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Sample records for altered modified histone

  1. Nucleosome alterations caused by mutations at modifiable histone residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongde; Wang, Pingyan; Liu, Lingjie; Min, Zhu; Luo, Kun; Wan, Yakun

    2015-10-26

    Nucleosome organization exhibits dynamic properties depending on the cell state and environment. Histone proteins, fundamental components of nucleosomes, are subject to chemical modifications on particular residues. We examined the effect of substituting modifiable residues of four core histones with the non-modifiable residue alanine on nucleosome dynamics. We mapped the genome-wide nucleosomes in 22 histone mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the nucleosome alterations relative to the wild-type strain. Our results indicated that different types of histone mutation resulted in different phenotypes and a distinct reorganization of nucleosomes. Nucleosome occupancy was altered at telomeres, but not at centromeres. The first nucleosomes upstream (-1) and downstream (+1) of the transcription start site (TSS) were more dynamic than other nucleosomes. Mutations in histones affected the nucleosome array downstream of the TSS. Highly expressed genes, such as ribosome genes and genes involved in glycolysis, showed increased nucleosome occupancy in many types of histone mutant. In particular, the H3K56A mutant exhibited a high percentage of dynamic genomic regions, decreased nucleosome occupancy at telomeres, increased occupancy at the +1 and -1 nucleosomes, and a slow growth phenotype under stress conditions. Our findings provide insight into the influence of histone mutations on nucleosome dynamics.

  2. Nucleosome alterations caused by mutations at modifiable histone residues in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongde; Wang, Pingyan; Liu, Lingjie; Min, Zhu; Luo, Kun; Wan, Yakun

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome organization exhibits dynamic properties depending on the cell state and environment. Histone proteins, fundamental components of nucleosomes, are subject to chemical modifications on particular residues. We examined the effect of substituting modifiable residues of four core histones with the non-modifiable residue alanine on nucleosome dynamics. We mapped the genome-wide nucleosomes in 22 histone mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and compared the nucleosome alterations relative to the wild-type strain. Our results indicated that different types of histone mutation resulted in different phenotypes and a distinct reorganization of nucleosomes. Nucleosome occupancy was altered at telomeres, but not at centromeres. The first nucleosomes upstream (−1) and downstream (+1) of the transcription start site (TSS) were more dynamic than other nucleosomes. Mutations in histones affected the nucleosome array downstream of the TSS. Highly expressed genes, such as ribosome genes and genes involved in glycolysis, showed increased nucleosome occupancy in many types of histone mutant. In particular, the H3K56A mutant exhibited a high percentage of dynamic genomic regions, decreased nucleosome occupancy at telomeres, increased occupancy at the +1 and −1 nucleosomes, and a slow growth phenotype under stress conditions. Our findings provide insight into the influence of histone mutations on nucleosome dynamics. PMID:26498326

  3. Histone Modifier Genes Alter Conotruncal Heart Phenotypes in 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Guo, Tingwei; Chung, Jonathan H; Wang, Tao; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Kates, Wendy R; Hawuła, Wanda; Coleman, Karlene; Zackai, Elaine; Emanuel, Beverly S; Morrow, Bernice E

    2015-12-03

    We performed whole exome sequence (WES) to identify genetic modifiers on 184 individuals with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), of whom 89 case subjects had severe congenital heart disease (CHD) and 95 control subjects had normal hearts. Three genes including JMJD1C (jumonji domain containing 1C), RREB1 (Ras responsive element binding protein 1), and SEC24C (SEC24 family member C) had rare (MAF < 0.001) predicted deleterious single-nucleotide variations (rdSNVs) in seven case subjects and no control subjects (p = 0.005; Fisher exact and permutation tests). Because JMJD1C and RREB1 are involved in chromatin modification, we investigated other histone modification genes. Eighteen case subjects (20%) had rdSNVs in four genes (JMJD1C, RREB1, MINA, KDM7A) all involved in demethylation of histones (H3K9, H3K27). Overall, rdSNVs were enriched in histone modifier genes that activate transcription (Fisher exact p = 0.0004, permutations, p = 0.0003, OR = 5.16); however, rdSNVs in control subjects were not enriched. This implicates histone modification genes as influencing risk for CHD in presence of the deletion.

  4. Histone modifying enzymes: novel disease biomarkers and assay development.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2016-01-01

    Histones are the chief components of chromatin. When being catalyzed by a series of histone modifying enzymes, histones may undergo various post-translational modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitylation and SUMOylation. The dysregulation of histone modifying enzymes will alter the histone post-modification patterns and cause diverse diseases including cancers. Consequently, the histone modifying enzymes have emerged as the promising biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis. In this review, we summarize the recent researches about the histone modifying enzymes as the disease biomarkers, and highlight the development of methods for histone modifying enzyme assays.

  5. Chemical and semisynthesis of modified histones.

    PubMed

    Maity, Suman Kumar; Jbara, Muhammad; Brik, Ashraf

    2016-05-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones play critical roles in the epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic genome by directly altering the biophysical properties of chromatin or by recruiting effector proteins. The large number of PTMs and the inherent complexity in their population and signaling processes make it highly challenging to understand epigenetics-related processes. To address these challenges, accesses to homogeneously modified histones are obligatory. Over the last decade, synthetic protein chemists have been devising novel synthetic tools and applying state-of-the-art chemoselective ligation strategies to prepare precious materials useful in answering fundamental questions in this area. In this short review, we cover some of the recent breakthroughs in these directions in particular the synthesis and semi-synthesis of modified histones and their use to unravel the mysteries of epigenetics. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Maternal nutrition during the first 50 days of gestation alters expression of histone and histone modifying genes in bovine fetal liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During the first 50 d of gestation, organogenesis is taking place. Nutritional influences during this time may alter the mammalian phenotype through affecting gene regulatory mechanisms, thus “programming” potential susceptibilities to chronic disease and metabolic issues into the animal’s genome. W...

  7. Substrate Specificity Profiling of Histone-Modifying Enzymes by Peptide Microarray.

    PubMed

    Cornett, E M; Dickson, B M; Vaughan, R M; Krishnan, S; Trievel, R C; Strahl, B D; Rothbart, S B

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic addition and removal of covalent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on histone proteins serves as a major mechanism regulating chromatin-templated biological processes in eukaryotic genomes. Histone PTMs and their combinations function by directly altering the physical structure of chromatin and as rheostats for effector protein interactions. In this chapter, we detail microarray-based methods for analyzing the substrate specificity of lysine methyltransferase and demethylase enzymes on immobilized synthetic histone peptides. Consistent with the "histone code" hypothesis, we reveal a strong influence of adjacent and, surprisingly, distant histone PTMs on the ability of histone-modifying enzymes to methylate or demethylate their substrates. This platform will greatly facilitate future investigations into histone substrate specificity and mechanisms of PTM signaling that regulate the catalytic properties of histone-modifying enzymes.

  8. Substrate Specificity Profiling of Histone-Modifying Enzymes by Peptide Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Cornett, E.M.; Dickson, B.M.; Vaughan, R.M.; Krishnan, S.; Trievel, R.C.; Strahl, B.D.; Rothbart, S.B.

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic addition and removal of covalent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on histone proteins serves as a major mechanism regulating chromatin-templated biological processes in eukaryotic genomes. Histone PTMs and their combinations function by directly altering the physical structure of chromatin and as rheostats for effector protein interactions. In this chapter, we detail microarray-based methods for analyzing the substrate specificity of lysine methyltransferase and demethylase enzymes on immobilized synthetic histone peptides. Consistent with the “histone code” hypothesis, we reveal a strong influenceof adjacent and,surprisingly,distant histonePTMs onthe ability of histone-modifying enzymes to methylate or demethylate their substrates. This platform will greatly facilitate future investigations into histone substrate specificity and mechanisms of PTM signaling that regulate the catalytic properties of histone-modifying enzymes. PMID:27423856

  9. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies. PMID:25365782

  10. Alterations of histone modifications by cobalt compounds

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Ke, Qingdong; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effects of CoCl2 on multiple histone modifications at the global level. We found that in both human lung carcinoma A549 cells and human bronchial epithelial Beas-2B cells, exposure to CoCl2 (≥200 μM) for 24 h increased H3K4me3, H3K9me2, H3K9me3, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, uH2A and uH2B but decreased acetylation at histone H4 (AcH4). Further investigation demonstrated that in A549 cells, the increase in H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 by cobalt ions exposure was probably through enhancing histone methylation processes, as methionine-deficient medium blocked the induction of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 by cobalt ions, whereas cobalt ions increased H3K9me3 and H3K36me3 by directly inhibiting JMJD2A demethylase activity in vitro, which was probably due to the competition of cobalt ions with iron for binding to the active site of JMJD2A. Furthermore, in vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays revealed that the cobalt-induced histone H2A and H2B ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of deubiquitinating enzyme activity. Microarray data showed that exposed to 200 μM of CoCl2 for 24 h, A549 cells not only increased but also decreased expression of hundreds of genes involved in different cellular functions, including tumorigenesis. This study is the first to demonstrate that cobalt ions altered epigenetic homeostasis in cells. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in cobalt-induced alteration of histone modifications, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis since cobalt at higher concentrations is a known carcinogen. PMID:19376846

  11. Interaction of calmodulin with histones. Alteration of histone dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Wolff, D J; Ross, J M; Thompson, P N; Brostrom, M A; Brostrom, C O

    1981-02-25

    The Ca2+-dependent regulator protein (CDR), also frequently termed "calmodulin" was determined to influence the dephosphorylation of mixed calf thymus histones or purified histones 1, 2A, or 2B by a partially purified bovine brain phosphoprotein phosphatase. CDR increase the rate of dephosphorylation of mixed histones more than 20-fold. With increasing concentrations of mixed histones as substrate, a proportionate increase of CDR concentration was required to maintain maximal expression of histone phosphatase activity. Mixed histones suppressed the activation by CDR of a bovine brain cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity, with activation being restored by increased quantities of CDR. Dephosphorylation of casein and phosphorylase alpha by the phosphatase preparation was not affected by CDR. These observations support the interpretation that the effects of CDR on histone dephosphorylation are substrate-directed. The rates of dephosphorylation of histones 1, 2A, and 2B by the phosphatase were 4- to 12-fold more rapid at low (sub-micromolar) concentrations of free Ca2+ than at high (200 microM) Ca2+ in incubations containing CDR, but they were unaffected by Ca2+ in incubations without CDR. The addition of stoichiometric quantities of calmodulin increased the apparent Km of the phosphatase for the various histones 2- to 6-fold, while maximal velocities were 4- to 12-fold higher at low than at high added Ca2+. The inhibitory effect of Ca2+ on histone dephosphorylation was immediately reversible by chelation of Ca2+ with EDTA. Ca2+-dependent inhibition of histone 1 or 2B phosphatase activities was also produced by rabbit skeletal muscle troponin C, but not by rabbit skeletal muscle parvalbumin, by poly(L-aspartate) or poly(L-glutamate). The phosphorylated fragment from the NH2-terminal region of either H2A (generated by treatment with N-bromosuccinimide) or H2B (generated by treatment with cyanogen bromide) was dephosphorylated by the phosphatase, with the rates of

  12. The Role of Histone Protein Modifications and Mutations in Histone Modifiers in Pediatric B-Cell Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Janczar, Szymon; Janczar, Karolina; Pastorczak, Agata; Harb, Hani; Paige, Adam J. W.; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Danilewicz, Marian; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    While cancer has been long recognized as a disease of the genome, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in neoplasia was acknowledged more recently. The most active epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone protein modifications and they are involved in basic biological phenomena in every cell. Their role in tumorigenesis is stressed by recent unbiased large-scale studies providing evidence that several epigenetic modifiers are recurrently mutated or frequently dysregulated in multiple cancers. The interest in epigenetic marks is especially due to the fact that they are potentially reversible and thus druggable. In B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) there is a relative paucity of reports on the role of histone protein modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation) as compared to acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell ALL, or other hematologic cancers, and in this setting chromatin modifications are relatively less well studied and reviewed than DNA methylation. In this paper, we discuss the biomarker associations and evidence for a driver role of dysregulated global and loci-specific histone marks, as well as mutations in epigenetic modifiers in BCP-ALL. Examples of chromatin modifiers recurrently mutated/disrupted in BCP-ALL and associated with disease outcomes include MLL1, CREBBP, NSD2, and SETD2. Altered histone marks and histone modifiers and readers may play a particular role in disease chemoresistance and relapse. We also suggest that epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation may have parallel roles in leukemogenesis. PMID:28054944

  13. Oxidative stress alters global histone modification and DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Niu, Yingmei; DesMarais, Thomas L; Tong, Zhaohui; Yao, Yixin; Costa, Max

    2015-05-01

    The JmjC domain-containing histone demethylases can remove histone lysine methylation and thereby regulate gene expression. The JmjC domain uses iron Fe(II) and α-ketoglutarate (αKG) as cofactors in an oxidative demethylation reaction via hydroxymethyl lysine. We hypothesize that reactive oxygen species will oxidize Fe(II) to Fe(III), thereby attenuating the activity of JmjC domain-containing histone demethylases. To minimize secondary responses from cells, extremely short periods of oxidative stress (3h) were used to investigate this question. Cells that were exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for 3h exhibited increases in several histone methylation marks including H3K4me3 and decreases of histone acetylation marks including H3K9ac and H4K8ac; preincubation with ascorbate attenuated these changes. The oxidative stress level was measured by generation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein, GSH/GSSG ratio, and protein carbonyl content. A cell-free system indicated that H2O2 inhibited histone demethylase activity where increased Fe(II) rescued this inhibition. TET protein showed a decreased activity under oxidative stress. Cells exposed to a low-dose and long-term (3 weeks) oxidative stress also showed increased global levels of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3. However, these global methylation changes did not persist after washout. The cells exposed to short-term oxidative stress also appeared to have higher activity of class I/II histone deacetylase (HDAC) but not class III HDAC. In conclusion, we have found that oxidative stress transiently alters the epigenetic program process through modulating the activity of enzymes responsible for demethylation and deacetylation of histones.

  14. Histone-modifying genes as biomarkers in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Shih-Ya; Lin, Hui-Hua; Yeh, Kun-Tu; Chang, Jan-Gowth

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the world’s fifth most common cancer and second leading cause of cancer-related death in Taiwan. Over 600,000 HCC patients die each year worldwide despite recent advances in surgical techniques and medical treatments. Epigenetic regulations including DNA methylation and histone modification control gene expressions and play important roles during tumorigenesis. This study evaluates association between histone-modifying genes and prognosis of HCC to ferret out new diagnostic markers. We collected 50 paired HCC and adjacent non-cancerous tissues from Taiwanese patients for survey by RT-qPCR and tissue microarray-based immunohistochemistry (TMA-based IHC) staining. RT-qPCR data showed four of twenty-four genes over eightfold up-regulated in tumor tissues: e.g., histone phosphorylation gene-ARK2, methylation genes-G9a, SUV39H2, and EZH2 (n = 50, all p < 0.0001). Results of TMA-based IHC staining showed proteins of ARK2, EZH2, G9a, and SUV39H2 also overexpressed in tumor tissues. Staining intensity of SUV39H2 correlated with HCV infection (p = 0.025). We further restricted the analysis only in tumor tissues, we found EZH2 staining intensity associated with tumor stage (p = 0.016) and survival (p = 0.007); SUV39H2 intensity associated with tumor stage (p = 0.044). Our findings indicate overexpression of histone-modifying genes EZH2 and SUV39H2 associated with prognosis of HCC cases. EZH2 expression can serve as a novel prognostic biomarker during HCC progression among Taiwanese. PMID:24966962

  15. DNA damage response induces structural alterations in histone H3–H4

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Yudai; Fujii, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Matsuo, Koichi; Namatame, Hirofumi; Taniguchi, Masaki; Yokoya, Akinari

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation circular-dichroism spectroscopy was used to reveal that the DNA damage response induces a decrement of α-helix and an increment of β-strand contents of histone H3–H4 extracted from X-ray–irradiated human HeLa cells. The trend of the structural alteration was qualitatively opposite to that of our previously reported results for histone H2A–H2B. These results strongly suggest that histones share roles in DNA damage responses, particularly in DNA repair processes and chromatin remodeling, via a specific structural alteration of each histone. PMID:27672100

  16. Epigenetics--an epicenter of gene regulation: histones and histone-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Biel, Markus; Wascholowski, Veit; Giannis, Athanassios

    2005-05-20

    The treatment of cancer through the development of new therapies is one of the most important challenges of our time. The decoding of the human genome has yielded important insights into the molecular basis of physical disorders, and in most cases a connection between failures in specific genes and the resulting clinical symptoms can be made. The modulation of epigenetic mechanisms enables, by definition, the alteration of cellular phenotype without altering the genotype. The information content of a single gene can be crucial or harmful, but the prerequisite for a cellular effect is active gene transcription. To this end, epigenetic mechanisms play a very important role, and the transcription of a given gene is directly influenced by the modification pattern of the surrounding histone proteins as well as the methylation pattern of the DNA. These processes are effected by different enzymes which can be directly influenced through the development of specific modulators. Of course, all genetic information is written as a four-character code in DNA. However, epigenetics describes the art of reading between the lines.

  17. Introns in histone genes alter the distribution of 3' ends.

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, N B; Chodchoy, N; Liu, T J; Marzluff, W F

    1990-01-01

    Chimeric genes were constructed which contained either a histone or globin promoter, a human alpha-globin coding region as a cDNA or containing one or both intervening sequences, and the 3' end of a mouse histone H2a gene. The genes were introduced into mouse L cells or Chinese Hamster Ovary cells. The genes containing at least one intervening sequence produced two mRNAs in about equal amounts, one which ended at a cryptic polyadenylation site 33 nucleotides 3' to the normal histone mRNA 3' end and one which ended at the normal histone 3' end. In contrast, the same construct containing a globin cDNA yielded mRNA ending only at the correct histone 3' end. Similar proportions of polyadenylated and non-polyadenylated mRNA were obtained when the cryptic polyadenylation signal was replaced with the globin polyadenylation signal. More than 90% of the transcripts were accurately spliced. All of the unspliced transcripts had histone 3' ends. Images PMID:2356116

  18. A Sex-Influenced Modifier in Drosophila That Affects a Broad Spectrum of Target Loci Including the Histone Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, U.; Pal-Bhadra, M.; Birchler, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    A second chromosomal trans-acting modifier, Lightener of white (Low), modulates the phenotypic expression of various alleles of the white eye color gene. This modifier has an unusually broad spectrum of affected genes including white, brown, scarlet and the eye developmental genes, Bar and Lobe. In addition, Low weakly suppresses position effect variegation. Northern blot hybridization with different X and autosomal probes reveals that Low modulates genes of independent expression patterns. Interestingly, many of the modulations of gene expression are developmentally restricted and differ in intensity between the sexes. Low also elevates the expression of the histone tandem repeats in three distinct developmental stages. A deficiency encompassing the histone cluster reduces their transcript levels and significantly alters the expression of some of the tested genes. Thus, Low is a modifier that plays a role in modulating the expression of genes governing various processes including pigment deposition, eye development, chromosomal proteins and position effect variegation. PMID:9215896

  19. Histone H3 phosphorylation near the nucleosome dyad alters chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    North, Justin A; Šimon, Marek; Ferdinand, Michelle B; Shoffner, Matthew A; Picking, Jonathan W; Howard, Cecil J; Mooney, Alex M; van Noort, John; Poirier, Michael G; Ottesen, Jennifer J

    2014-04-01

    Nucleosomes contain ∼146 bp of DNA wrapped around a histone protein octamer that controls DNA accessibility to transcription and repair complexes. Posttranslational modification (PTM) of histone proteins regulates nucleosome function. To date, only modest changes in nucleosome structure have been directly attributed to histone PTMs. Histone residue H3(T118) is located near the nucleosome dyad and can be phosphorylated. This PTM destabilizes nucleosomes and is implicated in the regulation of transcription and repair. Here, we report gel electrophoretic mobility, sucrose gradient sedimentation, thermal disassembly, micrococcal nuclease digestion and atomic force microscopy measurements of two DNA-histone complexes that are structurally distinct from nucleosomes. We find that H3(T118ph) facilitates the formation of a nucleosome duplex with two DNA molecules wrapped around two histone octamers, and an altosome complex that contains one DNA molecule wrapped around two histone octamers. The nucleosome duplex complex forms within short ∼150 bp DNA molecules, whereas altosomes require at least ∼250 bp of DNA and form repeatedly along 3000 bp DNA molecules. These results are the first report of a histone PTM significantly altering the nucleosome structure.

  20. Chemical and Biological Tools for the Preparation of Modified Histone Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Cecil J.; Yu, Ruixuan R.; Gardner, Miranda L.; Shimko, John C.; Ottesen, Jennifer J.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex and dynamic system in which the DNA double helix is organized and protected by interactions with histone proteins. This system is regulated through, a large network of dynamic post-translational modifications (PTMs) exists to ensure proper gene transcription, DNA repair, and other processes involving DNA. Homogenous protein samples with precisely characterized modification sites are necessary to better understand the functions of modified histone proteins. Here, we discuss sets of chemical and biological tools that have been developed for the preparation of modified histones, with a focus on the appropriate choice of tool for a given target. We start with genetic approaches for the creation of modified histones, including the incorporation of genetic mimics of histone modifications, chemical installation of modification analogs, and the use of the expanded genetic code to incorporate modified amino acids. Additionally, we will cover the chemical ligation techniques that have been invaluable in the generation of complex modified histones that are indistinguishable from the natural counterparts. Finally, we will end with a prospectus on future directions of synthetic chromatin in living systems. PMID:25863817

  1. Altered nucleosomes of active nucleolar chromatin contain accessible histone H3 in its hyperacetylated forms

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, E.M.; Sterner, R.; Allfrey, V.G.

    1987-05-25

    Chromatin of the organism Physarum polycephalum contains a class of conformationally altered nucleosomes previously localized to the transcribing regions of ribosomal genes in nucleoli. When nuclei are treated with 2-iodo(2-tritium)acetate, the histone H3 sulfhydryl group of the altered nucleosomes is derivatized while that of folded nucleosomes is not, and the labeled histones can then be identified by autoradiography of gels that separate H3 isoforms. The H3 derivatized is predominantly of tri- and tetraacetylated forms. In contrast, total free histone reacted with iodoacetate shows no preferential labeling of isoforms. Selective reaction of acetylated H3 is prevalent in both nucleolar and non-nucleolar chromatin. The results link specific patterns of H3 acetylation to changes in nucleosome conformation that occur during transcription.

  2. Modulations of DNA Contacts by Linker Histones and Post-translational Modifications Determine the Mobility and Modifiability of Nucleosomal H3 Tails.

    PubMed

    Stützer, Alexandra; Liokatis, Stamatios; Kiesel, Anja; Schwarzer, Dirk; Sprangers, Remco; Söding, Johannes; Selenko, Philipp; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2016-01-21

    Post-translational histone modifications and linker histone incorporation regulate chromatin structure and genome activity. How these systems interface on a molecular level is unclear. Using biochemistry and NMR spectroscopy, we deduced mechanistic insights into the modification behavior of N-terminal histone H3 tails in different nucleosomal contexts. We find that linker histones generally inhibit modifications of different H3 sites and reduce H3 tail dynamics in nucleosomes. These effects are caused by modulations of electrostatic interactions of H3 tails with linker DNA and largely depend on the C-terminal domains of linker histones. In agreement, linker histone occupancy and H3 tail modifications segregate on a genome-wide level. Charge-modulating modifications such as phosphorylation and acetylation weaken transient H3 tail-linker DNA interactions, increase H3 tail dynamics, and, concomitantly, enhance general modifiability. We propose that alterations of H3 tail-linker DNA interactions by linker histones and charge-modulating modifications execute basal control mechanisms of chromatin function.

  3. Defective histone supply causes condensin-dependent chromatin alterations, SAC activation and chromosome decatenation impairment

    PubMed Central

    Murillo-Pineda, Marina; Cabello-Lobato, María J.; Clemente-Ruiz, Marta; Monje-Casas, Fernando; Prado, Félix

    2014-01-01

    The structural organization of chromosomes is essential for their correct function and dynamics during the cell cycle. The assembly of DNA into chromatin provides the substrate for topoisomerases and condensins, which introduce the different levels of superhelical torsion required for DNA metabolism. In particular, Top2 and condensin are directly involved in both the resolution of precatenanes that form during replication and the formation of the intramolecular loop that detects tension at the centromeric chromatin during chromosome biorientation. Here we show that histone depletion activates the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) and impairs sister chromatid decatenation, leading to chromosome mis-segregation and lethality in the absence of the SAC. We demonstrate that histone depletion impairs chromosome biorientation and activates the Aurora-dependent pathway, which detects tension problems at the kinetochore. Interestingly, SAC activation is suppressed by the absence of Top2 and Smc2, an essential component of condensin. Indeed, smc2-8 suppresses catenanes accumulation, mitotic arrest and growth defects induced by histone depletion at semi-permissive temperature. Remarkably, SAC activation by histone depletion is associated with condensin-mediated alterations of the centromeric chromatin. Therefore, our results reveal the importance of a precise interplay between histone supply and condensin/Top2 for pericentric chromatin structure, precatenanes resolution and centromere biorientation. PMID:25300489

  4. dbHiMo: a web-based epigenomics platform for histone-modifying enzymes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Kim, Ki-Tae; Huh, Aram; Kwon, Seomun; Hong, Changyoung; Asiegbu, Fred O; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, epigenetics has evolved into a key concept for understanding regulation of gene expression. Among many epigenetic mechanisms, covalent modifications such as acetylation and methylation of lysine residues on core histones emerged as a major mechanism in epigenetic regulation. Here, we present the database for histone-modifying enzymes (dbHiMo; http://hme.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/) aimed at facilitating functional and comparative analysis of histone-modifying enzymes (HMEs). HMEs were identified by applying a search pipeline built upon profile hidden Markov model (HMM) to proteomes. The database incorporates 11,576 HMEs identified from 603 proteomes including 483 fungal, 32 plants and 51 metazoan species. The dbHiMo provides users with web-based personalized data browsing and analysis tools, supporting comparative and evolutionary genomics. With comprehensive data entries and associated web-based tools, our database will be a valuable resource for future epigenetics/epigenomics studies.

  5. Identification and characterization of histone lysine methylation modifiers in Fragaria vesca

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Tingting; Han, Yuhui; Huang, Ruirui; McAvoy, Richard J.; Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The diploid woodland strawberry (Fragaria vesca) is an important model for fruit crops because of several unique characteristics including the small genome size, an ethylene-independent fruit ripening process, and fruit flesh derived from receptacle tissues rather than the ovary wall which is more typical of fruiting plants. Histone methylation is an important factor in gene regulation in higher plants but little is known about its roles in fruit development. We have identified 45 SET methyltransferase, 22 JmjC demethylase and 4 LSD demethylase genes in F. vesca. The analysis of these histone modifiers in eight plant species supports the clustering of those genes into major classes consistent with their functions. We also provide evidence that whole genome duplication and dispersed duplications via retrotransposons may have played pivotal roles in the expansion of histone modifier genes in F. vesca. Furthermore, transcriptome data demonstrated that expression of some SET genes increase as the fruit develops and peaks at the turning stage. Meanwhile, we have observed that expression of those SET genes responds to cold and heat stresses. Our results indicate that regulation of histone methylation may play a critical role in fruit development as well as responses to abiotic stresses in strawberry. PMID:27049067

  6. Genome-wide analysis of histone modifiers in tomato: gaining an insight into their developmental roles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Histone post-translational modifications (HPTMs) including acetylation and methylation have been recognized as playing a crucial role in epigenetic regulation of plant growth and development. Although Solanum lycopersicum is a dicot model plant as well as an important crop, systematic analysis and expression profiling of histone modifier genes (HMs) in tomato are sketchy. Results Based on recently released tomato whole-genome sequences, we identified in silico 32 histone acetyltransferases (HATs), 15 histone deacetylases (HDACs), 52 histone methytransferases (HMTs) and 26 histone demethylases (HDMs), and compared them with those detected in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), maize (Zea mays) and rice (Oryza sativa) orthologs. Comprehensive analysis of the protein domain architecture and phylogeny revealed the presence of non-canonical motifs and new domain combinations, thereby suggesting for HATs the existence of a new family in plants. Due to species-specific diversification during evolutionary history tomato has fewer HMs than Arabidopsis. The transcription profiles of HMs within tomato organs revealed a broad functional role for some HMs and a more specific activity for others, suggesting key HM regulators in tomato development. Finally, we explored S. pennellii introgression lines (ILs) and integrated the map position of HMs, their expression profiles and the phenotype of ILs. We thereby proved that the strategy was useful to identify HM candidates involved in carotenoid biosynthesis in tomato fruits. Conclusions In this study, we reveal the structure, phylogeny and spatial expression of members belonging to the classical families of HMs in tomato. We provide a framework for gene discovery and functional investigation of HMs in other Solanaceae species. PMID:23356725

  7. Autoantibodies against Modified Histone Peptides in SLE Patients Are Associated with Disease Activity and Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Dieker, Jürgen; Berden, Jo H.; Bakker, Marinka; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane; Voll, Reinhard; Sjöwall, Christopher; Herrmann, Martin; Hilbrands, Luuk B.; van der Vlag, Johan

    2016-01-01

    Persistent exposure of the immune system to death cell debris leads to autoantibodies against chromatin in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Deposition of anti-chromatin/chromatin complexes can instigate inflammation in multiple organs including the kidney. Previously we identified specific cell death-associated histone modifications as targets of autoantibodies in SLE. In this study we addressed, in a large cohort of SLE patients and controls, the question whether plasma reactivities with specific histone peptides associated with serology and clinical features. Plasma from SLE patients with and without lupus nephritis, disease controls, and healthy controls, were tested in ELISA with histone H4 peptide acetylated at lysines 8, 12 and 16 (H4pac), H2B peptide acetylated at lysine 12 (H2Bpac), H3 peptide trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3pme), and their unmodified equivalents. SLE patients displayed a higher reactivity with the modified equivalent of each peptide. Reactivity with H4pac showed both a high sensitivity (89%) and specificity (91%) for SLE, while H2Bpac exhibited a high specificity (96%) but lower sensitivity (69%). Reactivity with H3pme appeared not specific for SLE. Anti-H4pac and anti-H2Bpac reactivity demonstrated a high correlation with disease activity. Moreover, patients reacting with multiple modified histone peptides exhibited higher SLEDAI and lower C3 levels. SLE patients with renal involvement showed higher reactivity with H2B/H2Bpac and a more pronounced reactivity with the modified equivalent of H3pme and H2Bpac. In conclusion, reactivity with H4pac and H2Bpac is specific for SLE patients and correlates with disease activity, whereas reactivity with H2Bpac is in particular associated with lupus nephritis. PMID:27780265

  8. Radiation-induced alterations in histone modification patterns and their potential impact on short-term radiation effects

    PubMed Central

    Friedl, Anna A.; Mazurek, Belinda; Seiler, Doris M.

