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Sample records for alter rna duplex

  1. Deformability Calculation for Estimation of the Relative Stability of Chemically Modified RNA Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yoshiaki; Sekine, Mitsuo; Seio, Kohji

    2017-03-02

    Chemical modification of RNA duplexes alters their stability. We have attempted to develop a computational approach to estimate the thermal stability of chemically modified duplexes. These studies revealed that the deformability of chemically modified RNA duplexes, calculated from molecular dynamics simulations, could be used as a good indicator for estimating the effect of chemical modification on duplex thermal stability. This unit describes how deformability calculation can be applied to estimate the relative stability of chemically modified RNA duplexes. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Spermine Condenses DNA, but Not RNA Duplexes

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, Andrea M.; Tolokh, Igor S.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Baker, Nathan; Onufriev, Alexey V.; Pollack, Lois

    2017-01-01

    Interactions between the polyamine spermine and nucleic acids drive important cellular processes. Spermine condenses DNA, and some RNAs such as poly(rA):poly(rU). A large fraction of the spermine present in cells is bound to RNA, but apparently does not condense it. Here, we study the effect of spermine binding to short duplex RNA and DNA and compare our findings with predictions of molecular dynamics simulations. When small numbers of spermine are introduced, RNA with a designed sequence, containing a mixture of 14 GC pairs and 11 AU pairs, resists condensation relative to DNA of an equivalent sequence or to 25 base pair poly(rA):poly(rU) RNA. Comparison of wide-angle x-ray scattering profiles with simulation suggests that spermine is sequestered deep within the major groove of mixed sequence RNA, preventing condensation by limiting opportunities to bridge to other molecules as well as stabilizing the RNA by locking it into a particular conformation. In contrast, for DNA, simulations suggest that spermine binds external to the duplex, offering opportunities for intermolecular interaction. The goal of this study is to explain how RNA can remain soluble, and available for interaction with other molecules in the cell, despite the presence of spermine at concentrations high enough to precipitate DNA.

  3. Thermodynamics of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Pasternak, Anna; Wengel, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics provides insights into the influence of modified nucleotide residues on stability of nucleic acids and is crucial for designing duplexes with given properties. In this article, we introduce detailed thermodynamic analysis of RNA duplexes modified with unlocked nucleic acid (UNA) nucleotide residues. We investigate UNA single substitutions as well as model mismatch and dangling end effects. UNA residues placed in a central position makes RNA duplex structure less favourable by 4.0–6.6 kcal/mol. Slight destabilization, by ∼0.5–1.5 kcal/mol, is observed for 5′- or 3′-terminal UNA residues. Furthermore, thermodynamic effects caused by UNA residues are extremely additive with ΔG°37 conformity up to 98%. Direct mismatches involving UNA residues decrease the thermodynamic stability less than unmodified mismatches in RNA duplexes. Additionally, the presence of UNA residues adjacent to unpaired RNA residues reduces mismatch discrimination. Thermodynamic analysis of UNA 5′- and 3′-dangling ends revealed that stacking interactions of UNA residues are always less favourable than that of RNA residues. Finally, circular dichroism spectra imply no changes in overall A-form structure of UNA–RNA/RNA duplexes relative to the unmodified RNA duplexes. PMID:20562222

  4. Using small RNA deep sequencing data to detect siRNA duplexes induced by plant viruses

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) duplexes are produced in plants during virus infection, which are short (usually 21 to 24-base pair) double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) with several overhanging nucleotides on the 5' end and 3' end. The investigation of the siRNA duplexes is useful to better understand the R...

  5. Quantifying the Temperature Dependence of Glycine Betaine RNA Duplex Destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J.; Menssen, Ryan J.; Kohler, James M.; Schmidt, Elliot C.; Thomas, Alexandra L.

    2013-01-01

    Glycine betaine stabilizes folded protein structure due to its unfavorable thermodynamic interactions with amide oxygen and aliphatic carbon surface area exposed during protein unfolding. However, glycine betaine can attenuate nucleic acid secondary structure stability, although its mechanism of destabilization is not currently understood. In this work we quantify glycine betaine interactions with the surface area exposed during thermal denaturation of nine RNA dodecamer duplexes with guanine-cytosine (GC) contents of 17–100%. Hyperchromicity values indicate increasing glycine betaine molality attenuates stacking. Glycine betaine destabilizes higher GC content RNA duplexes to a greater extent than low GC content duplexes due to greater accumulation at the surface area exposed during unfolding. The accumulation is very sensitive to temperature and displays characteristic entropy-enthalpy compensation. Since the entropic contribution to the m-value (used to quantify GB interaction with the RNA solvent accessible surface area exposed during denaturation) is more dependent on temperature than the enthalpic contribution, higher GC content duplexes with their larger transition temperatures are destabilized to a greater extent than low GC content duplexes. The concentration of glycine betaine at the RNA surface area exposed during unfolding relative to bulk was quantified using the solute partitioning model. Temperature correction predicts a glycine betaine concentration at 25 °C to be nearly independent of GC content, indicating that glycine betaine destabilizes all sequences equally at this temperature. PMID:24219229

  6. Binding of tobamovirus replication protein with small RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Yukio; Inaba, Naoko; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; Takeda, Atsushi; Tagami, Yuko; Watanabe, Yuichiro

    2007-08-01

    The sequence profiles of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in Arabidopsis infected with the crucifer tobamovirus tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-Cg were determined by using a small RNA cloning technique. The majority of TMV-derived siRNAs were 21 nt in length. The size of the most abundant endogenous small RNAs in TMV-infected plants was 21 nt, whilst in mock-inoculated plants, it was 24 nt. Northern blot analysis revealed that some microRNAs (miRNAs) accumulated more in TMV-infected plants than in mock-inoculated plants. The question of whether the TMV-Cg-encoded 126K replication protein, an RNA-silencing suppressor, caused small RNA enrichment was examined. Transient expression of the replication protein did not change the pattern of miRNA processing. However, miRNA, miRNA* (the opposite strand of the miRNA duplex) and hairpin-derived siRNA all co-immunoprecipitated with the replication protein. Gel mobility-shift assays indicated that the replication protein binds small RNA duplexes. These results suggest that the tobamovirus replication protein functions as a silencing suppressor by binding small RNA duplexes, changing the small RNA profile in infected plants.

  7. NMR spectroscopy of RNA duplexes containing pseudouridine in supercooled water.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Kersten T; Skalicky, Jack J; Greenbaum, Nancy L

    2005-07-01

    We have performed NMR experiments in supercooled water in order to decrease the temperature-dependent exchange of protons in RNA duplexes. NMR spectra of aqueous samples of RNA in bundles of narrow capillaries that were acquired at temperatures as low as -18 degrees C reveal resonances of exchangeable protons not seen at higher temperatures. In particular, we detected the imino protons of terminal base pairs and the imino proton of a non-base-paired pseudouridine in a duplex representing the eukaryotic pre-mRNA branch site helix. Analysis of the temperature dependence of chemical shift changes (thermal coefficients) for imino protons corroborated hydrogen bonding patterns observed in the NMR-derived structural model of the branch site helix. The ability to observe non-base-paired imino protons of RNA is of significant value in structure determination of RNA motifs containing loop and bulge regions.

  8. Fluorescence-based duplex-quadruplex competition test to screen for telomerase RNA quadruplex ligands.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Laurent; Séosse, Aurélie; Mergny, Jean-Louis

    2011-03-01

    RNA and DNA guanine-rich sequences can adopt unusual structures called Guanine quadruplexes (G4). A quadruplex-prone RNA sequence is present at the 5'-end of the 451-nt-long RNA component of telomerase, hTERC. As this quadruplex may interfere with P1 helix formation, a key structural element for this RNA, we are seeking molecules that would alter this RNA duplex-quadruplex equilibrium. In this work, we present a fluorescence-based test designed to identify G4 ligands specific for the hTERC G-rich motif and that can prevent P1 helix formation. From an initial panel of 169 different molecules, 11 were found to be excellent P1 duplex inhibitors. Interestingly, some of the compounds not only exhibit a strong selectivity for quadruplexes over duplexes, but also demonstrated a preference for G4-RNA over all other quadruplexes. This test may easily be adapted to almost any quadruplex-forming sequence and converted into HTS format.

  9. All-atom crystal simulations of DNA and RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunmei; Janowski, Pawel A.; Case, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics simulations can complement experimental measures of structure and dynamics of biomolecules. The quality of such simulations can be tested by comparisons to models refined against experimental crystallographic data. Methods We report simulations of a DNA and RNA duplex in their crystalline environment. The calculations mimic the conditions for PDB entries 1D23 [d(CGATCGATCG)2] and 1RNA [(UUAUAUAUAUAUAA)2], and contain 8 unit cells, each with 4 copies of the Watson-Crick duplex; this yields in aggregate 64 µs of duplex sampling for DNA and 16 µs for RNA. Results The duplex structures conform much more closely to the average structure seen in the crystal than do structures extracted from a solution simulation with the same force field. Sequence-dependent variations in helical parameters, and in groove widths, are largely maintained in the crystal structure, but are smoothed out in solution. However, the integrity of the crystal lattice is slowly degraded in both simulations, with the result that the interfaces between chains become heterogeneous. This problem is more severe for the DNA crystal, which has fewer inter-chain hydrogen bond contacts than does the RNA crystal. Conclusions Crystal simulations using current force fields reproduce many features of observed crystal structures, but suffer from a gradual degradation of the integrity of the crystal lattice. General significance The results offer insights into force-field simulations that tests their ability to preserve weak interactions between chains, which will be of importance also in non-crystalline applications that involve binding and recognition. PMID:25255706

  10. Synthesis of native-like crosslinked duplex RNA and study of its properties.

    PubMed

    Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Hazemi, Madoka E; Thomas, Justin M; Monteleone, Leanna R; Yamada, Ken; Imoto, Shuhei; Beal, Peter A; Nagatsugi, Fumi

    2017-04-01

    A variety of enzymes have been found to interact with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in order to carry out its functions. We have endeavored to prepare the covalently crosslinked native-like duplex RNA, which could be useful for biochemical studies and RNA nanotechnology. In this study, the interstrand covalently linked duplex RNA was formed by a crosslinking reaction between vinylpurine (VP) and the target cytosine or uracil in RNA. We measured melting temperatures and CD spectra to identify the properties of the VP crosslinked duplex RNA. The crosslinking formation increased the thermodynamic stability without disturbing the natural conformation of dsRNA. In addition, a competitive binding experiment with the duplex RNA binding enzyme, ADAR2, showed the crosslinked dsRNA bound the protein with nearly the same binding affinity as the natural dsRNA, confirming that it has finely preserved the natural traits of duplex RNA.

  11. Aminoglycoside complexation with a DNA.RNA hybrid duplex: the thermodynamics of recognition and inhibition of RNA processing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Christopher M; Li, Tsai-Kun; Guo, Susan; Wang, Gang; Shallop, Anthony J; Pan, Weidong; Yang, Gengcheng; Gaffney, Barbara L; Jones, Roger A; Pilch, Daniel S

    2003-05-28

    Spectroscopic and calorimetric techniques were employed to characterize and contrast the binding of the aminoglycoside paromomycin to three octamer nucleic acid duplexes of identical sequence but different strand composition (a DNA.RNA hybrid duplex and the corresponding DNA.DNA and RNA.RNA duplexes). In addition, the impact of paromomycin binding on both RNase H- and RNase A-mediated cleavage of the RNA strand in the DNA.RNA duplex was also determined. Our results reveal the following significant features: (i) Paromomycin binding enhances the thermal stabilities of the RNA.RNA and DNA.RNA duplexes to similar extents, with this thermal enhancement being substantially greater in magnitude than that of the DNA.DNA duplex. (ii) Paromomycin binding to the DNA.RNA hybrid duplex induces CD changes consistent with a shift from an A-like to a more canonical A-conformation. (iii) Paromomycin binding to all three octamer duplexes is linked to the uptake of a similar number of protons, with the magnitude of this number being dependent on pH. (iv) The affinity of paromomycin for the three host duplexes follows the hierarchy, RNA.RNA > DNA.RNA > DNA.DNA. (v) The observed affinity of paromomycin for the RNA.RNA and DNA.RNA duplexes decreases with increasing pH. (vi) The binding of paromomycin to the DNA.RNA hybrid duplex inhibits both RNase H- and RNase A-mediated cleavage of the RNA strand. We discuss the implications of our combined results with regard to the specific targeting of DNA.RNA hybrid duplex domains and potential antiretroviral applications.

  12. Using hiCLIP to identify RNA duplexes that interact with a specific RNA-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Yoichiro; Chakrabarti, Anob M; Luscombe, Nicholas M; Ule, Jernej

    2017-03-01

    The structure of RNA molecules has a critical role in regulating gene expression, largely through influencing their interactions with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). RNA hybrid and individual-nucleotide resolution UV cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (hiCLIP) is a transcriptome-wide method of monitoring these interactions by identifying RNA duplexes bound by a specific RBP. The hiCLIP protocol consists of the following steps: in vivo cross-linking of RBPs to their bound RNAs; partial RNA digestion and purification of RNA duplexes interacting with the specific RBP using immunoprecipitation; ligation of the two arms of RNA duplexes via a linker; reverse transcription; cDNA library amplification; and finally high-throughput DNA sequencing. Mapping of the sequenced arms to a reference transcriptome identifies the exact locations of duplexes. hiCLIP data can directly identify all types of RNA duplexes bound by RBPs, including those that are challenging to predict computationally, such as intermolecular and long-range intramolecular duplexes. Moreover, the use of an adaptor that links the two arms of the RNA duplex permits hiCLIP to unambiguously identify the duplexes. Here we describe in detail the procedure for a hiCLIP experiment and the subsequent streamlined data analysis with an R package, 'hiclipr' (https://github.com/luslab/hiclipr/). Preparation of the library for high-throughput DNA sequencing takes ∼7 d and the basic bioinformatic pipeline takes 1 d.

  13. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations. PMID:28084308

  14. Hole Transport in A-form DNA/RNA Hybrid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Jiun Ru; Shao, Fangwei

    2017-01-01

    DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes are prevalent in many cellular functions and are an attractive target form for electrochemical biosensing and electric nanodevice. However the electronic conductivities of DNA/RNA hybrid duplex remain relatively unexplored and limited further technological applications. Here cyclopropyl-modified deoxyribose- and ribose-adenosines were developed to explore hole transport (HT) in both DNA duplex and DNA/RNA hybrids by probing the transient hole occupancies on adenine tracts. HT yields through both B-form and A-form double helixes displayed similar shallow distance dependence, although the HT yields of DNA/RNA hybrid duplexes were lower than those of DNA duplexes. The lack of oscillatory periods and direction dependence in HT through both helixes implied efficient hole propagation can be achieved via the hole delocalization and coherent HT over adenine tracts, regardless of the structural variations.

  15. l-Proline and RNA Duplex m-Value Temperature Dependence.

    PubMed

    Schwinefus, Jeffrey J; Baka, Nadia L; Modi, Kalpit; Billmeyer, Kaylyn N; Lu, Shutian; Haase, Lucas R; Menssen, Ryan J

    2017-08-03

    The temperature dependence of l-proline interactions with the RNA dodecamer duplex surface exposed after unfolding was quantified using thermal and isothermal titration denaturation monitored by uv-absorbance. The m-value quantifying proline interactions with the RNA duplex surface area exposed after unfolding was measured using RNA duplexes with GC content ranging between 17 and 83%. The m-values from thermal denaturation decreased with increasing GC content signifying increasingly favorable proline interactions with the exposed RNA surface area. However, m-values from isothermal titration denaturation at 25.0 °C were independent of GC content and less negative than those from thermal denaturation. The m-value from isothermal titration denaturation for a 50% GC RNA duplex decreased (became more negative) as the temperature increased and was in nearly exact agreement with the m-value from thermal denaturation. Since RNA duplex transition temperatures increased with GC content, the more favorable proline interactions with the high GC content duplex surface area observed from thermal denaturation resulted from the temperature dependence of proline interactions rather than the RNA surface chemical composition. The enthalpy contribution to the m-value was positive and small (indicating a slight increase in duplex unfolding enthalpy with proline) while the entropic contribution to the m-value was positive and increased with temperature. Our results will facilitate proline's use as a probe of solvent accessible surface area changes during biochemical reactions at different reaction temperatures.

  16. Hoogsteen-Paired Homopurine [RP-PS]-DNA and Homopyrimidine RNA Strands Form a Thermally Stable Parallel Duplex

    PubMed Central

    Guga, Piotr; Janicka, Magdalena; Maciaszek, Anna; Rębowska, Beata; Nowak, Genowefa

    2007-01-01

    Homopurine deoxyribonucleoside phosphorothioates possessing all internucleotide linkages of RP configuration form a duplex with an RNA or 2′-OMe-RNA strand with Hoogsteen complementarity. The duplexes formed with RNA templates are thermally stable at pH 5.3, while those formed with a 2′-OMe-RNA are stable at neutrality. Melting temperature and fluorescence quenching experiments indicate that the strands are parallel. Remarkably, these duplexes are thermally more stable than parallel Hoogsteen duplexes and antiparallel Watson-Crick duplexes formed by unmodified homopurine DNA molecules of the same sequence with corresponding RNA templates. PMID:17693472

  17. Hoogsteen-paired homopurine [RP-PS]-DNA and homopyrimidine RNA strands form a thermally stable parallel duplex.

    PubMed

    Guga, Piotr; Janicka, Magdalena; Maciaszek, Anna; Rebowska, Beata; Nowak, Genowefa

    2007-11-15

    Homopurine deoxyribonucleoside phosphorothioates possessing all internucleotide linkages of R(P) configuration form a duplex with an RNA or 2'-OMe-RNA strand with Hoogsteen complementarity. The duplexes formed with RNA templates are thermally stable at pH 5.3, while those formed with a 2'-OMe-RNA are stable at neutrality. Melting temperature and fluorescence quenching experiments indicate that the strands are parallel. Remarkably, these duplexes are thermally more stable than parallel Hoogsteen duplexes and antiparallel Watson-Crick duplexes formed by unmodified homopurine DNA molecules of the same sequence with corresponding RNA templates.

  18. Structural basis for duplex RNA recognition and cleavage by Archaeoglobus fulgidus C3PO

    PubMed Central

    Parizotto, Eneida A; Lowe, Edward D; Parker, James S

    2013-01-01

    Oligomeric complexes of Trax and Translin proteins, known as C3POs, participate in a variety of eukaryotic nucleic acid metabolism pathways including RNAi and tRNA processing. In RNAi in humans and Drosophila, C3PO activates pre-RISC by removing the passenger strand of the siRNA precursor duplex using nuclease activity present in Trax. It is not known how C3POs engage with nucleic acid substrates. Here we identify a single protein from Archaeoglobus fulgidus that assembles into an octamer with striking similarity to human C3PO. The structure in complex with duplex RNA reveals that the octamer entirely encapsulates a single thirteen base-pair RNA duplex inside a large inner cavity. Trax-like subunit catalytic sites target opposite strands of the duplex for cleavage, separated by seven base pairs. The structure provides insight into the mechanism of RNA recognition and cleavage by an archaeal C3PO-like complex. PMID:23353787

  19. Cell cycle expression of RNA duplex unwindase activity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagnor, R.W.; Nishikura, K.

    1988-02-01

    An RNA duplex unwindase activity has been found by using an in vitro assay with various types of mammalian, somatic cells, including HeLa, mouse plasmacytoma, and Burkitt lymphoma. The unwindase activity is very low in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells arrested into quiescence, but increases when the cells are released into renewed growth by serum. In addition, a gel retardation assay proved to be specific and sensitive for detection of RNA duplex-unwindase complexes.

  20. 2-Thiouracil deprived of thiocarbonyl function preferentially base pairs with guanine rather than adenine in RNA and DNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Sochacka, Elzbieta; Szczepanowski, Roman H; Cypryk, Marek; Sobczak, Milena; Janicka, Magdalena; Kraszewska, Karina; Bartos, Paulina; Chwialkowska, Anna; Nawrot, Barbara

    2015-03-11

    2-Thiouracil-containing nucleosides are essential modified units of natural and synthetic nucleic acids. In particular, the 5-substituted-2-thiouridines (S2Us) present in tRNA play an important role in tuning the translation process through codon-anticodon interactions. The enhanced thermodynamic stability of S2U-containing RNA duplexes and the preferred S2U-A versus S2U-G base pairing are appreciated characteristics of S2U-modified molecular probes. Recently, we have demonstrated that 2-thiouridine (alone or within an RNA chain) is predominantly transformed under oxidative stress conditions to 4-pyrimidinone riboside (H2U) and not to uridine. Due to the important biological functions and various biotechnological applications for sulfur-containing nucleic acids, we compared the thermodynamic stabilities of duplexes containing desulfured products with those of 2-thiouracil-modified RNA and DNA duplexes. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments and theoretical calculations demonstrate that upon 2-thiouracil desulfuration to 4-pyrimidinone, the preferred base pairing of S2U with adenosine is lost, with preferred base pairing with guanosine observed instead. Therefore, biological processes and in vitro assays in which oxidative desulfuration of 2-thiouracil-containing components occurs may be altered. Moreover, we propose that the H2U-G base pair is a suitable model for investigation of the preferred recognition of 3'-G-ending versus A-ending codons by tRNA wobble nucleosides, which may adopt a 4-pyrimidinone-type structural motif.

  1. Structure of an A-form RNA duplex obtained by degradation of 6S RNA in a crystallization droplet

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Jiro; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Willkomm, Dagmar K.; Hartmann, Roland K.; Westhof, Eric

    2013-01-01

    In the course of a crystallographic study of a 132 nt variant of Aquifex aeolicus 6S RNA, a crystal structure of an A-form RNA duplex containing 12 base pairs was solved at a resolution of 2.6 Å. In fact, the RNA duplex is part of the 6S RNA and was obtained by accidental but precise degradation of the 6S RNA in a crystallization droplet. 6S RNA degradation was confirmed by microscopic observation of crystals and gel electrophoresis of crystallization droplets. The RNA oligomers obtained form regular A-form duplexes containing three GoU wobble-type base pairs, one of which engages in intermolecular contacts through a ribose-zipper motif at the crystal-packing interface. PMID:23722840

  2. Influence of two bulge loops on the stability of RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Claire V; Jones, Laura E; Morelli, Jessica N; Mastrogiacomo, Eric M; Porterfield, Claire; Kent, Jessica L; Serra, Martin J

    2017-02-01

    Fifty-three RNA duplexes containing two single nucleotide bulge loops were optically melted in 1 M NaCl in order to determine the thermodynamic parameters ΔH°, ΔS°, ΔG°37, and TM for each duplex. Because of the large number of possible combinations and lack of sequence effects observed previously, we limited our initial investigation to adenosine bulges, the most common naturally occurring bulge. For example, the following duplexes were investigated: 5'GGCAXYAGGC/3'CCG YX CCG, 5'GGCAXY GCC/3'CCG YXACGG, and 5'GGC XYAGCC/3'CCGAYX CGG. The identity of XY (where XY are Watson-Crick base pairs) and the total number of base pairs in the terminal and central stems were varied. As observed for duplexes with a single bulge loop, the effect of the two bulge loops on duplex stability is primarily influenced by non-nearest neighbor interactions. In particular, the stability of the stems influences the destabilization of the duplex by the inserted bulge loops. The model proposed to predict the influence of multiple bulge loops on duplex stability suggests that the destabilization of each bulge is related to the stability of the adjacent stems. A database of RNA secondary structures was examined to determine the naturally occurring abundance of duplexes containing multiple bulge loops. Of the 2000 examples found in the database, over 65% of the two bulge loops occur within 3 base pairs of each other. A database of RNA three-dimensional structures was examined to determine the structure of duplexes containing two single nucleotide bulge loops. The structures of the bulge loops are described.

  3. Nearest-neighbor parameters for 7-deaza-adenosine·uridine base pairs in RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Katherine E; Znosko, Brent M

    2016-06-01

    One of the major limitations in RNA structure prediction is the lack of information about the effect of nonstandard nucleotides on stability. The nonstandard nucleotide 7-deaza-adenosine (7DA) is a naturally occurring analog of adenosine that has been studied for medicinal purposes and is commonly referred to as tubercidin. In 7DA, the nitrogen in the 7 position of adenosine is replaced by a carbon. Differences in RNA duplex stability due to the removal of this nitrogen can be attributed to a possible change in hydration and a difference in base stacking interactions resulting from changes in the electrostatics of the ring. In order to determine how 7DA affects the stability of RNA, optical melting experiments were conducted on RNA duplexes that contain either internal or terminal 7DA·U pairs with all possible nearest-neighbor combinations. On average, duplexes containing 7DA·U pairs are 0.43 and 0.07 kcal/mol less stable than what is predicted for the same duplex containing internal and terminal A-U pairs, respectively. Thermodynamic parameters for all nearest-neighbor combinations of 7DA·U pairs were derived from the data. These parameters can be used to more accurately predict the secondary structure and stability of RNA duplexes containing 7DA·U pairs. © 2016 Richardson and Znosko; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  4. Use of duplex rigidity for stability and specificity in RNA tertiary structure.

    PubMed

    Narlikar, G J; Bartley, L E; Herschlag, D

    2000-05-23

    The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme's oligonucleotide substrate, CCCUCUA(5), forms six base pairs with the ribozyme's internal guide sequence (IGS, 5'GGAGGG) to give the P1 duplex, and this duplex then docks into the active site via tertiary interactions. Shortening the substrate by three residues to give UCUA(5) reduces the equilibrium constant for P1 docking by approximately 200-fold even though UCUA(5) retains all the functional groups known to be involved in tertiary interactions [Narlikar, G. J., Bartley, L. E., Khosla, M., and Herschlag, D. (1999) Biochemistry 38, 14192-14204]. Here we show that the P1 duplex formed with UCUA(5) engages in all of the major tertiary interactions made by the standard P1 duplex. This suggests that the destabilization is not due to disruption of specific tertiary interactions. It therefore appears that the weaker docking of UCUA(5) arises from the increased conformational freedom of the undocked P1 duplex, which has three unpaired IGS residues and thus a larger entropic cost for docking. Further, a 2'-methoxy substitution at an IGS residue that is base-paired in the standard P1 duplex with CCCUCUA(5) but unpaired in the P1 duplex with UCUA(5) destabilizes docking of the standard P1 duplex approximately 300-fold more than it destabilizes docking of the P1 duplex formed with UCUA(5). These results suggest that fixation of groups in the context of a rigid duplex may be a general strategy used by RNA to substantially increase interaction specificity, both by aiding binding of the desired functional groups and by increasing the energetic cost of forming alternative interactions.

  5. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Xing, Na; Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility.

  6. Ultrasensitive Detection of RNA and DNA Viruses Simultaneously Using Duplex UNDP-PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zengguo; Zhang, Xiujuan; Zhao, Xiaomin; Du, Qian; Chang, Lingling; Tong, Dewen

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infection of multiple viruses is common in modern intensive pig rearing. However, there are no methods available to detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system in preclinical level. In this study, we aimed to develop a duplex ultrasensitive nanoparticle DNA probe-based PCR assay (duplex UNDP-PCR) that was able to simultaneously detect DNA and RNA viruses in the same reaction system. PCV2 and TGEV are selected as representatives of the two different types of viruses. PCV2 DNA and TGEV RNA were simultaneously released from the serum sample by boiling with lysis buffer, then magnetic beads and gold nanoparticles coated with single and/or duplex specific probes for TGEV and PCV2 were added to form a sandwich-like complex with nucleic acids released from viruses. After magnetic separation, DNA barcodes specific for PCV2 and TGEV were eluted using DTT and characterized by specific PCR assay for specific DNA barcodes subsequently. The duplex UNDP-PCR showed similar sensitivity as that of single UNDP-PCR and was able to detect 20 copies each of PCV2 and TGEV in the serum, showing approximately 250-fold more sensitivity than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR assays. No cross-reaction was observed with other viruses. The positive detection rate of single MMPs- and duplex MMPs-based duplex UNDP-PCR was identical, with 29.6% for PCV2, 9.3% for TGEV and 3.7% for PCV2 and TGEV mixed infection. This duplex UNDP-PCR assay could detect TGEV (RNA virus) and PCV2 (DNA virus) from large-scale serum samples simultaneously without the need for DNA/RNA extraction, purification and reverse transcription of RNA, and showed a significantly increased positive detection rate for PCV2 (29%) and TGEV (11.7%) preclinical infection than conventional duplex PCR/RT-PCR. Therefore, the established duplex UNDP-PCR is a rapid and economical detection method, exhibiting high sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility. PMID:26544710

  7. RNA chaperones stimulate formation and yield of the U3 snoRNA-pre-rRNA duplexes needed for eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gérczei, Tímea; Shah, Binal N.; Manzo, Anthony J.; Walter, Nils G.; Correll, Carl C.

    2010-01-01

    To satisfy the high demand for ribosome synthesis in rapidly growing eukaryotic cells, short duplexes between the U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) and the precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA) must form quickly and with high yield. These interactions, designated the U3-ETS and U3-18S duplexes, are essential to initiate the processing of small subunit rRNA. Previously, we showed in vitro that duplexes corresponding to those in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are only observed after addition of one of two proteins: Imp3p or Imp4p. Here, we used fluorescence-based and other in vitro assays to determine whether these proteins possess RNA chaperone activities and to assess whether these activities are sufficient to satisfy the duplex yield and rate requirements expected in vivo. Assembly of both proteins with the U3 snoRNA into a chaperone complex destabilizes a U3-stem structure, apparently to expose its 18S base-pairing site. As a result, the chaperone complex accelerates formation of the U3-18S duplex from an undetectable rate to one comparable to the intrinsic rate observed for hybridizing short duplexes. The chaperone complex also stabilizes the U3-ETS duplex by 2.7 kcal/mol. These chaperone activities provide high U3-ETS duplex yield and rapid U3-18S duplex formation over a broad concentration range to help ensure that the U3-pre-rRNA interactions limit neither ribosome biogenesis nor rapid cell growth. The thermodynamic and kinetic framework used is general and thus suitable to investigate the mechanism of action of other RNA chaperones. PMID:19482034

  8. Dwell-Time Distribution, Long Pausing and Arrest of Single-Ribosome Translation through the mRNA Duplex.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2015-10-09

    Proteins in the cell are synthesized by a ribosome translating the genetic information encoded on the single-stranded messenger RNA (mRNA). It has been shown that the ribosome can also translate through the duplex region of the mRNA by unwinding the duplex. Here, based on our proposed model of the ribosome translation through the mRNA duplex we study theoretically the distribution of dwell times of the ribosome translation through the mRNA duplex under the effect of a pulling force externally applied to the ends of the mRNA to unzip the duplex. We provide quantitative explanations of the available single molecule experimental data on the distribution of dwell times with both short and long durations, on rescuing of the long paused ribosomes by raising the pulling force to unzip the duplex, on translational arrests induced by the mRNA duplex and Shine-Dalgarno(SD)-like sequence in the mRNA. The functional consequences of the pauses or arrests caused by the mRNA duplex and the SD sequence are discussed and compared with those obtained from other types of pausing, such as those induced by "hungry" codons or interactions of specific sequences in the nascent chain with the ribosomal exit tunnel.

  9. Base pairing and structural insights into the 5-formylcytosine in RNA duplex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Luo, Zhipu; He, Kaizhang; Delaney, Michael O.; Chen, Doris; Sheng, Jia

    2016-01-01

    5-Formylcytidine (f5C), a previously discovered natural nucleotide in the mitochondrial tRNA of many species including human, has been recently detected as the oxidative product of 5-methylcytidine (m5C) through 5-hydroxymethylcytidine (hm5C) in total RNA of mammalian cells. The discovery indicated that these cytosine derivatives in RNA might also play important epigenetic roles similar as in DNA, which has been intensively investigated in the past few years. In this paper, we studied the base pairing specificity of f5C in different RNA duplex contexts. We found that the 5-formyl group could increase duplex thermal stability and enhance base pairing specificity. We present three high-resolution crystal structures of an octamer RNA duplex [5′-GUA(f5C)GUAC-3′]2 that have been solved under three crystallization conditions with different buffers and pH values. Our results showed that the 5-formyl group is located in the same plane as the cytosine base and forms an intra-residue hydrogen bond with the amino group in the N4 position. In addition, this modification increases the base stacking between the f5C and the neighboring bases while not causing significant global and local structure perturbations. This work provides insights into the effects of 5-formylcytosine on RNA duplex. PMID:27079978

  10. Ethidium and proflavine binding to a 2',5'-linked RNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Eric D; Hud, Nicholas V

    2006-12-06

    Despite over 40 years of physical investigations, fundamental questions persist regarding the energetics of RNA and DNA intercalation. The dramatic unwinding of a nucleic acid duplex upon intercalation immediately suggests that the nucleic acid backbone should play a significant role in dictating the free energy of intercalation. However, the contribution of the backbone to intercalation free energy is difficult to appreciate given the intertwined energetics associated with intercalation (e.g., pi-pi stacking and solvent effects). Fluorescence titrations were used to determine the association constants of two known intercalators, proflavine and ethidium, for duplex 2',5'-linked RNA. Proflavine was found to bind 2',5' RNA with an association constant 25-fold greater than that measured for standard, 3',5'-linked RNA. In contrast, ethidium binds 2',5' RNA less favorably than standard RNA.

  11. 2-Thiouracil deprived of thiocarbonyl function preferentially base pairs with guanine rather than adenine in RNA and DNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Sochacka, Elzbieta; Szczepanowski, Roman H.; Cypryk, Marek; Sobczak, Milena; Janicka, Magdalena; Kraszewska, Karina; Bartos, Paulina; Chwialkowska, Anna; Nawrot, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    2-Thiouracil-containing nucleosides are essential modified units of natural and synthetic nucleic acids. In particular, the 5-substituted-2-thiouridines (S2Us) present in tRNA play an important role in tuning the translation process through codon–anticodon interactions. The enhanced thermodynamic stability of S2U-containing RNA duplexes and the preferred S2U-A versus S2U-G base pairing are appreciated characteristics of S2U-modified molecular probes. Recently, we have demonstrated that 2-thiouridine (alone or within an RNA chain) is predominantly transformed under oxidative stress conditions to 4-pyrimidinone riboside (H2U) and not to uridine. Due to the important biological functions and various biotechnological applications for sulfur-containing nucleic acids, we compared the thermodynamic stabilities of duplexes containing desulfured products with those of 2-thiouracil-modified RNA and DNA duplexes. Differential scanning calorimetry experiments and theoretical calculations demonstrate that upon 2-thiouracil desulfuration to 4-pyrimidinone, the preferred base pairing of S2U with adenosine is lost, with preferred base pairing with guanosine observed instead. Therefore, biological processes and in vitro assays in which oxidative desulfuration of 2-thiouracil-containing components occurs may be altered. Moreover, we propose that the H2U-G base pair is a suitable model for investigation of the preferred recognition of 3′-G-ending versus A-ending codons by tRNA wobble nucleosides, which may adopt a 4-pyrimidinone-type structural motif. PMID:25690900

  12. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  13. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  14. Computational exploration of mobile ion distributions around RNA duplex

    PubMed Central

    Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Elber, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Atomically detailed distributions of ions around an A-form RNA are computed. Different mixtures of monovalent and divalent ions are considered explicitly. Studies of tightly bound and of diffusive (but bound) ions around 25 base pairs RNA are conducted in explicit solvent. Replica exchange simulations provide detailed equilibrium distributions with moderate computing resources (20 nanoseconds of simulation using 64 replicas). The simulations show distinct behavior of single and doubly charged cations. Binding of Mg2+ ion includes tight binding to specific sites while Na+ binds only diffusively. The tight binding of Mg2+ is with a solvation shell while Na+ can bind directly to RNA. Negative mobile ions can be found near the RNA but must be assisted by proximate and mobile cations. At distances larger than 16Å from the RNA center, a model of RNA as charged rod in a continuum of ionic solution provides quantitative description of the ion density (the same as in atomically detailed simulation). At shorter distances, the structure of RNA (and ions) have significant impact on the pair correlation functions. Predicted binding sites of Mg2+ at the RNA surface are in accord with structures from crystallography. Electric field relaxation is investigated. The relaxation due to solution rearrangements is completed in tens of picoseconds, while the contribution of RNA tumbling continues to a few nanoseconds. PMID:20518549

  15. Early evaluation of renal hemodynamic alterations in type I diabetes mellitus with duplex ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Saif, Aasem; Soliman, Neveen A; Abdel-Hameed, Alaa

    2010-03-01

    To evaluate the role of renal duplex ultrasonography in the detection of early alteration of renal blood flow in type I diabetic patients, we studied with duplex ultrasound 32 patients with type I diabetes mellitus (19 males, 13 females, age range 8-19 years) and 35 age and sex-matched controls. The resistivity indices (RIs) and pulsatility indices (PIs) of the main renal as well as intra-renal arteries were calculated. Compared with the healthy control subjects, diabetic patients had significantly higher resistivity indices (RIs) in the intrarenal (segmental, arcuate and interlobar) arteries (P= 0.001). The study, also revealed a significantly positive correlation between the RIs in the intrarenal arteries in diabetics and the albumin/creatinine ratio (r= 0.54, 0.52 and 0.51 respectively), glycated hemoglobin (r= 0.61, 0.59 and 0.63 respectively), as well as the estimated GFR (e-GFR) (r= 0.53, 0.51 and 0.57 respectively). We conclude that the current study documented early intra-renal hemodynamic alterations in the form of pathologically elevated intrarenal RIs. This denotes the potential usefulness of duplex evaluation of the intrarenal arteries, as a noninvasive procedure, for monitoring type 1 diabetic patients to predict those at risk of diabetic nephropathy.

  16. Formation of sheared G:A base pairs in an RNA duplex modelled after ribozymes, as revealed by NMR.

    PubMed Central

    Katahira, M; Kanagawa, M; Sato, H; Uesugi, S; Fujii, S; Kohno, T; Maeda, T

    1994-01-01

    The thermal stability and structure of an RNA duplex, r(GGACGAGUCC)2, the base sequence of which was modelled after both a hammerhead ribozyme and a lead ribozyme, were studied by CD and NMR. We previously demonstrated that the corresponding DNA duplex, d(GGACGAGTCC)2, formed unique 'sheared' G:A base pairs, where an amino proton, instead of an imino proton, of G is involved in the hydrogen bonding, and G and A bases are arranged 'side by side' instead of 'head to head' (Nucleic Acids Res. (1993) 21, 5418-5424). CD melting profiles showed that the RNA duplex is thermally more stable than the corresponding DNA duplex. NMR studies revealed that sheared G:A base pairs are formed in the RNA duplex, too, although the overall structure of the RNA is the A form, which differs from the B form taken on by the corresponding DNA. A model building study confirmed that sheared G:A base pairs can be accommodated in the double helical structure of the A form. A difference between the RNA and DNA duplexes in the stacking interaction involving G:A mismatch bases is also suggested. The demonstration that sheared G:A base pairs can be formed not only in DNA but also in RNA suggests that this base pairing plays an important role regarding the RNA structure. PMID:7519767

  17. Formation of sheared G:A base pairs in an RNA duplex modelled after ribozymes, as revealed by NMR.

    PubMed

    Katahira, M; Kanagawa, M; Sato, H; Uesugi, S; Fujii, S; Kohno, T; Maeda, T

    1994-07-25

    The thermal stability and structure of an RNA duplex, r(GGACGAGUCC)2, the base sequence of which was modelled after both a hammerhead ribozyme and a lead ribozyme, were studied by CD and NMR. We previously demonstrated that the corresponding DNA duplex, d(GGACGAGTCC)2, formed unique 'sheared' G:A base pairs, where an amino proton, instead of an imino proton, of G is involved in the hydrogen bonding, and G and A bases are arranged 'side by side' instead of 'head to head' (Nucleic Acids Res. (1993) 21, 5418-5424). CD melting profiles showed that the RNA duplex is thermally more stable than the corresponding DNA duplex. NMR studies revealed that sheared G:A base pairs are formed in the RNA duplex, too, although the overall structure of the RNA is the A form, which differs from the B form taken on by the corresponding DNA. A model building study confirmed that sheared G:A base pairs can be accommodated in the double helical structure of the A form. A difference between the RNA and DNA duplexes in the stacking interaction involving G:A mismatch bases is also suggested. The demonstration that sheared G:A base pairs can be formed not only in DNA but also in RNA suggests that this base pairing plays an important role regarding the RNA structure.

  18. The DEAH-box protein PRP22 is an ATPase that mediates ATP-dependent mRNA release from the spliceosome and unwinds RNA duplexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J D; Jankowsky, E; Company, M; Pyle, A M; Abelson, J N

    1998-01-01

    Of the proteins required for pre-mRNA splicing, at least four, the DEAH-box proteins, are closely related due to the presence of a central 'RNA helicase-like' region, and extended homology through a large portion of the protein. A major unresolved question is the function of these proteins. Indirect evidence suggests that several of these proteins are catalysts for important structural rearrangements in the spliceosome. However, the mechanism for the proposed alterations is presently unknown. We present evidence that PRP22, a DEAH-box protein required for mRNA release from the spliceosome, unwinds RNA duplexes in a concentration- and ATP-dependent manner. This demonstrates that PRP22 can modify RNA structure directly. We also show that the PRP22-dependent release of mRNA from the spliceosome is an ATP-dependent process and that recombinant PRP22 is an ATPase. Non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs did not substitute for ATP in the RNA-unwinding reaction, suggesting that ATP hydrolysis is required for this reaction. Specific mutation of a putative ATP phosphate-binding motif in the recombinant protein eliminated the ATPase and RNA-unwinding capacity. Significantly, these data suggest that the DEAH-box proteins act directly on RNA substrates within the spliceosome. PMID:9582286

  19. Alternative RISC assembly: Binding and repression of microRNA–mRNA duplexes by human Ago proteins

    PubMed Central

    Janas, Maja M.; Wang, Bingbing; Harris, Abigail S.; Aguiar, Mike; Shaffer, Jonathan M.; Subrahmanyam, Yerramilli V.B.K.; Behlke, Mark A.; Wucherpfennig, Kai W.; Gygi, Steven P.; Gagnon, Etienne; Novina, Carl D.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally regulate protein output from the majority of human mRNAs. In contrast to the consensus view that all miRNAs are associated with Argonaute (Ago) proteins, we determine that miRNAs are expressed in a 13-fold excess relative to Agos in HeLa cells and that miRNAs are bound to mRNAs in a sevenfold excess relative to Agos, implying the existence of miRNA–mRNA duplexes not stoichiometrically bound by Agos. We show that all four human Agos can repress miRNA–mRNA duplexes, but only Ago2 can cleave small interfering RNA–mRNA duplexes in vitro. We visualize direct Ago binding to miRNA–mRNA duplexes in live cells using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy. In contrast to the consensus view that Agos bind miRNA duplexes, these data demonstrate that Agos can bind and repress miRNA–mRNA duplexes and support a model of catalytic Ago function in translational repression. PMID:23019594

  20. The relative flexibility of B-DNA and A-RNA duplexes: database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Alberto; Noy, Agnes; Lankas, Filip; Luque, F. Javier; Orozco, Modesto

    2004-01-01

    An extensive analysis of structural databases is carried out to investigate the relative flexibility of B-DNA and A-RNA duplexes in crystal form. Our results show that the general anisotropic concept of flexibility is not very useful to compare the deformability of B-DNA and A-RNA duplexes, since the flexibility patterns of B-DNA and A-RNA are quite different. In other words, ‘flexibility’ is a dangerous word for describing macromolecules, unless it is clearly defined. A few soft essential movements explain most of the natural flexibility of A-RNA, whereas many are necessary for B-DNA. Essential movements occurring in naked B-DNAs are identical to those necessary to deform DNA in DNA–protein complexes, which suggest that evolution has designed DNA–protein complexes so that B-DNA is deformed according to its natural tendency. DNA is generally more flexible, but for some distortions A-RNA is easier to deform. Local stiffness constants obtained for naked B-DNAs and DNA complexes are very close, demonstrating that global distortions in DNA necessary for binding to proteins are the result of the addition of small concerted deformations at the base-pair level. Finally, it is worth noting that in general the picture of the relative deformability of A-RNA and DNA derived from database analysis agrees very well with that derived from state of the art molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. PMID:15562006

  1. MiRduplexSVM: A High-Performing MiRNA-Duplex Prediction and Evaluation Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Karathanasis, Nestoras; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-01-01

    We address the problem of predicting the position of a miRNA duplex on a microRNA hairpin via the development and application of a novel SVM-based methodology. Our method combines a unique problem representation and an unbiased optimization protocol to learn from mirBase19.0 an accurate predictive model, termed MiRduplexSVM. This is the first model that provides precise information about all four ends of the miRNA duplex. We show that (a) our method outperforms four state-of-the-art tools, namely MaturePred, MiRPara, MatureBayes, MiRdup as well as a Simple Geometric Locator when applied on the same training datasets employed for each tool and evaluated on a common blind test set. (b) In all comparisons, MiRduplexSVM shows superior performance, achieving up to a 60% increase in prediction accuracy for mammalian hairpins and can generalize very well on plant hairpins, without any special optimization. (c) The tool has a number of important applications such as the ability to accurately predict the miRNA or the miRNA*, given the opposite strand of a duplex. Its performance on this task is superior to the 2nts overhang rule commonly used in computational studies and similar to that of a comparative genomic approach, without the need for prior knowledge or the complexity of performing multiple alignments. Finally, it is able to evaluate novel, potential miRNAs found either computationally or experimentally. In relation with recent confidence evaluation methods used in miRBase, MiRduplexSVM was successful in identifying high confidence potential miRNAs. PMID:25961860

  2. Crystal structure of a model branchpoint-U2 snRNA duplex containing bulged adenosines.

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, J A; Rosbash, M; Schultz, S C

    2001-01-01

    Bulged nucleotides play a variety of important roles in RNA structure and function, frequently forming tertiary interactions and sometimes even participating in RNA catalysis. In pre-mRNA splicing, the U2 snRNA base pairs with the intron branchpoint sequence (BPS) to form a short RNA duplex that contains a bulged adenosine that ultimately serves as the nucleophile that attacks the 5' splice site. We have determined a 2.18-A resolution crystal structure of a self-complementary RNA designed to mimic the highly conserved yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) branchpoint sequence (5'-UACUAACGUAGUA with the BPS italicized and the branchsite adenosine underlined) base paired with its complementary sequence from U2 snRNA. The structure shows a nearly ideal A-form helix from which two unpaired adenosines flip out. Although the adenosine adjacent to the branchsite adenosine is the one bulged out in the structure described here, either of these adenosines can serve as the nucleophile in mammalian but not in yeast pre-mRNA splicing. In addition, the packing of the bulged RNA helices within the crystal reveals a novel RNA tertiary interaction in which three RNA helices interact through bulged adenosines in the absence of any divalent metal ions. PMID:11350032

  3. Structural basis for RNA-duplex recognition and unwinding by the DEAD-box helicase Mss116p.

    PubMed

    Mallam, Anna L; Del Campo, Mark; Gilman, Benjamin; Sidote, David J; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2012-10-04

    DEAD-box proteins are the largest family of nucleic acid helicases, and are crucial to RNA metabolism throughout all domains of life. They contain a conserved 'helicase core' of two RecA-like domains (domains (D)1 and D2), which uses ATP to catalyse the unwinding of short RNA duplexes by non-processive, local strand separation. This mode of action differs from that of translocating helicases and allows DEAD-box proteins to remodel large RNAs and RNA-protein complexes without globally disrupting RNA structure. However, the structural basis for this distinctive mode of RNA unwinding remains unclear. Here, structural, biochemical and genetic analyses of the yeast DEAD-box protein Mss116p indicate that the helicase core domains have modular functions that enable a novel mechanism for RNA-duplex recognition and unwinding. By investigating D1 and D2 individually and together, we find that D1 acts as an ATP-binding domain and D2 functions as an RNA-duplex recognition domain. D2 contains a nucleic-acid-binding pocket that is formed by conserved DEAD-box protein sequence motifs and accommodates A-form but not B-form duplexes, providing a basis for RNA substrate specificity. Upon a conformational change in which the two core domains join to form a 'closed state' with an ATPase active site, conserved motifs in D1 promote the unwinding of duplex substrates bound to D2 by excluding one RNA strand and bending the other. Our results provide a comprehensive structural model for how DEAD-box proteins recognize and unwind RNA duplexes. This model explains key features of DEAD-box protein function and affords a new perspective on how the evolutionarily related cores of other RNA and DNA helicases diverged to use different mechanisms.

  4. Differential stability of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA hybrid duplexes: roles of structure, pseudohydrogen bonding, hydration, ion uptake and flexibility.

    PubMed

    Watts, Jonathan K; Martín-Pintado, Nerea; Gómez-Pinto, Irene; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Portella, Guillem; Orozco, Modesto; González, Carlos; Damha, Masad J

    2010-04-01

    Hybrids of RNA with arabinonucleic acids 2'F-ANA and ANA have very similar structures but strikingly different thermal stabilities. We now present a thorough study combining NMR and other biophysical methods together with state-of-the-art theoretical calculations on a fully modified 10-mer hybrid duplex. Comparison between the solution structure of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA hybrids indicates that the increased binding affinity of 2'F-ANA is related to several subtle differences, most importantly a favorable pseudohydrogen bond (2'F-purine H8) which contrasts with unfavorable 2'-OH-nucleobase steric interactions in the case of ANA. While both 2'F-ANA and ANA strands maintained conformations in the southern/eastern sugar pucker range, the 2'F-ANA strand's structure was more compatible with the A-like structure of a hybrid duplex. No dramatic differences are found in terms of relative hydration for the two hybrids, but the ANA*RNA duplex showed lower uptake of counterions than its 2'F-ANA*RNA counterpart. Finally, while the two hybrid duplexes are of similar rigidities, 2'F-ANA single strands may be more suitably preorganized for duplex formation. Thus the dramatically increased stability of 2'F-ANA*RNA and ANA*RNA duplexes is caused by differences in at least four areas, of which structure and pseudohydrogen bonding are the most important.

  5. Thermodynamic and kinetic analysis of an RNA kissing interaction and its resolution into an extended duplex.

    PubMed

    Salim, Nilshad; Lamichhane, Rajan; Zhao, Rui; Banerjee, Tuhina; Philip, Jane; Rueda, David; Feig, Andrew L

    2012-03-07

    Kissing hairpin interactions form when the loop residues of two hairpins have Watson-Crick complementarity. In a unimolecular context, kissing interactions are important for tertiary folding and pseudoknot formation, whereas in a bimolecular context, they provide a basis for molecular recognition. In some cases, kissing complexes can be a prelude to strand displacement reactions where the two hairpins resolve to form a stable extended intermolecular duplex. The kinetics and thermodynamics of kissing-complex formation and their subsequent strand-displacement reactions are poorly understood. Here, biophysical techniques including isothermal titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and single-molecule fluorescence have been employed to probe the factors that govern the stability of kissing complexes and their subsequent structural rearrangements. We show that the general understanding of RNA duplex formation can be extended to kissing complexes but that kissing complexes display an unusual level of stability relative to simple duplexes of the same sequence. These interactions form and break many times at room temperature before becoming committed to a slow, irreversible forward transition to the strand-displaced form. Furthermore, using smFRET we show that the primary difference between stable and labile kissing complexes is based almost completely on their off rates. Both stable and labile complexes form at the same rate within error, but less stable species dissociate rapidly, allowing us to understand how these complexes can help generate specificity along a folding pathway or during a gene regulation event. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermodynamic and Kinetic Analysis of an RNA Kissing Interaction and Its Resolution into an Extended Duplex

    PubMed Central

    Salim, Nilshad; Lamichhane, Rajan; Zhao, Rui; Banerjee, Tuhina; Philip, Jane; Rueda, David; Feig, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    Kissing hairpin interactions form when the loop residues of two hairpins have Watson-Crick complementarity. In a unimolecular context, kissing interactions are important for tertiary folding and pseudoknot formation, whereas in a bimolecular context, they provide a basis for molecular recognition. In some cases, kissing complexes can be a prelude to strand displacement reactions where the two hairpins resolve to form a stable extended intermolecular duplex. The kinetics and thermodynamics of kissing-complex formation and their subsequent strand-displacement reactions are poorly understood. Here, biophysical techniques including isothermal titration calorimetry, surface plasmon resonance, and single-molecule fluorescence have been employed to probe the factors that govern the stability of kissing complexes and their subsequent structural rearrangements. We show that the general understanding of RNA duplex formation can be extended to kissing complexes but that kissing complexes display an unusual level of stability relative to simple duplexes of the same sequence. These interactions form and break many times at room temperature before becoming committed to a slow, irreversible forward transition to the strand-displaced form. Furthermore, using smFRET we show that the primary difference between stable and labile kissing complexes is based almost completely on their off rates. Both stable and labile complexes form at the same rate within error, but less stable species dissociate rapidly, allowing us to understand how these complexes can help generate specificity along a folding pathway or during a gene regulation event. PMID:22404932

  7. Short RNA duplexes guide sequence-dependent cleavage by human Dicer.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Lucien; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2010-12-01

    Dicer is a member of the double-stranded (ds) RNA-specific ribonuclease III (RNase III) family that is required for RNA processing and degradation. Like most members of the RNase III family, Dicer possesses a dsRNA binding domain and cleaves long RNA duplexes in vitro. In this study, Dicer substrate selectivity was examined using bipartite substrates. These experiments revealed that an RNA helix possessing a 2-nucleotide (nt) 3'-overhang may bind and direct sequence-specific Dicer-mediated cleavage in trans at a fixed distance from the 3'-end overhang. Chemical modifications of the substrate indicate that the presence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group is not required for Dicer binding, but some located near the scissile bonds are needed for RNA cleavage. This suggests a flexible mechanism for substrate selectivity that recognizes the overall shape of an RNA helix. Examination of the structure of natural pre-microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) suggests that they may form bipartite substrates with complementary mRNA sequences, and thus induce seed-independent Dicer cleavage. Indeed, in vitro, natural pre-miRNA directed sequence-specific Dicer-mediated cleavage in trans by supporting the formation of a substrate mimic.

  8. Short RNA duplexes guide sequence-dependent cleavage by human Dicer

    PubMed Central

    Bergeron, Lucien Junior; Perreault, Jean-Pierre; Elela, Sherif Abou

    2010-01-01

    Dicer is a member of the double-stranded (ds) RNA-specific ribonuclease III (RNase III) family that is required for RNA processing and degradation. Like most members of the RNase III family, Dicer possesses a dsRNA binding domain and cleaves long RNA duplexes in vitro. In this study, Dicer substrate selectivity was examined using bipartite substrates. These experiments revealed that an RNA helix possessing a 2-nucleotide (nt) 3′-overhang may bind and direct sequence-specific Dicer-mediated cleavage in trans at a fixed distance from the 3′-end overhang. Chemical modifications of the substrate indicate that the presence of the ribose 2′-hydroxyl group is not required for Dicer binding, but some located near the scissile bonds are needed for RNA cleavage. This suggests a flexible mechanism for substrate selectivity that recognizes the overall shape of an RNA helix. Examination of the structure of natural pre-microRNAs (pre-miRNAs) suggests that they may form bipartite substrates with complementary mRNA sequences, and thus induce seed-independent Dicer cleavage. Indeed, in vitro, natural pre-miRNA directed sequence-specific Dicer-mediated cleavage in trans by supporting the formation of a substrate mimic. PMID:20974746

  9. DUPLEX: A molecular mechanics program in torsion angle space for computing structures of DNA and RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hingerty, B.E.

    1992-07-01

    DUPLEX produces energy minimized structures of DNA and RNA of any base sequence for single and double strands. The smallest subunits are deoxydinucleoside monophosphates, and up to 12 residues, single or double stranded can be treated. In addition, it can incorporate NMR derived interproton distances an constraints in the minimizations. Both upper and lower bounds for these distances can be specified. The program has been designed to run on a UNICOS Cray supercomputer, but should run, albeit slowly, on a laboratory computer such as a VAX or a workstation.

  10. Mammalian mitochondrial DNA replication intermediates are essentially duplex, but contain extensive tracts of RNA/DNA hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Pohjoismäki, Jaakko L. O.; Holmes, J. Bradley; Wood, Stuart R.; Yang, Ming-Yao; Yasukawa, Takehiro; Reyes, Aurelio; Laura, J. Bailey; Cluett, Tricia J.; Goffart, Steffi; Willcox, Smaranda; Rigby, Rachel E.; Jackson, Andrew P.; Spelbrink, Johannes N.; Griffith, Jack D.; Crouch, Robert J.; Jacobs, Howard T.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate, using transmission electron microscopy and immunopurification with an antibody specific for RNA/DNA hybrid, that intact mtDNA replication intermediates (mtRIs) are essentially duplex throughout their length, but contain extensive RNA tracts on one strand. However, the extent of preservation of RNA in such molecules is highly dependent on the preparative method used. These findings strongly support the strand-coupled model of mtDNA replication involving RNA incorporation throughout the lagging strand (RITOLS). PMID:20184890

  11. A crystallographic study of the binding of 13 metal ions to two related RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Ennifar, Eric; Walter, Philippe; Dumas, Philippe

    2003-01-01

    Metal ions, and magnesium in particular, are known to be involved in RNA folding by stabilizing secondary and tertiary structures, and, as cofactors, in RNA enzymatic activity. We have conducted a systematic crystallographic analysis of cation binding to the duplex form of the HIV-1 RNA dimerization initiation site for the subtype-A and -B natural sequences. Eleven ions (K+, Pb2+, Mn2+, Ba2+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Sr2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Au3+ and Pt4+) and two hexammines [Co (NH3)6]3+ and [Ru (NH3)6]3+ were found to bind to the DIS duplex structure. Although the two sequences are very similar, strong differences were found in their cation binding properties. Divalent cations bind almost exclusively, as Mg2+, at ‘Hoogsteen’ sites of guanine residues, with a cation-dependent affinity for each site. Notably, a given cation can have very different affinities for a priori equivalent sites within the same molecule. Surprisingly, none of the two hexammines used were able to efficiently replace hexahydrated magnesium. Instead, [Co (NH3)4]3+ was seen bound by inner-sphere coordination to the RNA. This raises some questions about the practical use of [Co (NH3)6]3+ as a [Mg (H2O)6]2+ mimetic. Also very unexpected was the binding of the small Au3+ cation exactly between the Watson–Crick sites of a G-C base pair after an obligatory deprotonation of N1 of the guanine base. This extensive study of metal ion binding using X-ray crystallography significantly enriches our knowledge on the binding of middleweight or heavy metal ions to RNA, particularly compared with magnesium. PMID:12736317

  12. The ups and downs of nucleic acid duplex stability: structure-stability studies on chemically-modified DNA:RNA duplexes.

    PubMed Central

    Freier, S M; Altmann, K H

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to discover novel oligonucleotide modifications for antisense therapeutics, we have prepared oligodeoxyribonucleotides containing more than 200 different modifications and measured their affinities for complementary RNA. These include modifications to the heterocyclic bases, the deoxy-ribose sugar and the phosphodiester linkage. From these results, we have been able to determine structure-activity relationships that correlate hybridization affinity with changes in oligonucleotide structure. Data for oligonucleotides containing modified pyrimidine nucleotides are presented. In general, modifications that resulted in the most stable duplexes contained a heteroatom at the 2'-position of the sugar. Other sugar modifications usually led to diminished hybrid stability. Most backbone modifications that led to improved hybridization restricted backbone mobility and resulted in an A-type sugar pucker for the residue 5'to the modified internucleotide linkage. Among the heterocycles, C-5-substituted pyrimidines stood out as substantially increasing duplex stability. PMID:9358149

  13. Pathway of ATP utilization and duplex rRNA unwinding by the DEAD-box helicase, DbpA.

    PubMed

    Henn, Arnon; Cao, Wenxiang; Licciardello, Nicholas; Heitkamp, Sara E; Hackney, David D; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2010-03-02

    DEAD-box RNA helicase proteins use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to drive the unwinding of duplex RNA. However, the mechanism that couples ATP utilization to duplex RNA unwinding is unknown. We measured ATP utilization and duplex RNA unwinding by DbpA, a non-processive bacterial DEAD-box RNA helicase specifically activated by the peptidyl transferase center (PTC) of 23S rRNA. Consumption of a single ATP molecule is sufficient to unwind and displace an 8 base pair rRNA strand annealed to a 32 base pair PTC-RNA "mother strand" fragment. Strand displacement occurs after ATP binding and hydrolysis but before P(i) product release. P(i) release weakens binding to rRNA, thereby facilitating the release of the unwound rRNA mother strand and the recycling of DbpA for additional rounds of unwinding. This work explains how ATPase activity of DEAD-box helicases is linked to RNA unwinding.

  14. 'A' forms of RNAs in single strands, duplexes and RNA-DNA hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Broyde, S; Hingerty, B

    1978-01-01

    Helical parameters have been calculated for the 'A' form minimum energy conformations of ApA, CpC, GpG, UpU, GpC and UpA. The helix geometries are base sequence dependent. The single strands are narrower and more tightly wound than that duplex RNA-11 form. 9-12 kcal./mole are needed to convert these single strands to the RNA-11 conformation. However, in some sequences other 'A' type conformers capable of complementary base pairing may be formed at lower energetic cost. There is substantially more base stacking in the calculated single strands than in the RNA-11 conformation. Calculated intrastrand base stacking energies reflect these differences, and also are sequence dependent. The 'A' form RNA subunits differ from the analogous DNAs in possessing a larger rise per residue, needed to accomodate the 2'-OH. RNA-DNA hybrids are consequently more likely to be in the 'A-RNA than in the 'A'-DNA conformation, although the base sequence determines the extent of the preference. PMID:693318

  15. N 2-methylguanosine is iso-energetic with guanosine in RNA duplexes and GNRA tetraloops.

    PubMed Central

    Rife, J P; Cheng, C S; Moore, P B; Strobel, S A

    1998-01-01

    Modified nucleotides are resource-intensive alternatives to the four nucleotides that constitute the bulk of natural RNAs. Yet, even in cases where modifications are highly conserved, their functions are difficult to identify. One possible function might be to modulate the stability of RNA structures. To investigate this possibility for N 2-methylguanosine (m2G), which is present in a wide variety of RNAs, we have determined the thermodynamic consequences of substituting m2G for G in G-C Watson-Crick pairs and G@U wobble pairs within RNA duplexes. The m2G substitution is iso-energetic with G in all cases, except for aninternal m2G@U pair, where it has a modest (0.3 kcal/mol) stabilizing effect. We have also examined theconsequences of replacing G by m2G, and A by N 6, N 6-dimethyladenosine (m26A) in the helix 45 tetraloop of 16S rRNA, which would otherwise be a standard GNRA tetraloop. This loop is a conserved, hypermethylated region of the ribosome where methylation appears to modulate activity. m26A substitution destabilizes the tetraloop, presumably because it prevents the formation of the G@A sheared pair it would otherwise contain. m2G substitution has no effect on tetraloop stability. Together, these results suggest that m2G is equally stable as either the s-cis or s-trans rotamer. The lack of a significant effect on secondary structural stability in these systems suggests that m2G is introduced into naturally occurring RNAs for reasons other than modulation of duplex stability. PMID:9685477

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation reveals conformational switching of water-mediated uracil-cytosine base-pairs in an RNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Schneider, C; Brandl, M; Sühnel, J

    2001-01-26

    A 4 ns molecular dynamics simulation of an RNA duplex (r-GGACUUCGGUCC)(2 )in solution with Na+ and Cl- as counterions was performed. The X-ray structure of this duplex includes two water-mediated uracil-cytosine pairs. In contrast to the other base-pairs in the duplex the water-mediated pairs switch between different conformations. One conformation corresponds to the geometry of the water-mediated UC pairs in the duplex X-ray structure with water acting both as hydrogen-bond donor and acceptor. Another conformation is close to that of a water-mediated UC base-pair found in the X-ray structure of the 23 S rRNA sarcin/ricin domain. In this case the oxygen of the water molecule is linked to two-base donor sites. For a very short time also a direct UC base-pair and a further conformation that is similar to the one found in the RNA duplex structure but exhibits an increased H3(U)...N3(C) distance is observed. Water molecules with unusually long residence times are involved in the water-mediated conformations. These results indicate that the dynamic behaviour of the water-mediated UC base-pairs differs from that of the duplex Watson-Crick and non-canonical guanine-uracil pairs with two or three direct hydrogen bonds. The conformational variability and increased flexibility has to be taken into account when considering these base-pairs as RNA building blocks and as recognition motifs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Visualizing transient Watson-Crick-like mispairs in DNA and RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Kimsey, Isaac J; Petzold, Katja; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Stein, Zachary W; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2015-03-19

    Rare tautomeric and anionic nucleobases are believed to have fundamental biological roles, but their prevalence and functional importance has remained elusive because they exist transiently, in low abundance, and involve subtle movements of protons that are difficult to visualize. Using NMR relaxation dispersion, we show here that wobble dG•dT and rG•rU mispairs in DNA and RNA duplexes exist in dynamic equilibrium with short-lived, low-populated Watson-Crick-like mispairs that are stabilized by rare enolic or anionic bases. These mispairs can evade Watson-Crick fidelity checkpoints and form with probabilities (10(-3) to 10(-5)) that strongly imply a universal role in replication and translation errors. Our results indicate that rare tautomeric and anionic bases are widespread in nucleic acids, expanding their structural and functional complexity beyond that attainable with canonical bases.

  18. Visualizing transient Watson-Crick-like mispairs in DNA and RNA duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimsey, Isaac J.; Petzold, Katja; Sathyamoorthy, Bharathwaj; Stein, Zachary W.; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M.

    2015-03-01

    Rare tautomeric and anionic nucleobases are believed to have fundamental biological roles, but their prevalence and functional importance has remained elusive because they exist transiently, in low abundance, and involve subtle movements of protons that are difficult to visualize. Using NMR relaxation dispersion, we show here that wobble dG•dT and rG•rU mispairs in DNA and RNA duplexes exist in dynamic equilibrium with short-lived, low-populated Watson-Crick-like mispairs that are stabilized by rare enolic or anionic bases. These mispairs can evade Watson-Crick fidelity checkpoints and form with probabilities (10-3 to 10-5) that strongly imply a universal role in replication and translation errors. Our results indicate that rare tautomeric and anionic bases are widespread in nucleic acids, expanding their structural and functional complexity beyond that attainable with canonical bases.

  19. Crystal structure studies of RNA duplexes containing s(2)U:A and s(2)U:U base pairs.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jia; Larsen, Aaron; Heuberger, Benjamin D; Blain, J Craig; Szostak, Jack W

    2014-10-01

    Structural studies of modified nucleobases in RNA duplexes are critical for developing a full understanding of the stability and specificity of RNA base pairing. 2-Thio-uridine (s(2)U) is a modified nucleobase found in certain tRNAs. Thermodynamic studies have evaluated the effects of s(2)U on base pairing in RNA, where it has been shown to stabilize U:A pairs and destabilize U:G wobble pairs. Surprisingly, no high-resolution crystal structures of s(2)U-containing RNA duplexes have yet been reported. We present here two high-resolution crystal structures of heptamer RNA duplexes (5'-uagcs(2)Ucc-3' paired with 3'-aucgAgg-5' and with 3'-aucgUgg-5') containing s(2)U:A and s(2)U:U pairs, respectively. For comparison, we also present the structures of their native counterparts solved under identical conditions. We found that replacing O2 with S2 stabilizes the U:A base pair without any detectable structural perturbation. In contrast, an s(2)U:U base pair is strongly stabilized in one specific U:U pairing conformation out of four observed for the native U:U base pair. This s(2)U:U stabilization appears to be due at least in part to an unexpected sulfur-mediated hydrogen bond. This work provides additional insights into the effects of 2-thio-uridine on RNA base pairing.

  20. Imp3 unfolds stem structures in pre-rRNA and U3 snoRNA to form a duplex essential for small subunit processing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Binal N.; Liu, Xin; Correll, Carl C.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis requires rapid hybridization between the U3 snoRNA and the pre-rRNA to direct cleavages at the A0, A1, and A2 sites in pre-rRNA that liberate the small subunit precursor. The bases involved in hybridization of one of the three duplexes that U3 makes with pre-rRNA, designated the U3-18S duplex, are buried in conserved structures: box A/A′ stem–loop in U3 snoRNA and helix 1 (H1) in the 18S region of the pre-rRNA. These conserved structures must be unfolded to permit the necessary hybridization. Previously, we reported that Imp3 and Imp4 promote U3-18S hybridization in vitro, but the mechanism by which these proteins facilitate U3-18S duplex formation remained unclear. Here, we directly addressed this question by probing base accessibility with chemical modification and backbone accessibility with ribonuclease activity of U3 and pre-rRNA fragments that mimic the secondary structure observed in vivo. Our results demonstrate that U3-18S hybridization requires only Imp3. Binding to each RNA by Imp3 provides sufficient energy to unfold both the 18S H1 and the U3 box A/A′ stem structures. The Imp3 unfolding activity also increases accessibility at the U3-dependent A0 and A1 sites, perhaps signaling cleavage at these sites to generate the 5′ mature end of 18S. Imp4 destabilizes the U3-18S duplex to aid U3 release, thus differentiating the roles of these proteins. Protein-dependent unfolding of these structures may serve as a switch to block U3-pre-rRNA interactions until recruitment of Imp3, thereby preventing premature and inaccurate U3-dependent pre-rRNA cleavage and folding events in eukaryotic ribosome biogenesis. PMID:23980203

  1. Influence of cationic molecules on the hairpin to duplex equilibria of self-complementary DNA and RNA oligonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Shu-ichi; Kirihata, Toshimasa; Fujii, Satoshi; Sakai, Hiroshi; Kuwahara, Masayasu; Sawai, Hiroaki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2007-01-01

    A self-complementary nucleotide sequence can form both a unimolecular hairpin and a bimolecular duplex. In this study, the secondary structures of the self-complementary DNA and RNA oligonucleotides with different sequences and lengths were investigated under various solution conditions by gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism (CD) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and a ultraviolet (UV) melting analysis. The DNA sequences tended to adopt a hairpin conformation at low cation concentrations, but a bimolecular duplex was preferentially formed at an elevated cationic strength. On the other hand, fully matched RNA sequences adopted a bimolecular duplex regardless of the cation concentration. The thermal melting experiments indicated a greater change in the melting temperature of the bimolecular duplexes (by ∼20°C) than that of the hairpin (by ∼10°C) by increasing the NaCl concentration from 10 mM to 1 M. Hairpin formations were also observed for the palindrome DNA sequences derived from Escherichia coli, but association of the complementary palindrome sequences was observed when spermine, one of the major cationic molecules in a cell, existed at the physiological concentration. The results indicate the role of cations for shifting the structural equilibrium toward a nucleotide assembly and implicate nucleotide structures in cells. PMID:17169988

  2. The X-ray Structures of Six Octameric RNA Duplexes in the Presence of Different Di- and Trivalent Cations

    PubMed Central

    Schaffer, Michelle F.; Peng, Guanya; Spingler, Bernhard; Schnabl, Joachim; Wang, Meitian; Olieric, Vincent; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the polyanionic nature of RNA, the principles of charge neutralization and electrostatic condensation require that cations help to overcome the repulsive forces in order for RNA to adopt a three-dimensional structure. A precise structural knowledge of RNA-metal ion interactions is crucial to understand the mechanism of metal ions in the catalytic or regulatory activity of RNA. We solved the crystal structure of an octameric RNA duplex in the presence of the di- and trivalent metal ions Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Sr2+, and Tb3+. The detailed investigation reveals a unique innersphere interaction to uracil and extends the knowledge of the influence of metal ions for conformational changes in RNA structure. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that an accurate localization of the metal ions in the X-ray structures require the consideration of several crystallographic and geometrical parameters as well as the anomalous difference map. PMID:27355942

  3. Imp3p and Imp4p mediate formation of essential U3–precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) duplexes, possibly to recruit the small subunit processome to the pre-rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Gérczei, Tímea; Correll, Carl C.

