahmood; Nasri, Sima; Jamal Omodi, Masome; Ghasemi, Elham; Ghorbani, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several experimental and clinical studies support beneficial effects of Trigonella foenum-graecum (fenugreek) in the management of metabolic diseases and inflammatory disorders. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of T. foenum-graecum seed extract in reducing the metabolic and inflammatory alternations associated with menopause. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 49 rats were divided into seven groups: (I) sham-control, (II) ovariectomized-control, (III and IV) ovariectomized treated with 50 and 150 mg/kg of T. foenum-graecum seed ethanolic extract, (V and VI) ovariectomized treated with 50 and 150 mg/kg of T. foenum-graecum hexanic extract, (VII) ovariectomized-positive control treated with 10 µg/kg of estradiol. The extracts were injected intraperitoneally one day after ovariectomy and the treatments were lasted for 42 days. Results: Fasting blood glucose and body weight gain increased significantly in the ovariectomized-control group compared with that in the sham animals (P < 0.05). Administration of estradiol and T. foenum-graecum (50 and 150 mg/dL of hexanic extract and 150 mg/kg of ethanolic extract) significantly diminished the increase in glucose and body weight (P < 0.05). The serum level of interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in the ovariectomized control group was significantly higher than those in the sham animals (P < 0.05). Both hexanic and ethanolic extracts as well as estradiol were able to decrease level of these cytokines in the serum of ovariectomized rats (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The results of the present study show that administration of T. foenum-graecum corrects metabolic and inflammatory alterations associated with ovariectomy and has a potential for the management of menopause. PMID:26732240

  6. Maternal Triclosan consumption alters the appetite regulatory network on Wistar rat offspring and predispose to metabolic syndrome in the adulthood.

    PubMed

    Rabaglino, María Belén; Moreira-Espinoza, María José; Lopez, Juan Pablo; Garcia, Nestor Horacio; Beltramo, Dante

    2016-11-30

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effects of maternal oral exposure to the antibacterial Triclosan (TCS) during gestation and lactation on the metabolic status of the adult offspring and on the expression of main genes controlling the appetite regulatory network. Pregnant rats were fed ad-libitum with ground food + TCS (1 mg/kg) from day 14 of gestation to day 20 of lactation (n=3) or ground food (n=3). After litter reduction, 12 males and 12 females born from the TCS exposed rats (TCS, n=24) or not (Control, n=24) were used to evaluate monthly body weight, food intake, plasma levels of cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides, and the hypothalamic mRNA expression of agouti-related protein (Agrp), neuropeptide Y (Npy) and propiomelanocortin (Pomc). Body weight for rats in the TCS group was 12.5% heavier for males at 4 months (p<0.001) and 19% heavier for females at 8 months (p=0.01). Food intake was significantly higher for rats in the TCS group at 5 months of age (p<0.01). Cholesterol and glucose levels were significantly higher for rats in the TCS group at 8 months (p<0.05). mRNA expression of Npy and Agrp were significantly increased in hypothalami of rats in the TCS group at 2 months for males or 8 months for females (p<0.05). In conclusion, low doses of oral TCS consumption by the pregnant and lactating dam increase the hypothalamic expression of the orexigenic neuropeptides Npy and Agrp in the offspring and alter their metabolic status during adulthood, resembling development of the metabolic syndrome.

  7. Selective alterations in cerebral metabolism within the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system produced by acute cocaine administration in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Porrino, L.J.; Domer, F.R.; Crane, A.M.; Sokoloff, L.

    1988-05-01

    The 2-(/sup 14/C)deoxyglucose method was used to examine the effects of acute intravenous administration of cocaine on local cerebral glucose utilization in rats. These effects were correlated with the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity assessed simultaneously in the same animals. At the lowest dose of cocaine, 0.5 mg/kg (1.47 mumol/kg), alterations in glucose utilization were restricted to the medial prefrontal cortex and nucleus accumbens. Metabolic activity at 1.0 mg/kg (2.9 mumol/kg) was altered in these structures, but in the substantia nigra reticulata and lateral habenula as well. The selectivity of cocaine's effects at low doses demonstrates the particular sensitivity of these structures to cocaine's actions in the brain. In contrast, 5.0 mg/kg (14.7 mumol/kg) produced widespread changes in glucose utilization, particularly in the extrapyramidal system. Only this dose significantly increased locomotor activity above levels in vehicle-treated controls. Rates of glucose utilization were positively correlated with locomotor activity in the globus pallidus, substantia nigra reticulata, and subthalamic nucleus, and negatively correlated in the lateral habenula.