    2012-01-01

    Detection and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage occur in the context of chromatin. An intricate network of mechanisms defines chromatin structure, including DNA methylation, incorporation of histone variants, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling. In the last years it became clear that the cellular response to radiation-induced DNA damage involves all of these mechanisms. Here we focus on the current knowledge on radiation-induced alterations in post-translational histone modification patterns and their effect on the chromatin accessibility, transcriptional regulation and chromosomal stability. PMID:23050241

  9. dbHiMo: a web-based epigenomics platform for histone-modifying enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaeyoung; Kim, Ki-Tae; Huh, Aram; Kwon, Seomun; Hong, Changyoung; Asiegbu, Fred O.; Jeon, Junhyun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, epigenetics has evolved into a key concept for understanding regulation of gene expression. Among many epigenetic mechanisms, covalent modifications such as acetylation and methylation of lysine residues on core histones emerged as a major mechanism in epigenetic regulation. Here, we present the database for histone-modifying enzymes (dbHiMo; http://hme.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/) aimed at facilitating functional and comparative analysis of histone-modifying enzymes (HMEs). HMEs were identified by applying a search pipeline built upon profile hidden Markov model (HMM) to proteomes. The database incorporates 11 576 HMEs identified from 603 proteomes including 483 fungal, 32 plants and 51 metazoan species. The dbHiMo provides users with web-based personalized data browsing and analysis tools, supporting comparative and evolutionary genomics. With comprehensive data entries and associated web-based tools, our database will be a valuable resource for future epigenetics/epigenomics studies. Database URL: http://hme.riceblast.snu.ac.kr/ PMID:26055100

  10. 17ß-Estradiol Regulates Histone Alterations Associated with Memory Consolidation and Increases "Bdnf" Promoter Acetylation in Middle-Aged Female Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortress, Ashley M.; Kim, Jaekyoon; Poole, Rachel L.; Gould, Thomas J.; Frick, Karyn M.

    2014-01-01

    Histone acetylation is essential for hippocampal memory formation in young adult rodents. Although dysfunctional histone acetylation has been associated with age-related memory decline in male rodents, little is known about whether histone acetylation is altered by aging in female rodents. In young female mice, the ability of 17ß-estradiol…

  11. The ZNF217 oncogene is a candidate organizer of repressive histone modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Banck, Michaela S.; Li, Side; Nishio, Hitomi; Wang, Cheng; Beutler, Andreas S.; Walsh, Martin J.

    2010-01-01

    The zinc finger protein 217 (ZNF217) is an important oncogene based on the high frequency of amplification and overexpression in many cancer types, but its molecular mode of gene regulation is poorly understood. We purified a complex of nuclear ZNF217-binding proteins by affinity chromatography and identified its components by mass spectrometry as Jarid1b/Plu-1, G9a, LSD1, CoREST and CtBP1. Individual binding of these with ZNF217 was confirmed by co-immunoprecipiation (IP). Known activities of these proteins suggested a role of the ZNF217 complex in histone modification. Using in vitro assays the following activities were demonstrated: Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethyl (H3K4me3) demethylase activity, which co-fractionated with Jarid1b/Plu-1 in anion-exchange chromatography; H3K9 methylation, the known principal activity of G9a; and H3K27 methylation. The latter suggested EZH2 as another ZNF217 binding candidate, which could be confirmed by co-IP. Taken together, these findings suggest that ZNF217 assembles a distinct set of histone modifying proteins at target DNA sites that act synergistically in transcriptional repression. PMID:19242095

  12. Arsenic alters global histone modifications in lymphocytes in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Pournara, Angeliki; Kippler, Maria; Holmlund, Teresa; Ceder, Rebecca; Grafström, Roland; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin; Wallberg, Annika E

    2016-08-01

    Arsenic, an established carcinogen and toxicant, occurs in drinking water and food and affects millions of people worldwide. Arsenic appears to interfere with gene expression through epigenetic processes, such as DNA methylation and post-translational histone modifications. We investigated the effects of arsenic on histone residues in vivo as well as in vitro. Analysis of H3K9Ac and H3K9me3 in CD4+ and CD8+ sorted blood cells from individuals exposed to arsenic through drinking water in the Argentinean Andes showed a significant decrease in global H3K9me3 in CD4+ cells, but not CD8+ cells, with increasing arsenic exposure. In vitro studies of inorganic arsenic-treated T lymphocytes (Jurkat and CCRF-CEM, 0.1, 1, and 100 μg/L) showed arsenic-related modifications of H3K9Ac and changes in the levels of the histone deacetylating enzyme HDAC2 at very low arsenic concentrations. Further, in vitro exposure of kidney HEK293 cells to arsenic (1 and 5 μM) altered the protein levels of PCNA and DNMT1, parts of a gene expression repressor complex, as well as MAML1. MAML1 co-localized and interacted with components of this complex in HEK293 cells, and in silico studies indicated that MAML1 expression correlate with HDAC2 and DNMT1 expression in kidney cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that arsenic exposure may lead to changes in the global levels of H3K9me3 and H3K9Ac in lymphocytes. Also, we show that arsenic exposure affects the expression of PCNA and DNMT1-proteins that are part of a gene expression silencing complex.

  13. Multiplex detection of histone-modifying enzymes by total internal reflection fluorescence-based single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fei; Liu, Meng; Wang, Zi-yue; Zhang, Chun-yang

    2016-01-21

    We develop a sensitive and selective method for the multiplex detection of histone-modifying enzymes (HMEs) through the integration of antibody-based fluorescence labeling with total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF)-based single-molecule detection. This method exhibits excellent specificity and high sensitivity with a detection limit of 21 pM for histone acetyltransferase GcN5 and 12 pM for histone methyltransferase G9a, and it can be applied for the screening of HME inhibitors as well.

  14. HDAC inhibition imparts beneficial transgenerational effects in Huntington's disease mice via altered DNA and histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Haiqun; Morris, Charles D.; Williams, Roy M.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Thomas, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that epigenetic factors can profoundly influence gene expression and, in turn, influence resistance or susceptibility to disease. Epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, are finding their way into clinical practice, although their exact mechanisms of action are unclear. To identify mechanisms associated with HDAC inhibition, we performed microarray analysis on brain and muscle samples treated with the HDAC1/3-targeting inhibitor, HDACi 4b. Pathways analyses of microarray datasets implicate DNA methylation as significantly associated with HDAC inhibition. Further assessment of DNA methylation changes elicited by HDACi 4b in human fibroblasts from normal controls and patients with Huntington’s disease (HD) using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip revealed a limited, but overlapping, subset of methylated CpG sites that were altered by HDAC inhibition in both normal and HD cells. Among the altered loci of Y chromosome-linked genes, KDM5D, which encodes Lys (K)-specific demethylase 5D, showed increased methylation at several CpG sites in both normal and HD cells, as well as in DNA isolated from sperm from drug-treated male mice. Further, we demonstrate that first filial generation (F1) offspring from drug-treated male HD transgenic mice show significantly improved HD disease phenotypes compared with F1 offspring from vehicle-treated male HD transgenic mice, in association with increased Kdm5d expression, and decreased histone H3 Lys4 (K4) (H3K4) methylation in the CNS of male offspring. Additionally, we show that overexpression of Kdm5d in mutant HD striatal cells significantly improves metabolic deficits. These findings indicate that HDAC inhibitors can elicit transgenerational effects, via cross-talk between different epigenetic mechanisms, to have an impact on disease phenotypes in a beneficial manner. PMID:25535382

  15. An RNA-Seq Transcriptome Analysis of Histone Modifiers and RNA Silencing Genes in Soybean during Floral Initiation Process

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Lim Chee; Singh, Mohan B.; Bhalla, Prem L.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics has been recognised to play vital roles in many plant developmental processes, including floral initiation through the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. The histone modifying proteins that mediate these modifications involve the SET domain-containing histone methyltransferases, JmjC domain-containing demethylase, acetylases and deacetylases. In addition, RNA interference (RNAi)-associated genes are also involved in epigenetic regulation via RNA-directed DNA methylation and post-transcriptional gene silencing. Soybean, a major crop legume, requires a short day to induce flowering. How histone modifications regulate the plant response to external cues that initiate flowering is still largely unknown. Here, we used RNA-seq to address the dynamics of transcripts that are potentially involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi mediated gene silencing during the floral initiation of soybean. Soybean is a paleopolyploid that has been subjected to at least two rounds of whole genome duplication events. We report that the expanded genomic repertoire of histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes in soybean includes 14 histone acetyltransferases, 24 histone deacetylases, 47 histone methyltransferases, 15 protein arginine methyltransferases, 24 JmjC domain-containing demethylases and 47 RNAi-associated genes. To investigate the role of these histone modifiers and RNA silencing genes during floral initiation, we compared the transcriptional dynamics of the leaf and shoot apical meristem at different time points after a short-day treatment. Our data reveal that the extensive activation of genes that are usually involved in the epigenetic programming and RNAi gene silencing in the soybean shoot apical meristem are reprogrammed for floral development following an exposure to inductive conditions. PMID:24147010

  16. The evolutionary history of histone H3 suggests a deep eukaryotic root of chromatin modifying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The phenotype of an organism is an outcome of both its genotype, encoding the primary sequence of proteins, and the developmental orchestration of gene expression. The substrate of gene expression in eukaryotes is the chromatin, whose fundamental units are nucleosomes composed of DNA wrapped around each two of the core histone types H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Key regulatory steps involved in the determination of chromatin conformations are posttranslational modifications (PTM) at histone tails as well as the assembly of histone variants into nucleosomal arrays. Although the mechanistic background is fragmentary understood, it appears that the chromatin signature of metazoan cell types is inheritable over generations. Even less understood is the conservation of epigenetic mechanisms among eukaryotes and their origins. Results In the light of recent progress in understanding the tree of eukaryotic life we discovered the origin of histone H3 by phylogenetic analyses of variants from all supergroups, which allowed the reconstruction of ancestral states. We found that H3 variants evolved frequently but independently within related species of almost all eukaryotic supergroups. Interestingly, we found all core histone types encoded in the genome of a basal dinoflagellate and H3 variants in two other species, although is was reported that dinoflagellate chromatin is not organized into nucleosomes. Most probably one or more animal/nuclearid H3.3-like variants gave rise to H3 variants of all opisthokonts (animals, choanozoa, fungi, nuclearids, Amoebozoa). H3.2 and H3.1 as well as H3.1t are derivatives of H3.3, whereas H3.2 evolved already in early branching animals, such as Trichoplax. H3.1 and H3.1t are probably restricted to mammals. We deduced a model for protoH3 of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) confirming a remarkable degree of sequence conservation in comparison to canonical human H3.1. We found evidence that multiple PTMs are conserved even in

  17. Histone modifying proteins Gcn5 and Hda1 affect flocculation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae during high-gravity fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dietvorst, Judith; Brandt, Anders

    2010-02-01

    The performance of yeast is often limited by the constantly changing environmental conditions present during high-gravity fermentation. Poor yeast performance contributes to incomplete and slow utilization of the main fermentable sugars which can lead to flavour problems in beer production. The expression of the FLO and MAL genes, which are important for the performance of yeast during industrial fermentations, is affected by complex proteins associated with Set1 (COMPASS) resulting in the induction of flocculation and improved maltose fermentation capacity during the early stages of high-gravity fermentation. In this study, we investigated a possible role for other histone modifying proteins. To this end, we tested a number of histone deacetylases (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases and we report that flocculation is induced in absence of the histone deacetylase Hda1 or the histone acetyltransferase Gcn5 during high-gravity fermentation. The absence of Gcn5 protein also improved utilization of high concentrations of maltose. Deletion of SIR2 encoding the HDA of the silent informator regulator complex, did not affect flocculation under high-gravity fermentation conditions. Despite the obvious roles for Hda1 and Gcn5 in flocculation, this work indicates that COMPASS mediated silencing is the most important amongst the histone modifying components to control the expression of the FLO genes during high-gravity fermentation.

  18. Insulin induced alteration in post-translational modifications of histone H3 under a hyperglycemic condition in L6 skeletal muscle myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Kabra, Dhiraj G; Gupta, Jeena; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2009-06-01

    Chromatin remodelling events, especially histone modifications are proposed to form the mainstay for most of the biological processes. However, the role of these histone modifications in the progression of diabetes is still unknown. Hyperglycemia plays a major role in diabetes and its complications. The present study was undertaken to check the effect of insulin on alterations in post-translational modifications of histone H3 in L6 myoblasts under a hyperglycemic condition. We provide first evidence that insulin under hyperglycemic condition alters multiple histone modifications by enhanced production of reactive oxygen species. Insulin induces dose dependent changes in Lysine 4 and 9 methylation, Ser 10 phosphorylation and acetylation of histone H3. Interestingly, insulin induced generation of reactive oxygen species induces dephosphorylation and deacetylation of histone H3. Preincubation with catalase and DPI prevents these changes in post-translational modifications of histone H3. Furthermore, changes in histone H3 phosphorylation was found to be independent of ERK, p38, RSK2 and MSK1. Moreover, serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor, okadaic acid attenuates insulin induced dephosphorylation and deacetylation of histone H3, suggesting a role of serine/threonine phosphatases in altering modifications of histone H3. These changes in epigenetic modifications can provide new insights into pathogenesis of diabetes.

  19. Transdifferentiation. Sequential histone-modifying activities determine the robustness of transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Zuryn, Steven; Ahier, Arnaud; Portoso, Manuela; White, Esther Redhouse; Morin, Marie-Charlotte; Margueron, Raphaël; Jarriault, Sophie

    2014-08-15

    Natural interconversions between distinct somatic cell types have been reported in species as diverse as jellyfish and mice. The efficiency and reproducibility of some reprogramming events represent unexploited avenues in which to probe mechanisms that ensure robust cell conversion. We report that a conserved H3K27me3/me2 demethylase, JMJD-3.1, and the H3K4 methyltransferase Set1 complex cooperate to ensure invariant transdifferentiation (Td) of postmitotic Caenorhabditis elegans hindgut cells into motor neurons. At single-cell resolution, robust conversion requires stepwise histone-modifying activities, functionally partitioned into discrete phases of Td through nuclear degradation of JMJD-3.1 and phase-specific interactions with transcription factors that have conserved roles in cell plasticity and terminal fate selection. Our results draw parallels between epigenetic mechanisms underlying robust Td in nature and efficient cell reprogramming in vitro.

  20. Methamphetamine causes differential alterations in gene expression and patterns of histone acetylation/hypoacetylation in the rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Martin, Tracey A; Jayanthi, Subramaniam; McCoy, Michael T; Brannock, Christie; Ladenheim, Bruce; Garrett, Tiffany; Lehrmann, Elin; Becker, Kevin G; Cadet, Jean Lud

    2012-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) addiction is associated with several neuropsychiatric symptoms. Little is known about the effects of METH on gene expression and epigenetic modifications in the rat nucleus accumbens (NAC). Our study investigated the effects of a non-toxic METH injection (20 mg/kg) on gene expression, histone acetylation, and the expression of the histone acetyltransferase (HAT), ATF2, and of the histone deacetylases (HDACs), HDAC1 and HDAC2, in that structure. Microarray analyses done at 1, 8, 16 and 24 hrs after the METH injection identified METH-induced changes in the expression of genes previously implicated in the acute and longterm effects of psychostimulants, including immediate early genes and corticotropin-releasing factor (Crf). In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent decreases in the expression of other genes including Npas4 and cholecystokinin (Cck). Pathway analyses showed that genes with altered expression participated in behavioral performance, cell-to-cell signaling, and regulation of gene expression. PCR analyses confirmed the changes in the expression of c-fos, fosB, Crf, Cck, and Npas4 transcripts. To determine if the METH injection caused post-translational changes in histone markers, we used western blot analyses and identified METH-mediated decreases in histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 (H3K9ac) and lysine 18 (H3K18ac) in nuclear sub-fractions. In contrast, the METH injection caused time-dependent increases in acetylated H4K5 and H4K8. The changes in histone acetylation were accompanied by decreased expression of HDAC1 but increased expression of HDAC2 protein levels. The histone acetyltransferase, ATF2, showed significant METH-induced increased in protein expression. These results suggest that METH-induced alterations in global gene expression seen in rat NAC might be related, in part, to METH-induced changes in histone acetylation secondary to changes in HAT and HDAC expression. The causal role that HATs and HDACs might

  1. Uncoupling histone turnover from transcription-associated histone H3 modifications.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Paolo; Strubin, Michel

    2015-04-30

    Transcription in eukaryotes is associated with two major changes in chromatin organization. Firstly, nucleosomal histones are continuously replaced by new histones, an event that in yeast occurs predominantly at transcriptionally active promoters. Secondly, histones become modified post-translationally at specific lysine residues. Some modifications, including histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and acetylation at lysines 9 (H3K9ac) and 14 (H3K14ac), are specifically enriched at active promoters where histones exchange, suggesting a possible causal relationship. Other modifications accumulate within transcribed regions and one of them, H3K36me3, is thought to prevent histone exchange. Here we explored the relationship between these four H3 modifications and histone turnover at a few selected genes. Using lysine-to-arginine mutants and a histone exchange assay, we found that none of these modifications plays a major role in either promoting or preventing histone turnover. Unexpectedly, mutation of H3K56, whose acetylation occurs prior to chromatin incorporation, had an effect only when introduced into the nucleosomal histone. Furthermore, we used various genetic approaches to show that histone turnover can be experimentally altered with no major consequence on the H3 modifications tested. Together, these results suggest that transcription-associated histone turnover and H3 modification are two correlating but largely independent events.

  2. Application of Celluspots peptide arrays for the analysis of the binding specificity of epigenetic reading domains to modified histone tails

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Epigenetic reading domains are involved in the regulation of gene expression and chromatin state by interacting with histones in a post-translational modification specific manner. A detailed knowledge of the target modifications of reading domains, including enhancing and inhibiting secondary modifications, will lead to a better understanding of the biological signaling processes mediated by reading domains. Results We describe the application of Celluspots peptide arrays which contain 384 histone peptides carrying 59 post translational modifications in different combinations as an inexpensive, reliable and fast method for initial screening for specific interactions of reading domains with modified histone peptides. To validate the method, we tested the binding specificities of seven known epigenetic reading domains on Celluspots peptide arrays, viz. the HP1ß and MPP8 Chromo domains, JMJD2A and 53BP1 Tudor domains, Dnmt3a PWWP domain, Rag2 PHD domain and BRD2 Bromo domain. In general, the binding results agreed with literature data with respect to the primary specificity of the reading domains, but in almost all cases we obtained additional new information concerning the influence of secondary modifications surrounding the target modification. Conclusions We conclude that Celluspots peptide arrays are powerful screening tools for studying the specificity of putative reading domains binding to modified histone peptides. PMID:21884582

  3. Altered memory capacities and response to stress in p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF) histone acetylase knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Tangui; Duclot, Florian; Meunier, Johann; Naert, Gaëlle; Givalois, Laurent; Meffre, Julie; Célérier, Aurélie; Jacquet, Chantal; Copois, Virginie; Mechti, Nadir; Ozato, Keiko; Gongora, Céline

    2008-06-01

    Chromatin remodeling by posttranslational modification of histones plays an important role in brain plasticity, including memory, response to stress and depression. The importance of H3/4 histones acetylation by CREB-binding protein (CBP) or related histone acetyltransferase, including p300, was specifically demonstrated using knockout (KO) mouse models. The physiological role of a related protein that also acts as a transcriptional coactivator with intrinsic histone acetylase activity, the p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), is poorly documented. We analyzed the behavioral phenotype of homozygous male and female PCAF KO mice and report a marked impact of PCAF deletion on memory processes and stress response. PCAF KO animals showed short-term memory deficits at 2 months of age, measured using spontaneous alternation, object recognition, or acquisition of a daily changing platform position in the water maze. Acquisition of a fixed platform location was delayed, but preserved, and no passive avoidance deficit was noted. No gender-related difference was observed. These deficits were associated with hippocampal alterations in pyramidal cell layer organization, basal levels of Fos immunoreactivity, and MAP kinase activation. PCAF KO mice also showed an exaggerated response to acute stress, forced swimming, and conditioned fear, associated with increased plasma corticosterone levels. Moreover, learning and memory impairments worsened at 6 and 12 months of age, when animals failed to acquire the fixed platform location in the water maze and showed passive avoidance deficits. These observations demonstrate that PCAF histone acetylase is involved lifelong in the chromatin remodeling necessary for memory formation and response to stress.

  4. De novo mutations in histone-modifying genes in congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Samir; Choi, Murim; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Ma, Lijiang; Jiang, Jianming; Overton, John D; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Bjornson, Robert D; Breitbart, Roger E; Brown, Kerry K; Carriero, Nicholas J; Cheung, Yee Him; Deanfield, John; DePalma, Steve; Fakhro, Khalid A; Glessner, Joseph; Hakonarson, Hakon; Italia, Michael J; Kaltman, Jonathan R; Kaski, Juan; Kim, Richard; Kline, Jennie K; Lee, Teresa; Leipzig, Jeremy; Lopez, Alexander; Mane, Shrikant M; Mitchell, Laura E; Newburger, Jane W; Parfenov, Michael; Pe'er, Itsik; Porter, George; Roberts, Amy E; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Sanders, Stephan J; Seiden, Howard S; State, Mathew W; Subramanian, Sailakshmi; Tikhonova, Irina R; Wang, Wei; Warburton, Dorothy; White, Peter S; Williams, Ismee A; Zhao, Hongyu; Seidman, Jonathan G; Brueckner, Martina; Chung, Wendy K; Gelb, Bruce D; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Seidman, Christine E; Lifton, Richard P

    2013-06-13

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most frequent birth defect, affecting 0.8% of live births. Many cases occur sporadically and impair reproductive fitness, suggesting a role for de novo mutations. Here we compare the incidence of de novo mutations in 362 severe CHD cases and 264 controls by analysing exome sequencing of parent-offspring trios. CHD cases show a significant excess of protein-altering de novo mutations in genes expressed in the developing heart, with an odds ratio of 7.5 for damaging (premature termination, frameshift, splice site) mutations. Similar odds ratios are seen across the main classes of severe CHD. We find a marked excess of de novo mutations in genes involved in the production, removal or reading of histone 3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methylation, or ubiquitination of H2BK120, which is required for H3K4 methylation. There are also two de novo mutations in SMAD2, which regulates H3K27 methylation in the embryonic left-right organizer. The combination of both activating (H3K4 methylation) and inactivating (H3K27 methylation) chromatin marks characterizes 'poised' promoters and enhancers, which regulate expression of key developmental genes. These findings implicate de novo point mutations in several hundreds of genes that collectively contribute to approximately 10% of severe CHD.

  5. Quantitative proteomics reveals direct and indirect alterations in the histone code following methyltransferase knockdown.

    PubMed

    Plazas-Mayorca, Mariana D; Bloom, Joshua S; Zeissler, Ulrike; Leroy, Gary; Young, Nicolas L; DiMaggio, Peter A; Krugylak, Leonid; Schneider, Robert; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2010-09-01

    Histones are highly conserved proteins that organize cellular DNA. These proteins, especially their N-terminal domains, are adorned with many post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as lysine methylation, which are associated with active or repressed transcriptional states. The lysine methyltransferase G9a and its interaction partner Glp1 can mono- or dimethylate histone H3 on lysine (H3K9me1 or me2); possible cross-talk between these modifications and other PTMs on the same or other histone molecules is currently uncharacterized. In this study, we comprehensively analyze the effects of G9a/Glp1 knockdown on the most abundant histone modifications through both Bottom Up and Middle Down mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In addition to the expected decrease in H3K9me1/me2 we find that other degrees of methylation on K9 are affected by the reduction of G9a/Glp1 activity, particularly when K9 methylation occurs in combination with K14 acetylation. In line with this, an increase in K14 acetylation upon G9a knockdown was observed across all H3 variants (H3.1, H3.2 and H3.3), hinting at the potential existence of a binary switch between K9 methylation and K14 acetylation. Interestingly, we also detect changes in the abundance of other modifications (such as H3K79me2) in response to lowered levels of G9a/Glp1 suggesting histone PTM cross-talk amongst the H3 variants. In contrast, we find that G9a/Glp1 knockdown produces little effect on the levels of histone H4 PTMs, indicating low to no trans-histone PTM crosstalk. Lastly, we determined gene expression profiles of control and G9a/Glp1 knockdown cells, and we find that the G9a/Glp1 knockdown influences several genes, including DNA binding proteins and key factors in chromatin. Our results provide new insights into the intra- and inter- histone cross-regulation of histone K9 methylation and its potential downstream gene targets.

  6. Brownian dynamics simulation of the cross-talking effect among modified histones on conformations of nucleosomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Zhao-Wen; Li, Wei; Xie, Ping; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2010-04-01

    Using Brownian dynamics simulation, we studied the effect of histone modifications on conformations of an array of nucleosomes in a segment of chromatin. The simulation demonstrated that the segment of chromatin shows the dynamic behaviour that its conformation can switch between a state with nearly all of the histones being wrapped by DNA and a state with nearly all of the histones being unwrapped by DNA, thus involving the “cross-talking" interactions among the histones. Each state can stay for a sufficiently long time. These conformational states are essential for gene expression or gene silence. The simulation also shows that these conformational states can be inherited by the daughter DNAs during DNA replication, giving a theoretical explanation of the epigenetic phenomenon.

  7. Altering a histone H3K4 methylation pathway in glomerular podocytes promotes a chronic disease phenotype.

    PubMed

    Lefevre, Gaelle M; Patel, Sanjeevkumar R; Kim, Doyeob; Tessarollo, Lino; Dressler, Gregory R

    2010-10-28

    Methylation of specific lysine residues in core histone proteins is essential for embryonic development and can impart active and inactive epigenetic marks on chromatin domains. The ubiquitous nuclear protein PTIP is encoded by the Paxip1 gene and is an essential component of a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) methyltransferase complex conserved in metazoans. In order to determine if PTIP and its associated complexes are necessary for maintaining stable gene expression patterns in a terminally differentiated, non-dividing cell, we conditionally deleted PTIP in glomerular podocytes in mice. Renal development and function were not impaired in young mice. However, older animals progressively exhibited proteinuria and podocyte ultra structural defects similar to chronic glomerular disease. Loss of PTIP resulted in subtle changes in gene expression patterns prior to the onset of a renal disease phenotype. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed a loss of PTIP binding and lower H3K4 methylation at the Ntrk3 (neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor, type 3) locus, whose expression was significantly reduced and whose function may be essential for podocyte foot process patterning. These data demonstrate that alterations or mutations in an epigenetic regulatory pathway can alter the phenotypes of differentiated cells and lead to a chronic disease state.