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotes, formation of short duplexes between the U3 small nucleolar RNA (snoRNA) and the precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) at multiple sites is a prerequisite for three endonucleolytic cleavages that initiate small subunit biogenesis by releasing the 18S rRNA precursor from the pre-rRNA. The most likely role of these RNA duplexes is to guide the U3 snoRNA and its associated proteins, designated the small subunit processome, to the target cleavage sites on the pre-rRNA. Studies by others in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified the proteins Mpp10p, Imp3p, and Imp4p as candidates to mediate U3–pre-rRNA interactions. We report here that Imp3p and Imp4p appear to stabilize an otherwise unstable duplex between the U3 snoRNA hinge region and complementary bases in the external transcribed spacer of the pre-rRNA. In addition, Imp4p, but not Imp3p, seems to rearrange the U3 box A stem structure to expose the site that base-pairs with the 5′ end of the 18S rRNA, thereby mediating duplex formation at a second site. By mediating formation of both essential U3–pre-rRNA duplexes, Imp3p and Imp4p may help the small subunit processome to dock onto the pre-rRNA, an event indispensable for ribosome biogenesis and hence for cell growth. PMID:15489263

  4. Synthesis and studies on the effect of 2-thiouridine and 4-thiouridine on sugar conformation and RNA duplex stability.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, R K; Davis, D R

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand the effect of 2-thiouridine (s2U) substitution on RNA structure and the potential for stabilization of tRNA codon-anticodon interactions through s2U-34 modification, a pentamer RNA sequence, Gs2UUUC, was synthesized and characterized by NMR spectroscopy. The single strand contains the UUU anticodon sequence of tRNALys with flanking GCs to increase duplex stability. Regiochemical effects of uridine thiolation were determined by comparing the structure and stability of the 2-thiouridine containing oligonucleotide with an identical sequence containing 4-thiouridine (s4U) and also the normal uridine nucleoside. Circular dichroism spectrum indicated an A-form helical conformation for Gs2UUUC which was further confirmed by 2D ROESY NMR experiments. The duplex stability of the three pentamers complexed with a 2'-O-methyl-ribonucleotide complementary strand, GmAmAmAmCm, was determined by UV thermal melting studies and by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The duplex containing s2U has a T m of 30.7 degrees C compared to 19. 0 degrees C for the unmodified control and 14.5 degrees C for the s4U containing duplex. The results from UV experiments were corroborated by imino proton NMR studies that show proton exchange rates, chemical shift differences, and NH proton linewidths indicative of the stability order s2U >U >s4U. The magnitude of the effect of s2U in our model system is comparable to the 20 degrees C stabilization observed by Grosjean and co-workers for 2-thiolation in a codon-anticodon model system composed of two tRNAs with complementary anticodon sequences [Houssier, C., Degee, P., Nicoghosian, K. and Grosjean, H. (1988) J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn., 5, 1259-1266]. PMID:9092639

  5. ESI-MS Investigation of an Equilibrium between a Bimolecular Quadruplex DNA and a Duplex DNA/RNA Hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrento, Monica L.; Bryan, Tracy M.; Samosorn, Siritron; Beck, Jennifer L.

    2015-07-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) conditions were optimized for simultaneous observation of a bimolecular qDNA and a Watson-Crick base-paired duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. The DNA sequence used was telomeric DNA, and the RNA contained the template for telomerase-mediated telomeric DNA synthesis. Addition of RNA to the quadruplex DNA (qDNA) resulted in formation of the duplex DNA/RNA hybrid. Melting profiles obtained using circular dichroism spectroscopy confirmed that the DNA/RNA hybrid exhibited greater thermal stability than the bimolecular qDNA in solution. Binding of a 13-substituted berberine ( 1) derivative to the bimolecular qDNA stabilized its structure as evidenced by an increase in its stability in the mass spectrometer, and an increase in its circular dichroism (CD) melting temperature of 10°C. The DNA/RNA hybrid did not bind the ligand extensively and its thermal stability was unchanged in the presence of ( 1). The qDNA-ligand complex resisted unfolding in the presence of excess RNA, limiting the formation of the DNA/RNA hybrid. Previously, it has been proposed that DNA secondary structures, such as qDNA, may be involved in the telomerase mechanism. DNA/RNA hybrid structures occur at the active site of telomerase. The results presented in the current work show that if telomeric DNA was folded into a qDNA structure, it is possible for a DNA/RNA hybrid to form as is required during template alignment. The discrimination of ligand ( 1) for binding to the bimolecular qDNA over the DNA/RNA hybrid positions it as a useful compound for probing the role(s), if any, of antiparallel qDNA in the telomerase mechanism.

  6. Cytosolic RNA:DNA Duplexes Generated by Endogenous Reverse Transcriptase Activity as Autonomous Inducers of Skin Inflammation in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Griez, Anthony; Guilhou, Jean-Jacques; Girard, Céline; Nagot, Nicolas; Van de Perre, Philippe; Dujols, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic skin disease of unknown ætiology. Recent studies suggested that a large amount of cytosolic DNA (cyDNA) in keratinocytes is breaking keratinocytes DNA tolerance and promotes self-sustained inflammation in the psoriatic lesion. We investigated the origin of this cyDNA. We show that, amongst all the possible DNA structures, the cyDNA could be present as RNA:DNA duplexes in keratinocytes. We further show that endogenous reverse transcriptase activities generate such duplexes and consequently activate the production of Th1-inflammatory cytokines. These observations open a new research avenue related to endogenous retroelements for the aetiology of psoriasis and probably of other human chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:28095445

  7. Effects of N[superscript 2],N[superscript 2]-dimethylguanosine on RNA structure and stability: Crystal structure of an RNA duplex with tandem m[superscript 2 subscript 2]G:A pairs

    SciTech Connect

    Pallan, Pradeep S.; Kreutz, Christoph; Bosio, Silvia; Micura, Ronald; Egli, Martin

    2008-12-15

    Methylation of the exocyclic amino group of guanine is a relatively common modification in rRNA and tRNA. Single methylation (N(2)-methylguanosine, m(2)G) is the second most frequently encountered nucleoside analog in Escherichia coli rRNAs. The most prominent case of dual methylation (N(2),N(2)-dimethylguanosine, m(2) (2)G) is found in the majority of eukaryotic tRNAs at base pair m(2) (2)G26:A44. The latter modification eliminates the ability of the N(2) function to donate in hydrogen bonds and alters its pairing behavior, notably vis-a-vis C. Perhaps a less obvious consequence of the N(2),N(2)-dimethyl modification is its role in controlling the pairing modes between G and A. We have determined the crystal structure of a 13-mer RNA duplex with central tandem m(2) (2)G:A pairs. In the structure both pairs adopt an imino-hydrogen bonded, pseudo-Watson-Crick conformation. Thus, the sheared conformation frequently seen in tandem G:A pairs is avoided due to a potential steric clash between an N(2)-methyl group and the major groove edge of A. Additionally, for a series of G:A containing self-complementary RNAs we investigated how methylation affects competitive hairpin versus duplex formation based on UV melting profile analysis.

  8. A novel duplex real time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for rubella virus with armored RNA as a noncompetitive internal positive control.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lihong; Li, Ruiying; Liu, Aihua; Zhao, Shuping

    2015-07-01

    The objective of this study was to build and apply a duplex real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for rubella virus. Firstly, a 60-bp-long armored RV RNA was constructed in the laboratory. Secondly, a duplex real time RT-PCR assay was established. Thirdly, the 60-bp-long armored RV RNA was used as an internal positive control (IPC) for the duplex real time RT-PCR. And finally the duplex real time RT-PCR assay was applied to detect RV RNA in clinical specimens. The in-house assay has a high amplification efficiency (0.99), a high analytical sensitivity (200 copies/mL), and a good reproducibility. The diagnostic specificity and sensitivity of the in-house assay were both 100%, due to the monitoring of the armored RV RNA IPC. Therefore, the in-house duplex real time quantitative RT-PCR assay is a specific, sensitive, reproducible and accurate assay for quantitation of RV RNA in clinical specimens. And noncompetitive armored RV RNA IPC can monitor RT-PCR inhibition and prevent false-negative and inaccurate results in the real time detection system.

  9. Effects of salt, polyethylene glycol, and locked nucleic acids on the thermodynamic stabilities of consecutive terminal adenosine mismatches in RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Gu, Xiaobo; Nguyen, Mai-Thao; Overacre, Abigail; Seaton, Samantha; Schroeder, Susan J

    2013-04-04

    Consecutive terminal mismatches add thermodynamic stability to RNA duplexes and occur frequently in microRNA-mRNA interactions. Accurate thermodynamic stabilities of consecutive terminal mismatches contribute to the development of specific, high-affinity siRNA therapeutics. Consecutive terminal adenosine mismatches (TAMS) are studied at different salt concentrations, with polyethylene glycol cosolutes, and with locked nucleic acid (LNA) substitutions. These measurements provide benchmarks for the application of thermodynamic predictions to different physiological or therapeutic conditions. The salt dependence for RNA duplex stability is similar for TAMS, internal loops, and Watson-Crick duplexes. A unified model for predicting the free energy of an RNA duplex with or without loops and mismatches at lower sodium concentrations is presented. The destabilizing effects of PEG 200 are larger for TAMS than internal loops or Watson-Crick duplexes, which may result from different base stacking conformations, dynamics, and water hydration. In contrast, LNA substitutions stabilize internal loops much more than TAMS. Surprisingly, the average per adenosine increase in stability for LNA substitutions in internal loops is -1.82 kcal/mol and only -0.20 kcal/mol for TAMS. The stabilities of TAMS and internal loops with LNA substitutions have similar favorable free energies. Thus, the unfavorable free energy of adenosine internal loops is largely an entropic effect. The favorable stabilities of TAMS result mainly from base stacking. The ability of RNA duplexes to form extended terminal mismatches in the absence of proteins such as argonaute and identifying the enthalpic contributions to terminal mismatch stabilities provide insight into the physical basis of microRNA-mRNA molecular recognition and specificity.

  10. Double proton transfer mechanism in the adenine-uracil base pair and spontaneous mutation in RNA duplex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José P.; Requena, Alberto; Perpète, Eric A.; Michaux, Catherine; Jacquemin, Denis

    2009-12-01

    We study the mechanism of double proton transfer (DPT) in the adenine-uracil (AU) base pair, both in gas phase and under the influence of surrounding water molecules. According to our ab initio calculations, no stable proton transfer product exists in gas phase, while in solution, the DPT process may occur only through the catalysis of water molecules. Nevertheless, a thermodynamic analysis confirms that AU does not contribute to spontaneous mutation in RNA duplex, and thus guanine-cytosine (GC) would be the only base pair contributing to spontaneous mutation.

  11. Thermodynamic stability and Watson-Crick base pairing in the seed duplex are major determinants of the efficiency of the siRNA-based off-target effect.

    PubMed

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Naito, Yuki; Nishi, Kenji; Juni, Aya; Saigo, Kaoru

    2008-12-01

    Short interfering RNA (siRNA) may down-regulate many unintended genes whose transcripts possess complementarity to the siRNA seed region, which contains 7 nt. The capability of siRNA to induce this off-target effect was highly correlated with the calculated melting temperature or standard free-energy change for formation of protein-free seed duplex, indicating that thermodynamic stability of seed duplex formed between the seed and target is one of the major factor in determining the degree of off-target effects. Furthermore, unlike intended gene silencing (RNA interference), off-target effect was completely abolished by introduction of a G:U pair into the seed duplex, and this loss in activity was completely recovered by a second mutation regenerating Watson-Crick pairing, indicating that seed duplex Watson-Crick pairing is also essential for off-target gene silencing. The off-target effect was more sensitive to siRNA concentration compared to intended gene silencing, which requires a near perfect sequence match between the siRNA guide strand and target mRNA.

  12. Human coronavirus 229E nonstructural protein 13: characterization of duplex-unwinding, nucleoside triphosphatase, and RNA 5'-triphosphatase activities.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Konstantin A; Ziebuhr, John

    2004-07-01

    The human coronavirus 229E (HCoV-229E) replicase gene-encoded nonstructural protein 13 (nsp13) contains an N-terminal zinc-binding domain and a C-terminal superfamily 1 helicase domain. A histidine-tagged form of nsp13, which was expressed in insect cells and purified, is reported to unwind efficiently both partial-duplex RNA and DNA of up to several hundred base pairs. Characterization of the nsp13-associated nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activities revealed that all natural ribonucleotides and nucleotides are substrates of nsp13, with ATP, dATP, and GTP being hydrolyzed most efficiently. Using the NTPase active site, HCoV-229E nsp13 also mediates RNA 5'-triphosphatase activity, which may be involved in the capping of viral RNAs.

  13. The use of BrCN for assembling modified DNA duplexes and DNA-RNA hybrids; comparison with water-soluble carbodiimide.

    PubMed Central

    Dolinnaya, N G; Sokolova, N I; Ashirbekova, D T; Shabarova, Z A

    1991-01-01

    Both cyanogen bromide (BrCN) and 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide may be used as coupling reagents for the template-directed assembly of DNA duplexes containing the sugar-phosphate backbone modification. Both reagents show similar ligation site structure-specific trend. Practical recommendations are given for selection of the condensing reagent depending on the properties of the duplex. Based on 31P NMR spectroscopy data, a scheme is suggested for BrCN activation of the nucleotide phosphomonoester group. Using both condensing reagents, we studied the condensation of oligonucleotides containing ribo-segments (from mononucleotide residue to full sequence) on the DNA template. Efficiency of the chemical ligation of RNA oligomers was shown to be much lower than that of DNA analogues. The coupling yield depends on the position of the RNA segment in the hybrid duplexes and on the position of the phosphate group in the nick. Images PMID:1711679

  14. Solution structure of RNA duplexes containing alternating CG base pairs: NMR study of r(CGCGCG)2 and 2'-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 under low salt conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Popenda, M; Biala, E; Milecki, J; Adamiak, R W

    1997-01-01

    Structures of r(CGCGCG)2 and 2'-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 have been determined by NMR spectroscopy under low salt conditions. All protons and phosphorus nuclei resonances have been assigned. Signals of H5'/5" have been assigned stereospecifically. All 3JH,H and 3JP,H coupling constants have been measured. The structures were determined and refined using an iterative relaxation matrix procedure (IRMA) and the restrained MD simulation. Both duplexes form half-turn, right-handed helices with several conformational features which deviate significantly from a canonical A-RNA structure. Duplexes are characterised as having C3'-endo sugar pucker, very low base-pair rise and high helical twist and inclination angles. Helices are overwound with <10 bp per turn. There is limited inter-strand guanine stacking for CG steps. Within CG steps of both duplexes, the planes of the inter-strand cytosines are not parallel while guanines are almost parallel. For the GC steps this pattern is reversed. The 2'-O-methyl groups are spatially close to the 5'-hydrogens of neighbouring residues from the 3'-side and are directed towards the minor groove of 2'-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 forming a hydrophobic layer. Solution structures of both duplexes are similar; the effect of 2'-O-methylation on the parent RNA structure is small. This suggests that intrinsic properties imposed by alternating CG base pairs govern the overall conformation of both duplexes. PMID:9358170

  15. Label-free microRNA detection based on terbium and duplex-specific nuclease assisted target recycling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Dongzhi; Chen, QiuXiang; Chen, Mei; Xia, Yaokun; Cai, Shuxian; Zhang, Xi; Wu, Fang; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-08-07

    In this paper, we describe a novel label-free fluorescence method for microRNA-21 (miR-21) detection based on terbium (Tb(3+)) and duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) assisted target recycling. Capture probes (Cps), containing a target-binding part and a signal-output part, are immobilized on magnetic beads (MBs). In the presence of the target miR-21, it hybridizes with the target-binding part of a Cp to form a DNA-RNA heteroduplex. Due to the considerable cleavage preference for DNA in DNA-RNA hybrids, DSN hydrolyzes the target-binding part of the Cp while liberating the intact target miR-21 to hybridize with a new Cp and initiate the second cycle of hydrolysis. Eventually, through magnetic separation, only the signal-output part of the Cp could remain in solution and function as a signalling flare to increase the fluorescence intensity of Tb(3+) dramatically. By employing the above strategy, this approach can gain an amplified fluorescent signal and detect as low as 8 fM miR-21 under the optimized conditions. Moreover, due to the high selectivity of DSN, the method shows little cross-hybridization among the closely related miRNA family members even at the single-base-mismatched level. Successful attempts were made in applying the approach to detect miR-21 in human cell lysate samples of breast cancer patients.

  16. Oligodeoxynucleoside phosphoramidates (P-NH2): synthesis and thermal stability of duplexes with DNA and RNA targets.

    PubMed Central

    Peyrottes, S; Vasseur, J J; Imbach, J L; Rayner, B

    1996-01-01

    Syntheses of non ionic oligodeoxynucleoside phosphoramidates (P-NH2) and mixed phosphoramidate- phosphodiester oligomers were accomplished on automated solid supported DNA synthesizer using both H-phosphonate and phosphoramidite chemistries, in combination with t-butylphenoxyacetyl for N-protection of nucleoside bases, an oxalyl anchored solid support and a final treatment with methanolic ammonia. Thermal stabilities of the hybrids formed between these new analogues and their DNA and RNA complementary strands were determined and compared with those of the corresponding unmodified oligonucleotides, as well as of the phosphorothioate and methylphosphonate derivatives. Dodecathymidines containing P-NH2 links form less stable duplexes with DNA targets, d(C2A12C2) (deltaTm/modification -1.4 degrees C) and poly dA (deltaTm/modification -1.1 degrees C) than the corresponding phosphodiester and methylphosphonate analogues, but the hybrids are slightly more stable than the one obtained with phosphorothioate derivative. The destabilization is more pronounced with poly rA as the target (deltaTm/modification -3 degrees C) and could be compared with that found with the dodecathymidine methylphosphonate. The modification is less destabilizing in an heteropolymer-RNA duplex (deltaTm/modification -2 degrees C). As expected, the P-NH2 modifications are highly resistant towards the action of various nucleases. It is also demonstrated that an all P-NH2 oligothymidine does not elicit Escherichia coli RNase H hydrolysis of the poly rA target but that the modification may be exploited in chimeric oligonucleotides combining P-NH2 sections with a central phosphodiester section. PMID:8657564

  17. The solution structure of a 3'-phenazinium (Pzn) tethered DNA-RNA duplex with a dangling adenosine: r(5'G-AUUGAA3'):d(5'TCAATC3'-Pzn).

    PubMed Central

    Maltseva, T V; Agback, P; Repkova, M N; Venyaminova, A G; Ivanova, E M; Sandström, A; Zarytova, V F; Chattopadhyaya, J

    1994-01-01

    The 3'-Pzn group tethered to an oligo-DNA stabilizes a DNA-RNA hybrid duplex structure by 13 degrees C compared to the natural counterpart. This report constitutes the first full study of the conformational features of a hybrid DNA-RNA duplex, which has been possible because of the unique stabilization of this rather small duplex by the tethered 3'-Pzn moiety (Tm approximately 40 degrees C from NMR). In this study, a total of 252 inter- and intra-strand torsional and distance constraints along with the full NOE relaxation matrix, taking into account the exchange process of imino and amino protons with water, have been used. The 3'-Pzn-promoted stabilization of the DNA-RNA hybrid duplex results in detailed local conformational characteristics such as the torsion angles of the backbone and sugar moieties that are close to the features of the other natural DNA-RNA hybrids (i.e. sugars of the RNA strand are 3'-endo, but the sugars of the DNA strand are intermediate between A- and B-forms of DNA, 72 degrees < P < 180 degrees; note however, that the sugars of our DNA strand have a C1-exo conformation: 131 degrees < P < 154 degrees). This study suggests that 3'-Pzn-tethered smaller oligo-DNA should serve the same purpose as a larger oligo-DNA as a antisense inhibitor of the viral mRNA. Additionally, these types of tethered oligos have been found to be relatively more resistant to the cellular nuclease. Moreover, they are taken up quite readily through the cellular membrane (14) compared to the natural counterparts. PMID:7838711

  18. The RNA Exosome Targets the AID Cytidine Deaminase to Both Strands of Transcribed Duplex DNA Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Uttiya; Meng, Fei-Long; Keim, Celia; Grinstein, Veronika; Pefanis, Evangelos; Eccleston, Jennifer; Zhang, Tingting; Myers, Darienne; Wesemann, Duane R.; Januszyk, Kurt; Gregory, Richard I.; Deng, Haiteng; Lima, Christopher D.; Alt, Frederick W.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Activation Induced cytidine Deaminase (AID) initiates Immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy chain (IgH) class switch recombination (CSR) and Ig variable region somatic hypermutation (SHM) in B lymphocytes by deaminating cytidines on template and non-template strands of transcribed DNA substrates. However, the mechanism of AID access to the template DNA strand, particularly when hybridized to a nascent RNA transcript, has been an enigma. We now implicate the RNA exosome, a cellular RNA processing/degradation complex, in targeting AID to both DNA strands. In B-lineage cells activated for CSR, the RNA exosome associates with AID, accumulates on IgH switch regions in an AID-dependent fashion, and is required for optimal CSR. Moreover, both the cellular RNA exosome complex and a recombinant RNA exosome core complex impart robust AID- and transcription-dependent DNA deamination of both strands of transcribed SHM substrates in vitro. Our findings reveal a role for non-coding RNA surveillance machinery in generating antibody diversity. PMID:21255825

  19. Identification and characterization of RNA duplex unwinding and ATPase activities of an alphatetravirus superfamily 1 helicase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qinrong; Han, Yajuan; Qiu, Yang; Zhang, Shaoqiong; Tang, Fenfen; Wang, Yan; Zhang, Jiamin; Hu, Yuanyang; Zhou, Xi

    2012-11-25

    Dendrolimus punctatus tetravirus (DpTV) belongs to the genus omegatetravirus of the Alphatetraviridae family. Sequence analysis predicts that DpTV replicase contains a putative helicase domain (Hel). However, the helicase activity in alphatetraviruses has never been formally determined. In this study, we determined that DpTV Hel is a functional RNA helicase belonging to superfamily-1 helicase with 5'-3' dsRNA unwinding directionality. Further characterization determined the length requirement of the 5' single-stranded tail on the RNA template and the optimal reaction conditions for the unwinding activity of DpTV Hel. Moreover, DpTV Hel also contains NTPase activity. The ATPase activity of DpTV Hel could be significantly stimulated by dsRNA, and dsRNA could partially rescue the ATPase activity abolishment caused by mutations. Our study is the first to identify an alphatetravirus RNA helicase and further characterize its dsRNA unwinding and NTPase activities in detail and should foster our understanding of DpTV and other alphatetraviruses.

  20. Enhancement of gene silencing potency and nuclease stability by chemically modified duplex RNA.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Takanori; Zhelev, Zhivko; Bakalova, Rumiana; Ohba, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we describe a development of chemically modified dsRNAs with improved biological properties. These dsRNAs possess an enhanced RNAi activity and a dramatically increased stability in cell cultured medium (containing 10% serum) in comparison with widely used 21nt siRNA. The chemically modified dsRNAs manifested a high longterm gene suppression after one week post-transfection, whereas 21nt siRNA showed a high RNAi activity only after 48 h cell transfection.

  1. High-resolution NMR studies of chimeric DNA-RNA-DNA duplexes, heteronomous base pairing, and continuous base stacking at junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Shanho Univ. of Washington, Seattle ); Flynn, P.; Wang, A.; Reid, B. )

    1991-05-28

    Two symmetrical DNA-RNA-DNA duplex chimeras, d(CGCG)r(AAUU)d(CGCG) (designated rAAUU) and d(CGCG)r(UAUA)d(CGCG) (designated rUAUA), and a nonsymmetrical chimeric duplex, d(CGTT)r(AUAA)d(TGCG)/d(CGCA)r(UUAU)d(AACG) (designated rAUAA), as well as their pure DNA analogues, containing dU instead of T, have been synthesized by solid-phase phosphoramidite methods and studied by high-resolution NMR techniques. The 1D imino proton NOE spectra of these d-r-d chimeras indicate normal Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding and base stacking at the junction region. Preliminary qualitative NOESY, COSY, and chemical shift data suggest that the internal RNA segment contains C3{prime}-endo (A-type) sugar conformations except for the first RNA residues (position 5 and 17) following the 3{prime} end of the DNA block, which, unlike the other six ribonucleotides, exhibit detectable H1{prime}-H2{prime} J coupling. The nucleosides of the two flanking DNA segments appear to adopt a fairly normal C2{prime}-endo B-DNA conformation except at the junction with the RNA blocks (residues 4 and 16), where the last DNA residue appears to adopt an intermediate sugar conformation. The data indicate that A-type and B-type conformations can coexist in a single short continuous nucleic acid duplex, but these results differ somewhat from previous theoretical model studies.

  2. G-quadruplex folds of the human telomere sequence alter the site reactivity and reaction pathway of guanine oxidation compared to duplex DNA.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Aaron M; Burrows, Cynthia J

    2013-04-15

    Telomere shortening occurs during oxidative and inflammatory stress with guanine (G) as the major site of damage. In this work, a comprehensive profile of the sites of oxidation and structures of products observed from G-quadruplex and duplex structures of the human telomere sequence was studied in the G-quadruplex folds (hybrid (K(+)), basket (Na(+)), and propeller (K(+) + 50% CH3CN)) resulting from the sequence 5'-(TAGGGT)4T-3' and in an appropriate duplex containing one telomere repeat. Oxidations with four oxidant systems consisting of riboflavin photosensitization, carbonate radical generation, singlet oxygen, and the copper Fenton-like reaction were analyzed under conditions of low product conversion to determine relative reactivity. The one-electron oxidants damaged the 5'-G in G-quadruplexes leading to spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and 2,2,4-triamino-2H-oxazol-5-one (Z) as major products as well as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG) and 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh) in low relative yields, while oxidation in the duplex context produced damage at the 5'- and middle-Gs of GGG sequences and resulted in Gh being the major product. Addition of the reductant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to the reaction did not alter the riboflavin-mediated damage sites but decreased Z by 2-fold and increased OG by 5-fold, while not altering the hydantoin ratio. However, NAC completely quenched the CO3(•-) reactions. Singlet oxygen oxidations of the G-quadruplex showed reactivity at all Gs on the exterior faces of G-quartets and furnished the product Sp, while no oxidation was observed in the duplex context under these conditions, and addition of NAC had no effect. Because a long telomere sequence would have higher-order structures of G-quadruplexes, studies were also conducted with 5'-(TAGGGT)8-T-3', and it provided oxidation profiles similar to those of the single G-quadruplex. Lastly, Cu(II)/H2O2-mediated oxidations were found to be indiscriminate in the damage patterns, and 5-carboxamido-5

  3. G-Quadruplex Folds of the Human Telomere Sequence Alter the Site Reactivity and Reaction Pathway of Guanine Oxidation Compared to Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Aaron M.; Burrows, Cynthia J.

    2013-01-01

    Telomere shortening occurs during oxidative and inflammatory stress with guanine (G) as the major site of damage. In this work, a comprehensive profile of the sites of oxidation and structures of products observed from G-quadruplex and duplex structures of the human telomere sequence was studied in the G-quadruplex folds (hybrid (K+), basket (Na+), and propeller (K+ + 50% CH3CN)) resulting from the sequence 5’-(TAGGGT)4T-3’ and in an appropriate duplex containing one telomere repeat. Oxidations with four oxidant systems consisting of riboflavin photosensitization, carbonate radical generation, singlet oxygen, and the copper Fenton-like reaction were analyzed under conditions of low product conversion to determine relative reactivity. The one-electron oxidants damaged the 5’-G in G-quadruplexes leading to spiroiminodihydantoin (Sp) and 2,2,4-triamino-2H-oxazol-5-one (Z) as major products as well as 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (OG) and 5-guanidinohydantoin (Gh) in low relative yields, while oxidation in the duplex context produced damage at the 5’- and middle-Gs of GGG sequences and resulted in Gh being the major product. Addition of the reductant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) to the reaction did not alter the riboflavin-mediated damage sites, but decreased Z by 2-fold and increased OG by 5-fold, while not altering the hydantoin ratio. However, NAC completely quenched the CO3•− reactions. Singlet oxygen oxidations of the G-quadruplex showed reactivity at all Gs on the exterior faces of G-quartets and furnished the product Sp, while no oxidation was observed in the duplex context under these conditions, and addition of NAC had no effect. Because a long telomere sequence would have higher-order structures of G-quadruplexes, studies were also conducted with 5’-(TAGGGT)8-T-3’, and it provided similar oxidation profiles to the single G-quadruplex. Lastly, CuII/H2O2-mediated oxidations were found to be indiscriminate in the damage patterns, and 5-carboxamido-5

  4. The VP3 factor from viruses of Birnaviridae family suppresses RNA silencing by binding both long and small RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Valli, Adrian; Busnadiego, Idoia; Maliogka, Varvara; Ferrero, Diego; Castón, José R; Rodríguez, José Francisco; García, Juan Antonio

    2012-01-01

    RNA silencing is directly involved in antiviral defense in a wide variety of eukaryotic organisms, including plants, fungi, invertebrates, and presumably vertebrate animals. The study of RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defences in vertebrates is hampered by the overlap with other antiviral mechanisms; thus, heterologous systems are often used to study the interplay between RNA silencing and vertebrate-infecting viruses. In this report we show that the VP3 protein of the avian birnavirus Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) displays, in addition to its capacity to bind long double-stranded RNA, the ability to interact with double-stranded small RNA molecules. We also demonstrate that IBDV VP3 prevents the silencing mediated degradation of a reporter mRNA, and that this silencing suppression activity depends on its RNA binding ability. Furthermore, we find that the anti-silencing activity of IBDV VP3 is shared with the homologous proteins expressed by both insect- and fish-infecting birnaviruses. Finally, we show that IBDV VP3 can functionally replace the well-characterized HCPro silencing suppressor of Plum pox virus, a potyvirus that is unable to infect plants in the absence of an active silencing suppressor. Altogether, our results support the idea that VP3 protects the viral genome from host sentinels, including those of the RNA silencing machinery.

  5. RNase III cleavage demonstrates a long range RNA: RNA duplex element flanking the hepatitis C virus internal ribosome entry site

    PubMed Central

    Beguiristain, Nerea; Robertson, Hugh D.; Gómez, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    Here, we show that Escherichia coli Ribonuclease III cleaves specifically the RNA genome of hepatitis C virus (HCV) within the first 570 nt with similar efficiency within two sequences which are ∼400 bases apart in the linear HCV map. Demonstrations include determination of the specificity of the cleavage sites at positions C27 and U33 in the first (5′) motif and G439 in the second (3′) motif, complete competition inhibition of 5′ and 3′ HCV RNA cleavages by added double-stranded RNA in a 1:6 to 1:8 weight ratio, respectively, 50% reverse competition inhibition of the RNase III T7 R1.1 mRNA substrate cleavage by HCV RNA at 1:1 molar ratio, and determination of the 5′ phosphate and 3′ hydroxyl end groups of the newly generated termini after cleavage. By comparing the activity and specificity of the commercial RNase III enzyme, used in this study, with the natural E.coli RNase III enzyme, on the natural bacteriophage T7 R1.1 mRNA substrate, we demonstrated that the HCV cuts fall into the category of specific, secondary RNase III cleavages. This reaction identifies regions of unusual RNA structure, and we further showed that blocking or deletion of one of the two RNase III-sensitive sequence motifs impeded cleavage at the other, providing direct evidence that both sequence motifs, besides being far apart in the linear RNA sequence, occur in a single RNA structural motif, which encloses the HCV internal ribosome entry site in a large RNA loop. PMID:16170153

  6. Understanding the role of base stacking in nucleic acids. MD and QM analysis of tandem GA base pairs in RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Morgado, Claudio A; Svozil, Daniel; Turner, Douglas H; Šponer, Jiří

    2012-09-28

    Preceding NMR experiments show that the conformation of tandem GA base pairs, an important recurrent non-canonical building block in RNA duplexes, is context dependent. The GA base pairs adopt "sheared" N3(G)-N6(A), N2(G)-N7(A) geometry in the r(CGAG)(2) and r(iGGAiC)(2) contexts while switching to "imino" N1(G)-N1(A), O6(G)-N6(A) geometry in the r(GGAC)(2) and r(iCGAiG)(2) contexts (iC and iG stand for isocytosine and isoguanine, respectively). As base stacking is likely to be one of the key sources of the context dependence of the conformation of GA base pairs, we calculated base stacking energies in duplexes containing such base pairs, to see if this dependence can be predicted by stacking energy calculations. When investigating the context dependence of the GA geometry two different conformations of the same duplex were compared (imino vs. sheared). The geometries were generated via explicit solvent MD simulations of the respective RNA duplexes, while the subsequent QM energy calculations focused on base stacking interactions of the four internal base pairs. Geometrical relaxation of nucleobase atoms prior to the stacking energy computations has a non-negligible effect on the results. The stacking energies were derived at the DFT-D/6-311++G(3df,3pd) level. We show a rather good correspondence between the intrinsic gas-phase stacking energies and the NMR-determined GA geometries. The conformation with more favorable gas-phase stacking is in most cases the one observed in experiments. This correlation is not improved when including solvent effects via the COSMO method. On the other side, the stacking calculations do not predict the relative thermodynamic stability of duplex formation for different sequences.

  7. A real-time fluorescence method to monitor the melting of duplex DNA during transcription initiation by RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Matlock, D L; Heyduk, T

    1999-05-15

    The melting of duplex DNA in the vicinity of the transcription start site is an essential step of transcription initiation. Here we describe a fluorescent promoter technique which allows the melting of promoter DNA to be observed in a real-time manner with high sensitivity. We have constructed a 114-bp lacUV5 promoter fragment (-89 to +25) which contains a fluorescence probe in the region between the -10 consensus hexamer and the transcription start site. This region was chosen to incorporate a fluorescence probe as it undergoes strand separation subsequent to binding RNA polymerase (RNAP) (i.e., open complex formation). Upon mixing RNAP and fluorochrome-labeled promoter a time-dependent biphasic change in fluorescence was observed. The second slower component was shown to be due to the open complex by comparing the fluorescence data with the kinetics of open complex formation as measured by using alternative methods of open complex detection. The rate constants for open complex formation and dissociation were determined and found to be in excellent agreement with previously reported values. The techniques presented herein can generally be applied to other systems. Furthermore, this method will serve as an important research tool as well as it could be used in designing high-throughput assays involving transcription complexes. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  8. Structure of an argonaute silencing complex with a seed-containing guide DNA and target RNA duplex

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yanli; Juranek, Stefan; Li, Haitao; Sheng, Gang; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2009-01-08

    Here we report on a 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of a ternary complex of wild-type Thermus thermophilus argonaute bound to a 5'-phosphorylated 21-nucleotide guide DNA and a 20-nucleotide target RNA containing cleavage-preventing mismatches at the 10-11 step. The seed segment (positions 2 to 8) adopts an A-helical-like Watson-Crick paired duplex, with both ends of the guide strand anchored in the complex. An arginine, inserted between guide-strand bases 10 and 11 in the binary complex, locking it in an inactive conformation, is released on ternary complex formation. The nucleic-acid-binding channel between the PAZ- and PIWI-containing lobes of argonaute widens on formation of a more open ternary complex. The relationship of structure to function was established by determining cleavage activity of ternary complexes containing position-dependent base mismatch, bulge and 2'-O-methyl modifications. Consistent with the geometry of the ternary complex, bulges residing in the seed segments of the target, but not the guide strand, were better accommodated and their complexes were catalytically active.

  9. Ion distributions around left- and right-handed DNA and RNA duplexes: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Feng; Roland, Christopher; Sagui, Celeste

    2014-01-01

    The ion atmosphere around nucleic acids is an integral part of their solvated structure. However, detailed aspects of the ionic distribution are difficult to probe experimentally, and comparative studies for different structures of the same sequence are almost non-existent. Here, we have used large-scale molecular dynamics simulations to perform a comparative study of the ion distribution around (5′-CGCGCGCGCGCG-3′)2 dodecamers in solution in B-DNA, A-RNA, Z-DNA and Z-RNA forms. The CG sequence is very sensitive to ionic strength and it allows the comparison with the rare but important left-handed forms. The ions investigated include Na+, K+ and Mg2 +, with various concentrations of their chloride salts. Our results quantitatively describe the characteristics of the ionic distributions for different structures at varying ionic strengths, tracing these differences to nucleic acid structure and ion type. Several binding pockets with rather long ion residence times are described, both for the monovalent ions and for the hexahydrated Mg[(H2O)6]2+ ion. The conformations of these binding pockets include direct binding through desolvated ion bridges in the GpC steps in B-DNA and A-RNA; direct binding to backbone oxygens; binding of Mg[(H2O)6]2+ to distant phosphates, resulting in acute bending of A-RNA; tight ‘ion traps’ in Z-RNA between C-O2 and the C-O2′ atoms in GpC steps; and others. PMID:25428372

  10. X-ray Structures of U2 snRNA-Branchpoint Duplexes Containing Conserved Pseudouridines

    SciTech Connect

    Lin,Y.; Kielkopf, C.

    2008-01-01

    A pseudouridine-modified region of the U2 small nuclear (sn)RNA anneals with the intronic branchpoint sequence and positions a bulged adenosine to serve as the nucleophile in the first chemical step of pre-mRNA splicing. We have determined three X-ray structures of RNA oligonucleotides containing the pseudouridylated U2 snRNA and the branchpoint consensus sequences. The expected adenosine branchpoint is extrahelical in a 1.65 Angstroms resolution structure containing the mammalian consensus sequence variant and in a 2.10 Angstroms resolution structure containing a shortened Saccharomyces cerevisiae consensus sequence. The adenosine adjacent to the expected branchpoint is extrahelical in a third structure, which contains the intact yeast consensus sequence at 1.57 Angstroms resolution. The hydration and base stacking interactions mediated by the U2 snRNA pseudouridines correlate with the identity of the unpaired adenosine. The expected adenosine bulge is associated with a well-stacked pseudouridine, which is linked via an ordered water molecule to a neighboring nucleotide. In contrast, the bulge of the adjacent adenosine shifts the base stacking and disrupts the water-mediated interactions of the pseudouridine. These structural differences may contribute to the ability of the pseudouridine modification to promote the bulged conformation of the branch site adenosine and to enhance catalysis by snRNAs. Furthermore, iodide binding sites are identified adjacent to the unconventional bulged adenosine, and the structure of the mammalian consensus sequence variant provides a high-resolution view of a hydrated magnesium ion bound in a similar manner to a divalent cation binding site of the group II intron.

  11. X-ray Structures of U2 snRNA - Branchpoint Duplexes Containing Conserved Pseudouridines

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan; Kielkopf, Clara L.

    2008-01-01

    A pseudouridine-modified region of the U2 small nuclear (sn)RNA anneals with the intronic branchpoint sequence, and positions a bulged adenosine to serve as the nucleophile in the first chemical step of pre-mRNA splicing. We have determined three X-ray structures of RNA oligonucleotides containing the pseudouridylated U2 snRNA and the branchpoint consensus sequences. The expected adenosine branchpoint is extrahelical in a 1.65 Å resolution structure containing the mammalian consensus sequence variant, and in a 2.10 Å resolution structure containing a shortened Saccharomyces cerevisiae consensus sequence. The adenosine adjacent to the expected branchpoint is extrahelical in a third structure, which contains the intact yeast consensus sequence at 1.57 Å resolution. The hydration and base stacking interactions mediated by the U2 snRNA pseudouridines correlate with the identity of the unpaired adenosine. The expected adenosine bulge is associated with a well-stacked pseudouridine, which is linked via an ordered water molecule to a neighboring nucleotide. In contrast, the bulge of the adjacent adenosine shifts the base stacking and disrupts the water-mediated interactions of the pseudouridine. These structural differences may contribute to the ability of the pseudouridine modification to promote the bulged conformation of the branch site adenosine, and to enhance catalysis by snRNAs. Furthermore, iodide binding sites are identified adjacent the unconventional bulged adenosine, and the structure of the mammalian consensus sequence variant provides a high resolution view of a hydrated magnesium ion bound in a similar manner to a divalent cation binding site of the Group II intron. PMID:18435545

  12. The crystal structure of an oligo(U):pre-mRNA duplex from a trypanosome RNA editing substrate

    PubMed Central

    Mooers, Blaine H.M.; Singh, Amritanshu

    2011-01-01

    Guide RNAs bind antiparallel to their target pre-mRNAs to form editing substrates in reaction cycles that insert or delete uridylates (Us) in most mitochondrial transcripts of trypanosomes. The 5′ end of each guide RNA has an anchor sequence that binds to the pre-mRNA by base-pair complementarity. The template sequence in the middle of the guide RNA directs the editing reactions. The 3′ ends of most guide RNAs have ∼15 contiguous Us that bind to the purine-rich unedited pre-mRNA upstream of the editing site. The resulting U-helix is rich in G·U wobble base pairs. To gain insights into the structure of the U-helix, we crystallized 8 bp of the U-helix in one editing substrate for the A6 mRNA of Trypanosoma brucei. The fragment provides three samples of the 5′-AGA-3′/5′-UUU-3′ base-pair triple. The fusion of two identical U-helices head-to-head promoted crystallization. We obtained X-ray diffraction data with a resolution limit of 1.37 Å. The U-helix had low and high twist angles before and after each G·U wobble base pair; this variation was partly due to shearing of the wobble base pairs as revealed in comparisons with a crystal structure of a 16-nt RNA with all Watson–Crick base pairs. Both crystal structures had wider major grooves at the junction between the poly(U) and polypurine tracts. This junction mimics the junction between the template helix and the U-helix in RNA-editing substrates and may be a site of major groove invasion by RNA editing proteins. PMID:21878548

  13. The crystal structure of an oligo(U):pre-mRNA duplex from a trypanosome RNA editing substrate.

    PubMed

    Mooers, Blaine H M; Singh, Amritanshu

    2011-10-01

    Guide RNAs bind antiparallel to their target pre-mRNAs to form editing substrates in reaction cycles that insert or delete uridylates (Us) in most mitochondrial transcripts of trypanosomes. The 5' end of each guide RNA has an anchor sequence that binds to the pre-mRNA by base-pair complementarity. The template sequence in the middle of the guide RNA directs the editing reactions. The 3' ends of most guide RNAs have ∼15 contiguous Us that bind to the purine-rich unedited pre-mRNA upstream of the editing site. The resulting U-helix is rich in G·U wobble base pairs. To gain insights into the structure of the U-helix, we crystallized 8 bp of the U-helix in one editing substrate for the A6 mRNA of Trypanosoma brucei. The fragment provides three samples of the 5'-AGA-3'/5'-UUU-3' base-pair triple. The fusion of two identical U-helices head-to-head promoted crystallization. We obtained X-ray diffraction data with a resolution limit of 1.37 Å. The U-helix had low and high twist angles before and after each G·U wobble base pair; this variation was partly due to shearing of the wobble base pairs as revealed in comparisons with a crystal structure of a 16-nt RNA with all Watson-Crick base pairs. Both crystal structures had wider major grooves at the junction between the poly(U) and polypurine tracts. This junction mimics the junction between the template helix and the U-helix in RNA-editing substrates and may be a site of major groove invasion by RNA editing proteins.

  14. Single-cell duplex RT-LATE-PCR reveals Oct4 and Xist RNA gradients in 8-cell embryos

    PubMed Central

    Hartshorn, Cristina; Eckert, Judith J; Hartung, Odelya; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2007-01-01

    Background The formation of two distinctive cell lineages in preimplantation mouse embryos is characterized by differential gene expression. The cells of the inner cell mass are pluripotent and express high levels of Oct4 mRNA, which is down-regulated in the surrounding trophectoderm. In contrast, the trophectoderm of female embryos contains Xist mRNA, which is absent from cells of the inner mass. Prior to blastocyst formation, all blastomeres of female embryos still express both of these RNAs. We, thus, postulated that simultaneous quantification of Oct4 and Xist transcripts in individual blastomeres at the 8-cell stage could be informative as to their subsequent fate. Testing this hypothesis, however, presented numerous technical challenges. We overcame these difficulties by combining PurAmp, a single-tube method for RNA preparation and quantification, with LATE-PCR, an advanced form of asymmetric PCR. Results We constructed a duplex RT-LATE-PCR assay for real-time measurement of Oct4 and Xist templates and confirmed its specificity and quantitative accuracy with different methods. We then undertook analysis of sets of blastomeres isolated from embryos at the 8-cell stage. At this stage, all cells in the embryo are still pluripotent and morphologically equivalent. Our results demonstrate, however, that both Oct4 and Xist RNA levels vary in individual blastomeres comprising the same embryo, with some cells having particularly elevated levels of either transcript. Analysis of multiple embryos also shows that Xist and Oct4 expression levels are not correlated at the 8-cell stage, although transcription of both genes is up-regulated at this time in development. In addition, comparison of data from males and females allowed us to determine that the efficiency of the Oct4/Xist assay is unaffected by sex-related differences in gene expression. Conclusion This paper describes the first example of multiplex RT-LATE-PCR and its utility, when combined with PurAmp sample

  15. Thermal stability and conformation of antiparallel duplexes formed by P-stereodefined phosphorothioate DNA/LNA chimeric oligomers with DNA and RNA matrices.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Katarzyna; Maciaszek, Anna; Dolot, Rafał; Bujacz, Grzegorz; Guga, Piotr

    2015-10-21

    3'-O-(2-Thio-4,4-pentamethylene-1,3,2-oxathiaphospholane) derivatives of LNA-type nucleosides (LNA-OTPs, 2a-d; B' = Thy, Ade(Bz), Cyt(Bz), Gua(dmf), respectively) were synthesized and separated into pure P-diastereomers. X-ray analysis allowed for assignment of the absolute configuration of the phosphorus atom in the detritylated, fast-eluting diastereomer 2a. The diastereomerically pure LNA-OTP monomers were used in solid phase synthesis of P-stereodefined chimeric PS-(DNA/LNA) 11-mers containing 2-3 LNA units. Formally, among the phosphorothioate oligomers the biggest enhancement in thermal stability of Watson-Crick paired duplexes was found for [SP-PS]-(DNA/LNA)/RNA duplexes (on average 8.2 °C per LNA nucleotide), followed by [RP-PS]-(DNA/LNA)/RNA (6.3 °C), [RP-PS]-(DNA/LNA)/DNA (3.8 °C) and [SP-PS]-(DNA/LNA)/DNA (2.4 °C per LNA nucleotide). However, detailed analysis of the thermal dissociation data showed that the thermal stability of (PS-LNA)-containing duplexes does not depend on the spatial orientation of the sulfur atoms. This conclusion received support from CD measurements.

  16. Recruitment, Duplex Unwinding and Protein-Mediated Inhibition of the Dead-Box RNA Helicase Dbp2 at Actively Transcribed Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wai Kit; Paudel, Bishnu P; Xing, Zheng; Sabath, Ivan G; Rueda, David; Tran, Elizabeth J

    2016-03-27

    RNA helicases play fundamental roles in modulating RNA structures and facilitating RNA-protein (RNP) complex assembly in vivo. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that the DEAD-box RNA helicase Dbp2 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required to promote efficient assembly of the co-transcriptionally associated mRNA-binding proteins Yra1, Nab2, and Mex67 onto poly(A)(+)RNA. We also found that Yra1 associates directly with Dbp2 and functions as an inhibitor of Dbp2-dependent duplex unwinding, suggestive of a cycle of unwinding and inhibition by Dbp2. To test this, we undertook a series of experiments to shed light on the order of events for Dbp2 in co-transcriptional mRNP assembly. We now show that Dbp2 is recruited to chromatin via RNA and forms a large, RNA-dependent complex with Yra1 and Mex67. Moreover, single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer and bulk biochemical assays show that Yra1 inhibits unwinding in a concentration-dependent manner by preventing the association of Dbp2 with single-stranded RNA. This inhibition prevents over-accumulation of Dbp2 on mRNA and stabilization of a subset of RNA polymerase II transcripts. We propose a model whereby Yra1 terminates a cycle of mRNP assembly by Dbp2.

  17. Duplex ultrasound

    MedlinePlus

    ... duplex ultrasound combines: Traditional ultrasound: This uses sound waves that bounce off blood vessels to create pictures. Doppler ultrasound: This records sound waves reflecting off moving objects, such as blood, to ...

  18. Thermodynamic instability of siRNA duplex is a prerequisite for dependable prediction of siRNA activities

    PubMed Central

    Ichihara, Masatoshi; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Masuda, Akio; Matsuura, Toru; Asai, Naoya; Jijiwa, Mayumi; Ishida, Maki; Shinmi, Jun; Yatsuya, Hiroshi; Qiao, Shanlou; Takahashi, Masahide; Ohno, Kinji

    2007-01-01

    We developed a simple algorithm, i-Score (inhibitory-Score), to predict active siRNAs by applying a linear regression model to 2431 siRNAs. Our algorithm is exclusively comprised of nucleotide (nt) preferences at each position, and no other parameters are taken into account. Using a validation dataset comprised of 419 siRNAs, we found that the prediction accuracy of i-Score is as good as those of s-Biopredsi, ThermoComposition21 and DSIR, which employ a neural network model or more parameters in a linear regression model. Reynolds and Katoh also predict active siRNAs efficiently, but the numbers of siRNAs predicted to be active are less than one-eighth of that of i-Score. We additionally found that exclusion of thermostable siRNAs, whose whole stacking energy (ΔG) is less than −34.6 kcal/mol, improves the prediction accuracy in i-Score, s-Biopredsi, ThermoComposition21 and DSIR. We also developed a universal target vector, pSELL, with which we can assay an siRNA activity of any sequence in either the sense or antisense direction. We assayed 86 siRNAs in HEK293 cells using pSELL, and validated applicability of i-Score and the whole ΔG value in designing siRNAs. PMID:17884914

  19. Au nanoparticles/hollow molybdenum disulfide microcubes based biosensor for microRNA-21 detection coupled with duplex-specific nuclease and enzyme signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Shuai, Hong-Lei; Huang, Ke-Jing; Chen, Ying-Xu; Fang, Lin-Xia; Jia, Meng-Pei

    2017-03-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for detecting microRNAs is fabricated based on hollow molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) microcubes. Duplex-specific nuclease, enzyme and electrochemical-chemical-chemical redox cycling are used for signal amplification. Hollow MoS2 microcubes constructed by ultrathin nanosheets are synthesized by a facile template-assisted strategy and used as supporting substrate. For biosensor assembling, biotinylated ssDNA capture probes are first immobilized on Au nanoparticles (AuNPs)/MoS2 modified electrode in order to combine with streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase (SA-ALP). When capture probes hybridize with miRNAs, duplex-specific nuclease cleaves the formative duplexes. At the moment, the biotin group strips from the electrode surface and SA-ALP is incapacitated to attach onto electrode. Then, ascorbic acids induce the electrochemical-chemical-chemical redox cycling to produce electrochemical response in the presence of ferrocene methanol and tris (2-carboxyethyl) phosphine. Under optimum conditions, the proposed biosensor shows a good linear relationship between the current variation and logarithm of the microRNAs concentration ranging from 0.1fM to 0.1pM with a detection limit of 0.086fM (S/N=3). Furthermore, the biosensor is successfully applied to detect target miRNA-21 in human serum samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Phosphorus-31 NMR spectra of ethidium, quinacrine, and daunomycin complexes with poly(adenylic acid)ter dot poly(uridylic acid) RNA duplex and calf thymus DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Gorenstein, D.G.; Lai, K. )

    1989-04-04

    {sup 31}P NMR provides a convenient monitor of the phosphate ester backbone conformational changes upon binding of the intercalating drugs ethidium, quinacrine, and daunomycin to sonicated poly(A){center dot}poly(U) and calf thymus DNA. {sup 31}P chemical shifts can also be used to assess differences in the duplex unwinding angles in the presence of the drug. Thus a new {sup 31}P signal, 1.8-2.2 ppm downfield from the double-stranded helix signals, is observed in the ethidium ion-poly(A){center dot}poly(U) complex. This signal arises from phosphates which are in perturbed environments due to intercalation of the drug. This is in keeping with the hypothesis that the P-O ester torsional angle in phosphates linking the intercalated base pairs is more trans-like. Similar though smaller deshielding of the {sup 31}P signals is observed in sonicated poly(A){center dot}poly(U)-quinacrine complexes as well as in the daunomycin complexes. The effect of added ethidium ion, quinacrine, and daunomycin on the {sup 31}P spectra of sonicated calf thymus DNA is consistent with Wilson and Jones' (1982) earlier study. In these drug-DNA complexes the drug produces a gradual downfield shift in the DNA {sup 31}P signal without the appearance of a separate downfield peak. These differences are attributed to differences in the rate of chemical exchange of the drug between free and bound duplex states. The previous correlation of {sup 31}P chemical shift with drug duplex unwinding angle is confirmed for both the RNA and DNA duplexes.

  1. LNA units present in the (2'-OMe)-RNA strand stabilize parallel duplexes (2'-OMe)-RNA/[All-R(P)-PS]-DNA and parallel triplexes (2'-OMe)-RNA/[All-R(P)-PS]-DNA/RNA. An improved tool for the inhibition of reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Maciaszek, Anna; Krakowiak, Agnieszka; Janicka, Magdalena; Tomaszewska-Antczak, Agnieszka; Sobczak, Milena; Mikołajczyk, Barbara; Guga, Piotr

    2015-02-28

    Homopurine phosphorothioate analogs of DNA, possessing all phosphorus atoms of RP configuration ([All-RP-PS]-DNA), when interact with appropriate complementary RNA or (2'-OMe)-RNA templates, form parallel triplexes or parallel duplexes of very high thermodynamic stability. The present results show that T-LNA or 5-Me-C-LNA units introduced into the parallel Hoogsteen-paired (2'-OMe)-RNA strands (up to four units in the oligomers of 9 or 12 nt in length) stabilize these parallel complexes. At neutral pH, dodecameric parallel duplexes have Tm values of 62-68 °C, which are by 4-10 °C higher than Tm for the reference duplex (with no LNA units present), while for the corresponding triplexes, Tm values exceeded 85 °C. For nonameric parallel duplexes, melting temperatures of 38-62 °C were found and (2'-OMe)-RNA oligomers containing 5-Me-C-LNA units stabilized the complexes more efficiently than the T-LNA containing congeners. In both series the stability of the parallel complexes increased with an increasing number of LNA units present. The same trend was observed in experiments of reverse transcription RNA→DNA (using AMV RT reverse transcriptase) where the formation of parallel triplexes (consisting of an RNA template, [All-RP-PS]-DNA nonamer and Hoogsteen-paired (2'-OMe)-RNA strands containing the LNA units) led to the efficient inhibition of the process. Under the best conditions checked (four 5-Me-C-LNA units, three-fold excess over the RNA template) the inhibition was 94% effective, compared to 71% inhibition observed in the reference system with the Hoogsteen-paired (2'-OMe)-RNA strand carrying no LNA units. This kind of complexation may "arrest" harmful RNA oligomers (e.g., viral RNA or mRNA of unwanted proteins) and, beneficially, exclude them from enzymatic processes, otherwise leading to viral or genetic diseases.

  2. An unusual mechanism of self-primed reverse transcription requires the RNase H domain of reverse transcriptase to cleave an RNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Levin, H L

    1996-10-01

    The reverse transcription of retroviruses and long terminal repeat-containing retrotransposons requires that tRNA species serve as primers. We recently reported that the long terminal repeat-containing retrotransposon Tf1 is a unique exception in that reverse transcription is independent of tRNA and is instead initiated by a self-priming mechanism. The first 11 bases of the Tf1 transcript fold back and anneal to the primer binding site in a process that results in the priming of minus-strand strong-stop DNA. Data presented here demonstrate that a cleavage occurs between the 11th and 12th bases of the transcript, resulting in the generation of the primer. Mutagenesis experiments presented here indicate that the RNase H domain of the Tf1 reverse transcriptase is required for the cleavage reaction, suggesting that this RNase H may have the novel ability to cleave double-stranded RNA at the end of a duplexed region.

  3. High-Resolution Crystal Structure of a Silver(I)-RNA Hybrid Duplex Containing Watson-Crick-like C-Silver(I)-C Metallo-Base Pairs.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Jiro; Tada, Yoshinari; Dairaku, Takenori; Saneyoshi, Hisao; Okamoto, Itaru; Tanaka, Yoshiyuki; Ono, Akira

    2015-11-02

    Metallo-base pairs have been extensively studied for applications in nucleic acid-based nanodevices and genetic code expansion. Metallo-base pairs composed of natural nucleobases are attractive because nanodevices containing natural metallo-base pairs can be easily prepared from commercially available sources. Previously, we have reported a crystal structure of a DNA duplex containing T-Hg(II)-T base pairs. Herein, we have determined a high-resolution crystal structure of the second natural metallo-base pair between pyrimidine bases C-Ag(I)-C formed in an RNA duplex. One Ag(I) occupies the center between two cytosines and forms a C-Ag(I)-C base pair through N3-Ag(I)-N3 linear coordination. The C-Ag(I)-C base pair formation does not disturb the standard A-form conformation of RNA. Since the C-Ag(I)-C base pair is structurally similar to the canonical Watson-Crick base pairs, it can be a useful building block for structure-based design and fabrication of nucleic acid-based nanodevices.

  4. An immobilization-free electrochemical impedance biosensor based on duplex-specific nuclease assisted target recycling for amplified detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Wu, Dong-Zhi; Cai, Shu-Xian; Chen, Mei; Xia, Yao-Kun; Wu, Fang; Chen, Jing-Hua

    2016-01-15

    An immobilization-free electrochemical impedance biosensor for microRNA detection was developed in this work, which was based on both the duplex-specific nuclease assisted target recycling (DSNATR) and capture probes (Cps) enriched from the solution to electrode surface via magnetic beads (MBs). In the absence of miR-21, Cps cannot be hydrolyzed due to the low activity of duplex-specific nuclease (DSN) against ssDNA. Therefore, the intact Cps could be attached to the surface of magnetic glass carbon electrode (MGCE), resulting in a compact negatively charged layer as well as a large charge-transfer resistance. While in the presence of miR-21, it hybridized with Cp to form a DNA-RNA heteroduplex. Due to the considerable cleavage preference for DNA in DNA-RNA hybrids, DSN hydrolyzed the target-binding part of the Cp while liberating the intact miR-21 to hybridize with a new Cp and initiate the second cycle of hydrolysis. In this way, a single miR-21 was able to trigger the permanent hydrolysis of multiple Cps. Finally, all Cps were digested. Thus, the negatively charged layer could not be formed, resulting in a small charge-transfer resistance. By employing the above strategy, the proposed biosensor achieved ultrahigh sensitivity toward miR-21 with a detection limit of 60aM. Meanwhile, the method showed little cross-hybridization among the closely related miRNA family members even at the single-base-mismatched level. Successful attempts were made in applying the approach to detect miR-21 in human serum samples of breast cancer patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Digoxin Suppresses HIV-1 Replication by Altering Viral RNA Processing

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Raymond W.; Balachandran, Ahalya; Ostrowski, Mario A.; Cochrane, Alan

    2013-01-01

    To develop new approaches to control HIV-1 replication, we examined the capacity of recently described small molecular modulators of RNA splicing for their effects on viral RNA metabolism. Of the drugs tested, digoxin was found to induce a dramatic inhibition of HIV-1 structural protein synthesis, a response due, in part, to reduced accumulation of the corresponding viral mRNAs. In addition, digoxin altered viral RNA splice site use, resulting in loss of the essential viral factor Rev. Digoxin induced changes in activity of the CLK family of SR protein kinases and modification of several SR proteins, including SRp20 and Tra2β, which could account for the effects observed. Consistent with this hypothesis, overexpression of SRp20 elicited changes in HIV-1 RNA processing similar to those observed with digoxin. Importantly, digoxin was also highly active against clinical strains of HIV-1 in vitro, validating this novel approach to treatment of this infection. PMID:23555254

  6. TRBP alters human precursor microRNA processing in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ho Young; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2012-11-01

    MicroRNAs play central roles in controlling gene expression in human cells. Sequencing data show that many miRNAs are produced at different levels and as multiple isoforms that can vary in length at their 5' or 3' ends, but the biogenesis and functional significance of these RNAs are largely unknown. We show here that the human trans-activation response (TAR) RNA binding protein (TRBP), a known molecular partner of the miRNA processing enzyme Dicer, changes the rates of pre-miRNA cleavage in an RNA-structure-specific manner. Furthermore, TRBP can trigger the generation of iso-miRNAs (isomiRs) that are longer than the canonical sequence by one nucleotide. We show that this change in miRNA processing site can alter guide strand selection, resulting in preferential silencing of a different mRNA target. These results implicate TRBP as a key regulator of miRNA processing and targeting in humans.

  7. Revision of AMBER Torsional Parameters for RNA Improves Free Energy Predictions for Tetramer Duplexes with GC and iGiC Base Pairs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    All-atom force fields are important for predicting thermodynamic, structural, and dynamic properties of RNA. In this paper, results are reported for thermodynamic integration calculations of free energy differences of duplex formation when CG pairs in the RNA duplexes r(CCGG)2, r(GGCC)2, r(GCGC)2, and r(CGCG)2 are replaced by isocytidine–isoguanosine (iCiG) pairs. Agreement with experiment was improved when ε/ζ, α/γ, β, and χ torsional parameters in the AMBER99 force field were revised on the basis of quantum mechanical calculations. The revised force field, AMBER99TOR, brings free energy difference predictions to within 1.3, 1.4, 2.3, and 2.6 kcal/mol at 300 K, respectively, compared to experimental results for the thermodynamic cycles of CCGG → iCiCiGiG, GGCC → iGiGiCiC, GCGC → iGiCiGiC, and CGCG → iCiGiCiG. In contrast, unmodified AMBER99 predictions for GGCC → iGiGiCiC and GCGC → iGiCiGiC differ from experiment by 11.7 and 12.6 kcal/mol, respectively. In order to test the dynamic stability of the above duplexes with AMBER99TOR, four individual 50 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in explicit solvent were run. All except r(CCGG)2 retained A-form conformation for ≥82% of the time. This is consistent with NMR spectra of r(iGiGiCiC)2, which reveal an A-form conformation. In MD simulations, r(CCGG)2 retained A-form conformation 52% of the time, suggesting that its terminal base pairs may fray. The results indicate that revised backbone parameters improve predictions of RNA properties and that comparisons to measured sequence dependent thermodynamics provide useful benchmarks for testing force fields and computational methods. PMID:22249447

  8. How do messenger RNA splicing alterations drive myelodysplasia?

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in RNA splicing factors are the single most common class of genetic alterations in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) patients. Although much has been learned about how these mutations affect splicing at a global- and transcript-specific level, critical questions about the role of these mutations in MDS development and maintenance remain. Here we present the questions to be addressed in order to understand the unique enrichment of these mutations in MDS. PMID:28348147

  9. A novel polydopamine-based chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer method for microRNA detection coupling duplex-specific nuclease-aided target recycling strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Yin, Bin-Cheng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2016-06-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), functioning as oncogenes or tumor suppressors, play significant regulatory roles in regulating gene expression and become as biomarkers for disease diagnostics and therapeutics. In this work, we have coupled a polydopamine (PDA) nanosphere-assisted chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) platform and a duplex-specific nuclease (DSN)-assisted signal amplification strategy to develop a novel method for specific miRNA detection. With the assistance of hemin, luminol, and H2O2, the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking G-rich sequence in the sensing probe produces chemiluminescence, which is quickly quenched by the CRET effect between PDA as energy acceptor and excited luminol as energy donor. The target miRNA triggers DSN to partially degrade the sensing probe in the DNA-miRNA heteroduplex to repeatedly release G-quadruplex formed by G-rich sequence from PDA for the production of chemiluminescence. The method allows quantitative detection of target miRNA in the range of 80 pM-50 nM with a detection limit of 49.6 pM. The method also shows excellent specificity to discriminate single-base differences, and can accurately quantify miRNA in biological samples, with good agreement with the result from a commercial miRNA detection kit. The procedure requires no organic dyes or labels, and is a simple and cost-effective method for miRNA detection for early clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Barley stripe mosaic virus γb protein promotes chloroplast-targeted replication by enhancing unwinding of RNA duplexes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kun; Zhang, Yongliang; Yang, Meng; Liu, Songyu; Li, Zhenggang; Wang, Xianbing; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2017-04-07

    RNA viruses encode various RNA binding proteins that function in many steps of viral infection cycles. These proteins function as RNA helicases, methyltransferases, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, RNA silencing suppressors, RNA chaperones, movement proteins, and so on. Although many of the proteins bind the viral RNA genome during different stages of infection, our knowledge about the coordination of their functions is limited. In this study, we describe a novel role for the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) γb as an enhancer of αa RNA helicase activity, and we show that the γb protein is recruited by the αa viral replication protein to chloroplast membrane sites of BSMV replication. Mutagenesis or deletion of γb from BSMV resulted in reduced positive strand (+) RNAα accumulation, but γb mutations abolishing viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) activity did not completely eliminate genomic RNA replication. In addition, cis- or trans-expression of the Tomato bushy stunt virus p19 VSR protein failed to complement the γb replication functions, indicating that the direct involvement of γb in BSMV RNA replication is independent of VSR functions. These data support a model whereby two BSMV-encoded RNA-binding proteins act coordinately to regulate viral genome replication and provide new insights into strategies whereby double-stranded viral RNA unwinding is regulated, as well as formation of viral replication complexes.

  11. The Barley stripe mosaic virus γb protein promotes chloroplast-targeted replication by enhancing unwinding of RNA duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Meng; Liu, Songyu; Li, Zhenggang; Wang, Xianbing; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin

    2017-01-01

    RNA viruses encode various RNA binding proteins that function in many steps of viral infection cycles. These proteins function as RNA helicases, methyltransferases, RNA-dependent RNA polymerases, RNA silencing suppressors, RNA chaperones, movement proteins, and so on. Although many of the proteins bind the viral RNA genome during different stages of infection, our knowledge about the coordination of their functions is limited. In this study, we describe a novel role for the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) γb as an enhancer of αa RNA helicase activity, and we show that the γb protein is recruited by the αa viral replication protein to chloroplast membrane sites of BSMV replication. Mutagenesis or deletion of γb from BSMV resulted in reduced positive strand (+) RNAα accumulation, but γb mutations abolishing viral suppressor of RNA silencing (VSR) activity did not completely eliminate genomic RNA replication. In addition, cis- or trans-expression of the Tomato bushy stunt virus p19 VSR protein failed to complement the γb replication functions, indicating that the direct involvement of γb in BSMV RNA replication is independent of VSR functions. These data support a model whereby two BSMV-encoded RNA-binding proteins act coordinately to regulate viral genome replication and provide new insights into strategies whereby double-stranded viral RNA unwinding is regulated, as well as formation of viral replication complexes. PMID:28388677

  12. A Viral RNA Structural Element Alters Host Recognition of Nonself RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, J. L.; Gardner, C. L.; Kimura, T.; White, J. P.; Liu, G.; Trobaugh, D. W.; Huang, C.; Tonelli, M.; Paessler, S.; Takeda, K.; Klimstra, W. B.; Amarasinghe, G. K.; Diamond, M. S.

    2014-01-30

    Although interferon (IFN) signaling induces genes that limit viral infection, many pathogenic viruses overcome this host response. As an example, 2'-O methylation of the 5' cap of viral RNA subverts mammalian antiviral responses by evading restriction of Ifit1, an IFN-stimulated gene that regulates protein synthesis. However, alphaviruses replicate efficiently in cells expressing Ifit1 even though their genomic RNA has a 5' cap lacking 2'-O methylation. We show that pathogenic alphaviruses use secondary structural motifs within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of their RNA to alter Ifit1 binding and function. Mutations within the 5'-UTR affecting RNA structural elements enabled restriction by or antagonism of Ifit1 in vitro and in vivo. These results identify an evasion mechanism by which viruses use RNA structural motifs to avoid immune restriction.

  13. A dual-amplified electrochemical detection of mRNA based on duplex-specific nuclease and bio-bar-code conjugates.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Mei; Wang, Lin-Lin; Luo, Jie; Wei, Qing-Li

    2015-03-15

    On the basis of strong preference for cleaving double-stranded DNA or DNA in DNA:RNA heteroduplexes of duplex-specific nuclease (DSN), a dual-amplified electrochemical detection of mRNA was developed in this article, by coupling the enhancement of DSN and bio-bar-code conjugates. Capture probe was linked with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at its 5' end and bio-bar-code at its 3' end. In the presence of target surviving mRNA, all hybridized S1 strands were cleaved off the biosensor by the DSN, and the bio-bar-code probe with CdS nanoparticles (CdS NPs) was released into the solution. The metal sulfide nanoparticles were measured by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) subsequently. This assay exhibited high sensitivity and selectivity with a detection limit of 0.48fM. In addition, we proved that this simple and cost-effective strategy is capable of detecting the target in complicated biological samples and holds great potential application in biomedical research and clinical diagnostics.