  8. Lack of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Attenuates Experimental Food Allergy but Not Its Metabolic Alterations regarding Adipokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Nathália Vieira; Fonseca, Roberta Cristelli; Perez, Denise; Pereira, Rafaela Vaz Sousa; de Lima Alves, Juliana; Pinho, Vanessa; Faria, Ana Maria Caetano; Cara, Denise Carmona

    2016-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is known to be an important mediator of anaphylaxis. However, there is a lack of information in the literature about the role of PAF in food allergy. The aim of this work was to elucidate the participation of PAF during food allergy development and the consequent adipose tissue inflammation along with its alterations. Our data demonstrated that, both before oral challenge and after 7 days receiving ovalbumin (OVA) diet, OVA-sensitized mice lacking the PAF receptor (PAFR) showed a decreased level of anti-OVA IgE associated with attenuated allergic markers in comparison to wild type (WT) mice. Moreover, there was less body weight and adipose tissue loss in PAFR-deficient mice. However, some features of inflamed adipose tissue presented by sensitized PAFR-deficient and WT mice after oral challenge were similar, such as a higher rate of rolling leukocytes in this tissue and lower circulating levels of adipokines (resistin and adiponectin) in comparison to nonsensitized mice. Therefore, PAF signaling through PAFR is important for the allergic response to OVA but not for the adipokine alterations caused by this inflammatory process. Our work clarifies some effects of PAF during food allergy along with its role on the metabolic consequences of this inflammatory process. PMID:27314042

  9. Fluoride Intensifies Hypercaloric Diet-Induced ER Oxidative Stress and Alters Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Heloisa Aparecida Barbosa Silva; Dionizio, Aline Salgado; Fernandes, Mileni Silva; Araujo, Tamara Teodoro; Cestari, Tânia Mary; Buzalaf, Camila Peres; Iano, Flávia Godoy; Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    The role of fluoride (F) in oxidative stress is well reported, but its effects on the lipid metabolism has not been completely explored Background Here, we evaluated the relationship of diet and F-induced oxidative stress to lipid metabolism in the liver of rats eating normocaloric or hypercaloric diets for two time periods (20 or 60 days). Methods Seventy-two 21-day-old Wistar rats were divided into 2 groups (n = 36) based on the type of diet they were eating; each of these groups was then further divided into another two groups (n = 18) based on the time periods of either 20 or 60 days, for a total of four groups. Each of these was divided into 3 subgroups (n = 6 animals/subgroup), dependent on the dose of F administered in the drinking water (0 mg/L(control), 15 mg/L or 50 mg/L). After the experimental period, blood samples and the liver were collected. Plasma samples were analyzed for HDL, cholesterol and triglycerides. Western blots were performed to probe for GRP78, Erp29, SOD2, Apo-E and SREBP in hepatic tissues. Results As expected,the expression of target proteins involved in oxidative stress increased in the F-treated groups, especially in liver tissue obtained from animals eating a hypercaloric diet. Most changes in the lipid levels and pathological conditions were seen earlier in the time period, at day 20. The morphometric analyses showed a reduction in steatosis in groups on ahypercaloric diet and treated with 50 mg F/L compared to the control, while no changes were obtained in normocaloric-fed rats. Accordingly, plasma TG was reduced in the F-treated group. The reduced expression of Apo-E in a time- and diet-dependent pattern may account for the particular decrease in steatosis in hypercaloric-fed F-treated rats. Conclusions These results suggest that F changes liver lipid homeostasis, possibly because of the induction of oxidative stress, which seems to be higher in animals fed hypercaloric diets. PMID:27336443

  10. Distinct von Hippel-Lindau gene and hypoxia-regulated alterations in gene and protein expression patterns of renal cell carcinoma and their effects on metabolism.

    PubMed

    Leisz, Sandra; Schulz, Kristin; Erb, Susanne; Oefner, Peter; Dettmer, Katja; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M; Stehle, Franziska; Seliger, Barbara

    2015-05-10

    During the last decade the knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of the cellular adaption to hypoxia and the function of the "von Hippel Lindau" (VHL) protein in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has increased, but there exists little information about the overlap and differences in gene/protein expression of both processes. Therefore the aim of this study was to dissect VHL- and hypoxia-regulated alterations in the metabolism of human RCC using ome-based strategies. The effect of the VHL- and hypoxia-regulated altered gene/protein expression pattern on the cellular metabolism was analyzed by determination of glucose uptake, lactate secretion, extracellular pH, lactate dehydrogenase activity, amino acid content and ATP levels. By employing VHL-/VHL(+) RCC cells cultured under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, VHL-dependent, HIF-dependent as well as VHL-/HIF-independent alterations in the gene and protein expression patterns were identified and further validated in other RCC cell lines. The genes/proteins differentially expressed under these distinct conditions were mainly involved in the cellular metabolism, which was accompanied by an altered metabolism as well as changes in the abundance of amino acids in VHL-deficient cells. In conclusion, the study reveals similarities, but also differences in the genes and proteins controlled by VHL functionality and hypoxia thereby demonstrating differences in the metabolic switch of RCC under these conditions.

  11. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson ... Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons; 2014:chap ...

  12. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... El metabolismo <