  8. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  9. Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Parbin, Sabnam; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Shilpi, Arunima; Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Rath, Sandip Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the current era of genomic medicine, diseases are identified as manifestations of anomalous patterns of gene expression. Cancer is the principal example among such maladies. Although remarkable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of cancer, its epigenetic regulation, particularly histone deacetylation, demands further studies. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are one of the key players in the gene expression regulation network in cancer because of their repressive role on tumor suppressor genes. Higher expression and function of deacetylases disrupt the finely tuned acetylation homeostasis in both histone and non-histone target proteins. This brings about alterations in the genes implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular processes. Moreover, the reversible nature of epigenetic modulation by HDACs makes them attractive targets for cancer remedy. This review summarizes the current knowledge of HDACs in tumorigenesis and tumor progression as well as their contribution to the hallmarks of cancer. The present report also describes briefly various assays to detect histone deacetylase activity and discusses the potential role of histone deacetylase inhibitors as emerging epigenetic drugs to cure cancer. PMID:24051359

  10. Epigenomic landscape modified by histone modification correlated with activation of IGF2 gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The links of histone post-translational modifications and chromatin structure to cell cycle progression, DNA replication, and overall chromosome functions are very clear. The modulation of genome expression as a consequence of chromatin structural changes is most likely a basic mechanism. The epige...

  11. Computer-aided Molecular Design of Compounds Targeting Histone Modifying Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Andreoli, Federico; Del Rio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidences show that epigenetic mechanisms play crucial roles in the genesis and progression of many physiopathological processes. As a result, research in epigenetic grew at a fast pace in the last decade. In particular, the study of histone post-translational modifications encountered an extraordinary progression and many modifications have been characterized and associated to fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Histone modifications are the catalytic result of a large set of enzyme families that operate covalent modifications on specific residues at the histone tails. Taken together, these modifications elicit a complex and concerted processing that greatly contribute to the chromatin remodeling and may drive different pathological conditions, especially cancer. For this reason, several epigenetic targets are currently under validation for drug discovery purposes and different academic and industrial programs have been already launched to produce the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes. In this scenario, computer-aided molecular design techniques are offering important tools, mainly as a consequence of the increasing structural information available for these targets. In this mini-review we will briefly discuss the most common types of known histone modifications and the corresponding operating enzymes by emphasizing the computer-aided molecular design approaches that can be of use to speed-up the efforts to generate new pharmaceutically relevant compounds. PMID:26082827

  12. Alteration in inflammatory/apoptotic pathway and histone modifications by nordihydroguaiaretic acid prevents acute pancreatitis in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Ujwal Mukund; Gupta, Chanchal; Wagh, Preshit Ravindra; Karpe, Pinakin Arun; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2011-11-01

    Reactive oxygen radicals, pro-inflammatory mediators and cytokines have been implicated in caerulein induced acute pancreatitis. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a plant lignin, has marked anti-inflammatory properties. The present study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of NDGA against caerulein induced pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis was induced by intraperitoneal administration of eight doses of caerulein in male swiss albino mice. NDGA was administered after 9 h of acute pancreatitis induction. Pancreatic damage and the protective effect of NDGA were assessed by oxidative stress parameters and histopathology of pancreas. The mRNA expression of heat shock proteins (DNAJ C15 and HSPD1) was examined by real-time RT-PCR analysis. Expression of HSP 27, NF-κB, TNF-α, p-p38, Bcl-2, p-PP2A, procaspase-3, caspase-3 and histone modifications were examined by western blotting. NDGA attenuated the oxidative stress, led to increased plasma α-amylase and decreased IGF-1 in AP mice. It modulated the mRNA and protein levels of heat shock proteins and reduced the expression of NF-κB, TNF-α and p-p38. It increased the number of TUNEL positive apoptotic cells in the pancreas of AP mice. In addition, NDGA prevented the changes in modifications of histone H3 in acute pancreatitis. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report which suggests that NDGA prevents the progression of acute pancreatitis by involving alteration of histone H3 modifications and modulating the expression of genes involved in inflammatory/apoptotic cascade, which may be responsible for decreased necrosis and increased apoptosis in this model of acute pancreatitis.

  13. Interplay Between Histone H3 Lysine 56 Deacetylation and Chromatin Modifiers in Response to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Simoneau, Antoine; Delgoshaie, Neda; Celic, Ivana; Dai, Junbiao; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Costantino, Santiago; Thibault, Pierre; Boeke, Jef D.; Verreault, Alain; Wurtele, Hugo

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56Ac) is present in newly synthesized histones deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. The sirtuins Hst3 and Hst4 deacetylate H3K56 after S phase, and virtually all histone H3 molecules are K56 acetylated throughout the cell cycle in hst3∆ hst4∆ mutants. Failure to deacetylate H3K56 causes thermosensitivity, spontaneous DNA damage, and sensitivity to replicative stress via molecular mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that unlike wild-type cells, hst3∆ hst4∆ cells are unable to complete genome duplication and accumulate persistent foci containing the homologous recombination protein Rad52 after exposure to genotoxic drugs during S phase. In response to replicative stress, cells lacking Hst3 and Hst4 also displayed intense foci containing the Rfa1 subunit of the single-stranded DNA binding protein complex RPA, as well as persistent activation of DNA damage–induced kinases. To investigate the basis of these phenotypes, we identified histone point mutations that modulate the temperature and genotoxic drug sensitivity of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. We found that reducing the levels of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation or H3 lysine 79 methylation partially suppresses these sensitivities and reduces spontaneous and genotoxin-induced activation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Our data further suggest that elevated DNA damage–induced signaling significantly contributes to the phenotypes of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Overall, these results outline a novel interplay between H3K56Ac, H3K79 methylation, and H4K16 acetylation in the cellular response to DNA damage. PMID:25786853

  14. Interplay between histone H3 lysine 56 deacetylation and chromatin modifiers in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Antoine; Delgoshaie, Neda; Celic, Ivana; Dai, Junbiao; Abshiru, Nebiyu; Costantino, Santiago; Thibault, Pierre; Boeke, Jef D; Verreault, Alain; Wurtele, Hugo

    2015-05-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, histone H3 lysine 56 acetylation (H3K56Ac) is present in newly synthesized histones deposited throughout the genome during DNA replication. The sirtuins Hst3 and Hst4 deacetylate H3K56 after S phase, and virtually all histone H3 molecules are K56 acetylated throughout the cell cycle in hst3∆ hst4∆ mutants. Failure to deacetylate H3K56 causes thermosensitivity, spontaneous DNA damage, and sensitivity to replicative stress via molecular mechanisms that remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that unlike wild-type cells, hst3∆ hst4∆ cells are unable to complete genome duplication and accumulate persistent foci containing the homologous recombination protein Rad52 after exposure to genotoxic drugs during S phase. In response to replicative stress, cells lacking Hst3 and Hst4 also displayed intense foci containing the Rfa1 subunit of the single-stranded DNA binding protein complex RPA, as well as persistent activation of DNA damage-induced kinases. To investigate the basis of these phenotypes, we identified histone point mutations that modulate the temperature and genotoxic drug sensitivity of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. We found that reducing the levels of histone H4 lysine 16 acetylation or H3 lysine 79 methylation partially suppresses these sensitivities and reduces spontaneous and genotoxin-induced activation of the DNA damage-response kinase Rad53 in hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Our data further suggest that elevated DNA damage-induced signaling significantly contributes to the phenotypes of hst3∆ hst4∆ cells. Overall, these results outline a novel interplay between H3K56Ac, H3K79 methylation, and H4K16 acetylation in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  15. Quantitative analysis of modified proteins and their positional isomers by tandem mass spectrometry: human histone H4.

    PubMed

    Pesavento, James J; Mizzen, Craig A; Kelleher, Neil L

    2006-07-01

    Here we show that fragment ion abundances from dissociation of ions created from mixtures of multiply modified histone H4 (11 kDa) or of N-terminal synthetic peptides (2 kDa) correspond to their respective intact ion abundances measured by Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Isomeric mixtures of modified forms of the same protein are resolved and quantitated with a precision of

  16. Frequent mutation of histone modifying genes in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Ryan D.; Mendez-Lago, Maria; Mungall, Andrew J.; Goya, Rodrigo; Mungall, Karen L.; Corbett, Richard; Johnson, Nathalie A.; Severson, Tesa M.; Chiu, Readman; Field, Matthew; Jackman, Shaun; Krzywinski, Martin; Scott, David W.; Trinh, Diane L.; Tamura-Wells, Jessica; Li, Sa; Firme, Marlo; Rogic, Sanja; Griffith, Malachi; Chan, Susanna; Yakovenko, Oleksandr; Meyer, Irmtraud M.; Zhao, Eric Y.; Smailus, Duane; Moksa, Michelle; Chittaranjan, Suganthi; Rimsza, Lisa; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Spinelli, John J.; Ben-Neriah, Susana; Meissner, Barbara; Woolcock, Bruce; Boyle, Merrill; McDonald, Helen; Tam, Angela; Zhao, Yongjun; Delaney, Allen; Zeng, Thomas; Tse, Kane; Butterfield, Yaron; Birol, Inanc; Holt, Rob; Schein, Jacqueline; Horsman, Douglas E.; Moore, Richard; Jones, Steven J.M.; Connors, Joseph M.; Hirst, Martin; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Marra, Marco A.

    2011-01-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) are the two most common non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs). To identify genes with mutations in B-cell NHL we sequenced tumour and matched normal DNA from 13 DLBCL cases and one FL case. We analysed RNA-seq data from these and another 113 NHLs to identify genes with candidate mutations, and then re-sequenced tumour and matched normal DNA from these cases to confirm 109 genes with multiple somatic mutations. Genes with roles in histone modification were frequent targets of somatic mutation. For example, 32% of DLBCL and 89% of FL cases had somatic mutations in MLL2, which encodes a histone methyltransferase. 11.4% of DLBCL and 13.4% of FL cases had somatic mutations in MEF2B, a calcium-regulated gene that cooperates with CREBBP and EP300 in acetylating histones. Our analysis thus suggests a previously unappreciated disruption of chromatin biology in lymphomagenesis. PMID:21796119

  17. Altered expression of BRG1 and histone demethylases, and aberrant H3K4 methylation in less developmentally competent embryos at the time of embryonic genome activation.

    PubMed

    Glanzner, Werner G; Wachter, Audrey; Coutinho, Ana Rita S; Albornoz, Marcelo S; Duggavathi, Raj; GonÇAlves, Paulo B D; Bordignon, Vilceu

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetics is a fundamental regulator underlying many biological functions, such as development and cell differentiation. Epigenetic modifications affect key chromatin regulation, including transcription and DNA repair, which are critical for normal embryo development. In this study, we profiled the expression of epigenetic modifiers and patterns of epigenetic changes in porcine embryos around the period of embryonic genome activation (EGA). We observed that Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) and Lysine demethylase 1A (KDM1A), which can alter the methylation status of lysine 4 in histone 3 (H3K4), localize to the nucleus at Day 3-4 of development. We then compared the abundance of epigenetic modifiers between early- and late-cleaving embryos, which were classified based on the time to the first cell cleavage, to investigate if their nuclear localization contributes to developmental competence. The mRNA abundance of BRG1, KDM1A, as well as other lysine demethylases (KDM1B, KDM5A, KDM5B, and KDM5C), were significantly higher in late- compared to early-cleaving embryos near the EGA period, although these difference disappeared at the blastocyst stage. The abundance of H3K4 mono- (H3K4me) and di-methylation (H3K4me2) during the EGA period was reduced in late-cleaving and less developmentally competent embryos. By contrast, BRG1, KDM1A, and H3K4me2 abundance was greater in embryos with more than eight cells at Day 3-4 of development compared to those with fewer than four cells. These findings suggest that altered epigenetic modifications of H3K4 around the EGA period may affect the developmental capacity of porcine embryos to reach the blastocyst stage. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 84: 19-29, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition.

    PubMed

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-08-01

    The development and marketing of 'novel' genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed.

  19. Safety assessment of genetically modified plants with deliberately altered composition

    PubMed Central

    Halford, Nigel G; Hudson, Elizabeth; Gimson, Amy; Weightman, Richard; Shewry, Peter R; Tompkins, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The development and marketing of ‘novel’ genetically modified (GM) crops in which composition has been deliberately altered poses a challenge to the European Union (EU)'s risk assessment processes, which are based on the concept of substantial equivalence with a non-GM comparator. This article gives some examples of these novel GM crops and summarizes the conclusions of a report that was commissioned by the European Food Safety Authority on how the EU's risk assessment processes could be adapted to enable their safety to be assessed. PMID:24735114

  20. 17β-Estradiol regulates histone alterations associated with memory consolidation and increases Bdnf promoter acetylation in middle-aged female mice.

    PubMed

    Fortress, Ashley M; Kim, Jaekyoon; Poole, Rachel L; Gould, Thomas J; Frick, Karyn M

    2014-09-01

    Histone acetylation is essential for hippocampal memory formation in young adult rodents. Although dysfunctional histone acetylation has been associated with age-related memory decline in male rodents, little is known about whether histone acetylation is altered by aging in female rodents. In young female mice, the ability of 17β-estradiol (E2) to enhance object recognition memory consolidation requires histone H3 acetylation in the dorsal hippocampus. However, the extent to which histone acetylation is regulated by E2 in middle-aged females is unknown. The mnemonic benefits of E2 in aging females appear to be greatest in middle age, and so pinpointing the molecular mechanisms through which E2 enhances memory at this age could lead to the development of safer and more effective treatments for maintaining memory function without the side effects of current therapies. Here, we show that dorsal hippocampal infusion of E2 rapidly enhanced object recognition and spatial memory, and increased histone H3 acetylation in the dorsal hippocampus, while also significantly reducing levels of histone deacetylase (HDAC2 and HDAC3) proteins. E2 specifically increased histone H3 acetylation at Bdnf promoters pII and pIV in the dorsal hippocampus of both young and middle-aged mice, despite age-related decreases in pI and pIV acetylation. Furthermore, levels of mature BDNF and pro-BDNF proteins in the dorsal hippocampus were increased by E2 in middle-aged females. Together, these data suggest that the middle-aged female dorsal hippocampus remains epigenetically responsive to E2, and that E2 may enhance memory in middle-aged females via epigenetic regulation of Bdnf.

  1. Butyrate, an HDAC inhibitor, stimulates interplay between different posttranslational modifications of histone H3 and differently alters G1-specific cell cycle proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Omana P; Ranganna, Kasturi; Yatsu, Frank M

    2010-12-01

    HDACs and HATs regulate histone acetylation, an epigenetic modification that controls chromatin structure and through it, gene expression. Butyrate, a dietary HDAC inhibitor, inhibits VSMC proliferation, a crucial factor in atherogenesis, and the principle mechanism in arterial and in-stent restenosis. Here, the link between antiproliferation action of butyrate and the portraits of global covalent modifications of histone H3 that it induces are characterized to understand the mechanics of butyrate-arrested VSMC proliferation. Analysis of histone H3 modifications specific to butyrate arrested VSMC proliferation display induction of histone H3-Lysine9 acetylation, inhibition of histone H3-Serine10 phosphorylation, reduction of histone H3-Lysine9 dimethylation and stimulation of histone H3-Lysine4 di-methylation, which is linked to transcriptional activation, cell cycle/mitosis, transcriptional suppression and activation, respectively. Conversely, untreated VSMCs exhibit inhibition of H3-Lysine9 acetylation, induction of H3-Serine10 phosphorylation, stimulation of H3-Lysine9 di-methylation and reduction in H3-Lysine4 di-methylation. Butyrate's cooperative effects on H3-Lysine9 acetylation and H3-Serine10 phosphorylation, and contrasting effects on di-methylation of H3-Lysine9 and H3-Lysine4 suggests that the interplay between these site-specific modifications cause distinct chromatin alterations that allow cyclin D1 and D3 induction, G1-specific cdk4, cdk6 and cdk2 downregulation, and upregulation of cdk inhibitors, p15INK4b and p21Cip1. Regardless of butyrate's effect on D-type cyclins, downregulation of G1-specific cdks and upregulation of cdk inhibitors by butyrate prevents cell cycle progression by failing to inactivate Rb. Overall, through chromatin remodeling, butyrate appears to differentially alter G1-specific cell cycle proteins to ensure proliferation arrest of VSMCs, a crucial cellular component of blood vessel wall.

  2. Frequent mutation of histone-modifying genes in non-Hodgkin lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In a recent Nature article, Morin et al. uncovered a novel role for chromatin modification in driving the progression of two non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs), follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Through DNA and RNA sequencing of 117 tumor samples and 10 assorted cell lines, the authors identified and validated 109 genes with multiple mutations in these B-cell NHLs. Of the 109 genes, several genes not previously linked to lymphoma demonstrated positive selection for mutation including two genes involved in histone modification, MLL2 and MEF2B.

  3. Early life stress triggers sustained changes in histone deacetylase expression and histone H4 modifications that alter responsiveness to adolescent antidepressant treatment

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Amir; Worrell, Trent R.; Zimnisky, Ross; Schmauss, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Early life stress can elicit long-lasting changes in gene expression and behavior. Recent studies on rodents suggest that these lasting effects depend on the genetic background. Whether epigenetic factors also play a role remains to be investigated. Here we exposed the stress-susceptible mouse strain Balb/c and the more resilient strain C57Bl/6 to a powerful early life stress paradigm, infant maternal separation. In Balb/c mice, infant maternal separation led to decreased expression of mRNA encoding the histone deacetylases (HDACs) 1, 3, 7, 8, and 10 in the forebrain neocortex in adulthood, an effect accompanied by increased expression of acetylated histone H4 proteins, especially acetylated H4K12 protein. These changes in HDAC expression and histone modifications were not detected in C57Bl/6 mice exposed to early life stress. Moreover, a reversal of the H4K12 hyperacetylation detected in infant maternally separated Balb/c mice (achieved with chronic adolescent treatment with a low dose of theophylline that only activates HDACs) worsened the abnormal emotional phenotype resulting from this early life stress exposure. In contrast, fluoxetine, a drug with potent antidepressant efficacy in infant maternally separated Balb/c mice, potentiated all histone modifications triggered by early life stress. Moreover, in non-stressed Balb/c mice, co-administration of an HDAC inhibitor and fluoxetine, but not fluoxetine alone, elicited antidepressant effects and also triggered changes in histone H4 expression that were similar to those provoked by fluoxetine treatment of mice exposed to early life stress. These results suggest that Balb/c mice develop epigenetic modifications after early life stress exposure that, in terms of the emotive phenotype, are of adaptive nature, and that enhance the efficacy of antidepressant drugs. PMID:21964251

  4. Oncogenic RAS alters the global and gene-specific histone modification pattern during epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Ignacio Mazón; Kalogeropoulou, Margarita; Ferraro, Angelo; Voulgari, Angeliki; Pankotai, Tibor; Boros, Imre; Pintzas, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    The presence of different forms of histone covalent modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation in localized promoter regions are markers for chromatin packing and transcription. Activation of RAS signalling pathways through oncogenic RAS mutations is a hallmark of colorectal cancer. Overexpression of Harvey-Ras oncogene induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in Caco-2 cells. We focused on the role of epigenetic modifications of histone H3 and its dependence on RAS signal transduction pathways and oncogenic transformation. Using cell lines stably overexpressing oncogenic Harvey-RAS with EMT phenotype, we studied the acquired changes in the H3 histone modification patterns. Two genes show inverse protein expression patterns after Ha-RAS overexpression: Cyclin D1, a cell cycle-related gene, and the EMT marker-gene E-cadherin. We report that these two genes demonstrate matching inverse histone repression patterns on their promoter, while histone markers associated with an active state of genes were affected by the RAS-activated signalling pathway MEK-ERK-MSK1. Furthermore, we show that though the level of methyltransferases enzymes was increased, the status of H3 three-methylation at lysine 27 (H3K27me(3)), associated with gene repression on the promoter of Cyclin D1, was lower. Together, these results suggest that histone covalent modifications can be affected by oncogenic RAS pathways to regulate the expression of target genes like Cyclin D1 or E-cadherin and that the dynamic balance of opposing histone-modifying enzymes is critical for the regulation of cell proliferation.

  5. Histone chaperones link histone nuclear import and chromatin assembly.

    PubMed

    Keck, Kristin M; Pemberton, Lucy F

    2013-01-01

    Histone chaperones are proteins that shield histones from nonspecific interactions until they are assembled into chromatin. After their synthesis in the cytoplasm, histones are bound by different histone chaperones, subjected to a series of posttranslational modifications and imported into the nucleus. These evolutionarily conserved modifications, including acetylation and methylation, can occur in the cytoplasm, but their role in regulating import is not well understood. As part of histone import complexes, histone chaperones may serve to protect the histones during transport, or they may be using histones to promote their own nuclear localization. In addition, there is evidence that histone chaperones can play an active role in the import of histones. Histone chaperones have also been shown to regulate the localization of important chromatin modifying enzymes. This review is focused on the role histone chaperones play in the early biogenesis of histones, the distinct cytoplasmic subcomplexes in which histone chaperones have been found in both yeast and mammalian cells and the importins/karyopherins and nuclear localization signals that mediate the nuclear import of histones. We also address the role that histone chaperone localization plays in human disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  6. Largazole and Analogues with Modified Metal-Binding Motifs Targeting Histone Deacetylases: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Bhansali, Pravin; Hanigan, Christin L.; Casero, Robert A.; Tillekeratne, L. M. Viranga

    2011-01-01

    The histone deacetylase inhibitor, largazole 1 was synthesized by a convergent approach which involved several efficient and high yielding single pot multistep protocols. Initial attempts using t-butyl as thiol protecting group proved problematic and synthesis was accomplished by switching to trityl protecting group. This synthetic protocol provides a convenient approach to many new largazole analogues. Three side chain analogues with multiple heteroatoms for chelation with Zn2+ were synthesized and their biological activities were evaluated. They were less potent than largazole 1 in growth inhibition of HCT116 colon carcinoma cell line and in inducing increases in global H3 acetylation. Largazole 1 and the three side chain analogues had no effect on HDAC6 as indicated by the lack of increased acetylation of α-tubulin. PMID:21936551

  7. Dual modified antiphospho (Ser10)-acetyl (Lys14)-histone H3 predominantly mark the pericentromeric chromatin during mitosis in monokinetic plants.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Santosh Kumar; Yamamoto, Maki; Mukai, Yasuhiko

    2016-12-01

    Epigenetic regulatory posttranslational histone modification marks not only function individually but also capable to act in combination as a unique pattern. A total of 16 plant species belonging to 11 genera of eight families (five dicots and three monocots) including land plants, epiphytes (orchids) and the holokinetic taxa (Drosera spp.) were analysed for chromosomal distribution of dual modified antiphospho (Ser10)-acetyl (K14)-histone H3 (H3S10phK14ac) to understand the combinatorial chromatin dynamics during mitotic cell division in plants. The anti-H3S10phK14ac evidently mark the pericentromeric chromatin on mitotic chromosomes of the plants excluding the holokinetic Drosera species, which revealed the immunolabelling of whole chromosomes all along the arms. The dual modified immunosignals were absent during early stages of mitosis, appeared intensively at metaphase and remained visible until late-anaphase/telophase however, labelled the whole chromosomes during meiotic metaphase I. Colocalization of anti-H3S10phK14ac with an onion's CENH3 antibody on mitotic chromosomes of Allium revealed the chromosomal location of anti-H3S10phK14ac in the region between signals for CENH3 detection. Overall analysis suggests that the unique localization of combinatorial histone modification mark at pericentromeric chromatin might have attributed through 'phospho-acetyl' cross talk that ultimately facilitate the sister chromatid cohesion at pericentromeres following condensation events in mitotic chromosomes. Here, we propose that dual modified H3S10phK14ac histone may serve as an additional cytogenetic landmark to identify pericentromeric chromatin during mitosis in plants. The plausible role of histone cross talk and future perspectives of combinatorial histone modification marks in plant cytogenetics with special reference to chromatin dynamics have been discussed.

  8. A multifaceted role for MOF histone modifying factor in genome maintenance.

    PubMed

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Hunt, Clayton R; Horikoshi, Nobuo; Pandita, Tej K

    2017-01-01

    MOF (males absent on the first) was initially identified as a dosage compensation factor in Drosophila that acetylates lysine 16 of histone H4 (H4K16ac) and increased gene transcription from the single copy male X-chromosome. In humans, however, the ortholog of Drosophila MOF has been shown to interact with a range of proteins that extend its potential significance well beyond transcription. For example, recent results indicate MOF is an upstream regulator of the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) protein, the loss of which is responsible for ataxia telangiectasia (AT). ATM is a key regulatory kinase that interacts with and phosphorylates multiple substrates that influence critical, cell-cycle control and DNA damage repair pathways in addition to other pathways. Thus, directly or indirectly, MOF may be involved in a wide range of cellular functions. This review will focus on the contribution of MOF to cellular DNA repair and new results that are beginning to examine the in vivo physiological role of MOF.

  9. Comparing and combining capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nano-liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for the characterization of post-translationally modified histones.

    PubMed

    Sarg, Bettina; Faserl, Klaus; Kremser, Leopold; Halfinger, Bernhard; Sebastiano, Roberto; Lindner, Herbert H

    2013-09-01

    We present the first comprehensive capillary electrophoresis electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (CESI-MS) analysis of post-translational modifications derived from H1 and core histones. Using a capillary electrophoresis system equipped with a sheathless high-sensitivity porous sprayer and nano-liquid chromatography electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-LC-ESI-MS) as two complementary techniques, we characterized H1 histones isolated from rat testis. Without any pre-separation of the perchloric acid extraction, a total of 70 different modified peptides, including 50 phosphopeptides, were identified in the rat linker histones H1.0, H1a-H1e, and H1t. Out of the 70 modified H1 histone peptides, 27 peptides could be identified with CESI-MS only, and 11 solely with LC-ESI-MS. Immobilized metal-affinity chromatography enrichment prior to MS analysis yielded a total of 55 phosphopeptides; 22 of these peptides could be identified only by CESI-MS, and 19 only by LC-ESI-MS, showing the complementarity of the two techniques. We mapped 42 H1 modification sites, including 31 phosphorylation sites, of which 8 were novel sites. For the analysis of core histones, we chose a different strategy. In a first step, the sulfuric-acid-extracted core histones were pre-separated using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. Individual rat testis core histone fractions obtained in this way were digested and analyzed via bottom-up CESI-MS. This approach yielded the identification of 42 different modification sites including acetylation (lysine and N(α)-terminal); mono-, di-, and trimethylation; and phosphorylation. When we applied CESI-MS for the analysis of intact core histone subtypes from butyrate-treated mouse tumor cells, we were able to rapidly detect their degree of modification, and we found this method very useful for the separation of isobaric trimethyl and acetyl modifications. Taken together, our results highlight the need for additional techniques

  10. Structural Basis of Histone H4 Recognition by p55

    SciTech Connect

    Song,J.; Garlick, J.; Kingston, R.

    2008-01-01

    p55 is a common component of many chromatin-modifying complexes and has been shown to bind to histones. Here, we present a crystal structure of Drosophila p55 bound to a histone H4 peptide. p55, a predicted WD40 repeat protein, recognizes the first helix of histone H4 via a binding pocket located on the side of a ?-propeller structure. The pocket cannot accommodate the histone fold of H4, which must be altered to allow p55 binding. Reconstitution experiments show that the binding pocket is important to the function of p55-containing complexes. These data demonstrate that WD40 repeat proteins use various surfaces to direct the modification of histones.

  11. Independent Mechanisms Target SMCHD1 to Trimethylated Histone H3 Lysine 9-Modified Chromatin and the Inactive X Chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Brideau, Nicholas J.; Coker, Heather; Gendrel, Anne-Valerie; Siebert, C. Alistair; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen; Poot, Raymond A.; Nesterova, Tatyana B.

    2015-01-01

    The chromosomal protein SMCHD1 plays an important role in epigenetic silencing at diverse loci, including the inactive X chromosome, imprinted genes, and the facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy locus. Although homology with canonical SMC family proteins suggests a role in chromosome organization, the mechanisms underlying SMCHD1 function and target site selection remain poorly understood. Here we show that SMCHD1 forms an active GHKL-ATPase homodimer, contrasting with canonical SMC complexes, which exist as tripartite ring structures. Electron microscopy analysis demonstrates that SMCHD1 homodimers structurally resemble prokaryotic condensins. We further show that the principal mechanism for chromatin loading of SMCHD1 involves an LRIF1-mediated interaction with HP1γ at trimethylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me3)-modified chromatin sites on the chromosome arms. A parallel pathway accounts for chromatin loading at a minority of sites, notably the inactive X chromosome. Together, our results provide key insights into SMCHD1 function and target site selection. PMID:26391951

  12. Nucleoporin Nup98 associates with Trx/MLL and NSL histone-modifying complexes and regulates Hox gene expression.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Garcia, Pau; Jeong, Jieun; Capelson, Maya

    2014-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex is a transport channel embedded in the nuclear envelope and made up of 30 different components termed nucleoporins (Nups). In addition to their classical role in transport, a subset of Nups has a conserved role in the regulation of transcription via direct binding to chromatin. The molecular details of this function remain obscure, and it is unknown how metazoan Nups are recruited to their chromatin locations or what transcription steps they regulate. Here, we demonstrate genome-wide and physical association between Nup98 and histone-modifying complexes MBD-R2/NSL [corrected] and Trx/MLL. Importantly, we identify a requirement for MBD-R2 in recruitment of Nup98 to many of its genomic target sites. Consistent with its interaction with the Trx/MLL complex, Nup98 is shown to be necessary for Hox gene expression in developing fly tissues. These findings introduce roles of Nup98 in epigenetic regulation that may underlie the basis of oncogenicity of Nup98 fusions in leukemia.