  14. Airway Epithelial miRNA Expression Is Altered in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Solberg, Owen D.; Ostrin, Edwin J.; Love, Michael I.; Peng, Jeffrey C.; Bhakta, Nirav R.; Nguyen, Christine; Solon, Margaret; Nguyen, Cindy; Barczak, Andrea J.; Zlock, Lorna T.; Blagev, Denitza P.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Ansel, K. Mark; Arron, Joseph R.; Erle, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Changes in airway epithelial cell differentiation, driven in part by IL-13, are important in asthma. Micro-RNAs (miRNAs) regulate cell differentiation in many systems and could contribute to epithelial abnormalities in asthma. Objectives: To determine whether airway epithelial miRNA expression is altered in asthma and identify IL-13–regulated miRNAs. Methods: We used miRNA microarrays to analyze bronchial epithelial brushings from 16 steroid-naive subjects with asthma before and after inhaled corticosteroids, 19 steroid-using subjects with asthma, and 12 healthy control subjects, and the effects of IL-13 and corticosteroids on cultured bronchial epithelial cells. We used quantitative polymerase chain reaction to confirm selected microarray results. Measurements and Main Results: Most (12 of 16) steroid-naive subjects with asthma had a markedly abnormal pattern of bronchial epithelial miRNA expression by microarray analysis. Compared with control subjects, 217 miRNAs were differentially expressed in steroid-naive subjects with asthma and 200 in steroid-using subjects with asthma (false discovery rate < 0.05). Treatment with inhaled corticosteroids had modest effects on miRNA expression in steroid-naive asthma, inducing a statistically significant (false discovery rate < 0.05) change for only nine miRNAs. qPCR analysis confirmed differential expression of 22 miRNAs that were highly differentially expressed by microarrays. IL-13 stimulation recapitulated changes in many differentially expressed miRNAs, including four members of the miR-34/449 family, and these changes in miR-34/449 family members were resistant to corticosteroids. Conclusions: Dramatic alterations of airway epithelial cell miRNA levels are a common feature of asthma. These alterations are only modestly corrected by inhaled corticosteroids. IL-13 effects may account for some of these alterations, including repression of miR-34/449 family members that have established roles in airway

  15. Altered adenosine-to-inosine RNA editing in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Paz, Nurit; Levanon, Erez Y; Amariglio, Ninette; Heimberger, Amy B; Ram, Zvi; Constantini, Shlomi; Barbash, Zohar S; Adamsky, Konstantin; Safran, Michal; Hirschberg, Avi; Krupsky, Meir; Ben-Dov, Issachar; Cazacu, Simona; Mikkelsen, Tom; Brodie, Chaya; Eisenberg, Eli; Rechavi, Gideon

    2007-11-01

    Adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) RNA editing was recently shown to be abundant in the human transcriptome, affecting thousands of genes. Employing a bioinformatic approach, we identified significant global hypoediting of Alu repetitive elements in brain, prostate, lung, kidney, and testis tumors. Experimental validation confirmed this finding, showing significantly reduced editing in Alu sequences within MED13 transcripts in brain tissues. Looking at editing of specific recoding and noncoding sites, including in cancer-related genes, a more complex picture emerged, with a gene-specific editing pattern in tumors vs. normal tissues. Additionally, we found reduced RNA levels of all three editing mediating enzymes, ADAR, ADARB1, and ADARB2, in brain tumors. The reduction of ADARB2 correlated with the grade of malignancy of glioblastoma multiforme, the most aggressive of brain tumors, displaying a 99% decrease in ADARB2 RNA levels. Consistently, overexpression of ADAR and ADARB1 in the U87 glioblastoma multiforme cell line resulted in decreased proliferation rate, suggesting that reduced A-to-I editing in brain tumors is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer. Altered epigenetic control was recently shown to play a central role in oncogenesis. We suggest that A-to-I RNA editing may serve as an additional epigenetic mechanism relevant to cancer development and progression.

  16. Human traumatic brain injury alters plasma microRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Redell, John B; Moore, Anthony N; Ward, Norman H; Hergenroeder, Georgene W; Dash, Pramod K

    2010-12-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) present in the serum/plasma are characteristically altered in many pathological conditions, and have been employed as diagnostic markers for specific diseases. We examined if plasma miRNA levels are altered in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) relative to matched healthy volunteers, and explored their potential for use as diagnostic TBI biomarkers. The plasma miRNA profiles from severe TBI patients (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤8) and age-, gender-, and race-matched healthy volunteers were compared by microarray analysis. Of the 108 miRNAs identified in healthy volunteer plasma, 52 were altered after severe TBI, including 33 with decreased and 19 with increased relative abundance. An additional 8 miRNAs were detected only in the TBI plasma. We used quantitative RT-PCR to determine if plasma miRNAs could identify TBI patients within the first 24 h post-injury. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that miR-16, miR-92a, and miR-765 were good markers of severe TBI (0.89, 0.82, and 0.86 AUC values, respectively). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that combining these miRNAs markedly increased diagnostic accuracy (100% specificity and 100% sensitivity), compared to either healthy volunteers or orthopedic injury patients. In mild TBI patients (GCS score > 12), miR-765 levels were unchanged, while the plasma levels of miR-92a and miR-16 were significantly increased within the first 24 h of injury compared to healthy volunteers, and had AUC values of 0.78 and 0.82, respectively. Our results demonstrate that circulating miRNA levels are altered after TBI, providing a rich new source of potential molecular biomarkers. Plasma-derived miRNA biomarkers, used in combination with established clinical practices such as imaging, neurocognitive, and motor examinations, have the potential to improve TBI patient classification and possibly management.

  17. Antisense Transcript and RNA Processing Alterations Suppress Instability of Polyadenylated mRNA in Chlamydomonas Chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yoshiki; Kikis, Elise A.; Zimmer, Sara L.; Komine, Yutaka; Stern, David B.

    2004-01-01

    In chloroplasts, the control of mRNA stability is of critical importance for proper regulation of gene expression. The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Δ26pAtE is engineered such that the atpB mRNA terminates with an mRNA destabilizing polyadenylate tract, resulting in this strain being unable to conduct photosynthesis. A collection of photosynthetic revertants was obtained from Δ26pAtE, and gel blot hybridizations revealed RNA processing alterations in the majority of these suppressor of polyadenylation (spa) strains, resulting in a failure to expose the atpB mRNA 3′ poly(A) tail. Two exceptions were spa19 and spa23, which maintained unusual heteroplasmic chloroplast genomes. One genome type, termed PS+, conferred photosynthetic competence by contributing to the stability of atpB mRNA; the other, termed PS−, was required for viability but could not produce stable atpB transcripts. Based on strand-specific RT-PCR, S1 nuclease protection, and RNA gel blots, evidence was obtained that the PS+ genome stabilizes atpB mRNA by generating an atpB antisense transcript, which attenuates the degradation of the polyadenylated form. The accumulation of double-stranded RNA was confirmed by insensitivity of atpB mRNA from PS+ genome-containing cells to S1 nuclease digestion. To obtain additional evidence for antisense RNA function in chloroplasts, we used strain Δ26, in which atpB mRNA is unstable because of the lack of a 3′ stem-loop structure. In this context, when a 121-nucleotide segment of atpB antisense RNA was expressed from an ectopic site, an elevated accumulation of atpB mRNA resulted. Finally, when spa19 was placed in a genetic background in which expression of the chloroplast exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase was diminished, the PS+ genome and the antisense transcript were no longer required for photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that antisense RNA in chloroplasts can protect otherwise unstable transcripts from 3′→5

  18. Understanding the Relative Flexibility of RNA and DNA Duplexes: Stretching and Twist-Stretch Coupling.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wu, Yuan-Yan; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2017-03-28

    The flexibility of double-stranded (ds) RNA and dsDNA is crucial for their biological functions. Recent experiments have shown that the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA can be distinctively different in the aspects of stretching and twist-stretch coupling. Although various studies have been performed to understand the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA, there is still a lack of deep understanding of the distinctive differences in the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA helices as pertains to their stretching and twist-stretch coupling. In this work, we have explored the relative flexibility in stretching and twist-stretch coupling between dsRNA and dsDNA by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated stretch modulus and twist-stretch coupling are in good accordance with the existing experiments. Our analyses show that the differences in stretching and twist-stretch coupling between dsRNA and dsDNA helices are mainly attributed to their different (A- and B-form) helical structures. Stronger basepair inclination and slide in dsRNA is responsible for the apparently weaker stretching rigidity versus that of dsDNA, and the opposite twist-stretch coupling for dsRNA and dsDNA is also attributed to the stronger basepair inclination in dsRNA than in dsDNA. Our calculated macroscopic elastic parameters and microscopic analyses are tested and validated by different force fields for both dsRNA and dsDNA.

  19. Messenger RNA processing is altered in autosomal dominant leukodystrophy†

    PubMed Central

    Bartoletti-Stella, Anna; Gasparini, Laura; Giacomini, Caterina; Corrado, Patrizia; Terlizzi, Rossana; Giorgio, Elisa; Magini, Pamela; Seri, Marco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Parchi, Piero; Brusco, Alfredo; Cortelli, Pietro; Capellari, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Adult-onset autosomal dominant leukodystrophy (ADLD) is a slowly progressive neurological disorder characterized by autonomic dysfunction, followed by cerebellar and pyramidal features. ADLD is caused by duplication of the lamin B1 gene (LMNB1), which leads to its increased expression. The molecular pathways involved in the disease are still poorly understood. Hence, we analyzed global gene expression in fibroblasts and whole blood of LMNB1 duplication carriers and used Gene Set Enrichment Analysis to explore their gene signatures. We found that LMNB1 duplication is associated with dysregulation of genes involved in the immune system, neuronal and skeletal development. Genes with an altered transcriptional profile clustered in specific genomic regions. Among the dysregulated genes, we further studied the role of RAVER2, which we found to be overexpressed at mRNA and protein level. RAVER2 encodes a putative trans regulator of the splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) and is likely implicated in alternative splicing regulation. Functional studies demonstrated an abnormal splicing pattern of several PTB-target genes and of the myelin protein gene PLP1, previously demonstrated to be involved in ADLD. Mutant mice with different lamin B1 expression levels confirmed that Raver2 expression is dependent on lamin B1 in neural tissue and determines an altered splicing pattern of PTB-target genes and Plp1. Overall our results demonstrate that deregulation of lamin B1 expression induces modified splicing of several genes, likely driven by raver-2 overexpression, and suggest that an alteration of mRNA processing could be a pathogenic mechanism in ADLD. PMID:25637521

  20. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Tjandrawinata, R R; Vincent, V L; Hughes-Fulford, M

    1997-05-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  1. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  2. Vibrational force alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tjandrawinata, R. R.; Vincent, V. L.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1997-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3E1) cells were subjected to a vibrational force modeled by NASA to simulate a space shuttle launch (7.83 G rms). The mRNA levels for eight genes were investigated to determine the effect of vibrational force on mRNA expression. The mRNA levels of two growth-related protooncogenes, c-fos and c-myc, were up-regulated significantly within 30 min after vibration, whereas those of osteocalcin as well as transforming growth factor-beta1 were decreased significantly within 3 h after vibration. No changes were detected in the levels of beta-actin, histone H4, or cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 after vibration. No basal levels of cyclooxygenase-2 expression were detected. In addition, the extracellular concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent autocrine/paracrine growth factor in bone, were not significantly altered after vibration most likely due to the serum deprivation state of the osteoblasts. In comparison with the gravitational launch profile, vibrational-induced changes in gene expression were greater both in magnitude and number of genes activated. Taken together, these data suggest that the changes in mRNA expression are due to a direct mechanical effect of the vibrational force on the osteoblast cells and not to changes in the local PGE2 concentrations. The finding that launch forces induce gene expression is of utmost importance since many of the biological experiments do not dampen vibrational loads on experimental samples. This lack of dampening of vibrational forces may partially explain why 1-G onboard controls sometimes do not reflect 1-G ground controls. These data may also suggest that scientists use extra ground controls that are exposed to launch forces, have these forces dampened on launched samples, or use facilities such as Biorack that provide an onboard 1-G centrufuge in order to control for space shuttle launch forces.

  3. [Sequence of venous blood flow alterations in patients after recently endured acute thrombosis of lower-limb deep veins based on the findings of ultrasonographic duplex scanning].

    PubMed

    Tarkovskiĭ, A A; Zudin, A M; Aleksandrova, E S

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the sequence of alterations in the venous blood flow to have occurred within the time frame of one year after sustained acute thrombosis of the lower-limb deep veins, which was carried out using the standard technique of ultrasonographic duplex scanning. A total of thirty-two 24-to-62-year-old patients presenting with newly onset acute phlebothrombosis were followed up. All the patients were sequentially examined at 2 days, 3 weeks, 3 months, 6 months and 12 months after the manifestation of the initial clinical signs of the disease. Amongst the parameters to determine were the patency of the deep veins and the condition of the valvular apparatus of the deep, superficial and communicant veins. According to the obtained findings, it was as early as at the first stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations after the endured thrombosis, i. e., during the acute period of the disease, that seven (21.9%) patients were found to have developed valvular insufficiency of the communicant veins of the cms, manifesting itself in the formation of a horizontal veno-venous reflux, and 6 months later, these events were observed to have occurred in all the patients examined (100%). Afterwards, the second stage of the phlebohaemodynamic alterations was, simultaneously with the process of recanalization of the thrombotic masses in the deep veins, specifically characterized by the formation of valvular insufficiency of the latter, manifesting itself in the form of the development of a deep vertical veno-venous reflux, which was revealed at month six after the onset of the disease in 56.3% of the examined subjects, to be then observed after 12 months in 93.8% of the patients involved. Recanalization of thrombotic masses was noted to commence 3 months after the onset of thrombosis in twelve (37.5%) patients, and after 12 months it was seen to ensue in all the patients (100%), eventually ending in complete restoration of the patency of the affected

  4. Duplex DNA and DNA-RNA hybrids with parallel strand orientation: 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoroisocytidine, 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoroisoguanosine, and canonical nucleosides with 2'-fluoro substituents cause unexpected changes on the double helix stability.

    PubMed

    Ingale, Sachin A; Leonard, Peter; Tran, Quang Nhat; Seela, Frank

    2015-03-20

    Oligonucleotides with parallel or antiparallel strand orientation incorporating 2'-fluorinated 2'-deoxyribonucleosides with canonical nucleobases or 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoroisocytidine ((F)iCd, 1c) and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoroisoguanosine ((F)iGd, 3c) were synthesized. To this end, the nucleosides 1c and 3c as well as the phosphoramidite building blocks 19 and 23 were prepared and employed in solid-phase oligonucleotide synthesis. Unexpectedly, (F)iCd is not stable during oligonucleotide deprotection (55 °C, aq NH3) and was converted to a cyclonucleoside (14). Side product formation was circumvented when oligonucleotides were deprotected under mild conditions (aq ammonia-EtOH, rt). Oligonucleotides containing 2'-fluoro substituents ((F)iCd, (F)iGd and fluorinated canonical 2'-deoxyribonucleosides) stabilize double-stranded DNA, RNA, and DNA-RNA hybrids with antiparallel strand orientation. Unexpected strong stability changes are observed for oligonucleotide duplexes with parallel chains. While fluorinated oligonucleotides form moderately stable parallel stranded duplexes with complementary DNA, they do not form stable hybrids with RNA. Furthermore, oligoribonucleotide duplexes with parallel strand orientation are extremely unstable. It is anticipated that nucleic acids with parallel chains might be too rigid to accept sugar residues in the N-conformation as observed for ribonucleosides or 2'-deoxy-2'-fluororibonucleosides. These observations might explain why nature has evolved the principle of antiparallel chain orientation and has not used the parallel chain alignment.

  5. Effect of guanine to inosine substitution on stability of canonical DNA and RNA duplexes: molecular dynamics thermodynamics integration study.

    PubMed

    Krepl, Miroslav; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel; Šponer, Jiří

    2013-02-14

    Guanine to inosine (G → I) substitution has often been used to study various properties of nucleic acids. Inosine differs from guanine only by loss of the N2 amino group, while both bases have similar electrostatic potentials. Therefore, G → I substitution appears to be optimally suited to probe structural and thermodynamics effects of single H-bonds and atomic groups. However, recent experiments have revealed substantial difference in free energy impact of G → I substitution in the context of B-DNA and A-RNA canonical helices, suggesting that the free energy changes reflect context-dependent balance of energy contributions rather than intrinsic strength of a single H-bond. In the present study, we complement the experiments by free energy computations using thermodynamics integration method based on extended explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations. The computations successfully reproduce the basic qualitative difference in free energy impact of G → I substitution in B-DNA and A-RNA helices although the magnitude of the effect is somewhat underestimated. The computations, however, do not reproduce the salt dependence of the free energy changes. We tentatively suggest that the different effect of G → I substitution in A-RNA and B-DNA may be related to different topologies of these helices, which affect the electrostatic interactions between the base pairs and the negatively charged backbone. Limitations of the computations are briefly discussed.

  6. A multi-step model for facilitated unwinding of the yeast U4/U6 RNA duplex.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Margaret L; Didychuk, Allison L; Butcher, Samuel E; Brow, David A; Hoskins, Aaron A

    2016-12-15

    The small nuclear RNA (snRNA) components of the spliceosome undergo many conformational rearrangements during its assembly, catalytic activation and disassembly. The U4 and U6 snRNAs are incorporated into the spliceosome as a base-paired complex within the U4/U6.U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (tri-snRNP). U4 and U6 are then unwound in order for U6 to pair with U2 to form the spliceosome's active site. After splicing, U2/U6 is unwound and U6 annealed to U4 to reassemble the tri-snRNP. U6 rearrangements are crucial for spliceosome formation but are poorly understood. We have used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer and unwinding assays to identify interactions that promote U4/U6 unwinding and have studied their impact in yeast. We find that U4/U6 is efficiently unwound using DNA oligonucleotides by coupling unwinding of U4/U6 stem II with strand invasion of stem I. Unwinding is stimulated by the U6 telestem, which transiently forms in the intact U4/U6 RNA complex. Stabilization of the telestem in vivo results in accumulation of U4/U6 di-snRNP and impairs yeast growth. Our data reveal conserved mechanisms for U4/U6 unwinding and indicate telestem dynamics are critical for tri-snRNP assembly and stability.

  7. A multi-step model for facilitated unwinding of the yeast U4/U6 RNA duplex

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Margaret L.; Didychuk, Allison L.; Butcher, Samuel E.; Brow, David A.; Hoskins, Aaron A.

    2016-01-01

    The small nuclear RNA (snRNA) components of the spliceosome undergo many conformational rearrangements during its assembly, catalytic activation and disassembly. The U4 and U6 snRNAs are incorporated into the spliceosome as a base-paired complex within the U4/U6.U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (tri-snRNP). U4 and U6 are then unwound in order for U6 to pair with U2 to form the spliceosome's active site. After splicing, U2/U6 is unwound and U6 annealed to U4 to reassemble the tri-snRNP. U6 rearrangements are crucial for spliceosome formation but are poorly understood. We have used single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer and unwinding assays to identify interactions that promote U4/U6 unwinding and have studied their impact in yeast. We find that U4/U6 is efficiently unwound using DNA oligonucleotides by coupling unwinding of U4/U6 stem II with strand invasion of stem I. Unwinding is stimulated by the U6 telestem, which transiently forms in the intact U4/U6 RNA complex. Stabilization of the telestem in vivo results in accumulation of U4/U6 di-snRNP and impairs yeast growth. Our data reveal conserved mechanisms for U4/U6 unwinding and indicate telestem dynamics are critical for tri-snRNP assembly and stability. PMID:27484481

  8. 2-Amino-alpha-2'-deoxyadenosine increased duplex stability of methoxyethylphosphoramidate alpha-oligodeoxynucleotides with RNA target.

    PubMed

    Naval, Magali; Michel, Thibaut; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Debart, Françoise

    2002-06-03

    A new efficient synthesis of 2-amino-alpha-2'-deoxyadenosine and its incorporation into methoxyethylphosphoramidate alpha-oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) via H-phosphonate chemistry were reported. Thermal denaturation experiments demonstrated a significant stabilization of the complexes formed between these analogues and their RNA target (+2 degrees C/NH2A) relative to adenosine-containing phosphoramidate alpha-oligonucleotides. Concerning the binding specificity of these modified ODNs, unlike natural ODNs, discrimination against G pairing is higher and against C pairing is lower.

  9. Groove modification of siRNA duplexes to elucidate siRNA-protein interactions using 7-bromo-7-deazaadenosine and 3-bromo-3-deazaadenosine as chemical probes.

    PubMed

    Saito-Tarashima, Noriko; Kira, Hirotaka; Wada, Tomoya; Miki, Kazuya; Ide, Shiho; Yamazaki, Naoshi; Matsuda, Akira; Minakawa, Noriaki

    2016-11-29

    Elucidation of dynamic interactions between RNA and proteins is essential for understanding the biological processes regulated by RNA, such as RNA interference (RNAi). In this study, the logical chemical probes, comprising 7-bromo-7-deazaadenosine (Br(7)C(7)A) and 3-bromo-3-deazaadenosine (Br(3)C(3)A), to investigate small interfering RNA (siRNA)-RNAi related protein interactions, were developed. The bromo substituents of Br(7)C(7)A and Br(3)C(3)A are expected to be located in the major and the minor grooves, respectively, and to act as a steric hindrance in each groove when these chemical probes are incorporated into siRNAs. A comprehensive investigation using siRNAs containing these chemical probes revealed that (i) Br(3)C(3)A(s) at the 5'-end of the passenger strand enhanced their RNAi activity, and (ii) the direction of RISC assembly is determined by the interaction between Argonaute2, which is the main component of RISC, and siRNA in the minor groove near the 5'-end of the passenger strand. Utilization of these chemical probes enables the investigation of the dynamic interactions between RNA and proteins.

  10. New Sensitive One-Step Real-Time Duplex PCR Method for Group A and B HIV-2 RNA Load

    PubMed Central

    Avettand-Fenoel, Véronique; Damond, Florence; Gueudin, Marie; Matheron, Sophie; Mélard, Adeline; Collin, Gilles; Descamps, Diane; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Rouzioux, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The Agence Nationale de Recherche sur le Sida et les hépatites virales (ANRS) previously developed a widely used method for HIV-1 RNA quantification (Biocentric). Here, we report the development of a new specific and sensitive method for HIV-2 RNA quantification, based on an adaptation of the existing HIV-1 protocol. The new test is based on TaqMan one-step reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) targeting two conserved consensus regions of HIV-2 (long terminal repeat [LTR] and gag). Analytic performances were determined in three laboratories. Clinical performances were evaluated on 100 plasma samples from HIV-2-infected patients (groups A, B, and H) by comparison with the assay currently used for the ANRS HIV-2 cohort. The specificity was 100%. Sensitivity was 50 copies/ml (cp/ml) and was optimized to 10 cp/ml. The within-run coefficients of variation in the three laboratories varied from 0.54% to 1.61% at 4 log10 copies/ml and from 7.24% to 14.32% at 2 log10 cp/ml. The between-run coefficients of variation varied from 2.28% to 6.43%. Of the 39 clinical samples below 2 log10 in the current assay, the new test improved the detection or quantification of 17 samples, including eight group B samples. For quantifiable samples, similar loads were obtained with the two assays for group A samples. The median difference between the two assays for group B samples was +0.18 but with greater heterogeneity than for group A. The HIV-2 group H sample had similar results with the two assays. This new assay is highly sensitive and accurately quantifies the most prevalent HIV-2 groups. This test will be useful for monitoring low viral loads in HIV-2-infected patients. PMID:24920771

  11. Altered RNA editing in 3′ UTR perturbs microRNA-mediated regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Liye; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Varelas, Xaralabos; Monti, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    RNA editing is a molecular event that alters specific nucleotides in RNA post-transcriptionally. RNA editing has the potential to impact a variety of cellular processes and is implicated in diseases such as cancer. Yet, the precise mechanisms by which RNA editing controls cellular processes are poorly understood. Here, we characterize sequences altered by RNA editing in patient samples from lymphoma, neuroblastoma and head and neck cancers. We show that A-to-I RNA editing sites are highly conserved across samples of the same tissue type and that most editing sites identified in tumors are also detectable in normal tissues. Next, we identify the significant changes in editing levels of known sites between tumor and paired “normal” tissues across 14 cancer types (627 pairs) from The Cancer Genome Atlas project and show that the complexity of RNA editing regulation cannot be captured by the activity of ADAR family genes alone. Our pan-cancer analysis confirms previous results on individual tumor types and suggests that changes of RNA editing levels in coding and 3′UTR regions could be a general mechanism to promote tumor growth. We also propose a model explaining how altered RNA editing levels affect microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors. PMID:26980570

  12. Altered RNA editing in 3' UTR perturbs microRNA-mediated regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liye; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Varelas, Xaralabos; Monti, Stefano

    2016-03-16

    RNA editing is a molecular event that alters specific nucleotides in RNA post-transcriptionally. RNA editing has the potential to impact a variety of cellular processes and is implicated in diseases such as cancer. Yet, the precise mechanisms by which RNA editing controls cellular processes are poorly understood. Here, we characterize sequences altered by RNA editing in patient samples from lymphoma, neuroblastoma and head and neck cancers. We show that A-to-I RNA editing sites are highly conserved across samples of the same tissue type and that most editing sites identified in tumors are also detectable in normal tissues. Next, we identify the significant changes in editing levels of known sites between tumor and paired "normal" tissues across 14 cancer types (627 pairs) from The Cancer Genome Atlas project and show that the complexity of RNA editing regulation cannot be captured by the activity of ADAR family genes alone. Our pan-cancer analysis confirms previous results on individual tumor types and suggests that changes of RNA editing levels in coding and 3'UTR regions could be a general mechanism to promote tumor growth. We also propose a model explaining how altered RNA editing levels affect microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of oncogenes and tumor-suppressors.

  13. Testosterone and its dimers alter tRNA morphology.

    PubMed

    Chanphai, P; Agudelo, D; Vesper, A R; Bérubé, G; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2017-02-05

    The morphology of tRNA was studied upon conjugation with testosterone and its aliphatic and aromatic dimers, using multiple spectroscopic methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular modeling. Structural analysis showed that testosterone binds tRNA through A62, A64, C60, C61, C63, G51, U50 and U59 bases. The binding affinity was testosterone dimer-aromatic>testosterone dimer-aliphatic>testosterone. The steroid loading efficacy was 35-45%. Transmission electron microscopy showed major changes in tRNA morphology upon testosterone interaction with an increase in the diameter of the tRNA aggregate, indicating encapsulation of testosterone by tRNA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. N6-methyladenosine alters RNA structure to regulate binding of a low-complexity protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nian; Zhou, Katherine I; Parisien, Marc; Dai, Qing; Diatchenko, Luda; Pan, Tao

    2017-02-25

    N6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant internal modification in eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA), and affects almost every stage of the mRNA life cycle. The YTH-domain proteins can specifically recognize m6A modification to control mRNA maturation, translation and decay. m6A can also alter RNA structures to affect RNA-protein interactions in cells. Here, we show that m6A increases the accessibility of its surrounding RNA sequence to bind heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein G (HNRNPG). Furthermore, HNRNPG binds m6A-methylated RNAs through its C-terminal low-complexity region, which self-assembles into large particles in vitro. The Arg-Gly-Gly repeats within the low-complexity region are required for binding to the RNA motif exposed by m6A methylation. We identified 13,191 m6A sites in the transcriptome that regulate RNA-HNRNPG interaction and thereby alter the expression and alternative splicing pattern of target mRNAs. Low-complexity regions are pervasive among mRNA binding proteins. Our results show that m6A-dependent RNA structural alterations can promote direct binding of m6A-modified RNAs to low-complexity regions in RNA binding proteins.

  15. Cigarette smoke exposure-associated alterations to non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Maccani, Matthew A; Knopik, Valerie S

    2012-01-01

    Environmental exposures vary by timing, severity, and frequency and may have a number of deleterious effects throughout the life course. The period of in utero development, for example, is one of the most crucial stages of development during which adverse environmental exposures can both alter the growth and development of the fetus as well as lead to aberrant fetal programming, increasing disease risk. During fetal development and beyond, the plethora of exposures, including nutrients, drugs, stress, and trauma, influence health, development, and survival. Recent research in environmental epigenetics has investigated the roles of environmental exposures in influencing epigenetic modes of gene regulation during pregnancy and at various stages of life. Many relatively common environmental exposures, such as cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and drug use, may have consequences for the expression and function of non-coding RNA (ncRNA), important post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. A number of ncRNA have been discovered, including microRNA (miRNA), Piwi-interacting RNA (piRNA), and long non-coding RNA (long ncRNA). The best-characterized species of ncRNA are miRNA, the mature forms of which are ∼22 nucleotides in length and capable of post-transcriptionally regulating target mRNA utilizing mechanisms based largely on the degree of complementarity between miRNA and target mRNA. Because miRNA can still negatively regulate gene expression when imperfectly base-paired with a target mRNA, a single miRNA can have a large number of potential mRNA targets and can regulate many different biological processes critical for health and development. The following review analyzes the current literature detailing links between cigarette smoke exposure and aberrant expression and function of ncRNA, assesses how such alterations may have consequences throughout the life course, and proposes future directions for this intriguing field of research.

  16. Altered MicroRNA Activity Promotes Resistance to Endocrine Therapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    MicroRNAs ( miRNAs ) have tumor suppressive and oncogenic potential in human cancer , but little is known...Microarray studies on miRNA levels in various human breast cancer tissues have shown that some miRNAs are up-regulated in breast cancer vs. normal tissue ... MicroRNAs ( miRNAs ) have tumor suppressive and oncogenic potential in human cancer , but little is known about the extent at which miRNA expression

  17. SomamiR 2.0: a database of cancer somatic mutations altering microRNA-ceRNA interactions.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Cui, Yan

    2016-01-04

    SomamiR 2.0 (http://compbio.uthsc.edu/SomamiR) is a database of cancer somatic mutations in microRNAs (miRNA) and their target sites that potentially alter the interactions between miRNAs and competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNA) including mRNAs, circular RNAs (circRNA) and long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA). Here, we describe the recent major updates to the SomamiR database. We expanded the scope of the database by including somatic mutations that impact the interactions between miRNAs and two classes of non-coding RNAs, circRNAs and lncRNAs. Recently, a large number of miRNA target sites have been discovered by newly emerged high-throughput technologies for mapping the miRNA interactome. We have mapped 388 247 somatic mutations to the experimentally identified miRNA target sites. The updated database also includes a list of somatic mutations in the miRNA seed regions, which contain the most important guiding information for miRNA target recognition. A recently developed webserver, miR2GO, was integrated with the database to provide a seamless pipeline for assessing functional impacts of somatic mutations in miRNA seed regions. Data and functions from multiple sources including biological pathways and genome-wide association studies were updated and integrated with SomamiR 2.0 to make it a better platform for functional analysis of somatic mutations altering miRNA-ceRNA interactions. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. N 6-methyladenosine alters RNA structure to regulate binding of a low-complexity protein

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Zhou, Katherine I.; Parisien, Marc; Dai, Qing; Diatchenko, Luda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract N 6-methyladenosine (m6A) is the most abundant internal modification in eukaryotic messenger RNA (mRNA), and affects almost every stage of the mRNA life cycle. The YTH-domain proteins can specifically recognize m6A modification to control mRNA maturation, translation and decay. m6A can also alter RNA structures to affect RNA–protein interactions in cells. Here, we show that m6A increases the accessibility of its surrounding RNA sequence to bind heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein G (HNRNPG). Furthermore, HNRNPG binds m6A-methylated RNAs through its C-terminal low-complexity region, which self-assembles into large particles in vitro. The Arg-Gly-Gly repeats within the low-complexity region are required for binding to the RNA motif exposed by m6A methylation. We identified 13,191 m6A sites in the transcriptome that regulate RNA–HNRNPG interaction and thereby alter the expression and alternative splicing pattern of target mRNAs. Low-complexity regions are pervasive among mRNA binding proteins. Our results show that m6A-dependent RNA structural alterations can promote direct binding of m6A-modified RNAs to low-complexity regions in RNA binding proteins. PMID:28334903

  19. Formaldehyde exposure alters miRNA expression profiles in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Li, Guifa; Yang, Jing; Ling, Shucai

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that inhaling formaldehyde (FA) causes damage to the central nervous system. However, it is unclear whether FA can disturb the function of the olfactory bulb. Using a microarray, we found that FA inhalation altered the miRNA expression profile. Functional enrichment analysis of the predicted targets of the changed miRNA showed that the enrichment canonical pathways and networks associated with cancer and transcriptional regulation. FA exposure disrupts miRNA expression profiles within the olfactory bulb.

  20. Small molecule-mediated duplex formation of nucleic acids with 'incompatible' backbones.

    PubMed

    Cafferty, Brian J; Musetti, Caterina; Kim, Keunsoo; Horowitz, Eric D; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Hud, Nicholas V

    2016-04-07

    Proflavine, a known intercalator of DNA and RNA, promotes duplex formation by nucleic acids with natural and non-natural backbones that otherwise form duplexes with low thermal stability, and even some that show no sign of duplex formation in the absence of proflavine. These findings demonstrate the potential for intercalators to be used as cofactors for the assembly of rationally designed nucleic acid structures, and could provide fundamental insights regarding intercalation of natural nucleic acid duplexes.

  1. Altered A-to-I RNA Editing in Human Embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mandel, Rachel; Ziskind, Anna; Nahor, Irit; Safran, Michal; Osenberg, Sivan; Sherf, Ofra; Rechavi, Gideon; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Post-transcriptional events play an important role in human development. The question arises as to whether Adenosine to Inosine RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, differs in human embryogenesis and in adulthood. We tested the editing of various target genes in coding (FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2) and non-coding sequences at their Alu elements (BRCA1, CARD11, RBBP9, MDM4, FNACC), as well as the transcriptional levels of the ADAR1 enzymes. This analysis was performed on five fetal and adult human tissues: brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, as well as on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which represent the blastocyst stage in early human development. Our results show substantially greater editing activity for most adult tissue samples relative to fetal ones, in six of the eight genes tested. To test the effect of reduced A-to-I RNA editing activity in early human development we used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a model and tried to generate hESC clones that overexpress the ADAR1–p110 isoform. We were unable to achieve overexpression of ADAR1–p110 by either transfection or lentiviral infection, though we easily generated hESC clones that expressed the GFP transgene and overexpressed ADAR1-p110 in 293T cells and in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Moreover, in contrast to the expected overexpression of ADAR1-p110 protein following its introduction into hESCs, the expression levels of this protein decreased dramatically 24–48 hr post infection. Similar results were obtained when we tried to overexpress ADAR1-p110 in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. This suggests that ADAR1 protein is substantially regulated in undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs. Overall, our data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing plays a critical role during early human development. PMID:22859999

  2. Altered A-to-I RNA editing in human embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shtrichman, Ronit; Germanguz, Igal; Mandel, Rachel; Ziskind, Anna; Nahor, Irit; Safran, Michal; Osenberg, Sivan; Sherf, Ofra; Rechavi, Gideon; Itskovitz-Eldor, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Post-transcriptional events play an important role in human development. The question arises as to whether Adenosine to Inosine RNA editing, catalyzed by the ADAR (Adenosine Deaminase acting on RNA) enzymes, differs in human embryogenesis and in adulthood. We tested the editing of various target genes in coding (FLNA, BLCAP, CYFIP2) and non-coding sequences at their Alu elements (BRCA1, CARD11, RBBP9, MDM4, FNACC), as well as the transcriptional levels of the ADAR1 enzymes. This analysis was performed on five fetal and adult human tissues: brain, heart, liver, kidney, and spleen, as well as on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which represent the blastocyst stage in early human development. Our results show substantially greater editing activity for most adult tissue samples relative to fetal ones, in six of the eight genes tested. To test the effect of reduced A-to-I RNA editing activity in early human development we used human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) as a model and tried to generate hESC clones that overexpress the ADAR1-p110 isoform. We were unable to achieve overexpression of ADAR1-p110 by either transfection or lentiviral infection, though we easily generated hESC clones that expressed the GFP transgene and overexpressed ADAR1-p110 in 293T cells and in primary human foreskin fibroblast (HFF) cells. Moreover, in contrast to the expected overexpression of ADAR1-p110 protein following its introduction into hESCs, the expression levels of this protein decreased dramatically 24-48 hr post infection. Similar results were obtained when we tried to overexpress ADAR1-p110 in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells. This suggests that ADAR1 protein is substantially regulated in undifferentiated pluripotent hESCs. Overall, our data suggest that A-to-I RNA editing plays a critical role during early human development.

  3. Mutant U2AF1 Expression Alters Hematopoiesis and Pre-mRNA Splicing In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Cara Lunn; Ley, James N.; White, Brian S.; Kim, Sanghyun; Tibbitts, Justin; Shao, Jin; Ndonwi, Matthew; Wadugu, Brian; Duncavage, Eric J.; Okeyo-Owuor, Theresa; Liu, Tuoen; Griffith, Malachi; McGrath, Sean; Magrini, Vincent; Fulton, Robert S.; Fronick, Catrina; O’Laughlin, Michelle; Graubert, Timothy A.; Walter, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Heterozygous somatic mutations in the spliceosome gene U2AF1 occur in ~11% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), the most common adult myeloid malignancy. It is unclear how these mutations contribute to disease. We examined in vivo hematopoietic consequences of the most common U2AF1 mutation using a doxycycline-inducible transgenic mouse model. Mice expressing mutant U2AF1(S34F) display altered hematopoiesis and changes in pre-mRNA splicing in hematopoietic progenitor cells by whole transcriptome analysis (RNA-seq). Integration with human RNA-seq datasets determined that common mutant U2AF1-induced splicing alterations are enriched in RNA processing genes, ribosomal genes, and recurrently-mutated MDS and acute myeloid leukemia-associated genes. These findings support the hypothesis that mutant U2AF1 alters downstream gene isoform expression, thereby contributing to abnormal hematopoiesis in MDS patients. PMID:25965570

  4. Altered translational repression of an RNA-binding protein, Elav by AOA2-causative Senataxin mutation.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Saumitra Dey; Vs, Ancy; Mushtaq, Zeeshan; Kumar, Vimlesh

    2017-05-01

    Mutations in Senataxin (SETX) gene causes two types of neurological disorders, Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS4) and Ataxia with Oculomotor Apraxia type 2 (AOA2). Recent studies in cultured cells suggest that SETX plays a crucial role at the interface of transcription and the DNA damage response. Whether SETX can alter translational of specific RNA is not known. In this study, we report that expressing AOA2-causative truncated form of human SETX in Drosophila neurons alters the development of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) synapses. Interestingly, we found that expressing this truncated form of SETX in Drosophila muscles resulted in an alteration of translational repression of an RNA-binding protein, Embryonic Lethal Abnormal Vision (Elav). Elav is transcribed in all tissues but remains translationally repressed except in neurons. Thus, our data suggest that an altered repression profile of RNA by SETX mutants could be one of the mechanisms underlying ALS4 or AOA2 pathogenesis.

  5. Chronic ethanol feeding alters miRNA expression dynamics during liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dippold, Rachael P.; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Gonye, Gregory E.; Patra, Biswanath; Hoek, Jan B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Adaptation to chronic ethanol treatment of rats results in a changed functional state of the liver and greatly inhibits its regenerative ability, which may contribute to the progression of alcoholic liver disease. Methods In this study we investigated the effect of chronic ethanol intake on hepatic miRNA expression in male Sprague-Dawley rats during the initial 24 hrs of liver regeneration following 70% partial hepatectomy (PHx) using microRNA (miRNA) microarrays. miRNA expression during adaptation to ethanol was investigated using RT-qPCR. Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFκB) binding at target miRNA promoters was investigated with chromatin immunoprecipitation. Results Unsupervised clustering of miRNA expression profiles suggested that miRNA expression was more affected by chronic ethanol feeding than by the acute challenge of liver regeneration after PHx. Several miRNAs that were significantly altered by chronic ethanol feeding, including miRs-34a, -103, -107, and -122 have been reported to play a role in regulating hepatic metabolism and the onset of these miRNA changes occurred gradually during the time course of ethanol feeding. Chronic ethanol feeding also altered the dynamic miRNA profile during liver regeneration. Promoter analysis predicted a role for Nuclear Factor kappa B (NFκB) in the immediate early miRNA response to PHx. NFκB binding at target miRNA promoters in the chronic ethanol-fed group was significantly altered and these changes directly correlated with the observed expression dynamics of the target miRNA. Conclusions Chronic ethanol consumption alters the hepatic miRNA expression profile such that the response of the metabolism-associated miRNAs occurs during long-term adaptation to ethanol rather than as an acute transient response to ethanol metabolism. Additionally, the dynamic miRNA program during liver regeneration in response to PHx is altered in the chronically ethanol-fed liver and these differences reflect, in part, differences

  6. Altered mRNA splicing in lipoprotein disorders.

    PubMed

    Calandra, Sebastiano; Tarugi, Patrizia; Bertolini, Stefano

    2011-04-01

    To review recent publications concerning the functional assessment on pre-mRNA splicing of genomic variants found in some monogenic dyslipidemias. Examples are derived from familial hypercholesterolemia, familial HDL deficiency/Tangier disease and familial hypobetalipoproteinemia. About 5-10% of genomic variants found in familial hypercholesterolemia, FHD/Tangier disease and familial hypobetalipoproteinemia are located in the introns of the candidate genes and are classified as splicing mutations. Although variants affecting highly conserved GT/AG dinucleotides at the splice sites are likely to be pathogenic, it is difficult to predict the effects of variants located deep in the introns. Algorithms were developed to predict the effect of these variants and to provide the rationale for functional studies. Combined in-silico and wet bench analysis revealed that some intronic variants classified as pathogenic have no effect, whereas others generated abnormal transcripts. Nucleotide substitutions at the 5' and the 3' of exons might change the splice site consensus sequence, causing splicing defects. Rare silent mutations were identified which create new splice sites within exons, with the consequent production of abnormal transcripts. Intronic variants, even if located deep in introns, as well as exonic variants could affect splicing with the formation of abnormal transcripts encoding structurally abnormal proteins.

  7. The N domain of Argonaute drives duplex unwinding during RISC assembly.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Pieter Bas; Tomari, Yukihide

    2012-01-10

    Small RNAs, such as microRNAs and small interfering RNAs, act through Argonaute (Ago) proteins as a part of RNA-induced silencing complexes (RISCs). To make RISCs, Ago proteins bind and subsequently unwind small RNA duplexes, finally leaving one strand stably incorporated. Here we identified the N domain of human AGO2 as the initiator of duplex unwinding during RISC assembly. We discovered that a functional N domain is strictly required for small RNA duplex unwinding but not for precedent duplex loading or subsequent target cleavage. We postulate that RISC assembly is tripartite, comprising (i) RISC loading, whereby Ago undergoes conformational opening and loads a small RNA duplex, forming pre-RISC; (ii) wedging, whereby the end of the duplex is pried open through active wedging by the N domain, in preparation for unwinding; and (iii) unwinding, whereby the passenger strand is removed through slicer-dependent or slicer-independent unwinding, forming mature RISC.

  8. [Renal duplex: clinical usefulness].

    PubMed

    Miralles, M; Giménez, A; Cairols, M A; Riambau, V; Sáez, A

    1993-01-01

    It is the purpose of this report to focus attention on the clinical usefulness of Renal Duplex for the diagnosis of patients with vasculo-renal diseases in terms of: 1. Accuracy of Duplex/Angiography in the measurement of the renal stenosis degree. 2. Correlationship between Duplex ans Isotopic Renogram with respect to the study of the parenchyma's perfusion. 3. The effect of the inhibitors of the conversor enzyme (Captopril) on the Doppler signal of the parenchyma, comparing it with the results from the captopril test about the peripheral plasmatic renin activity and the isotopic renogram, in patients with vasculo-renal HTA. Results obtains by Duplex and Angiography were compared in 92 renal arteries from 46 patients. For both technics, three degrees of stenosis were established: 0-59%, 60-99% and occlusion. The Duplex technique identified 49/54 stenosis < 60%, 28/33 stenosis > 60% and 5/5 occlusions (Kappa 0.8). Sensibility and specificity of Duplex for the diagnosis of stenosis > 60% were, respectively, 89.5% and 90.7%; with an exactness of 90.2%. The angiographies showed stenosis > 60% in 23 patients with HTA (diastolic pressures > 100 mmHg). In all of the patients, a measurement of the plasmatic renin activity, an isotopic renogram and a Doppler of the interlobar arteries basal and post-captopril, were performed. The correlationship between Duplex and isotopic renogram with respect to the measurement of the relative renal perfusion was statistically significant (r = 0.91; p < 0.0001). The captopril test for renin and isotopic renogram were positives for 5 patients (4 with unilateral stenosis an 1 with bilateral stenosis). All of them showed severe stenosis (> 80%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Retinoic Acid Induces Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation by Altering Both Encoding RNA and microRNA Expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingcheng; Gao, Yang; Yu, Mengying; Wu, Haibo; Ai, Zhiying; Wu, Yongyan; Liu, Hongliang; Du, Juan; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is a vitamin A metabolite that is essential for early embryonic development and promotes stem cell neural lineage specification; however, little is known regarding the impact of RA on mRNA transcription and microRNA levels on embryonic stem cell differentiation. Here, we present mRNA microarray and microRNA high-output sequencing to clarify how RA regulates gene expression. Using mRNA microarray analysis, we showed that RA repressed pluripotency-associated genes while activating ectoderm markers in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Moreover, RA modulated the DNA methylation of mESCs by altering the expression of epigenetic-associated genes such as Dnmt3b and Dnmt3l. Furthermore, H3K4me2, a pluripotent histone modification, was repressed by RA stimulation. From microRNA sequence data, we identified two downregulated microRNAs, namely, miR-200b and miR-200c, which regulated the pluripotency of stem cells. We found that miR-200b or miR-200c deficiency suppressed the expression of pluripotent genes, including Oct4 and Nanog, and activated the expression of the ectodermal marker gene Nestin. These results demonstrate that retinoid induces mESCs to differentiate by regulating miR-200b/200c. Our findings provide the landscapes of mRNA and microRNA gene networks and indicate the crucial role of miR-200b/200c in the RA-induced differentiation of mESCs.

  10. The microRNA biogenesis machinery: regulation by steroid hormones and alterations in cancer.

    PubMed

    González-Duarte, Ramiro José; Cázares-Ordoñez, Verna; Ávila-Chávez, Euclides

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. The major proteins of the canonical microRNA biogenesis pathway in human are: Drosha, DGCR8, DDX5, DDX17, Exportin 5, Dicer and Argonaute 2. Recent studies suggest that gene expression of some canonical microRNA biogenesis components could be regulated by steroid hormones. Furthermore, various alterations in microRNA biogenesis have been associated with diseases like cancer. Due to the importance of microRNAs in cell physiology, the study of the factors that regulate or affect their biogenesis is critical.

  11. Altered minor-groove hydrogen bonds in DNA block transcription elongation by T7 RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Tanasova, Marina; Goeldi, Silvan; Meyer, Fabian; Hanawalt, Philip C; Spivak, Graciela; Sturla, Shana J

    2015-05-26

    DNA transcription depends upon the highly efficient and selective function of RNA polymerases (RNAPs). Modifications in the template DNA can impact the progression of RNA synthesis, and a number of DNA adducts, as well as abasic sites, arrest or stall transcription. Nonetheless, data are needed to understand why certain modifications to the structure of DNA bases stall RNA polymerases while others are efficiently bypassed. In this study, we evaluate the impact that alterations in dNTP/rNTP base-pair geometry have on transcription. T7 RNA polymerase was used to study transcription over modified purines and pyrimidines with altered H-bonding capacities. The results suggest that introducing wobble base-pairs into the DNA:RNA heteroduplex interferes with transcriptional elongation and stalls RNA polymerase. However, transcriptional stalling is not observed if mismatched base-pairs do not H-bond. Together, these studies show that RNAP is able to discriminate mismatches resulting in wobble base-pairs, and suggest that, in cases of modifications with minor steric impact, DNA:RNA heteroduplex geometry could serve as a controlling factor for initiating transcription-coupled DNA repair. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Altering SARS coronavirus frameshift efficiency affects genomic and subgenomic RNA production.

    PubMed

    Plant, Ewan P; Sims, Amy C; Baric, Ralph S; Dinman, Jonathan D; Taylor, Deborah R

    2013-01-18

    In previous studies, differences in the amount of genomic and subgenomic RNA produced by coronaviruses with mutations in the programmed ribosomal frameshift signal of ORF1a/b were observed. It was not clear if these differences were due to changes in genomic sequence, the protein sequence or the frequency of frameshifting. Here, viruses with synonymous codon changes are shown to produce different ratios of genomic and subgenomic RNA. These findings demonstrate that the protein sequence is not the primary cause of altered genomic and subgenomic RNA production. The synonymous codon changes affect both the structure of the frameshift signal and frameshifting efficiency. Small differences in frameshifting efficiency result in dramatic differences in genomic RNA production and TCID50 suggesting that the frameshifting frequency must stay above a certain threshold for optimal virus production. The data suggest that either the RNA sequence or the ratio of viral proteins resulting from different levels of frameshifting affects viral replication.

  13. Oxidative Stress Alters miRNA and Gene Expression Profiles in Villous First Trimester Trophoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Courtney E.; Tolba, Mai F.; Rondelli, Catherine M.; Xu, Meixiang; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z.

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between oxidative stress and miRNA changes in placenta as a potential mechanism involved in preeclampsia (PE) is not fully elucidated. We investigated the impact of oxidative stress on miRNAs and mRNA expression profiles of genes associated with PE in villous 3A first trimester trophoblast cells exposed to H2O2 at 12 different concentrations (0-1 mM) for 0.5, 4, 24, and 48 h. Cytotoxicity, determined using the SRB assay, was used to calculate the IC50 of H2O2. RNA was extracted after 4 h exposure to H2O2 for miRNA and gene expression profiling. H2O2 exerted a concentration- and time-dependent cytotoxicity on 3A trophoblast cells. Short-term exposure of 3A cells to low concentration of H2O2 (5% of IC50) significantly altered miRNA profile as evidenced by significant changes in 195 out of 595 evaluable miRNAs. Tool for annotations of microRNAs (TAM) analysis indicated that these altered miRNAs fall into 43 clusters and 34 families, with 41 functions identified. Exposure to H2O2 altered mRNA expression of 22 out of 84 key genes involved in dysregulation of placental development. In conclusion, short-term exposure of villous first trimester trophoblasts to low concentrations of H2O2 significantly alters miRNA profile and expression of genes implicated in placental development. PMID:26339600

  14. 1. VIEW OF DUPLEX (FEATURE 7). CORNER OF DUPLEX (FEATURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DUPLEX (FEATURE 7). CORNER OF DUPLEX (FEATURE 6) IS VISIBLE AT LEFT. MILL SITE IS VISIBLE IN THE BACKGROUND. FACING EAST. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Duplex, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  15. Thermodynamic insights into 2-thiouridine-enhanced RNA hybridization.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Aaron T; Fahrenbach, Albert C; Sheng, Jia; Pian, Julia; Szostak, Jack W

    2015-09-18

    Nucleobase modifications dramatically alter nucleic acid structure and thermodynamics. 2-thiouridine (s(2)U) is a modified nucleobase found in tRNAs and known to stabilize U:A base pairs and destabilize U:G wobble pairs. The recently reported crystal structures of s(2)U-containing RNA duplexes do not entirely explain the mechanisms responsible for the stabilizing effect of s(2)U or whether this effect is entropic or enthalpic in origin. We present here thermodynamic evaluations of duplex formation using ITC and UV thermal denaturation with RNA duplexes containing internal s(2)U:A and s(2)U:U pairs and their native counterparts. These results indicate that s(2)U stabilizes both duplexes. The stabilizing effect is entropic in origin and likely results from the s(2)U-induced preorganization of the single-stranded RNA prior to hybridization. The same preorganizing effect is likely responsible for structurally resolving the s(2)U:U pair-containing duplex into a single conformation with a well-defined H-bond geometry. We also evaluate the effect of s(2)U on single strand conformation using UV- and CD-monitored thermal denaturation and on nucleoside conformation using (1)H NMR spectroscopy, MD and umbrella sampling. These results provide insights into the effects that nucleobase modification has on RNA structure and thermodynamics and inform efforts toward improving both ribozyme-catalyzed and nonenzymatic RNA copying.

  16. SF3B1/Hsh155 HEAT motif mutations affect interaction with the spliceosomal ATPase Prp5, resulting in altered branch site selectivity in pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing; Rodriguez-Santiago, Susana; Wang, Jing; Pu, Jia; Yuste, Andrea; Gupta, Varun; Moldón, Alberto; Xu, Yong-Zhen; Query, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the U2 snRNP component SF3B1 are prominent in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and other cancers and have been shown recently to alter branch site (BS) or 3′ splice site selection in splicing. However, the molecular mechanism of altered splicing is not known. We show here that hsh155 mutant alleles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, counterparts of SF3B1 mutations frequently found in cancers, specifically change splicing of suboptimal BS pre-mRNA substrates. We found that Hsh155p interacts directly with Prp5p, the first ATPase that acts during spliceosome assembly, and localized the interacting regions to HEAT (Huntingtin, EF3, PP2A, and TOR1) motifs in SF3B1 associated with disease mutations. Furthermore, we show that mutations in these motifs from both human disease and yeast genetic screens alter the physical interaction with Prp5p, alter branch region specification, and phenocopy mutations in Prp5p. These and other data demonstrate that mutations in Hsh155p and Prp5p alter splicing because they change the direct physical interaction between Hsh155p and Prp5p. This altered physical interaction results in altered loading (i.e., “fidelity”) of the BS–U2 duplex into the SF3B complex during prespliceosome formation. These results provide a mechanistic framework to explain the consequences of intron recognition and splicing of SF3B1 mutations found in disease. PMID:28087715

  17. Duplex structural differences and not 2'-hydroxyls explain the more stable binding of HIV-reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA.

    PubMed

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T; DeStefano, Jeffrey J

    2010-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) binds more stably in binary complexes with RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA. Current results indicate that only the -2 and -4 RNA nucleotides (-1 hybridized to the 3' recessed DNA base) are required for stable binding to RNA-DNA, and even a single RNA nucleotide conferred significantly greater stability than DNA-DNA. Replacing 2'- hydroxyls on pivotal RNA bases with 2'-O-methyls did not affect stability, indicating that interactions between hydroxyls and RT amino acids do not stabilize binding. RT's K(d) (k(off)/k(on)) for DNA-DNA and RNA-DNA were similar, although k(off) differed almost 40-fold, suggesting a faster k(on) for DNA-DNA. Avian myeloblastosis and Moloney murine leukemia virus RTs also bound more stably to RNA-DNA, but the difference was less pronounced than with HIV-RT. We propose that the H- versus B-form structures of RNA-DNA and DNA-DNA, respectively, allow the former to conform more easily to HIV-RT's binding cleft, leading to more stable binding. Biologically, the ability of RT to form a more stable complex on RNA-DNA may aid in degradation of RNA fragments that remain after DNA synthesis.

  18. Polymicrobial infection alter inflammatory microRNA in rat salivary glands during periodontal disease.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Gautam; Gauna, Adrienne; Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Velsko, Irina; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya; Cha, Seunghee

    2016-04-01

    Periodontal disease initiated by subgingival pathogens is linked with diminished secretion of saliva, and implies pathogenic bacteria dissemination to or affects secondary sites such as the salivary glands. MicroRNAs activated in response to bacteria may modulate immune responses against pathogens. Therefore, Sprague-Dawley rats were infected by oral lavage consisting of polymicrobial inocula, namely Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Treponema denticola, or sham-infected for 12 weeks (n = 6). We quantified inflammatory miRNA expression levels of miRNA-132, miR-146a, and miR-155 at secondary sites to the primary infection of the gingiva, including submandibular salivary glands, lacrimal glands, and pancreas. The presence of bacteria was detected in situ at secondary sites. Infected rat gingiva showed increased relative expression of miR-155. In contrast, miRNA-155 expression was decreased in submandibular salivary glands, along with positive identification of P. gingivalis in 2/6 and T. denticola in 1/6 rat salivary glands. Furthermore, miRNA-132 and miRNA-146a were significantly decreased in the pancreas of infected rats. This study is the first to show primary periodontal infections can alter miRNA profiles in secondary sites such as the salivary gland and pancreas. Whether these alterations contribute to pathologies of salivary glands in Sjögren's syndrome or of pancreas in diabetes warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Duplex unwinding with DEAD-box proteins.

    PubMed

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Putnam, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins, which comprise the largest helicase family, are involved in virtually all aspects of RNA metabolism. DEAD-box proteins catalyze diverse ATP-driven functions including the unwinding of RNA secondary structures. In contrast to many well-studied DNA and viral RNA helicases, DEAD-box proteins do not rely on translocation on one of the nucleic acid strands for duplex unwinding, but directly load onto helical regions and then locally pry the strands apart in an ATP-dependent fashion. In this chapter, we outline substrate design and unwinding protocols for DEAD-box proteins and focus on the quantitative evaluation of their unwinding activity.

  20. Circular RNA Expression Profiles Alter Significantly in Mouse Brain After Transient Focal Ischemia.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Suresh L; Pandi, Gopal; Vemuganti, Raghu

    2017-09-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are a novel class of noncoding RNAs formed from many protein-coding genes by backsplicing. Although their physiological functions are not yet completely defined, they are thought to control transcription, translation, and microRNA levels. We investigated whether stroke changes the circRNAs expression profile in the mouse brain. Male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, and circRNA expression profile was evaluated in the penumbral cortex at 6, 12, and 24 hours of reperfusion using circRNA microarrays and real-time PCR. Bioinformatics analysis was conducted to identify microRNA binding sites, transcription factor binding, and gene ontology of circRNAs altered after ischemia. One thousand three-hundred twenty circRNAs were expressed at detectable levels mostly from exonic (1064) regions of the genes in the cerebral cortex of sham animals. Of those, 283 were altered (>2-fold) at least at one of the reperfusion time points, whereas 16 were altered at all 3 time points of reperfusion after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion compared with sham. Postischemic changes in circRNAs identified by microarray analysis were confirmed by real-time PCR. Bioinformatics showed that these 16 circRNAs contain binding sites for many microRNAs. Promoter analysis showed that the circRNAs altered after stroke might be controlled by a set of transcription factors. The major biological and molecular functions controlled by circRNAs altered after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion are biological regulation, metabolic process, cell communication, and binding to proteins, ions, and nucleic acids. This is a first study that shows that stroke alters the expression of circRNAs with possible functional implication to poststroke pathophysiology. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Duplex tab exhaust nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmark, Ephraim Jeff (Inventor); Martens, Steven (nmn) (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle includes a conical duct terminating in an annular outlet. A row of vortex generating duplex tabs are mounted in the outlet. The tabs have compound radial and circumferential aft inclination inside the outlet for generating streamwise vortices for attenuating exhaust noise while reducing performance loss.

  2. The 1.19 Å X-ray structure of 2′-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 duplex shows dehydrated RNA with 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol in the minor groove

    PubMed Central

    Adamiak, Dorota A.; Rypniewski, Wojciech R.; Milecki, Jan; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2001-01-01

    The crystal and molecular structure of 2′-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 has been determined at 1.19 Å resolution, at 100 K, using synchrotron radiation. The structure in space group P3212 is a half-turn right-handed helix that includes two 2-methyl-2,4-pentanediol (MPD) molecules bound in the minor groove. The structure deviates from A-form RNA. The duplex is overwound with an average value of 9.7 bp per turn, characterised as having a C3′-endo sugar pucker, very low base pair rise and high helical twist and inclination angles. The structure includes 65 ordered water molecules. Only a single row of water molecules is observed in the minor groove due to the presence of hydrophobic 2′-O-methyl groups. As many as five magnesium ions are located in the structure. Two are in the major groove and interact with O6 and N7 of guanosine and N4 of cytidine residues through their hydration spheres. This work provides the first example of molecular interactions of nucleic acids with MPD, which was used as a precipitant, cryo-solvent and resolution enhancing agent. The two MPD molecules intrude into the hydration network in the minor groove, each forming hydrogen bonds between their secondary hydroxyl group and exo-amino functions of guanosine residues. Comparison of the 2′-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 structure in the P3212 and P6122 crystals delineates stability of the water network within the minor groove to dehydration by MPD and is of interest for evaluating factors governing small molecule binding to RNA. Intrusion of MPD into the minor groove of 2′-O-Me(CGCGCG)2 is discussed with respect to RNA dehydration, a prerequisite of Z-RNA formation. PMID:11600703

  3. Aging alters mRNA expression of amyloid transporter genes at the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Osgood, Doreen; Miller, Miles C; Messier, Arthur A; Gonzalez, Liliana; Silverberg, Gerald D

    2017-09-01

    Decreased clearance of potentially toxic metabolites, due to aging changes, likely plays a significant role in the accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides and other macromolecules in the brain of the elderly and in the patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aging is the single most important risk factor for AD development. Aβ transport receptor proteins expressed at the blood-brain barrier are significantly altered with age: the efflux transporters lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and P-glycoprotein are reduced, whereas the influx transporter receptor for advanced glycation end products is increased. These receptors play an important role in maintaining brain biochemical homeostasis. We now report that, in a rat model of aging, gene transcription is altered in aging, as measured by Aβ receptor gene messenger RNA (mRNA) at 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 20, 30, and 36 months. Gene mRNA expression from isolated cerebral microvessels was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 and P-glycoprotein mRNA were significantly reduced in aging, and receptor for advanced glycation end products was increased, in parallel with the changes seen in receptor protein expression. Transcriptional changes appear to play a role in aging alterations in blood-brain barrier receptor expression and Aβ accumulation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. MicroRNA Expression Signature Is Altered in the Cardiac Remodeling Induced by High Fat Diets.

    PubMed

    Guedes, Elaine Castilho; França, Gustavo Starvaggi; Lino, Caroline Antunes; Koyama, Fernanda Christtanini; Moreira, Luana do Nascimento; Alexandre, Juliana Gomes; Barreto-Chaves, Maria Luiza M; Galante, Pedro Alexandre Favoretto; Diniz, Gabriela Placoná

    2016-08-01

    Recent studies have revealed the involvement of microRNAs (miRNAs) in the control of cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial function. In addition, several reports have demonstrated that high fat (HF) diet induces cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling. In the current study, we investigated the effect of diets containing different percentages of fat on the cardiac miRNA expression signature. To address this question, male C57Bl/6 mice were fed with a low fat (LF) diet or two HF diets, containing 45 kcal% fat (HF45%) and 60 kcal% fat (HF60%) for 10 and 20 weeks. HF60% diet promoted an increase on body weight, fasting glycemia, insulin, leptin, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and induced glucose intolerance. HF feeding promoted cardiac remodeling, as evidenced by increased cardiomyocyte transverse diameter and interstitial fibrosis. RNA sequencing analysis demonstrated that HF feeding induced distinct miRNA expression patterns in the heart. HF45% diet for 10 and 20 weeks changed the abundance of 64 and 26 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. On the other hand, HF60% diet for 10 and 20 weeks altered the abundance of 27 and 88 miRNAs in the heart, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis indicated that insulin signaling pathway was overrepresented in response to HF diet. An inverse correlation was observed between cardiac levels of GLUT4 and miRNA-29c. Similarly, we found an inverse correlation between expression of GSK3β and the expression of miRNA-21a-3p, miRNA-29c-3p, miRNA-144-3p, and miRNA-195a-3p. In addition, miRNA-1 overexpression prevented cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Taken together, our results revealed differentially expressed miRNA signatures in the heart in response to different HF diets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1771-1783, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Gravitational loading of a simulated launch alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1996-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1a) were centrifuged under a regime designed to simulate a space shuttle launch (maximum of 3g). Messenger RNA levels for eight genes involved in bone growth and maintenance were determined using RT-PCR. Following 30 min of centrifugation, mRNA level for early response gene c-fos was significantly increased 89% (P < 0.05). The c-fos induction was transient and returned to control levels after 3 h. The mRNA level for the mineralization marker gene osteocalcin was significantly decreased to 44% of control level (P < 0.005) 3 h after centrifugation. No changes in mRNA levels were detected for c-myc, TGFbeta1, TGFbeta2, cyclophilin A, or actin. No basal mRNA level for TGFbeta3 was detected. In addition, no change in the steady-state synthesis of prostaglandin E2 was detected, possibly due to lack of lipid substrates in serum-deprived cells, suggesting that the increase in c-fos mRNA in response to gravitational loading is a result of mechanical stimulation. These results indicate that a small magnitude mechanical loading, such as that experienced during a shuttle launch, can alter mRNA levels in quiescent osteoblastic cells.

  6. Gravitational loading of a simulated launch alters mRNA expression in osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    1996-01-01

    Serum-deprived mouse osteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1a) were centrifuged under a regime designed to simulate a space shuttle launch (maximum of 3g). Messenger RNA levels for eight genes involved in bone growth and maintenance were determined using RT-PCR. Following 30 min of centrifugation, mRNA level for early response gene c-fos was significantly increased 89% (P < 0.05). The c-fos induction was transient and returned to control levels after 3 h. The mRNA level for the mineralization marker gene osteocalcin was significantly decreased to 44% of control level (P < 0.005) 3 h after centrifugation. No changes in mRNA levels were detected for c-myc, TGFbeta1, TGFbeta2, cyclophilin A, or actin. No basal mRNA level for TGFbeta3 was detected. In addition, no change in the steady-state synthesis of prostaglandin E2 was detected, possibly due to lack of lipid substrates in serum-deprived cells, suggesting that the increase in c-fos mRNA in response to gravitational loading is a result of mechanical stimulation. These results indicate that a small magnitude mechanical loading, such as that experienced during a shuttle launch, can alter mRNA levels in quiescent osteoblastic cells.

  7. A Cytoplasmic RNA Virus Alters the Function of the Cell Splicing Protein SRSF2.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Serrano, Efraín E; Fritch, Ethan J; Scholl, Elizabeth H; Sherry, Barbara

    2017-04-01

    To replicate efficiently, viruses must create favorable cell conditions and overcome cell antiviral responses. We previously reported that the reovirus protein μ2 from strain T1L, but not strain T3D, represses one antiviral response: alpha/beta interferon signaling. We report here that T1L, but not T3D, μ2 localizes to nuclear speckles, where it forms a complex with the mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 and alters its subnuclear localization. Reovirus replicates in cytoplasmic viral factories, and there is no evidence that reovirus genomic or messenger RNAs are spliced, suggesting that T1L μ2 might target splicing of cell RNAs. Indeed, RNA sequencing revealed that reovirus T1L, but not T3D, infection alters the splicing of transcripts for host genes involved in mRNA posttranscriptional modifications. Moreover, depletion of SRSF2 enhanced reovirus replication and cytopathic effect, suggesting that T1L μ2 modulation of splicing benefits the virus. This provides the first report of viral antagonism of the splicing factor SRSF2 and identifies the viral protein that determines strain-specific differences in cell RNA splicing.IMPORTANCE Efficient viral replication requires that the virus create favorable cell conditions. Many viruses accomplish this by repressing specific antiviral responses. We demonstrate here that some mammalian reoviruses, RNA viruses that replicate strictly in the cytoplasm, express a protein variant that localizes to nuclear speckles, where it targets a cell mRNA splicing factor. Infection with a reovirus strain that targets this splicing factor alters splicing of cell mRNAs involved in the maturation of many other cell mRNAs. Depletion of this cell splicing factor enhances reovirus replication and cytopathic effect. Our results provide the first evidence of viral antagonism of this splicing factor and suggest that downstream consequences to the cell are global and benefit the virus. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. A Cytoplasmic RNA Virus Alters the Function of the Cell Splicing Protein SRSF2

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Serrano, Efraín E.; Fritch, Ethan J.; Scholl, Elizabeth H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT To replicate efficiently, viruses must create favorable cell conditions and overcome cell antiviral responses. We previously reported that the reovirus protein μ2 from strain T1L, but not strain T3D, represses one antiviral response: alpha/beta interferon signaling. We report here that T1L, but not T3D, μ2 localizes to nuclear speckles, where it forms a complex with the mRNA splicing factor SRSF2 and alters its subnuclear localization. Reovirus replicates in cytoplasmic viral factories, and there is no evidence that reovirus genomic or messenger RNAs are spliced, suggesting that T1L μ2 might target splicing of cell RNAs. Indeed, RNA sequencing revealed that reovirus T1L, but not T3D, infection alters the splicing of transcripts for host genes involved in mRNA posttranscriptional modifications. Moreover, depletion of SRSF2 enhanced reovirus replication and cytopathic effect, suggesting that T1L μ2 modulation of splicing benefits the virus. This provides the first report of viral antagonism of the splicing factor SRSF2 and identifies the viral protein that determines strain-specific differences in cell RNA splicing. IMPORTANCE Efficient viral replication requires that the virus create favorable cell conditions. Many viruses accomplish this by repressing specific antiviral responses. We demonstrate here that some mammalian reoviruses, RNA viruses that replicate strictly in the cytoplasm, express a protein variant that localizes to nuclear speckles, where it targets a cell mRNA splicing factor. Infection with a reovirus strain that targets this splicing factor alters splicing of cell mRNAs involved in the maturation of many other cell mRNAs. Depletion of this cell splicing factor enhances reovirus replication and cytopathic effect. Our results provide the first evidence of viral antagonism of this splicing factor and suggest that downstream consequences to the cell are global and benefit the virus. PMID:28077658

  9. Gene expression and splicing alterations analyzed by high throughput RNA sequencing of chronic lymphocytic leukemia specimens.

    PubMed

    Liao, Wei; Jordaan, Gwen; Nham, Phillipp; Phan, Ryan T; Pelegrini, Matteo; Sharma, Sanjai

    2015-10-16

    To determine differentially expressed and spliced RNA transcripts in chronic lymphocytic leukemia specimens a high throughput RNA-sequencing (HTS RNA-seq) analysis was performed. Ten CLL specimens and five normal peripheral blood CD19+ B cells were analyzed by HTS RNA-seq. The library preparation was performed with Illumina TrueSeq RNA kit and analyzed by Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing system. An average of 48.5 million reads for B cells, and 50.6 million reads for CLL specimens were obtained with 10396 and 10448 assembled transcripts for normal B cells and primary CLL specimens respectively. With the Cuffdiff analysis, 2091 differentially expressed genes (DEG) between B cells and CLL specimens based on FPKM (fragments per kilobase of transcript per million reads and false discovery rate, FDR q < 0.05, fold change >2) were identified. Expression of selected DEGs (n = 32) with up regulated and down regulated expression in CLL from RNA-seq data were also analyzed by qRT-PCR in a test cohort of CLL specimens. Even though there was a variation in fold expression of DEG genes between RNA-seq and qRT-PCR; more than 90 % of analyzed genes were validated by qRT-PCR analysis. Analysis of RNA-seq data for splicing alterations in CLL and B cells was performed by Multivariate Analysis of Transcript Splicing (MATS analysis). Skipped exon was the most frequent splicing alteration in CLL specimens with 128 significant events (P-value <0.05, minimum inclusion level difference >0.1). The RNA-seq analysis of CLL specimens identifies novel DEG and alternatively spliced genes that are potential prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. High level of validation by qRT-PCR for a number of DEG genes supports the accuracy of this analysis. Global comparison of transcriptomes of B cells, IGVH non-mutated CLL (U-CLL) and mutated CLL specimens (M-CLL) with multidimensional scaling analysis was able to segregate CLL and B cell transcriptomes but the M-CLL and U-CLL transcriptomes

  10. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K; Ali, Abdullah M; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L

    2015-08-25

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein-protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting.