  13. Balancing chromatin remodeling and histone modifications in transcription

    PubMed Central

    Petty, Emily; Pillus, Lorraine

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin remodelers use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition or evict nucleosomes or to replace canonical histones with histone variants. By regulating nucleosome dynamics, remodelers gate access to the underlying DNA for replication, repair, and transcription. Nucleosomes are subject to extensive post-translational modifications that can recruit regulatory proteins or alter the local chromatin structure. Just as extensive cross-talk has been observed between different histone post-translational modifications, there is growing evidence for both coordinated and antagonistic functional relationships between nucleosome remodeling and modifying machineries. Defining the combined functions of the complexes that alter nucleosome interactions, position, and stability is key to understanding processes that require access to DNA, particularly with growing appreciation of their contributions to human health and disease. Here, we highlight recent advances in the interactions between histone modifications and the ISWI and CHD1 chromatin remodelers from studies in budding yeast, fission yeast, flies, and mammalian cells, with a focus on yeast. PMID:23870137

  14. TLR ligands, but not modulators of histone modifiers, can induce the complex immune response pattern of endotoxin tolerance in mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Günther, Juliane; Petzl, Wolfram; Zerbe, Holm; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Seyfert, Hans-Martin

    2017-02-01

    Excessive stimulation of the TLR4 axis through LPS reduces the expression of some cytokine genes in immune cells, while stimulating the expression of immune defense genes during a subsequent bacterial infection. This endotoxin tolerance (ET) is mediated via epigenetic mechanisms. Priming the udder of cows with LPS was shown to induce ET in mammary epithelial cells (MEC), thereby protecting the udder against reinfection for some time. Seeking alternatives to LPS priming we tried to elicit ET by priming MEC with either lipopeptide (Pam2CSK4) via the TLR2/6 axis or inhibitors of histone-modifying enzymes. Pre-incubation of MEC with Pam2CSK4 enhanced baseline and induced expression of bactericidal (β-defensin; SLPI) and membrane protecting factors ( SAA3, TGM3), while reducing the expression of cytokine- and chemokine-encoding genes ( TNF, IL1β) after a subsequent pathogen challenge, the latter, however, not as efficiently as after LPS priming. Pre-treating MEC with various inhibitors of histone H3 modifiers (for demethylation, acetylation or deacetylation) all failed to induce any of the protective factors and only resulted in some dampening of cytokine gene expression after the re-challenge. Hence, triggering immune functions via the TLR axis, but not through those histone modifiers, induced the beneficial phenomenon of ET in MEC.

  15. De novo mutations in histone modifying genes in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Zaidi, Samir; Choi, Murim; Wakimoto, Hiroko; Ma, Lijiang; Jiang, Jianming; Overton, John D.; Romano-Adesman, Angela; Bjornson, Robert D.; Breitbart, Roger E.; Brown, Kerry K.; Carriero, Nicholas J.; Cheung, Yee Him; Deanfield, John; DePalma, Steve; Fakhro, Khalid A.; Glessner, Joseph; Hakonarson, Hakon; Italia, Michael; Kaltman, Jonathan R.; Kaski, Juan; Kim, Richard; Kline, Jennie K.; Lee, Teresa; Leipzig, Jeremy; Lopez, Alexander; Mane, Shrikant M.; Mitchell, Laura E.; Newburger, Jane W.; Parfenov, Michael; Pe'er, Itsik; Porter, George; Roberts, Amy; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Sanders, Stephan J.; Seiden, Howard S.; State, Mathew W.; Subramanian, Sailakshmi; Tikhonova, Irina R.; Wang, Wei; Warburton, Dorothy; White, Peter S.; Williams, Ismee A.; Zhao, Hongyu; Seidman, Jonathan G.; Brueckner, Martina; Chung, Wendy K.; Gelb, Bruce D.; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Seidman, Christine E.; Lifton, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most frequent birth defect, affecting 0.8% of live births1. Many cases occur sporadically and impair reproductive fitness, suggesting a role for de novo mutations. By analysis of exome sequencing of parent-offspring trios, we compared the incidence of de novo mutations in 362 severe CHD cases and 264 controls. CHD cases showed a significant excess of protein-altering de novo mutations in genes expressed in the developing heart, with an odds ratio of 7.5 for damaging mutations. Similar odds ratios were seen across major classes of severe CHD. We found a marked excess of de novo mutations in genes involved in production, removal or reading of H3K4 methylation (H3K4me), or ubiquitination of H2BK120, which is required for H3K4 methylation2–4. There were also two de novo mutations in SMAD2; SMAD2 signaling in the embryonic left-right organizer induces demethylation of H3K27me5. H3K4me and H3K27me mark `poised' promoters and enhancers that regulate expression of key developmental genes6. These findings implicate de novo point mutations in several hundred genes that collectively contribute to ~10% of severe CHD. PMID:23665959

  16. Histone acetylation in neurodevelopment.

    PubMed

    Contestabile, Antonio; Sintoni, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modification of histones is a primary mechanism through which epigenetic regulation of DNA transcription does occur. Among these modifications, regulation of histone acetylation state is an important tool to influence gene expression. Epigenetic regulation of neurodevelopment contributes to the structural and functional shaping of the brain during neurogenesis and continues to impact on neural plasticity lifelong. Alterations of these mechanisms during neurodevelopment may result in later occurrence of neuropsychatric disorders. The present paper reviews and discusses available data on histone modifications, in particular histone acetylation, in neurogenesis considering results obtained in culture systems of neural progenitors as well as in in vivo studies. Possible teratogenic effects of altered histone acetylation state during development are also considered. The use during pregnancy of drugs such as valproic acid, which acts as a histone deacetylase inhibitor, may result during postnatal development in autistic-like symptoms. The effect of gestational administration of the drug has been, therefore, tested on adult hippocampal neurogenesis in animals showing behavioral impairment as a consequence of the drug administration at a specific stage of pregnancy. These experimental results show that adult neurogenesis in the hippocampal dentate gyrus is not quantitatively altered by gestational valproic acid administration. Future steps and goals of research on the role and mechanisms of histone acetylation in neurodevelopment are briefly discussed.

  17. Engineering of a Histone-Recognition Domain in Dnmt3a Alters the Epigenetic Landscape and Phenotypic Features of Mouse ESCs.

    PubMed

    Noh, Kyung-Min; Wang, Haibo; Kim, Hyunjae R; Wenderski, Wendy; Fang, Fang; Li, Charles H; Dewell, Scott; Hughes, Stephen H; Melnick, Ari M; Patel, Dinshaw J; Li, Haitao; Allis, C David

    2015-07-02

    Histone modification and DNA methylation are associated with varying epigenetic "landscapes," but detailed mechanistic and functional links between the two remain unclear. Using the ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L (ADD) domain of the DNA methyltransferase Dnmt3a as a paradigm, we apply protein engineering to dissect the molecular interactions underlying the recruitment of this enzyme to specific regions of chromatin in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs). By rendering the ADD domain insensitive to histone modification, specifically H3K4 methylation or H3T3 phosphorylation, we demonstrate the consequence of dysregulated Dnmt3a binding and activity. Targeting of a Dnmt3a mutant to H3K4me3 promoters decreases gene expression in a subset of developmental genes and alters ESC differentiation, whereas aberrant binding of another mutant to H3T3ph during mitosis promotes chromosome instability. Our studies support the general view that histone modification "reading" and DNA methylation are closely coupled in mammalian cells, and suggest an avenue for the functional assessment of chromatin-associated proteins.

  18. Alteration of histone acetylation pattern during long-term serum-free culture conditions of human fetal placental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yongzhao; Song, Xumei; Han, Fei; Li, Yukui; Wei, Jun; Liu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from placenta of fetal origin (fPMSCs) are superior to MSCs of other sources for cell therapy. Since the initial number of isolated MSCs is limited, in vitro propagation is often required to reach sufficient numbers of cells for therapeutic applications, during which MSCs may undergo genetic and/or epigenetic alterations that subsequently increase the probability of spontaneous malignant transformation. Thus, factors that influence genomic and epigenetic stability of MSCs following long-term expansions need to be clarified before cultured MSCs are employed for clinical settings. To date, the genetic and epigenetic stability of fPMSCs after long-term in vitro expansion has not been fully investigated. In this report, alterations to histone acetylation and consequence on the expression pattern of fPMSCs following in vitro propagation under serum-free conditions were explored. The results show that fPMSCs maintain their MSC characteristics before they reached a senescent state. Furthermore, acetylation modification patterns were changed in fPMSCs along with gradually increased global histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and expression of HDAC subtypes HDAC4, HDAC5 and HDAC6, as well as a down-regulated global histone H3/H4 acetylation during in vitro culturing. In line with the acetylation alterations, the expression of oncogenes Oct4, Sox2 and TERT were significantly decreased over the propagation period. Of note, the down-regulation of Oct4 was strongly associated with changes in acetylation. Intriguingly, telomere length in fPMSCs did not significantly change during the propagating process. These findings suggest that human fPMSCs may be a safe and reliable resource of MSCs and can be propagated under serum-free conditions with less risk of spontaneous malignancy, and warrants further validation in clinical settings.

  19. Histone deacetylase inhibitors promote the tumoricidal effect of HAMLET.

    PubMed

    Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Mattias; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gustafsson, Lotta; Duringer, Caroline; Hamiche, Ali; Svanborg, Catharina

    2007-12-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) and HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) interact with histones, modify the structure of chromatin, and trigger tumor cell death. This study investigated how the combination of HDIs and HAMLET influences cell viability, histone acetylation, and DNA integrity. The pretreatment of tumor cells with HDIs was shown to enhance the lethal effect of HAMLET and the histone hyperacetylation response to HDIs increased even further after HAMLET treatment. HDIs and HAMLET were shown to target different histone domains as HAMLET bound tailless core histones, whereas HDIs modify the acetylation of the histone tail. DNA damage in response to HAMLET was increased by HDIs. The DNA repair response (p21WAFI expression) was induced by both agonists but abolished when the two agonists were combined. The results suggest that the synergy of HDIs and HAMLET is based on different but converging death pathways, both involving chromatin alterations. We speculate that HAMLET and HDIs might be combined to promote tumor cell death in vivo.

  20. Anaplasma phagocytophilum increases the levels of histone modifying enzymes to inhibit cell apoptosis and facilitate pathogen infection in the tick vector Ixodes scapularis

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas-Cruz, Alejandro; Alberdi, Pilar; Ayllón, Nieves; Valdés, James J.; Pierce, Raymond; Villar, Margarita; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epigenetic mechanisms have not been characterized in ticks despite their importance as vectors of human and animal diseases worldwide. The objective of this study was to characterize the histones and histone modifying enzymes (HMEs) of the tick vector Ixodes scapularis and their role during Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection. We first identified 5 histones and 34 HMEs in I. scapularis in comparison with similar proteins in model organisms. Then, we used transcriptomic and proteomic data to analyze the mRNA and protein levels of I. scapularis histones and HMEs in response to A. phagocytophilum infection of tick tissues and cultured cells. Finally, selected HMEs were functionally characterized by pharmacological studies in cultured tick cells. The results suggest that A. phagocytophilum manipulates tick cell epigenetics to increase I. scapularis p300/CBP, histone deacetylase, and Sirtuin levels, resulting in an inhibition of cell apoptosis that in turn facilitates pathogen infection and multiplication. These results also suggest that a compensatory mechanism might exist by which A. phagocytophilum manipulates tick HMEs to regulate transcription and apoptosis in a tissue-specific manner to facilitate infection, but preserving tick fitness to guarantee survival of both pathogens and ticks. Our study also indicates that the pathogen manipulates arthropod and vertebrate cell epigenetics in similar ways to inhibit the host response to infection. Epigenetic regulation of tick biological processes is an essential element of the infection by A. phagocytophilum and the study of the mechanisms and principal actors involved is likely to provide clues for the development of anti-tick drugs and vaccines. PMID:27019326

  1. Heterologous expression ofa histone-like protein from Streptococcus intermedius in Escherichia coli alters the nucleoid structure and inhibits the growth of E. coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dali; Yumoto, Hiromichi; Murakami, Keiji; Hirota, Katsuhiko; Kayama, Shizuo; Taniguchi, Tomonori; Yamamoto, Akitake; Ono, Tsuneko; Matsuo, Takashi; Miyake, Yoichiro

    2008-11-01

    Escherichia coli failed to survive after transformation with a Streptococcus intermedius histone-like protein gene (Si-hlp) and its promoter-harbored plasmid. The promoter function of Si-hlp in E. coli was determined using enhanced green fluorescence protein (egfp) gene as a reporter. The inhibitory effect of Si-HLP on E. coli viability was verified by a tetracycline-inducible gene expression system. Further study suggested that Si-HLP may alter the bacterial nucleoid structure, leading to the growth inhibition of E. coli.

  2. Alteration of cancer stem cell-like phenotype by histone deacetylase inhibitors in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Chikamatsu, Kazuaki; Ishii, Hiroki; Murata, Takaaki; Sakakura, Koichi; Shino, Masato; Toyoda, Minoru; Takahashi, Katsumasa; Masuyama, Keisuke

    2013-11-01

    Recent progression in the understanding of stem cell biology has greatly facilitated the identification and characterization of cancer stem cells (CSCs). Moreover, evidence has accumulated indicating that conventional cancer treatments are potentially ineffective against CSCs. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) have multiple biologic effects consequent to alterations in the patterns of acetylation of histones and are a promising new group of anticancer agents. In this study, we investigated the effects of two HDACi, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and trichostatin A (TSA), on two CD44+ cancer stem-like cell lines from squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) cultured in serum-free medium containing epidermal growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Histone deacetylase inhibitors inhibited the growth of SCCHN cell lines in a dose-dependent manner as measured by MTS assays. Moreover, HDACi induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in these SCCHN cell lines. Interestingly, the expression of cancer stem cell markers, CD44 and ABCG2, on SCCHN cell lines was decreased by HDACi treatment. In addition, HDACi decreased mRNA expression levels of stemness-related genes and suppressed the epithelial-mesencymal transition phenotype of CSCs. As expected, the combination of HDACi and chemotherapeutic agents, including cisplatin and docetaxel, had a synergistic effect on SCCHN cell lines. Taken together, our data indicate that HDACi not only inhibit the growth of SCCHN cell lines by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest, but also alter the cancer stem cell phenotype in SCCHN, raising the possibility that HDACi may have therapeutic potential for cancer stem cells of SCCHN.

  3. Two Independent Regions of Simian Virus 40 T Antigen Increase CBP/p300 Levels, Alter Patterns of Cellular Histone Acetylation, and Immortalize Primary Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sáenz Robles, Maria Teresa; Shivalila, Chikdu; Wano, Jeremy; Sorrells, Shelly; Roos, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen (SVT) interferes with normal cell regulation and thus has been used to identify cellular components controlling proliferation and homeostasis. We have previously shown that SVT-mediated transformation requires interaction with the histone acetyltransferases (HATs) CBP/p300 and now report that the ectopic expression of SVT in several cell types in vivo and in vitro results in a significant increase in the steady-state levels of CBP/p300. Furthermore, SVT-expressing cells contain higher levels of acetylated CBP/p300, a modification that has been linked to increased HAT activity. Concomitantly, the acetylation levels of histone residues H3K56 and H4K12 are markedly increased in SVT-expressing cells. Other polyomavirus-encoded large T antigens also increase the levels of CBP/p300 and sustain a rise in the acetylation levels of H3K56 and H4K12. SVT does not affect the transcription of CBP/p300, but rather, alters their overall levels through increasing the loading of CBP/p300 mRNAs onto polysomes. Two distinct regions within SVT, one located in the amino terminus and one in the carboxy terminus, can independently alter both the levels of CBP/p300 and the loading of CBP/p300 transcripts onto polysomes. Within the amino-terminal fragment, a functional J domain is necessary for increasing CBP/p300 and specific histone acetylation levels, as well as for immortalizing primary cells. These studies uncover the action of polyomavirus T antigens on cellular CBP/p300 and suggest that additional mechanisms are used by T antigens to induce cell immortalization and transformation. PMID:24089570

  4. Cytoplasmic sequestration of FUS/TLS associated with ALS alters histone marks through loss of nuclear protein arginine methyltransferase 1.

    PubMed

    Tibshirani, Michael; Tradewell, Miranda L; Mattina, Katie R; Minotti, Sandra; Yang, Wencheng; Zhou, Hongru; Strong, Michael J; Hayward, Lawrence J; Durham, Heather D

    2015-02-01

    Mutations in the RNA-binding protein FUS/TLS (FUS) have been linked to the neurodegenerative disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Although predominantly nuclear, this heterogenous nuclear ribonuclear protein (hnRNP) has multiple functions in RNA processing including intracellular trafficking. In ALS, mutant or wild-type (WT) FUS can form neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions. Asymmetric arginine methylation of FUS by the class 1 arginine methyltransferase, protein arginine methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1), regulates nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of FUS. In motor neurons of primary spinal cord cultures, redistribution of endogenous mouse and that of ectopically expressed WT or mutant human FUS to the cytoplasm led to nuclear depletion of PRMT1, abrogating methylation of its nuclear substrates. Specifically, hypomethylation of arginine 3 of histone 4 resulted in decreased acetylation of lysine 9/14 of histone 3 and transcriptional repression. Distribution of neuronal PRMT1 coincident with FUS also was detected in vivo in the spinal cord of FUS(R495X) transgenic mice. However, nuclear PRMT1 was not stable postmortem obviating meaningful evaluation of ALS autopsy cases. This study provides evidence for loss of PRMT1 function as a consequence of cytoplasmic accumulation of FUS in the pathogenesis of ALS, including changes in the histone code regulating gene transcription.

  5. Sodium arsenite represses the expression of myogenin in C2C12 mouse myoblast cells through histone modifications and altered expression of Ezh2, Glp, and Igf-1

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Gia-Ming

    2012-05-01

    Arsenic is a toxicant commonly found in water systems and chronic exposure can result in adverse developmental effects including increased neonatal death, stillbirths, and miscarriages, low birth weight, and altered locomotor activity. Previous studies indicate that 20 nM sodium arsenite exposure to C2C12 mouse myocyte cells delayed myoblast differentiation due to reduced myogenin expression, the transcription factor that differentiates myoblasts into myotubes. In this study, several mechanisms by which arsenic could alter myogenin expression were examined. Exposing differentiating C2C12 cells to 20 nM arsenic increased H3K9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) and H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) by 3-fold near the transcription start site of myogenin, which is indicative of increased repressive marks, and reduced H3K9 acetylation (H3K9Ac) by 0.5-fold, indicative of reduced permissive marks. Protein expression of Glp or Ehmt1, a H3-K9 methyltransferase, was also increased by 1.6-fold in arsenic-exposed cells. In addition to the altered histone remodeling status on the myogenin promoter, protein and mRNA levels of Igf-1, a myogenic growth factor, were significantly repressed by arsenic exposure. Moreover, a 2-fold induction of Ezh2 expression, and an increased recruitment of Ezh2 (3.3-fold) and Dnmt3a (∼ 2-fold) to the myogenin promoter at the transcription start site (− 40 to + 42), were detected in the arsenic-treated cells. Together, we conclude that the repressed myogenin expression in arsenic-exposed C2C12 cells was likely due to a combination of reduced expression of Igf-1, enhanced nuclear expression and promoter recruitment of Ezh2, and altered histone remodeling status on myogenin promoter (− 40 to + 42). -- Highlights: ► Igf-1 expression is decreased in C2C12 cells after 20 nM arsenite exposure. ► Arsenic exposure alters histone remodeling on the myogenin promoter. ► Glp expression, a H3–K9 methyltransferase, was increased in arsenic-exposed cells. ► Ezh2

  6. Reshaping chromatin after DNA damage: the choreography of histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Polo, Sophie E

    2015-02-13

    DNA damage signaling and repair machineries operate in a nuclear environment where DNA is wrapped around histone proteins and packaged into chromatin. Understanding how chromatin structure is restored together with the DNA sequence during DNA damage repair has been a topic of intense research. Indeed, chromatin integrity is central to cell functions and identity. However, chromatin shows remarkable plasticity in response to DNA damage. This review presents our current knowledge of chromatin dynamics in the mammalian cell nucleus in response to DNA double strand breaks and UV lesions. I provide an overview of the key players involved in regulating histone dynamics in damaged chromatin regions, focusing on histone chaperones and their concerted action with histone modifiers, chromatin remodelers and repair factors. I also discuss how these dynamics contribute to reshaping chromatin and, by altering the chromatin landscape, may affect the maintenance of epigenetic information.

  7. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Colin M; Strømme, Caroline B; Huang, Hongda; Patel, Dinshaw J; Groth, Anja

    2017-03-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availability and fate, which affects all chromosomal processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation and genome replication and repair. Here, we review the distinct structural and functional properties of the expanding network of histone chaperones. We emphasize how chaperones cooperate in the histone chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin.

  8. Analysis of histones and histone variants in plants.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Ila; Rai, Krishan Mohan; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Kumar, Verandra; Singh, Mala; Ranjan, Amol; Lodhi, Niraj; Sawant, Samir V

    2012-01-01

    Histone proteins are the major protein components of chromatin - the physiologically relevant form of the genome (or epigenome) in all eukaryotic cells. For many years, histones were considered passive structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. In recent years, it has been demonstrated that dynamic association of histones and their variants to the genome plays a very important role in gene regulation. Histones are extensively modified during posttranslation viz. acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitylation, etc., and the identification of these covalent marks on canonical and variant histones is crucial for the understanding of their biological significance. Different biochemical techniques have been developed to purify and separate histone proteins; here, we describe techniques for analysis of histones from plant tissues.

  9. 76 FR 4451 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of Modified or Altered System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Services proposes to alter System of Records, 09-20-0112, ``Fellowship Program and Guest Researcher Records...-0112, ``, Fellowship Program and Guest Researcher Records, HHS/CDC/AHRC.'' This system is utilized by... Resources Center (AHRC) Fellowship Program And Guest Researcher Records Report of Modified or Altered...

  10. Telomeres, histone code, and DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Misri, S; Pandita, S; Kumar, R; Pandita, T K

    2008-01-01

    Genomic stability is maintained by telomeres, the end terminal structures that protect chromosomes from fusion or degradation. Shortening or loss of telomeric repeats or altered telomere chromatin structure is correlated with telomere dysfunction such as chromosome end-to-end associations that could lead to genomic instability and gene amplification. The structure at the end of telomeres is such that its DNA differs from DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) to avoid nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), which is accomplished by forming a unique higher order nucleoprotein structure. Telomeres are attached to the nuclear matrix and have a unique chromatin structure. Whether this special structure is maintained by specific chromatin changes is yet to be thoroughly investigated. Chromatin modifications implicated in transcriptional regulation are thought to be the result of a code on the histone proteins (histone code). This code, involving phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitylation, and sumoylation of histones, is believed to regulate chromatin accessibility either by disrupting chromatin contacts or by recruiting non-histone proteins to chromatin. The histone code in which distinct histone tail-protein interactions promote engagement may be the deciding factor for choosing specific DSB repair pathways. Recent evidence suggests that such mechanisms are involved in DNA damage detection and repair. Altered telomere chromatin structure has been linked to defective DNA damage response (DDR), and eukaryotic cells have evolved DDR mechanisms utilizing proficient DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoints in order to maintain genomic stability. Recent studies suggest that chromatin modifying factors play a critical role in the maintenance of genomic stability. This review will summarize the role of DNA damage repair proteins specifically ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and its effectors and the telomere complex in maintaining genome stability.

  11. Protein restriction during gestation alters histone modifications at the glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) promoter region and induces GLUT4 expression in skeletal muscle of female rat offspring.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shasha; Rollet, Michelle; Pan, Yuan-Xiang

    2012-09-01

    Maternal nutrition during pregnancy is an intrauterine factor that results in alteration of the offspring genome and associates with disease risk in the offspring. We investigated the impact of a maternal low-protein (LP) diet on the expression of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) in offspring skeletal muscle. GLUT4 is an insulin-regulated glucose transporter involved in insulin sensitivity and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle cells. We observed sex-dependent GLUT4 mRNA expression and increased GLUT4 protein content in female pup skeletal muscle with maternal LP. Analysis of transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of increased skeletal muscle GLUT4 expression in offspring rats revealed the regulatory mechanisms involved. The protein level of myocyte enhancer factor 2A (MEF2A), which has been known as an activator of GLUT4 transcription via the ability to carry out specific binding to the GLUT4 MEF2 binding sequence, increased in female pups whose mothers were fed a LP diet. Modifications of chromatin structure, including acetylated histone H3, acetylated histone H4 and di-methylated histone H3 at lysine 4, were detected at a significantly increased level at the GLUT4 promoter region in female pup muscle following a maternal LP diet. Glycogen content was also detected as up-regulated, accompanied by increased glycogen synthase in LP female offspring muscle. These results document that maternal protein restriction during pregnancy induces GLUT4 expression in female offspring skeletal muscle but not in males, which may indicate sex-dependent adaptation of glucose metabolism to a maternal LP diet.

  12. Histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in bladder cancer is associated with chromatin modification and modifying protein expression: A proteomic approach

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINGDI QUENTIN; HAO, JIAN-JIANG; ZHANG, ZHENG; HSU, IAWEN; LIU, YI; TAO, ZHEN; LEWI, KEIDREN; METWALLI, ADAM R.; AGARWAL, PIYUSH K.

    2016-01-01

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project recently identified the importance of mutations in chromatin remodeling genes in human carcinomas. These findings imply that epigenetic modulators might have a therapeutic role in urothelial cancers. To exploit histone deacetylases (HDACs) as targets for cancer therapy, we investigated the HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) romidepsin, trichostatin A, and vorinostat as potential chemotherapeutic agents for bladder cancer. We demonstrate that the three HDACIs suppressed cell growth and induced cell death in the bladder cancer cell line 5637. To identify potential mechanisms associated with the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects of the HDACIs, we used quantitative proteomics to determine the proteins potentially involved in these processes. Our proteome studies identified a total of 6003 unique proteins. Of these, 2472 proteins were upregulated and 2049 proteins were downregulated in response to HDACI exposure compared to the untreated controls (P<0.05). Bioinformatic analysis further revealed that those differentially expressed proteins were involved in multiple biological functions and enzyme-regulated pathways, including cell cycle progression, apoptosis, autophagy, free radical generation and DNA damage repair. HDACIs also altered the acetylation status of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as the levels of chromatin modification proteins, suggesting that HDACIs exert multiple cytotoxic actions in bladder cancer cells by inhibiting HDAC activity or altering the structure of chromatin. We conclude that HDACIs are effective in the inhibition of cell proliferation and the induction of apoptosis in the 5637 bladder cancer cells through multiple cell death-associated pathways. These observations support the notion that HDACIs provide new therapeutic options for bladder cancer treatment and thus warrant further preclinical exploration. PMID:27082124

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the transcriptional regulation of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-a gene: interactive roles of modified histones, histone acetyltransferase, p300, AND Sp1.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2014-03-07

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription.

  14. Bisulfite sequencing of chromatin immunoprecipitated DNA (BisChIP-seq) directly informs methylation status of histone-modified DNA

    PubMed Central

    Statham, Aaron L.; Robinson, Mark D.; Song, Jenny Z.; Coolen, Marcel W.; Stirzaker, Clare; Clark, Susan J.