  11. Alteration of PFK subunit protein, synthesis, and mRNA during neonatal brain development.

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, Y; Dunaway, G A

    1995-03-16

    During neonatal maturation of rat brain, a similar biphasic relationship exists between the previously reported pattern of glucose utilization and levels of each type of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK) subunit protein, relative synthesis, and mRNA. The increasing amounts of each subunit isoform generally correlated with elevated protein synthesis which was promoted by greater amounts of each type of subunit mRNA. For each parameter, the early phase, 1 to 10 days after birth, was characterized by small increases, and the subsequent period from ten to thirty days postpartum was characterized by a much greater rate of increase. By 30 days after birth, adult values were observed. The apparent efficiency of translation of each type of PFK subunit mRNA in brain suggests that the M-type subunit mRNA is the most efficient and that the L-type subunit mRNA is the least. The greatest relative increases in subunit protein, mRNA, and synthesis were observed for the C-type subunit. Since enhanced translation apparently makes little, if any, contribution, a possible explanation of these phenomena could be increased transcription of the PFK genes. These neonatal changes could involve age-dependent alteration of methylation of the PFK gene promotor(s) and/or activity of effectors of the transcription of the PFK genes.

  12. Formaldehyde and Epigenetic Alterations: MicroRNA Changes in the Nasal Epithelium of Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Julia E.; Moeller, Benjamin C.; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Kracko, Dean; Swenberg, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Formaldehyde is an air pollutant present in both indoor and outdoor atmospheres. Because of its ubiquitous nature, it is imperative to understand the mechanisms underlying formaldehyde-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) can influence disease caused by environmental exposures, yet miRNAs are understudied in relation to formaldehyde. Our previous investigation demonstrated that formaldehyde exposure in human lung cells caused disruptions in miRNA expression profiles in vitro. Objectives: Using an in vivo model, we set out to test the hypothesis that formaldehyde inhalation exposure significantly alters miRNA expression profiles within the nasal epithelium of nonhuman primates. Methods: Cynomolgus macaques were exposed by inhalation to approximately 0, 2, or 6 ppm formaldehyde for 6 hr/day for 2 consecutive days. Small RNAs were extracted from nasal samples and assessed for genome-wide miRNA expression levels. Transcriptional targets of formaldehyde-altered miRNAs were computationally predicted, analyzed at the systems level, and assessed using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results: Expression analysis revealed that 3 and 13 miRNAs were dysregulated in response to 2 and 6 ppm formaldehyde, respectively. Transcriptional targets of the miRNA with the greatest increase (miR-125b) and decrease (miR-142-3p) in expression were predicted and analyzed at the systems level. Enrichment was identified for miR-125b targeting genes involved in apoptosis signaling. The apoptosis-related targets were functionally tested using RT-PCR, where all targets showed decreased expression in formaldehyde-exposed samples. Conclusions: Formaldehyde exposure significantly disrupts miRNA expression profiles within the nasal epithelium, and these alterations likely influence apoptosis signaling. PMID:23322811

  13. Environmental Contaminants and microRNA Regulation: Transcription Factors as Regulators of Toxicant-Altered microRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Sollome, James; Martin, Elizabeth; Sethupathy, Praveen; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding mRNA transcripts and inhibiting translation and/or inducing degradation of the associated transcripts. Expression levels of miRNAs have been shown to be altered in response to environmental toxicants, thus impacting cellular function and influencing disease risk. Transcription factors (TFs) are known to be altered in response to environmental toxicants and play a critical role in the regulation of miRNA expression. To date, environmentally-responsive TFs that are important for regulating miRNAs remain understudied. In a state-of-the-art analysis, we utilized in silico bioinformatic analysis to characterize potential transcriptional regulators of environmentally-responsive miRNAs. Using the miRStart database, genomic sequences of promoter regions for all available human miRNAs (n=847) were identified and promoter regions were defined as −1000/+500 base pairs from the transcription start site. Subsequently, the promoter region sequences of environmentally-responsive miRNAs (n=128) were analyzed using enrichment analysis to determine overrepresented TF binding sites (TFBS). While most (56/73) TFs differed across environmental contaminants, a set of 17 TFs was enriched for promoter binding among miRNAs responsive to numerous environmental contaminants. Of these, one TF was common to miRNAs altered by the majority of environmental contaminants, namely SWI/SNF-related, matrix-associated, actin-dependent regulator of chromatin, subfamily A, member 3 (SMARCA3). These identified TFs represent candidate common transcriptional regulators of miRNAs perturbed by environmental toxicants. PMID:27292125

  14. Lipophilic 2'-O-Acetal Ester RNAs: Synthesis, Thermal Duplex Stability, Nuclease Resistance, Cellular Uptake, and siRNA Activity after Spontaneous Naked Delivery.

    PubMed

    Biscans, Annabelle; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Dubois, Josephine; Rüger, Jacqueline; Vasseur, Jean-Jacques; Sczakiel, Georg; Dupouy, Christelle; Debart, Françoise

    2016-11-03

    The in vivo application of siRNA depends on its cellular uptake and intracellular release, and this is an unsatisfactorily resolved technical hurdle in medicinal applications. Promising concepts directed towards providing efficient cellular and intracellular delivery include lipophilic chemical modification of siRNA. Here we describe chemistry for the production of modified siRNAs designed to display improved transmembrane transport into human cells while preserving the potency of the RNAi-based inhibitors. We report the synthesis and the biochemical and biophysical characteristics of 2'-O-phenylisobutyryloxymethyl (PiBuOM)-modified siRNAs and their impact on biological activity. In the case of spontaneous cellular uptake of naked PiBuOM-modified siRNA, we observed increased target suppression in human cells relative to unmodified or pivaloyloxymethyl (PivOM)-modified siRNA. We provide evidence of improved spontaneous cellular uptake of naked PiBuOM-modified siRNA and of substantial target suppression in human cells in serum-containing medium.

  15. Identification of pathogenic gene mutations in LMNA and MYBPC3 that alter RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kaoru; Patel, Parth N; Gorham, Joshua M; McDonough, Barbara; DePalma, Steven R; Adler, Emily E; Lam, Lien; MacRae, Calum A; Mohiuddin, Syed M; Fatkin, Diane; Seidman, Christine E; Seidman, J G

    2017-07-18

    Genetic variants that cause haploinsufficiency account for many autosomal dominant (AD) disorders. Gene-based diagnosis classifies variants that alter canonical splice signals as pathogenic, but due to imperfect understanding of RNA splice signals other variants that may create or eliminate splice sites are often clinically classified as variants of unknown significance (VUS). To improve recognition of pathogenic splice-altering variants in AD disorders, we used computational tools to prioritize VUS and developed a cell-based minigene splicing assay to confirm aberrant splicing. Using this two-step procedure we evaluated all rare variants in two AD cardiomyopathy genes, lamin A/C (LMNA) and myosin binding protein C (MYBPC3). We demonstrate that 13 LMNA and 35 MYBPC3 variants identified in cardiomyopathy patients alter RNA splicing, representing a 50% increase in the numbers of established damaging splice variants in these genes. Over half of these variants are annotated as VUS by clinical diagnostic laboratories. Familial analyses of one variant, a synonymous LMNA VUS, demonstrated segregation with cardiomyopathy affection status and altered cardiac LMNA splicing. Application of this strategy should improve diagnostic accuracy and variant classification in other haploinsufficient AD disorders.

  16. Cigarette smoking substantially alters plasma microRNA profiles in healthy subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kei; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Tatsumi, Naoyuki; Fukami, Tatsuki; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi; Nakajima, Miki

    2013-10-01

    Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) are receiving attention as potential biomarkers of various diseases, including cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular disease. However, it is unknown whether the levels of circulating miRNAs in a healthy subject might vary with external factors in daily life. In this study, we investigated whether cigarette smoking, a habit that has spread throughout the world and is a risk factor for various diseases, affects plasma miRNA profiles. We determined the profiles of 11 smokers and 7 non-smokers by TaqMan MicroRNA array analysis. A larger number of miRNAs were detected in smokers than in non-smokers, and the plasma levels of two-thirds of the detected miRNAs (43 miRNAs) were significantly higher in smokers than in non-smokers. A principal component analysis of the plasma miRNA profiles clearly separated smokers and non-smokers. Twenty-four of the miRNAs were previously reported to be potential biomarkers of disease, suggesting the possibility that smoking status might interfere with the diagnosis of disease. Interestingly, we found that quitting smoking altered the plasma miRNA profiles to resemble those of non-smokers. These results suggested that the differences in the plasma miRNA profiles between smokers and non-smokers could be attributed to cigarette smoking. In addition, we found that an acute exposure of ex-smokers to cigarette smoke (smoking one cigarette) did not cause a dramatic change in the plasma miRNA profile. In conclusion, we found that repeated cigarette smoking substantially alters the plasma miRNA profile, interfering with the diagnosis of disease or signaling potential smoking-related diseases. - Highlights: • Plasma miRNA profiles were unambiguously different between smokers and non-smokers. • Smoking status might interfere with the diagnosis of disease using plasma miRNAs. • Changes of plasma miRNA profiles may be a signal of smoking-related diseases.

  17. Duplex structural differences and not 2′-hydroxyls explain the more stable binding of HIV-reverse transcriptase to RNA-DNA versus DNA-DNA

    PubMed Central

    Olimpo, Jeffrey T.; DeStefano, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) binds more stably in binary complexes with RNA–DNA versus DNA–DNA. Current results indicate that only the -2 and -4 RNA nucleotides (-1 hybridized to the 3′ recessed DNA base) are required for stable binding to RNA–DNA, and even a single RNA nucleotide conferred significantly greater stability than DNA–DNA. Replacing 2′- hydroxyls on pivotal RNA bases with 2′-O-methyls did not affect stability, indicating that interactions between hydroxyls and RT amino acids do not stabilize binding. RT’s Kd (koff/kon) for DNA–DNA and RNA–DNA were similar, although koff differed almost 40-fold, suggesting a faster kon for DNA–DNA. Avian myeloblastosis and Moloney murine leukemia virus RTs also bound more stably to RNA–DNA, but the difference was less pronounced than with HIV-RT. We propose that the H- versus B-form structures of RNA–DNA and DNA–DNA, respectively, allow the former to conform more easily to HIV-RT’s binding cleft, leading to more stable binding. Biologically, the ability of RT to form a more stable complex on RNA–DNA may aid in degradation of RNA fragments that remain after DNA synthesis. PMID:20338878

  18. Microarray analysis reveals altered circulating microRNA expression in mice infected with Coxsackievirus B3

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chaoyu; Tong, Lei; Zhao, Wenran; Wang, Yan; Meng, Yuan; Lin, Lexun; Liu, Bingchen; Zhai, Yujia; Zhong, Zhaohua; Li, Xueqi

    2016-01-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a common causative agent in the development of inflammatory cardiomyopathy. However, whether the expression of peripheral blood microRNAs (miRNAs) is altered in this process is unknown. The present study investigated changes to miRNA expression in the peripheral blood of CVB3-infected mice. Utilizing miRNA microarray technology, differential miRNA expression was examined between normal and CVB3-infected mice. The present results suggest that specific miRNAs were differentially expressed in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3, varying with infection duration. Using miRNA microarray analysis, a total of 96 and 89 differentially expressed miRNAs were identified in the peripheral blood of mice infected with CVB3 for 3 and 6 days, respectively. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to validate differentially expressed miRNAs, revealing a consistency of these results with the miRNA microarray analysis results. The biological functions of the differentially expressed miRNAs were then predicted by bioinformatics analysis. The potential biological roles of differentially expressed miRNAs included hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, dilated cardiomyopathy and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy. These results may provide important insights into the mechanisms responsible for the progression of CVB3 infection. PMID:27698715

  19. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-11-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0 · 05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings.

  20. Transcriptional profiling reveals that C5a alters microRNA in brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eadon, Michael T; Jacob, Alexander; Cunningham, Patrick N; Quigg, Richard J; Garcia, Joe G N; Alexander, Jessy J

    2014-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier (BBB) disturbance is a crucial occurrence in many neurological diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Our previous studies showed that experimental lupus serum altered the integrity of the mouse brain endothelial layer, an important constituent of the BBB. Complement activation occurs in lupus with increased circulating complement components. Using a genomics approach, we identified the microRNA (miRNA) altered in mouse brain endothelial cells (bEnd3) by lupus serum and the complement protein, C5a. Of the 318 miRNA evaluated, 23 miRNAs were altered by lupus serum and 32 were altered by C5a alone compared with controls. Seven miRNAs (P < 0·05) were differentially expressed by both treatments: mmu-miR-133a*, mmu-miR-193*, mmu-miR-26b, mmu-miR-28*, mmu-miR-320a, mmu-miR-423-3p and mmu-miR-509-5p. The microarray results were validated by quantitative RT-PCR. In line with the in vitro results, expression of miR-26b and miR-28* were also significantly up-regulated in lupus mouse brain which was reduced by C5a receptor inhibition. Target prediction analysis revealed miR gene targets encoding components involved in inflammation, matrix arrangement, and apoptosis, pathways known to play important roles in central nervous system lupus. Our findings suggest that the miRNAs reported in this study may represent novel therapeutic targets in central nervous system lupus and other similar neuroinflammatory settings. PMID:24801999

  1. Altered expression of selected microRNAs in melanoma: antiproliferative and proapoptotic activity of miRNA-155.

    PubMed

    Levati, Lauretta; Alvino, Ester; Pagani, Elena; Arcelli, Diego; Caporaso, Patrizia; Bondanza, Sergio; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Ferracin, Manuela; Volinia, Stefano; Bonmassar, Enzo; Croce, Carlo Maria; D'Atri, Stefania

    2009-08-01

    Altered expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) has been detected in cancer, suggesting that these small non-coding RNAs can act as oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes. In the present study, we investigated the expression of miRNA-17-5p, miRNA-18a, miRNA-20a, miRNA-92a, miRNA-146a, miRNA-146b and miRNA-155 by real-time quantitative RT-PCR in a panel of melanocyte cultures and melanoma cell lines and explored the possible role of miRNA-155 in melanoma cell proliferation and survival. The analyzed miRNAs were selected on the basis of previous studies strongly supporting their involvement in cancer development and/or progression. We found that miRNA-17-5p, miRNA-18a, miRNA-20a, and miRNA-92a were overexpressed, whereas miRNA-146a, miRNA-146b and miRNA-155 were down-regulated in the majority of melanoma cell lines with respect to melanocytes. Ectopic expression of miRNA-155 significantly inhibited proliferation in 12 of 13 melanoma cell lines with reduced levels of this miRNA and induced apoptosis in 4 out of 4 cell lines analyzed. In conclusion, our data further support the finding of altered miRNA expression in melanoma cells and establish for the first time that miRNA-155 is a negative regulator of melanoma cell proliferation and survival.

  2. Altered Long Noncoding RNA Expression Precedes the Course of Parkinson's Disease-a Preliminary Report.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Theo F J; Haider, Melanie; Spanner, Judith; Steinmaurer, Martina; Dietinger, Vanessa; Kretzschmar, Hans A

    2017-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a slowly progressing neurodegenerative disorder that affects approximately seven million patients worldwide. Despite intensive research, the molecular mechanisms initiating and promoting PD are still unknown. However, it is assumed that environmental factors trigger PD. Recent research demonstrated that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) interfere in transcriptional and translational processes modulating gene expression reflecting environmental influences. Nevertheless, there is no systematic analysis available that investigates the impact of lncRNAs on PD. In the current study, we performed a comprehensive analysis on expression levels of 90 well-annotated lncRNAs in 30 brain specimens deriving from 20 PD patients and 10 controls as a preliminary report on the significance of lncRNAs in PD. Expression profiling of lncRNAs revealed that five lncRNAs are significantly differentially expressed in PD. While H19 upstream conserved 1 and 2 is significantly downregulated in PD, lincRNA-p21, Malat1, SNHG1, and TncRNA are significantly upregulated. An analysis on expression levels and PD stages revealed that the identified dysregulated lncRNA are altered already in early disease stage and that they precede the course of PD. In summary, this is the first comprehensive analysis on lncRNAs in PD revealing significantly altered lncRNAs. Additionally, we found that lncRNA dysregulations precede the course of the disease. Thus, the five newly identified lncRNAs may serve as potential new biomarkers appropriate even in early PD. They may be used in monitoring disease progression and they may serve as potential new targets for novel therapeutic approaches.

  3. Altered long non-coding RNA transcriptomic profiles in brain microvascular endothelium after cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J; Yuan, L; Zhang, X; Hamblin, M H; Zhu, T; Meng, F; Li, Y; Chen, Y E; Yin, K J

    2016-03-01

    The brain endothelium is an important therapeutic target for the inhibition of cerebrovascular dysfunction in ischemic stroke. Previously, we documented the important regulatory roles of microRNAs in the cerebral vasculature, in particular the cerebral vascular endothelium. However, the functional significance and molecular mechanisms of other classes of non-coding RNAs in the regulation of cerebrovascular endothelial pathophysiology after stroke are completely unknown. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) technology, we profiled long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expressional signatures in primary brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs) after oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD), an in vitro mimic of ischemic stroke conditions. After 16h of OGD exposure, the expression levels for 362 of the 10,677 lncRNAs analyzed changed significantly, including a total of 147 lncRNAs increased and 70 lncRNAs decreased by more than 2-fold. Among them, the most highly upregulated lncRNAs include Snhg12, Malat1, and lnc-OGD 1006, whereas the most highly downregulated lncRNAs include 281008D09Rik, Peg13, and lnc-OGD 3916. Alteration of the most highly upregulated/downregulated ODG-responsive lncRNAs was further confirmed in cultured BMECs after OGD as well as isolated cerebral microvessels in mice following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and 24h reperfusion by the quantitative real-time PCR approach. Moreover, promoter analysis of altered ODG-responsive endothelial lncRNA genes by bioinformatics showed substantial transcription factor binding sites on lncRNAs, implying potential transcriptional regulation of those lncRNAs. These findings are the first to identify OGD-responsive brain endothelial lncRNAs, which suggest potential pathological roles for these lncRNAs in mediating endothelial responses to ischemic stimuli. Endothelial-selective lncRNAs may function as a class of novel master regulators in cerebrovascular endothelial pathologies after ischemic stroke.

  4. Spaceflight alters expression of microRNA during T-cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Hughes-Fulford, Millie; Chang, Tammy T.; Martinez, Emily M.; Li, Chai-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Altered immune function has been demonstrated in astronauts during spaceflights dating back to Apollo and Skylab; this could be a major barrier to long-term space exploration. We tested the hypothesis that spaceflight causes changes in microRNA (miRNA) expression. Human leukocytes were stimulated with mitogens on board the International Space Station using an onboard normal gravity control. Bioinformatics showed that miR-21 was significantly up-regulated 2-fold during early T-cell activation in normal gravity, and gene expression was suppressed under microgravity. This was confirmed using quantitative real-time PCR (n = 4). This is the first report that spaceflight regulates miRNA expression. Global microarray analysis showed significant (P < 0.05) suppression of 85 genes under microgravity conditions compared to normal gravity samples. EGR3, FASLG, BTG2, SPRY2, and TAGAP are biologically confirmed targets and are co-up-regulated with miR-21. These genes share common promoter regions with pre-mir-21; as the miR-21 matures and accumulates, it most likely will inhibit translation of its target genes and limit the immune response. These data suggest that gravity regulates T-cell activation not only by transcription promotion but also by blocking translation via noncoding RNA mechanisms. Moreover, this study suggests that T-cell activation itself may induce a sequence of gene expressions that is self-limited by miR-21.—Hughes-Fulford, M., Chang, T. T., Martinez, E. M., Li, C.-F. Spaceflight alters expression of microRNA during T-cell activation. PMID:26276131

  5. Alteration of the microRNA network during the progression of Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Pierre; Bossers, Koen; Janky, Rekin's; Salta, Evgenia; Frigerio, Carlo Sala; Barbash, Shahar; Rothman, Roy; Sierksma, Annerieke S R; Thathiah, Amantha; Greenberg, David; Papadopoulou, Aikaterini S; Achsel, Tilmann; Ayoubi, Torik; Soreq, Hermona; Verhaagen, Joost; Swaab, Dick F; Aerts, Stein; De Strooper, Bart

    2013-01-01

    An overview of miRNAs altered in Alzheimer's disease (AD) was established by profiling the hippocampus of a cohort of 41 late-onset AD (LOAD) patients and 23 controls, showing deregulation of 35 miRNAs. Profiling of miRNAs in the prefrontal cortex of a second independent cohort of 49 patients grouped by Braak stages revealed 41 deregulated miRNAs. We focused on miR-132-3p which is strongly altered in both brain areas. Downregulation of this miRNA occurs already at Braak stages III and IV, before loss of neuron-specific miRNAs. Next-generation sequencing confirmed a strong decrease of miR-132-3p and of three family-related miRNAs encoded by the same miRNA cluster on chromosome 17. Deregulation of miR-132-3p in AD brain appears to occur mainly in neurons displaying Tau hyper-phosphorylation. We provide evidence that miR-132-3p may contribute to disease progression through aberrant regulation of mRNA targets in the Tau network. The transcription factor (TF) FOXO1a appears to be a key target of miR-132-3p in this pathway. PMID:24014289

  6. FocalScan: Scanning for altered genes in cancer based on coordinated DNA and RNA change

    PubMed Central

    Karlsson, Joakim; Larsson, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Somatic genomic copy-number alterations can lead to transcriptional activation or inactivation of tumor driver or suppressor genes, contributing to the malignant properties of cancer cells. Selection for such events may manifest as recurrent amplifications or deletions of size-limited (focal) regions. While methods have been developed to identify such focal regions, finding the exact targeted genes remains a challenge. Algorithms are also available that integrate copy number and RNA expression data, to aid in identifying individual targeted genes, but specificity is lacking. Here, we describe FocalScan, a tool designed to simultaneously uncover patterns of focal copy number alteration and coordinated expression change, thus combining both principles. The method outputs a ranking of tentative cancer drivers or suppressors. FocalScan works with RNA-seq data, and unlike other tools it can scan the genome unaided by a gene annotation, enabling identification of novel putatively functional elements including lncRNAs. Application on a breast cancer data set suggests considerably better performance than other DNA/RNA integration tools. PMID:27474725

  7. Mice with altered serotonin 2C receptor RNA editing display characteristics of Prader-Willi Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Morabito, Michael V.; Abbas, Atheir I.; Hood, Jennifer L.; Kesterson, Robert A.; Jacobs, Michelle M.; Kump, David S.; Hachey, David L.; Roth, Bryan L.; Emeson, Ronald B.

    2010-01-01

    RNA transcripts encoding the 2C-subtype of serotonin (5HT2C) receptor undergo up to five adenosine-to-inosine editing events to encode twenty-four protein isoforms. To examine the effects of altered 5HT2C editing in vivo, we generated mutant mice solely expressing the fully-edited (VGV) isoform of the receptor. Mutant animals present phenotypic characteristics of Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) including a failure to thrive, decreased somatic growth, neonatal muscular hypotonia, and reduced food consumption followed by post-weaning hyperphagia. Though previous studies have identified alterations in both 5HT2C receptor expression and 5HT2C-mediated behaviors in both PWS patients and mouse models of this disorder, to our knowledge the 5HT2C gene is the first locus outside the PWS imprinted region in which mutations can phenocopy numerous aspects of this syndrome. These results not only strengthen the link between the molecular etiology of PWS and altered 5HT2C expression, but also demonstrate the importance of normal patterns of 5HT2C RNA editing in vivo. PMID:20394819

  8. Pulse dipolar ESR of doubly labeled mini TAR DNA and its annealing to mini TAR RNA.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan; Borbat, Peter P; Grigoryants, Vladimir M; Myers, William K; Freed, Jack H; Scholes, Charles P

    2015-02-17

    Pulse dipolar electron-spin resonance in the form of double electron electron resonance was applied to strategically placed, site-specifically attached pairs of nitroxide spin labels to monitor changes in the mini TAR DNA stem-loop structure brought on by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7. The biophysical structural evidence was at Ångstrom-level resolution under solution conditions not amenable to crystallography or NMR. In the absence of complementary TAR RNA, double labels located in both the upper and the lower stem of mini TAR DNA showed in the presence of NCp7 a broadened distance distribution between the points of attachment, and there was evidence for several conformers. Next, when equimolar amounts of mini TAR DNA and complementary mini TAR RNA were present, NCp7 enhanced the annealing of their stem-loop structures to form duplex DNA-RNA. When duplex TAR DNA-TAR RNA formed, double labels initially located 27.5 Å apart at the 3'- and 5'-termini of the 27-base mini TAR DNA relocated to opposite ends of a 27 bp RNA-DNA duplex with 76.5 Å between labels, a distance which was consistent with the distance between the two labels in a thermally annealed 27-bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex. Different sets of double labels initially located 26-27 Å apart in the mini TAR DNA upper stem, appropriately altered their interlabel distance to ~35 Å when a 27 bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex formed, where the formation was caused either through NCp7-induced annealing or by thermal annealing. In summary, clear structural evidence was obtained for the fraying and destabilization brought on by NCp7 in its biochemical function as an annealing agent and for the detailed structural change from stem-loop to duplex RNA-DNA when complementary RNA was present. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reciprocal Alterations in Regulator of G Protein Signaling 4 and microRNA16 in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kimoto, Sohei; Glausier, Jill R; Fish, Kenneth N; Volk, David W; Bazmi, H Holly; Arion, Dominique; Datta, Dibyadeep; Lewis, David A

    2016-03-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) hypofunction in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has been implicated in the pathology of schizophrenia. NMDAR activity is negatively regulated by some G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Signaling through these GPCRs is reduced by Regulator of G protein Signaling 4 (RGS4). Thus, lower levels of RGS4 would enhance GPCR-mediated reductions in NMDAR activity and could contribute to NMDAR hypofunction in schizophrenia. In this study, we quantified RGS4 mRNA and protein levels at several levels of resolution in the DLPFC from subjects with schizophrenia and matched healthy comparison subjects. To investigate molecular mechanisms that could contribute to altered RGS4 levels, we quantified levels of small noncoding RNAs, known as microRNAs (miRs), which regulate RGS4 mRNA integrity after transcription. RGS4 mRNA and protein levels were significantly lower in schizophrenia subjects and were positively correlated across all subjects. The RGS4 mRNA deficit was present in pyramidal neurons of DLPFC layers 3 and 5 of the schizophrenia subjects. In contrast, levels of miR16 were significantly higher in the DLPFC of schizophrenia subjects, and higher miR16 levels predicted lower RGS4 mRNA levels. These findings provide convergent evidence of lower RGS4 mRNA and protein levels in schizophrenia that may result from increased expression of miR16. Given the role of RGS4 in regulating GPCRs, and consequently the strength of NMDAR signaling, these findings could contribute to the molecular substrate for NMDAR hypofunction in DLPFC pyramidal cells in schizophrenia.

  10. Placental microRNA Expression Is Not Altered by Maternal Obesity and Fetal Overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Neda; Parry, Samuel; Elovitz, Michal A.; Durnwald, Celeste P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The epigenetic mechanisms underlying fetal metabolic programming are poorly understood. We studied whether obesity is associated with alterations in placental miRNA expression. Study Design A cross-sectional study was performed, including (1) normal-weight women (BMI 20–24.9 kg/m2) and normal-birth-weight (BW) infants (2,700–3,500 g) (n = 20), (2) normal-weight and macrosomic infants (BW ≥ 4,000 g) (n = 10), (3) obese (BMI ≥ 35 kg/m2) and normal BW infants (n = 16), and (4) obese and macrosomic infants (n = 10). All had term deliveries (37–41 weeks) and normal glucose tolerance (1 hour GCT < 7.2 mmol/L [130 mg/dL]). The expression of 5,639 placental miRNAs was assessed using miRNA microarray. Differential miRNA expression was determined using two-way ANOVA and pairwise contrasts, with the Benjamini-Hochberg (BH) correction. MiRNAs with Z-scores ≥ 2 and false discovery rate (FDR) < 20% were considered significant. Results Principal components analysis demonstrated similar global miRNA expression profiles among groups. Of 5,639 miRNAs, only 5 were significantly different between obese and controls, which were not validated by quantitative polymerase reaction. Conclusion There was no difference in placental miRNA expression associated with obesity or overgrowth. Aberrant placental miRNA expression is an unlikely mechanism underlying fetal metabolic programming related to maternal obesity. PMID:28050331

  11. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis is Associated With Altered Hepatic microRNA Expression

    PubMed Central

    Padgett, Kerstien A.; Lan, Ruth Y.; Leung, Patrick C.; Lleo, Ana; Dawson, Kevin; Pfeiff, Janice; Mao, Tin K.; Coppel, Ross L.; Ansari, Aftab A.; Gershwin, M. Eric

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small RNA molecules that negatively regulate protein coding gene expression and are thought to play a critical role in many biological processes. Aberrant levels of miRNAs have been associated with numerous diseases and cancers, and as such, miRNAs have gain much interests as diagnostic biomarkers, and as therapeutic targets. However, their role in autoimmunity is largely unknown. The aims of this study are to: (1) identify differentially expressed miRNAs in human primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC); (2) validate these independently; and (3) indentify potential targets of differentially expressed miRNAs. We compared the expression of 377 miRNAs in explanted livers form subjects with PBC versus controls with normal liver histology. A total of 35 independent miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed in PBC (p< 0.001). Quantitative PCR was employed to validate down-regulation of microRNA-122a (miR-122a) and miR-26a and the increased expression of miR-328 and miR-299-5p. The predicted targets of these miRNAs are known to affect cell proliferation, apoptosis, inflammation, oxidative stress, and metabolism. Our data are the first to demonstrate that PBC is characterized by altered expression of hepatic miRNA; however additional studies are required to demonstrate a causal link between those miRNA and the development of PBC. PMID:19345069

  12. Functional Alteration of Tumor-infiltrating Myeloid Cells in RNA Adjuvant Therapy.

    PubMed

    Seya, Tsukasa; Shime, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Misako

    2015-08-01

    Macrophages, as well as dendritic cells (DCs), are derived from myeloid progenitor cells. Recent evidence suggests that tumor-infiltrating macrophages differ in many aspects from conventional tissue macrophages, including nature, function and markers. Tumors usually contain various myeloid lineage cells in their non-parenchymal environment. In immunotherapy for cancer, tumor cells and non-parenchymal cells are exposed to tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and tumor-cell-derived nucleic acids. In addition, a dsRNA mimic, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (polyI:C), exhibits strong adjuvant activity, which acts both on the immune system and tumor constituents. Herein we discuss the RNA recognition system and unique cellular output in tumor-associated myeloid cells in response to immunotherapy. We especially focus on the mechanism by which RNA adjuvant alters the tumor-supportive nature of tumor-infiltrated myeloid cells to those with tumoricidal activity. We discuss how RNA administration makes tumor cells collapse and its significance of evoking cell death signals in tumor cells and macrophages. This knowledge will be applicable to the development of an alternative immunotherapy for cancer.

  13. Basic Mechanisms of RNA Polymerase II Activity and Alteration of Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Craig D.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA Polymerase II (Pol II), and all RNA polymerases for that matter, may be understood as comprising two cycles. The first cycle relates to the basic mechanism of the transcription process wherein Pol II must select the appropriate nucleoside triphosphate (NTP) substrate complementary to the DNA template, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation, and translocate to the next position on the DNA template. Performing this cycle in an iterative fashion allows the synthesis of RNA chains that can be over one million nucleotides in length in some larger eukaryotes. Overlaid upon this enzymatic cycle, transcription may be divided into another cycle of three phases: initiation, elongation, and termination. Each of these phases has a large number of associated transcription factors that function to promote or regulate the gene expression process. Complicating matters, each phase of the latter transcription cycle are coincident with cotranscriptional RNA processing events. Additionally, transcription takes place within a highly dynamic and regulated chromatin environment. This chromatin environment is radically impacted by active transcription and associated chromatin modifications and remodeling, while also functioning as a major platform for Pol II regulation. This review will focus on our basic knowledge of the Pol II transcription mechanism, and how altered Pol II activity impacts gene expression in vivo in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23022618

  14. MicroRNA expression profiling altered by variant dosage of radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuei-Fang; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Liu, Ingrid Y; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Various biological effects are associated with radiation exposure. Irradiated cells may elevate the risk for genetic instability, mutation, and cancer under low levels of radiation exposure, in addition to being able to extend the postradiation side effects in normal tissues. Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is the focus of rigorous research as it may promote the development of cancer even at low radiation doses. Alterations in the DNA sequence could not explain these biological effects of radiation and it is thought that epigenetics factors may be involved. Indeed, some microRNAs (or miRNAs) have been found to correlate radiation-induced damages and may be potential biomarkers for the various biological effects caused by different levels of radiation exposure. However, the regulatory role that miRNA plays in this aspect remains elusive. In this study, we profiled the expression changes in miRNA under fractionated radiation exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. By utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and performing cross validations with our previous gene expression profiling under the same radiation condition, we identified various miRNA-gene interactions specific to different doses of radiation treatment, providing new insights for the molecular underpinnings of radiation injury.

  15. MicroRNA Expression Profiling Altered by Variant Dosage of Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kuei-Fang; Hsu, Paul Wei-Che; Liu, Ingrid Y.; Wu, Lawrence Shih-Hsin

    2014-01-01

    Various biological effects are associated with radiation exposure. Irradiated cells may elevate the risk for genetic instability, mutation, and cancer under low levels of radiation exposure, in addition to being able to extend the postradiation side effects in normal tissues. Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is the focus of rigorous research as it may promote the development of cancer even at low radiation doses. Alterations in the DNA sequence could not explain these biological effects of radiation and it is thought that epigenetics factors may be involved. Indeed, some microRNAs (or miRNAs) have been found to correlate radiation-induced damages and may be potential biomarkers for the various biological effects caused by different levels of radiation exposure. However, the regulatory role that miRNA plays in this aspect remains elusive. In this study, we profiled the expression changes in miRNA under fractionated radiation exposure in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. By utilizing publicly available microRNA knowledge bases and performing cross validations with our previous gene expression profiling under the same radiation condition, we identified various miRNA-gene interactions specific to different doses of radiation treatment, providing new insights for the molecular underpinnings of radiation injury. PMID:25313363

  16. Chemoprevention of Cigarette Smoke–Induced Alterations of MicroRNA Expression in Rat Lungs

    PubMed Central

    Izzotti, Alberto; Calin, George A.; Steele, Vernon E.; Cartiglia, Cristina; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Croce, Carlo M.; De Flora, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that exposure to environmental cigarette smoke (ECS) for 28 days causes extensive downregulation of microRNA expression in the lungs of rats, resulting in the overexpression of multiple genes and proteins. In the present study, we evaluated by microarray the expression of 484 microRNAs in the lungs of either ECS-free or ECS-exposed rats treated with the orally administered chemopreventive agents N-acetylcysteine, oltipraz, indole-3-carbinol, 5,6-benzoflavone, and phenethyl isothiocyanate (as single agents or in combinations). This is the first study of microRNA modulation by chemopreventive agents in nonmalignant tissues. Scatterplot, hierarchical cluster, and principal component analyses of microarray and quantitative PCR data showed that none of the above chemopreventive regimens appreciably affected the baseline microRNA expression, indicating potential safety. On the other hand, all of them attenuated ECS-induced alterations but to a variable extent and with different patterns, indicating potential preventive efficacy. The main ECS-altered functions that were modulated by chemopreventive agents included cell proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, Ras activation, P53 functions, NF-κB pathway, transforming growth factor–related stress response, and angiogenesis. Some micro-RNAs known to be polymorphic in humans were downregulated by ECS and were protected by chemopreventive agents. This study provides proof-of-concept and validation of technology that we are further refining to screen and prioritize potential agents for continued development and to help elucidate their biological effects and mechanisms. Therefore, microRNA analysis may provide a new tool for predicting at early carcinogenesis stages both the potential safety and efficacy of cancer chemopreventive agents. PMID:20051373

  17. Alterations in hepatic miRNA expression during negative energy balance in postpartum dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Attia; Waters, Sinead; O'Boyle, Padraig; Seoighe, Cathal; Morris, Dermot G

    2014-01-15

    Negative energy balance (NEB), an altered metabolic state, occurs in early postpartum dairy cattle when energy demands to support lactation exceed energy intake. During NEB the liver undergoes oxidative stress and increased breakdown of fatty acids accompanied by changes in gene expression. It is now known that micro RNAs (miRNA) can have a role in mediating such alterations in gene expression through repression or degradation of target mRNAs. miRNA expression is known to be altered by metabolism and environmental factors and miRNAs are implicated in expression modulation of metabolism related genes. miRNA expression was profiled in the liver of moderate yielding dairy cattle under severe NEB (SNEB) and mild NEB (MNEB) using the Affymetrix Gene Chip miRNA_2.0 array with 679 probe sets for Bos-taurus miRNAs. Ten miRNAs were found to be differentially expressed using the 'samr' statistical package (delta = 0.6) at a q-value FDR of < 12%. Five miRNAs including miR-17-5p, miR-31, miR-140, miR-1281 and miR-2885 were validated using RT-qPCR, to be up-regulated under SNEB. Liver diseases associated with these miRNAs include non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFLD) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). miR-140 and miR-17-5p are known to show differential expression under oxidative stress. A total of 32 down-regulated putative target genes were also identified among 418 differentially expressed hepatic genes previously reported for the same animal model. Among these, GPR37 (G protein-coupled receptor 37), HEYL (hairy/enhancer-of-split related with YRPW motif-like), DNJA1, CD14 (Cluster of differentiation 14) and GNS (glucosamine (N-acetyl)-6-sulfatase) are known to be associated with hepatic metabolic disorders. In addition miR-140 and miR-2885 have binding sites on the most down-regulated of these genes, FADS2 (Fatty acid desaturase 2) which encodes an enzyme critical in lipid biosynthesis. Furthermore, HNF3-gamma (Hepatocyte nuclear factor 3-gamma), a hepatic transcription factor

  18. Crystal structures of two forms of a 14-mer RNA/DNA chimer duplex with double UU bulges: a novel intramolecular U*(A x U) base triple.

    PubMed

    Deng, J; Xiong, Y; Sudarsanakumar, C; Shi, K; Sundaralingam, M

    2001-10-01

    The RNA/DNA 14-mer, (gguauuucgguaCc)2 with consecutive uridine bulges (underlined) on each strand has been determined in two crystal forms, spermine bound (Sp-form) and spermine free (Sp-free). The former was solved by the MAD method with three-wavelength data collected at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); the later isomorphous structure was solved by the molecular replacement method using data collected on our Raxis IIc imaging plate system. The two crystal forms belong to the space group C2 with one molecule of double-stranded 14 mer in the asymmetric unit. The Sp-form has cell constants, a = 60.06, b = 29.10, c = 52.57 A, beta = 120.79 degrees and was refined to 1.7 A resolution with a final Rwork/Rfree of 19.8%/22.7% using 8,549 independent reflections. The Sp-free structure has cell constants, a = 60.06, b = 29.58, c = 52.50 A, beta = 120.85 degrees and was refined to 1.8 A with a final Rwork/ Rfree of 20.8%/23.2% using 6,285 unique reflections. The two structures are identical, except that the Sp-form has a spermine bound in the major groove, parallel to the RNA helical axis. One of the uridine bulges forms a novel intramolecular U*(A x U) base triple. The helices are in the C3'-endo conformation (A-form), but the bulges adopt the C2'-endo sugar pucker. Furthermore, the bulges induce a kink (30 degrees) in the helix axis and a very large twist (55 degrees) between the base pairs flanking the bulges. The Sp-form has one Mg2+ ion whereas the Sp-free form has two Mg2+ ions.

  19. Niacin in pharmacological doses alters microRNA expression in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Couturier, Aline; Keller, Janine; Most, Erika; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Administration of pharmacological niacin doses was recently reported to have pronounced effects on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats, with the molecular mechanisms underlying the alteration of gene expression being completely unknown. Since miRNAs have been shown to play a critical role for gene expression through inducing miRNA-mRNA interactions which results in the degradation of specific mRNAs or the repression of protein translation, we herein aimed to investigate the influence of niacin at pharmacological doses on the miRNA expression profile in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats fed either a control diet with 30 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet or a high-niacin diet with 780 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet for 4 wk. miRNA microarray analysis revealed that 42 out of a total of 259 miRNAs were differentially expressed (adjusted P-value <0.05), 20 being down-regulated and 22 being up-regulated, between the niacin group and the control group. Using a biostatistics approach, we could demonstrate that the most strongly up-regulated (log2 ratio ≥0.5) and down-regulated (log2 ratio ≤-0.5) miRNAs target approximately 1,800 mRNAs. Gene-term enrichment analysis showed that many of the predicted target mRNAs from the most strongly regulated miRNAs were involved in molecular processes dealing with gene transcription such as DNA binding, transcription regulator activity, transcription factor binding and in important regulatory pathways such as Wnt signaling and MAPK signaling. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that pharmacological niacin doses alter the expression of miRNAs in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats and that the niacin-regulated miRNAs target a large set of genes and pathways which are involved in gene regulatory activity indicating that at least some of the recently reported effects of niacin on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats are mediated through miRNA-mRNA

  20. Niacin in Pharmacological Doses Alters MicroRNA Expression in Skeletal Muscle of Obese Zucker Rats

    PubMed Central

    Most, Erika; Ringseis, Robert; Eder, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Administration of pharmacological niacin doses was recently reported to have pronounced effects on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats, with the molecular mechanisms underlying the alteration of gene expression being completely unknown. Since miRNAs have been shown to play a critical role for gene expression through inducing miRNA-mRNA interactions which results in the degradation of specific mRNAs or the repression of protein translation, we herein aimed to investigate the influence of niacin at pharmacological doses on the miRNA expression profile in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats fed either a control diet with 30 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet or a high-niacin diet with 780 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet for 4 wk. miRNA microarray analysis revealed that 42 out of a total of 259 miRNAs were differentially expressed (adjusted P-value <0.05), 20 being down-regulated and 22 being up-regulated, between the niacin group and the control group. Using a biostatistics approach, we could demonstrate that the most strongly up-regulated (log2 ratio ≥0.5) and down-regulated (log2 ratio ≤−0.5) miRNAs target approximately 1,800 mRNAs. Gene-term enrichment analysis showed that many of the predicted target mRNAs from the most strongly regulated miRNAs were involved in molecular processes dealing with gene transcription such as DNA binding, transcription regulator activity, transcription factor binding and in important regulatory pathways such as Wnt signaling and MAPK signaling. In conclusion, the present study shows for the first time that pharmacological niacin doses alter the expression of miRNAs in skeletal muscle of obese Zucker rats and that the niacin-regulated miRNAs target a large set of genes and pathways which are involved in gene regulatory activity indicating that at least some of the recently reported effects of niacin on skeletal muscle gene expression and phenotype in obese Zucker rats are mediated through miRNA-mRNA

  1. Concerning RNA-guided gene drives for the alteration of wild populations

    PubMed Central

    Esvelt, Kevin M; Smidler, Andrea L; Catteruccia, Flaminia; Church, George M

    2014-01-01

    Gene drives may be capable of addressing ecological problems by altering entire populations of wild organisms, but their use has remained largely theoretical due to technical constraints. Here we consider the potential for RNA-guided gene drives based on the CRISPR nuclease Cas9 to serve as a general method for spreading altered traits through wild populations over many generations. We detail likely capabilities, discuss limitations, and provide novel precautionary strategies to control the spread of gene drives and reverse genomic changes. The ability to edit populations of sexual species would offer substantial benefits to humanity and the environment. For example, RNA-guided gene drives could potentially prevent the spread of disease, support agriculture by reversing pesticide and herbicide resistance in insects and weeds, and control damaging invasive species. However, the possibility of unwanted ecological effects and near-certainty of spread across political borders demand careful assessment of each potential application. We call for thoughtful, inclusive, and well-informed public discussions to explore the responsible use of this currently theoretical technology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03401.001 PMID:25035423

  2. A unique microRNA profile in end-stage heart failure indicates alterations in specific cardiovascular signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Gupta, Manveen K; Duan, Zhong-Hui; Surampudi, Venkata Suresh K; Liu, Chang-Gong; Kotwal, Ashwin; Moravec, Christine S; Starling, Randall C; Perez, Dianne M; Sen, Subha; Wu, Qingyu; Plow, Edward F; Karnik, Sadashiva

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that the gene expression patterns are substantially altered in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, however, less is known about the reasons behind such global differences. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that can target multiple molecules to regulate wide array of proteins in diverse pathways. The goal of the study was to profile alterations in miRNA expression using end-stage human heart failure samples with an aim to build signaling network pathways using predicted targets for the altered miRNA and to determine nodal molecules regulating individual networks. Profiling of miRNAs using custom designed microarray and validation with an independent set of samples identified eight miRNAs that are altered in human heart failure including one novel miRNA yet to be implicated in cardiac pathology. To gain an unbiased perspective on global regulation by top eight altered miRNAs, functional relationship of predicted targets for these eight miRNAs were examined by network analysis. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis network algorithm was used to build global signaling networks based on the targets of altered miRNAs which allowed us to identify participating networks and nodal molecules that could contribute to cardiac pathophysiology. Majority of the nodal molecules identified in our analysis are targets of altered miRNAs and known regulators of cardiovascular signaling. Cardio-genomics heart failure gene expression public data base was used to analyze trends in expression pattern for target nodal molecules and indeed changes in expression of nodal molecules inversely correlated to miRNA alterations. We have used NF kappa B network as an example to show that targeting other molecules in the network could alter the nodal NF kappa B despite not being a miRNA target suggesting an integrated network response. Thus, using network analysis we show that altering key functional target proteins may regulate expression of the myriad signaling pathways

  3. Liposomal curcumin alters chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells to Adriamycin via regulating microRNA expression.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Siying; Li, Jian; Xu, Hanzi; Zhang, Sijie; Chen, Xiu; Chen, Wei; Yang, Sujin; Zhong, Shanliang; Zhao, Jianhua; Tang, Jinhai

    2017-07-30

    Emerging evidence suggests that curcumin can overcome drug resistance to classical chemotherapies, but poor bioavailability and low absorption have limited its clinical use and the mechanisms remain unclear. Also, Adriamycin (Adr) is one of the most active cytotoxic agents in breast cancer; however, the high resistant rate of Adr leads to a poor prognosis. We utilized encapsulation in liposomes as a strategy to improve the bioavailability of curcumin and demonstrated that liposomal curcumin altered chemosensitivity of Adr-resistant MCF-7 human breast cancer (MCF-7/Adr) by MTT assay. The miRNA and mRNA expression profiles of MCF-7/S, MCF-7/Adr and curcumin-treated MCF-7/Adr cells were analyzed by microarray and further confirmed by real-time PCR. We focused on differentially expressed miR-29b-1-5p to explore the involvement of miR-29b-1-5p in the resistance of Adr. Candidate genes of dysregulated miRNAs were identified by prediction algorithms based on gene expression profiles. Networks of KEGG pathways were organized by the selected dysregulated miRNAs. Moreover, protein-protein interaction (PPI) was utilized to map protein interaction networks of curcumin regulated proteins. We first demonstrated liposomal curcumin could rescue part of Adriamycin resistance in breast cancer and further identified 67 differentially expressed microRNAs among MCF-7/S, MCF-7/Adr and curcumin-treated MCF-7/Adr. The results showed that lower expressed miR-29b-1-5p decreased the IC50 of MCF-7/Adr cells and higher expressed miR-29b-1-5p, weaken the effects of liposomal curcumin to Adr-resistance. Besides, we found that 20 target genes (mRNAs) of each dysregulated miRNA were not only predicted by prediction algorithms, but also differentially expressed in the microarray. The results showed that MAPK, mTOR, PI3K-Akt, AMPK, TNF, Ras signaling pathways and several target genes such as PPARG, RRM2, SRSF1and EPAS1, may associate with drug resistance of breast cancer cells to Adr. We determined

  4. BRF1 mutations alter RNA polymerase III–dependent transcription and cause neurodevelopmental anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Hög, Friederike; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Tan, Perciliz L.; Sowada, Nadine; Medeira, Ana; Gueneau, Lucie; Thiele, Holger; Kousi, Maria; Lepri, Francesca; Wenzeck, Larissa; Blumenthal, Ian; Radicioni, Antonio; Schwarzenberg, Tito Livio; Mandriani, Barbara; Fischetto, Rita; Morris-Rosendahl, Deborah J.; Altmüller, Janine; Reymond, Alexandre; Nürnberg, Peter; Merla, Giuseppe; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Katsanis, Nicholas; Cramer, Patrick; Kubisch, Christian

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase III (Pol III) synthesizes tRNAs and other small noncoding RNAs to regulate protein synthesis. Dysregulation of Pol III transcription has been linked to cancer, and germline mutations in genes encoding Pol III subunits or tRNA processing factors cause neurogenetic disorders in humans, such as hypomyelinating leukodystrophies and pontocerebellar hypoplasia. Here we describe an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cerebellar hypoplasia and intellectual disability, as well as facial dysmorphic features, short stature, microcephaly, and dental anomalies. Whole-exome sequencing revealed biallelic missense alterations of BRF1 in three families. In support of the pathogenic potential of the discovered alleles, suppression or CRISPR-mediated deletion of brf1 in zebrafish embryos recapitulated key neurodevelopmental phenotypes; in vivo complementation showed all four candidate mutations to be pathogenic in an apparent isoform-specific context. BRF1 associates with BDP1 and TBP to form the transcription factor IIIB (TFIIIB), which recruits Pol III to target genes. We show that disease-causing mutations reduce Brf1 occupancy at tRNA target genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and impair cell growth. Moreover, BRF1 mutations reduce Pol III–related transcription activity in vitro. Taken together, our data show that BRF1 mutations that reduce protein activity cause neurodevelopmental anomalies, suggesting that BRF1-mediated Pol III transcription is required for normal cerebellar and cognitive development. PMID:25561519

  5. Achieving targeted and quantifiable alteration of mRNA splicing with Morpholino oligos

    SciTech Connect

    Morcos, Paul A. . E-mail: pmorcos@gene-tools.com

    2007-06-29

    This work represents the first guide for using steric-block antisense oligos as tools for effective and targeted modification of RNA splicing. Comparison of several steric-block oligo types shows the properties of Morpholinos provide significant advantages over other potential splice-blocking oligos. The procedures and complications of designing effective splice-blocking Morpholino oligos are described. The design process requires complete pre-mRNA sequence for defining suitable targets, which usually generate specific predictable messengers. To validate the targeting procedure, the level and nature of transcript alteration is characterized by RT-PCR analysis of splice modification in a {beta}-globin splice model system. An oligo-walking study reveals that while U1 and U2 small nuclear RiboNucleoProtein (snRNP) binding sites are the most effective targets for blocking splicing, inclusion of these sites is not required to achieve effective splice modifications. The most effective targeting strategy employs simultaneously blocking snRNP binding sites and splice-junctions. The work presented here continues to be the basis for most of the successful Morpholino oligos designed for the worldwide research community to block RNA splicing.

  6. Integrative analysis of somatic mutations altering microRNA targeting in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    Ziebarth, Jesse D; Bhattacharya, Anindya; Cui, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Determining the functional impact of somatic mutations is crucial to understanding tumorigenesis and metastasis. Recent sequences of several cancers have provided comprehensive lists of somatic mutations across entire genomes, enabling investigation of the functional impact of somatic mutations in non-coding regions. Here, we study somatic mutations in 3'UTRs of genes that have been identified in four cancers and computationally predict how they may alter miRNA targeting, potentially resulting in dysregulation of the expression of the genes harboring these mutations. We find that somatic mutations create or disrupt putative miRNA target sites in the 3'UTRs of many genes, including several genes, such as MITF, EPHA3, TAL1, SCG3, and GSDMA, which have been previously associated with cancer. We also integrate the somatic mutations with germline mutations and results of association studies. Specifically, we identify putative miRNA target sites in the 3'UTRs of BMPR1B, KLK3, and SPRY4 that are disrupted by both somatic and germline mutations and, also, are in linkage disequilibrium blocks with high scoring markers from cancer association studies. The somatic mutation in BMPR1B is located in a target site of miR-125b; germline mutations in this target site have previously been both shown to disrupt regulation of BMPR1B by miR-125b and linked with cancer.

  7. Altering the interaction between σ70 and RNA polymerase generates complexes with distinct transcription-elongation properties

    PubMed Central

    Berghöfer-Hochheimer, Yvonne; Lu, Chi Zen; Gross, Carol A.

    2005-01-01

    We compare the elongation behavior of native Escherichia coli RNA polymerase holoenzyme assembled in vivo, holoenzyme reconstituted from σ70 and RNA polymerase in vitro, and holoenzyme with a specific alteration in the interface between σ70 and RNA polymerase. Elongating RNA polymerase from each holoenzyme has distinguishable properties, some of which cannot be explained by differential retention or rebinding of σ70 during elongation, or by differential presence of elongation factors. We suggest that interactions between RNA polymerase and σ70 may influence the ensemble of conformational states adopted by RNA polymerase during initiation. These states, in turn, may affect the conformational states adopted by the elongating enzyme, thereby physically and functionally imprinting RNA polymerase. PMID:15650048

  8. Anomalous altered expressions of downstream gene-targets in TP53-miRNA pathways in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sanga; Mukherjee, Nupur; Das, Smarajit; Das, Pijush; Panda, Chinmay Kumar; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, HNSCC, continues to grow. Change in the expression of TP53 in HNSCC affects its downstream miRNAs and their gene targets, anomalously altering the expressions of the five genes, MEIS1, AGTR1, DTL, TYMS and BAK1. These expression alterations follow the repression of TP53 that upregulates miRNA-107, miRNA- 215, miRNA-34 b/c and miRNA-125b, but downregulates miRNA-155. The above five so far unreported genes are the targets of these miRNAs. Meta-analyses of microarray and RNA-Seq data followed by qRT-PCR validation unravel these new ones in HNSCC. The regulatory roles of TP53 on miRNA-155 and miRNA-125b differentiate the expressions of AGTR1 and BAK1in HNSCC vis-à-vis other carcinogenesis. Expression changes alter cell cycle regulation, angiogenic and blood cell formation, and apoptotic modes in affliction. Pathway analyses establish the resulting systems-level functional and mechanistic insights into the etiology of HNSCC. PMID:25186767

  9. 6S RNA Regulation of pspF Transcription Leads to Altered Cell Survival at High pH

    PubMed Central

    Trotochaud, Amy E.; Wassarman, Karen M.

    2006-01-01

    6S RNA is a highly abundant small RNA that regulates transcription through direct interaction with RNA polymerase. Here we show that 6S RNA directly inhibits transcription of pspF, which subsequently leads to inhibition of pspABCDE and pspG expression. Cells without 6S RNA are able to survive at elevated pH better than wild-type cells due to loss of 6S RNA-regulation of pspF. This 6S RNA-dependent phenotype is eliminated in pspF-null cells, indicating that 6S RNA effects are conferred through PspF. Similar growth phenotypes are seen when PspF levels are increased in a 6S RNA-independent manner, signifying that changes to pspF expression are sufficient. Changes in survival at elevated pH most likely result from altered expression of pspABCDE and/or pspG, both of which require PspF for transcription and are indirectly regulated by 6S RNA. 6S RNA provides another layer of regulation in response to high pH during stationary phase. We propose that the normal role of 6S RNA at elevated pH is to limit the extent of the psp response under conditions of nutrient deprivation, perhaps facilitating appropriate allocation of diminishing resources. PMID:16707685

  10. 6S RNA regulation of relA alters ppGpp levels in early stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Amy T; Chandrangsu, Pete; Wassarman, Karen M

    2010-12-01

    6S RNA is a small, non-coding RNA that interacts directly with σ(70)-RNA polymerase and regulates transcription at many σ(70)-dependent promoters. Here, we demonstrate that 6S RNA regulates transcription of relA, which encodes a ppGpp synthase. The 6S RNA-dependent regulation of relA expression results in increased ppGpp levels during early stationary phase in cells lacking 6S RNA. These changes in ppGpp levels, although modest, are sufficient to result in altered regulation of transcription from σ(70)-dependent promoters sensitive to ppGpp, including those promoting expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and rRNA. These data place 6S RNA as another player in maintaining appropriate gene expression as cells transition into stationary phase. Independent of this ppGpp-mediated 6S RNA-dependent regulation, we also demonstrate that in later stationary phase, 6S RNA continues to downregulate transcription in general, and specifically at a subset of the amino acid promoters, but through a mechanism that is independent of ppGpp and which we hypothesize is through direct regulation. In addition, 6S RNA-dependent regulation of σ(S) activity is not mediated through observed changes in ppGpp levels. We suggest a role for 6S RNA in modulating transcription of several global regulators directly, including relA, to downregulate expression of key pathways in response to changing environmental conditions.

  11. 6S RNA regulation of relA alters ppGpp levels in early stationary phase

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Amy T.; Chandrangsu, Pete; Wassarman, Karen M.

    2010-01-01

    6S RNA is a small, non-coding RNA that interacts directly with σ70-RNA polymerase and regulates transcription at many σ70-dependent promoters. Here, we demonstrate that 6S RNA regulates transcription of relA, which encodes a ppGpp synthase. The 6S RNA-dependent regulation of relA expression results in increased ppGpp levels during early stationary phase in cells lacking 6S RNA. These changes in ppGpp levels, although modest, are sufficient to result in altered regulation of transcription from σ70-dependent promoters sensitive to ppGpp, including those promoting expression of genes involved in amino acid biosynthesis and rRNA. These data place 6S RNA as another player in maintaining appropriate gene expression as cells transition into stationary phase. Independent of this ppGpp-mediated 6S RNA-dependent regulation, we also demonstrate that in later stationary phase, 6S RNA continues to downregulate transcription in general, and specifically at a subset of the amino acid promoters, but through a mechanism that is independent of ppGpp and which we hypothesize is through direct regulation. In addition, 6S RNA-dependent regulation of σS activity is not mediated through observed changes in ppGpp levels. We suggest a role for 6S RNA in modulating transcription of several global regulators directly, including relA, to downregulate expression of key pathways in response to changing environmental conditions. PMID:20829285

  12. MicroRNA Expression is Altered in Lateral Septum Across Reproductive Stages

    PubMed Central

    Saul, Michael C.; Zhao, Changjiu; Driessen, Terri M.; Eisinger, Brian E.; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) inhibit RNA targets and may contribute to postpartum CNS gene expression changes, although this has never been tested. In the present study, we directly evaluated miRNA levels using RNA sequencing during reproduction in female mice in lateral septum (LS). We found the reliable and robust changes of miRNAs away from the virgin stage at the three other stages, namely pregnant, day 1 postpartum, and day 8 postpartum. For a given miRNA that was significantly different from the virgin condition in more than one group, the direction of change was always the same. Overall, we identified 32 upregulated miRNAs and 25 downregulated miRNAs that were consistently different from the virgin state. ‘Arm switching’ occurs for miR-433-3 and miR-7b. Unexpectedly, a third of upregulated miRNAs (relative to virgin) were highly localized within the 12qF1 region of chromosome 12 that includes the Dlk1-Dio3 gene cluster implicated in stem cell and neuronal differentiation. Over 1500 genes were targeted by multiple upregulated miRNAs with about 100 genes targeted by 5 or more miRNAs. Over 1000 genes were targeted by multiple downregulated miRNAs with about 50 genes targeted by 5 or more miRNAs. Half of the target genes were regulated by up and downregulated miRNAs, indicating homeostatic regulation. Transcriptional regulation was the most enriched pathway for genes linked to up or down regulated miRNAs. Other enriched pathways included protein kinase activity (e.g., MAP kinase), CNS development, axon guidance, neurotrophin signaling, neuron development/differentiation, and neurogenesis. Previously published postpartum LS gene expression changes were enrichment for LS miRNA targets, as expected. Surprisingly, postpartum gene expression changes from other regions were also enriched against LS miRNA targets, suggesting a core group of miRNAs may act across the CNS during reproduction. Together, we directly examine miRNAs and find significant alterations in the

  13. Alterations in Somatostatin mRNA Expression in the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex of Subjects with Schizophrenia or Schizoaffective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Harvey M.; Hashimoto, Takanori; Lewis, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Alterations in the inhibitory circuitry of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) in schizophrenia include reduced expression of the messenger RNA (mRNA) for somatostatin (SST), a neuropeptide present in a subpopulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurons. However, neither the cellular substrate nor the causal mechanisms for decreased SST mRNA levels in schizophrenia are known. We used in situ hybridization to quantify the compartmental, laminar, and cellular levels of SST mRNA expression in the DLPFC of 23 pairs of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder and control subjects. We also explored potential causal mechanisms by utilizing similar methods to analyze SST mRNA expression in 2 animal models. The expression of SST mRNA was significantly decreased in layers 2–superficial 6 of subjects with schizophrenia, but not in layer 1, deep 6 or the white matter. At the cellular level, both the density of cortical SST mRNA-positive neurons and the expression of SST mRNA per neuron were reduced in the subjects with schizophrenia. These alterations were not due to potential confounds and appeared to be a downstream consequence of impaired neurotrophin signaling through the trkB receptor. These findings support the hypothesis that a marked reduction in SST mRNA expression in a subset of GABA neurons contributes to DLPFC dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:18203698

  14. How RNase HI (Escherichia coli) promoted site-selective hydrolysis works on RNA in duplex with carba-LNA and LNA substituted antisense strands in an antisense strategy context?

    PubMed

    Plashkevych, Oleksandr; Li, Qing; Chattopadhyaya, Jyoti

    2017-03-29

    A detailed kinetic study of 36 single modified AON-RNA heteroduplexes shows that substitution of a single native nucleotide in the antisense strand (AON) by locked nucleic acid (LNA) or by diastereomerically pure carba-LNA results in site-dependent modulation of RNase H promoted cleavage of complementary mRNA strands by 2 to 5 fold at 5'-GpN-3' cleavage sites, giving up to 70% of the RNA cleavage products. The experiments have been performed using RNase HI of Escherichia coli. The 2nd best cleavage site, being the 5'-ApN-3' sites, cleaves up to 23%, depending upon the substitution site in 36 isosequential complementary AONs. A comparison of the modified AON promoted RNA cleavage rates with that of the native AON shows that sequence-specificity is considerably enhanced as a result of modification. Clearly, relatively weaker 5'-purine (Pu)-pyrimidine (Py)-3' stacking in the complementary RNA strand is preferred (giving ∼90% of total cleavage products), which plays an important role in RNase H promoted RNA cleavage. A plausible mechanism of RNase H mediated cleavage of the RNA has been proposed to be two-fold, dictated by the balancing effect of the aromatic character of the purine aglycone: first, the locally formed 9-guanylate ion (pKa 9.3, ∼18-20% N1 ionized at pH 8) alters the adjoining sugar-phosphate backbone around the scissile phosphate, transforming its sugar N/S conformational equilibrium, to preferential S-type, causing preferential cleavage at 5'-GpN-3' sites around the center of 20 mer complementary mRNA. Second, the weaker nearest-neighbor strength of 5'-Pu-p-Py-3' stacking promotes preferential 5'-GpN-3' and 5'-ApN-3' cleavage, providing ∼90% of the total products, compared to ∼50% in that of the native one, because of the cLNA/LNA substituent effect on the neighboring 5'-Pu-p-Py-3' sites, providing both local steric flexibility and additional hydration. This facilitates both the water and water/Mg(2+) ion availability at the cleavage site

  15. Duplex unwinding and ATPase activities of the DEAD-box helicase eIF4A are coupled by eIF4G and eIF4B.

    PubMed

    Özeş, Ali R; Feoktistova, Kateryna; Avanzino, Brian C; Fraser, Christopher S

    2011-09-30

    Eukaryotic initiation factor (eIF) 4A is a DEAD-box helicase that stimulates translation initiation by unwinding mRNA secondary structure. The accessory proteins eIF4G, eIF4B, and eIF4H enhance the duplex unwinding activity of eIF4A, but the extent to which they modulate eIF4A activity is poorly understood. Here, we use real-time fluorescence assays to determine the kinetic parameters of duplex unwinding and ATP hydrolysis by these initiation factors. To ensure efficient duplex unwinding, eIF4B and eIF4G cooperatively activate the duplex unwinding activity of eIF4A. Our data reveal that eIF4H is much less efficient at stimulating eIF4A unwinding activity than eIF4B, implying that eIF4H is not able to completely substitute for eIF4B in duplex unwinding. By monitoring unwinding and ATPase assays under identical conditions, we demonstrate that eIF4B couples the ATP hydrolysis cycle of eIF4A with strand separation, thereby minimizing nonproductive unwinding events. Using duplex substrates with altered GC contents but similar predicted thermal stabilities, we further show that the rate of formation of productive unwinding complexes is strongly influenced by the local stability per base pair, in addition to the stability of the entire duplex. This finding explains how a change in the GC content of a hairpin is able to influence translation initiation while maintaining the overall predicted thermal stability.

  16. CBR antimicrobials alter coupling between the bridge helix and the β subunit in RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Malinen, Anssi M; Nandymazumdar, Monali; Turtola, Matti; Malmi, Henri; Grocholski, Thadee; Artsimovitch, Irina; Belogurov, Georgiy A

    2014-03-06

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a validated target for antibacterial drugs. CBR703 series antimicrobials allosterically inhibit transcription by binding to a conserved α helix (β' bridge helix, BH) that interconnects the two largest RNAP subunits. Here we show that disruption of the BH-β subunit contacts by amino-acid substitutions invariably results in accelerated catalysis, slowed-down forward translocation and insensitivity to regulatory pauses. CBR703 partially reverses these effects in CBR-resistant RNAPs while inhibiting catalysis and promoting pausing in CBR-sensitive RNAPs. The differential response of variant RNAPs to CBR703 suggests that the inhibitor binds in a cavity walled by the BH, the β' F-loop and the β fork loop. Collectively, our data are consistent with a model in which the β subunit fine tunes RNAP elongation activities by altering the BH conformation, whereas CBRs deregulate transcription by increasing coupling between the BH and the β subunit.

  17. [Carotid duplex ultrasonography for neurosurgeons].

    PubMed

    Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Ishihara, Hideyuki; Oka, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Michiyasu

    2011-12-01

    Carotid duplex ultrasonography (CDU) is one of the most well-known imaging methods for arteriosclerosis and ischemic stroke. For neurosurgeons, it is very important for the details of carotid plaque to be thoroughly investigated by CDU. Symptomatic carotid plaque is very fragile and easily changes morphologically, and so requires frequent CDU examination. Furthermore, after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) and carotid artery stenting (CAS), restenosis is evaluated with CDU. CDU facilitates not only morphological imaging in the B mode, but also allows a flow study with color Doppler and duplex imaging. So, CDU can help assess the presence of proximal and intracranial artery lesions in spite of only having a cervical view, and the patency of the extracranial artery to intracranial artery bypass is revealed with CDU, which shows a rich velocity and low pulsatility index (PI) in duplex imaging. For the examiner, it is necessary to ponder on what duplex imaging means in examinations, and to summarize all imaging finding.

  18. Alterations in microRNA Expression in Stress-induced Cellular Senescence

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guorong; Luna, Coralia; Qiu, Jianming; Epstein, David L.; Gonzalez, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    Summary We investigated miRNA expression changes associated with stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS) in primary cultures of human diploid fibroblasts (HDF) and human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells. Twenty-five miRNAs were identified by miRNA microarray analysis and their changes in expression were validated by TaqMan realtime RT-PCR in three independent cell lines of HTM and HDF. SIPS in both HTM and HDF cell types was associated with significant down-regulation of four members of the miR-15 family and five miRNAs of the miR-106b family located in the oncogenic clusters miR-17–92, miR-106a-363, and miR-106b-25. SIPS was also associated with up-regulation of two miRNAs (182 and 183) from the miR-183-96-182 cluster. Transfection with miR-106a agomir inhibited the up-regulation of p21CDKN1A associated with SIPS while transfection with miR-106a antagomir led to increased p21CDKN1A expression in senescent cells. In addition, we identified retinoic acid receptor gamma (RARG) as a target of miR-182 and showed that this protein was down-regulated during SIPS in HDF and HTM cells. These results suggest that changes in miRNA expression might contribute to phenotypic alterations of senescent cells by modulating the expression of key regulatory proteins such as p21CDKN1A as well as by targeting genes that are down-regulated in senescent cells such as RARG. PMID:19782699

  19. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Merianda, Tanuja T.; Jin, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons. PMID:28197547

  20. Neural Progenitor Cells Promote Axonal Growth and Alter Axonal mRNA Localization in Adult Neurons.

    PubMed

    Merianda, Tanuja T; Jin, Ying; Kalinski, Ashley L; Sahoo, Pabitra K; Fischer, Itzhak; Twiss, Jeffery L

    2017-01-01

    The inhibitory environment of the spinal cord and the intrinsic properties of neurons prevent regeneration of axons following CNS injury. However, both ascending and descending axons of the injured spinal cord have been shown to regenerate into grafts of embryonic neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Previous studies have shown that grafts composed of glial-restricted progenitors (GRPs) and neural-restricted progenitors (NRPs) can provide a permissive microenvironment for axon growth. We have used cocultures of adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons together with NPCs, which have shown significant enhancement of axon growth by embryonic rat GRP and GRPs/NRPs, both in coculture conditions and when DRGs are exposed to conditioned medium from the NPC cultures. This growth-promoting effect of NPC-conditioned medium was also seen in injury-conditioned neurons. DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs showed altered expression of regeneration-associated genes at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. We found that levels of GAP-43 mRNA increased in DRG cell bodies and axons. However, hepcidin antimicrobial peptide (HAMP) mRNA decreased in the cell bodies of DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs, which is distinct from the increase in cell body HAMP mRNA levels seen in DRGs after injury conditioning. Endogenous GAP-43 and β-actin mRNAs as well as reporter RNAs carrying axonally localizing 3'UTRs of these transcripts showed significantly increased levels in distal axons in the DRGs cocultured with GRPs/NRPs. These results indicate that axon growth promoted by NPCs is associated not only with enhanced transcription of growth-associated genes but also can increase localization of some mRNAs into growing axons.