    2012-01-01

    The complex relationship between DNA methylation, chromatin modification, and underlying DNA sequence is often difficult to unravel with existing technologies. Here, we describe a novel technique based on high-throughput sequencing of bisulfite-treated chromatin immunoprecipitated DNA (BisChIP-seq), which can directly interrogate genetic and epigenetic processes that occur in normal and diseased cells. Unlike most previous reports based on correlative techniques, we found using direct bisulfite sequencing of Polycomb H3K27me3-enriched DNA from normal and prostate cancer cells that DNA methylation and H3K27me3-marked histones are not always mutually exclusive, but can co-occur in a genomic region-dependent manner. Notably, in cancer, the co-dependency of marks is largely redistributed with an increase of the dual repressive marks at CpG islands and transcription start sites of silent genes. In contrast, there is a loss of DNA methylation in intergenic H3K27me3-marked regions. Allele-specific methylation status derived from the BisChIP-seq data clearly showed that both methylated and unmethylated alleles can simultaneously be associated with H3K27me3 histones, highlighting that DNA methylation status in these regions is not dependent on Polycomb chromatin status. BisChIP-seq is a novel approach that can be widely applied to directly interrogate the genomic relationship between allele-specific DNA methylation, histone modification, or other important epigenetic regulators. PMID:22466171

  15. The Y641C mutation of EZH2 alters substrate specificity for histone H3 lysine 27 methylation states.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Tim J; Knutson, Sarah K; Jin, Lei; Kuntz, Kevin W; Pollock, Roy M; Richon, Victoria M; Copeland, Robert A; Scott, Margaret Porter

    2011-10-03

    Mutations at tyrosine 641 (Y641F, Y641N, Y641S and Y641H) in the SET domain of EZH2 have been identified in patients with certain subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). These mutations were shown to change the substrate specificity of EZH2 for various methylation states of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27). An additional mutation at EZH2 Y641 to cysteine (Y641C) was also found in one patient with NHL and in SKM-1 cells derived from a patient with myelodisplastic syndrome (MDS). The Y641C mutation has been reported to dramatically reduce enzymatic activity. Here, we demonstrate that while the Y641C mutation ablates enzymatic activity against unmethylated and monomethylated H3K27, it is superior to wild-type in catalyzing the formation of trimethylated H3K27 from the dimethylated precursor.

  16. Adolescent alcohol exposure alters lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1) expression and histone methylation in the amygdala during adulthood.

    PubMed

    Kyzar, Evan J; Zhang, Huaibo; Sakharkar, Amul J; Pandey, Subhash C

    2016-05-15

    Alcohol exposure in adolescence is an important risk factor for the development of alcoholism in adulthood. Epigenetic processes are implicated in the persistence of adolescent alcohol exposure-related changes, specifically in the amygdala. We investigated the role of histone methylation mechanisms in the persistent effects of adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE) exposure in adulthood. Adolescent rats were exposed to 2 g/kg ethanol (2 days on/off) or intermittent n-saline (AIS) during postnatal days (PND) 28-41 and used for behavioral and epigenetic studies. We found that AIE exposure caused a long-lasting decrease in mRNA and protein levels of lysine demethylase 1(Lsd1) and mRNA levels of Lsd1 + 8a (a neuron-specific splice variant) in specific amygdaloid structures compared with AIS-exposed rats when measured at adulthood. Interestingly, AIE increased histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2) levels in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) and medial nucleus of the amygdala (MeA) in adulthood without producing any change in H3K4me2 protein levels. Acute ethanol challenge (2 g/kg) in adulthood attenuated anxiety-like behaviors and the decrease in Lsd1 + 8a mRNA levels in the amygdala induced by AIE. AIE caused an increase in H3K9me2 occupancy at the brain-derived neurotrophic factor exon IV promoter in the amygdala that returned to baseline after acute ethanol challenge in adulthood. These results indicate that AIE specifically modulates epizymes involved in H3K9 dimethylation in the amygdala in adulthood, which are possibly responsible for AIE-induced chromatin remodeling and adult psychopathology such as anxiety.

  17. Genome-Wide Alteration of Histone H3K9 Acetylation Pattern in Mouse Offspring Prenatally Exposed to Arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Cronican, Andrea A.; Fitz, Nicholas F.; Carter, Alexis; Saleem, Muzamil; Shiva, Sruti; Barchowsky, Aaron; Koldamova, Radosveta; Schug, Jonathan; Lefterov, Iliya

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to arsenic in drinking water, especially in utero or perinatal exposure, can initiate neurological and cognitive dysfunction, as well as memory impairment. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated cognitive and learning deficits in children with early exposure to low to moderate levels of arsenic, but pathogenic mechanisms or etiology for these deficits are poorly understood. Since in vivo studies show a role for histone acetylation in cognitive performance and memory formation, we examined if prenatal exposure to arsenic causes changes in the epigenomic landscape. We exposed C57Bl6/J mice to 100 μg/L arsenic in the drinking water starting 1 week before conception till birth and applied chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput massive parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq) to evaluate H3K9 acetylation pattern in the offspring of exposed and control mice. Arsenic exposure during embryonic life caused global hypo-acetylation at H3K9 and changes in functional annotation with highly significant representation of Krüppel associated box (KRAB) transcription factors in brain samples from exposed pups. We also found that arsenic exposure of adult mice impaired spatial and episodic memory, as well as fear conditioning performance. This is the first study to demonstrate: a) genome wide changes in H3K9 acetylation pattern in an offspring prenatally exposed to arsenic, and b) a connection between moderate arsenic exposure and cognitive impairment in adult mice. The results also emphasize the applicability of Next Generation Sequencing methodology in studies aiming to reveal the role of environmental factors, other than dietary restriction, in developmental reprogramming through histone modifications during embryonic development. PMID:23405071

  18. Characterization of antimicrobial histone sequences and posttranslational modifications by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ouvry-Patat, Séverine A; Schey, Kevin L

    2007-05-01

    Histones typically play a role in DNA packaging and transcription regulation. These proteins are heavily modified by acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and/or ubiquitination, and various combinations of these modifications alter histone functions and form the basis of the histone code. Furthermore, histones, including those found in shrimp, have recently been found to possess antimicrobial properties; however, the sequences and posttranslational modifications of shrimp histones are largely unknown. In this study mass spectrometry was used to characterize the primary structure of the shrimp antimicrobial histone. A combination of in-solution digestion and in-gel propionylation/digestion followed by LC-MS-MS and MALDI-TOF-TOF analysis was used. Over 80% of each histone sequence was obtained by in-solution digestion; however, none of the N-terminal domains was sequenced with this method. An in-gel propionylation method was optimized to recover and sequence the extremely hydrophilic histone N-termini. This method was then applied to shrimp hemocyte lysates separated on a 1-D SDS-PAGE gel. Overall, 95% coverage was obtained for the histone sequences as well as the identification of posttranslational sites such as acetylation, methylation and phosphorylation.

  19. Genetic alterations of JAK/STAT cascade and histone modification in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type

    PubMed Central

    Kang, So Young; Kim, Seok Jin; Hwang, Jinha; Lee, Seungho; Kwak, Soo Heon; Park, Kyong Soo; Yoo, Hae Yong

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma nasal type (ENKL) is a rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma that more frequently occurs in East Asia and Latin America. Even though its molecular background has been discussed in the last few years, the current knowledge does not explain the disease pathogenesis in most cases of ENKL. Here, we performed multiple types of next-generation sequencing on 34 ENKL samples, including whole-exome sequencing (9 cancer tissues and 4 cancer cell lines), targeted sequencing (21 cancer tissues), and RNA sequencing (3 cancer tissues and 4 cancer cell lines). Mutations were found most frequently in 3 genes, STAT3, BCOR, and MLL2 (which were present in 9, 7, and 6 cancer samples, respectively), whereas there were only 2 cases of JAK3 mutation. In total, JAK/STAT pathway- and histone modification-related genes accounted for 55.9% and 38.2% of cancer samples, respectively, and their involvement in ENKL pathogenesis was also supported by gene expression analysis. In addition, we provided 177 genes upregulated only in cancer tissues, which appear to be linked with angiocentric and angiodestructive growth of ENKL. In this study, we propose several novel driver genes of ENKL, and show that these genes and their functional groups may be future therapeutic targets of this disease. PMID:25980440

  20. Altering histone acetylation status in donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid does not affect dog cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Suh, Han Na; Jo, Young Kwang; Choi, Yoo Bin; Kim, Dong Hoon; Han, Ho Jae; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2015-10-15

    Although dog cloning technology has been applied to conservation of endangered canids, propagation of elite dogs, and production of transgenic dogs, the efficiency of cloning is still very low. To help overcome this problem, we evaluated the effect of treating donor cells with suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), a histone deacetylase inhibitor, on dog cloning efficiency. Relative messenger RNA expressions of the bax1/bcl2 ratio and Dnmt1 in fibroblasts treated with different concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50 μM) of SAHA and durations (0, 20, 44 hours) were compared. Treatment with 1 μM for 20 hours showed significantly lower bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcript abundance. Acetylation of H3K9 was significantly increased after SAHA treatment, but H4K5, H4K8 and H4K16 were not changed. After SCNT using control or donor cells treated with SAHA, a total of 76 and 64 cloned embryos were transferred to seven and five recipients, respectively. Three fetuses were diagnosed in both control and SAHA-treated groups by ultrasonography 29 days after the embryo transfer, but there was no significant difference in the pregnancy rate (4.2% vs. 4.3%). In conclusion, although SAHA treatment as used in this study significantly decreased bax1/bcl2 and Dnmt1 transcripts of donor nuclei, as well as increased H3 acetylation, it was not enough to increase in vivo developmental competence of cloned dog embryos.

  1. Nuclear Arc Interacts with the Histone Acetyltransferase Tip60 to Modify H4K12 Acetylation1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Caroline L.; Teo, Shaun; Oey, Nicodemus E.; Wright, Graham D.; VanDongen, Hendrika M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Arc is an immediate-early gene whose genetic ablation selectively abrogates long-term memory, indicating a critical role in memory consolidation. Although Arc protein is found at synapses, it also localizes to the neuronal nucleus, where its function is less understood. Nuclear Arc forms a complex with the β-spectrin isoform βSpIVΣ5 and associates with PML bodies, sites of epigenetic regulation of gene expression. We report here a novel interaction between Arc and Tip60, a histone-acetyltransferase and subunit of a chromatin-remodelling complex, using biochemistry and super-resolution microscopy in primary rat hippocampal neurons. Arc and βSpIVΣ5 are recruited to nuclear Tip60 speckles, and the three proteins form a tight complex that localizes to nuclear perichromatin regions, sites of transcriptional activity. Neuronal activity-induced expression of Arc (1) increases endogenous nuclear Tip60 puncta, (2) recruits Tip60 to PML bodies, and (3) increases histone acetylation of Tip60 substrate H4K12, a learning-induced chromatin modification. These mechanisms point to an epigenetic role for Arc in regulating memory consolidation. PMID:26464963

  2. Methylglyoxal mediated conformational changes in histone H2A-generation of carboxyethylated advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Mir, Abdul Rouf; uddin, Moin; Alam, Khursheed; Ali, Asif

    2014-08-01

    Methylglyoxal, an oxo-aldehyde has been implicated as a potential precursor in non enzymatic glycation reactions. Its role in the modification of extra cellular proteins has been extensively reported, but little is known about its modification of nuclear proteins, like histones. Here, we report the methylglyoxal induced modification of histone H2A which forms an essential part of intact core nucleosome. In this study commercially available histone H2A was subjected to in vitro non-enzymatic glycation by methylglyoxal. The structural alterations in the histone were characterised by various biophysical and biochemical techniques. The modified histone showed hyperchromicity at 276nm, loss in intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence intensity at 305nm along with a red shift, cross linking and dimer formation in SDS PAGE, induction of α-helix in CD spectroscopy, reduced hydrophobicity in ANS binding studies, accumulation of AGE products, increased carbonyl content, and appearance of a novel peak showing carboxyethylation complemented by a shift in amide I and amide II bands in ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. The modified histone exhibited increased melting temperatures (Tm) and enhanced heat capacities (Cp) in differential scanning calorimetric analysis. The results suggest that methylglyoxal significantly altered the structure of the nuclear histone H2A by non enzymatic glycation reaction. The conformational changes in histone H2A may influence the chromatin integrity which may have implications in various pathological conditions.

  3. The Caenorhabditis elegans Protein FIC-1 Is an AMPylase That Covalently Modifies Heat-Shock 70 Family Proteins, Translation Elongation Factors and Histones

    PubMed Central

    Truttmann, Matthias C.; Guo, Xuanzong; Engert, Christoph; Schwartz, Thomas U.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    Protein AMPylation by Fic domain-containing proteins (Fic proteins) is an ancient and conserved post-translational modification of mostly unexplored significance. Here we characterize the Caenorhabditis elegans Fic protein FIC-1 in vitro and in vivo. FIC-1 is an AMPylase that localizes to the nuclear surface and modifies core histones H2 and H3 as well as heat shock protein 70 family members and translation elongation factors. The three-dimensional structure of FIC-1 is similar to that of its human ortholog, HYPE, with 38% sequence identity. We identify a link between FIC-1-mediated AMPylation and susceptibility to the pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, establishing a connection between AMPylation and innate immunity in C. elegans. PMID:27138431

  4. A genetic system to assess in vivo the functions of histones and histone modifications in higher eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Günesdogan, Ufuk; Jäckle, Herbert; Herzig, Alf

    2010-10-01

    Despite the fundamental role of canonical histones in nucleosome structure, there is no experimental system for higher eukaryotes in which basic questions about histone function can be directly addressed. We developed a new genetic tool for Drosophila melanogaster in which the canonical histone complement can be replaced with multiple copies of experimentally modified histone transgenes. This new histone-replacement system provides a well-defined and direct cellular assay system for histone function with which to critically test models in chromatin biology dealing with chromatin assembly, variant histone functions and the biological significance of distinct histone modifications in a multicellular organism.

  5. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  6. Recruitment of the Mammalian Histone-modifying EMSY Complex to Target Genes Is Regulated by ZNF131.

    PubMed

    Varier, Radhika A; Carrillo de Santa Pau, Enrique; van der Groep, Petra; Lindeboom, Rik G H; Matarese, Filomena; Mensinga, Anneloes; Smits, Arne H; Edupuganti, Raghu Ram; Baltissen, Marijke P; Jansen, Pascal W T C; Ter Hoeve, Natalie; van Weely, Danny R; Poser, Ina; van Diest, Paul J; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Vermeulen, Michiel

    2016-04-01

    Recent work from others and us revealed interactions between the Sin3/HDAC complex, the H3K4me3 demethylase KDM5A, GATAD1, and EMSY. Here, we characterize the EMSY/KDM5A/SIN3B complex in detail by quantitative interaction proteomics and ChIP-sequencing. We identify a novel substoichiometric interactor of the complex, transcription factor ZNF131, which recruits EMSY to a large number of active, H3K4me3 marked promoters. Interestingly, using an EMSY knock-out line and subsequent rescue experiments, we show that EMSY is in most cases positively correlated with transcriptional activity of its target genes and stimulates cell proliferation. Finally, by immunohistochemical staining of primary breast tissue microarrays we find that EMSY/KDM5A/SIN3B complex subunits are frequently overexpressed in primary breast cancer cases in a correlative manner. Taken together, these data open venues for exploring the possibility that sporadic breast cancer patients with EMSY amplification might benefit from epigenetic combination therapy targeting both the KDM5A demethylase and histone deacetylases.

  7. Knockdown of selenocysteine-specific elongation factor in Amblyomma maculatum alters the pathogen burden of Rickettsia parkeri with epigenetic control by the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Steven W; Browning, Rebecca E; Budachetri, Khemraj; Ribeiro, José M C; Karim, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF). The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex.

  8. Knockdown of Selenocysteine-Specific Elongation Factor in Amblyomma maculatum Alters the Pathogen Burden of Rickettsia parkeri with Epigenetic Control by the Sin3 Histone Deacetylase Corepressor Complex

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Steven W.; Browning, Rebecca E.; Budachetri, Khemraj; Ribeiro, José M. C.; Karim, Shahid

    2013-01-01

    Selenocysteine is the 21st naturally-occurring amino acid. Selenoproteins have diverse functions and many remain uncharacterized, but they are typically associated with antioxidant activity. The incorporation of selenocysteine into the nascent polypeptide chain recodes the TGA stop codon and this process depends upon a number of essential factors including the selenocysteine elongation factor (SEF). The transcriptional expression of SEF did not change significantly in tick midguts throughout the blood meal, but decreased in salivary glands to 20% at the end of the fast feeding phase. Since selenoprotein translation requires this specialized elongation factor, we targeted this gene for knockdown by RNAi to gain a global view of the role selenoproteins play in tick physiology. We found no significant differences in tick engorgement and embryogenesis but detected no antioxidant capacity in tick saliva. The transcriptional profile of selenoproteins in R. parkeri-infected Amblyomma maculatum revealed declined activity of selenoprotein M and catalase and increased activity of selenoprotein O, selenoprotein S, and selenoprotein T. Furthermore, the pathogen burden was significantly altered in SEF-knockdowns. We then determined the global impact of SEF-knockdown by RNA-seq, and mapped huge shifts in secretory gene expression that could be the result of downregulation of the Sin3 histone deacetylase corepressor complex. PMID:24282621

  9. HHMD: the human histone modification database.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Lv, Jie; Liu, Hongbo; Zhu, Jiang; Su, Jianzhong; Wu, Qiong; Qi, Yunfeng; Wang, Fang; Li, Xia

    2010-01-01

    Histone modifications play important roles in chromatin remodeling, gene transcriptional regulation, stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Alterations in histone modifications may be linked to human diseases especially cancer. Histone modifications including methylation, acetylation and ubiquitylation probed by ChIP-seq, ChIP-chip and qChIP have become widely available. Mining and integration of histone modification data can be beneficial to novel biological discoveries. There has been no comprehensive data repository that is exclusive for human histone modifications. Therefore, we developed a relatively comprehensive database for human histone modifications. Human Histone Modification Database (HHMD, http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/hhmd) focuses on the storage and integration of histone modification datasets that were obtained from laboratory experiments. The latest release of HHMD incorporates 43 location-specific histone modifications in human. To facilitate data extraction, flexible search options are built in HHMD. It can be searched by histone modification, gene ID, functional categories, chromosome location and cancer name. HHMD also includes a user-friendly visualization tool named HisModView, by which genome-wide histone modification map can be shown. HisModView facilitates the acquisition and visualization of histone modifications. The database also has manually curated information of histone modification dysregulation in nine human cancers.

  10. Quantitative measurement of histone tail acetylation reveals stage-specific regulation and response to environmental changes during Drosophila development

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Ryan A.; Singh, Tanu; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Biester, Alison; O’Keefe, Abigail; Lee, Sandy; Andrews, Andrew J.; O’Reilly, Alana M.

    2016-01-01

    Histone modification plays a major role in regulating gene transcription and ensuring the healthy development of an organism. Numerous studies have suggested that histones are dynamically modified during developmental events to control gene expression levels in a temporal and spatial manner. However, the study of histone acetylation dynamics using currently available techniques is hindered by the difficulty of simultaneously measuring acetylation of the numerous potential sites of modification present in histones. Here, we present a methodology that allows us to combine mass spectrometry-based histone analysis with Drosophila developmental genetics. Using this system, we characterized histone acetylation patterns during multiple developmental stages of the fly. Additionally, we utilized this analysis to characterize how treatments with pharmacological agents or environmental changes such as gamma-irradiation altered histone acetylation patterns. Strikingly, gamma-irradiation dramatically increased acetylation at H3K18, a site linked to DNA repair via non-homologous end joining. In mutant fly strains deficient in DNA repair proteins, however, this increase in H3K18 acetylation was lost. These results demonstrate the efficacy of our combined mass spectrometry system with a Drosophila model system, and provide interesting insight into the changes in histone acetylation during development, as well as the effects of both pharmacological and environmental agents on global histone acetylation. PMID:26836402

  11. Alterations in sarcomere function modify the hyperplastic to hypertrophic transition phase of mammalian cardiomyocyte development

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Benjamin R.; Williams, Alexandra F.; Glennon, Michael S.; de Feria, Alejandro E.; Sebag, Sara C.; Baldwin, H. Scott; Becker, Jason R.

    2017-01-01

    It remains unclear how perturbations in cardiomyocyte sarcomere function alter postnatal heart development. We utilized murine models that allowed manipulation of cardiac myosin-binding protein C (MYBPC3) expression at critical stages of cardiac ontogeny to study the response of the postnatal heart to disrupted sarcomere function. We discovered that the hyperplastic to hypertrophic transition phase of mammalian heart development was altered in mice lacking MYBPC3 and this was the critical period for subsequent development of cardiomyopathy. Specifically, MYBPC3-null hearts developed evidence of increased cardiomyocyte endoreplication, which was accompanied by enhanced expression of cell cycle stimulatory cyclins and increased phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Interestingly, this response was self-limited at later developmental time points by an upregulation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. These results provide valuable insights into how alterations in sarcomere protein function modify postnatal heart development and highlight the potential for targeting cell cycle regulatory pathways to counteract cardiomyopathic stimuli. PMID:28239655

  12. Dicarbonyl Induced Structural Perturbations Make Histone H1 Highly Immunogenic and Generate an Auto-Immune Response in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mir, Abdul Rouf; Uddin, Moin; Khan, Farzana; Alam, Khursheed; Ali, Asif

    2015-01-01

    Increased oxidative stress under hyperglycemic conditions, through the interaction of AGEs with RAGE receptors and via activation of interleukin mediated transcription signalling, has been reported in cancer. Proteins modifications are being explored for their roles in the development and progression of cancer and autoantibody response against them is gaining interest as a probe for early detection of the disease. This study has analysed the changes in histone H1 upon modification by methylglyoxal (MG) and its implications in auto-immunopathogenesis of cancer. Modified histone showed modifications in the aromatic residues, changed tyrosine microenvironment, intermolecular cross linking and generation of AGEs. It showed masking of hydrophobic patches and a hypsochromic shift in the in ANS specific fluorescence. MG aggressively oxidized histone H1 leading to the accumulation of reactive carbonyls. Far UV CD measurements showed di-carbonyl induced enhancement of the alpha structure and the induction of beta sheet conformation; and thermal denaturation (Tm) studies confirmed the thermal stability of the modified histone. FTIR analysis showed amide I band shift, generation of a carboxyethyl group and N-Cα vibrations in the modified histone. LCMS analysis confirmed the formation of Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine and electron microscopic studies revealed the amorphous aggregate formation. The modified histone showed altered cooperative binding with DNA. Modified H1 induced high titre antibodies in rabbits and the IgG isolated form sera of rabbits immunized with modified H1 exhibited specific binding with its immunogen in Western Blot analysis. IgG isolated from the sera of patients with lung cancer, prostate cancer, breast cancer and cancer of head and neck region showed better recognition for neo-epitopes on the modified histone, reflecting the presence of circulating autoantibodies in cancer. Since reports suggest a link between AGE-RAGE axis and carcinogenesis

  13. Parasites alter freshwater communities in mesocosms by modifying invasive crayfish behavior.

    PubMed

    Reisinger, Lindsey S; Lodge, David M

    2016-06-01

    trend for greater macrophyte consumption associated with infection and a trend indicating infection might alter macroinvertebrate community composition. Our results suggest that parasites can alter aquatic communities in mesocosms merely by modifying host behavior.

  14. Altered expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic histone H1 in pulmonary artery and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in patients with IPAH

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Megha; Seeley, Erin; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; Delisser, Horace; McDonald, Hayes; Ye, Fei; Zhang, Xueqiong; Shyr, Yu; Caprioli, Richard; Meyrick, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary hypertension is poorly understood. This paper utilized histology-based Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) to identify as-yet unknown proteins that may be associated with the structural changes in the pulmonary arterial walls of patients with IPAH. The technology identified significant increases in two fragments of histone H1 in the IPAH cases compared to controls. This finding was further examined using immunofluorescence techniques applied to sections from IPAH and control pulmonary arteries. In addition, cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were utilized for Western analysis of histone H1 and importin β and importin 7, immunoprecipitation and assessment of nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Immunofluorescence techniques revealed that nuclear expression of histone H1 was decreased and the chromatin was less compact in the IPAH cases than in the controls; furthermore, some cases showed a marked increase in cytoplasmic histone H1 expression. Using nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of cultured PASMCs, we confirmed the reduction in histone H1 in the nucleus and an increase in the cytoplasm in IPAH cells compared to controls. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated a decreased association of histone H1 with importin β while importin 7 was unchanged in the IPAH cells compared to controls. The assessment of NRL revealed that the distance between nucleosomes was increased by ~20 bp in IPAH compared to controls. We conclude that at least two factors contribute to the reduction in nuclear histone H1—fragmentation of the protein and decreased import of histone H1 into the nucleus by importins. We further suggest that the decreased nuclear H1 contributes the less compact nucleosomal pattern in IPAH and this, in turn, contributes to the increase in NRL. PMID:23130102

  15. Histone Octamer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    1 mm histone octamer crystal grown on STS-81. A very dynamic structure which functions in many aspects of gene regulation from control of gene activity to the more subtle mechanisms of genetic imprinting. Principle Investigator is Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  16. Histone Octamer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is a large 2 mm crystal of histone octamer, grown on STS-81. A very dynamic structure which functions in many aspects of gene regulation from control of gene activity to the more subtle mechanisms of genetic imprinting. Principle Investigator is Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  17. Abnormal levels of histone methylation in the retinas of diabetic rats are reversed by minocycline treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjun; Sidoli, Simone; Zhang, Wenquan; Wang, Qing; Wang, Leilei; Jensen, Ole N.; Guo, Lin; Zhao, Xiaolu; Zheng, Ling

    2017-01-01

    In this study we quantified the alterations of retinal histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) in diabetic rats using a liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach. Some diabetic rats were subsequently treated with minocycline, a tetracycline antibiotic, which has been shown to inhibit the diabetes-induced chronic inflammation in the retinas of rodents. We quantified 266 differentially modified histone peptides, including 48 out of 83 methylation marks with significantly different abundancein retinas of diabetic rats as compared to non-diabetic controls. About 67% of these marks had their relative abundance restored to non-diabetic levels after minocycline treatment. Mono- and di-methylation states of histone H4 lysine 20 (H4K20me1/me2), markers related to DNA damage response, were found to be up-regulated in the retinas of diabetic rats and restored to control levels upon minocycline treatment. DNA damage response biomarkers showed the same pattern once quantified by western blotting. Collectively, this study indicates that alteration of some histone methylation levels is associated with the development of diabetic retinopathy in rodents, and the beneficial effect of minocycline on the retinas of diabetic rodents is partially through its ability to normalize the altered histone methylation levels. PMID:28338045

  18. Histone Deacetylases and Cardiometabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yiew, Kan Hui; Chatterjee, Tapan K.; Hui, David Y.; Weintraub, Neal L.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiometabolic disease, emerging as a worldwide epidemic, is a combination of metabolic derangements leading to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Genetic and environmental factors are linked through epigenetic mechanisms to the pathogenesis of cardiometabolic disease. Post-translational modifications of histone tails, including acetylation and deacetylation, epigenetically alter chromatin structure and dictate cell-specific gene expression patterns. The histone deacetylase (HDAC) family is comprised of 18 members that regulate gene expression by altering the acetylation status of nucleosomal histones and by functioning as nuclear transcriptional co-repressors. HDACs regulate key aspects of metabolism, inflammation, and vascular function pertinent to cardiometabolic disease in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. HDACs also likely play a role in the “metabolic memory” of diabetes, an important clinical aspect of the disease. Understanding the molecular, cellular, and physiological functions of HDACs in cardiometabolic disease is expected to provide insight into disease pathogenesis, risk factor control, and therapeutic development. PMID:26183616

  19. Compendium of aberrant DNA methylation and histone modifications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Naoko; Ushijima, Toshikazu

    2014-12-05

    Epigenetics now refers to the study or research field related to DNA methylation and histone modifications. Historically, global DNA hypomethylation was first revealed in 1983, and, after a decade, silencing of a tumor suppressor gene by regional DNA hypermethylation was reported. After the proposal of the histone code in the 2000s, alterations of histone methylation were also identified in cancers. Now, it is established that aberrant epigenetic alterations are involved in cancer development and progression, along with mutations and chromosomal losses. Recent cancer genome analyses have revealed a large number of mutations of epigenetic modifiers, supporting their important roles in cancer pathogenesis. Taking advantage of the reversibility of epigenetic alterations, drugs targeting epigenetic regulators and readers have been developed for restoration of normal pattern of the epigenome, and some have already demonstrated clinical benefits. In addition, DNA methylation of specific marker genes can be used as a biomarker for cancer diagnosis, including risk diagnosis, detection of cancers, and pathophysiological diagnosis. In this paper, we will summarize the major concepts of cancer epigenetics, placing emphasis on history.

  20. Ligand modified nanoparticles increases cell uptake, alters endocytosis and elevates glioma distribution and internalization.

    PubMed

    Gao, Huile; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Shuang; Cao, Shijie; Shen, Shun; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) were widely used in drugs/probes delivery for improved disease diagnosis and/or treatment. Targeted delivery to cancer cells is a highly attractive application of NPs. However, few studies have been performed on the targeting mechanisms of these ligand-modified delivery systems. Additional studies are needed to understand the transport of nanoparticles in the cancer site, the interactions between nanoparticles and cancer cells, the intracellular trafficking of nanoparticles within the cancer cells and the subcellular destiny and potential toxicity. Interleukin 13 (IL-13) peptide can specifically bind IL-13Rα2, a receptor that is highly expressed on glioma cells but is expressed at low levels on other normal cells. It was shown that the nanoparticels modification with the IL-13 peptide could improve glioma treatment by selectively increasing cellular uptake, facilitating cell internalization, altering the uptake pathway and increasing glioma localization.

  1. Prenatal tactile stimulation attenuates drug-induced behavioral sensitization, modifies behavior, and alters brain architecture.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Arif; Kolb, Bryan

    2011-07-11

    Based on the findings of postnatal tactile stimulation (TS), a favorable experience in rats, the present study examined the influence of prenatal TS on juvenile behavior, adult amphetamine (AMPH) sensitization, and structural alteration in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and the striatum. Female rats received TS through a baby hair brush throughout pregnancy, and the pups born were tested for open field locomotion, elevated plus maze (EPM), novel object recognition (NOR), and play fighting behaviors. Development and persistence of drug-induced behavioral sensitization in adults were tested by repeated AMPH administration and a challenge, respectively. Structural plasticity in the brain was assessed from the prefrontal cortical thickness and striatum size from serial coronal sections. The results indicate that TS females showed enhanced exploration in the open field. TS decreased the frequency of playful attacks whereas the response to face or evade an attack was not affected. Anxiety-like behavior and cognitive performance were not influenced by TS. AMPH administration resulted in gradual increase in locomotor activity (i.e., behavioral sensitization) that persisted at least for 2 weeks. However, both male and female TS rats exhibited attenuated AMPH sensitization compared to sex-matched controls. Furthermore, the drug-associated alteration in the prefrontal cortical thickness and striatum size observed in controls were prevented by TS experience. In summary, TS during prenatal development modified juvenile behavior, attenuated drug-induced behavioral sensitization in adulthood, and reorganized brain regions implicated in drug addiction.

  2. Structural insights into yeast histone chaperone Hif1: a scaffold protein recruiting protein complexes to core histones.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hejun; Zhang, Mengying; He, Wei; Zhu, Zhongliang; Teng, Maikun; Gao, Yongxiang; Niu, Liwen

    2014-09-15

    Yeast Hif1 [Hat1 (histone acetyltransferase 1)-interacting factor], a homologue of human NASP (nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein), is a histone chaperone that is involved in various protein complexes which modify histones during telomeric silencing and chromatin reassembly. For elucidating the structural basis of Hif1, in the present paper we demonstrate the crystal structure of Hif1 consisting of a superhelixed TPR (tetratricopeptide repeat) domain and an extended acid loop covering the rear of TPR domain, which represent typical characteristics of SHNi-TPR [Sim3 (start independent of mitosis 3)-Hif1-NASP interrupted TPR] proteins. Our binding assay indicates that Hif1 could bind to the histone octamer via histones H3 and H4. The acid loop is shown to be crucial for the binding of histones and may also change the conformation of the TPR groove. By binding to the core histone complex Hif1 may recruit functional protein complexes to modify histones during chromatin reassembly.

  3. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis.

  4. RelB/p52-mediated NF-κB signaling alters histone acetylation to increase the abundance of corticotropin-releasing hormone in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Di Stefano, Valeria; Wang, Bingbing; Parobchak, Nataliya; Roche, Natalie; Rosen, Todd

    2015-08-25

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) produced in the placenta may be part of a clock that regulates the length of human gestation. Maternal plasma CRH abundance exponentially increases as pregnancy advances. Glucocorticoid stimulates CRH expression in full-term human placenta by promoting noncanonical (RelB/p52 heterodimer-mediated) nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) pathway activity. Using dexamethasone to mimic glucocorticoid exposure, we found that an epigenetic switch mediated the glucocorticoid-induced expression of CRH as gestation advances. The amount of acetylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) associated with the CRH promoter was greater in cytotrophoblasts from full-term placenta than in those from midterm placenta. Knocking down the lysine acetyltransferase CBP reduced H3K9 histone acetylation and prevented dexamethasone-induced CRH expression. Unexpectedly, knocking down the histone deacetylase HDAC1 or pharmacologically inhibiting type I and II HDACs also decreased the expression of CRH yet increased the acetylation of H3K9 and other histone regions. Both CBP and HDAC1 bound at the CRH promoter in a complex with the RelB/p52 heterodimer in a mutually dependent manner; knocking down any one factor in the complex prevented binding of the others as well as the dexamethasone-induced CRH expression. Our results suggest that glucocorticoids induce a transcription complex consisting of RelB/p52, CBP, and HDAC1 that triggers a dynamic acetylation-mediated epigenetic change to induce CRH expression in full-term human placenta.

  5. Prenatal Exposure to apoE Deficiency and Postnatal Hypercholesterolemia Are Associated with Altered Cell-Specific Lysine Methyltransferase and Histone Methylation Patterns in the Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Alkemade, Fanneke E.; van Vliet, Patrick; Henneman, Peter; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Hierck, Beerend P.; van Munsteren, J. Conny; Scheerman, Joyce A.; Goeman, Jelle J.; Havekes, Louis M.; Gittenberger-de Groot, Adriana C.; van den Elsen, Peter J.; DeRuiter, Marco C.

    2010-01-01

    We recently demonstrated that neointima formation of adult heterozygous apolipoprotein E (apoE+/−) offspring from hypercholesterolemic apoE−/− mothers was significantly increased as compared with genetically identical apoE+/− offspring from normocholesterolemic wild-type mothers. Since atherosclerosis is the consequence of a complex microenvironment and local cellular interactions, the effects of in utero programming and type of postnatal diet on epigenetic histone modifications in the vasculature were studied in both groups of offspring. An immunohistochemical approach was used to detect cell-specific histone methylation modifications and expression of accompanying lysine methyltransferases in the carotid arteries. Differences in histone triple-methylation modifications in vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells revealed that the offspring from apoE−/− mothers had significantly different responses to a high cholesterol diet when compared with offspring from wild-type mothers. Our results suggest that both in utero programming and postnatal hypercholesterolemia affect epigenetic patterning in the vasculature, thereby providing novel insights regarding initiation and progression of vascular disease in adults. PMID:20035052

  6. Acetylation of Transition Protein 2 (TP2) by KAT3B (p300) Alters Its DNA Condensation Property and Interaction with Putative Histone Chaperone NPM3*

    PubMed Central

    Pradeepa, Madapura M.; Nikhil, Gupta; Hari Kishore, Annavarapu; Bharath, Giriyapura N.; Kundu, Tapas K.; Rao, Manchanahalli R. Satyanarayana

    2009-01-01

    The hallmark of mammalian spermiogenesis is the dramatic chromatin remodeling process wherein the nucleosomal histones are replaced by the transition proteins TP1, TP2, and TP4. Subsequently these transition proteins are replaced by the protamines P1 and P2. Hyperacetylation of histone H4 is linked to their replacement by transition proteins. Here we report that TP2 is acetylated in vivo as detected by anti-acetylated lysine antibody and mass spectrometric analysis. Further, recombinant TP2 is acetylated in vitro by acetyltransferase KAT3B (p300) more efficiently than by KAT2B (PCAF). In vivo p300 was demonstrated to acetylate TP2. p300 acetylates TP2 in its C-terminal domain, which is highly basic in nature and possesses chromatin-condensing properties. Mass spectrometric analysis showed that p300 acetylates four lysine residues in the C-terminal domain of TP2. Acetylation of TP2 by p300 leads to significant reduction in its DNA condensation property as studied by circular dichroism and atomic force microscopy analysis. TP2 also interacts with a putative histone chaperone, NPM3, wherein expression is elevated in haploid spermatids. Interestingly, acetylation of TP2 impedes its interaction with NPM3. Thus, acetylation of TP2 adds a new dimension to its role in the dynamic reorganization of chromatin during mammalian spermiogenesis. PMID:19710011

  7. The PHD-finger module of the Arabidopsis thaliana defense regulator EDM2 can recognize triply modified histone H3 peptides.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Tokuji; Eulgem, Thomas

    2014-05-15

    Recently we reported that the Arabidopsis thaliana PHD-finger protein EDM2 (enhanced downy mildew 2) impacts disease resistance by affecting levels of di-methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me2) at an alternative polyadenylation site in the immune receptor gene RPP7. EDM2-dependent modulation of this post-translational histone modification (PHM) shifts the balance between full-length RPP7 transcripts and prematurely polyadenylated transcripts, which do not encode the RPP7 protein. Our previous work genetically linked, for the first time, PHMs to alternative polyadenylation and established EDM2 as a critical component mediating PHM-dependent polyadenylation control. However, how EDM2 is recruited to its genomic target sites and how it affects H3K9me2 levels is unknown. Here we show the PHD-finger module of EDM2 to recognize histone H3 bearing certain combinations of three distinct PHMs. Our results suggest that targeting of EDM2 to specific genomic regions is mediated by the histone-binding selectivity of its PHD-finger domain.

  8. The PHD-finger module of the Arabidopsis thaliana defense regulator EDM2 can recognize triply modified histone H3 peptides.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Tokuji; Eulgem, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Recently we reported that the Arabidopsis thaliana PHD-finger protein EDM2 (enhanced downy mildew 2) impacts disease resistance by affecting levels of di-methylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3K9me2) at an alternative polyadenylation site in the immune receptor gene RPP7. EDM2-dependent modulation of this post-translational histone modification (PHM) shifts the balance between full-length RPP7 transcripts and prematurely polyadenylated transcripts, which do not encode the RPP7 protein. Our previous work genetically linked, for the first time, PHMs to alternative polyadenylation and established EDM2 as a critical component mediating PHM-dependent polyadenylation control. However, how EDM2 is recruited to its genomic target sites and how it affects H3K9me2 levels is unknown. Here we show the PHD-finger module of EDM2 to recognize histone H3 bearing certain combinations of 3 distinct PHMs. Our results suggest that targeting of EDM2 to specific genomic regions is mediated by the histone-binding selectivity of its PHD-finger domain.

  9. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G.; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Barneche, Fredy; Lauer, Ulrich M.; Bitzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes. PMID:26530086

  10. Analysis of epigenetic alterations to proprotein convertase genes in disease.

    PubMed

    Fu, YangXin; Nachtigal, Mark W

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations produce heritable changes in phenotype or gene expression without changing DNA sequence. Modified levels of gene expression contribute to a variety of human diseases encompassing genetic disorders, pediatric syndromes, autoimmune disease, aging, and cancer. Alterations in proprotein convertase gene expression are associated with numerous disease states; however, the underlying mechanism for changes in PC gene expression remains understudied. Epigenetic changes in gene expression profiles can be accomplished through modification of chromatin, specifically via chemical modification of DNA bases (methylation of cytosine) or associated histone proteins (acetylation or methylation). In general, active chromatin is associated with low DNA methylation status and histone acetylation, whereas silenced gene are typically in inactive regions of chromatin exhibiting DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation. This chapter will provide in-depth protocols to analyze epigenetic alterations in proprotein convertase gene expression using the PCSK6 gene in the context of human ovarian cancer as a model system.

  11. The chromatin remodeling complex NuRD establishes the poised state of rRNA genes characterized by bivalent histone modifications and altered nucleosome positions.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenbing; Ling, Te; Zhou, Yonggang; Feng, Weijun; Zhu, Qiaoyun; Stunnenberg, Henk G; Grummt, Ingrid; Tao, Wei

    2012-05-22

    rRNA genes (rDNA) exist in two distinct epigenetic states, active promoters being unmethylated and marked by euchromatic histone modifications, whereas silent ones are methylated and exhibit heterochromatic features. Here we show that the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complex establishes a specific chromatin structure at rRNA genes that are poised for transcription activation. The promoter of poised rRNA genes is unmethylated, associated with components of the preinitiation complex, marked by bivalent histone modifications and covered by a nucleosome in the "off" position, which is refractory to transcription initiation. Repression of rDNA transcription in growth-arrested and differentiated cells correlates with elevated association of NuRD and increased levels of poised rRNA genes. Reactivation of transcription requires resetting the promoter-bound nucleosome into the "on" position by the DNA-dependent ATPase CSB (Cockayne syndrome protein B). The results uncover a unique mechanism by which ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes with opposing activities establish a specific chromatin state and regulate transcription.

  12. Histone variants in plant transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Danhua; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin based organization of eukaryotic genome plays a profound role in regulating gene transcription. Nucleosomes form the basic subunits of chromatin by packaging DNA with histone proteins, impeding the access of DNA to transcription factors and RNA polymerases. Exchange of histone variants in nucleosomes alters the properties of nucleosomes and thus modulates DNA exposure during transcriptional regulation. Growing evidence indicates the important function of histone variants in programming transcription during developmental transitions and stress response. Here we review how histone variants and their deposition machineries regulate the nucleosome stability and dynamics, and discuss the link between histone variants and transcriptional regulation in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  13. The potential of histone deacetylase inhibitors in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Ana

    2006-03-01

    In the nucleus, DNA is wrapped around octamers of histone proteins. Histones, like other proteins, are posttranslationally modified by the addition of an array of chemical groups that affect their interactions with surrounding structures. Histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs) are the enzymes involved in the addition and removal, respectively, of acetyl groups from the aminoterminal tails of histones. A number of structurally diverse compounds are capable of inhibiting HDACs and exert a variety of biologic effects on cancer cells in preclinical models. Early clinical trials with the first generation of HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) have demonstrated promising therapeutic activity, and HDACs have become one of the hottest targets in drug development today.

  14. Plasma Metabolomics Implicates Modified Transfer RNAs and Altered Bioenergetics in the Outcomes of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Christopher J.; Ghataorhe, Pavandeep; Wharton, John; Rue-Albrecht, Kevin C.; Hadinnapola, Charaka; Watson, Geoffrey; Bleda, Marta; Haimel, Matthias; Coghlan, Gerry; Corris, Paul A.; Howard, Luke S.; Kiely, David G.; Peacock, Andrew J.; Pepke-Zaba, Joanna; Toshner, Mark R.; Wort, S. John; Gibbs, J. Simon R.; Lawrie, Allan; Gräf, Stefan; Morrell, Nicholas W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous disorder with high mortality. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive study of plasma metabolites using ultraperformance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry to identify patients at high risk of early death, to identify patients who respond well to treatment, and to provide novel molecular insights into disease pathogenesis. Results: Fifty-three circulating metabolites distinguished well-phenotyped patients with idiopathic or heritable PAH (n=365) from healthy control subjects (n=121) after correction for multiple testing (P<7.3e-5) and confounding factors, including drug therapy, and renal and hepatic impairment. A subset of 20 of 53 metabolites also discriminated patients with PAH from disease control subjects (symptomatic patients without pulmonary hypertension, n=139). Sixty-two metabolites were prognostic in PAH, with 36 of 62 independent of established prognostic markers. Increased levels of tRNA-specific modified nucleosides (N2,N2-dimethylguanosine, N1-methylinosine), tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates (malate, fumarate), glutamate, fatty acid acylcarnitines, tryptophan, and polyamine metabolites and decreased levels of steroids, sphingomyelins, and phosphatidylcholines distinguished patients from control subjects. The largest differences correlated with increased risk of death, and correction of several metabolites over time was associated with a better outcome. Patients who responded to calcium channel blocker therapy had metabolic profiles similar to those of healthy control subjects. Conclusions: Metabolic profiles in PAH are strongly related to survival and should be considered part of the deep phenotypic characterization of this disease. Our results support the investigation of targeted therapeutic strategies that seek to address the alterations in translational regulation and energy metabolism that characterize these patients. PMID:27881557

  15. 76 FR 4435 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of Modified or Altered System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Altered System of Records AGENCY: National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), Centers...: Notification of Proposed Altered System of Records. SUMMARY: The Department of Health and Human Services proposes to alter System of Records, 09-20-0001, ``Certifying Interpreting Physician File,...

  16. Assessment of estrogen receptor--histone interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kallos, J; Fasy, T M; Hollander, V P

    1981-01-01

    Several different in vitro binding assays show that the estrogen receptor from rabbit uterus interacts selectively with purified histones from calf thymus. The estrogen receptor binds strongly to histones H2B and H2A, moderately to histones H3 and H4, and poorly to histone H1. In the presence of histones H2B or H2A, the position at which the estrogen receptor focuses in an isoelectric gradient is shifted to a more basic zone. Kinetic experiments show that, if histone H2B is bound to a DNA, the estrogen receptor dissociates more slowly from that DNA. The portion of the estrogen receptor molecule required for binding to histone H2B is relatively stable to tryptic digestion; in contrast, the portion of the receptor molecule responsible for DNA binding is promptly lost during limited tryptic digestion. These in vitro findings suggest that the mechanism by which the estrogen receptor selectively alters gene expression may involve specific contacts with histone molecules. PMID:6942408

  17. Targeting histone methylation for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tao; Lin, Chengyuan; Zhong, Linda L. D.; Zhao, Ling; Zhang, Ge; Lu, Aiping; Wu, Jiang; Bian, Zhaoxiang

    2016-01-01

    As a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) results from accumulation of both genetic and epigenetic alterations. Disruption of epigenetic regulation in CRC, particularly aberrant histone methylation mediated by histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and demethylases (HDMs), have drawn increasing interest in recent years. In this paper, we aim to review the roles of histone methylation and associated enzymes in the pathogenesis of CRC, and the development of small-molecule modulators to regulate histone methylation for treating CRC. Multiple levels of evidence suggest that aberrant histone methylations play important roles in CRC. More than 20 histone-methylation enzymes are found to be clinically relevant to CRC, including 17 oncoproteins and 8 tumor suppressors. Inhibitors of EZH2 and DOT1L have demonstrated promising therapeutic effects in preclinical CRC treatment. Potent and selective chemical probes of histone-methylation enzymes are required for validation of their functional roles in carcinogenesis and clinical translations as CRC therapies. With EZH2 inhibitor EPZ-6438 entering into phase I/II trials for advanced solid tumors, histone methylation is emerging as a promising target for CRC. PMID:28286564

  18. Structural cooperativity in histone H3 tail modifications.

    PubMed

    Sanli, Deniz; Keskin, Ozlem; Gursoy, Attila; Erman, Burak

    2011-12-01

    Post-translational modifications of histone H3 tails have crucial roles in regulation of cellular processes. There is cross-regulation between the modifications of K4, K9, and K14 residues. The modifications on these residues drastically promote or inhibit each other. In this work, we studied the structural changes of the histone H3 tail originating from the three most important modifications; tri-methylation of K4 and K9, and acetylation of K14. We performed extensive molecular dynamics simulations of four types of H3 tails: (i) the unmodified H3 tail having no chemical modification on the residues, (ii) the tri-methylated lysine 4 and lysine 9 H3 tail (K4me3K9me3), (iii) the tri-methylated lysine 4 and acetylated lysine 14 H3 tail (K4me3K14ace), and (iv) tri-methylated lysine 9 and acetylated lysine 14 H3 tail (K9me3K14ace). Here, we report the effects of K4, K9, and K14 modifications on the backbone torsion angles and relate these changes to the recognition and binding of histone modifying enzymes. According to the Ramachandran plot analysis; (i) the dihedral angles of K4 residue are significantly affected by the addition of three methyl groups on this residue regardless of the second modification, (ii) the dihedral angle values of K9 residue are similarly altered majorly by the tri-methylation of K4 residue, (iii) different combinations of modifications (tri-methylation of K4 and K9, and acetylation of K14) have different influences on phi and psi values of K14 residue. Finally, we discuss the consequences of these results on the binding modes and specificity of the histone modifying enzymes such as DIM-5, GCN5, and JMJD2A.

  19. Perceiving the epigenetic landscape through histone readers

    PubMed Central

    Musselman, Catherine A.; Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Côté, Jacques; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones provide a fine-tuned mechanism for regulating chromatin structure and dynamics. PTMs can alter direct interactions between histones and DNA and serve as docking sites for protein effectors, or readers, of these PTMs. Binding of the readers recruits or stabilizes various components of the nuclear signaling machinery at specific genomic sites, mediating fundamental DNA-templated processes, including gene transcription and DNA recombination, replication and repair. In this review, we highlight the latest advances in characterizing histone-binding mechanisms and identifying new epigenetic readers and summarize the functional significance of PTM recognition. PMID:23211769

  20. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  1. Methods for Activity Analysis of the Proteins that Regulate Histone Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Amy M; Simeonov, Anton

    2011-01-01

    The enzymes that regulate histone methylation states and the protein domains that recognize methylated histone residues have been implicated in a number of human diseases, including cancer, as a result of their ability to affect transcriptional changes by altering chromatin structure. These proteins are recognized as potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of diseases associated with epigenetic disruption; however, few inhibitors of their activity have been identified. The majority of histone demethylase and methyltransferase enzyme inhibitors have been discovered on the basis of their structural similarity to substrates or known inhibitors of enzymes with analogous mechanisms. The general lack of potency and specificity of these compounds indicates that novel chemotypes are needed to address the large number of recently discovered histone-modifying enzymes. High-throughput screening (HTS) allows rapid testing of chemically diverse small molecule libraries, provided assays amenable to HTS exist. Here we review the biochemical and cellular assays available for testing the proteins and enzymes that regulate histone methylation. Progress in the development of high-throughput, sensitive, and robust assays will enable discovery of small molecules for epigenetic therapy. PMID:21966349

  2. Replication stress interferes with histone recycling and predeposition marking of new histones.

    PubMed

    Jasencakova, Zuzana; Scharf, Annette N D; Ask, Katrine; Corpet, Armelle; Imhof, Axel; Almouzni, Geneviève; Groth, Anja

    2010-03-12

    To restore chromatin on new DNA during replication, recycling of histones evicted ahead of the fork is combined with new histone deposition. The Asf1 histone chaperone, which buffers excess histones under stress, is a key player in this process. Yet how histones handled by human Asf1 are modified remains unclear. Here we identify marks on histones H3-H4 bound to Asf1 and changes induced upon replication stress. In S phase, distinct cytosolic and nuclear Asf1b complexes show ubiquitous H4K5K12diAc and heterogeneous H3 marks, including K9me1, K14ac, K18ac, and K56ac. Upon acute replication arrest, the predeposition mark H3K9me1 and modifications typical of chromatin accumulate in Asf1 complexes. In parallel, ssDNA is generated at replication sites, consistent with evicted histones being trapped with Asf1. During recovery, histones stored with Asf1 are rapidly used as replication resumes. This shows that replication stress interferes with predeposition marking and histone recycling with potential impact on epigenetic stability.

  3. Aberrant histone modification in CD19+ B cells of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Keshu; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Yanyan; Xiong, Yuanyuan; Wu, Shengsheng; Yang, Jingke; Zhou, Hu; Liu, Xinjian; Wei, Xudong; Song, Yongping

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to detect the alterations in histone methylation and acetylation in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Global histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4/H3K9 methylation were detected by the EpiQuik™ global histone H3/H4 acetylation and H3K4/H3K9 methylation assay kits. The mRNA expression of selected chromatin modifier genes was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Our results found that the global histone H3/H4 hypoacetylation in the CD19+ B cells of patients with CLL (P=0.028 and P=0.03, respectively) and the global histone H3K9 methylation in patients with CLL were significantly increased compared with controls (P=0.02), while there was no significant difference in the global histone H3K4 methylation between the two groups. The level of SIRT1 and EZH2 mRNA expression was upregulated in patients with CLL (P=0.03 and P=0.02, respectively), which increased significantly with progression from Binet stage A to stage C (P=0.015 and P=0.01, respectively) and Rai good to high risk stage (P=0.007 and P=0.008, respectively). The level of HDAC1 and HDAC7 mRNA expression was significantly increased (P=0.02 and P=0.008, respectively) and HDAC2 and P300 mRNA expression was reduced in patients with CLL (P=0.002 and P=0.001, respectively). In conclusion, it is observed that the aberrant histone modification plays an important role in the pathogenesis of CLL. PMID:28260932

  4. Maternal Betaine Supplementation throughout Gestation and Lactation Modifies Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolic Genes in Weaning Piglets via AMPK/LXR-Mediated Pathway and Histone Modification.

    PubMed

    Cai, Demin; Yuan, Mengjie; Liu, Haoyu; Pan, Shifeng; Ma, Wenqiang; Hong, Jian; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-10-18

    Betaine serves as an animal and human nutrient which has been heavily investigated in glucose and lipid metabolic regulation, yet the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. In this study, feeding sows with betaine-supplemented diets during pregnancy and lactation increased cholesterol content and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) gene expression, but decreasing bile acids content and cholesterol-7a-hydroxylase (CYP7a1) expression in the liver of weaning piglets. This was associated with the significantly elevated serum betaine and methionine levels and hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) content. Concurrently, the hepatic nuclear transcription factor liver X receptor LXR was downregulated along with activated signal protein AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed lower LXR binding on CYP7a1 gene promoter and more enriched activation histone marker H3K4me3 on LDLR and SR-BI promoters. These results suggest that gestational and lactational betaine supplementation modulates hepatic gene expression involved in cholesterol metabolism via an AMPK/LXR pathway and histone modification in the weaning offspring.

  5. Maternal Betaine Supplementation throughout Gestation and Lactation Modifies Hepatic Cholesterol Metabolic Genes in Weaning Piglets via AMPK/LXR-Mediated Pathway and Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Demin; Yuan, Mengjie; Liu, Haoyu; Pan, Shifeng; Ma, Wenqiang; Hong, Jian; Zhao, Ruqian

    2016-01-01

    Betaine serves as an animal and human nutrient which has been heavily investigated in glucose and lipid metabolic regulation, yet the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. In this study, feeding sows with betaine-supplemented diets during pregnancy and lactation increased cholesterol content and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) gene expression, but decreasing bile acids content and cholesterol-7a-hydroxylase (CYP7a1) expression in the liver of weaning piglets. This was associated with the significantly elevated serum betaine and methionine levels and hepatic S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) content. Concurrently, the hepatic nuclear transcription factor liver X receptor LXR was downregulated along with activated signal protein AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed lower LXR binding on CYP7a1 gene promoter and more enriched activation histone marker H3K4me3 on LDLR and SR-BI promoters. These results suggest that gestational and lactational betaine supplementation modulates hepatic gene expression involved in cholesterol metabolism via an AMPK/LXR pathway and histone modification in the weaning offspring. PMID:27763549

  6. PARAQUAT TOLERANCE3 Is an E3 Ligase That Switches off Activated Oxidative Response by Targeting Histone-Modifying PROTEIN METHYLTRANSFERASE4b

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jin; Zhao, Tao-Lan; Wang, Peng-Fei; Zhao, Ping-Xia; Xie, Qi; Cao, Xiao-Feng; Xiang, Cheng-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is unavoidable for aerobic organisms. When abiotic and biotic stresses are encountered, oxidative damage could occur in cells. To avoid this damage, defense mechanisms must be timely and efficiently modulated. While the response to oxidative stress has been extensively studied in plants, little is known about how the activated response is switched off when oxidative stress is diminished. By studying Arabidopsis mutant paraquat tolerance3, we identified the genetic locus PARAQUAT TOLERANCE3 (PQT3) as a major negative regulator of oxidative stress tolerance. PQT3, encoding an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is rapidly down-regulated by oxidative stress. PQT3 has E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in ubiquitination assay. Subsequently, we identified PRMT4b as a PQT3-interacting protein. By histone methylation, PRMT4b upregulates the expression of APX1 and GPX1, encoding two key enzymes against oxidative stress. On the other hand, PRMT4b is recognized by PQT3 for targeted degradation via 26S proteasome. Therefore, we have identified PQT3 as an E3 ligase that acts as a negative regulator of activated response to oxidative stress and found that histone modification by PRMT4b at APX1 and GPX1 loci plays an important role in oxidative stress tolerance. PMID:27676073

  7. Extracellular histones inhibit efferocytosis.

    PubMed

    Friggeri, Arnaud; Banerjee, Sami; Xie, Na; Cui, Huachun; De Freitas, Andressa; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Dupont, Hervé; Abraham, Edward; Liu, Gang

    2012-07-18

    The uptake and clearance of apoptotic cells by macrophages and other phagocytic cells, a process called efferocytosis, is a major component in the resolution of inflammation. Increased concentrations of extracellular histones are found during acute inflammatory states and appear to contribute to organ system dysfunction and mortality. In these studies, we examined the potential role of histones in modulating efferocytosis. We found that phagocytosis of apoptotic neutrophils or thymocytes by macrophages was significantly diminished in the presence of histones H3 or H4, but not histone H1. Histone H3 demonstrated direct binding to macrophages, an effect that was diminished by preincubation of macrophages with the opsonins growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6) and milk fat globule-epidermal growth factor (EGF) 8 (MFG-E8). Incubation of histone H3 with soluble α(v)β₅ integrin and Mer, but not with α(v)β₃, diminished its binding to macrophages. Phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by alveolar macrophages in vivo was diminished in the presence of histone H3. Incubation of histone H3 with activated protein C, a treatment that degrades histones, abrogated its inhibitory effects on efferocytosis under both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The present studies demonstrate that histones have inhibitory effects on efferocytosis, suggesting a new mechanism by which extracellular histones contribute to acute inflammatory processes and tissue injury.