  1. A MYLK variant regulates asthmatic inflammation via alterations in mRNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Zhou, Tong; Saadat, Laleh; Garcia, Joe GN

    2015-01-01

    Myosin light-chain kinase (MYLK) is a gene known to be significantly associated with severe asthma in African Americans. Here we further examine the molecular function of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), located in the non-muscle myosin light-chain kinase isoform (nmMLCK), in asthma susceptibility and pathobiology. We identified nmMLCK variant (reference SNP: rs9840993, NM_053025: 721C>T, c.439C>T) with a distinct mRNA secondary structure from the other variants. The nmMLCK variant (721C) secondary structure exhibits increased stability with an elongated half-life in the human endothelial cell, and greater efficiency in protein translation initiation owing to an increased accessibility to translation start site. Finally, nmMLCK expression of 721C- and 721T-containing MYLK transgenes were compared in nmMLCK−/− mice and confirmed deleterious effects of nmMLCK expression on asthmatic indices and implicated the augmented influence of MYLK 721C>T (c.439C>T) SNP on asthma severity. The confirmation of the novel mechanism of the regulation of asthmatic inflammation by a MYLK advances knowledge of the genetic basis for asthma disparities, and further suggests the potential of nmMLCK as a therapeutic target. Our study suggests that in addition to altering protein structure and function, non-synonymous SNPs may also lead to phenotypic disparity by altering protein expression. PMID:25271083

  2. Structural alterations of the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase from Salmonella typhimurium affect tRNA substrate specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J N; Björk, G R

    1999-01-01

    In Salmonella typhimurium, the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase (the product of the trmD gene) catalyzes the formation of m1G37, which is present adjacent and 3' of the anticodon (position 37) in seven tRNA species, two of which are tRNA(Pro)CGG and tRN(Pro)GGG. These two tRNA species also exist as +1 frameshift suppressor sufA6 and sufB2, respectively, both having an extra G in the anticodon loop next to and 3' of m1G37. The wild-type form of the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase efficiently methylates these mutant tRNAs. We have characterized one class of mutant forms of the tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase that does not methylate the sufA6 tRNA and thereby induce extensive frameshifting resulting in a nonviable cell. Accordingly, pseudorevertants of strains containing such a mutated trmD allele in conjunction with the sufA6 allele had reduced frameshifting activity caused by either a 9-nt duplication in the sufA6tRNA or a deletion of its structural gene, or by an increased level of m1G37 in the sufA6tRNA. However, the sufB2 tRNA as well as the wild-type counterparts of these two tRNAs are efficiently methylated by this class of structural altered tRNA(m1G37)methyltransferase. Two other mutations (trmD3, trmD10) were found to reduce the methylation of all potential tRNA substrates and therefore primarily affect the catalytic activity of the enzyme. We conclude that all mutations except two (trmD3 and trmD10) do not primarily affect the catalytic activity, but rather the substrate specificity of the tRNA, because, unlike the wild-type form of the enzyme, they recognize and methylate the wild-type but not an altered form of a tRNA. Moreover, we show that the TrmD peptide is present in catalytic excess in the cell. PMID:10094308

  3. Comparative transcriptomic analysis reveals the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1 globally alters mRNA and miRNA to enhance myoblast invasion

    PubMed Central

    Loupe, J M; Miller, P J; Bonner, B P; Maggi, E C; Vijayaraghavan, J; Crabtree, J S; Taylor, C M; Zabaleta, J; Hollenbach, A D

    2016-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma, one of the most common childhood sarcomas, is comprised of two main subtypes, embryonal and alveolar (ARMS). ARMS, the more aggressive subtype, is primarily characterized by the t(2;13)(p35;p14) chromosomal translocation, which fuses two transcription factors, PAX3 and FOXO1 to generate the oncogenic fusion protein PAX3-FOXO1. Patients with PAX3-FOXO1-postitive tumors have a poor prognosis, in part due to the enhanced local invasive capacity of these cells, which leads to the increased metastatic potential for this tumor. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the role that the oncogenic fusion protein has in this increased invasive potential. In this report we use large-scale comparative transcriptomic analyses in physiologically relevant primary myoblasts to demonstrate that the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 is sufficient to alter the expression of 70 mRNA and 27 miRNA in a manner predicted to promote cellular invasion. In contrast the expression of PAX3 alters 60 mRNA and 23 miRNA in a manner predicted to inhibit invasion. We demonstrate that these alterations in mRNA and miRNA translate into changes in the invasive potential of primary myoblasts with PAX3-FOXO1 increasing invasion nearly 2-fold while PAX3 decreases invasion nearly 4-fold. Taken together, these results allow us to build off of previous reports and develop a more expansive molecular model by which the presence of PAX3-FOXO1 alters global gene regulatory networks to enhance the local invasiveness of cells. Further, the global nature of our observed changes highlights the fact that instead of focusing on a single-gene target, we must develop multi-faceted treatment regimens targeting multiple genes of a single oncogenic phenotype or multiple genes that target different oncogenic phenotypes for tumor progression. PMID:27454080

  4. Altering the GTP binding site of the DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/TB-RBP, decreases RNA binding and may create a dominant negative phenotype.

    PubMed

    Chennathukuzhi, V M; Kurihara, Y; Bray, J D; Yang, J; Hecht, N B

    2001-11-01

    The DNA/RNA-binding protein, Translin/Testis Brain RNA-binding protein (Translin/TB-RBP), contains a putative GTP binding site in its C-terminus which is highly conserved. To determine if guanine nucleotide binding to this site functionally alters nucleic acid binding, electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with RNA and DNA binding probes. GTP, but not GDP, reduces RNA binding by approximately 50% and the poorly hydrolyzed GTP analog, GTPgammaS, reduces binding by >90% in gel shift and immunoprecipitation assays. No similar reduction of DNA binding is seen. When the putative GTP binding site of TB-RBP, amino acid sequence VTAGD, is altered to VTNSD by site directed mutagenesis, GTP will no longer bind to TB-RBP(GTP) and TB-RBP(GTP) no longer binds to RNA, although DNA binding is not affected. Yeast two-hybrid assays reveal that like wild-type TB-RBP, TB-RBP(GTP) will interact with itself, with wild-type TB-RBP and with Translin associated factor X (Trax). Transfection of TB-RBP(GTP) into NIH 3T3 cells leads to a marked increase in cell death suggesting a dominant negative function for TB-RBP(GTP) in cells. These data suggest TB-RBP is an RNA-binding protein whose activity is allosterically controlled by nucleotide binding.

  5. Individual and combined effects of DNA methylation and copy number alterations on miRNA expression in breast tumors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The global effect of copy number and epigenetic alterations on miRNA expression in cancer is poorly understood. In the present study, we integrate genome-wide DNA methylation, copy number and miRNA expression and identify genetic mechanisms underlying miRNA dysregulation in breast cancer. Results We identify 70 miRNAs whose expression was associated with alterations in copy number or methylation, or both. Among these, five miRNA families are represented. Interestingly, the members of these families are encoded on different chromosomes and are complementarily altered by gain or hypomethylation across the patients. In an independent breast cancer cohort of 123 patients, 41 of the 70 miRNAs were confirmed with respect to aberration pattern and association to expression. In vitro functional experiments were performed in breast cancer cell lines with miRNA mimics to evaluate the phenotype of the replicated miRNAs. let-7e-3p, which in tumors is found associated with hypermethylation, is shown to induce apoptosis and reduce cell viability, and low let-7e-3p expression is associated with poorer prognosis. The overexpression of three other miRNAs associated with copy number gain, miR-21-3p, miR-148b-3p and miR-151a-5p, increases proliferation of breast cancer cell lines. In addition, miR-151a-5p enhances the levels of phosphorylated AKT protein. Conclusions Our data provide novel evidence of the mechanisms behind miRNA dysregulation in breast cancer. The study contributes to the understanding of how methylation and copy number alterations influence miRNA expression, emphasizing miRNA functionality through redundant encoding, and suggests novel miRNAs important in breast cancer. PMID:24257477

  6. Altered expression of microRNA-451 in eutopic endometrium of baboons (Papio anubis) with endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, N R; Su, R W; Chandramouli, G V R; Khoo, S K; Jeong, J W; Young, S L; Lessey, B A; Fazleabas, A T

    2015-12-01

    Are microRNAs (miRs) altered in the eutopic endometrium (EuE) of baboons following the induction of endometriosis? Induction of endometriosis causes significant changes in the expression of eight miRs, including miR-451, in the baboon endometrium as early as 3 months following induction of the disease. Endometriosis is one of the most common gynecological disorders and causes chronic pelvic pain and infertility in women of reproductive age. Altered expression of miRs has been reported in women and has been suggested to play an important role in the pathophysiology of several gynecological disorders including endometriosis. EuE was obtained from the same group of baboons before and 3 months after the induction of endometriosis. The altered expression of miR-451 was validated in the eutopic and ectopic endometrium of additional baboons between 3 and 15 months following disease induction. Timed endometrial biopsies from women with and without endometriosis were also used to validate the expression of miR-451. Total RNA was extracted from EuE samples before and after the induction of endometriosis, and miRNA expression was analyzed using a 8 × 15 K miR microarray. Microarray signal data were preprocessed by AgiMiRna software, and an empirical Bayes model was used to estimate the changes. The present study focused on quantitative RT-PCR validation of the microarray data, specifically on miR-451 and its target genes in both baboons (n = 3) and women [control (n = 7) and endometriosis (n = 19)]. Descriptive and correlative analysis of miR-451 and target gene expression was conducted using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, while functional analysis utilized an in vitro 3' untranslated region (UTR) luciferase assay and overexpression of miR-451 in human endometrial and endometriotic cell lines. Induction of endometriosis results in the altered expression of miR-451, -141, -29c, -21, -424, -19b, -200a and -181a in the baboon endometrium. In the baboon

  7. Characterization of novel inhibitors of HIV-1 replication that function via alteration of viral RNA processing and rev function.

    PubMed

    Wong, Raymond W; Balachandran, Ahalya; Haaland, Matthew; Stoilov, Peter; Cochrane, Alan

    2013-11-01

    Expression of the complete HIV-1 genome depends on the appropriate processing of viral RNA. Altering the balance of viral RNA processing impairs replication of the virus. In this report, we characterize two small molecule modulators of HIV-1 RNA processing, 8-azaguanine and 2-(2-(5-nitro-2-thienyl)vinyl)quinoline (5350150), which function by distinct mechanisms to suppress viral gene expression. Although only 8-Azaguanine dramatically decreased accumulation of HIV-1 unspliced and singly spliced RNAs and altered splice site usage, both compounds blocked Gag and Env expression without affecting production of Tat (p16) and Rev regulatory proteins. Subsequent analyses suggest that these compounds affect Rev-mediated RNA transport by different mechanisms. Both compounds induced cytoplasmic accumulation of Rev, suggesting that they function, in part, by impairing Rev function. This conclusion is supported by the determination that both drugs block the nuclear export of genomic HIV-1 RNA to the cytoplasm. Testing confirmed that these compounds suppress HIV-1 expression in T cells at doses below those previously used in humans for tumour chemotherapy. Together, our observations demonstrate that small molecules can be used to inhibit HIV-1 replication by altering another avenue of viral RNA processing, offering the potential for the development of novel therapeutics for controlling this disease.

  8. Intestinal Epithelial Barrier Disruption through Altered Mucosal MicroRNA Expression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Gaulke, Christopher A.; Porter, Matthew; Han, Yan-Hong; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Grishina, Irina; George, Michael D.; Dang, Angeline T.; Ding, Shou-Wei; Jiang, Guochun; Korf, Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial barrier dysfunction during human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has largely been attributed to the rapid and severe depletion of CD4+ T cells in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Although it is known that changes in mucosal gene expression contribute to intestinal enteropathy, the role of small noncoding RNAs, specifically microRNA (miRNA), has not been investigated. Using the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected nonhuman primate model of HIV pathogenesis, we investigated the effect of viral infection on miRNA expression in intestinal mucosa. SIV infection led to a striking decrease in the expression of mucosal miRNA compared to that in uninfected controls. This decrease coincided with an increase in 5′-3′-exoribonuclease 2 protein and alterations in DICER1 and Argonaute 2 expression. Targets of depleted miRNA belonged to molecular pathways involved in epithelial proliferation, differentiation, and immune response. Decreased expression of several miRNA involved in maintaining epithelial homeostasis in the gut was localized to the proliferative crypt region of the intestinal epithelium. Our findings suggest that SIV-induced decreased expression of miRNA involved in epithelial homeostasis, disrupted expression of miRNA biogenesis machinery, and increased expression of XRN2 are involved in the development of epithelial barrier dysfunction and gastroenteropathy. IMPORTANCE MicroRNA (miRNA) regulate the development and function of intestinal epithelial cells, and many viruses disrupt normal host miRNA expression. In this study, we demonstrate that SIV and HIV disrupt expression of miRNA in the small intestine during infection. The depletion of several key miRNA is localized to the proliferative crypt region of the gut epithelium. These miRNA are known to control expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell death, and epithelial maturation. Our data indicate that this disruption might be caused by altered expression of miRNA

  9. Epigenetic Changes Induced by Air Toxics: Formaldehyde Exposure Alters miRNA Expression Profiles in Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Julia E.; Smeester, Lisa; Jaspers, Ilona; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2011-01-01

    Background Exposure to formaldehyde, a known air toxic, is associated with cancer and lung disease. Despite the adverse health effects of formaldehyde, the mechanisms underlying formaldehyde-induced disease remain largely unknown. Research has uncovered microRNAs (miRNAs) as key posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression that may influence cellular disease state. Although studies have compared different miRNA expression patterns between diseased and healthy tissue, this is the first study to examine perturbations in global miRNA levels resulting from formaldehyde exposure. Objectives We investigated whether cellular miRNA expression profiles are modified by formaldehyde exposure to test the hypothesis that formaldehyde exposure disrupts miRNA expression levels within lung cells, representing a novel epigenetic mechanism through which formaldehyde may induce disease. Methods Human lung epithelial cells were grown at air–liquid interface and exposed to gaseous formaldehyde at 1 ppm for 4 hr. Small RNAs and protein were collected and analyzed for miRNA expression using microarray analysis and for interleukin (IL-8) protein levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Gaseous formaldehyde exposure altered the miRNA expression profiles in human lung cells. Specifically, 89 miRNAs were significantly down-regulated in formaldehyde-exposed samples versus controls. Functional and molecular network analysis of the predicted miRNA transcript targets revealed that formaldehyde exposure potentially alters signaling pathways associated with cancer, inflammatory response, and endocrine system regulation. IL-8 release increased in cells exposed to formaldehyde, and results were confirmed by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Conclusions Formaldehyde alters miRNA patterns that regulate gene expression, potentially leading to the initiation of a variety of diseases. PMID:21147603

  10. A unique microRNA profile in end-stage heart failure indicates alterations in specific cardiovascular signaling networks

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Zhong-Hui; Surampudi, Venkata Suresh K.; Liu, Chang-Gong; Kotwal, Ashwin; Moravec, Christine S.; Starling, Randall C.; Perez, Dianne M.; Sen, Subha; Wu, Qingyu; Plow, Edward F.; Karnik, Sadashiva

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that the gene expression patterns are substantially altered in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, however, less is known about the reasons behind such global differences. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that can target multiple molecules to regulate wide array of proteins in diverse pathways. The goal of the study was to profile alterations in miRNA expression using end-stage human heart failure samples with an aim to build signaling network pathways using predicted targets for the altered miRNA and to determine nodal molecules regulating individual networks. Profiling of miRNAs using custom designed microarray and validation with an independent set of samples identified eight miRNAs that are altered in human heart failure including one novel miRNA yet to be implicated in cardiac pathology. To gain an unbiased perspective on global regulation by top eight altered miRNAs, functional relationship of predicted targets for these eight miRNAs were examined by network analysis. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis network algorithm was used to build global signaling networks based on the targets of altered miRNAs which allowed us to identify participating networks and nodal molecules that could contribute to cardiac pathophysiology. Majority of the nodal molecules identified in our analysis are targets of altered miRNAs and known regulators of cardiovascular signaling. Cardio-genomics heart failure gene expression public data base was used to analyze trends in expression pattern for target nodal molecules and indeed changes in expression of nodal molecules inversely correlated to miRNA alterations. We have used NF kappa B network as an example to show that targeting other molecules in the network could alter the nodal NF kappa B despite not being a miRNA target suggesting an integrated network response. Thus, using network analysis we show that altering key functional target proteins may regulate expression of the myriad signaling pathways

  11. Isotope effect analyses provide evidence for an altered transition state for RNA 2'-O-transphosphorylation catalyzed by Zn(2+).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuming; Gu, Hong; Chen, Haoyuan; Strong, Emily; Ollie, Edward W; Kellerman, Daniel; Liang, Danni; Miyagi, Masaru; Anderson, Vernon E; Piccirilli, Joseph A; York, Darrin M; Harris, Michael E

    2016-03-25

    Solvent D2O and (18)O kinetic isotope effects on RNA 2'-O-transphosphorylation catalyzed by Zn(2+) demonstrate an altered transition state relative to specific base catalysis. A recent model from DFT calculations involving inner sphere coordination to the non-bridging and leaving group oxygens is consistent with the data.

  12. Prediction of Altered 3′- UTR miRNA-Binding Sites from RNA-Seq Data: The Swine Leukocyte Antigen Complex (SLA) as a Model Region

    PubMed Central

    Endale Ahanda, Marie-Laure; Fritz, Eric R.; Estellé, Jordi; Hu, Zhi-Liang; Madsen, Ole; Groenen, Martien A. M.; Beraldi, Dario; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Hume, David A.; Rowland, Robert R. R.; Lunney, Joan K.; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Reecy, James M.; Giuffra, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    The SLA (swine leukocyte antigen, MHC: SLA) genes are the most important determinants of immune, infectious disease and vaccine response in pigs; several genetic associations with immunity and swine production traits have been reported. However, most of the current knowledge on SLA is limited to gene coding regions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of a large number of protein-coding genes in metazoans, and are suggested to play important roles in fine-tuning immune mechanisms and disease responses. Polymorphisms in either miRNAs or their gene targets may have a significant impact on gene expression by abolishing, weakening or creating miRNA target sites, possibly leading to phenotypic variation. We explored the impact of variants in the 3′-UTR miRNA target sites of genes within the whole SLA region. The combined predictions by TargetScan, PACMIT and TargetSpy, based on different biological parameters, empowered the identification of miRNA target sites and the discovery of polymorphic miRNA target sites (poly-miRTSs). Predictions for three SLA genes characterized by a different range of sequence variation provided proof of principle for the analysis of poly-miRTSs from a total of 144 M RNA-Seq reads collected from different porcine tissues. Twenty-four novel SNPs were predicted to affect miRNA-binding sites in 19 genes of the SLA region. Seven of these genes (SLA-1, SLA-6, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, SLA-DOA, SLA-DOB and TAP1) are linked to antigen processing and presentation functions, which is reminiscent of associations with disease traits reported for altered miRNA binding to MHC genes in humans. An inverse correlation in expression levels was demonstrated between miRNAs and co-expressed SLA targets by exploiting a published dataset (RNA-Seq and small RNA-Seq) of three porcine tissues. Our results support the resource value of RNA-Seq collections to identify SNPs that may lead to altered miRNA regulation

  13. Prediction of altered 3'- UTR miRNA-binding sites from RNA-Seq data: the swine leukocyte antigen complex (SLA) as a model region.

    PubMed

    Endale Ahanda, Marie-Laure; Fritz, Eric R; Estellé, Jordi; Hu, Zhi-Liang; Madsen, Ole; Groenen, Martien A M; Beraldi, Dario; Kapetanovic, Ronan; Hume, David A; Rowland, Robert R R; Lunney, Joan K; Rogel-Gaillard, Claire; Reecy, James M; Giuffra, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    THE SLA (swine leukocyte antigen, MHC: SLA) genes are the most important determinants of immune, infectious disease and vaccine response in pigs; several genetic associations with immunity and swine production traits have been reported. However, most of the current knowledge on SLA is limited to gene coding regions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small molecules that post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of a large number of protein-coding genes in metazoans, and are suggested to play important roles in fine-tuning immune mechanisms and disease responses. Polymorphisms in either miRNAs or their gene targets may have a significant impact on gene expression by abolishing, weakening or creating miRNA target sites, possibly leading to phenotypic variation. We explored the impact of variants in the 3'-UTR miRNA target sites of genes within the whole SLA region. The combined predictions by TargetScan, PACMIT and TargetSpy, based on different biological parameters, empowered the identification of miRNA target sites and the discovery of polymorphic miRNA target sites (poly-miRTSs). Predictions for three SLA genes characterized by a different range of sequence variation provided proof of principle for the analysis of poly-miRTSs from a total of 144 M RNA-Seq reads collected from different porcine tissues. Twenty-four novel SNPs were predicted to affect miRNA-binding sites in 19 genes of the SLA region. Seven of these genes (SLA-1, SLA-6, SLA-DQA, SLA-DQB1, SLA-DOA, SLA-DOB and TAP1) are linked to antigen processing and presentation functions, which is reminiscent of associations with disease traits reported for altered miRNA binding to MHC genes in humans. An inverse correlation in expression levels was demonstrated between miRNAs and co-expressed SLA targets by exploiting a published dataset (RNA-Seq and small RNA-Seq) of three porcine tissues. Our results support the resource value of RNA-Seq collections to identify SNPs that may lead to altered miRNA regulation patterns.

  14. Ustilago maydis natural antisense transcript expression alters mRNA stability and pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, Michael E; Saville, Barry J

    2013-01-01

    Ustilago maydis infection of Zea mays leads to the production of thick-walled diploid teliospores that are the dispersal agent for this pathogen. Transcriptome analyses of this model biotrophic basidiomycete fungus identified natural antisense transcripts (NATs) complementary to 247 open reading frames. The U. maydis NAT cDNAs were fully sequenced and annotated. Strand-specific RT-PCR screens confirmed expression and identified NATs preferentially expressed in the teliospore. Targeted screens revealed four U. maydis NATs that are conserved in a related fungus. Expression of NATs in haploid cells, where they are not naturally occurring, resulted in increased steady-state levels of some complementary mRNAs. The expression of one NAT, as-um02151, in haploid cells resulted in a twofold increase in complementary mRNA levels, the formation of sense–antisense double-stranded RNAs, and unchanged Um02151 protein levels. This led to a model for NAT function in the maintenance and expression of stored teliospore mRNAs. In testing this model by deletion of the regulatory region, it was determined that alteration in NAT expression resulted in decreased pathogenesis in both cob and seedling infections. This annotation and functional analysis supports multiple roles for U. maydis NATs in controlling gene expression and influencing pathogenesis. PMID:23650872

  15. Epigenetic alterations and microRNA misexpression in cancer and autoimmune diseases: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Saito, Hidetsugu; Liang, Gangning; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2014-10-01

    Epigenetic markers such as DNA methylation and histone modifications around promoter regions modify chromatin structure and regulate expression of downstream genes. In fact, aberrant epigenetic modifications are common events in human disease including tumorigenesis and autoimmunity. Small non-coding RNAs named microRNAs (miRNAs) are modulators of gene expression and play critical roles in various cellular processes. Several miRNAs have been characterized as tumor suppressors or oncogenes in cancer, and recent reports implicate certain miRNAs in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Epigenetic investigations have shown that distinct miRNAs are directly regulated by DNA methylation and histone modifications at their promoters. Moreover, miRNAs themselves are key participants in regulating the chromatin modifying machinery. Chromatin-modifying drugs such as DNA methylation inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors have shown efficacy in human malignancies and there is some evidence that these drugs may be useful in autoimmune disease. The benefits of these drugs are at least partially mediated by restoring expression of epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes, including miRNAs. The complex layers regulating gene expression have yet to be fully elucidated, but it is clear that epigenetic alterations and miRNA misexpression are essential events in pathologic processes, especially cancer and autoimmune disease, and represent promising therapeutic targets.

  16. RNA-Seq Identifies Key Reproductive Gene Expression Alterations in Response to Cadmium Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hanyang; Lu, Xing; Cen, Xiang; Chen, Xiaohua; Li, Feng; Zhong, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium is a common toxicant that is detrimental to many tissues. Although a number of transcriptional signatures have been revealed in different tissues after cadmium treatment, the genes involved in the cadmium caused male reproductive toxicity, and the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed that the mice treated with different amount of cadmium in their rodent chow for six months exhibited reduced serum testosterone. We then performed RNA-seq to comprehensively investigate the mice testicular transcriptome to further elucidate the mechanism. Our results showed that hundreds of genes expression altered significantly in response to cadmium treatment. In particular, we found several transcriptional signatures closely related to the biological processes of regulation of hormone, gamete generation, and sexual reproduction, respectively. The expression of several testosterone synthetic key enzyme genes, such as Star, Cyp11a1, and Cyp17a1, were inhibited by the cadmium exposure. For better understanding of the cadmium-mediated transcriptional regulatory mechanism of the genes, we computationally analyzed the transcription factors binding sites and the mircoRNAs targets of the differentially expressed genes. Our findings suggest that the reproductive toxicity by cadmium exposure is implicated in multiple layers of deregulation of several biological processes and transcriptional regulation in mice. PMID:24982889

  17. CBR antimicrobials alter coupling between the bridge helix and the β subunit in RNA polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Malinen, Anssi M.; NandyMazumdar, Monali; Turtola, Matti; Malmi, Henri; Grocholski, Thadee; Artsimovitch, Irina; Belogurov, Georgiy A

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) is a validated target for antibacterial drugs. CBR703 series antimicrobials allosterically inhibit transcription by binding to a conserved α helix (β′ bridge helix, BH) that interconnects the two largest RNAP subunits. Here we show that disruption of the BH-β subunit contacts by amino-acid substitutions invariably results in accelerated catalysis, slowed-down forward translocation and insensitivity to regulatory pauses. CBR703 partially reverses these effects in CBR-resistant RNAPs while inhibiting catalysis and promoting pausing in CBR-sensitive RNAPs. The differential response of variant RNAPs to CBR703 suggests that the inhibitor binds in a cavity walled by the BH, the β′ F-loop and the β fork loop. Collectively, our data are consistent with a model in which the β subunit fine tunes RNAP elongation activities by altering the BH conformation, whereas CBRs deregulate transcription by increasing coupling between the BH and the β subunit. PMID:24598909

  18. Translation initiation factor 2gamma mutant alters start codon selection independent of Met-tRNA binding.

    PubMed

    Alone, Pankaj V; Cao, Chune; Dever, Thomas E

    2008-11-01

    Selection of the AUG start codon for translation in eukaryotes is governed by codon-anticodon interactions between the initiator Met-tRNA(i)(Met) and the mRNA. Translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2) binds Met-tRNA(i)(Met) to the 40S ribosomal subunit, and previous studies identified Sui(-) mutations in eIF2 that enhanced initiation from a noncanonical UUG codon, presumably by impairing Met-tRNA(i)(Met) binding. Consistently, an eIF2gamma-N135D GTP-binding domain mutation impairs Met-tRNA(i)(Met) binding and causes a Sui(-) phenotype. Intragenic A208V and A382V suppressor mutations restore Met-tRNA(i)(Met) binding affinity and cell growth; however, only A208V suppresses the Sui(-) phenotype associated with the eIF2gamma-N135D mutation. An eIF2gamma-A219T mutation impairs Met-tRNA(i)(Met) binding but unexpectedly enhances the fidelity of initiation, suppressing the Sui(-) phenotype associated with the eIF2gamma-N135D,A382V mutant. Overexpression of eIF1, which is thought to monitor codon-anticodon interactions during translation initiation, likewise suppresses the Sui(-) phenotype of the eIF2gamma mutants. We propose that structural alterations in eIF2gamma subtly alter the conformation of Met-tRNA(i)(Met) on the 40S subunit and thereby affect the fidelity of start codon recognition independent of Met-tRNA(i)(Met) binding affinity.

  19. Alteration of the Total Nuclear DNA Ploidy in Different Histopathological Liver Tissues Negative and Positive for HCV RNA.

    PubMed

    Tabll, Ashraf A; Kishta, Sara S; Farrag, Abdel Razik H; El Din, Noha G Bader; Mohamed, Mervat S; El Abd, Yasmine S; El Esawy, Basem H; Kishta, Sobhy A; Dawood, Reham M; Ismail, Allaa; El Awady, Mostafa K

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The molecular mechanisms of HCV-associated carcinogenesis are unknown. We aim to investigate the alteration of the total nuclear DNA content (ploidy) in different histopathological liver tissues infected with HCV and their relation to the seropositivity of HCV RNA. Blood and liver tissues were collected from 26 patients. Diagnosis was carried out according to clinical and pathological examinations by specialized physicians. HCV RNA was detected in patients' sera and tissue samples by RT-PCR. To examine nuclear DNA ploidy, liver tissues were stained with blue Fulgen using the image analysis techniques. Finally, the patients' DNA content was examined by histochemical analysis depending on the optical density of DNA from liver biopsies using the grey image menu in each specimen. The HCV RT-PCR results demonstrated that 13/26 (50%) patients had detectable HCV RNA in their sera samples while 18/26 (69%) had detectable HCV RNA in liver tissues. The DNA content from those patients measured by image cytometry showed a high level of alteration of nuclear DNA ploidy and proliferation in liver tissues with HCC, less alteration of nuclear DNA ploidy in cirrhotic patients, and least proliferation nearly normal in liver fibrosis patients. Moreover, the results of histochemical analysis confirmed the DNA image cytometry results and showed that positive HCV RNA liver tissues had more DNA ploidy than negative HCV RNA liver tissues with statistical significance (p-value < 0.05). HCV positive liver tissue had alterations in DNA content (ploidy) which may lead to liver disease progression, malignant transformation of the liver cells and development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Human papillomavirus alters microRNA profiles in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Abigail I.; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Wells, Susanne I.; Ferris, Robert L.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) positive cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) have a much better disease outcome compared to SCCHN cases lacking HPVs. Differences in microRNA (miRNA) expression may affect their clinical outcomes. Methods miRNA expression was studied using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR in HPV-16 positive and HPV-negative SCCHN cell lines. The role of HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes in altering miRNA expression was investigated using human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs). Results MiRNAs miR-363, miR-33 and miR-497 were upregulated while miR-155, miR-181a, miR-181b, miR-29a, miR-218, miR-222, miR-221 and miR-142-5p were downregulated in HPV-positive cells compared to both HPV-negative SCCHN and normal oral keratinocytes. HPV-16 E6 oncogene altered miRNA expression in HFKs and in an HPV-16 positive cell line with E6 knockdown using siRNA. Conclusions MiRNAs differentially expressed in the presence of HPV-16 may provide biomarkers for SCCHN and identify cellular pathways targeted by this virus. PMID:20652977

  1. Virus-Mediated Alterations in miRNA Factors and Degradation of Viral miRNAs by MCPIP1

    PubMed Central

    Happel, Christine; Ramalingam, Dhivya; Ziegelbauer, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), the causative agent of Kaposi’s sarcoma, encodes 25 mature viral miRNAs. MCP-1-induced protein-1 (MCPIP1), a critical regulator of immune homeostasis, has been shown to suppress miRNA biosynthesis via cleavage of precursor miRNAs through its RNase domain. We demonstrate that MCPIP1 can directly cleave KSHV and EBV precursor miRNAs and that MCPIP1 expression is repressed following de novo KSHV infection. In addition, repression with siRNAs to MCPIP1 in KSHV-infected cells increased IL-6 and KSHV miRNA expression, supporting a role for MCPIP1 in IL-6 and KSHV miRNA regulation. We also provide evidence that KSHV miRNAs repress MCPIP1 expression by targeting the 3’UTR of MCPIP1. Conversely, expression of essential miRNA biogenesis components Dicer and TRBP is increased following latent KSHV infection. We propose that KSHV infection inhibits a negative regulator of miRNA biogenesis (MCPIP1) and up-regulates critical miRNA processing components to evade host mechanisms that inhibit expression of viral miRNAs. KSHV-mediated alterations in miRNA biogenesis represent a novel mechanism by which KSHV interacts with its host and a new mechanism for the regulation of viral miRNA expression. PMID:27893764

  2. Benefits of Automatic Duplexing Fact Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This resource provides a how-to duplex guide, informs the reader on the benefits and cost savings from automatic duplexing, and several off the shelf print management software options for your facility.

  3. Effects of Aicardi-Goutières syndrome mutations predicted from ADAR-RNA structures.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Andrew J; Beal, Peter A

    2017-02-01

    Adenosine (A) to inosine (I) RNA editing is important for life in metazoan organisms. Dysregulation or mutations that compromise the efficacy of A to I editing results in neurological disorders and a shorten life span. These reactions are catalyzed by adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs), which hydrolytically deaminate adenosines in regions of duplex RNA. Because inosine mimics guanosine in hydrogen bonding, this prolific RNA editing alters the sequence and structural information in the RNA landscape. Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a severe childhood autoimmune disease that is one of a broader set of inherited disorders characterized by constitutive upregulation of type I interferon (IFN) referred to as type I interferonopathies. AGS is caused by mutations in multiple genes whose protein products, including ADAR1, are all involved in nucleic acid metabolism or sensing. The recent crystal structures of human ADAR2 deaminase domain complexed with duplex RNA substrates enabled modeling of how AGS causing mutations may influence RNA binding and catalysis. The mutations can be broadly characterized into three groups; mutations on RNA-binding loops that directly affect RNA binding, "second-layer" mutations that can alter the disposition of RNA-binding loops, and mutations that can alter the position of an α-helix bearing an essential catalytic residue.

  4. Sex differences in alcohol consumption and alterations in nucleus accumbens endocannabinoid mRNA in alcohol-dependent rats.

    PubMed

    Henricks, Angela M; Berger, Anthony L; Lugo, Janelle M; Baxter-Potter, Lydia N; Bieniasz, Kennedy V; Craft, Rebecca M; McLaughlin, Ryan J

    2016-10-29

    Chronic intermittent alcohol (CIA) exposure produces altered motivational states characterized by anxiety and escalated alcohol consumption during withdrawal. The endocannabinoid (ECB) system contributes to these symptoms, and sex differences in alcohol dependence, as well as bidirectional interactions between ECBs and gonadal hormones have been documented. Thus, we evaluated sex differences in alcohol consumption, anxiety-like behavior, and ECB mRNA expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) of alcohol-dependent rats during acute withdrawal. Male rats exposed to six weeks of CIA showed escalated alcohol consumption during acute withdrawal and reductions in NAc N-acyl phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipase D (NAPEPLD), DAG lipase alpha (DAGLα), and monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) mRNA. Intact alcohol-dependent female rats also escalated their consumption, but notably, this effect was also present in non-dependent females. No differences in NAc ECB mRNA were observed between CIA- and air-exposed females during acute withdrawal. However, when these data were analyzed according to estrous stage, significant differences in NAPEPLD and MAGL mRNA expression emerged in the NAc of air-exposed control rats, which were absent in alcohol-dependent females. We subsequently measured alcohol consumption and NAc ECB mRNA in ovariectomized (OVX) females with or without estradiol (E2) replacement during withdrawal. Neither E2 nor CIA altered alcohol consumption in OVX females. However, E2 reduced both DAGLα and MAGL mRNA, suggesting that E2 may influence the biosynthesis and degradation of 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) in the NAc. Collectively, these studies indicate sexual dimorphism in alcohol consumption in non-dependent rats and suggest that E2-mediated alterations in NAc ECB mRNA expression during withdrawal may be a mechanism by which sex differences in alcohol dependence emerge. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Altered microRNA expression profile in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: a role in the regulation of NFL mRNA levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, adult onset, fatal neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons. There is emerging evidence that alterations in RNA metabolism may be critical in the pathogenesis of ALS. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are key determinants of mRNA stability. Considering that miRNAs are increasingly being recognized as having a role in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, we decided to characterize the miRNA expression profile in spinal cord (SC) tissue in sporadic ALS (sALS) and controls. Furthermore, we performed functional analysis to identify a group of dysregulated miRNAs that could be responsible for the selective suppression of low molecular weight neurofilament (NFL) mRNA observed in ALS. Results Using TaqMan arrays we analyzed 664 miRNAs and found that a large number of miRNAs are differentially expressed in ventral lumbar SC in sALS compared to controls. We observed that the majority of dysregulated miRNAs are down-regulated in sALS SC tissues. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) showed that dysregulated miRNAs are linked with nervous system function and cell death. We used two prediction algorithms to develop a panel of miRNAs that have recognition elements within the human NFL mRNA 3′UTR, and then we performed functional analysis for these miRNAs. Our results demonstrate that three miRNAs that are dysregulated in sALS (miR-146a*, miR-524-5p and miR-582-3p) are capable of interacting with NFL mRNA 3′UTR in a manner that is consistent with the suppressed steady state mRNA levels observed in spinal motor neurons in ALS. Conclusions The miRNA expression profile is broadly altered in the SC in sALS. Amongst these is a group of dysregulated miRNAs directly regulate the NFL mRNA 3′UTR, suggesting a role in the selective suppression of NFL mRNA in the ALS spinal motor neuron neurofilamentous aggregate formation. PMID:23705811

  6. Altered microRNA expression profile in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: a role in the regulation of NFL mRNA levels.

    PubMed

    Campos-Melo, Danae; Droppelmann, Cristian A; He, Zhongping; Volkening, Kathryn; Strong, Michael J

    2013-05-24

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive, adult onset, fatal neurodegenerative disease of motor neurons. There is emerging evidence that alterations in RNA metabolism may be critical in the pathogenesis of ALS. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that are key determinants of mRNA stability. Considering that miRNAs are increasingly being recognized as having a role in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases, we decided to characterize the miRNA expression profile in spinal cord (SC) tissue in sporadic ALS (sALS) and controls. Furthermore, we performed functional analysis to identify a group of dysregulated miRNAs that could be responsible for the selective suppression of low molecular weight neurofilament (NFL) mRNA observed in ALS. Using TaqMan arrays we analyzed 664 miRNAs and found that a large number of miRNAs are differentially expressed in ventral lumbar SC in sALS compared to controls. We observed that the majority of dysregulated miRNAs are down-regulated in sALS SC tissues. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) showed that dysregulated miRNAs are linked with nervous system function and cell death. We used two prediction algorithms to develop a panel of miRNAs that have recognition elements within the human NFL mRNA 3'UTR, and then we performed functional analysis for these miRNAs. Our results demonstrate that three miRNAs that are dysregulated in sALS (miR-146a*, miR-524-5p and miR-582-3p) are capable of interacting with NFL mRNA 3'UTR in a manner that is consistent with the suppressed steady state mRNA levels observed in spinal motor neurons in ALS. The miRNA expression profile is broadly altered in the SC in sALS. Amongst these is a group of dysregulated miRNAs directly regulate the NFL mRNA 3'UTR, suggesting a role in the selective suppression of NFL mRNA in the ALS spinal motor neuron neurofilamentous aggregate formation.

  7. Analysis of miRNA and mRNA Expression Profiles Highlights Alterations in Ionizing Radiation Response of Human Lymphocytes under Modeled Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Casara, Silvia; Sales, Gabriele; Lanfranchi, Gerolamo; Celotti, Lucia; Mognato, Maddalena

    2012-01-01

    Background Ionizing radiation (IR) can be extremely harmful for human cells since an improper DNA-damage response (DDR) to IR can contribute to carcinogenesis initiation. Perturbations in DDR pathway can originate from alteration in the functionality of the microRNA-mediated gene regulation, being microRNAs (miRNAs) small noncoding RNA that act as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. In this study we gained insight into the role of miRNAs in the regulation of DDR to IR under microgravity, a condition of weightlessness experienced by astronauts during space missions, which could have a synergistic action on cells, increasing the risk of radiation exposure. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed miRNA expression profile of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) incubated for 4 and 24 h in normal gravity (1 g) and in modeled microgravity (MMG) during the repair time after irradiation with 0.2 and 2Gy of γ-rays. Our results show that MMG alters miRNA expression signature of irradiated PBL by decreasing the number of radio-responsive miRNAs. Moreover, let-7i*, miR-7, miR-7-1*, miR-27a, miR-144, miR-200a, miR-598, miR-650 are deregulated by the combined action of radiation and MMG. Integrated analyses of miRNA and mRNA expression profiles, carried out on PBL of the same donors, identified significant miRNA-mRNA anti-correlations of DDR pathway. Gene Ontology analysis reports that the biological category of “Response to DNA damage” is enriched when PBL are incubated in 1 g but not in MMG. Moreover, some anti-correlated genes of p53-pathway show a different expression level between 1 g and MMG. Functional validation assays using luciferase reporter constructs confirmed miRNA-mRNA interactions derived from target prediction analyses. Conclusions/Significance On the whole, by integrating the transcriptome and microRNome, we provide evidence that modeled microgravity can affects the DNA-damage response to IR in human PBL. PMID:22347458

  8. Alterations of microRNA and microRNA-regulated messenger RNA expression in germinal center B-cell lymphomas determined by integrative sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Hezaveh, Kebria; Kloetgen, Andreas; Bernhart, Stephan H; Mahapatra, Kunal Das; Lenze, Dido; Richter, Julia; Haake, Andrea; Bergmann, Anke K; Brors, Benedikt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Drexler, Hans G; Eils, Roland; Haas, Siegfried; Hoffmann, Steve; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleinheinz, Kortine; Korbel, Jan; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Leich, Ellen; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Loeffler, Luisa; López, Cristina; McHardy, Alice C; Möller, Peter; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholz, Ingrid; Stadler, Peter F; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Sungalee, Stéphanie; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A; Siebert, Reiner; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hummel, Michael; Hoell, Jessica I

    2016-11-01

    MicroRNA are well-established players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. However, information on the effects of microRNA deregulation mainly relies on bioinformatic prediction of potential targets, whereas proof of the direct physical microRNA/target messenger RNA interaction is mostly lacking. Within the International Cancer Genome Consortium Project "Determining Molecular Mechanisms in Malignant Lymphoma by Sequencing", we performed miRnome sequencing from 16 Burkitt lymphomas, 19 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and 21 follicular lymphomas. Twenty-two miRNA separated Burkitt lymphomas from diffuse large B-cell lymphomas/follicular lymphomas, of which 13 have shown regulation by MYC. Moreover, we found expression of three hitherto unreported microRNA. Additionally, we detected recurrent mutations of hsa-miR-142 in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and follicular lymphomas, and editing of the hsa-miR-376 cluster, providing evidence for microRNA editing in lymphomagenesis. To interrogate the direct physical interactions of microRNA with messenger RNA, we performed Argonaute-2 photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments. MicroRNA directly targeted 208 messsenger RNA in the Burkitt lymphomas and 328 messenger RNA in the non-Burkitt lymphoma models. This integrative analysis discovered several regulatory pathways of relevance in lymphomagenesis including Ras, PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling pathways, also recurrently deregulated in lymphomas by mutations. Our dataset reveals that messenger RNA deregulation through microRNA is a highly relevant mechanism in lymphomagenesis.

  9. Alterations of microRNA and microRNA-regulated messenger RNA expression in germinal center B-cell lymphomas determined by integrative sequencing analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hezaveh, Kebria; Kloetgen, Andreas; Bernhart, Stephan H; Mahapatra, Kunal Das; Lenze, Dido; Richter, Julia; Haake, Andrea; Bergmann, Anke K; Brors, Benedikt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Drexler, Hans G; Eils, Roland; Haas, Siegfried; Hoffmann, Steve; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleinheinz, Kortine; Korbel, Jan; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Leich, Ellen; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Loeffler, Luisa; López, Cristina; McHardy, Alice C; Möller, Peter; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schlesner, Matthias; Scholz, Ingrid; Stadler, Peter F; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Sungalee, Stéphanie; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A; Siebert, Reiner; Borkhardt, Arndt; Hummel, Michael; Hoell, Jessica I.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNA are well-established players in post-transcriptional gene regulation. However, information on the effects of microRNA deregulation mainly relies on bioinformatic prediction of potential targets, whereas proof of the direct physical microRNA/target messenger RNA interaction is mostly lacking. Within the International Cancer Genome Consortium Project “Determining Molecular Mechanisms in Malignant Lymphoma by Sequencing”, we performed miRnome sequencing from 16 Burkitt lymphomas, 19 diffuse large B-cell lymphomas, and 21 follicular lymphomas. Twenty-two miRNA separated Burkitt lymphomas from diffuse large B-cell lymphomas/follicular lymphomas, of which 13 have shown regulation by MYC. Moreover, we found expression of three hitherto unreported microRNA. Additionally, we detected recurrent mutations of hsa-miR-142 in diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and follicular lymphomas, and editing of the hsa-miR-376 cluster, providing evidence for microRNA editing in lymphomagenesis. To interrogate the direct physical interactions of microRNA with messenger RNA, we performed Argonaute-2 photoactivatable ribonucleoside-enhanced cross-linking and immunoprecipitation experiments. MicroRNA directly targeted 208 messsenger RNA in the Burkitt lymphomas and 328 messenger RNA in the non-Burkitt lymphoma models. This integrative analysis discovered several regulatory pathways of relevance in lymphomagenesis including Ras, PI3K-Akt and MAPK signaling pathways, also recurrently deregulated in lymphomas by mutations. Our dataset reveals that messenger RNA deregulation through microRNA is a highly relevant mechanism in lymphomagenesis. PMID:27390358

  10. Point mutations in the West Nile virus (Flaviviridae; Flavivirus) RNA-dependent RNA polymerase alter viral fitness in a host-dependent manner in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Van Slyke, Greta A; Ciota, Alexander T; Willsey, Graham G; Jaeger, Joachim; Shi, Pei-Yong; Kramer, Laura D

    2012-05-25

    The West Nile virus (WNV) genome contains a single RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene, which is responsible for replication of the viral genome and, as such, is an important target for antiviral therapy. Viral RdRps are known to lack proofreading capabilities and as a result viruses such as WNV exist as a mixture of viral genotypes within an infection, enabling the virus to readily emerge and adapt to new host environments. To test the consequences of subtle structural alterations remote from the RdRp active-site, the following single point mutations were engineered in the WNV NS5 RdRp coding region: T363N, A365N, and T537I; these mutations were selected in an effort to stabilize the secondary structural elements near the rNTP binding pocket of the RdRp. Mutant viruses were tested in vitro on Vero, C6/36, Culex tarsalis and DF-1 cell types and in vivo in one day old chickens and Culex pipiens mosquitoes. Plaque morphology was affected by each mutation and growth and RNA replication kinetics were altered as well. Our results demonstrate that subtle alteration of the RdRp protein away from the active site can have a significant overall biological effect on WNV fitness, and that this effect can be host-dependent.

  11. Integration of mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels in breast cancer to improve grade definition.

    PubMed

    Cava, Claudia; Bertoli, Gloria; Ripamonti, Marilena; Mauri, Giancarlo; Zoppis, Italo; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Gilardi, Maria Carla; Castiglioni, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Defining the aggressiveness and growth rate of a malignant cell population is a key step in the clinical approach to treating tumor disease. The correct grading of breast cancer (BC) is a fundamental part in determining the appropriate treatment. Biological variables can make it difficult to elucidate the mechanisms underlying BC development. To identify potential markers that can be used for BC classification, we analyzed mRNAs expression profiles, gene copy numbers, microRNAs expression and their association with tumor grade in BC microarray-derived datasets. From mRNA expression results, we found that grade 2 BC is most likely a mixture of grade 1 and grade 3 that have been misclassified, being described by the gene signature of either grade 1 or grade 3. We assessed the potential of the new approach of integrating mRNA expression profile, copy number alterations, and microRNA expression levels to select a limited number of genomic BC biomarkers. The combination of mRNA profile analysis and copy number data with microRNA expression levels led to the identification of two gene signatures of 42 and 4 altered genes (FOXM1, KPNA4, H2AFV and DDX19A) respectively, the latter obtained through a meta-analytical procedure. The 42-based gene signature identifies 4 classes of up- or down-regulated microRNAs (17 microRNAs) and of their 17 target mRNA, and the 4-based genes signature identified 4 microRNAs (Hsa-miR-320d, Hsa-miR-139-5p, Hsa-miR-567 and Hsa-let-7c). These results are discussed from a biological point of view with respect to pathological features of BC. Our identified mRNAs and microRNAs were validated as prognostic factors of BC disease progression, and could potentially facilitate the implementation of assays for laboratory validation, due to their reduced number.

  12. Alteration of microRNA expressions in the pons and medulla in rats after 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile administration.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Keiko; Kushida, Masahiko; Miyata, Kaori; Sumida, Kayo; Takeda, Shuji; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2016-10-01

    Although 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) is widely used as a neurotoxicant to cause axonopathy due to accumulation of neurofilaments in several rodent models, its mechanism of neurotoxicity has not been fully understood. In particular, no information regarding microRNA (miRNA) alteration associated with IDPN is available. This study was conducted to reveal miRNA alteration related to IDPN-induced neurotoxicity. Rats were administered IDPN (20, 50, or 125 mg/kg/day) orally for 3, 7, and 14 days. Histopathological features were investigated using immunohistochemistry for neurofilaments and glial cells, and miRNA alterations were analyzed by microarray and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nervous symptoms such as ataxic gait and head bobbing were observed from Day 9 at 125 mg/kg. Axonal swelling due to accumulation of neurofilaments was observed especially in the pons, medulla, and spinal cord on Day 7 at 125 mg/kg and on Day 14 at 50 and 125 mg/kg. Furthermore, significant upregulation of miR-547* was observed in the pons and medulla in treated animals only on Day 14 at 125 mg/kg. This is the first report indicating that miR-547* is associated with IDPN-induced neurotoxicity, especially in an advanced stage of axonopathy.

  13. Sperm microRNA Content Is Altered in a Mouse Model of Male Obesity, but the Same Suite of microRNAs Are Not Altered in Offspring's Sperm.

    PubMed

    Fullston, Tod; Ohlsson-Teague, E Maria C; Print, Cristin G; Sandeman, Lauren Y; Lane, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide and has tripled in men of reproductive age since the 1970s. Concerningly, obesity is not only comorbid with other chronic diseases, but there is mounting evidence that it increases the non-communicable disease load in their children (eg mortality, obesity, autism). Animal studies have demonstrated that paternal obesity increases the risk of metabolic (eg glucose metabolism defects, obesity) and reproductive disorders in offspring. Epigenetic changes within sperm are clear mechanistic candidates that are associated with both changes to the father's environment and offspring phenotype. Specifically there is emerging evidence that a father's sperm microRNA content both responds to paternal environmental cues and alters the gene expression profile and subsequent development of the early embryo. We used a mouse model of high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity to investigate whether male obesity could modulate sperm microRNA content. We also investigated whether this alteration to a father's sperm microRNA content lead to a similar change in the sperm of male offspring. Our investigations were initially guided by a Taqman PCR array, which indicated the differential abundance of 28 sperm borne microRNAs in HFD mice. qPCR confirmation in a much larger cohort of founder males demonstrated that 13 of these microRNAs were differentially abundant (11 up-regulated; 2 down-regulated) due to HFD feeding. Despite metabolic and reproductive phenotypes also being observed in grand-offspring fathered via the male offspring lineage, there was no evidence that any of the 13 microRNAs were also dysregulated in male offspring sperm. This was presumably due to the variation seen within both groups of offspring and suggests other mechanisms might act between offspring and grand-offspring. Thus 13 sperm borne microRNAs are modulated by a father's HFD and the presumed transfer of this altered microRNA payload to the embryo at fertilisation

  14. Altered EphA5 mRNA expression in rat brain with a single methamphetamine treatment.

    PubMed

    Numachi, Yohtaro; Yoshida, Sumiko; Yamashita, Motoyasu; Fujiyama, Ko; Toda, Shigenobu; Matsuoka, Hiroo; Kajii, Yasushi; Nishikawa, Toru

    2007-09-07

    Methamphetamine is a potent and indirect dopaminergic agonist which can cause chronic brain dysfunctions including drug abuse, drug dependence and drug-induced psychosis. Methamphetamine is known to trigger molecular mechanisms involved in associative learning and memory, and thereby alter patterns of synaptic connectivity. The persistent risk of relapse in methamphetamine abuse, dependence and psychosis may be caused by such alterations in synaptic connectivity. EphA5 receptors constitute large families of tyrosine kinase receptor and are expressed almost exclusively in the nervous system, especially in the limbic structures. Recent studies suggest EphA5 to be important in the topographic projection, development, and plasticity of limbic structures, and to be involved in dopaminergic neurotransmission. We used in situ hybridization to examine whether methamphetamine alters EphA5 mRNA expression in the brains of adult male Wister rats. EphA5 mRNA was widely distributed in the medial frontal cortex, cingulate cortex, piriform cortex, hippocampus, habenular nucleus and amygdala. Compared to baseline expression at 0h, EphA5 mRNA was significantly decreased (by 20%) in the medial frontal cortex at 24h, significantly increased (by 30%) in the amygdala at 9 and 24h, significantly but transiently decreased (by 30%) in the habenular nucleus at 1h after a single injection of methamphetamine. Methamphetamine did not change EphA5 mRNA expression in the cingulate cortex, piriform cortex or hippocampus. Our results that methamphetamine altered EphA5 mRNA expression in rat brain suggest methamphetamine could affect patterns of synaptic connectivity, which might be responsible for methamphetamine-induced chronic brain dysfunctions.

  15. Paternal stress exposure alters sperm microRNA content and reprograms offspring HPA stress axis regulation

    PubMed Central

    Rodgers, Ali B.; Morgan, Christopher P.; Bronson, Stefanie L.; Revello, Sonia; Bale, Tracy L.

    2013-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric disease frequently presents with an underlying hypo- or hyper- reactivity of the HPA stress axis, suggesting an exceptional vulnerability of this circuitry to external perturbations. Parental lifetime exposures to environmental challenges are associated with increased offspring neuropsychiatric disease risk, and likely contribute to stress dysregulation. While maternal influences have been extensively examined, much less is known regarding the specific role of paternal factors. To investigate the potential mechanisms by which paternal stress may contribute to offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation, we exposed mice to six weeks of chronic stress prior to breeding. As epidemiological studies support variation in paternal germ cell susceptibility to reprogramming across the lifespan, male stress exposure occurred either throughout puberty or in adulthood. Remarkably, offspring of sires from both paternal stress groups displayed significantly reduced HPA axis stress responsivity. Gene set enrichment analyses in offspring stress regulating brain regions, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the bed nucleus of stria terminalis (BNST), revealed global pattern changes in transcription suggestive of epigenetic reprogramming and consistent with altered offspring stress responsivity, including increased expression of glucocorticoid-responsive genes in the PVN. In examining potential epigenetic mechanisms of germ cell transmission, we found robust changes in sperm miRNA (miR) content, where nine specific miRs were significantly increased in both paternal stress groups. Overall, these results demonstrate that paternal experience across the lifespan can induce germ cell epigenetic reprogramming and impact offspring HPA stress axis regulation, and may therefore offer novel insight into factors influencing neuropsychiatric disease risk. PMID:23699511

  16. Duplex evaluation of venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Labropoulos, Nicos; Leon, Luis R

    2005-03-01

    Duplex ultrasound is the most useful examination for the evaluation of venous valvular incompetence. Multi-frequency 4 to 7-MHz linear array transducers are typically used for this assessment of superficial and deep reflux. The examination is done with the patient standing and manual compression maneuvers are used to initiate reflux. Automatic rapid inflation and deflation cuffs may be used when a standard stimulus is needed. Cutoff values for reflux have been defined. Perforating veins must be identified and flow direction during compression recorded. When ulcers are present, duplex ultrasound is used to investigate veins of the ulcerated legs. Venous outflow obstruction is also studied by duplex ultrasound and chronic changes in deep and superficial veins following deep venous thrombosis noted. The main drawback in evaluation of chronic obstruction is inability to quantify hemodynamic significance. Anatomic variations in superficial and deep veins are common and their identification is necessary. Reporting results of duplex ultrasound studies must take into consideration the proper classification of venous disease as well as the new anatomic terms that have been accepted.

  17. Sequestration of DROSHA and DGCR8 by Expanded CGG RNA Repeats Alters MicroRNA Processing in Fragile X-Associated Tremor/Ataxia Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sellier, Chantal; Freyermuth, Fernande; Tabet, Ricardos; Tran, Tuan; He, Fang; Ruffenach, Frank; Alunni, Violaine; Moine, Herve; Thibault, Christelle; Page, Adeline; Tassone, Flora; Willemsen, Rob; Disney, Matthew D.; Hagerman, Paul J.; Todd, Peter K.; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of 55–200 CGG repeats in the 5′ UTR of FMR1. These expanded CGG repeats are transcribed and accumulate in nuclear RNA aggregates that sequester one or more RNA-binding proteins, thus impairing their functions. Here, we have identified that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 binds to expanded CGG repeats, resulting in the partial sequestration of DGCR8 and its partner, DROSHA, within CGG RNA aggregates. Consequently, the processing of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) is reduced, resulting in decreased levels of mature miRNAs in neuronal cells expressing expanded CGG repeats and in brain tissue from patients with FXTAS. Finally, overexpression of DGCR8 rescues the neuronal cell death induced by expression of expanded CGG repeats. These results support a model in which a human neurodegenerative disease originates from the alteration, in trans, of the miRNA-processing machinery. PMID:23478018

  18. Sequestration of DROSHA and DGCR8 by expanded CGG RNA repeats alters microRNA processing in fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sellier, Chantal; Freyermuth, Fernande; Tabet, Ricardos; Tran, Tuan; He, Fang; Ruffenach, Frank; Alunni, Violaine; Moine, Herve; Thibault, Christelle; Page, Adeline; Tassone, Flora; Willemsen, Rob; Disney, Matthew D; Hagerman, Paul J; Todd, Peter K; Charlet-Berguerand, Nicolas

    2013-03-28

    Fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of 55-200 CGG repeats in the 5' UTR of FMR1. These expanded CGG repeats are transcribed and accumulate in nuclear RNA aggregates that sequester one or more RNA-binding proteins, thus impairing their functions. Here, we have identified that the double-stranded RNA-binding protein DGCR8 binds to expanded CGG repeats, resulting in the partial sequestration of DGCR8 and its partner, DROSHA, within CGG RNA aggregates. Consequently, the processing of microRNAs (miRNAs) is reduced, resulting in decreased levels of mature miRNAs in neuronal cells expressing expanded CGG repeats and in brain tissue from patients with FXTAS. Finally, overexpression of DGCR8 rescues the neuronal cell death induced by expression of expanded CGG repeats. These results support a model in which a human neurodegenerative disease originates from the alteration, in trans, of the miRNA-processing machinery.

  19. Antisense oligodeoxynucleotides targeted to MAG mRNA profoundly alter BP and PLP mRNA expression in differentiating oligodendrocytes: a caution.

    PubMed

    Laszkiewicz, I; Wiggins, R C; Konat, G W

    1999-09-01

    The applicability of antisense technology to suppress the expression of myelin associated glycoprotein (MAG) in cultured oligodendrocytes was evaluated. Differentiating oligodendrocyte precursor cells obtained by the shake-off method were exposed to nine unmodified antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) targeted to the first seven exons of MAG mRNA. After four days, steady-state levels of MAG, proteolipid protein (PLP) and basic protein (BP) mRNAs were determined by Northern blot analysis. Only ODN annealing to 599-618 nt of the MAG mRNA (the junction of exon 5 and 6) resulted in a significant, 75% decrease in the MAG mRNA level. Unexpectedly, six other anti-MAG ODNs which had no significant effect on the MAG message, greatly increased the level of BP mRNA. The highest upregulation of approximately 12 fold was observed with ODN annealing to 139-168 nt (junction of exon 3 and 4). On the other hand, the 997-1016 ODN decreased the levels of BP and PLP messages by 70-80%. The 599-618 ODN also decreased the PLP mRNA by 85%. The results demonstrate that antisense ODNs targeted to one gene may profoundly alter the expression of other genes, and hence, complicate functional analysis of the targeted protein.

  20. Calorimetric and Spectroscopic Analysis of the Thermal Stability of Short Duplex DNA-Containing Sugar and Base-Modified Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Fakhfakh, Kareem; Hughesman, Curtis B; Louise Creagh, A; Kao, Vincent; Haynes, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Base- and sugar-modified analogs of DNA and RNA are finding ever expanding use in medicine and biotechnology as tools to better tailor structured oligonucleotides by altering their thermal stability, nuclease resistance, base-pairing specificity, antisense activity, or cellular uptake. Proper deployment of these chemical modifications generally requires knowledge of how each affects base-pairing properties and thermal stabilities. Here, we describe in detail how differential scanning calorimetry and UV spectroscopy may be used to quantify the melting thermodynamics of short dsDNA containing chemically modified nucleosides in one or both strands. Insights are provided into why and how the presence of highly stable base pairs containing modified nucleosides can alter the nature of calorimetry or melting spectroscopy data, and how each experiment must therefore be conducted to ensure high-quality melting thermodynamics data are obtained. Strengths and weaknesses of the two methods when applied to chemically modified duplexes are also addressed.

  1. SiRNA-mediated silencing of Snail-1 induces apoptosis and alters micro RNA expression in human urinary bladder cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Musavi Shenas, Seyed Mohammad Hossein; Mansoori, Behzad; Mohammadi, Ali; Salehi, Shima; Kaffash, Behzad; Talebi, Behnaz; Babaloo, Zohreh; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-06-20

    Snail-1 known as one of the important transcription factor is a mediator of survival and cell migration, and expression is raised in numerous cancer types. Snail-1 gene may show a role in recurrence of several cancers including bladder cancer by down-regulating E-cadherin, inducing an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and its related microRNAs (miRNAs). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a specific Snail-1 siRNA on apoptosis and alter EMT related miRNAs of EJ-138 (bladder cancer) cells. The cells were transfected with siRNAs using transfection reagent. The cytotoxic effects of Snail-1 siRNA, on bladder cancer cells were determined using MTT assay. Relative Snail-1 mRNA levels were measured by QRT- PCR, respectively. Apoptosis was measured by TUNEL test based on labeling of DNA strand breaks. We also evaluated miR-29b, miR-21, and miR-203 expression by QRT-PCR to determine alteration in miRNAs expression involved in EMT. Snail-1 siRNA significantly reduced mRNA expression levels in 48 h after transfection at the concentration of 60 pmol in bladder cancer cells. We also showed that the silencing of Snail-1 led to the induction of apoptosis. miR-21 and miR-29b depression have been shown in Snail-1 suppressed group in EJ-138 cells in vitro. These results propose that Snail-1 might play an important role in the progression of bladder cancer, and be a potential therapeutic target for trigger apoptosis and suppression of EMT-related miRNAs in bladder cancer.

  2. Role of a neuronal small non-messenger RNA: behavioural alterations in BC1 RNA-deleted mice.

    PubMed

    Lewejohann, L; Skryabin, B V; Sachser, N; Prehn, C; Heiduschka, P; Thanos, S; Jordan, U; Dell'Omo, G; Vyssotski, A L; Pleskacheva, M G; Lipp, H-P; Tiedge, H; Brosius, J; Prior, H

    2004-09-23

    BC1 RNA is a small non-messenger RNA common in dendritic microdomains of neurons in rodents. In order to investigate its possible role in learning and behaviour, we compared controls and knockout mice from three independent founder lines established from separate embryonic stem cells. Mutant mice were healthy with normal brain morphology and appeared to have no neurological deficits. A series of tests for exploration and spatial memory was carried out in three different laboratories. The tests were chosen as to ensure that different aspects of spatial memory and exploration could be separated and that possible effects of confounding variables could be minimised. Exploration was studied in a barrier test, in an open-field test, and in an elevated plus-maze test. Spatial memory was investigated in a Barnes maze and in a Morris water maze (memory for a single location), in a multiple T-maze and in a complex alley maze (route learning), and in a radial maze (working memory). In addition to these laboratory tasks, exploratory behaviour and spatial memory were assessed under semi-naturalistic conditions in a large outdoor pen. The combined results indicate that BC1 RNA-deficient animals show behavioural changes best interpreted in terms of reduced exploration and increased anxiety. In contrast, spatial memory was not affected. In the outdoor pen, the survival rates of BC1-depleted mice were lower than in controls. Thus, we conclude that the neuron-specific non-messenger BC1 RNA contributes to the aptive modulation of behaviour.

  3. Abnormal expression of mRNA, microRNA alteration and aberrant DNA methylation patterns in rectal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xianglong; Yuan, Xiangfei; Qin, Hai; Zhang, Xipeng

    2017-01-01

    Aim Rectal adenocarcinoma (READ) is a malignancy cancer with the high morbidity and motility worldwide. Our study aimed to explore the potential pathogenesis of READ through integrated analysis of gene expression profiling and DNA methylation data. Methods The miRNA, mRNA expression profiling and corresponding DNA methylation data were downloaded from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) database. Differentially expressed mRNAs/ miRNAs/methylated regions (DEmRNA/DEmiRNAs) were identified in READ. The negatively correlation of DEmiRNA-DEmRNAs and DNA methylation-DEmRNAs were obtained. DEmRNAs expression was validated through quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microarray expression profiling analyses. Results 1192 dysregulated DEmRNAs, 27 dysregulated DEmiRNAs and 6403 aberrant methylation CpG sites were screened in READ compared to normal controls. 1987 negative interaction pairs among 27 DEmiRNAs and 668 DEmRNAs were predicted. 446 genes with aberrant methylation were annotated. Eventually, 50 DEmRNAs (39 down- and 11 up-regulated DEmRNAs) with hypermethylation, synchronously negatively targeted by DEmiRNAs, were identified through the correlation analysis among 446 genes with aberrant methylation and 668 DEmRNAs. 50 DEmRNAs were significantly enriched in cAMP signaling pathway, circadian entrainment and glutamatergic synapse. The validation results of expression levels of DEmRNAs through qRT-PCR and microarray analyses were compatible with our study. Conclusion 7 genes of SORCS1, PDZRN4, LONRF2, CNGA3, HAND2, RSPO2 and GNAO1 with hypermethylation and negatively regulation by DEmiRNAs might contribute to the tumorigenesis of READ. Our work might provide valuable foundation for the READ in mechanism elucidation, early diagnosis and therapeutic target identification. PMID:28350845

  4. Adipose tissue angiopoietin-like protein 4 messenger RNA changes with altered energy balance in lactating Holstein cows.

    PubMed

    Koltes, D A; Spurlock, D M

    2012-11-01

    Negative energy balance at the onset of lactation is unfavorably associated with fitness traits in high-producing dairy cows. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (ANGPTL4) is an adipokine that has been associated with the regulation of lipid metabolism through the inhibition of lipoprotein lipase activity and regulation of lipolysis. Expression of ANGPTL4 messenger RNA (mRNA) increases during early lactation, but its regulation with changing energy status is currently unknown. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to determine whether ANGPTL4 mRNA abundance is responsive to declining energy balance induced by the transition from pregnancy to lactation, feed restriction, and GH administration in lactating dairy cows. The mRNA abundance of leptin, adiponectin, and adiponectin receptor 2 were also measured to compare adipokine mRNA profiles during changes in energy metabolism. Repeated adipose tissue biopsies were taken from different cows during transition from late pregnancy to lactation (n = 26), feed restriction (n = 19), and GH administration (n = 20). As expected, milk yield increased with the onset of lactation and GH administration (P < 0.01) but declined during feed restriction. Energy balance declined in each experiment, resulting in negative energy balance at the onset of lactation and after feed restriction. Abundance of ANGPTL4 mRNA expression increased 2- to 6-fold with declining energy balance in each experiment. Leptin mRNA declined with feed restriction, and adiponectin mRNA decreased with the onset of lactation. The consistency and magnitude of the increase in ANGPTL4 mRNA across multiple models of altered energy balance identifies it as an adipokine that is uniquely responsive to changes in energy balance in the lactating dairy cow. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. MicroRNA buffering and altered variance of gene expression in response to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hua; Kommadath, Arun; Plastow, Graham S; Tuggle, Christopher K; Guan, Le Luo; Stothard, Paul

    2014-01-01

    One potential role of miRNAs is to buffer variation in gene expression, although conflicting results have been reported. To investigate the buffering role of miRNAs in response to Salmonella infection in pigs, we sequenced miRNA and mRNA in whole blood from 15 pig samples before and after Salmonella challenge. By analyzing inter-individual variation in gene expression patterns, we found that for moderately and lowly expressed genes, putative miRNA targets showed significantly lower expression variance compared with non-miRNA-targets. Expression variance between highly expressed miRNA targets and non-miRNA-targets was not significantly different. Further, miRNA targets demonstrated significantly reduced variance after challenge whereas non-miRNA-targets did not. RNA binding proteins (RBPs) are significantly enriched among the miRNA targets with dramatically reduced variance of expression after Salmonella challenge. Moreover, we found evidence that targets of young (less-conserved) miRNAs showed lower expression variance compared with targets of old (evolutionarily conserved) miRNAs. These findings point to the importance of a buffering effect of miRNAs for relatively lowly expressed genes, and suggest that the reduced expression variation of RBPs may play an important role in response to Salmonella infection.

  6. Targeted RNA Sequencing Assay to Characterize Gene Expression and Genomic Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Dorrelyn P.; Miya, Jharna; Reeser, Julie W.; Roychowdhury, Sameek

    2017-01-01

    RNA sequencing (RNAseq) is a versatile method that can be utilized to detect and characterize gene expression, mutations, gene fusions, and noncoding RNAs. Standard RNAseq requires 30 – 100 million sequencing reads and can include multiple RNA products such as mRNA and noncoding RNAs. We demonstrate how targeted RNAseq (capture) permits a focused study on selected RNA products using a desktop sequencer. RNAseq capture can characterize unannotated, low, or transiently expressed transcripts that may otherwise be missed using traditional RNAseq methods. Here we describe the extraction of RNA from cell lines, ribosomal RNA depletion, cDNA synthesis, preparation of barcoded libraries, hybridization and capture of targeted transcripts and multiplex sequencing on a desktop sequencer. We also outline the computational analysis pipeline, which includes quality control assessment, alignment, fusion detection, gene expression quantification and identification of single nucleotide variants. This assay allows for targeted transcript sequencing to characterize gene expression, gene fusions, and mutations. PMID:27585245

  7. X-ray Crystal Structure of a Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA) Duplex Composed of a Palindromic 10-mer DNA Strand Containing One LNA Thymine Monomer

    SciTech Connect

    Egli, M.; Minasov, G.; Teplova, M.; Kumar, R.; Wengel, J.

    2010-03-05

    Locked nucleic acid (LNA), a recently introduced nucleic acid analogue with a bicyclic 2'-O,4'-C-methylene linked furanose sugar, exhibits enhanced affinities for DNA and RNA relative to the corresponding oligodeoxyribonucleotides and oligoribonucleotides; we report the first crystal structure of an LNA unit incorporated in an oligonucleotide duplex. The structure at 1.4 {angstrom} resolution of the DNA-LNA decamer duplex with one LNA thymine monomer per strand provides a detailed view of the conformation and hydration of locked nucleic acid residues in a duplex A-form. Our study provides a first look at the conformational properties of LNA in a crystal structure at relatively high resolution. The main characteristics of the structure are the standard A-type conformation induced by LNA residues and the capacity of the 2'-oxygen that is part of the bicyclic sugar framework to engage in a least two hydrogen bonds to water molecules. Circular dichroism spectra (CD) of LNA-LNA duplexes in solution indicated that such duplexes appear to adopt a conformation that closely resembles the A-form geometry of RNA-RNA duplexes. However, these spectra also manifested subtle differences between the two species (data not shown). The present analysis of a duplex with only a single LNA residue per strand does not provide any insight into potential conformational differences between LNA and RNA duplexes. Attempts to determine a crystal structure of a completely modified LNA-LNA duplex are underway.