  8. Altered expression of histone deacetylases, inflammatory cytokines and contractile-associated factors in uterine myometrium of Long Evans rats gestationally exposed to benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Laknaur, Archana; Foster, Terri-Lee; Bobb, Lesley E; Ramesh, Aramandla; Ladson, Gwinnett M; Hood, Darryl B; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Thota, Chandrasekhar

    2016-06-01

    Etiology of preterm birth (PTB) is multifactorial; therefore, decreasing the incidence of PTB is a major challenge in the field of obstetrics. Epidemiological studies have reported an association between toxicants and PTB. However, there are no studies on the role of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), an environmental toxicant, in the incidence of PTB. We first assessed the effects of BaP (150 and 300 µg kg(-1) body weight) dosed via gavage from day 14 to 17 of pregnancy on gestation length in Long Evans rats. We further assessed the histopathology of the uterus, expression of inflammatory cytokines, contractile-associated factors, histone deacetylases (HDACs) and NFқB-p65 in myometrium collected on day 22 postpartum versus vehicle-treated controls. In our study, rats exposed to BaP delivered prematurely (P < 0.05) compared to control. Hematoxylin and eosin staining of uterus showed squamous metaplasia, glandular and stromal hyperplasia in BaP-exposed rats versus control. The concentrations of BaP metabolites measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography were higher in uterine myometrium of BaP-exposed rats while they were undetectable in controls. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed significant increases in mRNA expression of interleukin-1β and -8, tumor necrosis factor-α, connexin 43, cyclo-oxygenase-2 and prostaglandin F2α receptor as compared to controls (P < 0.05). Western blot analysis revealed that BaP exposure caused decreases in class I HDACs 1 and 3 and increases in class II HDAC 5, cyclo-oxygenase-2 and nuclear translocation of NFκB-p65 relative to controls. Our results suggest that gestational exposure to BaP increases incidence of PTB through epigenetic changes that causes increases in the expression of contractile-associated factors through the NFκB pathway. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Re-writing the Histone Code of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    associated with poor prognosis. The structure of the chromatin in these self-renewal gene promoters is a major determinant associated with...transcriptional dysregulation and oncogenesis. Chromatin structure and function is controlled in large part by the post-translational modification of...histones and the incorporation of specialized histone variants into nucleosomes . Strikingly, histone proteins are highly modified by an array of diverse

  10. Nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination by inhibiting histone deubiquitinating enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ke Qingdong; Ellen, Thomas P.; Costa, Max

    2008-04-15

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are known carcinogens but underlying mechanisms are not clear. Epigenetic changes are likely to play an important role in nickel ion carcinogenesis. Previous studies have shown epigenetic effects of nickel ions, including the loss of histone acetylation and a pronounced increase in dimethylated H3K9 in nickel-exposed cells. In this study, we demonstrated that both water-soluble and insoluble nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination (uH2A and uH2B) in a variety of cell lines. Investigations of the mechanism by which nickel increases histone ubiquitination in cells reveal that nickel does not affect cellular levels of the substrates of this modification, i.e., ubiquitin, histones, and other non-histone ubiquitinated proteins. In vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays have been developed to further investigate possible effects of nickel on enzymes responsible for histone ubiquitination. Results from the in vitro assays demonstrate that the presence of nickel did not affect the levels of ubiquitinated histones in the ubiquitinating assay. Instead, the addition of nickel significantly prevents loss of uH2A and uH2B in the deubiquitinating assay, suggesting that nickel-induced histone ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of (a) putative deubiquitinating enzyme(s). Additional supporting evidence comes from the comparison of the response to nickel ions with a known deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor, iodoacetamide (IAA). This study is the first to demonstrate such effects of nickel ions on histone ubiquitination. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in altering the steady state of this modification. The study provides further evidence that supports the notion that nickel ions alter epigenetic homeostasis in cells, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis.

  11. RAPID SEMISYNTHESIS OF ACETYLATED AND SUMOYLATED HISTONE ANALOGS

    PubMed Central

    Dhall, Abhinav; Weller, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    The density and diversity of post-translational modifications (PTMs) observed in histone proteins typically limits their purification to homogeneity from biological sources. Access to quantities of uniformly modified histones is, however, critical for investigating the downstream effects of histone PTMs on chromatin-templated processes. Therefore, a number of semisynthetic methodologies have been developed to generate histones bearing precisely defined PTMs or close analogs thereof. In this chapter, we present two optimized and rapid strategies for generating functional analogs of site-specifically acetylated and sumoylated histones. First, we describe a convergent strategy to site-specifically attach the small ubiquitin-like modifier-3 (SUMO-3) protein to the site of Lys12 in histone H4 by means of a disulfide linkage. We then describe the generation of thialysine analogs of histone H3 acetylated at Lys 14 or Lys 56, using thiol-ene coupling chemistry. Both strategies afford multi-milligram quantities of uniformly modified histones that are easily incorporated into mononucleosomes and nucleosome arrays for biophysical and biochemical investigations. These methods are readily extendable to any desired sites in the four core nucleosomal histones and their variant forms. PMID:27423861

  12. Histone chaperones: assisting histone traffic and nucleosome dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Quivy, Jean-Pierre; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2014-01-01

    The functional organization of eukaryotic DNA into chromatin uses histones as components of its building block, the nucleosome. Histone chaperones, which are proteins that escort histones throughout their cellular life, are key actors in all facets of histone metabolism; they regulate the supply and dynamics of histones at chromatin for its assembly and disassembly. Histone chaperones can also participate in the distribution of histone variants, thereby defining distinct chromatin landscapes of importance for genome function, stability, and cell identity. Here, we discuss our current knowledge of the known histone chaperones and their histone partners, focusing on histone H3 and its variants. We then place them into an escort network that distributes these histones in various deposition pathways. Through their distinct interfaces, we show how they affect dynamics during DNA replication, DNA damage, and transcription, and how they maintain genome integrity. Finally, we discuss the importance of histone chaperones during development and describe how misregulation of the histone flow can link to disease.

  13. Temperature Shift Alters DNA Methylation and Histone Modification Patterns in Gonadal Aromatase (cyp19a1) Gene in Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination

    PubMed Central

    Hannigan, Brette; Crews, David

    2016-01-01

    The environment surrounding the embryos has a profound impact on the developmental process and phenotypic outcomes of the organism. In species with temperature-dependent sex determination, gonadal sex is determined by the incubation temperature of the eggs. A mechanistic link between temperature and transcriptional regulation of developmental genes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we examine the changes in DNA methylation and histone modification patterns of the aromatase (cyp19a1) gene in embryonic gonads of red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta) subjected to a temperature shift during development. Shifting embryos from a male-producing temperature (MPT) to a female-producing temperature (FPT) at the beginning of the temperature-sensitive period (TSP) resulted in an increase in aromatase mRNA expression while a shift from FPT to MPT resulted in decreased expression. DNA methylation levels at CpG sites in the promoter of the aromatase gene were high (70–90%) at the beginning of TSP, but decreased in embryos that were incubated at constant FPT and those shifted from MPT to the FPT. This decrease in methylation in the promoter inversely correlated with the expected increase in aromatase expression at the FPT. The active demethylation under the FPT was especially prominent at the CpG site upstream of the gonad-specific TATA box at the beginning of TSP and spread downstream of the gene including exon1 as the gonad development progressed. In embryos incubated at FPT, the promoter region was also labeled by canonical transcriptional activation markers, H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II. A transcriptional repression marker, H3K27me3, was observed in temperature-shifted gonads of both temperature groups, but was not maintained throughout the development in either group. Our findings suggest that DNA hypomethylation and H3K4me3 modification at the aromatase promoter may be a primary mechanism that releases a transcriptional block of aromatase to initiate a

  14. Temperature Shift Alters DNA Methylation and Histone Modification Patterns in Gonadal Aromatase (cyp19a1) Gene in Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Yuiko; Hannigan, Brette; Crews, David

    2016-01-01

    The environment surrounding the embryos has a profound impact on the developmental process and phenotypic outcomes of the organism. In species with temperature-dependent sex determination, gonadal sex is determined by the incubation temperature of the eggs. A mechanistic link between temperature and transcriptional regulation of developmental genes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we examine the changes in DNA methylation and histone modification patterns of the aromatase (cyp19a1) gene in embryonic gonads of red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta) subjected to a temperature shift during development. Shifting embryos from a male-producing temperature (MPT) to a female-producing temperature (FPT) at the beginning of the temperature-sensitive period (TSP) resulted in an increase in aromatase mRNA expression while a shift from FPT to MPT resulted in decreased expression. DNA methylation levels at CpG sites in the promoter of the aromatase gene were high (70-90%) at the beginning of TSP, but decreased in embryos that were incubated at constant FPT and those shifted from MPT to the FPT. This decrease in methylation in the promoter inversely correlated with the expected increase in aromatase expression at the FPT. The active demethylation under the FPT was especially prominent at the CpG site upstream of the gonad-specific TATA box at the beginning of TSP and spread downstream of the gene including exon1 as the gonad development progressed. In embryos incubated at FPT, the promoter region was also labeled by canonical transcriptional activation markers, H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II. A transcriptional repression marker, H3K27me3, was observed in temperature-shifted gonads of both temperature groups, but was not maintained throughout the development in either group. Our findings suggest that DNA hypomethylation and H3K4me3 modification at the aromatase promoter may be a primary mechanism that releases a transcriptional block of aromatase to initiate a

  15. Correlated alterations in genome organization, histone methylation, and DNA-lamin A/C interactions in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    PubMed

    McCord, Rachel Patton; Nazario-Toole, Ashley; Zhang, Haoyue; Chines, Peter S; Zhan, Ye; Erdos, Michael R; Collins, Francis S; Dekker, Job; Cao, Kan

    2013-02-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a premature aging disease that is frequently caused by a de novo point mutation at position 1824 in LMNA. This mutation activates a cryptic splice donor site in exon 11, and leads to an in-frame deletion within the prelamin A mRNA and the production of a dominant-negative lamin A protein, known as progerin. Here we show that primary HGPS skin fibroblasts experience genome-wide correlated alterations in patterns of H3K27me3 deposition, DNA-lamin A/C associations, and, at late passages, genome-wide loss of spatial compartmentalization of active and inactive chromatin domains. We further demonstrate that the H3K27me3 changes associate with gene expression alterations in HGPS cells. Our results support a model that the accumulation of progerin in the nuclear lamina leads to altered H3K27me3 marks in heterochromatin, possibly through the down-regulation of EZH2, and disrupts heterochromatin-lamina interactions. These changes may result in transcriptional misregulation and eventually trigger the global loss of spatial chromatin compartmentalization in late passage HGPS fibroblasts.

  16. Genetically modified animal models recapitulating molecular events altered in human hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Aránzazu; Fabregat, Isabel

    2009-04-01

    New advancements have been made in recent years in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern human liver tumorigenesis. Experimental animal models have been widely used, especially mouse models. In this review we highlight some of the genetically engineered mouse models that have proved to be excellent tools to study the intracellular signalling pathways altered in hepatocarcinogenesis and establish potential correlations with data from humans, with special focus on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of primary liver cancer. Information obtained from these animal models will help to design future therapeutic approaches to HCC, particularly those that explore drugs that specifically target the altered molecular pathways.

  17. 76 FR 4478 - Privacy Act of 1974; Report of Modified or Altered System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Privacy Act of 1974; Report of Modified or... of Health Professionals in Disease Prevention and Control Training Programs, HHS/CDC/NCHSTP.'' HHS is... curricula and programs for disease prevention and control for such health care personnel. This System...

  18. Development of a certified reference material for genetically modified potato with altered starch composition.

    PubMed

    Broothaerts, Wim; Corbisier, Philippe; Emons, Hendrik; Emteborg, Håkan; Linsinger, Thomas P J; Trapmann, Stefanie

    2007-06-13

    The presence of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food and feed products is subject to regulation in the European Union (EU) and elsewhere. As part of the EU authorization procedure for GMOs intended for food and feed use, reference materials must be produced for the quality control of measurements to quantify the GMOs. Certified reference materials (CRMs) are available for a range of herbicide- and insect-resistant genetically modified crops such as corn, soybean, and cotton. Here the development of the first CRM for a GMO that differs from its non-GMO counterpart in a major compositional constituent, that is, starch, is described. It is shown that the modification of the starch composition of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, together with other characteristics of the delivered materials, have important consequences for the certification strategy. Moreover, the processing and characterization of the EH92-527-1 potato material required both new and modified procedures, different from those used routinely for CRMs produced from genetically modified seeds.

  19. A Genetic Screen and Transcript Profiling Reveal a Shared Regulatory Program for Drosophila Linker Histone H1 and Chromatin Remodeler CHD1

    PubMed Central

    Kavi, Harsh; Lu, Xingwu; Xu, Na; Bartholdy, Boris A.; Vershilova, Elena; Skoultchi, Arthur I.; Fyodorov, Dmitry V.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin structure and activity can be modified through ATP-dependent repositioning of nucleosomes and posttranslational modifications of core histone tails within nucleosome core particles and by deposition of linker histones into the oligonucleosome fiber. The linker histone H1 is essential in metazoans. It has a profound effect on organization of chromatin into higher-order structures and on recruitment of histone-modifying enzymes to chromatin. Here, we describe a genetic screen for modifiers of the lethal phenotype caused by depletion of H1 in Drosophila melanogaster. We identify 41 mis-expression alleles that enhance and 20 that suppress the effect of His1 depletion in vivo. Most of them are important for chromosome organization, transcriptional regulation, and cell signaling. Specifically, the reduced viability of H1-depleted animals is strongly suppressed by ubiquitous mis-expression of the ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzyme CHD1. Comparison of transcript profiles in H1-depleted and Chd1 null mutant larvae revealed that H1 and CHD1 have common transcriptional regulatory programs in vivo. H1 and CHD1 share roles in repression of numerous developmentally regulated and extracellular stimulus-responsive transcripts, including immunity-related and stress response-related genes. Thus, linker histone H1 participates in various regulatory programs in chromatin to alter gene expression. PMID:25628309

  20. Readers of histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Miyong; Wu, Jun; Workman, Jerry L; Li, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Histone modifications not only play important roles in regulating chromatin structure and nuclear processes but also can be passed to daughter cells as epigenetic marks. Accumulating evidence suggests that the key function of histone modifications is to signal for recruitment or activity of downstream effectors. Here, we discuss the latest discovery of histone-modification readers and how the modification language is interpreted. PMID:21423274

  1. Metabolic regulation of histone post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Krautkramer, Kimberly A.; Feldman, Jessica L.; Denu, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications regulate transcription and other DNA-templated functions. This process is dynamically regulated by specific modifying enzymes whose activities require metabolites that either serve as co-substrates or act as activators/inhibitors. Therefore, metabolism can influence histone modification by changing local concentrations of key metabolites. Physiologically, the epigenetic response to metabolism is important for nutrient sensing and environment adaption. In pathologic states, the connection between metabolism and histone modification mediates epigenetic abnormality in complex disease. In this review, we summarize recent studies of the molecular mechanisms involved in metabolic regulation of histone modifications and discuss their biological significance. PMID:25562692

  2. Histone Arginine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzo, Alessandra Di; Bedford, Mark T.

    2012-01-01

    Arginine methylation is a common posttranslational modification (PTM). This type of PTM occurs on both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins, and is particularly abundant on shuttling proteins. In this review, we will focus on one aspect of this PTM: the diverse roles that arginine methylation of the core histone tails play in regulating chromatin function. A family of nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs) catalyze methylation reactions, and a subset target histones. Importantly, arginine methylation of histone tails can promote or prevent the docking of key transcriptional effector molecules, thus playing a central role in the orchestration of the histone code. PMID:21074527

  3. Histone Variants and Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Henikoff, Steven; Smith, M. Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Histones package and compact DNA by assembling into nucleosome core particles. Most histones are synthesized at S phase for rapid deposition behind replication forks. In addition, the replacement of histones deposited during S phase by variants that can be deposited independently of replication provide the most fundamental level of chromatin differentiation. Alternative mechanisms for depositing different variants can potentially establish and maintain epigenetic states. Variants have also evolved crucial roles in chromosome segregation, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair, and other processes. Investigations into the evolution, structure, and metabolism of histone variants provide a foundation for understanding the participation of chromatin in important cellular processes and in epigenetic memory. PMID:25561719

  4. Histone variants: the tricksters of the chromatin world☆

    PubMed Central

    Volle, Catherine; Dalal, Yamini

    2014-01-01

    The eukaryotic genome exists in vivo at an equimolar ratio with histones, thus forming a polymer composed of DNA and histone proteins. Each nucleosomal unit in this polymer provides versatile capabilities and dynamic range. Substitutions of the individual components of the histone core with structurally distinct histone variants and covalent modifications alter the local fabric of the chromatin fiber, resulting in epigenetic changes that can be regulated by the cell. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of histone variant structure, assembly, and inheritance, their influence on nucleosome positioning, and their cumulative effect upon gene expression, DNA repair and the progression of disease. We also highlight fundamental questions that remain unanswered regarding the behavior of histone variants and their influence on cellular function in the normal and diseased states. PMID:24463272

  5. Interrogating the function of metazoan histones using engineered gene clusters

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Daniel J.; Klusza, Stephen; Penke, Taylor J.R.; Meers, Michael P.; Curry, Kaitlin P.; McDaniel, Stephen L.; Malek, Pamela Y.; Cooper, Stephen W.; Tatomer, Deirdre C.; Lieb, Jason D.; Strahl, Brian D.; Duronio, Robert J.; Matera, A. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Histones and their post-translational modifications influence the regulation of many DNA-dependent processes. Although an essential role for histone-modifying enzymes in these processes is well established, defining the specific contribution of individual histone residues remains a challenge because many histone-modifying enzymes have non-histone targets. This challenge is exacerbated by the paucity of suitable approaches to genetically engineer histone genes in metazoans. Here, we describe a facile platform in Drosophila for generating and analyzing any desired histone genotype, and we use it to test the in vivo function of three histone residues. We demonstrate that H4K20 is neither essential for DNA replication nor for completion of development, unlike conclusions drawn from analyses of H4K20 methyltransferases. We also show that H3K36 is required for viability and H3K27 is essential for maintenance of cellular identity during development. These findings highlight the power of engineering histones to interrogate genome structure and function in animals. PMID:25669886

  6. Heart failure: the pivotal role of histone deacetylases.

    PubMed

    Hewitson, Ruth; Dargan, James; Collis, David; Green, Aneta; Moorjani, Narain; Ohri, Sunil; Townsend, Paul A

    2013-02-01

    Heart failure, a state in which cardiac output is unable to meet the metabolic demands of the tissues, poses a significant health burden; following an initial hospital admission with heart failure, five-year mortality is close to 50%. Cardiac hypertrophy, characterised by increased cardiomyocyte size and protein synthesis, has deleterious effects when prolonged and contributes to heart failure. Cardiac hypertrophy itself increases risk of morbidity and mortality. Histone deacetylases are chromatin modifiers which deacetylate the N-terminal tails of histones and have been implicated in common cardiac pathologies associated with hypertrophy. There are 18 histone deacetylases separated into four classes. Class I histone deacetylases interact with heat shock proteins and are pro-hypertrophic, class IIa histone deacetylases repress hypertrophy by inhibiting the activity of transcription factors such as myocyte enhancer factor 2. Histone deacetylases present an exciting new target in combating cardiac hypertrophy and progression to heart failure.

  7. New insights into the molecular mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis: In vivo adduction of histone H2B by a reactive metabolite of the chemical carcinogen furan.

    PubMed

    Nunes, João; Martins, Inês L; Charneira, Catarina; Pogribny, Igor P; de Conti, Aline; Beland, Frederick A; Marques, M Matilde; Jacob, Cristina C; Antunes, Alexandra M M

    2016-12-15

    Furan is a rodent hepatocarcinogen ubiquitously found in the environment and heat-processed foods. Furan undergoes cytochrome P450 2E1-catalyzed bioactivation to cis-2-butene-1,4-dial (BDA), which has been shown to form an electrophilic conjugate (GSH-BDA) with glutathione. Both BDA and GSH-BDA yield covalent adducts with lysine residues in proteins. Dose- and time-dependent epigenetic histone alterations have been observed in furan-treated rats. While the covalent modification of histones by chemical carcinogens has long been proposed, histone-carcinogen adducts have eluded detection in vivo. In this study, we investigated if the covalent modification of histones by furan may occur in vivo prior to epigenetic histone alterations. Using a "bottom-up" methodology, involving the analysis of tryptic peptides by liquid chromatography - high resolution mass spectrometry, we obtained evidence for a cross-link between GSH-BDA and lysine 107 of histone H2B isolated from the livers of male F344 rats treated with tumorigenic doses of furan. This cross-link was detected at the shortest treatment period (90 days) in the lowest dose group (0.92mg/kg body weight/day), prior to the identification of epigenetic changes, and occurred at a lysine residue that is a target for epigenetic modifications and crucial for nucleosome stability. Our results represent the first unequivocal proof of the occurrence of carcinogen-modified histones in vivo and suggest that such modification happens at the initial stages of furan-induced carcinogenesis. This type of alteration may be general in scope, opening new insights into the mechanisms of chemical carcinogenesis/toxicity and new opportunities for the development of early compound-specific biomarkers of exposure.

  8. Alterations in Osteopontin Modify Muscle Size in Females in Both Humans and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Eric P.; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; McLane, Virginia D.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Thompson, Paul D.; Visich, Paul; Gordon, Paul M.; Pescatello, Linda S.; Zoeller, Robert F.; Moyna, Niall M.; Angelopoulos, Theodore J.; Pegoraro, Elena; Cox, Gregory A.; Clarkson, Priscilla M.

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE An osteopontin (OPN; SPP1) gene promoter polymorphism modifies disease severity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and we hypothesized that it might also modify muscle phenotypes in healthy volunteers. METHODS Gene association studies were carried out for OPN (rs28357094) in the FAMuSS cohort (n=752; age 23.7±5.7 yrs). Phenotypes studied included muscle size (MRI), strength, and response to supervised resistance training. We also studied 147 young adults that had carried out a bout of eccentric elbow exercise (age 24.0 ± 5.2 yrs). Phenotypes analyzed included strength, soreness, and serum muscle enzymes. RESULTS In the FAMuSS cohort, the G allele was associated with 17% increase in baseline upper arm muscle volume only in women (F=26.32; p=5.32 × 10−7), explaining 5% of population variance. In the eccentric damage cohort, weak associations of the G allele were seen in women with both baseline myoglobin, and elevated CK. Sexually dimorphic effects of OPN on muscle were also seen in OPN null mice. Five of seven muscle groups examined showed smaller size in OPN null female mice, whereas two were smaller in males. Query of OPN gene transcription after experimental muscle damage in mice showed rapid induction within 12 hrs (100-fold increase from baseline), followed by sustained high level expression through 16 days of regeneration before falling to back to baseline. CONCLUSION OPN is a sexually dimorphic modifier of muscle size in normal humans and mice, and responds to muscle damage. The OPN gene is known to be estrogen responsive, and this may explain the female-specific genotype effects in adult volunteers. PMID:23274598

  9. Alteration of Gene Expression, DNA Methylation, and Histone Methylation in Free Radical Scavenging Networks in Adult Mouse Hippocampus following Fetal Alcohol Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Chater-Diehl, Eric J.; Castellani, Christina A.; Alberry, Bonnie L.; Singh, Shiva M.

    2016-01-01

    The molecular basis of Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) is poorly understood; however, epigenetic and gene expression changes have been implicated. We have developed a mouse model of FASD characterized by learning and memory impairment and persistent gene expression changes. Epigenetic marks may maintain expression changes over a mouse’s lifetime, an area few have explored. Here, mice were injected with saline or ethanol on postnatal days four and seven. At 70 days of age gene expression microarray, methylated DNA immunoprecipitation microarray, H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 chromatin immunoprecipitation microarray were performed. Following extensive pathway analysis of the affected genes, we identified the top affected gene expression pathway as “Free radical scavenging”. We confirmed six of these changes by droplet digital PCR including the caspase Casp3 and Wnt transcription factor Tcf7l2. The top pathway for all methylation-affected genes was “Peroxisome biogenesis”; we confirmed differential DNA methylation in the Acca1 thiolase promoter. Altered methylation and gene expression in oxidative stress pathways in the adult hippocampus suggests a novel interface between epigenetic and oxidative stress mechanisms in FASD. PMID:27136348

  10. Runners with patellofemoral pain have altered biomechanics which targeted interventions can modify: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Neal, Bradley S; Barton, Christian J; Gallie, Rosa; O'Halloran, Patrick; Morrissey, Dylan

    2016-03-01

    Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is the most prevalent running pathology and associated with multi-level biomechanical factors. This systematic review aims to guide treatment and prevention of PFP by synthesising prospective, observational and intervention studies that measure clinical and biomechanical outcomes in symptomatic running populations. Medline, Web of Science and CINAHL were searched from inception to April 2015 for prospective, case-control or intervention studies in running-related PFP cohorts. Study methodological quality was scored by two independent raters using the modified Downs and Black or PEDro scales, with meta-analysis performed where appropriate. 28 studies were included. Very limited evidence indicates that increased peak hip adduction is a risk factor for PFP in female runners, supported by moderate evidence of a relationship between PFP and increased peak hip adduction, internal rotation and contralateral pelvic drop, as well as reduced peak hip flexion. Limited evidence was also identified that altered peak force and time to peak at foot level is a risk factor for PFP development. Limited evidence from intervention studies indicates that both running retraining and proximal strengthening exercise lead to favourable outcomes in both pain and function, but only running retraining significantly reduces peak hip adduction, suggesting a possible kinematic mechanism. Put together, these findings highlight limited but coherent evidence of altered biomechanics which interventions can alter with resultant symptom change in females with PFP. There is a clear need for high quality prospective studies of intervention efficacy with measurement of explanatory mechanisms.

  11. The FACT Histone Chaperone Guides Histone H4 Into Its Nucleosomal Conformation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Laura; Poe, Bryan; Connell, Zaily; Xin, Hua; Formosa, Tim

    2013-01-01

    The pob3-Q308K mutation alters the small subunit of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone/nucleosome chaperone Facilitates Chromatin Transactions (FACT), causing defects in both transcription and DNA replication. We describe histone mutations that suppress some of these defects, providing new insight into the mechanism of FACT activity in vivo. FACT is primarily known for its ability to promote reorganization of nucleosomes into a more open form, but neither the pob3-Q308K mutation nor the compensating histone mutations affect this activity. Instead, purified mutant FACT complexes fail to release from nucleosomes efficiently, and the histone mutations correct this flaw. We confirm that pob3-T252E also suppresses pob3-Q308K and show that combining two suppressor mutations can be detrimental, further demonstrating the importance of balance between association and dissociation for efficient FACT:nucleosome interactions. To explain our results, we propose that histone H4 can adopt multiple conformations, most of which are incompatible with nucleosome assembly. FACT guides H4 to adopt appropriate conformations, and this activity can be enhanced or diminished by mutations in Pob3 or histones. FACT can therefore destabilize nucleosomes by favoring the reorganized state, but it can also promote assembly by tethering histones and DNA together and maintaining them in conformations that promote canonical nucleosome formation. PMID:23833181

  12. Biochemical Studies on Methylglyoxal-Mediated Glycated Histones: Implications for Presence of Serum Antibodies against the Glycated Histones in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Nadeem A; Dash, Debabrata

    2013-01-01

    Reactive carbonyl species (RCS) mainly reacts with lysine and arginine residues of proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs). Histone was glycoxidated with glyoxal and methylglyoxal. It was characterized by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and quenching studies involving penicillamine and aminoguanidine as carbonyl scavengers. Further characterization of histone modified with methylglyoxal was done by UV, fluorescence, and IR spectrophotometry. Spectral analysis of the protein clearly demonstrates structural perturbation in the histone by methylglyoxal. Methylglyoxal-induces cross-linking in the protein leading to aggregation. Role of methylglyoxal mediated glycoxidation of histone in type 1 diabetes was also undertaken. Antibodies were detected against glycoxidated histone in sera of type 1 diabetes patients by solid-phase enzyme immunoassay. The findings indicate that as a result of structural perturbation in histone by methylglyoxal, the modified histone may be involved in production of serum antibodies in the diabetes patients.