  8. KEX2 mutations suppress RNA polymerase II mutants and alter the temperature range of yeast cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, C; Young, R A

    1989-01-01

    Suppressors of a temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutation were isolated to identify proteins that interact with RNA polymerase II in yeast cells. Ten independently isolated extragenic mutations that suppressed the temperature-sensitive mutation rpb1-1 and produced a cold-sensitive phenotype were all found to be alleles of a single gene, SRB1. An SRB1 partial deletion mutant was further investigated and found to exhibit several pleiotropic phenotypes. These included suppression of numerous temperature-sensitive RNA polymerase II mutations, alteration of the temperature growth range of cells containing wild-type RNA polymerase, and sterility of cells of alpha mating type. The ability of SRB1 mutations to suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype of RNA polymerase II mutants did not extend to other temperature-sensitive mutants investigated. Isolation of the SRB1 gene revealed that SRB1 is KEX2. These results indicate that the KEX2 protease, whose only known substrates are hormone precursors, can have an important influence on RNA polymerase II and the temperature-dependent growth properties of yeast cells. Images PMID:2668732

  9. Inactivation of a Single Copy of Crebbp Selectively Alters Pre-mRNA Processing in Mouse Hematopoietic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lemieux, Madeleine E.; Cheng, Ziming; Zhou, Qing; White, Ruth; Cornell, John; Kung, Andrew L.; Rebel, Vivienne I.

    2011-01-01

    Global expression analysis of fetal liver hematopoietic stem cells (FL HSCs) revealed the presence of unspliced pre-mRNA for a number of genes in normal FL HSCs. In a subset of these genes, Crebbp+/− FL HSCs had less unprocessed pre-mRNA without a corresponding reduction in total mRNA levels. Among the genes thus identified were the key regulators of HSC function Itga4, Msi2 and Tcf4. A similar but much weaker effect was apparent in Ep300+/− FL HSCs, indicating that, in this context as in others, the two paralogs are not interchangeable. As a group, the down-regulated intronic probe sets could discriminate adult HSCs from more mature cell types, suggesting that the underlying mechanism is regulated with differentiation stage and is active in both fetal and adult hematopoiesis. Consistent with increased myelopoiesis in Crebbp hemizygous mice, targeted reduction of CREBBP abundance by shRNA in the multipotent EML cell line triggered spontaneous myeloid differentiation in the absence of the normally required inductive signals. In addition, differences in protein levels between phenotypically distinct EML subpopulations were better predicted by taking into account not only the total mRNA signal but also the amount of unspliced message present. CREBBP thus appears to selectively influence the timing and degree of pre-mRNA processing of genes essential for HSC regulation and thereby has the potential to alter subsequent cell fate decisions in HSCs. PMID:21901164

  10. Cavitation erosion of duplex and super duplex stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kwok, C.T.; Man, H.C.; Cheng, F.T.

    1998-10-05

    Owing to their excellent corrosion resistance, stainless steels are widely used both in the marine, urban water, chemical and food industries. In addition to the corrosive environment, high fluid flow speeds are always encountered for components used in these industries. The cavitation characteristics of S30400 and S31600 austenitic stainless steels and duplex stainless steels were studied in detail by a number of authors. It was generally agreed that S30400 has higher cavitation erosion resistance than that of S31600 due to higher tendency of strain induced martensitic transformation under high impulse of stress. A considerable number of results on stress corrosion cracking characteristics of SDSS and duplex stainless steels have been published but data concerning their cavitation erosion property are extremely rare.

  11. Elucidating the cancer-specific genetic alteration spectrum of glioblastoma derived cell lines from whole exome and RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2015-01-01

    Cell lines derived from tumor tissues have been used as a valuable system to study gene regulation and cancer development. Comprehensive characterization of the genetic background of cell lines could provide clues on novel genes responsible for carcinogenesis and help in choosing cell lines for particular studies. Here, we have carried out whole exome and RNA sequencing of commonly used glioblastoma (GBM) cell lines (U87, T98G, LN229, U343, U373 and LN18) to unearth single nucleotide variations (SNVs), indels, differential gene expression, gene fusions and RNA editing events. We obtained an average of 41,071 SNVs out of which 1,594 (3.88%) were potentially cancer-specific. The cell lines showed frequent SNVs and indels in some of the genes that are known to be altered in GBM- EGFR, TP53, PTEN, SPTA1 and NF1. Chromatin modifying genes- ATRX, MLL3, MLL4, SETD2 and SRCAP also showed alterations. While no cell line carried IDH1 mutations, five cell lines showed hTERT promoter activating mutations with a concomitant increase in hTERT transcript levels. Five significant gene fusions were found of which NUP93-CYB5B was validated. An average of 18,949 RNA editing events was also obtained. Thus we have generated a comprehensive catalogue of genetic alterations for six GBM cell lines. PMID:26496030

  12. Cooperative translocation enhances the unwinding of duplex DNA by SARS coronavirus helicase nsP13.

    PubMed

    Lee, Na-Ra; Kwon, Hyun-Mi; Park, Kkothanahreum; Oh, Sangtaek; Jeong, Yong-Joo; Kim, Dong-Eun

    2010-11-01

    SARS coronavirus encodes non-structural protein 13 (nsP13), a nucleic acid helicase/NTPase belonging to superfamily 1 helicase, which efficiently unwinds both partial-duplex RNA and DNA. In this study, unwinding of DNA substrates that had different duplex lengths and 5'-overhangs was examined under single-turnover reaction conditions in the presence of excess enzyme. The amount of DNA unwound decreased significantly as the length of the duplex increased, indicating a poor in vitro processivity. However, the quantity of duplex DNA unwound increased as the length of the single-stranded 5'-tail increased for the 50-bp duplex. This enhanced processivity was also observed for duplex DNA that had a longer single-stranded gap in between. These results demonstrate that nsP13 requires the presence of a long 5'-overhang to unwind longer DNA duplexes. In addition, enhanced DNA unwinding was observed for gapped DNA substrates that had a 5'-overhang, indicating that the translocated nsP13 molecules pile up and the preceding helicase facilitate DNA unwinding. Together with the propensity of oligomer formation of nsP13 molecules, we propose that the cooperative translocation by the functionally interacting oligomers of the helicase molecules loaded onto the 5'-overhang account for the observed enhanced processivity of DNA unwinding.

  13. Lamina- and cell-specific alterations in cortical somatostatin receptor 2 mRNA expression in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Beneyto, Monica; Morris, Harvey M.; Rovenski, Katherine C.; Lewis, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Disturbed cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in schizophrenia is evident from lamina- and cell type- specific alterations in presynaptic markers. In the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), these alterations include lower transcript expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67) and somatostatin (SST), a neuropeptide expressed in the Martinotti subpopulation of GABA neurons whose axons innervate the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons. However, whether the alterations in SST-containing interneurons are associated with changes in post-synaptic receptors for SST has not been examined. Thus, we used in situ hybridization to quantify the mRNA expression levels of SST receptors subtype 1 (SSTR1) and subtype 2 (SSTR2) in DLPFC area 9 from 23 matched pairs of subjects with schizophrenia and normal comparison subjects. We also assessed the effects of potential confounding variables within the human subjects and in brain specimens from macaque monkeys with long term exposure to antipsychotic drugs. SSTR1 mRNA levels did not differ between subject groups. In contrast, mean cortical SSTR2 mRNA levels were significantly 19% lower in the subjects with schizophrenia. Laminar and cellular level analyses revealed that lower SSTR2 mRNA levels were localized to pyramidal cells in cortical layers 5-6. Expression of SSTR2 mRNA did not differ between monkeys exposed chronically to high doses of haloperidol or olanzapine and control animals, or between subjects with schizophrenia on or off antipsychotic medications at the time of death. However, levels of SSTR2 mRNA were significantly 37.6% lower in monkeys exposed chronically to low dose haloperidol, suggesting that the lower levels of SSTR2 mRNA selectively in pyramidal neurons in DLPFC layers 5-6 in schizophrenia should be interpreted with caution. In concert with prior findings of lower SST mRNA expression in the same subjects, the results of this study suggest the convergence of pre- and post

  14. Expression of trkB mRNA is altered in rat hippocampus after experimental brain trauma.

    PubMed

    Hicks, R R; Zhang, L; Dhillon, H S; Prasad, M R; Seroogy, K B

    1998-08-31

    Recent investigations have shown that expression of mRNAs for the neurotrophins brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) is differentially altered in the hippocampus following traumatic brain injury. In the present study, modulation of neurotrophin receptor expression was examined in the hippocampus in a rat model of traumatic brain injury using in situ hybridization. Messenger RNA for trkB, the high-affinity receptor for BDNF and neurotrophin-4 (NT-4), was increased between 3 and 6 h bilaterally in the dentate gyrus following a lateral fluid-percussion brain injury of moderate severity (2.0-2.1 atm). No time-dependent alterations were observed for trkB mRNA in hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3. Levels of mRNA for trkC, the high-affinity receptor for NT-3, did not change in any region of the hippocampus. These data demonstrate that lateral fluid-percussion injury modulates expression of trkB mRNA in the hippocampus and support a role for BDNF/trkB signalling mechanisms in secondary events associated with traumatic brain injury.

  15. A comprehensive study of smoking-specific microRNA alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Aswini R; Zheng, Hao; Kwok, James G; Qu, Yuanhao; Zou, Angela E; Korrapati, Avinaash; Li, Pin Xue; Califano, Joseph A; Hovell, Melbourne F; Wang-Rodriguez, Jessica; Ongkeko, Weg M

    2017-09-01

    While tobacco smoking is a well-known risk factor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), the molecular mechanisms underlying tobacco-induced HNSCC remain unclear. This study sought to comprehensively identify microRNA (miRNA) alterations and evaluate their clinical relevance in smoking-induced HNSCC pathogenesis and progression. Using small RNA-sequencing data and clinical data from 145 HNSCC patients, we performed a series of differential expression and correlation analyses to identify a panel of tobacco-dysregulated miRNAs associated with key clinical characteristics in HNSCC. We then examined the expression patterns of these miRNAs in normal epithelial cell lines following exposure to cigarette smoke extract. Our analyses revealed distinct panels of miRNAs to be dysregulated with smoking status and associated with additional clinical features, including tumor stage, metastasis, anatomic site, and patient survival. The differential expression of key miRNAs, including miR-101, miR-181b, miR-486, and miR-1301, was verified in cigarette-treated epithelial cell lines, suggesting their potential roles in the early development of smoking-related HNSCCs. Specific alterations in miRNA expression may be traced to tobacco use and are associated with important HNSCC clinical characteristics. Future studies of these miRNAs may be valuable for furthering the understanding and targeted treatment of smoking-associated HNSCC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. MicroRNA abundance is altered in synaptoneurosomes during prion disease.

    PubMed

    Boese, Amrit S; Saba, Reuben; Campbell, Kristyn; Majer, Anna; Medina, Sarah; Burton, Lynn; Booth, Timothy F; Chong, Patrick; Westmacott, Garrett; Dutta, Sucharita M; Saba, Julian A; Booth, Stephanie A

    2016-03-01

    Discrepancy in synaptic structural plasticity is one of the earliest manifestations of the neurodegenerative state. In prion diseases, a reduction in synapses and dendritic spine densities is observed during preclinical disease in neurons of the cortex and hippocampus. The underlying molecular mechanisms of these alterations have not been identified but microRNAs (miRNAs), many of which are enriched at the synapse, likely regulate local protein synthesis in rapid response to stressors such as replicating prions. MiRNAs are therefore candidate regulators of these early neurodegenerative changes and may provide clues as to the molecular pathways involved. We therefore determined changes in mature miRNA abundance within synaptoneurosomes isolated from prion-infected, as compared to mock-infected animals, at asymptomatic and symptomatic stages of disease. During preclinical disease, miRNAs that are enriched in neurons including miR-124a-3p, miR-136-5p and miR-376a-3p were elevated. At later stages of disease we found increases in miRNAs that have previously been identified as deregulated in brain tissues of prion infected mice, as well as in Alzheimer's disease (AD) models. These include miR-146a-5p, miR-142-3p, miR-143-3p, miR-145a-5p, miR-451a, miR-let-7b, miR-320 and miR-150-5p. A number of miRNAs also decreased in abundance during clinical disease. These included almost all members of the related miR-200 family (miR-200a-3p, miR-200b-3p, miR-200c-3p, miR-141-3p, and miR-429-3p) and the 182 cluster (miR-182-5p and miR-183-5p).

  17. Time Course of Behavioral Alteration and mRNA Levels of Neurotrophic Factor Following Stress Exposure in Mouse.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa, Naoya; Ogawa, Takumi; Sakamoto, Yusuke; Ogawa, Mami; Matsuo, Yumi; Zamami, Yoshito; Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi

    2015-08-01

    Stress is known to affect neurotrophic factor expression, which induces depression-like behavior. However, whether there are time-dependent changes in neurotrophic factor mRNA expression following stress remains unclear. In the present study, we tested whether chronic stress exposure induces long-term changes in depression-related behavior, serum corticosterone, and hippocampal proliferation as well as neurotrophic factor family mRNA levels, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), in the mouse hippocampus. The mRNA level of neurotrophic factors (BDNF, NGF, NT-3, and CNTF) was measured using the real-time PCR. The serum corticosterone level was evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and, for each subject, the hippocampal proliferation was examined by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine immunostaining. Mice exhibited depression-like behavior in the forced-swim test (FST) and decreased BDNF mRNA and hippocampal proliferation in the middle of the stress exposure. After 15 days of stress exposure, we observed increased immobility in the FST, serum corticosterone levels, and BDNF mRNA levels and degenerated hippocampal proliferation, maintained for at least 2 weeks. Anhedonia-like behavior in the sucrose preference test and NGF mRNA levels were decreased following 15 days of stress. NGF mRNA levels were significantly higher 1 week after stress exposure. The current data demonstrate that chronic stress exposure induces prolonged BDNF and NGF mRNA changes and increases corticosterone levels and depression-like behavior in the FST, but does not alter other neurotrophic factors or performance in the sucrose preference test.

  18. Altered dynein-dependent transport in piRNA pathway mutants

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Caryn; Bullock, Simon; Lehmann, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    Maintenance of genome integrity in germ cells is crucial for the success of future generations. In Drosophila, and mammals, transposable element activity in the germline can cause DNA breakage and sterility. Recent studies have shown that proteins involved in piRNA (PIWI-interacting RNA) biogenesis are necessary for retrotransposon silencing in the Drosophila germline. Females mutant for genes in the piRNA biogenesis pathway produce eggs with patterning defects that result from Chk-2 (checkpoint kinase-2) DNA damage checkpoint activation. Here we show that large ribonucleoprotein aggregates form in response to DNA damage checkpoint activation in egg chambers of females defective in piRNA biogenesis. Aggregate formation is specific to piRNA biogenesis mutants, as other mutations that activate the same Chk-2-dependent checkpoint do not cause aggregate formation. These aggregates contain components of the dynein motor machinery, retrotransposon RNA, and protein and axial patterning RNAs. Disruption of the aggregates by colcemid treatment leads to increased retrotransposon RNA levels, indicating that these structures may be the destination of retrotransposon RNA transport and may be degradation or sequestration sites. We propose that aggregate formation is a cellular response to protect germ cells from DNA damage caused by elevated retrotransposon expression. PMID:19478063

  19. A hypertension-associated mitochondrial DNA mutation alters the tertiary interaction and function of tRNA(Leu(UUR)).

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Wang, Meng; Xue, Ling; Lin, Zhi; He, Qiufen; Shi, Wenwen; Chen, Yaru; Jin, Xiaofen; Li, Haiying; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Min-Xin

    2017-08-25

    Several mitochondrial tRNA mutations have been associated with hypertension, but their pathophysiology remains poorly understood. In this report, we identified a novel homoplasmic 3253T→C mutation in the mitochondrial tRNA(Leu(UUR)) gene in a Han Chinese family with maternally inherited hypertension. The m.3253T→C mutation affected a highly conserved uridine at position 22 at the D-stem of tRNA(Leu(UUR)), introducing a G-C base pairing (G13-C22) at the D-stem and a tertiary base pairing (C22-G46) between the D-stem and the variable loop. We therefore hypothesized that the m.3253T→C mutation altered both the structure and function of tRNA(Leu(UUR)) Using cytoplasmic hybrid (cybrid) cell lines derived from this Chinese family, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation perturbed the conformation and stability of tRNA(Leu(UUR)), as suggested by faster electrophoretic mobility of mutated tRNA relative to the wild-type molecule. Northern blot analysis revealed an ∼45% decrease in the steady-state level of tRNA(Leu(UUR)) in the mutant cell lines carrying the m.3253T→C mutation, as compared with control cell lines. Moreover, an ∼35% reduction in aminoacylation efficiency of tRNA(Leu(UUR)) was observed in the m.3253T→C mutant cells. These alterations in tRNA(Leu(UUR)) metabolism impaired mitochondrial translation, especially for those polypeptides with a high proportion of Leu(UUR) codons, such as ND6. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the m.3253T→C mutation decreased the activities of mitochondrial complexes I and V, markedly diminished mitochondrial ATP levels and membrane potential, and increased the production of reactive oxygen species in the cells. In conclusion, our findings may provide new insights into the pathophysiology of maternally inherited hypertension. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The effect of hybridization-induced secondary structure alterations on RNA detection using backscattering interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nicholas M.; Olmsted, Ian R.; Haselton, Frederick R.; Bornhop, Darryl J.; Wright, David W.

    2013-01-01

    Backscattering interferometry (BSI) has been used to successfully monitor molecular interactions without labeling and with high sensitivity. These properties suggest that this approach might be useful for detecting biomarkers of infection. In this report, we identify interactions and characteristics of nucleic acid probes that maximize BSI signal upon binding the respiratory syncytial virus nucleocapsid gene RNA biomarker. The number of base pairs formed upon the addition of oligonucleotide probes to a solution containing the viral RNA target correlated with the BSI signal magnitude. Using RNA folding software mfold, we found that the predicted number of unpaired nucleotides in the targeted regions of the RNA sequence generally correlated with BSI sensitivity. We also demonstrated that locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes improved sensitivity approximately 4-fold compared to DNA probes of the same sequence. We attribute this enhancement in BSI performance to the increased A-form character of the LNA:RNA hybrid. A limit of detection of 624 pM, corresponding to ∼105 target molecules, was achieved using nine distinct ∼23-mer DNA probes complementary to regions distributed along the RNA target. Our results indicate that BSI has promise as an effective tool for sensitive RNA detection and provides a road map for further improving detection limits. PMID:23519610

  1. Maternal consumption of organic trace minerals alters calf systemic and neutrophil mRNA and microRNA indicators of inflammation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Jacometo, Carolina B; Osorio, Johan S; Socha, Michael; Corrêa, Marcio N; Piccioli-Cappelli, Fiorenzo; Trevisi, Erminio; Loor, Juan J

    2015-11-01

    Organic trace mineral (ORG) supplementation to dairy cows in substitution of sulfate (INO) sources has been associated with improvement in immune function during stressful states such as the peripartal period. However, the effect of supplemental ORG during pregnancy on the neonatal calf is unknown. Therefore, our aim was to investigate the effects of ORG supplementation during late pregnancy on the immune system and growth of the neonatal calf. Of specific interest was the evaluation of inflammation-related microRNA (miRNA) and target gene expression in blood neutrophils as indicators of possible nutritional programming. Forty multiparous cows were supplemented for 30d prepartum with 40 mg/kg of Zn, 20 mg/kg of Mn, 5 mg/kg of Cu, and 1mg/kg of Co from either organic (ORG) or sulfate (INO) sources (total diet contained supplemental 75 mg/kg of Zn, 65 mg/kg of Mn, 11 mg/kg of Cu, and 1 mg/kg of Co, and additional Zn, Mn, and Co provided by sulfates), and a subset of calves (n=8/treatment) was used for blood immunometabolic marker and polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMNL) gene and miRNA expression analyses. Samples were collected at birth (before colostrum feeding), 1d (24 h after colostrum intake), and 7 and 21d of age. Data were analyzed as a factorial design with the PROC MIXED procedure of SAS. No differences were detected in BW, but maternal ORG tended to increase calf withers height. Calves from INO-fed cows had greater concentrations of blood glucose, GOT, paraoxonase, myeloperoxidase, and reactive oxygen metabolites. Antioxidant capacity also was greater in INO calves. The PMNL expression of toll-like receptor pathway genes indicated a pro-inflammatory state in INO calves, with greater expression of the inflammatory mediators MYD88, IRAK1, TRAF6, NFKB, and NFKBIA. The lower expression of miR-155 and miR-125b in ORG calves indicated the potential for maternal organic trace minerals in regulating the PMNL inflammatory response at least via alterations in mRNA and

  2. Low-level lasers alter mRNA levels from traditional reference genes used in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, A. F.; Canuto, K. S.; Rodrigues, J. A.; Fonseca, A. S.; Mencalha, A. L.

    2017-07-01

    Cancer is among the leading causes of mortality worldwide, increasing the importance of treatment development. Low-level lasers are used in several diseases, but some concerns remains on cancers. Reverse transcriptase quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is a technique used to understand cellular behavior through quantification of mRNA levels. Output data from target genes are commonly relative to a reference that cannot vary according to treatment. This study evaluated reference genes levels from MDA-MB-231 cells exposed to red or infrared lasers at different fluences. Cultures were exposed to red and infrared lasers, incubated (4 h, 37 °C), total RNA was extracted and cDNA synthesis was performed to evaluate mRNA levels from ACTB, GUSB and TRFC genes by RT-qPCR. Specific amplification was verified by melting curves and agarose gel electrophoresis. RefFinder enabled data analysis by geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. Specific amplifications were obtained and, although mRNA levels from ACTB, GUSB or TRFC genes presented no significant variation through traditional statistical analysis, Excel-based tools revealed that the use of these reference genes are dependent of laser characteristics. Our data showed that exposure to low-level red and infrared lasers at different fluences alter the mRNA levels from ACTB, GUSB and TRFC in MDA-MB-231 cells.

  3. Altered stoichiometry Escherichia coli Cascade complexes with shortened CRISPR RNA spacers are capable of interference and primed adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Kuznedelov, Konstantin; Mekler, Vladimir; Lemak, Sofia; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Datsenko, Kirill A.; Jain, Ishita; Savitskaya, Ekaterina; Mallon, John; Shmakov, Sergey; Bothner, Brian; Bailey, Scott; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Severinov, Konstantin; Semenova, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli type I-E CRISPR-Cas system Cascade effector is a multisubunit complex that binds CRISPR RNA (crRNA). Through its 32-nucleotide spacer sequence, Cascade-bound crRNA recognizes protospacers in foreign DNA, causing its destruction during CRISPR interference or acquisition of additional spacers in CRISPR array during primed CRISPR adaptation. Within Cascade, the crRNA spacer interacts with a hexamer of Cas7 subunits. We show that crRNAs with a spacer length reduced to 14 nucleotides cause primed adaptation, while crRNAs with spacer lengths of more than 20 nucleotides cause both primed adaptation and target interference in vivo. Shortened crRNAs assemble into altered-stoichiometry Cascade effector complexes containing less than the normal amount of Cas7 subunits. The results show that Cascade assembly is driven by crRNA and suggest that multisubunit type I CRISPR effectors may have evolved from much simpler ancestral complexes. PMID:27738137

  4. Alteration of 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase subunit protein, synthesis rates, and mRNA during rat neonatal development.

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, Y; Dunaway, G A

    1996-03-29

    For the three 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK) subunits in heart, skeletal muscle, liver and kidney, developmentally-associated changes in protein, mRNA and apparent synthesis rates were observed. During neonatal maturation, all three phenomena for the M-type in heart and skeletal muscle exhibited large increases. Also, during neonatal development, the L-type and C-type subunits were unaffected in heart but disappeared from skeletal muscle. In the newborn liver and kidney, the amounts of each type of PFK subunit protein were nearly identical. During neonatal development, the levels of all three PFK subunit proteins in kidney increased more than twofold; and this was associated with a similar increase in apparent subunit synthesis rates and mRNA levels. During liver neonatal development, the L-type subunit protein, synthesis and mRNA levels also increased more than twofold. However, during hepatic maturation, M-type subunit protein, synthesis and mRNA levels were unchanged and apparently unaffected. The C-type subunit protein during neonatal liver development decreased approximately 80% as did its apparent synthesis rate. These data suggest that regulation of the alteration of the PFK subunit proteins during neonatal maturation can vary among these tissues and is not the same for each subunit type. Different mechanisms, such as transcription, translation, and mRNA stability could be involved.

  5. Altered promoter selection by a novel form of Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Jaehning, J A; Wiggs, J L; Chamberlin, M J

    1979-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis RNA polymerase holoenzyme prepared by several standard methods utilizes bacteriophage T7 DeltaD111 DNA as an efficient template. The major RNA products are specific transcripts from T7 promoters A(1) and C; these promoters are also efficiently utilized by RNA polymerases purified from a wide range of other bacterial species [Wiggs, J., Bush, J. & Chamberlin, M. (1979) Cell 16, 97-109]. In contrast, B. subtilis RNA polymerase preparations purified by a modification of the method of Burgess and Jendrisak (designated fraction 5) utilize T7 DeltaD111 promoters A(1) and C and an additional promoter site, J, which has been located at 90.6% on the standard T7 physical map. This promoter is not used by B. subtilis core RNA polymerase or by RNA polymerase from any other bacterial species we have tested. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of fraction 5 RNA polymerase shows that it contains B. subtilis components sigma and delta and a polypeptide of M(r) 92,000 in addition to the B. subtilis beta, beta', and alpha subunits. Chromatography of fraction 5 on single-stranded DNA-cellulose gives an enzyme fraction, Bs I, that is indistinguishable from B. subtilis RNA polymerase holoenzyme both in its peptide composition (betabeta'alpha(2)sigma) and in the selective transcription of only T7 RNAs A(1) and C. Chromatography of fraction 5 on phosphocellulose yields an enzyme fraction, Bs II, devoid of sigma subunit but containing the M(r) 92,000 peptide and traces of delta. This fraction synthesizes predominantly T7 J RNA in vitro together with traces of T7 A(1) and C RNAs. Hence, B. subtilis RNA polymerase fraction Bs II appears to contain a form of RNA polymerase that can transcribe selectively without detectable amounts of B. subtilis sigma subunit and that utilizes a promoter site not used by other known bacterial RNA polymerases. The structural basis for this specificity is not yet known.

  6. Influence of an altered methylation potential on mRNA methylation and gene expression in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Marina; Osswald, Hartmut; Mattar, Julia; Kloor, Doris

    2004-04-01

    S-adenosylhomocysteine (AdoHcy), a by-product and inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methylation reactions, is removed by AdoHcy hydrolase. The ratio of AdoMet and AdoHcy, also termed methylation potential (MP), is a metabolic indicator for cellular methylation status. In the present study, we have investigated the influence of hypoxia and inhibition of AdoHcy hydrolase on MP in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, we studied the impact of deviations in MP on mRNA and DNA methylation and the expression of selected genes: erythropoietin, VEGF-A, AdoHcy hydrolase, cyclophilin, and HIF-1alpha. Under hypoxic conditions, the MP raised from 53.4 +/- 3.3 to 239.4 +/- 24.8, which is the result of increased AdoMet and decreased AdoHcy levels. Inhibition of AdoHcy hydrolase by adenosine-2',3'-dialdehyde leads to a 40-fold reduction of the MP under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Hypoxia increases erythropoietin (2.7-fold) and VEGF-A (5-fold) mRNA expression. During a reduced MP erythropoietin mRNA expression is lowered under normoxia and hypoxia by 70%, whereas VEGF-A mRNA expression is only reduced under hypoxic conditions by 60%. The mRNA expression of AdoHcy hydrolase, HIF-1alpha, and cyclophilin is insensitive to an altered MP. Furthermore, decreased MP leads to a highly significant decrease in overall mRNA methylation. Our results show that the mRNA levels of the studied genes respond differentially to changes in MP. This implies that genes with a slower transcription rate and mRNAs with a slower turnover are insensitive to short-term changes in MP.

  7. An RNA-seq Protocol to Identify mRNA Expression Changes in Mouse Diaphyseal Bone: Applications in Mice with Bone Property Altering Lrp5 Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ayturk, Ugur M.; Jacobsen, Christina M.; Christodoulou, Danos C.; Gorham, Joshua; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Seidman, Christine E.; Robling, Alexander G.; Warman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Loss-of-function and certain missense mutations in the Wnt co-receptor LRP5 significantly decrease or increase bone mass, respectively. These human skeletal phenotypes have been recapitulated in mice harboring Lrp5 knockout and knockin mutations. We hypothesized that measuring mRNA expression in diaphyseal bone from mice with Lrp5 wild-type (Lrp5+/+), knockout (Lrp5−/−), and high bone mass (HBM)-causing (Lrp5p.A214V/+) alleles could identify genes and pathways that regulate or are regulated by LRP5 activity. We performed RNA-seq on pairs of tibial diaphyseal bones from four 16-week-old mice with each of the aforementioned genotypes. We then evaluated different methods for controlling for contaminating non-skeletal tissue (i.e., blood, bone marrow, and skeletal muscle) in our data. These methods included pre-digestion of diaphyseal bone with collagenase and separate transcriptional profiling of blood, skeletal muscle and bone marrow. We found that collagenase digestion reduced contamination, but also altered gene expression in the remaining cells. In contrast, in silico filtering of the diaphyseal bone RNA-seq data for highly expressed blood, skeletal muscle, and bone marrow transcripts significantly increased the correlation between RNA-seq data from an animal’s right and left tibiae and from animals with the same Lrp5 genotype. We conclude that reliable and reproducible RNA-seq data can be obtained from mouse diaphyseal bone and that lack of LRP5 has a more pronounced effect on gene expression than the HBM-causing LRP5 missense mutation. We identified 84 differentially expressed protein-coding transcripts between LRP5 “sufficient” (i.e., Lrp5+/+ and Lrp5p.A214V/+) and “insufficient” (Lrp5−/−) diaphyseal bone, and far fewer differentially expressed genes between Lrp5p.A214V/+ and Lrp5+/+ diaphyseal bone. PMID:23553928

  8. Transcriptome-wide analysis of compression-induced microRNA expression alteration in breast cancer for mining therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Baek Gil; Kang, Suki; Han, Hyun Ho; Lee, Joo Hyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Sung Hwan; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2016-05-10

    Tumor growth-generated mechanical compression may increase or decrease expression of microRNAs, leading to tumor progression. However, little is known about whether mechanical compression induces aberrant expression of microRNAs in cancer and stromal cells. To investigate the relationship between compression and microRNA expression, microRNA array analysis was performed with breast cancer cell lines and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) exposed to different compressive conditions. In our study, mechanical compression induced alteration of microRNA expression level in breast cancer cells and CAFs. The alteration was greater in the breast cancer cells than CAFs. Mechanical compression mainly induced upregulation of microRNAs rather than downregulation. In a parallel mRNA array analysis, more than 25% of downregulated target genes were functionally involved in tumor suppression (apoptosis, cell adhesion, and cell cycle arrest), whereas generally less than 15% were associated with tumor progression (epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis). Of all cells examined, MDA-MB-231 cells showed the largest number of compression-upregulated microRNAs. miR-4769-5p and miR-4446-3p were upregulated by compression in both MDA-MB-231 cells and CAFs. Our results suggest that mechanical compression induces changes in microRNA expression level, which contribute to tumor progression. In addition, miR-4769-5p and miR-4446-3p may be potential therapeutic targets for incurable cancers, such as triple negative breast cancer, in that this would reduce or prevent downregulation of tumor-suppressing genes in both the tumor and its microenvironment simultaneously.

  9. Transcriptome-wide analysis of compression-induced microRNA expression alteration in breast cancer for mining therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Baek Gil; Kang, Suki; Han, Hyun Ho; Lee, Joo Hyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Lee, Sung Hwan; Cho, Nam Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Tumor growth–generated mechanical compression may increase or decrease expression of microRNAs, leading to tumor progression. However, little is known about whether mechanical compression induces aberrant expression of microRNAs in cancer and stromal cells. To investigate the relationship between compression and microRNA expression, microRNA array analysis was performed with breast cancer cell lines and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) exposed to different compressive conditions. In our study, mechanical compression induced alteration of microRNA expression level in breast cancer cells and CAFs. The alteration was greater in the breast cancer cells than CAFs. Mechanical compression mainly induced upregulation of microRNAs rather than downregulation. In a parallel mRNA array analysis, more than 25% of downregulated target genes were functionally involved in tumor suppression (apoptosis, cell adhesion, and cell cycle arrest), whereas generally less than 15% were associated with tumor progression (epithelial-mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis). Of all cells examined, MDA-MB-231 cells showed the largest number of compression-upregulated microRNAs. miR-4769-5p and miR-4446-3p were upregulated by compression in both MDA-MB-231 cells and CAFs. Our results suggest that mechanical compression induces changes in microRNA expression level, which contribute to tumor progression. In addition, miR-4769-5p and miR-4446-3p may be potential therapeutic targets for incurable cancers, such as triple negative breast cancer, in that this would reduce or prevent downregulation of tumor-suppressing genes in both the tumor and its microenvironment simultaneously. PMID:27027350

  10. Cisplatin-induced duplex dissociation of complementary and destabilized short GG-containing duplex RNAs.

    PubMed

    Polonyi, Christopher; Alshiekh, Alak; Sarsam, Lamya A; Clausén, Maria; Elmroth, Sofi K C

    2014-08-21

    The ability of the anticancer active drug cisplatin to exert biological activity through interference with nucleic acid function is well documented. Since kinetics play a key role in determining product distributions in these systems, methods for accurate documentation of reactivity serve the purpose to identify preferential metal binding sites. In the present study, the aim has been to further explore a recently communicated approach (C. Polonyi and S. K. C. Elmroth, J. Chem. Soc., Dalton Trans., 2013, 42, 14959-14962) utilizing UV/vis spectroscopy and metal induced duplex RNA melting for monitoring of kinetics. More specifically, the sensitivity of the UV/vis-methodology has been evaluated by investigation of how overall length and changes of base-pairing in the close vicinity of a centrally located GG-site affect the rate of cisplatin binding, using the intracellularly active mono-aquated form of cisplatin (cis-Pt(NH3)2Cl(OH2)(+), ()) as the platination reagent. For this purpose, the reactivity of five different 13- to 17 base-pair duplex RNAs was monitored at 38 °C. A common trend of a ca. 10-fold reduction in reactivity was found to accompany an increase of bulk sodium concentration from CNa+ = 122 mM to 1.0 M. Typical half-lives are exemplified by the interaction of with the fully complementary 15-mer RNA-1 with t1/2 = ca. 0.5 and 4.8 hours, at CNa+ = 122 mM and 1.0 M respectively, and C = 45 μM. Lowering of melting temperature (Tm) was found to promote reactivity regardless of whether the change involved a decrease or increase of the RNA length. For example, at CNa+ = 1.0 M, truncation of the fully complementary and GG-containing 15-mer RNA-1 (Tm = 68.9 °C) to the 13-mer RNA-1-1-S (Tm = 63.9 °C) resulted in an increase of k2,app from ca. 0.9 M(-1) s(-1) to 2.0 M(-1) s(-1). Further, the 17-mer RNA-1-4 (Tm = 42.0 °C) with a central U4 bulge exhibited the highest reactivity of the sequences studied with k2,app = 4.0 M(-1) s(-1). The study shows that the

  11. Global Assessment of Antrodia cinnamomea-Induced MicroRNA Alterations in Hepatocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yu-Tzu; Huang, Yu-Feng; Ma, Nianhan; Yu, Alice L.; Wu, Chung-Yi; Hu, Miao-Lin; Chiu, Kuo Ping

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a potent anticancer potential of medicinal fungus Antrodia cinnamomea, especially against hepatocarcinoma. These studies, however, were performed with prolonged treatments, and the early anticancer events remain missing. To probe the early anticancer mechanisms of A. cinnamomea, we treated SK-Hep-1 liver cancer cell with A. cinnamomea fruiting body extract for 2 and 4 hours, sequenced RNA samples with next-generation sequencing approach, and profiled the genome-wide miRNA and mRNA transcriptomes. Results unmistakably associated the early anticancer effect of A. cinnamomea fruiting body extract with a global downregulation of miRNAs which occurred solely in the A. cinnamomea fruiting body extract-treated SK-Hep-1 cells. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of A. cinnamomea fruiting body extract upon cancer miRNAs imposed no discrimination against any particular miRNA species, with oncomirs miR-21, miR-191 and major oncogenic clusters miR-17-92 and miR-106b-25 among the most severely downregulated. Western blotting further indicated a decrease in Drosha and Dicer proteins which play a key role in miRNA biogenesis, together with an increase of XRN2 known to participate in miRNA degradation pathway. Transcriptome profiling followed by GO and pathway analyses indicated that A. cinnamomea induced apoptosis, which was tightly associated with a downregulation of PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. Phosphorylation assay further suggested that JNK and c-Jun were closely involved in the apoptotic process. Taken together, our data indicated that the anticancer effect of A. cinnamomea can take place within a few hours by targeting multiple proteins and the miRNA system. A. cinnamomea indiscriminately induced a global downregulation of miRNAs by simultaneously inhibiting the key enzymes involved in miRNA maturation and activating XRN2 protein involved in miRNA degradation. Collapsing of the miRNA system together with downregulation of cell growth and survival

  12. Genes and Small RNA Transcripts Exhibit Dosage-Dependent Expression Pattern in Maize Copy-Number Alterations.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Tao; Zhang, Jianbo; Lithio, Andrew; Dash, Sudhansu; Weber, David F; Wise, Roger; Nettleton, Dan; Peterson, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes which tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplications (<100 kb) often exhibit dosage-dependent expression, whereas large duplications (>50 Mb) are more often dosage compensated. However, little or nothing is known about expression in moderately-sized (1-50 Mb) segmental duplications, and about the response of small RNAs to dosage change. Here, we compared maize (Zea mays) plants with two, three, and four doses of a 14.6-Mb segment of chromosome 1 that contains ∼300 genes. Plants containing the duplicated segment exhibit dosage-dependent effects on ear length and flowering time. Transcriptome analyses using GeneChip and RNA-sequencing methods indicate that most expressed genes and unique small RNAs within the duplicated segments exhibit dosage-dependent transcript levels. We conclude that dosage effect is the predominant regulatory response for both genes and unique small RNA transcripts in the segmental dosage series we tested. To our knowledge this is the first analysis of small RNA expression in plant gene dosage variants. Because segmental duplications comprise a significant proportion of eukaryotic genomes, these findings provide important new insight into the regulation of genes and small RNAs in response to dosage changes. Copyright © 2016 by the Genetics Society of America.

  13. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-11-10

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein (APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls.

  14. Altered microRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid exosome in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease

    PubMed Central

    Gui, YaXing; Liu, Hai; Zhang, LiShan; Lv, Wen; Hu, XingYue

    2015-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of Parkinson's diseases (PD) is challenging, especially in the early stages of the disease. We developed a microRNA profiling strategy for exosomal miRNAs isolated from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in PD and AD. Sixteen exosomal miRNAs were up regulated and 11 miRNAs were under regulated significantly in PD CSF when compared with those in healthy controls (relative fold > 2, p < 0.05). MiR-1 and miR-19b-3p were validated and significantly reduced in independent samples. While miR-153, miR-409-3p, miR-10a-5p, and let-7g-3p were significantly over expressed in PD CSF exosome. Bioinformatic analysis by DIANA-mirPath demonstrated that Neurotrophin signaling, mTOR signaling, Ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, Dopaminergic synapse, and Glutamatergic synapse were the most prominent pathways enriched in quantiles with PD miRNA patterns. Messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts [amyloid precursor protein, APP), α-synuclein (α-syn), Tau, neurofilament, light gene (NF-L), DJ-1/PARK7, Fractalkine and Neurosin] and long non-coding RNAs (RP11-462G22.1 and PCA3) were differentially expressed in CSF exosomes in PD and AD patients. These data demonstrated that CSF exosomal RNA molecules are reliable biomarkers with fair robustness in regard to specificity and sensitivity in differentiating PD from healthy and diseased (AD) controls. PMID:26497684

  15. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  16. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  17. An Arabidopsis ATP-dependent, DEAD-box RNA helicase loses activity upon iosAsp formation but is restored by Protein Isoaspartyl Methltransferase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Arabidopsis thaliana PLANT RNA HELICASE75 (AtPRH75) demonstrated an ATP-dependent, RNA duplex unwinding capacity and an ATP-independent, RNA duplex reforming ability. It is known to accumulate isoAsp, but the consequences of isoAsp formation in AtPRH75 are unknown. Duplex unwinding was abolished by ...

  18. Altered Micro-RNA Degradation Promotes Tumor Heterogeneity: A Result from Boolean Network Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yunyi; Krueger, Gerhard R F; Wang, Guanyu

    2016-02-01

    Cancer heterogeneity may reflect differential dynamical outcomes of the regulatory network encompassing biomolecules at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. In other words, differential gene-expression profiles may correspond to different stable steady states of a mathematical model for simulation of biomolecular networks. To test this hypothesis, we simplified a regulatory network that is important for soft-tissue sarcoma metastasis and heterogeneity, comprising of transcription factors, micro-RNAs, and signaling components of the NOTCH pathway. We then used a Boolean network model to simulate the dynamics of this network, and particularly investigated the consequences of differential miRNA degradation modes. We found that efficient miRNA degradation is crucial for sustaining a homogenous and healthy phenotype, while defective miRNA degradation may lead to multiple stable steady states and ultimately to carcinogenesis and heterogeneity.

  19. Chronic nicotine exposure systemically alters microRNA expression profiles during post-embryonic stages in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Taki, Faten A; Pan, Xiaoping; Zhang, Baohong

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco smoking is associated with many diseases. Addiction is of the most notorious tobacco-related syndrome and is mainly attributed to nicotine. In this study, we employed Caenorhabditis elegans as a biological model to systemically investigate the effect of chronic nicotine exposure on microRNA (miRNA) expression profile and their regulated biochemical pathways. Nicotine treatment (20 µM and 20 mM) was limited to the post-embryonic stage from L1 to L4 (∼31 h) period after which worms were collected for genome-wide miRNA profiling. Our results show that nicotine significantly altered the expression patterns of 40 miRNAs. The effect was proportional to the nicotine dose and was expected to have an additive, more robust response. Based on pathway enrichment analyses coupled with nicotine-induced miRNA patterns, we inferred that miRNAs as a system mediates "regulatory hormesis", manifested in biphasic behavioral and physiological phenotypes. We proposed a model where nicotine addiction is mediated by miRNAs' regulation of fos-1 and is maintained by epigenetic factors. Thus, our study offers new insights for a better understanding of the sensitivity of early developmental stages to nicotine.

  20. Altered peritumoral microRNA expression predicts head and neck cancer patients with a high risk of recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ganci, Federica; Sacconi, Andrea; Manciocco, Valentina; Covello, Renato; Benevolo, Maria; Rollo, Francesca; Strano, Sabrina; Valsoni, Sara; Bicciato, Silvio; Spriano, Giuseppe; Muti, Paola; Fontemaggi, Giulia; Blandino, Giovanni

    2017-10-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is typically characterized by a high incidence of local recurrences. It has been extensively shown that mucosa from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients carries both genetic and gene expression alterations, which are mostly attributable to major etiologic agents of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. We previously identified a signature of microRNAs (miRNAs) whose high expression in tumors is predictive of recurrence. Here, we investigated whether the deregulation of miRNA expression in the tumor-surrounding mucosa is correlated to disease recurrence. Specifically, comparing the miRNA expression in matched tumoral, peritumoral, and normal tissues collected from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients, we identified 35 miRNAs that are deregulated in both tumoral and peritumoral tissues as compared with normal matched samples. Four of these composed a miRNA signature that predicts head and neck squamous cell carcinoma local recurrence independently from prognostic clinical variables. The predictive power of the miRNA signature increased when using the expression levels derived from both the peritumoral and the tumoral tissues. The expression signal of the miRNAs composing the predictive signature correlated with the transcriptional levels of genes mostly associated with proliferation. Our results show that expression of miRNAs in tumor-surrounding mucosa may strongly contribute to the identification of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients at high risk of local recurrence.

  1. Altered microRNA expression profiles in a rat model of spina bifida

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Pan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Da; Liu, Qiu-liang; Chen, Xin-rang; Yang, He-ying; Fan, Ying-zhong; Wang, Jia-xiang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are dynamically regulated during neurodevelopment, yet few reports have examined their role in spina bifida. In this study, we used an established fetal rat model of spina bifida induced by intragastrically administering olive oil-containing all-trans retinoic acid to dams on day 10 of pregnancy. Dams that received intragastric administration of all-trans retinoic acid-free olive oil served as controls. The miRNA expression profile in the amniotic fluid of rats at 20 days of pregnancy was analyzed using an miRNA microarray assay. Compared with that in control fetuses, the expression of miRNA-9, miRNA-124a, and miRNA-138 was significantly decreased (> 2-fold), whereas the expression of miRNA-134 was significantly increased (> 4-fold) in the amniotic fluid of rats with fetuses modeling spina bifida. These results were validated using real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the microarray data showed that these differentially expressed miRNAs could distinguish fetuses modeling spina bifida from control fetuses. Our bioinformatics analysis suggested that these differentially expressed miRNAs were associated with many cytological pathways, including a nervous system development signaling pathway. These findings indicate that further studies are warranted examining the role of miRNAs through their regulation of a variety of cell functional pathways in the pathogenesis of spina bifida. Such studies may provide novel targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of spina bifida. PMID:27127493

  2. Altered microRNA expression profiles in a rat model of spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Qin, Pan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Da; Liu, Qiu-Liang; Chen, Xin-Rang; Yang, He-Ying; Fan, Ying-Zhong; Wang, Jia-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are dynamically regulated during neurodevelopment, yet few reports have examined their role in spina bifida. In this study, we used an established fetal rat model of spina bifida induced by intragastrically administering olive oil-containing all-trans retinoic acid to dams on day 10 of pregnancy. Dams that received intragastric administration of all-trans retinoic acid-free olive oil served as controls. The miRNA expression profile in the amniotic fluid of rats at 20 days of pregnancy was analyzed using an miRNA microarray assay. Compared with that in control fetuses, the expression of miRNA-9, miRNA-124a, and miRNA-138 was significantly decreased (> 2-fold), whereas the expression of miRNA-134 was significantly increased (> 4-fold) in the amniotic fluid of rats with fetuses modeling spina bifida. These results were validated using real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the microarray data showed that these differentially expressed miRNAs could distinguish fetuses modeling spina bifida from control fetuses. Our bioinformatics analysis suggested that these differentially expressed miRNAs were associated with many cytological pathways, including a nervous system development signaling pathway. These findings indicate that further studies are warranted examining the role of miRNAs through their regulation of a variety of cell functional pathways in the pathogenesis of spina bifida. Such studies may provide novel targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of spina bifida.

  3. Apolipoprotein B RNA editing enzyme-deficient mice are viable despite alterations in lipoprotein metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, J R; Pászty, C; Stevens, M E; Hughes, S D; Forte, T; Scott, J; Rubin, E M

    1996-01-01

    RNA editing in the nucleus of higher eukaryotes results in subtle changes to the RNA sequence, with the ability to effect dramatic changes in biological function. The first example to be described and among the best characterized, is the cytidine-to-uridine editing of apolipoprotein B (apo-B) RNA. The editing of apo-B RNA is mediated by a novel cytidine deaminase, apobec-1, which has acquired the ability to bind RNA. The stop translation codon generated by the editing of apo-B RNA truncates the full-length apo-B100 to form apo-B48. The recent observations of tumor formation in Apobec-1 transgenic animals, together with the fact that Apobec-1 is expressed in numerous tissues lacking apo-B, raises the issue of whether this enzyme is essential for a variety of posttranscriptional editing events. To directly test this, mice were created with a null mutation in Apobec-1 using homologous recombination in embryonic stem cells. Mice, homozygous for this mutation, were viable and made apo-B100 but not apo-B48. The null animals were fertile, and a variety of histological, behavioral, and morphological analyses revealed no phenotype other than abnormalities in lipoprotein metabolism, which included an increased low density lipoprotein fraction and a reduction in high density lipoprotein cholesterol. These studies demonstrate that neither apobec-1 nor apo-B48 is essential for viability and suggest that the major role of apobec-1 may be confined to the modulation of lipid transport. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8692961

  4. Alteration of RNA Splicing by Small-Molecule Inhibitors of the Interaction between NHP2L1 and U4.

    PubMed

    Diouf, Barthelemy; Lin, Wenwei; Goktug, Asli; Grace, Christy R R; Waddell, Michael Brett; Bao, Ju; Shao, Youming; Heath, Richard J; Zheng, Jie J; Shelat, Anang A; Relling, Mary V; Chen, Taosheng; Evans, William E

    2017-10-01

    Splicing is an important eukaryotic mechanism for expanding the transcriptome and proteome, influencing a number of biological processes. Understanding its regulation and identifying small molecules that modulate this process remain a challenge. We developed an assay based on time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) to detect the interaction between the protein NHP2L1 and U4 RNA, which are two key components of the spliceosome. We used this assay to identify small molecules that interfere with this interaction in a high-throughput screening (HTS) campaign. Topotecan and other camptothecin derivatives were among the top hits. We confirmed that topotecan disrupts the interaction between NHP2L1 and U4 by binding to U4 and inhibits RNA splicing. Our data reveal new functions of known drugs that could facilitate the development of therapeutic strategies to modify splicing and alter gene function.

  5. Gad1 mRNA as a reliable indicator of altered GABA release from orexigenic neurons in the hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Dicken, Matthew S.; Hughes, Alexander R.; Hentges, Shane T.

    2016-01-01

    The strength of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic input is a principle determinant of neuronal activity. However, because of differences in the number of GABA afferent inputs and the sites of synapses, it is difficult to directly assay for altered GABA transmission between specific cells. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of mRNA for the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can provide a reliable proxy for GABA release. This was tested in a mouse hypothalamic circuit important in the regulation of energy balance. Fluorescent in situ hybridization results show that the expression of Gad1 mRNA (encoding the GAD67 enzyme) was increased in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) neurons after an overnight fast, consistent with the ability of GABA from these neurons to stimulate food intake. Optogenetic studies confirmed that the observed increase in Gad1 mRNA correlated with an increase in the probability of GABA release from NPY/AgRP neurons onto downstream proopiomelanocortin neurons. Likewise, there was an increase in the readily releasable pool of GABA in NPY/AgRP neurons. Selective inhibition of GAD activity in NPY/AgRP neurons decreased GABA release, indicating that GAD67 activity, which is largely dictated by expression level, is a key determinant of GABA release. Altogether, it appears that Gad expression may be a reliable proxy of altered GABAergic transmission. Examining changes in Gad mRNA as a proxy for GABA release may be particularly helpful when the downstream targets are not known or when limited tools exist for detecting GABA release at a particular synapse. PMID:26370162

  6. A potential role for estrogen in cigarette smoke-induced microRNA alterations and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Amit; Smith, Yoav

    2016-01-01

    Alteration in the expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is associated with oncogenesis and cancer progression. In this review we aim to suggest that elevated levels of estrogens and their metabolites inside the lungs as a result of cigarette smoke exposure can cause widespread repression of miRNA and contribute to lung tumor development. Anti-estrogenic compounds, such as the components of cruciferous vegetables, can attenuate this effect and potentially reduce the risk of lung cancer (LC) among smokers. PMID:27413713

  7. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex and RNA splicing alterations in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Hales, Chadwick M.; Chen, Ping-Chung; Gozal, Yair; Dammer, Eric B.; Fritz, Jason J.; Wang, Xusheng; Xia, Qiangwei; Duong, Duc M.; Street, Craig; Cantero, Gloria; Cheng, Dongmei; Jones, Drew R.; Wu, Zhiping; Li, Yuxin; Diner, Ian; Heilman, Craig J.; Rees, Howard D.; Wu, Hao; Lin, Li; Szulwach, Keith E.; Gearing, Marla; Mufson, Elliott J.; Bennett, David A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Wingo, Thomas S.; Sun, Yi E.; Jin, Peng; Hanfelt, John; Willcock, Donna M.; Levey, Allan; Lah, James J.; Peng, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of insoluble protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. The universal presence of β-amyloid and tau in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has facilitated advancement of the amyloid cascade and tau hypotheses that have dominated AD pathogenesis research and therapeutic development. However, the underlying etiology of the disease remains to be fully elucidated. Here we report a comprehensive study of the human brain-insoluble proteome in AD by mass spectrometry. We identify 4,216 proteins, among which 36 proteins accumulate in the disease, including U1-70K and other U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) spliceosome components. Similar accumulations in mild cognitive impairment cases indicate that spliceosome changes occur in early stages of AD. Multiple U1 snRNP subunits form cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in AD but not in other examined neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Comparison of RNA from AD and control brains reveals dysregulated RNA processing with accumulation of unspliced RNA species in AD, including myc box-dependent-interacting protein 1, clusterin, and presenilin-1. U1-70K knockdown or antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of U1 snRNP increases the protein level of amyloid precursor protein. Thus, our results demonstrate unique U1 snRNP pathology and implicate abnormal RNA splicing in AD pathogenesis. PMID:24023061

  8. Altered Exosomal RNA Profiles in Bronchoalveolar Lavage from Lung Transplants with Acute Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hoji, Aki; Injean, Patil; Poynter, Steven T.; Briones, Claudia; Palchevskiy, Vyacheslav; Sam Weigt, S.; Shino, Michael Y.; Derhovanessian, Ariss; Saggar, Rajan; Ross, David; Ardehali, Abbas; Lynch, Joseph P.; Belperio, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: The mechanism by which acute allograft rejection leads to chronic rejection remains poorly understood despite its common occurrence. Exosomes, membrane vesicles released from cells within the lung allograft, contain a diverse array of biomolecules that closely reflect the biologic state of the cell and tissue from which they are released. Exosome transcriptomes may provide a better understanding of the rejection process. Furthermore, biomarkers originating from this transcriptome could provide timely and sensitive detection of acute cellular rejection (AR), reducing the incidence of severe AR and chronic lung allograft dysfunction and improving outcomes. Objectives: To provide an in-depth analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exosomal shuttle RNA population after lung transplantation and evaluate for differential expression between acute AR and quiescence. Methods: Serial bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were ultracentrifuged to obtain the exosomal pellet for RNA extraction, on which RNA-Seq was performed. Measurements and Main Results: AR demonstrates an intense inflammatory environment, skewed toward both innate and adaptive immune responses. Novel, potential upstream regulators identified offer potential therapeutic targets. Conclusions: Our findings validate bronchoalveolar lavage fluid exosomal shuttle RNA as a source for understanding the pathophysiology of AR and for biomarker discovery in lung transplantation. PMID:26308930

  9. Altering the orientation of a fused protein to the RNA-binding ribosomal protein L7Ae and its derivatives through circular permutation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohuchi, Shoji J.; Sagawa, Fumihiko; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Inoue, Tan

    2015-10-23

    RNA-protein complexes (RNPs) are useful for constructing functional nano-objects because a variety of functional proteins can be displayed on a designed RNA scaffold. Here, we report circular permutations of an RNA-binding protein L7Ae based on the three-dimensional structure information to alter the orientation of the displayed proteins on the RNA scaffold. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and atomic force microscopy (AFM) analysis revealed that most of the designed circular permutants formed an RNP nano-object. Moreover, the alteration of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) orientation was confirmed with AFM by employing EGFP on the L7Ae permutant on the RNA. The results demonstrate that targeted fine-tuning of the stereo-specific fixation of a protein on a protein-binding RNA is feasible by using the circular permutation technique.

  10. Altered spinal microRNA-146a and the microRNA-183 cluster contribute to osteoarthritic pain in knee joints.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Kc, Ranjan; Gibson, Gary; Chen, Di; Corbett, Grant T; Pahan, Kalipada; Fayyaz, Sana; Kim, Jae-Sung; van Wijnen, Andre J; Suh, Joon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether altered expression of microRNAs in central nervous system components is pathologically linked to chronic knee joint pain in osteoarthritis. A surgical animal model for knee joint OA was generated by medial meniscus transection in rats followed by behavioral pain tests. Relationships between pathological changes in knee joint and development of chronic joint pain were examined by histology and imaging analyses. Alterations in microRNAs associated with OA-evoked pain sensation were determined in bilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal dorsal horn by microRNA array followed by individual microRNA analyses. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of selected microRNAs (miR-146a and miR-183 cluster) were conducted to identify target pain mediators regulated by these selective microRNAs in glial cells. The ipsilateral hind leg displayed significantly increased hyperalgesia after 4 weeks of surgery, and sensitivity was sustained for the remainder of the 8-week experimental period (F = 341, p < 0.001). The development of OA-induced chronic pain was correlated with pathological changes in the knee joints as assessed by histological and imaging analyses. MicroRNA analyses showed that miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster were markedly reduced in the sensory neurons in DRG (L4/L5) and spinal cord from animals experiencing knee joint OA pain. The downregulation of miR-146a and/or the miR-183 cluster in the central compartments (DRG and spinal cord) are closely associated with the upregulation of inflammatory pain mediators. The corroboration between decreases in these signature microRNAs and their specific target pain mediators were further confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function analyses in glia, the major cellular component of the central nervous system (CNS). MicroRNA therapy using miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster could be powerful therapeutic intervention for OA in alleviating joint pain and concomitantly

  11. Altered Spinal MicroRNA-146a and the MicroRNA-183 Cluster Contribute to Osteoarthritic Pain in Knee Joints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Kroin, Jeffrey S; Kc, Ranjan; Gibson, Gary; Chen, Di; Corbett, Grant T; Pahan, Kalipada; Fayyaz, Sana; Kim, Jae-Sung; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Suh, Joon; Kim, Su-Gwan; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective Examine whether altered expression of microRNAs in central nervous system components is pathologically linked to chronic knee joint pain in osteoarthritis. Methods A surgical animal model for knee joint OA was generated by medial meniscus transection in rats followed by behavioral pain tests. Relationships between pathological changes in knee joint and development of chronic joint pain were examined by histology and imaging analyses. Alterations in microRNAs associated with OA-evoked pain sensation were determined in bilateral lumbar dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and the spinal dorsal horn by microRNA array followed by individual microRNA analyses. Gain- and loss-of-function studies of selected microRNAs (miR-146a and miR-183 cluster) were conducted to identify target pain mediators regulated by these selective microRNAs in glial cells. Results The ipsilateral hind leg displayed significantly increased hyperalgesia after 4 weeks of surgery and sensitivity was sustained for the remainder of the 8 week experimental period (F=341, P<0.001). The development of OA-induced chronic pain was correlated with pathological changes in the knee joints as assessed by histological and imaging analyses. MicroRNA analyses showed that miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster were markedly reduced in the sensory neurons in DRG (L4/L5) and spinal cord from animals experiencing knee joint OA pain. The downregulation of miR-146a and/or the miR-183 cluster in the central compartments (DRG and spinal cord) are closely associated with the upregulation of inflammatory pain mediators. The corroboration between decreases in these signature microRNAs and their specific target pain mediators were further confirmed by gain- and loss-of-function analyses in glia, the major cellular component of the central nervous system (CNS). Conclusion MicroRNA therapy using miR-146a and the miR-183 cluster could be powerful therapeutic intervention for OA in alleviating joint pain and concomitantly regenerating

  12. Pulse Dipolar ESR of Doubly Labeled Mini TAR DNA and Its Annealing to Mini TAR RNA

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Borbat, Peter P.; Grigoryants, Vladimir M.; Myers, William K.; Freed, Jack H.; Scholes, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    Pulse dipolar electron-spin resonance in the form of double electron electron resonance was applied to strategically placed, site-specifically attached pairs of nitroxide spin labels to monitor changes in the mini TAR DNA stem-loop structure brought on by the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein NCp7. The biophysical structural evidence was at Ångstrom-level resolution under solution conditions not amenable to crystallography or NMR. In the absence of complementary TAR RNA, double labels located in both the upper and the lower stem of mini TAR DNA showed in the presence of NCp7 a broadened distance distribution between the points of attachment, and there was evidence for several conformers. Next, when equimolar amounts of mini TAR DNA and complementary mini TAR RNA were present, NCp7 enhanced the annealing of their stem-loop structures to form duplex DNA-RNA. When duplex TAR DNA-TAR RNA formed, double labels initially located 27.5 Å apart at the 3′- and 5′-termini of the 27-base mini TAR DNA relocated to opposite ends of a 27 bp RNA-DNA duplex with 76.5 Å between labels, a distance which was consistent with the distance between the two labels in a thermally annealed 27-bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex. Different sets of double labels initially located 26–27 Å apart in the mini TAR DNA upper stem, appropriately altered their interlabel distance to ∼35 Å when a 27 bp TAR DNA-TAR RNA duplex formed, where the formation was caused either through NCp7-induced annealing or by thermal annealing. In summary, clear structural evidence was obtained for the fraying and destabilization brought on by NCp7 in its biochemical function as an annealing agent and for the detailed structural change from stem-loop to duplex RNA-DNA when complementary RNA was present. PMID:25692594

  13. Heat Capacity Changes Associated with DNA Duplex Formation: Salt- and Sequence-Dependent Effects†

    PubMed Central

    Mikulecky, Peter J.; Feig, Andrew L.

    2008-01-01

    Duplexes are the most fundamental elements of nucleic acid folding. Although it has become increasingly clear that duplex formation can be associated with a significant change in heat capacity (ΔCp), this parameter is typically overlooked in thermodynamic studies of nucleic acid folding. Analogy to protein folding suggests that base stacking events coupled to duplex formation should give rise to a ΔCp due to the release of waters solvating aromatic surfaces of nucleotide bases. In previous work, we showed that the ΔCp observed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) for RNA duplex formation depended on salt and sequence. In the present work, we apply calorimetric and spectroscopic techniques to a series of designed DNA duplexes to demonstrate that both the salt dependence and sequence dependence of ΔCps observed by ITC reflect perturbations to the same fundamental phenomenon: stacking in the single-stranded state. By measuring the thermodynamics of single strand melting, one can accurately predict the ΔCps observed for duplex formation by ITC at high and low ionic strength. We discuss our results in light of the larger issue of contributions to ΔCp from coupled equilibria and conclude that observed ΔCps can be useful indicators of intermediate states in nucleic acid folding phenomena. PMID:16401089

  14. Human cytomegalovirus latent infection alters the expression of cellular and viral microRNA.

    PubMed

    Fu, Miao; Gao, Yan; Zhou, Qiuju; Zhang, Qi; Peng, Ying; Tian, Kegang; Wang, Jinhua; Zheng, Xiaoqun

    2014-02-25

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important roles in regulating gene expression of plants, animals and viruses. Comprehensive characterization of host and viral miRNA will help uncover the molecular mechanisms that underlie the progression of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latent infection. To investigate the miRNA expression profile of HCMV and host cells during latent infection, we performed deep-sequencing analysis of the small RNAs isolated from HCMV-infected and mock-infected human monocytic leukemia cell line, THP-1. We established a HCMV latent infection cell model using the THP-1 cells. High-throughput sequencing technology was used to sequence small RNA libraries of the HCMV-infected and mock-infected THP-1 and to investigate their small RNA transcriptomes. We found eight miRNAs including miR-US25-1, miR-US25-2-5p and miR-UL112 that were expressed by HCMV during latent infection. The expressions of the host miRNAs were also affected by HCMV latent infection. At least 49 cellular miRNAs were differentially expressed: 39 were up-regulated and 10 were down-regulated upon HCMV latent infection. The expression of the human miRNA hsa-miR-124-3p was significantly up-regulated in the HCMV latent infection library. In addition, we found 14 cellular novel miRNAs in the HCMV-infected and mock-infected THP-1 libraries. Functional annotation of the target genes of the differentially expressed miRNAs suggested that the majority of the genes are involved in melanogenesis, pathways in cancer, endocytosis and wnt signaling pathway. The small RNA transcriptomes obtained in this study demonstrate the usefulness of the deep-sequencing combined with bioinformatics approach in understanding of the expression and function of host and viral small RNAs in HCMV latent infection. This approach can also be applied to the study of other kinds of viruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Altered microRNA expression in bovine skeletal muscle with age

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Age dependent decline in skeletal muscle function leads to several inherited and acquired muscular disorders in elderly individuals. The levels of microRNAs (miRNAs) could be altered during muscle maintenance and repair. Therefore, we performed a comprehensive investigation for miRNAs from 5 differe...

  16. Epigallocatechin Gallate-Mediated Alteration of the MicroRNA Expression Profile in 5α-Dihydrotestosterone-Treated Human Dermal Papilla Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Shanghun; Kim, Karam; Lee, Myung Joo; Lee, Jeongju; Choi, Sungjin; Kim, Kyung-Suk; Ko, Jung-Min; Han, Hyunjoo; Kim, Su Young; Youn, Hae Jeong; Ahn, Kyu Joong; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) induces androgenic alopecia by shortening the hair follicle growth phase, resulting in hair loss. We previously demonstrated how changes in the microRNA (miRNA) expression profile influenced DHT-mediated cell death, cell cycle arrest, cell viability, the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and senescence. Protective effects against DHT have not, however, been elucidated at the genome level. Objective We showed that epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a major component of green tea, protects DHT-induced cell death by regulating the cellular miRNA expression profile. Methods We used a miRNA microarray to identify miRNA expression levels in human dermal papilla cells (DPCs). We investigated whether the miRNA expression influenced the protective effects of EGCG against DHT-induced cell death, growth arrest, intracellular ROS levels, and senescence. Results EGCG protected against the effects of DHT by altering the miRNA expression profile in human DPCs. In addition, EGCG attenuated DHT-mediated cell death and growth arrest and decreased intracellular ROS levels and senescence. A bioinformatics analysis elucidated the relationship between the altered miRNA expression and EGCG-mediated protective effects against DHT. Conclusion Overall, our results suggest that EGCG ameliorates the negative effects of DHT by altering the miRNA expression profile in human DPCs. PMID:27274631

  17. Altered miRNA expression in the cervix during pregnancy associated with lead and mercury exposure

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Alison P; Burris, Heather H; Just, Allan C; Motta, Valeria; Amarasiriwardena, Chitra; Svensson, Katherine; Oken, Emily; Solano-Gonzalez, Maritsa; Mercado-Garcia, Adriana; Pantic, Ivan; Schwartz, Joel; Tellez-Rojo, Martha M; Baccarelli, Andrea A; Wright, Robert O

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Toxic metals including lead and mercury are associated with adverse pregnancy outcomes. This study aimed to assess the association between miRNA expression in the cervix during pregnancy with lead and mercury levels. Materials & methods: We obtained cervical swabs from pregnant women (n = 60) and quantified cervical miRNA expression. Women's blood lead, bone lead and toenail mercury levels were analyzed. We performed linear regression to examine the association between metal levels and expression of 74 miRNAs adjusting for covariates. Results: Seventeen miRNAs were negatively associated with toenail mercury levels, and tibial bone lead levels were associated with decreased expression of miR-575 and miR-4286. Conclusion: The findings highlight miRNAs in the human cervix as novel responders to maternal chemical exposure during pregnancy. PMID:26418635

  18. Alterations in the estrogen receptor alpha mRNA in the breast tumors of African American women.

    PubMed

    Koduri, S; Fuqua, S A; Poola, I

    2000-05-01

    Several recent reports have shown that the mortality rate with breast cancer is about three times higher in African American women than in other populations. In addition, the available data also indicate that the tumors are very aggressive and poorly differentiated with a very low frequency of hormone receptors. To gain an insight into the factors that may be responsible for their aggressive tumors, we investigated the transcript profiles of the estrogen receptor (ER), the most important prognostic factor in breast cancer, in the tumors derived from African American women. We analyzed 24 immunohistochemically ER+ and 6 ER- malignant tumors for ER mRNA by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using a number of primer pairs. For comparative purposes, 20 ER- malignant tumor issues derived from Caucasian patients were also included. Our results showed that only 15 of the ER+ tumors from African American women patients had full-length wild-type receptor transcripts and the others exhibited alterations/truncations in exon 8. We also found that the majority of tumors that had alterations/truncations in exon 8 did not express the naturally occurring, more abundant exon 7 deletion transcript. Most of the tumors expressed exon 2, exons 2-3, and exon 5 deletion variant transcripts. Unexpectedly, 2 of the 6 immunohistochemically ER- tumors showed full-length wild-type receptor mRNA but none of the variant transcripts.

  19. Altered mRNA Splicing in SMN-Depleted Motor Neuron-Like Cells.

    PubMed

    Custer, Sara K; Gilson, Timra D; Li, Hongxia; Todd, A Gary; Astroski, Jacob W; Lin, Hai; Liu, Yunlong; Androphy, Elliot J

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an intractable neurodegenerative disease afflicting 1 in 6-10,000 live births. One of the key functions of the SMN protein is regulation of spliceosome assembly. Reduced levels of the SMN protein that are observed in SMA have been shown to result in aberrant mRNA splicing. SMN-dependent mis-spliced transcripts in motor neurons may cause stresses that are particularly harmful and may serve as potential targets for the treatment of motor neuron disease or as biomarkers in the SMA patient population. We performed deep RNA sequencing using motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells to screen for SMN-dependent mRNA processing changes that occur following acute depletion of SMN. We identified SMN-dependent splicing changes, including an intron retention event that results in the production of a truncated Rit1 transcript. This intron-retained transcript is stable and is mis-spliced in spinal cord from symptomatic SMA mice. Constitutively active Rit1 ameliorated the neurite outgrowth defect in SMN depleted NSC-34 cells, while expression of the truncated protein product of the mis-spliced Rit1 transcript inhibited neurite extension. These results reveal new insights into the biological consequence of SMN-dependent splicing in motor neuron-like cells.

  20. Altered mRNA Splicing in SMN-Depleted Motor Neuron-Like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Todd, A. Gary; Astroski, Jacob W.; Lin, Hai; Liu, Yunlong

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an intractable neurodegenerative disease afflicting 1 in 6–10,000 live births. One of the key functions of the SMN protein is regulation of spliceosome assembly. Reduced levels of the SMN protein that are observed in SMA have been shown to result in aberrant mRNA splicing. SMN-dependent mis-spliced transcripts in motor neurons may cause stresses that are particularly harmful and may serve as potential targets for the treatment of motor neuron disease or as biomarkers in the SMA patient population. We performed deep RNA sequencing using motor neuron-like NSC-34 cells to screen for SMN-dependent mRNA processing changes that occur following acute depletion of SMN. We identified SMN-dependent splicing changes, including an intron retention event that results in the production of a truncated Rit1 transcript. This intron-retained transcript is stable and is mis-spliced in spinal cord from symptomatic SMA mice. Constitutively active Rit1 ameliorated the neurite outgrowth defect in SMN depleted NSC-34 cells, while expression of the truncated protein product of the mis-spliced Rit1 transcript inhibited neurite extension. These results reveal new insights into the biological consequence of SMN-dependent splicing in motor neuron-like cells. PMID:27736905

  1. Evolution in vitro of an RNA enzyme with altered metal dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, N.; Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme catalyses a sequence-specific phosphodiester cleavage reaction on an external RNA oligonucleotide substrate in the presence of a divalent metal cation cofactor. This reaction proceeds readily with either Mg2+ or Mn2+, but no detectable reaction has been reported when other divalent cations are used as the sole cofactor. Cations such as Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ can stabilize the correct folded conformation of the ribozyme, thereby partially alleviating the Mg2+ or Mn2+ requirement. But catalysis by the ribozyme involves coordination of either Mg2+ or Mn2+ at the active site, resulting in an overall requirement for one of these two cations. Here we use an in vitro evolution process to obtain variants of the Tetrahymena ribozyme that are capable of cleaving an RNA substrate in reaction mixtures containing Ca2+ as the divalent cation. These findings extend the range of different chemical environments available to RNA enzymes and illustrate the power of in vitro evolution in generating macromolecular catalysts with desired properties.

  2. Evolution in vitro of an RNA enzyme with altered metal dependence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehman, N.; Joyce, G. F.

    1993-01-01

    The Tetrahymena group I ribozyme catalyses a sequence-specific phosphodiester cleavage reaction on an external RNA oligonucleotide substrate in the presence of a divalent metal cation cofactor. This reaction proceeds readily with either Mg2+ or Mn2+, but no detectable reaction has been reported when other divalent cations are used as the sole cofactor. Cations such as Ca2+, Sr2+ and Ba2+ can stabilize the correct folded conformation of the ribozyme, thereby partially alleviating the Mg2+ or Mn2+ requirement. But catalysis by the ribozyme involves coordination of either Mg2+ or Mn2+ at the active site, resulting in an overall requirement for one of these two cations. Here we use an in vitro evolution process to obtain variants of the Tetrahymena ribozyme that are capable of cleaving an RNA substrate in reaction mixtures containing Ca2+ as the divalent cation. These findings extend the range of different chemical environments available to RNA enzymes and illustrate the power of in vitro evolution in generating macromolecular catalysts with desired properties.

  3. Duplex gall bladder: bystander or culprit.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Jogender; Yadav, Arushi

    2017-08-30

    Gall bladder (GB) duplication is a rare anatomical malformation, which can be detected by preoperative imaging study. We present a case of duplex gall bladder in a 14-year-old boy who presented with abdominal pain. On ultrasound, he had right nephrolithiasis and duplex gall bladder. Duplex gall bladder was confirmed on MR cholangiopancreatography. There was a dilemma for surgical management of duplex gall bladder; however, he became asymptomatic after conservative treatment. Prophylactic surgery is not recommended for asymptomatic incidentally detected duplex gall bladder. Radiologists and paediatric surgeons should be sensitised about the exact anatomy of this entity. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Thermodynamic Consequences of the Hyperoxidized Guanine Lesion Guanidinohydantoin in Duplex DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yennie, Craig J.; Delaney, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Guanidinohydantoin (Gh) is a hyperoxidized DNA lesion produced by oxidation of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG). Previous work has shown that Gh is potently mutagenic both in vitro and in vivo coding for G → T and G → C transversion mutations. In this work, analysis by circular dichroism shows that the Gh lesion does not significantly alter the global structure of a 15-mer duplex, and that the DNA remains in the B-form. However, we find that Gh causes a large decrease in the thermal stability, decreasing the duplex melting temperature by ~ 17 °C relative to an unmodified duplex control. Using optical melting analysis and differential scanning calorimetry the thermodynamic parameters describing duplex melting were also determined. We find that the Gh lesion causes a dramatic decrease in the enthalpic stability of the duplex. This enthalpic destabilization is somewhat tempered by entropic stabilization yet Gh results in an overall decrease in thermodynamic stability of the duplex relative to a control which lacks DNA damage, with a ΔΔG° of −7 kcal/mol. These results contribute to our understanding of the consequences of hyperoxidation of G and provide insight into how the thermal and thermodynamic destabilization caused by Gh may influence replication and/or repair of the lesion. PMID:22780843

  5. Coordinate regulation of ribosomal component synthesis in Acanthamoeba castellanii: 5S RNA transcription is down regulated during encystment by alteration of TFIIIA activity.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, J L; Zwick, M G; Paule, M R

    1995-01-01

    Transcription of large rRNA precursor and 5S RNA were examined during encystment of Acanthamoeba castellanii. Both transcription units are down regulated almost coordinately during this process, though 5S RNA transcription is not as completely shut down as rRNA transcription. The protein components necessary for transcription of 5S RNA and tRNA were determined, and fractions containing transcription factors comparable to TFIIIA, TFIIIB, and TFIIIC, as well as RNA polymerase III and a 3'-end processing activity, were identified. Regulation of 5S RNA transcription could be recapitulated in vitro, and the activities of the required components were compared. In contrast to regulation of precursor rRNA, there is no apparent change during encystment in the activity of the polymerase dedicated to 5S RNA expression. Similarly, the transcriptional and promoter-binding activities of TFIIIC are not altered in parallel with 5S RNA regulation. TFIIIB transcriptional activity is unaltered in encysting cells. In contrast, both the transcriptional and DNA-binding activities of TFIIIA are strongly reduced in nuclear extracts from transcriptionally inactive cells. These results were analyzed in terms of mechanisms for coordinate regulation of rRNA and 5S RNA expression. PMID:7760828

  6. Lentiviral delivery of PPARγ shRNA alters the balance of osteogenesis and adipogenesis, improving bone microarchitecture.

    PubMed

    James, Aaron W; Shen, Jia; Khadarian, Kevork; Pang, Shen; Chung, Greg; Goyal, Raghav; Asatrian, Greg; Velasco, Omar; Kim, Jung; Zhang, Xinli; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2014-10-01

    Skeletal aging is associated not only with alterations in osteoblast (OB) and osteoclast (OC) number and activity within the basic metabolic unit, but also with increased marrow adiposity. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is commonly considered the master transcriptional regulator of adipogenesis, however, it has known roles in osteoblast and osteoclast function as well. Here, we designed a lentiviral delivery system for PPARγ shRNA, and examined its effects in vitro on bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC) and in a mouse intramedullary injection model. PPARγ shRNA was delivered by a replication-deficient lentiviral vector, after in vitro testing to confirm purity, concentration, and efficacy for Pparg transcript reduction. Next, control green fluorescent protein lentivirus or PPARγ shRNA expressing lentivirus were delivered by intramedullary injection into the femoral bone marrow of male SCID mice. Analyses included daily monitoring of animal health, and postmortem analysis at 4 weeks. Postmortem analyses included high resolution microcomputed tomography (microCT) reconstructions and analysis, routine histology and histomorphometric analysis, quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction analysis of Pparg transcript levels, and immunohistochemical analysis for markers of adipocytes (PPARγ, fatty acid binding protein 4 [FABP4]), osteoblasts (alkaline phosphatase [ALP], osteocalcin [OCN]), and osteoclasts (tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase [TRAP], Cathepsin K). In vitro, PPARγ shRNA delivery significantly reduced Pparg expression in mouse BMSC, accompanied by a significant reduction in lipid droplet accumulation. In vivo, a near total reduction in mature marrow adipocytes was observed at 4 weeks postinjection. This was accompanied by significant reductions in adipocyte-specific markers. Parameters of trabecular bone were significantly increased by both microCT and histomorphometric analysis. By immunohistochemical staining and semi

  7. Altered DNA Methylation of Long Noncoding RNA H19 in Calcific Aortic Valve Disease Promotes Mineralization by Silencing NOTCH1.

    PubMed

    Hadji, Fayez; Boulanger, Marie-Chloé; Guay, Simon-Pierre; Gaudreault, Nathalie; Amellah, Soumiya; Mkannez, Guada; Bouchareb, Rihab; Marchand, Joël Tremblay; Nsaibia, Mohamed Jalloul; Guauque-Olarte, Sandra; Pibarot, Philippe; Bouchard, Luigi; Bossé, Yohan; Mathieu, Patrick

    2016-12-06

    Calcific aortic valve disease is characterized by an abnormal mineralization of the aortic valve. Osteogenic activity in the aortic valve is under the control of NOTCH1, which regulates the expression of key pro-osteogenic genes such as RUNX2 and BMP2. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) may reprogram cells by altering the gene expression pattern. Multidimensional genomic profiling was performed in human aortic valves to document the expression of lncRNAs and the DNA methylation pattern in calcific aortic valve disease. In-depth functional assays were carried out to document the impact of lncRNA on the mineralization of the aortic valve. We documented that lncRNA H19 (H19) was increased in calcific aortic valve disease. Hypomethylation of the promoter region was observed in mineralized aortic valves and was inversely associated with H19 expression. Knockdown and overexpression experiments showed that H19 induces a strong osteogenic phenotype by altering the NOTCH1 pathway. Gene promoter analyses showed that H19 silenced NOTCH1 by preventing the recruitment of p53 to its promoter. A knockdown of H19 in valve interstitial cells (VICs) increased the expression of NOTCH1 and decreased the level of RUNX2 and BMP2, 2 downstream targets repressed by NOTCH1. In rescue experiments, the transfection of a vector encoding for the active Notch intracellular domain prevented H19-induced mineralization of valve interstitial cells. These findings indicate that a dysregulation of DNA methylation in the promoter of H19 during calcific aortic valve disease is associated with a higher expression of this lncRNA, which promotes an osteogenic program by interfering with the expression of NOTCH1. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  8. Ultra-fast alterations in mRNA levels uncover multiple players in light stress acclimation in plants.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Devireddy, Amith R; Inupakutika, Madhuri A; Baxter, Aaron; Miller, Gad; Song, Luhua; Shulaev, Elena; Azad, Rajeev K; Shulaev, Vladimir; Mittler, Ron

    2015-11-01

    The acclimation of plants to changes in light intensity requires rapid responses at several different levels. These include biochemical and biophysical responses as well as alterations in the steady-state level of different transcripts and proteins. Recent studies utilizing promoter::reporter constructs suggested that transcriptional responses to changes in light intensity could occur within seconds, rates for which changes in mRNA expression are not routinely measured or functionally studied. To identify and characterize rapid changes in the steady-state level of different transcripts in response to light stress we performed RNA sequencing analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana plants subjected to light stress. Here we report that mRNA accumulation of 731 transcripts occurs as early as 20-60 sec following light stress application, and that at least five of these early response transcripts play an important biological role in the acclimation of plants to light stress. More than 20% of transcripts accumulating in plants within 20-60 sec of initiation of light stress are H2 O2 - and ABA-response transcripts, and the accumulation of several of these transcripts is inhibited by transcriptional inhibitors. In accordance with the association of rapid response transcripts with H2 O2 and ABA signaling, a mutant impaired in ABA sensing (abi-1) was found to be more tolerant to light stress, and the response of several of the rapid response transcripts was altered in mutants impaired in reactive oxygen metabolism. Our findings reveal that transcriptome reprogramming in plants could occur within seconds of initiation of abiotic stress and that this response could invoke known as well as unknown proteins and pathways.

  9. Wastewater treatment plant effluent alters pituitary gland gonadotropin mRNA levels in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch).

    PubMed

    Harding, Louisa B; Schultz, Irvin R; da Silva, Denis A M; Ylitalo, Gina M; Ragsdale, Dave; Harris, Stephanie I; Bailey, Stephanie; Pepich, Barry V; Swanson, Penny

    2016-09-01

    It is well known that endocrine disrupting compounds (EDCs) present in wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents interfere with reproduction in fish, including altered gonad development and induction of vitellogenin (Vtg), a female-specific egg yolk protein precursor produced in the liver. As a result, studies have focused on the effects of EDC exposure on the gonad and liver. However, impacts of environmental EDC exposure at higher levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonad axis are less well understood. The pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone (Fsh) and luteinizing hormone (Lh) are involved in all aspects of gonad development and are subject to feedback from gonadal steroids making them a likely target of endocrine disruption. In this study, the effects of WWTP effluent exposure on pituitary gonadotropin mRNA expression were investigated to assess the utility of Lh beta-subunit (lhb) as a biomarker of estrogen exposure in juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). First, a controlled 72-h exposure to 17α-ethynylestradiol (EE2) and 17β-trenbolone (TREN) was performed to evaluate the response of juvenile coho salmon to EDC exposure. Second, juvenile coho salmon were exposed to 0, 20 or 100% effluent from eight WWTPs from the Puget Sound, WA region for 72h. Juvenile coho salmon exposed to 2 and 10ng EE2L(-1) had 17-fold and 215-fold higher lhb mRNA levels relative to control fish. Hepatic vtg mRNA levels were dramatically increased 6670-fold, but only in response to 10ng EE2L(-1) and Fsh beta-subunit (fshb) mRNA levels were not altered by any of the treatments. In the WWTP effluent exposures, lhb mRNA levels were significantly elevated in fish exposed to five of the WWTP effluents. In contrast, transcript levels of vtg were not affected by any of the WWTP effluent exposures. Mean levels of natural and synthetic estrogens in fish bile were consistent with pituitary lhb expression, suggesting that the observed lhb induction may be due to

  10. RNA-binding protein CELF1 promotes tumor growth and alters gene expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    House, Reniqua P; Talwar, Sudha; Hazard, E Starr; Hill, Elizabeth G; Palanisamy, Viswanathan

    2015-12-22

    The RNA binding protein CELF1 (also known as CUGBP1) is emerging as a critical regulator of cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, to provide a global prospective of CELF1 regulation of oral squamous cell carcinoma, we performed RNA-sequencing in oral cancer cells and CELF1 overexpression analysis in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes. Our approaches identified 1283 mRNAs differentially regulated as a function of CELF1 expression and more importantly CELF1 promoted alternative splicing of several target pre-mRNAs, which are known to be involved in various cancer biological processes. Overexpression of CELF1 in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes protected cells against oxidative damage and altered gene expression patterns. Finally, we provide evidence that reduction of CELF1 protein using a xenograft tumorigenesis mouse model decreased tumor growth. Altogether, these data provided a comprehensive view of the CELF1 mRNA regulatory network in oral cancer and suggests that CELF1 and/or its target mRNAs are viable candidates for therapeutic intervention.

  11. Circular RNA alterations are involved in resistance to avian leukosis virus subgroup-J-induced tumor formation in chickens.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinheng; Yan, Yiming; Lei, Xiaoya; Li, Aijun; Zhang, Huanmin; Dai, Zhenkai; Li, Xinjian; Chen, Weiguo; Lin, Wencheng; Chen, Feng; Ma, Jingyun; Xie, Qingmei

    2017-05-23

    Avian leukosis virus subgroup (ALV-J) is an oncogenic neoplasm-inducing retrovirus that causes significant economic losses in the poultry industry. Recent studies have demonstrated circular RNAs (circRNAs) are implicated in pathogenic processes; however, no research has indicated circRNAs are involved in resistance to disease. In this study, over 1800 circRNAs were detected by circRNA sequencing of liver tissues from ALV-J-resistant (n = 3) and ALV-J-susceptible chickens (n = 3). 32 differentially expressed circRNAs were selected for analyzing including 12 upregulated in ALV-J-resistant chickens and 20 upregulated in ALV-J-susceptible chickens, besides, the top five microRNAs (miRNAs) for 12 upregulated circRNAs in ALV-J-resistant chickens were analyzed. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses were performed for miRNA target genes, the predicted genes were mainly involved in immune pathways. This study provides the first evidence that circRNA alterations are involved in resistance to ALV-J-induced tumor formation. We propose circRNAs may help to mediate tumor induction and development in chickens.

  12. RNA-binding protein CELF1 promotes tumor growth and alters gene expression in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    House, Reniqua P.; Talwar, Sudha; Hazard, E. Starr; Hill, Elizabeth G.; Palanisamy, Viswanathan

    2015-01-01

    The RNA binding protein CELF1 (also known as CUGBP1) is emerging as a critical regulator of cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here, to provide a global prospective of CELF1 regulation of oral squamous cell carcinoma, we performed RNA-sequencing in oral cancer cells and CELF1 overexpression analysis in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes. Our approaches identified 1283 mRNAs differentially regulated as a function of CELF1 expression and more importantly CELF1 promoted alternative splicing of several target pre-mRNAs, which are known to be involved in various cancer biological processes. Overexpression of CELF1 in non-malignant human oral keratinocytes protected cells against oxidative damage and altered gene expression patterns. Finally, we provide evidence that reduction of CELF1 protein using a xenograft tumorigenesis mouse model decreased tumor growth. Altogether, these data provided a comprehensive view of the CELF1 mRNA regulatory network in oral cancer and suggests that CELF1 and/or its target mRNAs are viable candidates for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26498364

  13. Analysis of miRNA in Normal Appearing White Matter to Identify Altered CNS Pathways in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Liu, Yue; Meisen, Walter H; Pitt, David; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies suggest that the immune system is the greatest genetic contributor to multiple sclerosis (MS) susceptibility. Yet, these immune-related genes do not explain why inflammation is limited to the CNS in MS. We hypothesize that there is an underlying dysregulation in the CNS of MS patients that makes them more vulnerable to CNS inflammation. The sparsity of CNS-related genes associated with MS suggests that epigenetic changes in the CNS may play a role. Thus, a miRNA profiling study was performed in NAWM of MS patients and control subjects to determine if specific CNS pathways can be identified that may be altered due to miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional dysregulation. There were 15 differentially expressed miRNAs found in the MS patients’ NAWM. Pathway analysis indicated that the MAPK pathway and pathways associated with the blood-brain barrier were predicted to be significantly affected by these miRNAs. Using target predication and mRNA analysis, an inverse relationship was found between miR-191 and BDNF, SOX4, FZD5 and WSB1. The pathway and target analysis of the MS-associated miRNAs suggests that MS patients’ CNS is more prone to inflammation and less capable of repair, yet enriched in neuroprotective mechanisms. PMID:26894232

  14. Brownian dynamics simulations of sequence-dependent duplex denaturation in dynamically superhelical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, Steven P.; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Krishnan, V. V.; Fink, William H.; Benham, Craig J.

    2005-09-01

    The topological state of DNA in vivo is dynamically regulated by a number of processes that involve interactions with bound proteins. In one such process, the tracking of RNA polymerase along the double helix during transcription, restriction of rotational motion of the polymerase and associated structures, generates waves of overtwist downstream and undertwist upstream from the site of transcription. The resulting superhelical stress is often sufficient to drive double-stranded DNA into a denatured state at locations such as promoters and origins of replication, where sequence-specific duplex opening is a prerequisite for biological function. In this way, transcription and other events that actively supercoil the DNA provide a mechanism for dynamically coupling genetic activity with regulatory and other cellular processes. Although computer modeling has provided insight into the equilibrium dynamics of DNA supercoiling, to date no model has appeared for simulating sequence-dependent DNA strand separation under the nonequilibrium conditions imposed by the dynamic introduction of torsional stress. Here, we introduce such a model and present results from an initial set of computer simulations in which the sequences of dynamically superhelical, 147 base pair DNA circles were systematically altered in order to probe the accuracy with which the model can predict location, extent, and time of stress-induced duplex denaturation. The results agree both with well-tested statistical mechanical calculations and with available experimental information. Additionally, we find that sites susceptible to denaturation show a propensity for localizing to supercoil apices, suggesting that base sequence determines locations of strand separation not only through the energetics of interstrand interactions, but also by influencing the geometry of supercoiling.

  15. Haemolysis during sample preparation alters microRNA content of plasma.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, Michaela B; Kao, Steven C; Edelman, J James; Armstrong, Nicola J; Vallely, Michael P; van Zandwijk, Nico; Reid, Glen

    2011-01-01

    The presence of cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) has been detected in a range of body fluids. The miRNA content of plasma/serum in particular has been proposed as a potential source of novel biomarkers for a number of diseases. Nevertheless, the quantification of miRNAs from plasma or serum is made difficult due to inefficient isolation and lack of consensus regarding the optimal reference miRNA. The effect of haemolysis on the quantification and normalisation of miRNAs in plasma has not been investigated in great detail. We found that levels of miR-16, a commonly used reference gene, showed little variation when measured in plasma samples from healthy volunteers or patients with malignant mesothelioma or coronary artery disease. Including samples with evidence of haemolysis led to variation in miR-16 levels and consequently decreased its ability to serve as a reference. The levels of miR-16 and miR-451, both present in significant levels in red blood cells, were proportional to the degree of haemolysis. Measurements of the level of these miRNAs in whole blood, plasma, red blood cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that the miRNA content of red blood cells represents the major source of variation in miR-16 and miR-451 levels measured in plasma. Adding lysed red blood cells to non-haemolysed plasma allowed a cut-off level of free haemoglobin to be determined, below which miR-16 and miR-451 levels displayed little variation between individuals. In conclusion, increases in plasma miR-16 and miR-451 are caused by haemolysis. In the absence of haemolysis the levels of both miR-16 and miR-451 are sufficiently constant to serve as normalisers.

  16. Haemolysis during Sample Preparation Alters microRNA Content of Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Kirschner, Michaela B.; Kao, Steven C.; Edelman, J. James; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Vallely, Michael P.; van Zandwijk, Nico; Reid, Glen

    2011-01-01

    The presence of cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) has been detected in a range of body fluids. The miRNA content of plasma/serum in particular has been proposed as a potential source of novel biomarkers for a number of diseases. Nevertheless, the quantification of miRNAs from plasma or serum is made difficult due to inefficient isolation and lack of consensus regarding the optimal reference miRNA. The effect of haemolysis on the quantification and normalisation of miRNAs in plasma has not been investigated in great detail. We found that levels of miR-16, a commonly used reference gene, showed little variation when measured in plasma samples from healthy volunteers or patients with malignant mesothelioma or coronary artery disease. Including samples with evidence of haemolysis led to variation in miR-16 levels and consequently decreased its ability to serve as a reference. The levels of miR-16 and miR-451, both present in significant levels in red blood cells, were proportional to the degree of haemolysis. Measurements of the level of these miRNAs in whole blood, plasma, red blood cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed that the miRNA content of red blood cells represents the major source of variation in miR-16 and miR-451 levels measured in plasma. Adding lysed red blood cells to non-haemolysed plasma allowed a cut-off level of free haemoglobin to be determined, below which miR-16 and miR-451 levels displayed little variation between individuals. In conclusion, increases in plasma miR-16 and miR-451 are caused by haemolysis. In the absence of haemolysis the levels of both miR-16 and miR-451 are sufficiently constant to serve as normalisers. PMID:21909417

  17. Rapamycin (Sirolimus) alters mechanistic target of rapamycin pathway regulation and microRNA expression in mouse meiotic spermatocytes.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Koli, S; Reddy, K V R

    2015-09-01

    Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a signal transduction pathway that modulates translation initiation in several animals including mammals. Rapamaycin, an allosteric inhibitor of mTOR pathway, is often used as an immunosuppressive drug following kidney transplantation and causes gonadal dysfunction and defects in spermatogenesis. The molecular mechanism behind rapamycin-mediated testicular dysfunction is not known. We have therefore explored the contribution of rapamycin in mTOR regulation and microRNA (miRNA) expression in mouse spermatocytes, the intermediate stage of spermatogenesis, where meiosis takes place. In the present study, we optimized the isolation of highly pure and viable spermatocytes by flow sorting, treated them with rapamycin, and investigated the expression of mTOR and downstream effector molecules. Western blot and immunocytochemical analysis confirm that rapamycin treatment suppresses mTOR and phopsphorylated P70S6 kinase activities in spermatocytes, but not that of phosphorylated 4E-binding protein 1. Also, rapamycin treatment modulates the expression of several spermatocyte-specific miRNAs. To complement these finding an in vivo study was also performed. In silico prediction of target genes of these miRNAs and their functional pathway analysis revealed that, several of them are involved in crucial biological process, cellular process and catalytic activities. miRNA-transcription factor (TF) network analysis enlisted different TFs propelling the transcription machineries of these miRNAs. In silico prediction followed by quatitative real-time PCR revealed two of these TFs namely, PU.1 and CCCTC binding factor (CTCF) are down and upregulated, respectively, which may be the reason of the altered expression of miRNAs following rapamycin treatment. In conclusion, for the first time, the present study provides insight into how rapamycin regulates mTOR pathway and spermatocyte-specific miRNA expression which in turn, regulate expression of

  18. Perinatal protein malnutrition alters expression of miRNA biogenesis genes Xpo5 and Ago2 in mice brain.

    PubMed

    Berardino, Bruno G; Fesser, Estefanía A; Cánepa, Eduardo T

    2017-04-24

    Due to its widespread incidence, maternal malnutrition remains one of the major non-genetic factors affecting the development of newborn's brain. While all nutrients have certain influence on brain maturation, proteins appear to be the most critical for the development of neurological functions. An increasing number of studies point out that the effects of early-life nutritional inadequacy has long lasting effects on the brain and lead to permanent deficits in learning and behavior. Epigenetic mechanisms provide a potential link between the nutrition status during critical periods and changes in gene expression that may lead to disease phenotypes. Among those epigenetic mechanisms microRNAs (miRNAs) emerge as promising molecules for the link between nutrition and gene expression due to their relevance in many central nervous system functions. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the impact of perinatal protein malnutrition on the development of male and female mice offspring and to analyze the expression of the genes involved in the miRNA biogenesis pathway in different mouse brain structures. We demonstrated that early nutritional stress such as exposition to a protein-deficient diet during gestation and lactation reduced the hippocampal weight, delayed offspring's development and deregulated the expression of Xpo5 and Ago2 genes in hippocampus and hypothalamus of weanling mice. Moreover, an overall increase in mature miRNAs was consistent with the induction of Xpo5 mRNA. Altered miRNA biogenesis could modify the availability and functionality of miRNA becoming a causal factor of the adverse effects of protein malnutrition.

  19. Analysis of altered microRNA expression profiles in the kidney tissues of ethylene glycol-induced hyperoxaluric rats

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuo; Jiang, Hongyang; Yang, Jun; Wang, Tao; Ding, Yufeng; Liu, Jihong; Wang, Shaogang; Ye, Zhangqun

    2016-01-01

    Calcium oxalate stones account for >80% of urinary stones, however the mechanisms underlying their formation remains to be elucidated. Hyperoxaluria serves an important role in the pathophysiological process of stone formation. In the present study, differences in the miRNA expression profiles between experimental hyperoxaluric rats and normal rats were analyzed, in order to identify target genes and signaling pathways involved in the pathogenesis of hyperoxaluria. Ethylene glycol and ammonium chloride was fed to male hyperoxaluric rats (EXP) and normal age-matched male rats (CON). The oxalate concentration in the urine of each experimental rat was collected every 24 h and measured on day 14. Three rats exhibiting the highest concentrations were selected for microarray analysis. Microarray analysis was performed to evaluate differences in the expression of microRNA (miRNA) in the kidney tissues from EXP and CON groups, and miRNAs that exhibited a >2-fold or a <0.5-fold alteration in expression between these groups were screened for differential expression patterns according to the threshold P-values. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis was employed to confirm the microarray results. In order to predict the potential role of miRNAs in pathophysiological processes, gene ontology (GO), pathway and target prediction analyses were conducted. A total of 28 miRNAs were observed to be differentially expressed (>2-fold change) between EXP and CON groups. Among these miRNAs, 20 were upregulated and 8 were downregulated. GO and pathway analyses revealed that the insulin resistance and phosphatidylinositol-bisphosphonate 3-kinase/AKT serine threonine kinase signaling pathways were potentially associated with miRNA regulation in this setting. In conclusion, the results of the present study identified differentially expressed miRNAs in hyperoxaluric rats, and provided a novel perspective for the role of miRNAs in the formation of calcium oxalate

  20. Cesium Toxicity Alters MicroRNA Processing and AGO1 Expressions in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Jung, Il Lae; Ryu, Moonyoung; Cho, Seok Keun; Shah, Pratik; Lee, Ju Hye; Bae, Hansol; Kim, In Gyu; Yang, Seong Wook

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short RNA fragments that play important roles in controlled gene silencing, thus regulating many biological processes in plants. Recent studies have indicated that plants modulate miRNAs to sustain their survival in response to a variety of environmental stimuli, such as biotic stresses, cold, drought, nutritional starvation, and toxic heavy metals. Cesium and radio-cesium contaminations have arisen as serious problems that both impede plant growth and enter the food chain through contaminated plants. Many studies have been performed to define plant responses against cesium intoxication. However, the complete profile of miRNAs in plants during cesium intoxication has not been established. Here we show the differential expression of the miRNAs that are mostly down-regulated during cesium intoxication. Furthermore, we found that cesium toxicity disrupts both the processing of pri-miRNAs and AGONOUTE 1 (AGO1)-mediated gene silencing. AGO 1 seems to be especially destabilized by cesium toxicity, possibly through a proteolytic regulatory pathway. Our study presents a comprehensive profile of cesium-responsive miRNAs, which is distinct from that of potassium, and suggests two possible mechanisms underlying the cesium toxicity on miRNA metabolism.

  1. Mutually Exclusive Binding of Telomerase RNA and DNA by Ku Alters Telomerase Recruitment Model

    PubMed Central

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S.; Goodrich, Karen J.; Taabazuing, Cornelius; Ouenzar, Faissal; Chartrand, Pascal; Cech, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the Ku heterodimer contributes to telomere maintenance as a component of telomeric chromatin and as an accessory subunit of telomerase. How Ku binding to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and to telomerase RNA (TLC1) promotes its telomeric functions is incompletely understood. We demonstrate that deletions designed to constrict the DNA-binding ring of Ku80 disrupt non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), telomeric gene silencing and telomere length maintenance, suggesting that these functions require Ku's DNA end-binding activity. Contrary to the current model, a mutant Ku with low affinity for dsDNA also loses affinity for TLC1 both in vitro and in vivo. Competition experiments reveal that wild-type Ku binds dsDNA and TLC1 mutually exclusively. Cells expressing the mutant Ku are deficient in nuclear accumulation of TLC1, as expected from the RNA-binding defect. These findings force reconsideration of the mechanisms by which Ku assists in recruiting telomerase to natural telomeres and broken chromosome ends. PMID:22365814

  2. Duplex Direct Data Distribution System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenfield, Israel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is developing and demonstrating communications and network technologies that are helping to enable the near-Earth space Internet. GRC envisions several service categories. The first of these categories is direct data distribution or D3 (pronounced "D-cubed"). Commercially provided D3 will make it possible to download a data set from a spacecraft, like the International Space Station. as easily as one can extract a file from a remote server today, using a file transfer protocol. In a second category, NASA spacecraft will make use of commercial satellite communication (SATCOM) systems. Some of those services will come from purchasing time on unused transponders that cover landmasses. While it is likely there will be gaps in service coverage, Internet services should be available using these systems. This report addresses alternative methods of implementing a full duplex enhancement of the GRC developed experimental Ka-Band Direct Data Distribution (D3) space-to-ground communication link. The resulting duplex version is called the Duplex Direct Data Distribution (D4) system. The D4 system is intended to provide high-data-rate commercial direct or internet-based communications service between the NASA spacecraft in low earth orbit (LEO) and the respective principal investigators associated with these spacecraft. Candidate commercial services were assessed regarding their near-term potential to meet NASA requirements. Candidates included Ka-band and V-band geostationary orbit and non-geostationary orbit satellite relay services and direct downlink ("LEO teleport") services. End-to-end systems concepts were examined and characterized in terms of alternative link layer architectures. Alternatives included a Direct Link, a Relay Link, a Hybrid Link, and a Dual Mode Link. The direct link assessment examined sample ground terminal placements and antenna angle issues. The SATCOM-based alternatives examined existing or proposed commercial

  3. Effects on translation pausing of alterations in protein and RNA components of the ribosome exit tunnel.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Marlon G; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M

    2008-09-01

    Amino acids are polymerized into peptides in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The nascent peptides then pass through the exit tunnel before they reach the extraribosomal environment. A number of nascent peptides interact with the exit tunnel and stall elongation at specific sites within their peptide chain. Several mutational changes in RNA and protein components of the ribosome have previously been shown to interfere with pausing. These changes are localized in the narrowest region of the tunnel, near a constriction formed by ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. To expand our knowledge about peptide-induced pausing, we performed a comparative study of pausing induced by two peptides, SecM and a short peptide, Crb(CmlA), that requires chloramphenicol as a coinducer of pausing. We analyzed the effects of 15 mutational changes in L4 and L22, as well as the effects of methylating nucleotide A2058 of 23S rRNA, a nucleotide previously implicated in pausing and located close to the L4-L22 constriction. Our results show that methylation of A2058 and most mutational changes in L4 and L22 have differential effects on pausing in response to Crb(CmlA) and SecM. Only one change, a 6-amino-acid insertion after amino acid 72 in L4, affects pausing in both peptides. We conclude that the two peptides interact with different regions of the exit tunnel. Our results suggest that either the two peptides use different mechanisms of pausing or they interact differently but induce similar inhibitory conformational changes in functionally important regions of the ribosome.

  4. Effects on Translation Pausing of Alterations in Protein and RNA Components of the Ribosome Exit Tunnel▿

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, Marlon G.; Lindahl, Lasse; Zengel, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Amino acids are polymerized into peptides in the peptidyl transferase center of the ribosome. The nascent peptides then pass through the exit tunnel before they reach the extraribosomal environment. A number of nascent peptides interact with the exit tunnel and stall elongation at specific sites within their peptide chain. Several mutational changes in RNA and protein components of the ribosome have previously been shown to interfere with pausing. These changes are localized in the narrowest region of the tunnel, near a constriction formed by ribosomal proteins L4 and L22. To expand our knowledge about peptide-induced pausing, we performed a comparative study of pausing induced by two peptides, SecM and a short peptide, CrbCmlA, that requires chloramphenicol as a coinducer of pausing. We analyzed the effects of 15 mutational changes in L4 and L22, as well as the effects of methylating nucleotide A2058 of 23S rRNA, a nucleotide previously implicated in pausing and located close to the L4-L22 constriction. Our results show that methylation of A2058 and most mutational changes in L4 and L22 have differential effects on pausing in response to CrbCmlA and SecM. Only one change, a 6-amino-acid insertion after amino acid 72 in L4, affects pausing in both peptides. We conclude that the two peptides interact with different regions of the exit tunnel. Our results suggest that either the two peptides use different mechanisms of pausing or they interact differently but induce similar inhibitory conformational changes in functionally important regions of the ribosome. PMID:18586934

  5. The adipokine leptin increases skeletal muscle mass and significantly alters skeletal muscle miRNA expression profile in aged mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hamrick, Mark W.; Herberg, Samuel; Arounleut, Phonepasong; He, Hong-Zhi; Shiver, Austin; Qi, Rui-Qun; Zhou, Li; Isales, Carlos M.; and others

    2010-09-24

    Research highlights: {yields} Aging is associated with muscle atrophy and loss of muscle mass, known as the sarcopenia of aging. {yields} We demonstrate that age-related muscle atrophy is associated with marked changes in miRNA expression in muscle. {yields} Treating aged mice with the adipokine leptin significantly increased muscle mass and the expression of miRNAs involved in muscle repair. {yields} Recombinant leptin therapy may therefore be a novel approach for treating age-related muscle atrophy. -- Abstract: Age-associated loss of muscle mass, or sarcopenia, contributes directly to frailty and an increased risk of falls and fractures among the elderly. Aged mice and elderly adults both show decreased muscle mass as well as relatively low levels of the fat-derived hormone leptin. Here we demonstrate that loss of muscle mass and myofiber size with aging in mice is associated with significant changes in the expression of specific miRNAs. Aging altered the expression of 57 miRNAs in mouse skeletal muscle, and many of these miRNAs are now reported to be associated specifically with age-related muscle atrophy. These include miR-221, previously identified in studies of myogenesis and muscle development as playing a role in the proliferation and terminal differentiation of myogenic precursors. We also treated aged mice with recombinant leptin, to determine whether leptin therapy could improve muscle mass and alter the miRNA expression profile of aging skeletal muscle. Leptin treatment significantly increased hindlimb muscle mass and extensor digitorum longus fiber size in aged mice. Furthermore, the expression of 37 miRNAs was altered in muscles of leptin-treated mice. In particular, leptin treatment increased the expression of miR-31 and miR-223, miRNAs known to be elevated during muscle regeneration and repair. These findings suggest that aging in skeletal muscle is associated with marked changes in the expression of specific miRNAs, and that nutrient

  6. Epstein-Barr virus growth/latency III program alters cellular microRNA expression

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Jennifer E. Fewell, Claire Yin, Qinyan McBride, Jane Wang Xia Lin Zhen

    2008-12-20

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with lymphoid and epithelial cancers. Initial EBV infection alters lymphocyte gene expression, inducing cellular proliferation and differentiation as the virus transitions through consecutive latency transcription programs. Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of signaling pathways and are implicated in carcinogenesis. The extent to which EBV exploits cellular miRNAs is unknown. Using micro-array analysis and quantitative PCR, we demonstrate differential expression of cellular miRNAs in type III versus type I EBV latency including elevated expression of miR-21, miR-23a, miR-24, miR-27a, miR-34a, miR-146a and b, and miR-155. In contrast, miR-28 expression was found to be lower in type III latency. The EBV-mediated regulation of cellular miRNAs may contribute to EBV signaling and associated cancers.

  7. Nutritional status alters saccharin intake and sweet receptor mRNA expression in rat taste buds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ke; Yan, Jianqun; Suo, Yi; Li, Jinrong; Wang, Qian; Lv, Bo

    2010-04-14

    Sweet taste usually signifies the presence of caloric food. It is commonly accepted that a close association exists among sweet taste perception, preference, and nutritional status. However, the mechanisms involved remain unknown. To investigate whether nutritional status affects the preference for palatable solutions and alters sweet taste receptor gene expression in rats, we measured saccharin intake and preference using a two-bottle preference test, and changes in body weight, plasma leptin levels, and gene expression for the sweet taste receptor in taste buds in high-fat diet-induced obese rats and chronically diet-restricted rats. We found that the consumption and preference ratios for 0.01 and 0.04 M saccharin were significantly lower in the high-fat diet-induced obese rats than in the normal diet rats, while the serum leptin levels were markedly increased in obese rats. Consistent with the changes in saccharin intake, the gene expression level of the sweet taste receptor T1R3 was significantly decreased in the high-fat diet-induced obese rats compared with the control rats. By contrast, the chronically diet-restricted rats showed remarkably enhanced consumption and preference for 0.04 M saccharin. The serum leptin concentration was decreased, and the gene expression of the leptin receptor was markedly increased in the taste buds. In conclusion, our results suggest that nutritional status alters saccharin preference and the expression of T1R3 in taste buds. These processes may be involved in the mechanisms underlying the modulation of peripheral sweet taste sensitivity, in which leptin plays a role. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. MicroRNA-29b mediates altered innate immune development in acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L.; Scoville, Steven D.; Chen, Li; McConnell, Kathleen; Mao, Hsiaoyin C.; Ahmed, Elshafa H.; Zorko, Nicholas; Harvey, Sophia; Cole, Jordan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Costinean, Stefan; Croce, Carlo M.; Larkin, Karilyn; Byrd, John C.; Vasu, Sumithira; Blum, William; Yu, Jianhua; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can have potent antileukemic activity following haplo-mismatched, T cell–depleted stem cell transplantations for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but they are not successful in eradicating de novo AML. Here, we have used a mouse model of de novo AML to elucidate the mechanisms by which AML evades NK cell surveillance. NK cells in leukemic mice displayed a marked reduction in the cytolytic granules perforin and granzyme B. Further, as AML progressed, we noted the selective loss of an immature subset of NK cells in leukemic mice and in AML patients. This absence was not due to elimination by cell death or selective reduction in proliferation, but rather to the result of a block in NK cell differentiation. Indeed, NK cells from leukemic mice and humans with AML showed lower levels of TBET and EOMES, transcription factors that are critical for terminal NK cell differentiation. Further, the microRNA miR-29b, a regulator of T-bet and EOMES, was elevated in leukemic NK cells. Finally, deletion of miR-29b in NK cells reversed the depletion of this NK cell subset in leukemic mice. These results indicate that leukemic evasion of NK cell surveillance occurs through miR-mediated dysregulation of lymphocyte development, representing an additional mechanism of immune escape in cancer. PMID:27775550

  9. Alteration of microRNA expression of human dental pulp cells during odontogenic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gong, Qimei; Wang, Runfu; Jiang, Hongwei; Lin, Zhengmei; Ling, Junqi

    2012-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play momentous roles in various biological processes including cell differentiation. However, little is known about the role of miRNAs in human dental pulp cells (hDPCs) during odontogenic differentiation. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of miRNAs in the primary culture of hDPCs when incubated in odontogenic medium. The potential characteristics of hDPCs were investigated by miRNA microarray and real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Bioinformatics (ie, target prediction, Gene Ontology analysis, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes mapping tools) were applied for predicting the complementary target genes of miRNAs and their biological functions. A total of 22 miRNAs were differentially expressed in which 12 miRNAs up-regulated and 10 miRNAs down-regulated in differentiated hDPCs compared with the control. The target genes of differential miRNAs were predicted to associate with several biological functions and signaling pathways including the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the Wnt signaling pathway. The differential expression miRNAs may be involved in governing hDPC odontogenic differentiation, thus contributing to the future investigations of regulatory mechanisms in reparative dentin formation and dental pulp regeneration. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Sensitivity to Alternaria alternata toxin in citrus because of altered mitochondrial RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Ohtani, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2002-01-01

    Specificity in the interaction between rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) and the fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata rough lemon pathotype is determined by a host-selective toxin, ACR-toxin. Mitochondria from rough lemon are sensitive to ACR-toxin whereas mitochondria from resistant plants, including other citrus species, are resistant. We have identified a C. jambhiri mitochondrial DNA sequence, designated ACRS (ACR-toxin sensitivity gene), that confers toxin sensitivity to Escherichia coli. ACRS is located in the group II intron of the mitochondrial tRNA-Ala and is translated into a SDS-resistant oligomeric protein in C. jambhiri mitochondria but is not translated in the toxin-insensitive mitochondria. ACRS is present in the mitochondrial genome of both toxin-sensitive and -insensitive citrus. However, in mitochondria of toxin-insensitive plants, the transcripts from ACRS are shorter than those in mitochondria of sensitive plants. These results demonstrate that sensitivity to ACR-toxin and hence specificity of the interaction between A. alternata rough lemon pathotype and C. jambhiri is due to differential posttranscriptional processing of a mitochondrial gene. PMID:11842194

  11. Alterations of pre-mRNA splicing in human inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Häsler, Robert; Kerick, Martin; Mah, Nancy; Hultschig, Claus; Richter, Gesa; Bretz, Frank; Sina, Christian; Lehrach, Hans; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Schreiber, Stefan; Rosenstiel, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is regarded as a pivotal mechanism for generating proteome diversity and complexity from a limited inventory of mammalian genes. Aberrant splicing has been described as a predisposing factor for a number of diseases, but very little is known about its role in chronic inflammation. In this study, we systematically screened 149 splicing factors and 145 potential intron retention events for occurrence and differential expression in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). As a result, we identified 47 splicing factors and 33 intron retention events that were differentially regulated in mucosal tissue of IBD patients at transcript level. Despite the fact that Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, two subtypes of IBD, share the expression patterns of splicing factors and intron retention events in the majority of cases, we observed significant differences. To investigate these subtype-specific changes in detail we determined the expression levels of seven splicing factors (DUSP11, HNRPAB, HNRPH3, SLU7, SFR2IP, SFPQ, SF3B14) and three intron retention events (PARC, IER3, FGD2) in a cohort of 165 patients with inflammatory diseases of the colon (120 with IBD) and 30 healthy controls by real time PCR (TaqMan). This study demonstrates the potential impact of regulated splicing factors on subsequent regulated intron retention in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, exemplified by IBD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. Sensitivity to Alternaria alternata toxin in citrus because of altered mitochondrial RNA processing.

    PubMed

    Ohtani, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Akimitsu, Kazuya

    2002-02-19

    Specificity in the interaction between rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) and the fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata rough lemon pathotype is determined by a host-selective toxin, ACR-toxin. Mitochondria from rough lemon are sensitive to ACR-toxin whereas mitochondria from resistant plants, including other citrus species, are resistant. We have identified a C. jambhiri mitochondrial DNA sequence, designated ACRS (ACR-toxin sensitivity gene), that confers toxin sensitivity to Escherichia coli. ACRS is located in the group II intron of the mitochondrial tRNA-Ala and is translated into a SDS-resistant oligomeric protein in C. jambhiri mitochondria but is not translated in the toxin-insensitive mitochondria. ACRS is present in the mitochondrial genome of both toxin-sensitive and -insensitive citrus. However, in mitochondria of toxin-insensitive plants, the transcripts from ACRS are shorter than those in mitochondria of sensitive plants. These results demonstrate that sensitivity to ACR-toxin and hence specificity of the interaction between A. alternata rough lemon pathotype and C. jambhiri is due to differential posttranscriptional processing of a mitochondrial gene.

  13. MicroRNA-29b mediates altered innate immune development in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Scoville, Steven D; Chen, Li; McConnell, Kathleen; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; Ahmed, Elshafa H; Zorko, Nicholas; Harvey, Sophia; Cole, Jordan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Costinean, Stefan; Croce, Carlo M; Larkin, Karilyn; Byrd, John C; Vasu, Sumithira; Blum, William; Yu, Jianhua; Freud, Aharon G; Caligiuri, Michael A

    2016-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can have potent antileukemic activity following haplo-mismatched, T cell-depleted stem cell transplantations for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but they are not successful in eradicating de novo AML. Here, we have used a mouse model of de novo AML to elucidate the mechanisms by which AML evades NK cell surveillance. NK cells in leukemic mice displayed a marked reduction in the cytolytic granules perforin and granzyme B. Further, as AML progressed, we noted the selective loss of an immature subset of NK cells in leukemic mice and in AML patients. This absence was not due to elimination by cell death or selective reduction in proliferation, but rather to the result of a block in NK cell differentiation. Indeed, NK cells from leukemic mice and humans with AML showed lower levels of TBET and EOMES, transcription factors that are critical for terminal NK cell differentiation. Further, the microRNA miR-29b, a regulator of T-bet and EOMES, was elevated in leukemic NK cells. Finally, deletion of miR-29b in NK cells reversed the depletion of this NK cell subset in leukemic mice. These results indicate that leukemic evasion of NK cell surveillance occurs through miR-mediated dysregulation of lymphocyte development, representing an additional mechanism of immune escape in cancer.

  14. Analysis of Altered Micro RNA Expression Profiles in Focal Cortical Dysplasia IIB.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Liu, Chang-Qing; Li, Tian-Fu; Guan, Yu-Guang; Zhou, Jian; Qi, Xue-Ling; Yang, Yu-Tao; Deng, Jia-Hui; Xu, Zhi-Qing David; Luan, Guo-Ming

    2016-04-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia type IIB is a commonly encountered subtype of developmental malformation of the cerebral cortex and is often associated with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. In this study, to investigate the molecular etiology of focal cortical dysplasia type IIB, the authors performed micro ribonucleic acid (RNA) microarray on surgical specimens from 5 children (2 female and 3 male, mean age was 73.4 months, range 50-112 months) diagnosed of focal cortical dysplasia type IIB and matched normal tissue adjacent to the lesion. In all, 24 micro RNAs were differentially expressed in focal cortical dysplasia type IIB, and the microarray results were validated using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Then the putative target genes of the differentially expressed micro RNAs were identified by bioinformatics analysis. Moreover, biological significance of the target genes was evaluated by investigating the pathways in which the genes were enriched, and the Hippo signaling pathway was proposed to be highly related with the pathogenesis of focal cortical dysplasia type IIB.

  15. The synovial microenvironment of osteoarthritic joints alters RNA-seq expression profiles of human primary articular chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lewallen, Eric A; Bonin, Carolina A; Li, Xin; Smith, Jay; Karperien, Marcel; Larson, A Noelle; Lewallen, David G; Cool, Simon M; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Krych, Aaron J; Leontovich, Alexey A; Im, Hee-Jeong; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-10-15

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disabling degenerative joint disease that prompts pain and has limited treatment options. To permit early diagnosis and treatment of OA, a high resolution mechanistic understanding of human chondrocytes in normal and diseased states is necessary. In this study, we assessed the biological effects of OA-related changes in the synovial microenvironment on chondrocytes embedded within anatomically intact cartilage from joints with different pathological grades by next generation RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq). We determined the transcriptome of primary articular chondrocytes derived from anatomically unaffected knees and ankles, as well as from joints affected by OA. The GALAXY bioinformatics platform was used to facilitate biological interpretations. Comparisons of patient samples by k-means, hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses together reveal that primary chondrocytes exhibit OA grade-related differences in gene expression, including genes involved in cell-adhesion, ECM production and immune response. We conclude that diseased synovial microenvironments in joints with different histopathological OA grades directly alter gene expression in chondrocytes. One ramification of this finding is that anatomically intact cartilage from OA joints is not an ideal source of healthy chondrocytes, nor should these specimens be used to generate a normal baseline for the molecular characterization of diseased joints. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Reovirus-mediated induction of ADAR1 (p150) minimally alters RNA editing patterns in discrete brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Jennifer L.; Morabito, Michael V.; Martinez, Charles R.; Gilbert, James A.; Ferrick, Elizabeth A.; Ayers, Gregory D.; Chappell, James D.; Dermody, Terence S.; Emeson, Ronald B.

    2014-01-01

    Transcripts encoding ADAR1, a double-stranded, RNA-specific adenosine deaminase involved in the adenosine-to-inosine (A-to-I) editing of mammalian RNAs, can be alternatively spliced to produce an interferon-inducible protein isoform (p150) that is up-regulated in both cell culture and in vivo model systems in response to pathogen or interferon stimulation. In contrast to other tissues, p150 is expressed at extremely low levels in the brain and it is unclear what role, if any, this isoform may play in the innate immune response of the central nervous system (CNS) or whether the extent of editing for RNA substrates critical for CNS function is affected by its induction. To investigate the expression of ADAR1 isoforms in response to viral infection and subsequent alterations in A-to-I editing profiles for endogenous ADAR targets, we used a neuro-tropic strain of reovirus to infect neonatal mice and quantify A-to-I editing in discrete brain regions using a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing strategy. While intracranial injection of reovirus resulted in a widespread increase in the expression of ADAR1 (p150) in multiple brain regions and peripheral organs, significant changes in site-specific A-to-I conversion were quite limited, suggesting that steady-state levels of p150 expression are not a primary determinant for modulating the extent of editing for numerous ADAR targets in vivo. PMID:24906008

  17. THE ROLE OF ASPARTATE 143 IN E. coli tRNA-GUANINE TRANSGLYCOSYLASE: ALTERATION OF HETEROCYCLIC SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY

    PubMed Central

    Todorov, Katherine Abold; Garcia, George A.

    2008-01-01

    tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT) is a key enzyme involved in the post-transcriptional modification of certain tRNAs in their anticodon wobble positions with queuine. In order to maintain the correct Watson-Crick base pairing properties of the wobble base (and hence proper translation of the genetic code), TGT must recognize its heterocyclic substrate with high specificity. The X-ray crystal structure of a eubacterial TGT bound to preQ1 (Romier et al., EMBO J. (1996) 15, 2850–2857) suggested that aspartate 143 (E. coli TGT numbering) was involved in heterocyclic substrate recognition. Subsequent mutagenic and computational modeling studies from our lab (Todorov et al., Biophys. J. (2005), 89 (3), 1965–1977) provided experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. Herein, we report further studies probing the differential heterocyclic substrate recognition properties of the aspartate 143 mutant TGTs. Our results are consistent with one of the mutants exhibiting an inversion of substrate recognition preference (xanthine vs. guanine) relative to the wild-type, as evidenced by Km values. This confirms the key role of aspartate 143 in maintaining the anticodon identities of the queuine-containing tRNAs and suggests that TGT mutants could be developed that would alter the tRNA wobble base base-pairing properties. PMID:16401090

  18. Role of aspartate 143 in Escherichia coli tRNA-guanine transglycosylase: alteration of heterocyclic substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Todorov, Katherine Abold; Garcia, George A

    2006-01-17

    tRNA-guanine transglycosylase (TGT) is a key enzyme involved in the post-transcriptional modification of certain tRNAs in their anticodon wobble positions with queuine. To maintain the correct Watson-Crick base pairing properties of the wobble base (and hence proper translation of the genetic code), TGT must recognize its heterocyclic substrate with high specificity. The X-ray crystal structure of a eubacterial TGT bound to preQ1 [Romier, C., et al. (1996) EMBO J. 15, 2850-2857] suggested that aspartate 143 (Escherichia coli TGT numbering) was involved in heterocyclic substrate recognition. Subsequent mutagenic and computational modeling studies from our lab [Todorov, K. A., et al. (2005) Biophys. J. 89 (3), 1965-1977] provided experimental evidence supporting this hypothesis. Herein, we report further studies probing the differential heterocyclic substrate recognition properties of the aspartate 143 mutant TGTs. Our results are consistent with one of the mutants exhibiting an inversion of substrate recognition preference (xanthine vs guanine) relative to that of the wild type, as evidenced by Km values. This confirms the key role of aspartate 143 in maintaining the anticodon identities of the queuine-containing tRNAs and suggests that TGT mutants could be developed that would alter the tRNA wobble base base pairing properties.

  19. Region-specific alterations of A-to-I RNA editing of serotonin 2c receptor in the cortex of suicides with major depression

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, D; van der Laan, S; Underwood, M D; Salvetat, N; Cavarec, L; Vincent, L; Molina, F; Mann, J J; Arango, V; Pujol, J F

    2016-01-01

    Brain region-specific abnormalities in serotonergic transmission appear to underlie suicidal behavior. Alterations of RNA editing on the serotonin receptor 2C (HTR2C) pre-mRNA in the brain of suicides produce transcripts that attenuate 5-HT2CR signaling by impairing intracellular G-protein coupling and subsequent intracellular signal transduction. In brain, the distribution of RNA-editing enzymes catalyzing deamination (A-to-I modification) shows regional variation, including within the cerebral cortex. We tested the hypothesis that altered pre-mRNA 5-HT2CR receptor editing in suicide is region-specific. To this end, we investigated the complete 5-HT2CR mRNA-editing profile in two architectonically distinct cortical areas involved in mood regulation and decision-making in a clinically well-characterized cohort of age- and sex-matched non-psychiatric drug-free controls and depressed suicides. By using an original biochemical detection method, that is, capillary electrophoresis single-stranded conformational polymorphism (CE-SSCP), we corroborated the 5-HT2CR mRNA-editing profile previously described in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 9 (BA9)). Editing of 5-HT2CR mRNA displayed clear regional difference when comparing dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (BA9) and anterior cingulate cortex (BA24). Compared with non-psychiatric control individuals, alterations of editing levels of 5-HT2CR mRNA were detected in both cortical areas of depressed suicides. A marked increase in editing on 5-HT2CR was especially observed in the anterior cingulate cortex in suicides, implicating this cortical area in suicide risk. The results suggest that region-specific changes in RNA editing of 5-HT2CR mRNA and deficient receptor function likely contribute to the etiology of major depressive disorder or suicide. PMID:27576167

  20. The decapping activator Edc3 and the Q/N-rich domain of Lsm4 function together to enhance mRNA stability and alter mRNA decay pathway dependence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Huch, Susanne; Müller, Maren; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Gommlich, Jessie; Balagopal, Vidya; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rate and regulation of mRNA decay are major elements in the proper control of gene expression. Edc3 and Lsm4 are two decapping activator proteins that have previously been shown to function in the assembly of RNA granules termed P bodies. Here, we show that deletion of edc3, when combined with a removal of the glutamine/asparagine rich region of Lsm4 (edc3Δ lsm4ΔC) reduces mRNA stability and alters pathways of mRNA degradation. Multiple tested mRNAs exhibited reduced stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant. The destabilization was linked to an increased dependence on Ccr4-mediated deadenylation and mRNA decapping. Unlike characterized mutations in decapping factors that either are neutral or are able to stabilize mRNA, the combined edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant reduced mRNA stability. We characterized the growth and activity of the major mRNA decay systems and translation in double mutant and wild-type yeast. In the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant, we observed alterations in the levels of specific mRNA decay factors as well as nuclear accumulation of the catalytic subunit of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. Hence, we suggest that the effects on mRNA stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant may originate from mRNA decay protein abundance or changes in mRNPs, or alternatively may imply a role for P bodies in mRNA stabilization. PMID:27543059

  1. The decapping activator Edc3 and the Q/N-rich domain of Lsm4 function together to enhance mRNA stability and alter mRNA decay pathway dependence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Huch, Susanne; Müller, Maren; Muppavarapu, Mridula; Gommlich, Jessie; Balagopal, Vidya; Nissan, Tracy

    2016-10-15

    The rate and regulation of mRNA decay are major elements in the proper control of gene expression. Edc3 and Lsm4 are two decapping activator proteins that have previously been shown to function in the assembly of RNA granules termed P bodies. Here, we show that deletion of edc3, when combined with a removal of the glutamine/asparagine rich region of Lsm4 (edc3Δ lsm4ΔC) reduces mRNA stability and alters pathways of mRNA degradation. Multiple tested mRNAs exhibited reduced stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant. The destabilization was linked to an increased dependence on Ccr4-mediated deadenylation and mRNA decapping. Unlike characterized mutations in decapping factors that either are neutral or are able to stabilize mRNA, the combined edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant reduced mRNA stability. We characterized the growth and activity of the major mRNA decay systems and translation in double mutant and wild-type yeast. In the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant, we observed alterations in the levels of specific mRNA decay factors as well as nuclear accumulation of the catalytic subunit of the decapping enzyme Dcp2. Hence, we suggest that the effects on mRNA stability in the edc3Δ lsm4ΔC mutant may originate from mRNA decay protein abundance or changes in mRNPs, or alternatively may imply a role for P bodies in mRNA stabilization. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Altered miRNA expression in aniline-mediated cell cycle progression in rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gangduo; Wang, Jianling; Khan, M Firoze

    2017-09-01

    Aniline exposure is associated with toxicity to the spleen, however, early molecular events in aniline-induced cell cycle progression in the spleen remain unknown. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in tumor development by modulating key cell cycle regulators and controlling cell proliferation. This study was, therefore, undertaken on the expression of miRNAs, regulation of cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) in an experimental condition that precedes a tumorigenic response. Male SD rats were treated with aniline (1 mmol/kg/day by gavage) for 7 days, and expression of miRNAs, cyclins and CDKs in rat spleens were analyzed. Microarray and/or qPCR analyses showed that aniline exposure led to significantly decreased miRNA expression of let-7a, miR-24, miR-34c, miR-100, miR-125b, and greatly increased miR-181a. The aberrant expression of miRNAs was associated with significantly increased protein expression of cyclins A, B1, D3 and E. Furthermore, remarkably enhanced expression of CDKs like CDK1, CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, especially p-CDK1 and p-CDK2 as well as alternations in the expression of pRB, p27, and CDC25A in the spleens of aniline-treated rats was also observed. The data suggest that aniline exposure leads to aberrant expression of miRNAs in the spleen which could be important in the regulation of cell cycle proteins. Our findings, thus, provide new insight into the role of miRNAs in cell cycle progression, which may contribute to aniline-induced tumorigenic response in the spleen.

  3. PCR hot-start using duplex primers.

    PubMed

    Kong, Deming; Shen, Hanxi; Huang, Yanping; Mi, Huaifeng

    2004-02-01

    A new technique of PCR hot-start using duplex primers has been developed which can decrease the undesirable products arising throughout PCR amplification thereby giving better results than a manual hot-start method.

  4. Cyclic stretch and compression forces alter microRNA-29 expression of human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yinghua; Mohammed, Arshad; Oubaidin, Maysaa; Evans, Carla A; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Luan, Xianghong; Diekwisch, Thomas G H; Atsawasuwan, Phimon

    2015-07-15

    MicroRNAs (miRs) play an important role in the development and remodeling of tissues through the regulation of large cohorts of extracellular matrix (ECM) genes. The purpose of the present study was to determine the response of miR-29 family expression to loading forces and their effects on ECM gene expression in periodontal ligament cells, the key effector cell population during orthodontic tooth movement. In a comparison between miRs from human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs) and alveolar bone cells (ABCs) from healthy human subjects, the ABC cohort of miRs was substantially greater than the corresponding PDLC cohort. Cyclic mechanical stretch forces at 12% deformation at 0.1Hz for 24h decreased expression of miR-29 family member miRs about 0.5 fold while 2g/cm(2) compression force for 24h increased miR-29 family member expression in PDLCs 1.8-4 folds. Cyclic stretch up-regulated major ECM genes in PDLCs, such as COL1A1, COL3A1 and COL5A1, while the compression force resulted in a down-regulation of these ECM genes. Direct interactions of miR-29 and Col1a1, Col3a1 and Col5a1 were confirmed using a dual luciferase reporter gene assay. In addition, transient transfection of a miR-29b mimic in mouse PDLCs down-regulated Col1a1, Col3a1 and Col5a1 while the transfection of miR-29b inhibitor up-regulated these genes compared to control transfection indicating that these target ECM genes directly responded to the altered level of miR-29b. These results provided a possible explanation for the effects of the miR-29 family on loaded PDLCS and their roles in extracellular matrix gene expression.

  5. Stability of free and mineral-protected nucleic acids: Implications for the RNA world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swadling, Jacob B.; Coveney, Peter V.; Christopher Greenwell, H.

    2012-04-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the structural stability of three different nucleic acids intercalated within a magnesium aluminium layered double hydroxide (LDH) mineral, at varying degrees of hydration, and free in aqueous solution. The nucleotides investigated are ribose nucleic acid (RNA), deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA) and peptide nucleic acid (PNA), all in duplex form. Our simulations show that DNA has enhanced Watson-Crick hydrogen-bonding when intercalated within the LDH clay interlayers, compared with intercalated RNA and PNA, whilst the reverse trend is found for the nucleic acids in bulk water. The tendency for LDH to alter the stability of the three nucleic acids persists for higher temperature and pressure conditions. The uncharged protein backbone of PNA is found to have a detrimental effect on the overall stability of the duplex, as it experiences a greatly reduced electrostatic interaction with the charged LDH sheets compared to RNA and DNA. Assuming an RNA world, in which RNA preceded the DNA/protein world, at some point in time DNA must have taken over the role as the information storage molecule from RNA. These results suggest that a mineral based origin of life may have favoured DNA as the information-storage biomolecule over potentially competing RNA and PNA, providing a route to modern biology from the RNA world.

  6. Alterations of GABAA receptor subunit mRNA levels associated with increases in punished responding induced by acute alprazolam administration: an in situ hybridization study.

    PubMed

    Liu, M; Glowa, J R

    1999-03-20

    Changes in the mRNA encoding alpha1, alpha2, beta2 and gamma2 subunits of the GABAA receptor associated with the anxiolytic effects of alprazolam were measured in 20 brain regions using in situ hybridization techniques. Compared to non-punished controls, punishment decreased alpha1 mRNA levels in two nuclei of the amygdala, the cerebral cortex, and the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus and decreased alpha2 mRNA levels in the hippocampus. Punishment increased beta2 mRNA levels in ventroposterior thalamic nucleus and gamma2 mRNA levels in the CA2 area of the hippocampus. All of these effects were reversed when alprazolam increased punished responding, while alprazolam alone had no effect on either non-punished responding or GABAA receptor subunit regulation in these brain regions. Some brain regions that were unaffected by punishment were altered by alprazolam plus punishment. These results demonstrate that punishment and alprazolam can produce reciprocal changes in the mRNA levels for some subunits of the GABAA receptor. These changes may alter GABAergic synaptic inhibition by altering the density of GABAA receptors or their efficacy to bind drugs. They suggest that the underlying mechanisms by which drugs affect behavior can depend upon the conditions under which behavior is assessed. Copyright 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Altered Expression of MicroRNA-203 in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts and Its Role in Fibroblast Activation

    PubMed Central

    Stanczyk, Joanna; Ospelt, Caroline; Karouzakis, Emmanuel; Filer, Andrew; Raza, Karim; Kolling, Christoph; Gay, Renate; Buckley, Christopher D.; Tak, Paul P.; Gay, Steffen; Kyburz, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Objective MicroRNA (miRNA) are recognized as important regulators of a variety of fundamental biologic processes. Previously, we described increased expression of miR-155 and miR-146a in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and showed a repressive effect of miR-155 on matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) expression in RA synovial fibroblasts (RASFs). The present study was undertaken to examine alterations in expression of miR-203 in RASFs and analyze its role in fibroblast activation. Methods Differentially expressed miRNA in RASFs versus osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) were identified by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)–based screening of 260 individual miRNA. Transfection of miR-203 precursor was used to analyze the function of miR-203 in RASFs. Levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and MMPs were measured by real-time PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RASFs were stimulated with IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and 5-azacytidine (5-azaC). Activity of IκB kinase 2 was inhibited with SC-514. Results Expression of miR-203 was higher in RASFs than in OASFs or fibroblasts from healthy donors. Levels of miR-203 did not change upon stimulation with IL-1β, TNFα, or LPS; however, DNA demethylation with 5-azaC increased the expression of miR-203. Enforced expression of miR-203 led to significantly increased levels of MMP-1 and IL-6. Induction of IL-6 by miR-203 overexpression was inhibited by blocking of the NF-κB pathway. Basal expression levels of IL-6 correlated with basal expression levels of miR-203. Conclusion The current results demonstrate methylation-dependent regulation of miR-203 expression in RASFs. Importantly, they also show that elevated levels of miR-203 lead to increased secretion of MMP-1 and IL-6 via the NF-κB pathway and thereby contribute to the activated phenotype of synovial fibroblasts in RA. PMID:21279994

  8. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, Stephanie E.; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C.; Ramirez, Claire A.; Malpas, Janae M.; Propper, Catherine R.

    2015-01-01

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring for endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10−9 M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10−9 M, 10−8 M, and 10−7 M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10−7 M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10−9 and 10−8 M OP, but not 10−7 M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed

  9. Estrogenic environmental contaminants alter the mRNA abundance profiles of genes involved in gonadal differentiation of the American bullfrog.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Stephanie E; Veldhoen, Nik; Helbing, Caren C; Ramirez, Claire A; Malpas, Janae M; Propper, Catherine R

    2015-07-15

    Wildlife and human populations are exposed to anthropogenic mixtures of chemicals in the environment that may adversely influence normal reproductive function and development. We determined the effects of exposure to estrogenic chemicals and wastewater effluent (WWE) on developing gonads of the American bullfrog, Rana (Lithobates) catesbeiana, a species whose widespread distribution make it an ideal model for environmental monitoring of endocrine effects of chemical contaminants. Premetamorphic bullfrog tadpoles were exposed to treatment vehicle, 17β-estradiol (E2; 10(-9)M) or 4-tert-octylphenol (OP; 10(-9)M, 10(-8)M, and 10(-7)M). Additionally, gonadal differentiation was evaluated in bullfrog tadpoles from a WWE-containing site versus those from a reference location receiving no WWE. In both studies, phenotypic sex, steroidogenic factor-1 (nr5a1), and aromatase (cyp19a1) mRNA levels using quantitative real-time PCR were determined. Exposure to E2 or OP did not alter sex ratios. In controls, both nr5a1 and cyp19a1 transcript levels exhibited sexual dimorphism, with males demonstrating higher levels of nr5a1 and females greater abundance of cyp19a1. However, E2 exposure increased cyp19a1 mRNA abundance in testes and decreased levels in ovaries, eliminating the sexual dimorphism observed in controls. E2-exposed males exhibited increased nr5a1 transcript levels in the testes compared to controls, while females demonstrated no E2 effect. OP treatment had no effect on female cyp19a1 mRNA abundance, but exposure to 10(-7)M OP increased testicular transcript levels. Treatment with 10(-9) and 10(-8)M OP, but not 10(-7)M, resulted in decreased abundance of nr5a1 transcript in both ovaries and testes. Animals from the field had sexually dimorphic gonadal levels of cyp19a1, but both sexes from the WWE site exhibited elevated cyp19a1 transcript abundance compared to the reference location. Individual chemical compounds and anthropogenic wastewater effluent dispersed within

  10. Altered Circulating miRNA Expression Profile in Pregestational and Gestational Obesity.

    PubMed

    Carreras-Badosa, Gemma; Bonmatí, Alexandra; Ortega, Francisco-Jose; Mercader, Josep-Maria; Guindo-Martínez, Marta; Torrents, David; Prats-Puig, Anna; Martinez-Calcerrada, Jose-Maria; Platero-Gutierrez, Estíbaliz; De Zegher, Francis; Ibáñez, Lourdes; Fernandez-Real, Jose-Manuel; Lopez-Bermejo, Abel; Bassols, Judit

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are valuable circulating biomarkers and therapeutic targets for metabolic diseases. The objective of the study was to define the pattern of circulating miRNAs in pregestational and gestational obesity and to explore their associations with maternal metabolic parameters and with markers for pre- and postnatal growth. design, settings, and main outcome measure: TaqMan low-density arrays were used to profile plasma miRNAs in six women with pregestational obesity (PregestOB), six with gestational obesity (GestOB), and six with normal pregnancies (control) during the second trimester of gestation. The most relevant miRNAs were validated in 70 pregnant women (20 PregestOB, 25 GestOB, and 25 control). Maternal metabolic parameters including glucose, glycated hemoglobin, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance, C-peptide, and lipids were assessed. Placentas were weighed at delivery and newborns also during 6 months of life. We identified 13 circulating miRNAs differentially expressed in maternal obesity, including decreased levels of miR-29c, miR-99b, miR-103, miR-221, and miR-340 and increased levels of miR-30a-5p, miR-130a, and miR-150 in GestOB; and decreased levels of miR-122, miR-324-3p, miR-375, and miR-652 and increased levels of miR-625 in both PregestOB and GestOB (P < .05 to P < .0001 vs control). Decreased levels of several of these miRNAs associated with a more adverse maternal metabolic status (more pregnancy weight gain, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance, C-peptide, and triacylglycerol and less high density lipoprotein cholesterol), with more placental weight, weight at birth, and weight at 6 months of life (all P < .05 to P < .001). This study provides the first identification of altered circulating miRNAs in maternal obesity and suggests a possible role of such miRNAS as markers for pre- and postnatal growth.

  11. Specific recognition of guanines in non-duplex regions of nucleic acids with potassium tungstate and hydrogen peroxide

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Wuxiang; Xu, Xiaowei; He, Huan; Huang, Rong; Chen, Xi; Xiao, Heng; Yu, Zhenduo; Liu, Yi; Zhou, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Structural features of nucleic acids have become an integral part of current biomedical research. Highly selective and readily performed methods with little toxicity that target guanosines in non-duplex nucleic acids are needed, which led us to search for an effective agent for guanosine sequencing. Treatment of DNA or RNA with potassium tungstate and hydrogen peroxide produced damaged guanosines in DNA or RNA sequences. The damaged guanosines in non-duplex DNA could be cleaved by hot piperidine. Similarly, damaged guanosines in non-duplex RNA could be cleaved by aniline acetate. We could identify structural features of nucleic acid using this strategy instead of dimethyl sulphate and Ribonuclease T1. PMID:25355517

  12. Evolution of the plastid ribosomal RNA operon in a nongreen parasitic plant: accelerated sequence evolution, altered promoter structure, and tRNA pseudogenes.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, K H; Katz-Downie, D S; Morden, C W; Palmer, J D

    1992-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 7.4 kb region containing the entire plastid ribosomal RNA operon of the nongreen parasitic plant Epifagus virginiana has been determined. Analysis of the sequence indicates that all four rRNA genes are intact and almost certainly functional. In contrast, the split genes for tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala) present in the 16S-23S rRNA spacer region have become pseudogenes, and deletion upstream of the 16S rRNA gene has removed a tRNA(Val) gene and most of the promoter region for the rRNA operon. The rate of nucleotide substitution in 16S and 23S rRNAs is several times higher in Epifagus than in tobacco, a related photosynthetic plant. Possible reasons for this, including relaxed translational constraints, are discussed.

  13. Duplex sampling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Paul E.; Lloyd, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An improved apparatus is provided for sampling a gaseous mixture and for measuring mixture components. The apparatus includes two sampling containers connected in series serving as a duplex sampling apparatus. The apparatus is adapted to independently determine the amounts of condensable and noncondensable gases in admixture from a single sample. More specifically, a first container includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a sample source and a second port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a second container. A second container also includes a first port capable of selectively connecting to and disconnecting from the second port of the first container and a second port capable of either selectively connecting to and disconnecting from a differential pressure source. By cooling a mixture sample in the first container, the condensable vapors form a liquid, leaving noncondensable gases either as free gases or dissolved in the liquid. The condensed liquid is heated to drive out dissolved noncondensable gases, and all the noncondensable gases are transferred to the second container. Then the first and second containers are separated from one another in order to separately determine the amount of noncondensable gases and the amount of condensable gases in the sample.

  14. Secondary structure analysis of the RepA mRNA leader transcript involved in control of replication of plasmid R1.

    PubMed Central

    Ohman, M; Wagner, E G

    1989-01-01

    The main replication control function in plasmid R1 is an antisense RNA, CopA RNA. By binding to its target (CopT) in the leader of the RepA mRNA, CopA RNA inhibits the expression of the rate-limiting RepA protein. The formation of the RNA duplex has been proposed to alter the folding around the RepA start region. Knowledge of the secondary structure of both CopA and CopT RNA is crucial for an understanding of the regulation. Previously, we reported the structure of CopA RNA under native conditions. In the present communication we have analyzed the secondary structure of the RepA leader transcript. Our main findings are: The two loops of CopA RNA have their correspondence in CopT RNA. No major structural changes are found downstream of the duplex when CopA was bound to its target RNA during transcription. Furthermore, in agreement with CopA/CopT RNA binding studies reported recently we do not find evidence for the existence of a binding window. Images PMID:2470028

  15. Altered gene expression and miRNA expression associated with cancerous IEC-6 cell transformed by MNNG.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wang, Xukai; Wang, Yan

    2009-04-28

    Tumorigenesis is thought to be the consequence of gene mutation and disordered gene expression. However, the detailed molecular mechanism underlying the development and progress of colon cancer have not been elucidate completely. This study aimed to find out the genes associated with cancer biological pathways involved in transformation and tumorigenesis. Normal intestinal cell line 6 (IEC-6) cells were transformed to cancer cells by treatment with cancerogenic agent of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and Phorbol 12-myristate 13 acetate (PMA). Then we investigated the altered gene expression of transformed IEC-6 cells by the microarray containing 113 genes associated with cancer pathway. Also the altered miRNAs of transformed IEC-6 cells were analyzed by array hybridization (miRCURY Array v9.2, Exiqon). The levels of acetylated histone H3 in transformed IEC-6 cells was evaluated by western blot. Cell proliferation was significantly increased as IEC-6 cells were transformed and tumor xenografts could be detected in animals as transformed IEC-6 cells were inoculated subcutaneously in nude mice. Result of microarray showed nine genes were increased and two decreased, as well as 13 miRNA were increased and 97 decreased. Verification by real-time PCR implies that the data obtained from microarray analysis were reliable. Western blot showed the levels of acetylated histone H3 were increased dramatically after MNNG/PMA treatment. Our results showed many important biological pathways and miRNAs were involved in transformation and tumorigenesis of IEC-6 cells, which suggested the transformation of normal cells was involved with large mount of genetic and epigenetic variation.

  16. Isotope effect analyses provide evidence for an altered transition state for RNA 2′-O-transphosphorylation catalyzed by Zn2+†

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuming; Gu, Hong; Chen, Haoyuan; Strong, Emily; Ollie, Edward W.; Kellerman, Daniel; Liang, Danni; Miyagi, Masaru; Anderson, Vernon E.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.; York, Darrin M.; Harris, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Solvent D2O and 18O kinetic isotope effects on RNA 2′-O-transphosphorylation catalyzed by Zn2+ demonstrate an altered transition state relative to specific base catalysis. A recent model from DFT calculations involving inner sphere coordination to the non-bridging and leaving group oxygens is consistent with the data. PMID:26859380

  17. MicroRNA-mediated regulation of gene expression is affected by disease-associated SNPs within the 3′-UTR via altered RNA structure

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Ulrike; Sczakiel, Georg; Laufer, Sandra D.

    2012-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in microRNAs (miRNAs) or their target sites (miR-SNPs) within the 3′-UTR of mRNAs are increasingly thought to play a major role in pathological dysregulation of gene expression. Here, we studied the functional role of miR-SNPs on miRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. First, analyses were performed on a SNP located in the miR-155 target site within the 3′-UTR of the Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AGTR1; rs5186, A > C) mRNA. Second, a SNP in the 3′-UTR of the muscle RAS oncogene homolog (MRAS; rs9818870, C > T) mRNA was studied which is located outside of binding sites of miR-195 and miR-135. Using these SNPs we investigated their effects on local RNA structure, on local structural accessibility and on functional miRNA binding, respectively. Systematic computational RNA folding analyses of the allelic mRNAs in either case predicted significant changes of local RNA structure in the vicinity of the cognate miRNA binding sites. Consistently, experimental in vitro probing of RNA showing differential cleavage patterns and reporter gene-based assays indicated functional differences of miRNA-mediated regulation of the two AGTR1 and MRAS alleles. In conclusion, we describe a novel model explaining the functional influence of 3′-UTR-located SNPs on miRNA-mediated control of gene expression via SNP-related changes of local RNA structure in non-coding regions of mRNA. This concept substantially extends the meaning of disease-related SNPs identified in non protein-coding transcribed sequences within or close to miRNA binding sites. PMID:22664914

  18. Hammerhead ribozyme activity and oligonucleotide duplex stability in mixed solutions of water and organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Shu-ichi; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Miyoshi, Daisuke; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acids are useful for biomedical targeting and sensing applications in which the molecular environment is different from that of a dilute aqueous solution. In this study, the influence of various types of mixed solutions of water and water-soluble organic compounds on RNA was investigated by measuring the catalytic activity of the hammerhead ribozyme and the thermodynamic stability of an oligonucleotide duplex. The compounds with a net neutral charge, such as poly(ethylene glycol), small primary alcohols, amide compounds, and aprotic solvent molecules, added at high concentrations changed the ribozyme-catalyzed RNA cleavage rate, with the magnitude of the effect dependent on the NaCl concentration. These compounds also changed the thermodynamic stability of RNA base pairs of an oligonucleotide duplex and its dependence on the NaCl concentration. Specific interactions with RNA molecules and reduced water activity could account for the inhibiting effects on the ribozyme catalysis and destabilizing effects on the duplex stability. The salt concentration dependence data correlated with the dielectric constant, but not with water activity, viscosity, and the size of organic compounds. This observation suggests the significance of the dielectric constant effects on the RNA reactions under molecular crowding conditions created by organic compounds. PMID:25161873

  19. A noncoding RNA produced by arthropod-borne flaviviruses inhibits the cellular exoribonuclease XRN1 and alters host mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Stephanie L.; Anderson, John R.; Kumagai, Yutaro; Wilusz, Carol J.; Akira, Shizuo; Khromykh, Alexander A.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    All arthropod-borne flaviviruses generate a short noncoding RNA (sfRNA) from the viral 3′ untranslated region during infection due to stalling of the cellular 5′-to-3′ exonuclease XRN1. We show here that formation of sfRNA also inhibits XRN1 activity. Cells infected with Dengue or Kunjin viruses accumulate uncapped mRNAs, decay intermediates normally targeted by XRN1. XRN1 repression also resulted in the increased overall stability of cellular mRNAs in flavivirus-infected cells. Importantly, a mutant Kunjin virus that cannot form sfRNA but replicates to normal levels failed to affect host mRNA stability or XRN1 activity. Expression of sfRNA in the absence of viral infection demonstrated that sfRNA formation was directly responsible for the stabilization of cellular mRNAs. Finally, numerous cellular mRNAs were differentially expressed in an sfRNA-dependent fashion in a Kunjin virus infection. We conclude that flaviviruses incapacitate XRN1 during infection and dysregulate host mRNA stability as a result of sfRNA formation. PMID:23006624

  20. Differential pre-mRNA Splicing Alters the Transcript Diversity of Helitrons Between the Maize Inbred Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Brian T.; Patrick, Tara L.; Moreno, Jennifer J.; Siebert, Amy E.; Klusman, Katarina M.; Shodja, Donya N.; Hannah, L. Curtis; Lal, Shailesh K.

    2015-01-01

    The propensity to capture and mobilize gene fragments by the highly abundant Helitron family of transposable elements likely impacts the evolution of genes in Zea mays. These elements provide a substrate for natural selection by giving birth to chimeric transcripts by intertwining exons of disparate genes. They also capture flanking exons by read-through transcription. Here, we describe the expression of selected Helitrons in different maize inbred lines. We recently reported that these Helitrons produce multiple isoforms of transcripts in inbred B73 via alternative splicing. Despite sharing high degrees of sequence similarity, the splicing profile of Helitrons differed among various maize inbred lines. The comparison of Helitron sequences identified unique polymorphisms in inbred B73, which potentially give rise to the alternatively spliced sites utilized by transcript isoforms. Some alterations in splicing, however, do not have obvious explanations. These observations not only add another level to the creation of transcript diversity by Helitrons among inbred lines but also provide novel insights into the cis-acting elements governing splice-site selection during pre-mRNA processing. PMID:26070844

  1. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing reveals alterations of mouse intestinal microbiota after radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Young Suk; Kim, Jinu; Park, Soo-Je

    2015-06-01

    The mammalian gastrointestinal tract harbors a highly complex microbial community that comprises hundreds of different types of bacterial cells. The gastrointestinal microbiota plays an important role in the function of the host intestine. Most cancer patients undergoing pelvic irradiation experience side effects such as diarrhea; however, little is currently known about the effects of irradiation on the microorganisms colonizing the mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of gamma irradiation on the compositions of the large and small intestinal microbiotas. The gut microbiotas in control mice and mice receiving irradiation treatment were characterized by high-throughput sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene. Irradiation treatment induced significant alterations in the bacterial compositions of the large and small intestines at the genus level. Unexpectedly, irradiation treatment increased the number of operational taxonomic units in the small intestine but not the large intestine. In particular, irradiation treatment increased the level of the genera Alistipes in the large intestine and increased the level of the genus Corynebacterium in the small intestine. By contrast, compared with that in the corresponding control group, the level of the genera Prevotella was lower in the irradiated large intestine, and the level of the genera Alistipes was lower in the irradiated small intestine. Overall, the data presented here reveal the potential microbiological effects of pelvic irradiation on the gastrointestinal tracts of cancer patients.

  2. Regional and Duration of Illness Differences in the Alteration of NCAM-180 mRNA Expression within the Cortex of Subjects with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gibbons, A. S.; Thomas, E. A.; Dean, B

    2009-01-01

    Schizophrenia has been proposed to have a neurodevelopmental aetiology. Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 (NCAM1) is involved in several neurodevelopmental processes and abnormal expression of this gene has been associated in the pathology of schizophrenia and, thus, altered NCAM1 expression may be characteristic of the early stages of the illness. Alternative splicing of the NCAM1 transcript produces 3 major isoforms. Using qPCR we analysed mRNA expression of one of these isoforms; the 180 kDa isoform of NCAM1 (NCAM-180), in Brodmann Area (BA) 46, BA10 and BA17, postmortem, from 15 subjects with a short duration of illness of schizophrenia (<7 years) and 15 control subjects. NCAM-180 mRNA expression was increased in BA46 from subjects with schizophrenia compared to controls (P=0.013). By contrast, there were no significant differences in the expression of NCAM-180 mRNA in BA10 (P=0.575) or BA17 (P=0.772). We then analysed NCAM-180 mRNA expression in BA46 from 15 subjects with a longer duration of illness of schizophrenia (>22 years) and 15 controls. There was no significant difference in NCAM-180 mRNA expression in this second cohort. This data suggests NCAM-180 mRNA expression is altered in a regionally-specific manner in schizophrenia and these changes are associated with the early period following diagnosis. PMID:19411161

  3. Altered miRNA Signature of Developing Germ-cells in Infertile Patients Relates to the Severity of Spermatogenic Failure and Persists in Spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Xavier; Mata, Ana; Bassas, Lluís; Larriba, Sara

    2015-12-09

    The aim of this study was to assess the cellular miRNA expression behaviour in testes with spermatogenic failure (SpF). We performed a high-throughput screen of 623 mature miRNAs by a quantitative RT-qPCR-based approach in histologically well-defined testicular samples with spermatogenic disruption at different germ-cell stages, which revealed altered patterns of miRNA expression. We focussed on the differentially expressed miRNAs whose expression correlated with the number of testicular mature germ-cells and described the combined expression values of a panel of three miRNAs (miR-449a, miR-34c-5p and miR-122) as a predictive test for the presence of mature germ-cells in testicular biopsy. Additionally, we determined decreased cellular miRNA content in developing germ-cells of SpF testis; this was more noticeable the earlier the stage of germ-cell differentiation was affected by maturation failure. Furthermore, we showed that the miRNA expression profile in mature sperm from mild SpF patients was widely altered. Our results suggest that the cellular miRNA content of developed germ-cells depends heavily on the efficacy of the spermatogenic process. What is more, spermatozoa that have fulfilled the differentiation process still retain the dysregulated miRNA pattern observed in the developing SpF germ-cells. This altered miRNA molecular signature may have functional implications for the male gamete.

  4. Interpretation of duplex ultrasound dialysis access testing.

    PubMed

    Bandyk, Dennis F

    2013-01-01

    Conditions producing dialysis access dysfunction include failure of access maturation, cannulation injury to the conduit wall, thrombosis, low-volume flow, and aneurysmal degeneration. Duplex ultrasound is an accurate diagnostic technique to assess dialysis access anatomy and function, including the obligatory criteria for maturation, eg, volume flow >800 mL/min, conduit depth 0.6 cm from skin surface, and adequate (>5 mm) conduit diameter for cannulation. Measurement of access volume flow from the brachial artery or access conduit is prognostic for effective dialysis and conduit patency; including the determination of whether access maturation has occurred or when to intervene for a duplex-identified access stenosis. The application of duplex surveillance after autogenous vein or prosthetic bridge dialysis access construction has the potential to improve patency and function in the patient whose life is dependent on effective hemodialysis. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. La Deletion from Mouse Brain Alters Pre-tRNA Metabolism and Accumulation of Pre-5.8S rRNA, with Neuron Death and Reactive Astrocytosis.

    PubMed

    Blewett, Nathan H; Iben, James R; Gaidamakov, Sergei; Maraia, Richard J

    2017-05-15

    Human La antigen (Sjögren's syndrome antigen B [SSB]) is an abundant multifunctional RNA-binding protein. In the nucleoplasm, La binds to and protects from 3' exonucleases, the ends of precursor tRNAs, and other transcripts synthesized by RNA polymerase III and facilitates their maturation, while a nucleolar isoform has been implicated in rRNA biogenesis by multiple independent lines of evidence. We showed previously that conditional La knockout (La cKO) from mouse cortex neurons results in defective tRNA processing, although the pathway(s) involved in neuronal loss thereafter was unknown. Here, we demonstrate that La is stably associated with a spliced pre-tRNA intermediate. Microscopic evidence of aberrant nuclear accumulation of 5.8S rRNA in La cKO is supported by a 10-fold increase in a pre-5.8S rRNA intermediate. To identify pathways involved in subsequent neurodegeneration and loss of brain mass in the cKO cortex, we employed mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq), immunohistochemistry, and other approaches. This revealed robust enrichment of immune and astrocyte reactivity in La cKO cortex. Immunohistochemistry, including temporal analyses, demonstrated neurodegeneration, followed by astrocyte invasion associated with immune response and decreasing cKO cortex size over time. Thus, deletion of La from postmitotic neurons results in defective pre-tRNA and pre-rRNA processing and progressive neurodegeneration with loss of cortical brain mass. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  6. 1. VIEW OF DUPLEX (FEATURE 9), FACING NORTHEAST. MILL SITE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF DUPLEX (FEATURE 9), FACING NORTHEAST. MILL SITE IS SHOWN IN UPPER RIGHT CORNER OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Duplex, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  7. 3. VIEW OF DUPLEX (FEATURE 7), FACING NORTH. OFFICE (FEATURE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF DUPLEX (FEATURE 7), FACING NORTH. OFFICE (FEATURE 11) VISIBLE IN BACKGROUND. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Duplex, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  8. FACILITY 810, REAR OF DUPLEX SHOWING COURTYARD BETWEEN WINGS, OBLIQUE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACILITY 810, REAR OF DUPLEX SHOWING COURTYARD BETWEEN WINGS, OBLIQUE VIEW FACING EAST. - Schofield Barracks Military Reservation, Duplex Housing Type with Corner Entries, Between Hamilton & Tidball Streets near Williston Avenue, Wahiawa, Honolulu County, HI

  9. MicroRNA Expression Is Altered in an Ovalbumin-Induced Asthma Model and Targeting miR-155 with Antagomirs Reveals Cellular Specificity.

    PubMed

    Plank, Maximilian W; Maltby, Steven; Tay, Hock L; Stewart, Jessica; Eyers, Fiona; Hansbro, Philip M; Foster, Paul S

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs are post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression that are differentially regulated during development and in inflammatory diseases. A role for miRNAs in allergic asthma is emerging and further investigation is required to determine whether they may serve as potential therapeutic targets. We profiled miRNA expression in murine lungs from an ovalbumin-induced allergic airways disease model, and compared expression to animals receiving dexamethasone treatment and non-allergic controls. Our analysis identified 29 miRNAs that were significantly altered during allergic inflammation. Target prediction analysis revealed novel genes with altered expression in allergic airways disease and suggests synergistic miRNA regulation of target mRNAs. To assess the impacts of one induced miRNA on pathology, we targeted miR-155-5p using a specific antagomir. Antagomir administration successfully reduced miR-155-5p expression with high specificity, but failed to alter the disease phenotype. Interestingly, further investigation revealed that antagomir delivery has variable efficacy across different immune cell types, effectively targeting myeloid cell populations, but exhibiting poor uptake in lymphocytes. Our findings demonstrate that antagomir-based targeting of miRNA function in the lung is highly specific, but highlights cell-specificity as a key limitation to be considered for antagomir-based strategies as therapeutics.

  10. U1 small nuclear RNAs with altered specificity can be stably expressed in mammalian cells and promote permanent changes in pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, J B; Broz, S D; Levinson, A D

    1993-01-01

    Pre-mRNA 5' splice site activity depends, at least in part, on base complementarity to U1 small nuclear RNA. In transient coexpression assays, defective 5' splice sites can regain activity in the presence of U1 carrying compensatory changes, but it is unclear whether such mutant U1 RNAs can be permanently expressed in mammalian cells. We have explored this issue to determine whether U1 small nuclear RNAs with altered specificity may be of value to rescue targeted mutant genes or alter pre-mRNA processing profiles. This effort was initiated following our observation that U1 with specificity for a splice site associated with an alternative H-ras exon substantially reduced the synthesis of the potentially oncogenic p21ras protein in transient assays. We describe the development of a mammalian complementation system that selects for removal of a splicing-defective intron placed within a drug resistance gene. Complementation was observed in proportion to the degree of complementarity between transfected mutant U1 genes and different defective splice sites, and all cells selected in this manner were found to express mutant U1 RNA. In addition, these cells showed specific activation of defective splice sites presented by an unlinked reporter gene. We discuss the prospects of this approach to permanently alter the expression of targeted genes in mammalian cells. Images PMID:7682651

  11. Alteration of microRNA expressions in the pons and medulla in rats after 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile administration

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Keiko; Kushida, Masahiko; Miyata, Kaori; Sumida, Kayo; Takeda, Shuji; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2016-01-01

    Although 3,3′-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN) is widely used as a neurotoxicant to cause axonopathy due to accumulation of neurofilaments in several rodent models, its mechanism of neurotoxicity has not been fully understood. In particular, no information regarding microRNA (miRNA) alteration associated with IDPN is available. This study was conducted to reveal miRNA alteration related to IDPN-induced neurotoxicity. Rats were administered IDPN (20, 50, or 125 mg/kg/day) orally for 3, 7, and 14 days. Histopathological features were investigated using immunohistochemistry for neurofilaments and glial cells, and miRNA alterations were analyzed by microarray and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Nervous symptoms such as ataxic gait and head bobbing were observed from Day 9 at 125 mg/kg. Axonal swelling due to accumulation of neurofilaments was observed especially in the pons, medulla, and spinal cord on Day 7 at 125 mg/kg and on Day 14 at 50 and 125 mg/kg. Furthermore, significant upregulation of miR-547* was observed in the pons and medulla in treated animals only on Day 14 at 125 mg/kg. This is the first report indicating that miR-547* is associated with IDPN-induced neurotoxicity, especially in an advanced stage of axonopathy. PMID:27821907

  12. A Case of Zoster Duplex Bilateralis

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung Woong; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Whang, Kyu Uang; Lee, Jongsuk; Park, Younglip; Cho, Moon Kyun; Lee, Sanghoon

    2009-01-01

    The skin lesions of herpes zoster are classically limited to a single dermatome and most cases of multidermatomal herpes zoster have contiguous skin lesions. Simultaneous involvement of two noncontiguous dermatomes is very rare and it has been referred to as zoster duplex unilateralis or bilateralis, depending whether one or both halves of the body are involved. A 67-year-old woman presented with a group of painful vesicles on the right buttock and thigh, and left anterior chest and back. The Tzanck smear and skin biopsy were consistent with a herpetic infection. We report a rare case of zoster duplex bilateralis. PMID:20523839

  13. Full-duplex optical communication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shay, Thomas M. (Inventor); Hazzard, David A. (Inventor); Horan, Stephen (Inventor); Payne, Jason A. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method of full-duplex electromagnetic communication wherein a pair of data modulation formats are selected for the forward and return data links respectively such that the forward data electro-magnetic beam serves as a carrier for the return data. A method of encoding optical information is used wherein right-hand and left-hand circular polarizations are assigned to optical information to represent binary states. An application for an earth to low earth orbit optical communications system is presented which implements the full-duplex communication and circular polarization keying modulation format.

  14. Extensional duplex in the Purcell Mountains of southeastern British Columbia

    SciTech Connect

    Root, K.G. )

    1990-05-01

    An extensional duplex consisting of fault-bounded blocks (horses) located between how-angle normal faults is exposed in Proterozoic strata in the Purcell Mountains of British Columbia, Canada. This is one of the first documented extensional duplexes, and it is geometrically and kinematically analogous to duplexes developed in contractional and strike-slip fault systems. The duplex formed within an extensional fault with a ramp and flat geometry when horses were sliced from the ramp and transported within the fault system.

  15. Rice Stripe Virus Infection Alters mRNA Levels of Sphingolipid-Metabolizing Enzymes and Sphingolipids Content in Laodelphax striatellus

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fei-Qiang; Bai, Yue-Liang; Shi, Xiao-Xiao; Zhu, Mu-Fei; Zhang, Min-Jing; Mao, Cun-Gui; Zhu, Zeng-Rong

    2017-01-01

    Sphingolipids and their metabolites have been implicated in viral infection and replication in mammal cells but how their metabolizing enzymes in the host are regulated by viruses remains largely unknown. Here we report the identification of 12 sphingolipid genes and their regulation by Rice stripe virus in the small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén), a serious pest of rice throughout eastern Asia. According to protein sequence similarity, we identified 12 sphingolipid enzyme genes in L. striatellus. By comparing their mRNA levels in viruliferous versus nonviruliferous L. striatellus at different life stages by qPCR, we found that RSV infection upregulated six genes (LsCGT1, LsNAGA1, LsSGPP, LsSMPD4, LsSMS, and LsSPT) in most stages of L. striatellus. Especially, four genes (LsCGT1, LsSMPD2, LsNAGA1, and LsSMS) and another three genes (LsNAGA1, LsSGPP, and LsSMS) were significantly upregulated in viruliferous third-instar and fourth-instar nymphs, respectively. HPLC-MS/MS results showed that RSV infection increased the levels of various ceramides, such as Cer18:0, Cer20:0, and Cer22:0 species, in third and fourth instar L. striatellus nymphs. Together, these results demonstrate that RSV infection alters the transcript levels of various sphingolipid enzymes and the contents of sphingolipids in L. striatellus, indicating that sphingolipids may be important for RSV infection or replication in L. striatellus. PMID:28130458

  16. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J.; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes.

  17. The Contribution of the Activation Entropy to the Gas-Phase Stability of Modified Nucleic Acid Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Hari, Yvonne; Dugovič, Branislav; Istrate, Alena; Fignolé, Annabel; Leumann, Christian J; Schürch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA) is a sugar-modified analogue of DNA currently tested for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in an antisense approach. Tandem mass spectrometry plays a key role in modern medical diagnostics and has become a widespread technique for the structure elucidation and quantification of antisense oligonucleotides. Herein, mechanistic aspects of the fragmentation of tcDNA are discussed, which lay the basis for reliable sequencing and quantification of the antisense oligonucleotide. Excellent selectivity of tcDNA for complementary RNA is demonstrated in direct competition experiments. Moreover, the kinetic stability and fragmentation pattern of matched and mismatched tcDNA heteroduplexes were investigated and compared with non-modified DNA and RNA duplexes. Although the separation of the constituting strands is the entropy-favored fragmentation pathway of all nucleic acid duplexes, it was found to be only a minor pathway of tcDNA duplexes. The modified hybrid duplexes preferentially undergo neutral base loss and backbone cleavage. This difference is due to the low activation entropy for the strand dissociation of modified duplexes that arises from the conformational constraint of the tc-sugar-moiety. The low activation entropy results in a relatively high free activation enthalpy for the dissociation comparable to the free activation enthalpy of the alternative reaction pathway, the release of a nucleobase. The gas-phase behavior of tcDNA duplexes illustrates the impact of the activation entropy on the fragmentation kinetics and suggests that tandem mass spectrometric experiments are not suited to determine the relative stability of different types of nucleic acid duplexes. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  18. Changes in the conformation of 5S rRNA cause alterations in principal functions of the ribosomal nanomachine.

    PubMed

    Kouvela, Ekaterini C; Gerbanas, George V; Xaplanteri, Maria A; Petropoulos, Alexandros D; Dinos, George P; Kalpaxis, Dimitrios L

    2007-01-01

    5S rRNA is an integral component of the large ribosomal subunit in virtually all living organisms. Polyamine binding to 5S rRNA was investigated by cross-linking of N1-azidobenzamidino (ABA)-spermine to naked 5S rRNA or 50S ribosomal subunits and whole ribosomes from Escherichia coli cells. ABA-spermine cross-linking sites were kinetically measured and their positions in 5S rRNA were localized by primer extension analysis. Helices III and V, and loops A, C, D and E in naked 5S rRNA were found to be preferred polyamine binding sites. When 50S ribosomal subunits or poly(U)-programmed 70S ribosomes bearing tRNA(Phe) at the E-site and AcPhe-tRNA at the P-site were targeted, the susceptibility of 5S rRNA to ABA-spermine was greatly reduced. Regardless of 5S rRNA assembly status, binding of spermine induced significant changes in the 5S rRNA conformation; loop A adopted an apparent 'loosening' of its structure, while loops C, D, E and helices III and V achieved a more compact folding. Poly(U)-programmed 70S ribosomes possessing 5S rRNA cross-linked with spermine were more efficient than control ribosomes in tRNA binding, peptidyl transferase activity and translocation. Our results support the notion that 5S rRNA serves as a signal transducer between regions of 23S rRNA responsible for principal ribosomal functions.

  19. Alteration of microRNA expression in cerebrospinal fluid of unconscious patients after traumatic brain injury and a bioinformatic analysis of related single nucleotide polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    You, Wen-Dong; Tang, Qi-Lin; Wang, Lei; Lei, Jin; Feng, Jun-Feng; Mao, Qing; Gao, Guo-Yi; Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2016-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that genetic factors play a role in traumatic brain injury (TBI), whether in modifying clinical outcome after TBI or determining susceptibility to it. MicroRNAs are small RNA molecules involved in various pathophysiological processes by repressing target genes at the post- transcriptional level, and TBI alters microRNA expression levels in the hippocampus and cortex. This study was designed to detect differentially expressed microRNAs in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of TBI patients remaining unconscious two weeks after initial injury and to explore related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We used a microarray platform to detect differential microRNA expression levels in CSF samples from patients with post-traumatic coma compared with samples from controls. A bioinformatic scan was performed covering microRNA gene promoter regions to identify potential functional SNPs. Totally 26 coma patients and 21 controls were included in this study, with similar distribution of age and gender between the two groups. Microarray showed that fourteen microRNAs were differentially expressed, ten at higher and four at lower expression levels in CSF of traumatic coma patients compared with controls (p<0.05). One SNP (rs11851174 allele: C/T) was identified in the motif area of the microRNA hsa-miR-431-3P gene promoter region. The altered microRNA expression levels in CSF after brain injury together with SNP identified within the microRNA gene promoter area provide a new perspective on the mechanism of impaired consciousness after TBI. Further studies are needed to explore the association between the specific microRNAs and their related SNPs with post-traumatic unconsciousness.

  20. CLIPing Staufen to secondary RNA structures: size and location matter!

    PubMed

    Fernández Moya, Sandra M; Kiebler, Michael A

    2015-10-01

    hiCLIP (RNA hybrid and individual-nucleotide resolution ultraviolet cross-linking and immunoprecipitation), is a novel technique developed by Sugimoto et al. (2015). Here, the use of different adaptors permits a controlled ligation of the two strands of a RNA duplex allowing the identification of each arm in the duplex upon sequencing. The authors chose a notoriously difficult to study double-stranded RNA-binding protein (dsRBP) termed Staufen1, a mammalian homolog of Drosophila Staufen involved in mRNA localization and translational control. Using hiCLIP, they discovered a dominance of intramolecular RNA duplexes compared to the total RNA duplexes identified. Importantly, the authors discovered two different types of intramolecular duplexes in the cell: highly translated mRNAs with long-range duplexes in their 3'-UTRs and poorly translated mRNAs with duplexes in their coding region. In conclusion, the authors establish hiCLIP as an important novel technique for the identification of RNA secondary structures that serve as in vivo binding sites for dsRBPs. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Model of ribosome translation and mRNA unwinding.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ping

    2013-05-01

    A ribosome is an enzyme that catalyzes translation of the genetic information encoded in messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins. Besides translation through the single-stranded mRNA, the ribosome is also able to translate through the duplex region of mRNA via unwinding the duplex. Here, based on our proposed ribosome translation model, we study analytically the dynamics of Escherichia coli ribosome translation through the duplex region of mRNA, and compare with the available single molecule experimental data. It is shown that the ribosome uses only one active mechanism (mechanical unwinding), rather than two active mechanisms (open-state stabilization and mechanical unwinding), as proposed before, to unwind the duplex. The reduced rate of translation through the duplex region is due to the occurrence of futile transitions, which are induced by the energy barrier from the duplex unwinding to the forward translocation along the single-stranded mRNA. Moreover, we also present predicted results of the average translation rate versus the external force acting on the ribosome translating through the duplex region and through the single-stranded region of mRNA, which can be easily tested by future experiments.

  2. Loss of nuclear TDP-43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes altered expression of splicing machinery and widespread dysregulation of RNA splicing in motor neurones.

    PubMed

    Highley, J Robin; Kirby, Janine; Jansweijer, Joeri A; Webb, Philip S; Hewamadduma, Channa A; Heath, Paul R; Higginbottom, Adrian; Raman, Rohini; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; McDermott, Christopher J; Wharton, Stephen B; Shaw, Pamela J; Ince, Paul G

    2014-10-01

    Loss of nuclear TDP-43 characterizes sporadic and most familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). TDP-43 (encoded by TARDBP) has multiple roles in RNA processing. We aimed to determine whether (1) RNA splicing dysregulation is present in lower motor neurones in ALS and in a motor neurone-like cell model; and (2) TARDBP mutations (mtTARDBP) are associated with aberrant RNA splicing using patient-derived fibroblasts. Affymetrix exon arrays were used to study mRNA expression and splicing in lower motor neurones obtained by laser capture microdissection of autopsy tissue from individuals with sporadic ALS and TDP-43 proteinopathy. Findings were confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and in NSC34 motor neuronal cells following shRNA-mediated TDP-43 depletion. Exon arrays and immunohistochemistry were used to study mRNA splicing and TDP-43 expression in fibroblasts from patients with mtTARDBP-associated, sporadic and mutant SOD1-associated ALS. We found altered expression of spliceosome components in motor neurones and widespread aberrations of mRNA splicing that specifically affected genes involved in ribonucleotide binding. This was confirmed in TDP-43-depleted NSC34 cells. Fibroblasts with mtTARDBP showed loss of nuclear TDP-43 protein and demonstrated similar changes in splicing and gene expression, which were not present in fibroblasts from patients with sporadic or SOD1-related ALS. Loss of nuclear TDP-43 is associated with RNA processing abnormalities in ALS motor neurones, patient-derived cells with mtTARDBP, and following artificial TDP-43 depletion, suggesting that splicing dysregulation directly contributes to disease pathogenesis. Key functional pathways affected include those central to RNA metabolism. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  3. Altered expression of hyaluronan synthase and hyaluronidase mRNA may affect hyaluronic acid distribution in keloid disease compared with normal skin.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, Gary P; Iqbal, Syed A; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2013-05-01

    Keloid disease (KD) is a fibroproliferative disorder characterised partly by an altered extracellular matrix (ECM) profile. In fetal scarring, hyaluronic acid (HA) expression is increased, but is reduced in KD tissue compared with normal skin (NS). The expression of Hyaluronan Synthase (HAS) and hyaluronidase (HYAL) in KD and NS tissue were investigated for the first time using a range of techniques. Hyaluronan synthase and HYAL mRNA expression were significantly increased in NS tissue compared with KD tissue (P < 0.05). Immunohistological analysis of tissue indicated an accumulation of HAS and HYAL protein expression in KD compared with NS due to the thicker epidermis. No differences were observed in mRNA or protein expression in KD and NS fibroblasts. Reduced expression of HAS and HYAL may alter HA synthesis, degradation and accumulation in KD. Better understanding of the role of HA in KD may lead to novel therapeutic approaches to address the resulting ECM imbalance.

  4. Detection of Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica by a Rapid and Sensitive Duplex PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Wannet, Wim J. B.; Reessink, Michiel; Brunings, Henk A.; Maas, Henny M. E.

    2001-01-01

    A duplex PCR assay targeting the ail and 16S rRNA genes of Yersinia enterocolitica was developed to specifically identify pathogenic Y. enterocolitica from pure culture. Validation of the assay was performed with 215 clinical Yersinia strains and 40 strains of other bacterial species. Within an assay time of 4 h, this assay offers a very specific, reliable, and inexpensive alternative to the conventional phenotypic assays used in clinical laboratories to identify pathogenic Y. enterocolitica. PMID:11724866

  5. 2,6-Diaminopurine to TNA: Effect on Duplex Stabilities and on the Efficiency of Template-Controlled Ligations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiaolin; Delgado, Guillermo; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Eschenmoser, Albert

    2003-01-01

    Replacement of adenine by 2,6-diaminopurine-two nucleobases to be considered equivalent from an etlological point of view-strongly enhances the stability of TNA/TNA, TNA/RNA, or TNA/DNA duplexes and efficiently accelerates template-directed ligation of TNA ligands.

  6. 2,6-Diaminopurine to TNA: Effect on Duplex Stabilities and on the Efficiency of Template-Controlled Ligations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Xiaolin; Delgado, Guillermo; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayanan; Eschenmoser, Albert

    2003-01-01

    Replacement of adenine by 2,6-diaminopurine-two nucleobases to be considered equivalent from an etlological point of view-strongly enhances the stability of TNA/TNA, TNA/RNA, or TNA/DNA duplexes and efficiently accelerates template-directed ligation of TNA ligands.

  7. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V.; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G.

    2015-01-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5′-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5′ exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8SC and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8SC rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes. PMID:25995445

  8. Altered RNA processing and export lead to retention of mRNAs near transcription sites and nuclear pore complexes or within the nucleolus

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Biplab; Montpetit, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Many protein factors are required for mRNA biogenesis and nuclear export, which are central to the eukaryotic gene expression program. It is unclear, however, whether all factors have been identified. Here we report on a screen of >1000 essential gene mutants in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for defects in mRNA processing and export, identifying 26 mutants with defects in this process. Single-molecule FISH data showed that the majority of these mutants accumulated mRNA within specific regions of the nucleus, which included 1) mRNAs within the nucleolus when nucleocytoplasmic transport, rRNA biogenesis, or RNA processing and surveillance was disrupted, 2) the buildup of mRNAs near transcription sites in 3′-end processing and chromosome segregation mutants, and 3) transcripts being enriched near nuclear pore complexes when components of the mRNA export machinery were mutated. These data show that alterations to various nuclear processes lead to the retention of mRNAs at discrete locations within the nucleus. PMID:27385342

  9. The Ams (altered mRNA stability) protein and ribonuclease E are encoded by the same structural gene of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Babitzke, P; Kushner, S R

    1991-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo analysis of the ribonuclease E-deficient (rne-) and the altered mRNA stability protein-deficient (ams-) strains of Escherichia coli has demonstrated that they carry mutations in the same structural gene. Strains encoding either thermolabile RNase E (rne-3071) or Ams protein (ams-1) are defective in both rRNA processing and mRNA turnover. Immediately after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature, the chemical decay rate of bulk mRNA is slowed 2- to 3-fold, and within 70 min, precursors to 5S rRNA begin to accumulate. In addition, all of the phenotypes associated with either the rne-3071 or the ams-1 alleles were complemented by a recombinant plasmid carrying ams+. When taken together with previous genetic studies, these results suggest that the role of ribonuclease E in mRNA turnover involves endonucleolytic cleavages at the proposed ACAG(A/U)AUUUG consensus sequence. Images PMID:1846032

  10. Reduced expression of the mouse ribosomal protein Rpl17 alters the diversity of mature ribosomes by enhancing production of shortened 5.8S rRNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minshi; Parshin, Andrey V; Shcherbik, Natalia; Pestov, Dimitri G

    2015-07-01

    Processing of rRNA during ribosome assembly can proceed through alternative pathways but it is unclear whether this could affect the structure of the ribosome. Here, we demonstrate that shortage of a ribosomal protein can change pre-rRNA processing in a way that over time alters ribosome diversity in the cell. Reducing the amount of Rpl17 in mouse cells led to stalled 60S subunit maturation, causing degradation of most of the synthesized precursors. A fraction of pre-60S subunits, however, were able to complete maturation, but with a 5'-truncated 5.8S rRNA, which we named 5.8SC. The 5' exoribonuclease Xrn2 is involved in the generation of both 5.8S(C) and the canonical long form of 5.8S rRNA. Ribosomes containing 5.8S(C) rRNA are present in various mouse and human cells and engage in translation. These findings uncover a previously undescribed form of mammalian 5.8S rRNA and demonstrate that perturbations in ribosome assembly can be a source of heterogeneity in mature ribosomes.

  11. Py-Im Polyamides Distinguish Double Helical DNA and RNA**

    PubMed Central

    Chenoweth, David M.; Meier, Jordan L.

    2012-01-01

    Groove specificity. Pyrrole-imidazole polyamides are well-known for their specific interactions with the minor groove of DNA. Here we demonstrate that polyamides do not similarly bind duplex RNA, and offer a structural rationale for the molecular-level discrimination of nucleic acid duplexes by minor groove binding ligands. PMID:22987334

  12. Alteration of the levels of the M-type 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase mRNA isoforms during neonatal maturation of heart, brain and muscle.

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, Y; Armour, G; Dunaway, G

    2000-11-01

    During muscle, heart, and brain neonatal maturation, the capacity to utilize glucose in energy metabolism is directly related to the extent of accumulation of the 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK) M-type subunit. Neonatal development of other organs, such as liver and kidney, which are not characterized by large increases in the capacity to use glucose do not exhibit large increases in the M-type subunit protein. The presence of the M-type subunit in a PFK isozyme pool fosters a higher affinity utilization of carbohydrate and increased responsiveness to the levels of regulatory metabolites. To better appreciate this phenomenon, which is vital for normal development, the different isoforms of the M-type subunit mRNA's and alteration of their levels during maturation have been examined. Further, the potential promoter regions, i.e., the regions upstream from the sites of initiation of transcription, which are involved in expression of the different M-type subunit mRNA isoforms have been isolated, sequenced, and examined for possible transcription factor interaction sites. Using cDNA libraries produced from adult rat brain or skeletal muscle RNA, two primary forms of rat M-type subunit cDNA's were detected. Although the translated regions of these mRNA's were essentially identical, the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) exhibited different lengths (90 or 59 bp) and sequences. Each M-type subunit cDNA had 10 common nucleotides immediately upstream from the initiator ATG, and the remaining 5'-UTR's had insignificant identity. A genomic fragment which interacted with probes complimentary to the sequences of the 5'-UTR of each M-type subunit mRNA isoform was isolated and sequenced by primer walking. It was discovered that the 5'-UTR of one of the mRNA's (proximal mRNA) was located immediately upstream from exon I and was apparently transcribed without splicing. Subsequently, the initial bp in the sequence of the other mRNA isoform (distal mRNA) was located 4010 bp upstream from

  13. Cytomegalovirus Late Protein pUL31 Alters Pre-rRNA Expression and Nuclear Organization during Infection.

    PubMed

    Westdorp, Kristen N; Sand, Andrea; Moorman, Nathaniel J; Terhune, Scott S

    2017-09-15

    The replication cycle of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) leads to drastic reorganization of domains in the host cell nucleus. However, the mechanisms involved and how these domains contribute to infection are not well understood. Our recent studies defining the CMV-induced nuclear proteome identified several viral proteins of unknown functions, including a protein encoded by the UL31 gene. We set out to define the role of UL31 in CMV replication. UL31 is predicted to encode a 74-kDa protein, referred to as pUL31, containing a bipartite nuclear localization signal, an intrinsically disordered region overlapping arginine-rich motifs, and a C-terminal dUTPase-like structure. We observed that pUL31 is expressed with true late kinetics and is localized to nucleolin-containing nuclear domains. However, pUL31 is excluded from the viral nuclear replication center. Nucleolin is a marker of nucleoli, which are membrane-less regions involved in regulating ribosome biosynthesis and cellular stress responses. Other CMV proteins associate with nucleoli, and we demonstrate that pUL31 specifically interacts with the viral protein, pUL76. Coexpression of both proteins altered pUL31 localization and nucleolar organization. During infection, pUL31 colocalizes with nucleolin but not the transcriptional activator, UBF. In the absence of pUL31, CMV fails to reorganize nucleolin and UBF and exhibits a replication defect at a low multiplicity of infection. Finally, we observed that pUL31 is necessary and sufficient to reduce pre-rRNA levels, and this was dependent on the dUTPase-like motif in pUL31. Our studies demonstrate that CMV pUL31 functions in regulating nucleolar biology and contributes to the reorganization of nucleoli during infection.IMPORTANCE Nucleolar biology is important during CMV infection with the nucleolar protein, with nucleolin playing a role in maintaining the architecture of the viral nuclear replication center. However, the extent of CMV-mediated regulation of

  14. Crystal Structure of a B-form DNA Duplex Containing (L)-alpha-Threofuranosyl (3'-2') Nucleosides (TNA): A Simple Four Carbon Sugar is Easily Accommodated into the Backbone of DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Wilds, C.J.; Wawrzak, Z.; Krishnamurthy, R.; Eschenmoser, A.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    (L)-{alpha}-Threofuranosyl-(3' {yields} 2')-oligonucleotides (TNA) containing vicinally connected phosphodiester linkages undergo informational base pairing in an antiparallel strand orientation and are capable of cross-pairing with RNA and DNA. TNA is derived from a sugar containing only four carbon atoms and is one of the simplest potentially natural nucleic acid alternatives investigated thus far in the context of a chemical etiology of nucleic acid structure. Compared to DNA and RNA that contain six covalent bonds per repeating nucleotide unit, TNA contains only five. We have determined the atomic-resolution crystal structure of the B-form DNA duplex [d(CGCGAA)T*d(TCGCG)]{sub 2} containing a single (L)-{alpha}-threofuranosyl thymine (T*) per strand. In the modified duplex base stacking interactions are practically unchanged relative to the reference DNA structure. The orientations of the backbone at the TNA incorporation sites are slightly altered in order to accommodate fewer atoms and covalent bonds. The conformation of the threose is C4'-exo with the 2'- and 3'-substituents assuming quasi-diaxial orientation.

  15. Sirt1 AS lncRNA interacts with its mRNA to inhibit muscle formation by attenuating function of miR-34a

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guo-qiang; Wang, Yu; Xiong, Yan; Chen, Xiao-Chang; Ma, Mei-ling; Cai, Rui; Gao, Yun; Sun, Yun-mei; Yang, Gong-She; Pang, Wei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrate the functions of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in mediating gene expression at the transcriptional or translational level. Our previous study identified a Sirt1 antisense (AS) lncRNA transcribed from the Sirt1 AS strand. However, its role and regulatory mechanism is still unknown in myogenesis. Here, functional analyses showed that Sirt1 AS lncRNA overexpression promoted myoblast proliferation, but inhibited differentiation. Mechanistically, Sirt1 AS lncRNA was found to activate its sense gene, Sirt1. The luciferase assay provided evidences that Sirt1 AS lncRNA interacted with Sirt1 3′ UTR and rescued Sirt1 transcriptional suppression by competing with miR-34a. In addition, RNA stability assay showed that Sirt1 AS lncRNA prolonged Sirt1 mRNA half-life from 2 to 10 h. Ribonuclease protection assay further indicated that it fully bound to Sirt1 mRNA in the myoblast cytoplasm. Moreover, Sirt1 AS overexpression led to less mouse weight than the control because of less lean mass and greater levels of Sirt1, whereas the fat mass and levels of miR-34a were not altered. Based on the findings, a novel regulatory mechanism was found that Sirt1 AS lncRNA preferably interacted with Sirt1 mRNA forming RNA duplex to promote Sirt1 translation by competing with miR-34a, inhibiting muscle formation. PMID:26902620

  16. Thermodynamic Features of Structural Motifs Formed by β-L-RNA

    PubMed Central

    Szabat, Marta; Gudanis, Dorota; Kotkowiak, Weronika; Gdaniec, Zofia; Kierzek, Ryszard; Pasternak, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This is the first report to provide comprehensive thermodynamic and structural data concerning duplex, hairpin, quadruplex and i-motif structures in β-L-RNA series. Herein we confirm that, within the limits of experimental error, the thermodynamic stability of enantiomeric structural motifs is the same as that of naturally occurring D-RNA counterparts. In addition, formation of D-RNA/L-RNA heterochiral duplexes is also observed; however, their thermodynamic stability is significantly reduced in reference to homochiral D-RNA duplexes. The presence of three locked nucleic acid (LNA) residues within the D-RNA strand diminishes the negative effect of the enantiomeric, complementary L-RNA strand in the formation of heterochiral RNA duplexes. Similar behavior is also observed for heterochiral LNA-2′-O-methyl-D-RNA/L-RNA duplexes. The formation of heterochiral duplexes was confirmed by 1H NMR spectroscopy. The CD curves of homochiral L-RNA structural motifs are always reversed, whereas CD curves of heterochiral duplexes present individual features dependent on the composition of chiral strands. PMID:26908023

  17. Sperm microRNA Content Is Altered in a Mouse Model of Male Obesity, but the Same Suite of microRNAs Are Not Altered in Offspring’s Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Fullston, Tod; Ohlsson-Teague, E. Maria C.; Print, Cristin G.; Sandeman, Lauren Y.; Lane, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is increasing worldwide and has tripled in men of reproductive age since the 1970s. Concerningly, obesity is not only comorbid with other chronic diseases, but there is mounting evidence that it increases the non-communicable disease load in their children (eg mortality, obesity, autism). Animal studies have demonstrated that paternal obesity increases the risk of metabolic (eg glucose metabolism defects, obesity) and reproductive disorders in offspring. Epigenetic changes within sperm are clear mechanistic candidates that are associated with both changes to the father’s environment and offspring phenotype. Specifically there is emerging evidence that a father’s sperm microRNA content both responds to paternal environmental cues and alters the gene expression profile and subsequent development of the early embryo. We used a mouse model of high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity to investigate whether male obesity could modulate sperm microRNA content. We also investigated whether this alteration to a father’s sperm microRNA content lead to a similar change in the sperm of male offspring. Our investigations were initially guided by a Taqman PCR array, which indicated the differential abundance of 28 sperm borne microRNAs in HFD mice. qPCR confirmation in a much larger cohort of founder males demonstrated that 13 of these microRNAs were differentially abundant (11 up-regulated; 2 down-regulated) due to HFD feeding. Despite metabolic and reproductive phenotypes also being observed in grand-offspring fathered via the male offspring lineage, there was no evidence that any of the 13 microRNAs were also dysregulated in male offspring sperm. This was presumably due to the variation seen within both groups of offspring and suggests other mechanisms might act between offspring and grand-offspring. Thus 13 sperm borne microRNAs are modulated by a father’s HFD and the presumed transfer of this altered microRNA payload to the embryo at

  18. Allele-Selective Inhibition of Mutant Atrophin-1 Expression by Duplex and Single-Stranded RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that currently has no curative treatments. DRPLA is caused by an expansion of a CAG trinucleotide repeat region within the protein-encoding sequence of the atrophin-1 (ATN-1) gene. Inhibition of mutant ATN-1 protein expression is one strategy for treating DRPLA, and allele-selective gene silencing agents that block mutant expression over wild-type expression would be lead compounds for therapeutic development. Here we develop an assay for distinguishing mutant from wild-type ATN-1 protein by gel electrophoresis. We use this assay to evaluate duplex RNAs and single-stranded silencing RNAs (ss-siRNAs) for allele-selective inhibition of ATN-1 protein expression. We observed potent and allele-selective inhibition by RNA duplexes that contain mismatched bases relative to the CAG target and have the potential to form miRNA-like complexes. ss-siRNAs that contained mismatches were as selective as mismatch-containing duplexes. We also report allele-selective inhibition by duplex RNAs containing unlocked nucleic acids or abasic substitutions, although selectivities are not as high. Five compounds that showed >8-fold allele selectivity for mutant ATN-1 were also selective for inhibiting the expression of two other trinucleotide repeat disease genes, ataxin-3 (ATXN-3) and huntingtin (HTT). These data demonstrate that the expanded trinucleotide repeat within ATN-1 mRNA is a potential target for compounds designed to achieve allele-selective inhibition of ATN-1 protein, and one agent may allow the targeting of multiple disease genes. PMID:24981774

  19. Position-dependent effects on stability in tricyclo-DNA modified oligonucleotide duplexes

    PubMed Central

    Ittig, Damian; Gerber, Anna-Barbara; Leumann, Christian J.

    2011-01-01

    A series of oligodeoxyribonucleotides and oligoribonucleotides containing single and multiple tricyclo(tc)-nucleosides in various arrangements were prepared and the thermal and thermodynamic transition profiles of duplexes with complementary DNA and RNA evaluated. Tc-residues aligned in a non-continuous fashion in an RNA strand significantly decrease affinity to complementary RNA and DNA, mostly as a consequence of a loss of pairing enthalpy ΔH. Arranging the tc-residues in a continuous fashion rescues Tm and leads to higher DNA and RNA affinity. Substitution of oligodeoxyribonucleotides in the same way causes much less differences in Tm when paired to complementary DNA and leads to substantial increases in Tm when paired to complementary RNA. CD-spectroscopic investigations in combination with molecular dynamics simulations of duplexes with single modifications show that tc-residues in the RNA backbone distinctly influence the conformation of the neighboring nucleotides forcing them into higher energy conformations, while tc-residues in the DNA backbone seem to have negligible influence on the nearest neighbor conformations. These results rationalize the observed affinity differences and are of relevance for the design of tc-DNA containing oligonucleotides for applications in antisense or RNAi therapy. PMID:20719742

  20. Genes and small RNA transcripts exhibit dosage-dependent expression pattern in maize copy-number alterations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Copy-number alterations are widespread in animal and plant genomes, but their immediate impact on gene expression is still unclear. In animals, copy-number alterations usually exhibit dosage effects, except for sex chromosomes that tend to be dosage compensated. In plants, genes within small duplica...

  1. Urea Mimics Nucleobases by Preserving the Helical Integrity of B-DNA Duplexes via Hydrogen Bonding and Stacking Interactions.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Gorle; Padhi, Siladitya; Patil, Indrajit; Priyakumar, U Deva

    2016-10-11

    Urea lesions are formed in DNA because of free radical damage of the thymine base, and their occurrence in DNA blocks DNA polymerases, which has deleterious consequences. Recently, it has been shown that urea is capable of forming hydrogen bonding and stacking interactions with nucleobases, which are responsible for the unfolding of RNA in aqueous urea. Base pairing and stacking are inherent properties of nucleobases; because urea is able to form both, this study attempts to investigate if urea can mimic nucleobases in the context of nucleic acid structures by examining the effect of introducing urea lesions complementary to the four different nucleobases on the overall helical integrity of B-DNA duplexes and their thermodynamic stabilities using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations resulted in stable duplexes without significant changes in the global B-DNA conformation. The urea lesions occupy intrahelical positions by forming hydrogen bonds with nitrogenous nucleobases, in agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, these urea lesions form hydrogen bonding and stacking interactions with other nucleobases of the same and partner strands, analogous to nucleobases in typical B-DNA duplexes. Direct hydrogen bond interactions are observed for the urea-purine pairs within DNA duplexes, whereas two different modes of pairing, namely, direct hydrogen bonds and water-mediated hydrogen bonds, are observed for the urea-pyrimidine pairs. The latter explains the complexities involved in interpreting the experimental nuclear magnetic resonance data reported previously. Binding free energy calculations were further performed to confirm the thermodynamic stability of the urea-incorporated DNA duplexes with respect to pure duplexes. This study suggests that urea mimics nucleobases by pairing opposite all four nucleobases and maintains the overall structure of the B-DNA duplexes.

  2. Polymorphisms in microRNA target sites influence susceptibility to schizophrenia by altering the binding of miRNAs to their targets.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yunguo; Wu, Chao N; Xu, Jiawei; Feng, Guoyin; Xing, Q H; Fu, W; Li, Chong; He, L; Zhao, X Z

    2013-10-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3' untranslated regions (3' UTRs) of genes may affect miRNA binding to messenger RNA and contribute to the risk of disease. Whether the SNPs that modify miRNA binding in the 3' UTR are involved in schizophrenia-related genes remains unclear. We selected 803 SNPs from the 3' UTRs of 425 candidate genes for schizophrenia. The potential target SNPs were recognized by Gibbs free energy of miRNA binding. Some SNPs were associated in the literature with schizophrenia or other related neurological diseases. A case-control study of nine SNPs not previously reported as significant in any disease was carried out in a Chinese-Han cohort. We found that rs3219151 (C>T, GABRA6) showed significant decreased risk for schizophrenia (OR=0.8121, p=0.008, p(adjust)=0.03). Further, two putative target SNPs, rs165599 (COMT) and rs10759 (RGS4) reported in several references previously, were selected for analysis by luciferase assay to determine their modification to miRNA binding. We found that miR-124 showed significantly repressed 3' UTR binding to RGS4 mRNA from the rs10759-C allele (p<0.05). Our results suggest that rs3219151 of GABRA6 was associated significantly to decrease the risk of schizophrenia, rs10759 (RGS4) was possible to increase the risk of schizophrenia by miRNA altering the binding of miRNAs to their targets influencing susceptibility to schizophrenia.

  3. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-10-29

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging.

  4. The RNA Splicing Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim; Chabot, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The number of factors known to participate in the DNA damage response (DDR) has expanded considerably in recent years to include splicing and alternative splicing factors. While the binding of splicing proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes to nascent transcripts prevents genomic instability by deterring the formation of RNA/DNA duplexes, splicing factors are also recruited to, or removed from, sites of DNA damage. The first steps of the DDR promote the post-translational modification of splicing factors to affect their localization and activity, while more downstream DDR events alter their expression. Although descriptions of molecular mechanisms remain limited, an emerging trend is that DNA damage disrupts the coupling of constitutive and alternative splicing with the transcription of genes involved in DNA repair, cell-cycle control and apoptosis. A better understanding of how changes in splice site selection are integrated into the DDR may provide new avenues to combat cancer and delay aging. PMID:26529031

  5. Sequence-Selective Formation of Synthetic H-Bonded Duplexes.

    PubMed

    Stross, Alexander E; Iadevaia, Giulia; Núñez-Villanueva, Diego; Hunter, Christopher A

    2017-09-13

    Oligomers equipped with a sequence of phenol and pyridine N-oxide groups form duplexes via H-bonding interactions between these recognition units. Reductive amination chemistry was used to synthesize all possible 3-mer sequences: AAA, AAD, ADA, DAA, ADD, DAD, DDA, and DDD. Pairwise interactions between the oligomers were investigated using NMR titration and dilution experiments in toluene. The measured association constants vary by 3 orders of magnitude (10(2) to 10(5) M(-1)). Antiparallel sequence-complementary oligomers generally form more stable complexes than mismatched duplexes. Mismatched duplexes that have an excess of H-bond donors are stabilized by the interaction of two phenol donors with one pyridine N-oxide acceptor. Oligomers that have a H-bond donor and acceptor on the ends of the chain can fold to form intramolecular H-bonds in the free state. The 1,3-folding equilibrium competes with duplex formation and lowers the stability of duplexes involving these sequences. As a result, some of the mismatch duplexes are more stable than some of the sequence-complementary duplexes. However, the most stable mismatch duplexes contain DDD and compete with the most stable sequence-complementary duplex, AAA·DDD, so in mixtures that contain all eight sequences, sequence-complementary duplexes dominate. Even higher fidelity sequence selectivity can be achieved if alternating donor-acceptor sequences are avoided.

  6. Development of internally controlled duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays for the detection of microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed

    Clancy, Eoin; Coughlan, Helena; Higgins, Owen; Boo, Teck Wee; Cormican, Martin; Barrett, Louise; Smith, Terry J; Reddington, Kate; Barry, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    Three duplex molecular beacon based real-time Nucleic Acid Sequence Based Amplification (NASBA) assays have been designed and experimentally validated targeting RNA transcripts for the detection and identification of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae respectively. Each real-time NASBA diagnostics assay includes an endogenous non-competitive Internal Amplification Control (IAC) to amplify the splice variant 1 mRNA of the Homo sapiens TBP gene from human total RNA. All three duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays were determined to be 100% specific for the target species tested for. Also the Limits of Detection (LODs) for the H. influenzae, N. meningitidis and S. pneumoniae duplex real-time NASBA assays were 55.36, 0.99, and 57.24 Cell Equivalents (CE) respectively. These robust duplex real-time NASBA diagnostics assays have the potential to be used in a clinical setting for the rapid (<60min) specific detection and identification of the most prominent microorganisms associated with bacterial meningitis in humans.

  7. Cis-acting single nucleotide polymorphisms alter MicroRNA-mediated regulation of human brain-expressed transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Shyam; Coffin, Stephanie L.; Tang, Tin-Yun; Jobaliya, Chintan D.; Spengler, Ryan M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Substantial variability exists in the presentation of complex neurological disorders, and the study of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) has shed light on disease mechanisms and pathophysiological variability in some cases. However, the vast majority of disease-linked SNPs have unidentified pathophysiological relevance. Here, we tested the hypothesis that SNPs within the miRNA recognition element (MRE; the region of the target transcript to which the miRNA binds) can impart changes in the expression of those genes, either by enhancing or reducing transcript and protein levels. To test this, we cross-referenced 7,153 miRNA-MRE brain interactions with the SNP database (dbSNP) to identify candidates, and functionally assessed 24 SNPs located in the 3’UTR or the coding sequence (CDS) of targets. For over half of the candidates tested, SNPs either enhanced (4 genes) or disrupted (10 genes) miRNA binding and target regulation. Additionally, SNPs causing a shift from a common to rare codon within the CDS facilitated miRNA binding downstream of the SNP, dramatically repressing target gene expression. The biological activity of the SNPs on miRNA regulation was also confirmed in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. These studies strongly support the notion that SNPs in the 3’UTR or the coding sequence of disease-relevant genes may be important in disease pathogenesis and should be reconsidered as candidate modifiers. PMID:28171541

  8. Altered microRNA expression and pre-mRNA splicing events reveal new mechanisms associated with early stage Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guanxiang; Malmuthuge, Nilusha; Guan, Yongjuan; Ren, Yuwei; Griebel, Philip J; Guan, Le Luo

    2016-04-22

    The molecular regulatory mechanisms of host responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection during the early subclinical stage are still not clear. In this study, surgically isolated ileal segments in newborn calves (n = 5) were used to establish in vivo MAP infection adjacent to an uninfected control intestinal compartment. RNA-Seq was used to profile the whole transcriptome (mRNAs) and the microRNAome (miRNAs) of ileal tissues collected at one-month post-infection. The most related function of the differentially expressed mRNAs between infected and uninfected tissues was "proliferation of endothelial cells", indicating that MAP infection may lead to the over-proliferation of endothelial cells. In addition, 46.2% of detected mRNAs displayed alternative splicing events. The pre-mRNA of two genes related to macrophage maturation (monocyte to macrophage differentiation-associated) and lysosome function (adenosine deaminase) showed differential alternative splicing events, suggesting that specific changes in the pre-mRNA splicing sites may be a mechanism by which MAP escapes host immune responses. Moreover, 9 miRNAs were differentially expressed after MAP infection. The integrated analysis of microRNAome and transcriptome revealed that these miRNAs might regulate host responses to MAP infection, such as "proliferation of endothelial cells" (bta-miR-196 b), "bacteria recognition" (bta-miR-146 b), and "regulation of the inflammatory response" (bta-miR-146 b).

  9. Dislocation substructure in fatigued duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Polak, J. . Lab. de Mecanique de Lille Inst. of Physical Metallurgy, Brno . Academy of Sciences); Degallaix, S. . Lab. de Mecanique de Lille); Kruml, T. . Academy of Sciences)

    1993-12-15

    Cyclic plastic straining of crystalline materials results in the formation of specific dislocation structures. Considerable progress in mapping and understanding internal dislocation structures has been achieved by studying single crystal behavior: however, most structural materials have a polycrystalline structure and investigations of polycrystals in comparison to single crystal behavior of simple metals prove to be very useful in understanding more complex materials. There are some classes of materials, however, with complicated structure which do not have a direct equivalent in single crystalline form. Moreover, the specific dimensions and shapes of individual crystallites play an important role both in the cyclic stress-strain response of these materials and in the formation of their interior structure in cyclic straining. Austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel, which is a kind of a natural composite, is a material of this type. The widespread interest in the application of duplex steels is caused by approximately doubled mechanical properties and equal corrosion properties, when compared with classical austenitic stainless steels. Fatigue resistance of these steels as well as the surface damage evolution in cyclic straining have been studied; however, much less is known about the internal substructure development in cyclic straining. In this study the dislocation arrangement in ferritic and austenitic grains of the austenitic-ferritic duplex steel alloyed with nitrogen and cyclically strained with two strain amplitudes, is reported and compared to the dislocation arrangement found in single and polycrystals of austenitic and ferritic materials of a similar composition and with the surface relief produced in cyclic plastic straining.

  10. Spontaneous running wheel improves cognitive functions of mouse associated with miRNA expressional alteration in hippocampus following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bao, Tian-hao; Miao, Wei; Han, Jian-hong; Yin, Mei; Yan, Yong; Wang, Wei-wei; Zhu, Yu-hong

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an insult to the brain that results in impairments of cognitive and physical functioning. Both of human research and animal studies demonstrate that spontaneous exercise can facilitate neuronal plasticity and improve cognitive function in normal or TBI rodent models. However, the possible mechanisms underlying are still not well known. We postulated that spontaneous running wheel (RW) altered microRNA (miRNA) expressions in hippocampus of mice following TBI, which might be associated with the improvement in cognitive functions. In the present study, acquisition of spatial learning and memory retention was assessed by using the Morris water maze (MWM) test on days 15 post RW exercise. Then, microarray analyses in miRNA files were employed, and the expressional changes of miRNAs in the hippocampus of mice were detected. The results showed that spontaneous RW exercise (i) recovered the hippocampus-related cognitive deficits induced by TBI, (ii) altered hippocampal expressions of miRNAs in both of sham and TBI mice, and (iii) miR-21 or miR-34a was associated with the recovery process. The present results indicated that an epigenetic mechanism might be involved in voluntary exercise-induced cognitive improvement of mice that suffered from TBI.

  11. Acute heat stress up-regulates neuropeptide Y precursor mRNA expression and alters brain and plasma concentrations of free amino acids in chicks.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kentaro; Bahry, Mohammad A; Hui, Yang; Furuse, Mitsuhiro; Chowdhury, Vishwajit S

    2015-09-01

    Heat stress causes an increase in body temperature and reduced food intake in chickens. Several neuropeptides and amino acids play a vital role in the regulation of food intake. However, the responses of neuropeptides and amino acids to heat-stress-induced food-intake regulation are poorly understood. In the current study, the hypothalamic mRNA expression of some neuropeptides related to food intake and the content of free amino acids in the brain and plasma was examined in 14-day-old chicks exposed to a high ambient temperature (HT; 40±1 °C for 2 or 5 h) or to a control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30±1 °C). HT significantly increased rectal temperature and plasma corticosterone level and suppressed food intake. HT also increased the expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and agouti-signaling protein (ASIP) precursor mRNA, while no change was observed in pro-opiomelanocortin, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, or corticotropin-releasing hormone precursor mRNA. It was further found that the diencephalic content of free amino acids - namely, tryptophan, leucine, isoleucine, valine and serine - was significantly higher in HT chicks with some alterations in their plasma amino acids in comparison with CT chicks. The induction of NPY and ASIP expression and the alteration of some free amino acids during HT suggest that these changes can be the results or causes the suppression of food intake.

  12. Alteration of c-Fos mRNA in the accessory lobe of crayfish is associated with a conditioned-cocaine induced reward.

    PubMed

    Nathaniel, Thomas I; Panksepp, Jaak; Huber, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The major molecular and anatomical substrates of drug related reward in mammals have received considerable attention. In contrast, molecular mechanisms and specific neuroanatomical targets of drug associated reward in invertebrate models of drug addiction have gone largely unexplored. With a modular nervous system amenable to molecular techniques, crayfish offer a novel system for simultaneously exploring molecular mechanism and neuroanatomical targets of cocaine-induced reward in an invertebrate system. We aimed to determine whether novelty in a cocaine-paired stimulus is accompanied by changes in c-Fos mRNA in the accessory lobe of crayfish. The first set of experiments revealed that cocaine-conditioned animals demonstrated reward in a drug-paired compartment in contrast to saline-conditioned animals. Following the expression of reward, we designed a second set of experiments to determine context-specificity of the cocaine-conditioned novelty effect in altering c-Fos mRNA expression in the accessory lobe of cocaine treated crayfish. This is the first report that characterized context-specific alteration of c-Fos mRNA expression in the accessory lobe of crayfish during drug-induced reward. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  13. RNA-seq Analysis of δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-treated T Cells Reveals Altered Gene Expression Profiles That Regulate Immune Response and Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaoming; Bam, Marpe; Nagarkatti, Prakash S.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2016-01-01

    Marijuana has drawn significant public attention and concern both for its medicinal and recreational use. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the main bioactive component in marijuana, has also been shown to possess potent anti-inflammatory properties by virtue of its ability to activate cannabinoid receptor-2 (CB-2) expressed on immune cells. In this study, we used RNA-seq to quantify the transcriptomes and transcript variants that are differentially regulated by THC in super antigen-activated lymph node cells and CD4+ T cells. We found that the expressions of many transcripts were altered by THC in both total lymph node cells and CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, the abundance of many miRNA precursors and long non-coding RNAs was dramatically altered in THC-treated mice. For example, the expression of miR-17/92 cluster and miR-374b/421 cluster was down-regulated by THC. On the other hand miR-146a, which has been shown to induce apoptosis, was up-regulated by THC. Long non-coding RNAs that are expressed from the opposite strand of CD27 and Appbp2 were induced by THC. In addition, THC treatment also caused alternative promoter usage and splicing. The functions of those altered transcripts were mainly related to immune response and cell proliferation. PMID:27268054

  14. A general strategy to inhibiting viral −1 frameshifting based on upstream attenuation duplex formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao-Teng; Cho, Che-Pei; Lin, Ya-Hui; Chang, Kung-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Viral −1 programmed ribosomal frameshifting (PRF) as a potential antiviral target has attracted interest because many human viral pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and coronaviruses, rely on −1 PRF for optimal propagation. Efficient eukaryotic −1 PRF requires an optimally placed stimulator structure downstream of the frameshifting site and different strategies targeting viral −1 PRF stimulators have been developed. However, accessing particular −1 PRF stimulator information represents a bottle-neck in combating the emerging epidemic viral pathogens such as Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). Recently, an RNA hairpin upstream of frameshifting site was shown to act as a cis-element to attenuate −1 PRF with mechanism unknown. Here, we show that an upstream duplex formed in-trans, by annealing an antisense to its complementary mRNA sequence upstream of frameshifting site, can replace an upstream hairpin to attenuate −1 PRF efficiently. This finding indicates that the formation of a proximal upstream duplex is the main determining factor responsible for −1 PRF attenuation and provides mechanistic insight. Additionally, the antisense-mediated upstream duplex approach downregulates −1 PRF stimulated by distinct −1 PRF stimulators, including those of MERS-CoV, suggesting its general application potential as a robust means to evaluating viral −1 PRF inhibition as soon as the sequence information of an emerging human coronavirus is available. PMID:26612863

  15. Real-time fluorescence assays to monitor duplex unwinding and ATPase activities of helicases.