  13. Altered folate metabolism modifies cell proliferation and progesterone secretion in human placental choriocarcinoma JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Moussa, Carolyne; Ross, Nikia; Jolette, Philippe; MacFarlane, Amanda J

    2015-09-28

    Folate is an essential B vitamin required for de novo purine and thymidylate synthesis, and for the remethylation of homocysteine to form methionine. Folate deficiency has been associated with placenta-related pregnancy complications, as have SNP in genes of the folate-dependent enzymes, methionine synthase (MTR) and methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase 1 (MTHFD1). We aimed to determine the effect of altered folate metabolism on placental cell proliferation, viability and invasive capacity and on progesterone and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) secretion. Human placental choriocarcinoma (JEG-3) cells cultured in low folic acid (FA) (2 nM) demonstrated 13% (P<0.001) and 26% (P<0.001) lower proliferation, 5.5% (P=0.025) and 7.5% (P=0.004) lower invasion capacity, and 5 to 7.5% (P=0.004-0.025) lower viability compared with control (20 nM) or supplemented (100 nM) cells, respectively. FA concentration had no effect on progesterone or hCG secretion. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of MTR gene and protein expression resulted in 17.7% (P<0.0001) lower proliferation and 61% (P=0.014) higher progesterone secretion, but had no effect on cell invasion and hCG secretion. siRNA knockdown of MTHFD1 gene expression in the absence of detectable changes in protein expression resulted in 10.3% (P=0.001) lower cell proliferation, but had no effect on cell invasion and progesterone or hCG secretion. Our data indicate that impaired folate metabolism can result in lower trophoblast proliferation, and could alter viability, invasion capacity and progesterone secretion, which may explain in part the observed associations between folate and placenta-related complications.

  14. Surprising Alteration of Antibacterial Activity of 5″-Modified Neomycin against Resistant Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianjun; Chiang, Fang-I; Wu, Long; Czyryca, Przemyslaw Greg; Li, Ding; Chang, Cheng-Wei Tom

    2009-01-01

    A facile synthetic protocol for the production of neomycin B derivatives with various modifications at the 5″ position has been developed. Structural activity relationship (SAR) against aminoglycoside resistant bacteria equipped with various aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes (AME's) was investigated. Enzymatic and molecular modeling studies reveal that the superb substrate promiscuity of AME's allows the resistant bacteria to cope with diverse structural modifications despite the observation that several derivatives show enhanced antibacterial activity than the parent neomycin. Surprisingly, when testing synthetic neomycin derivatives against other human pathogens, two leads exhibit prominent activity against both Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) that are known to exert high level of resistance against clinically used aminoglycosides. These findings can be extremely useful in developing new aminoglycoside antibiotics against resistant bacteria. Our result also suggests that new biological and antimicrobial activities can be obtained by chemical modifications of old drugs. PMID:19012394

  15. The Histone Database: an integrated resource for histones and histone fold-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Levine, Kevin M; Morales, Mario; Zhang, Suiyuan; Moreland, R Travis; Baxevanis, Andreas D; Landsman, David

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is composed of DNA and protein components-core histones-that act to compactly pack the DNA into nucleosomes, the fundamental building blocks of chromatin. These nucleosomes are connected to adjacent nucleosomes by linker histones. Nucleosomes are highly dynamic and, through various core histone post-translational modifications and incorporation of diverse histone variants, can serve as epigenetic marks to control processes such as gene expression and recombination. The Histone Sequence Database is a curated collection of sequences and structures of histones and non-histone proteins containing histone folds, assembled from major public databases. Here, we report a substantial increase in the number of sequences and taxonomic coverage for histone and histone fold-containing proteins available in the database. Additionally, the database now contains an expanded dataset that includes archaeal histone sequences. The database also provides comprehensive multiple sequence alignments for each of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), the linker histones (H1/H5) and the archaeal histones. The database also includes current information on solved histone fold-containing structures. The Histone Sequence Database is an inclusive resource for the analysis of chromatin structure and function focused on histones and histone fold-containing proteins.

  16. Altering the sex determination pathway in Drosophila fat body modifies sex-specific stress responses

    PubMed Central

    Neckameyer, Wendi S.

    2014-01-01

    The stress response in Drosophila melanogaster reveals sex differences in behavior, similar to what has been observed in mammals. However, unlike mammals, the sex determination pathway in Drosophila is well established, making this an ideal system to identify factors involved in the modulation of sex-specific responses to stress. In this study, we show that the Drosophila fat body, which has been shown to be important for energy homeostasis and sex determination, is a dynamic tissue that is altered in response to stress in a sex and time-dependent manner. We manipulated the sex determination pathway in the fat body via targeted expression of transformer and transformer-2 and analyzed these animals for changes in their response to stress. In the majority of cases, manipulation of transformer or transformer-2 was able to change the physiological output in response to starvation and oxidative stress to that of the opposite sex. Our data also uncover the possibility of additional downstream targets for transformer and transformer-2 that are separate from the sex determination pathway and can influence behavioral and physiological responses. PMID:24789992

  17. Altering Conidial Dispersal of Alternaria solani by Modifying Microclimate in Tomato Crop Canopy

    PubMed Central

    Jambhulkar, Prashant Prakash; Jambhulkar, Nitiprasad; Meghwal, Madanlal; Ameta, Gauri Shankar

    2016-01-01

    Early blight of tomato caused by Alternaria solani, is responsible for severe yield losses in tomato. The conidia survive on soil surface and old dry lower leaves of the plant and spread when suitable climatic conditions are available. Macroclimatic study reveals that highest inoculum concentration of Alternaria spores appeared in May 2012 to 2013 and lowest concentration during January 2012 to 2013. High night temperature positively correlated and significantly (P < 0.01) involved in conidial spore dispersal and low relative humidity (RH) displayed significant (P < 0.05) but negative correlation with conidial dispersal. The objective of the study was to modify microclimatic conditions of tomato crop canopy which may hamper conidial dispersal and reduce disease severity. We evaluated effect of marigold intercropping and plastic mulching singly and in consortia on A. solani conidial density, tomato leaf damage and microclimatic parameters as compar to tomato alone (T). Tomato-marigold intercropping–plastic mulching treatment (T + M + P) showed 35–39% reduction in disease intensity as compared to tomato alone. When intercropped with tomato, marigold served as barrier to conidial movement and plastic mulching prevented evapotranspiration and reduced the canopy RH that resulted in less germination of A. solani spores. Marigold intercropping and plastic mulching served successfully as physical barrier against conidial dissemination to diminish significantly the tomato foliar damage produced by A. solani. PMID:27904457

  18. Altering Conidial Dispersal of Alternaria solani by Modifying Microclimate in Tomato Crop Canopy.

    PubMed

    Jambhulkar, Prashant Prakash; Jambhulkar, Nitiprasad; Meghwal, Madanlal; Ameta, Gauri Shankar

    2016-12-01

    Early blight of tomato caused by Alternaria solani, is responsible for severe yield losses in tomato. The conidia survive on soil surface and old dry lower leaves of the plant and spread when suitable climatic conditions are available. Macroclimatic study reveals that highest inoculum concentration of Alternaria spores appeared in May 2012 to 2013 and lowest concentration during January 2012 to 2013. High night temperature positively correlated and significantly (P < 0.01) involved in conidial spore dispersal and low relative humidity (RH) displayed significant (P < 0.05) but negative correlation with conidial dispersal. The objective of the study was to modify microclimatic conditions of tomato crop canopy which may hamper conidial dispersal and reduce disease severity. We evaluated effect of marigold intercropping and plastic mulching singly and in consortia on A. solani conidial density, tomato leaf damage and microclimatic parameters as compar to tomato alone (T). Tomato-marigold intercropping-plastic mulching treatment (T + M + P) showed 35-39% reduction in disease intensity as compared to tomato alone. When intercropped with tomato, marigold served as barrier to conidial movement and plastic mulching prevented evapotranspiration and reduced the canopy RH that resulted in less germination of A. solani spores. Marigold intercropping and plastic mulching served successfully as physical barrier against conidial dissemination to diminish significantly the tomato foliar damage produced by A. solani.

  19. Application of the Protein Semisynthesis Strategy to the Generation of Modified Chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Matthew; Muir, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Histone proteins are subject to a host of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) that modulate chromatin structure and function. Such control is achieved by the direct alteration of the intrinsic physical properties of the chromatin fiber or by regulating the recruitment and activity of a host of trans-acting nuclear factors. The sheer number of histone PTMs presents a formidable barrier to understanding the molecular mechanisms at the heart of epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic genomes. One aspect of this multifarious problem, namely how to access homogeneously modified chromatin for biochemical studies, is well suited to the sensibilities of the organic chemist. Indeed, recent years have witnessed a critical role for synthetic protein chemistry methods in generating the raw materials needed for studying how histone PTMs regulate chromatin biochemistry. This review focuses on what is arguably the most powerful, and widely employed, of these chemical strategies, namely histone semisynthesis via the chemical ligation of peptide fragments. PMID:25784050

  20. The human rs1050286 polymorphism alters LOX-1 expression through modifying miR-24 binding.

    PubMed

    Morini, Elena; Rizzacasa, Barbara; Pucci, Sabina; Polidoro, Chiara; Ferrè, Fabrizio; Caporossi, Daniela; Helmer Citterich, Manuela; Novelli, Giuseppe; Amati, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The up-regulation of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1), encoded by the OLR1 gene, plays a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Moreover, OLR1 polymorphisms were associated with increased susceptibility to acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and coronary artery diseases (CAD). In these pathologies, the identification of therapeutic approaches that can inhibit or reduce LOX-1 overexpression is crucial. Predictive analysis showed a putative hsa-miR-24 binding site in the 3'UTR of OLR1, 'naturally' mutated by the presence of the rs1050286 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP). Luciferase assays revealed that miR-24 targets OLR1 3'UTR-G, but not 3'UTR-A (P < 0.0005). The functional relevance of miR-24 in regulating the expression of OLR1 was established by overexpressing miR-24 in human cell lines heterozygous (A/G, HeLa) and homozygous (A/A, HepG2) for rs1050286 SNP. Accordingly, HeLa (A/G), but not HepG2 (A/A), showed a significant down-regulation of OLR1 both at RNA and protein level. Our results indicate that rs1050286 SNP significantly affects miR-24 binding affinity to the 3'UTR of OLR1, causing a more efficient post-transcriptional gene repression in the presence of the G allele. On this basis, we considered that OLR1 rs1050286 SNP may contribute to modify OLR1 susceptibility to AMI and CAD, so ORL1 SNPs screening could help to stratify patients risk.

  1. Modifying Charge and Hydrophilicity of Simple Ru(II) Polypyridyl Complexes Radically Alters Biological Activities: Old Complexes, Surprising New Tricks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Compounds capable of light-triggered cytotoxicity are appealing potential therapeutics, because they can provide spatial and temporal control over cell killing to reduce side effects in cancer therapy. Two simple homoleptic Ru(II) polypyridyl complexes with almost-identical photophysical properties but radically different physiochemical properties were investigated as agents for photodynamic therapy (PDT). The two complexes were identical, except for the incorporation of six sulfonic acids into the ligands of one complex, resulting in a compound carrying an overall −4 charge. The negatively charged compound exhibited significant light-mediated cytotoxicity, and, importantly, the negative charges resulted in radical alterations of the biological activity, compared to the positively charged analogue, including complete abrogation of toxicity in the dark. The charges also altered the subcellular localization properties, mechanism of action, and even the mechanism of cell death. The incorporation of negative charged ligands provides a simple chemical approach to modify the biological properties of light-activated Ru(II) cytotoxic agents. PMID:25249443

  2. Characterization of 4-HNE Modified L-FABP Reveals Alterations in Structural and Functional Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Smathers, Rebecca L.; Fritz, Kristofer S.; Galligan, James J.; Shearn, Colin T.; Reigan, Philip; Marks, Michael J.; Petersen, Dennis R.

    2012-01-01

    4-Hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde produced during oxidative stress and subsequent lipid peroxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids. The reactivity of 4-HNE towards DNA and nucleophilic amino acids has been well established. In this report, using proteomic approaches, liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) is identified as a target for modification by 4-HNE. This lipid binding protein mediates the uptake and trafficking of hydrophobic ligands throughout cellular compartments. Ethanol caused a significant decrease in L-FABP protein (P<0.001) and mRNA (P<0.05), as well as increased poly-ubiquitinated L-FABP (P<0.001). Sites of 4-HNE adduction on mouse recombinant L-FABP were mapped using MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry on apo (Lys57 and Cys69) and holo (Lys6, Lys31, His43, Lys46, Lys57 and Cys69) L-FABP. The impact of 4-HNE adduction was found to occur in a concentration-dependent manner; affinity for the fluorescent ligand, anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid, was reduced from 0.347 µM to Kd1 = 0.395 µM and Kd2 = 34.20 µM. Saturation analyses revealed that capacity for ligand is reduced by approximately 50% when adducted by 4-HNE. Thermal stability curves of apo L-FABP was also found to be significantly affected by 4-HNE adduction (ΔTm = 5.44°C, P<0.01). Computational-based molecular modeling simulations of adducted protein revealed minor conformational changes in global protein structure of apo and holo L-FABP while more apparent differences were observed within the internal binding pocket, revealing reduced area and structural integrity. New solvent accessible portals on the periphery of the protein were observed following 4-HNE modification in both the apo and holo state, suggesting an adaptive response to carbonylation. The results from this study detail the dynamic process associated with L-FABP modification by 4-HNE and provide insight as to how alterations in structural integrity and ligand binding may a

  3. Symbiotic bacterial communities in ants are modified by invasion pathway bottlenecks and alter host behavior.

    PubMed

    Lester, Philip J; Sébastien, Alexandra; Suarez, Andrew V; Barbieri, Rafael F; Gruber, Monica A M

    2017-03-01

    interspecific aggression, but this increase significantly decreased survival in interspecific interactions. The survival of the native ant species also decreased when the symbiotic microbial community within Argentine ants was modified by antibiotics. Our work offers support for both the enemy release hypothesis and that invasive species accumulate novel microbial taxa within their invaded range. These changes appear likely to influence invader behavior and survival.

  4. Pmr, a histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family protein encoded by the IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1, is a key global regulator that alters host function.

    PubMed

    Yun, Choong-Soo; Suzuki, Chiho; Naito, Kunihiko; Takeda, Toshiharu; Takahashi, Yurika; Sai, Fumiya; Terabayashi, Tsuguno; Miyakoshi, Masatoshi; Shintani, Masaki; Nishida, Hiromi; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2010-09-01

    Histone-like protein H1 (H-NS) family proteins are nucleoid-associated proteins (NAPs) conserved among many bacterial species. The IncP-7 plasmid pCAR1 is transmissible among various Pseudomonas strains and carries a gene encoding the H-NS family protein, Pmr. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a host of pCAR1, which harbors five genes encoding the H-NS family proteins PP_1366 (TurA), PP_3765 (TurB), PP_0017 (TurC), PP_3693 (TurD), and PP_2947 (TurE). Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that the presence of pCAR1 does not affect the transcription of these five genes and that only pmr, turA, and turB were primarily transcribed in KT2440(pCAR1). In vitro pull-down assays revealed that Pmr strongly interacted with itself and with TurA, TurB, and TurE. Transcriptome comparisons of the pmr disruptant, KT2440, and KT2440(pCAR1) strains indicated that pmr disruption had greater effects on the host transcriptome than did pCAR1 carriage. The transcriptional levels of some genes that increased with pCAR1 carriage, such as the mexEF-oprN efflux pump genes and parI, reverted with pmr disruption to levels in pCAR1-free KT2440. Transcriptional levels of putative horizontally acquired host genes were not altered by pCAR1 carriage but were altered by pmr disruption. Identification of genome-wide Pmr binding sites by ChAP-chip (chromatin affinity purification coupled with high-density tiling chip) analysis demonstrated that Pmr preferentially binds to horizontally acquired DNA regions. The Pmr binding sites overlapped well with the location of the genes differentially transcribed following pmr disruption on both the plasmid and the chromosome. Our findings indicate that Pmr is a key factor in optimizing gene transcription on pCAR1 and the host chromosome.

  5. One-pot refolding of core histones from bacterial inclusion bodies allows rapid reconstitution of histone octamer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Tae; Gibbons, Garrett; Lee, Shirley Y; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Dou, Yali

    2015-06-01

    We report an optimized method to purify and reconstitute histone octamer, which utilizes high expression of histones in inclusion bodies but eliminates the time consuming steps of individual histone purification. In the newly modified protocol, Xenopus laevis H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 are expressed individually into inclusion bodies of bacteria, which are subsequently mixed together and denatured in 8M guanidine hydrochloride. Histones are refolded and reconstituted into soluble octamer by dialysis against 2M NaCl, and metal-affinity purified through an N-terminal polyhistidine-tag added on the H2A. After cleavage of the polyhistidine-tag, histone octamer is further purified by size exclusion chromatography. We show that the nucleosomes reconstituted using the purified histone octamer above are fully functional. They serve as effective substrates for the histone methyltransferases DOT1L and MLL1. Small angle X-ray scattering further confirms that the reconstituted nucleosomes have correct structural integration of histone octamer and DNA as observed in the X-ray crystal structure. Our new protocol enables rapid reconstitution of histone octamer with an optimal yield. We expect this simplified approach to facilitate research using recombinant nucleosomes in vitro.

  6. Detection of histone modifications in plant leaves.

    PubMed

    Jaskiewicz, Michal; Peterhansel, Christoph; Conrath, Uwe

    2011-09-23

    Chromatin structure is important for the regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes. In this process, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, and covalent modifications on the amino-terminal tails of histones H3 and H4 play essential roles(1-2). H3 and H4 histone modifications include methylation of lysine and arginine, acetylation of lysine, and phosphorylation of serine residues(1-2). These modifications are associated either with gene activation, repression, or a primed state of gene that supports more rapid and robust activation of expression after perception of appropriate signals (microbe-associated molecular patterns, light, hormones, etc.)(3-7). Here, we present a method for the reliable and sensitive detection of specific chromatin modifications on selected plant genes. The technique is based on the crosslinking of (modified) histones and DNA with formaldehyde(8,9), extraction and sonication of chromatin, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with modification-specific antibodies(9,10), de-crosslinking of histone-DNA complexes, and gene-specific real-time quantitative PCR. The approach has proven useful for detecting specific histone modifications associated with C(4;) photosynthesis in maize(5,11) and systemic immunity in Arabidopsis(3).

  7. Histone chaperones FACT and Spt6 prevent histone variants from turning into histone deviants.

    PubMed

    Jeronimo, Célia; Robert, François

    2016-05-01

    Histone variants are specialized histones which replace their canonical counterparts in specific nucleosomes. Together with histone post-translational modifications and DNA methylation, they contribute to the epigenome. Histone variants are incorporated at specific locations by the concerted action of histone chaperones and ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers. Recent studies have shown that the histone chaperone FACT plays key roles in preventing pervasive incorporation of two histone variants: H2A.Z and CenH3/CENP-A. In addition, Spt6, another histone chaperone, was also shown to be important for appropriate H2A.Z localization. FACT and Spt6 are both associated with elongating RNA polymerase II. Based on these two examples, we propose that the establishment and maintenance of histone variant genomic distributions depend on a transcription-coupled epigenome editing (or surveillance) function of histone chaperones.

  8. Histone Methyltransferase MMSET/NSD2 Alters EZH2 Binding and Reprograms the Myeloma Epigenome through Global and Focal Changes in H3K36 and H3K27 Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Giannopoulou, Eugenia G.; Zhang, Quanwei; Zhang, Qingyang; Ezponda, Teresa; Shah, Mrinal Y.; Zheng, Yupeng; Will, Christine M.; Small, Eliza C.; Hua, Youjia; Bulic, Marinka; Jiang, Yanwen; Carrara, Matteo; Calogero, Raffaele A.; Kath, William L.; Kelleher, Neil L.; Wang, Ji-Ping; Elemento, Olivier; Licht, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of the histone methyltransferase MMSET in t(4;14)+ multiple myeloma patients is believed to be the driving factor in the pathogenesis of this subtype of myeloma. MMSET catalyzes dimethylation of lysine 36 on histone H3 (H3K36me2), and its overexpression causes a global increase in H3K36me2, redistributing this mark in a broad, elevated level across the genome. Here, we demonstrate that an increased level of MMSET also induces a global reduction of lysine 27 trimethylation on histone H3 (H3K27me3). Despite the net decrease in H3K27 methylation, specific genomic loci exhibit enhanced recruitment of the EZH2 histone methyltransferase and become hypermethylated on this residue. These effects likely contribute to the myeloma phenotype since MMSET-overexpressing cells displayed increased sensitivity to EZH2 inhibition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that such MMSET-mediated epigenetic changes require a number of functional domains within the protein, including PHD domains that mediate MMSET recruitment to chromatin. In vivo, targeting of MMSET by an inducible shRNA reversed histone methylation changes and led to regression of established tumors in athymic mice. Together, our work elucidates previously unrecognized interplay between MMSET and EZH2 in myeloma oncogenesis and identifies domains to be considered when designing inhibitors of MMSET function. PMID:25188243

  9. Structural changes in histone H2A by methylglyoxal generate highly immunogenic amorphous aggregates with implications in auto-immune response in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mir, Abdul Rouf; Moinuddin; Habib, Safia; Khan, Farzana; Alam, Khursheed; Ali, Asif

    2016-02-01

    The role of aberrant protein modifications in cancer and its diagnosis have emerged as a promising research field. Nonenzymatic glyco-oxidation of proteins under oxidative stress has been associated with carcinogenesis through advanced glycation end products (AGE)-receptors for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) axis. Modified proteins that are immunogenic and stimulate cellular and humoral immune responses are being studied to develop early detection markers of cancer. This study has probed the structural alternations; leading to the formation of adducts and aggregates, in histone H2A upon in vitro modification by methylglyoxal (MG). The immunogenicity of modified histone H2A and its binding with cancer autoantibodies was also assessed. MG induced lysine side chain modifications, blocking of free amino groups and the formation of condensed cross structures in histone H2A; and its effect was inhibited by carbonyl scavengers. It led to the adduct formation and generation of N-epsilon-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) and its decomposition forms as revealed by Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography and LC-MS. MG-H2A showed amorphous aggregate formation under electron microscopy and altered binding with DNA in circular dichroism studies. The modified histone elicited high titer immunogen-specific antibodies in rabbits when compared with the native, thus pointing toward the generation of neo-epitopes in MG-H2A. The autoantibodies derived from cancer patients exhibited enhanced binding with MG-H2A as compared with the native histone in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and gel retardation assay. This reflects sharing of epitopes on MG-H2A and histones in cancer patients. The neo-epitopes on H2A may be responsible for induction and elevated levels of antibodies in cancer patients. Thus, MG-H2A may be considered as potential antigenic candidate for auto-immune response in cancer.

  10. Histone lysine methyltransferases as anti-cancer targets for drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Wang, Ming-wei

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational epigenetic modification of histones is controlled by a number of histone-modifying enzymes. Such modification regulates the accessibility of DNA and the subsequent expression or silencing of a gene. Human histone methyltransferases (HMTs)constitute a large family that includes histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs) and histone/protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs). There is increasing evidence showing a correlation between HKMTs and cancer pathogenesis. Here, we present an overview of representative HKMTs, including their biological and biochemical properties as well as the profiles of small molecule inhibitors for a comprehensive understanding of HKMTs in drug discovery. PMID:27397541

  11. Histone Gene Multiplicity and Position Effect Variegation in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Gerald D.; Sinclair, Donald A.; Grigliatti, Thomas A.

    1983-01-01

    The histone genes of wild-type Drosophila melanogaster are reiterated 100–150 times per haploid genome and are located in the segment of chromosome 2 that corresponds to polytene bands 39D2-3 to E1-2. The influence of altered histone gene multiplicity on chromatin structure has been assayed by measuring modification of the gene inactivation associated with position effect variegation in genotypes bearing deletions of the 39D-E segment. The proportion of cells in which a variegating gene is active is increased in genotypes that are heterozygous for a deficiency that removes the histone gene complex. Deletions that remove segments adjacent to the histone gene complex have no effect on the expression of variegating genes. Suppression of position effect variegation associated with reduction of histone gene multiplicity applies to both X-linked and autosomal variegating genes. Position effects exerted by both autosomal and sex-chromosome heterochromatin were suppressible by deletions of the histone gene complex. The suppression was independent of the presence of the Y chromosome. A deficiency that deletes only the distal portion of the histone gene complex also has the ability to suppress position effect variegation. Duplication of the histone gene complex did not enhance position effect variegation. Deletion or duplication of the histone gene complex in the maternal genome had no effect on the extent of variegation in progeny whose histone gene multiplicity was normal. These results are discussed with respect to current knowledge of the organization of the histone gene complex and control of its expression. PMID:17246163

  12. High-resolution genome-wide mapping of histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Roh, Tae-young; Ngau, Wing Chi; Cui, Kairong; Landsman, David; Zhao, Keji

    2004-08-01

    The expression patterns of eukaryotic genomes are controlled by their chromatin structure, consisting of nucleosome subunits in which DNA of approximately 146 bp is wrapped around a core of 8 histone molecules. Post-translational histone modifications play an essential role in modifying chromatin structure. Here we apply a combination of SAGE and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocols to determine the distribution of hyperacetylated histones H3 and H4 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We call this approach genome-wide mapping technique (GMAT). Using GMAT, we find that the highest acetylation levels are detected in the 5' end of a gene's coding region, but not in the promoter. Furthermore, we show that the histone acetyltransferase, GCN5p, regulates H3 acetylation in the promoter and 5' end of the coding regions. These findings indicate that GMAT should find valuable applications in mapping target sites of chromatin-modifying enzymes.

  13. Comprehensive Genomic Profiling of Orbital and Ocular Adnexal Lymphomas Identifies Frequent Alterations in MYD88 and Chromatin Modifiers: New Routes to Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Cani, Andi K.; Soliman, Moaaz; Hovelson, Daniel H.; Liu, Chia-Jen; McDaniel, Andrew S.; Haller, Michaela J.; Bratley, Jarred; Rahrig, Samantha; Li, Qiang; Briceño, César A.; Tomlins, Scott A.; Rao, Rajesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the orbit and ocular adnexa is the most common primary orbital malignancy. Treatments for low- (extra-nodal marginal zone and follicular lymphomas) and high-grade (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) are associated with local and vision-threatening toxicities. High-grade lymphomas relapse frequently and exhibit poor survival rates. Despite advances in genomic profiling and precision-medicine, orbital and ocular adnexal lymphomas remain poorly characterized molecularly. We performed targeted next-generation sequencing profiling of 38 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, orbital and ocular adnexal lymphomas obtained from a single-center using a panel targeting near-term, clinically-relevant genes. Potentially actionable mutations and copy-number alterations were prioritized based on gain- and loss-of function analyses, catalogued approved and investigational therapies. Of 36 informative samples, including marginal zone lymphomas (n=20), follicular lymphomas (n=9), and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas (n=7), 53% harbored a prioritized alteration (median=1, range 0–5/sample). MYD88 was the most frequently altered gene in our cohort, with potentially clinically-relevant hot-spot gain-of-function mutations identified in 71% of diffuse large B-cell and 25% of marginal zone lymphomas. Prioritized alterations in epigenetic modulators were common and included gain-of-function EZH2 and loss-of-function ARID1A mutations (14% of diffuse large B-cell lymphomas and 22% of follicular lymphomas contained alterations in each of these two genes). Single prioritized alterations were also identified in the histone methyltransferases KMT2B (follicular lymphoma) and KMT3B (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma). Loss-of-function mutations and copy-number alterations in the tumor suppressors TP53 (diffuse large B-cell and follicular lymphoma), CDKN2A (all subtypes), PTEN (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma), ATM (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma) and NF1 (diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

  14. Gene amplification of the histone methyltransferase SETDB1 contributes to human lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Paredes, M; Martinez de Paz, A; Simó-Riudalbas, L; Sayols, S; Moutinho, C; Moran, S; Villanueva, A; Vázquez-Cedeira, M; Lazo, P A; Carneiro, F; Moura, C S; Vieira, J; Teixeira, M R; Esteller, M

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of the histone modification patterns is one of the most common features of human tumors. However, few genetic alterations in the histone modifier genes have been described in tumorigenesis. Herein we show that the histone methyltransferase SETDB1 undergoes gene amplification in non-small and small lung cancer cell lines and primary tumors. The existence of additional copies of the SETDB1 gene in these transformed cells is associated with higher levels of the corresponding mRNA and protein. From a functional standpoint, the depletion of SETDB1 expression in amplified cells reduces cancer growth in cell culture and nude mice models, whereas its overexpression increases the tumor invasiveness. The increased gene dosage of SETDB1 is also associated with enhanced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effect mediated by the SETDB1-interfering drug mithramycin. Overall, the findings identify SETDB1 as a bona fide oncogene undergoing gene amplification-associated activation in lung cancer and suggest its potential for new therapeutic strategies. PMID:23770855

  15. Real-Time Tracking of Parental Histones Reveals Their Contribution to Chromatin Integrity Following DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Adam, Salomé; Dabin, Juliette; Chevallier, Odile; Leroy, Olivier; Baldeyron, Céline; Corpet, Armelle; Lomonte, Patrick; Renaud, Olivier; Almouzni, Geneviève; Polo, Sophie E

    2016-10-06

    Chromatin integrity is critical for cell function and identity but is challenged by DNA damage. To understand how chromatin architecture and the information that it conveys are preserved or altered following genotoxic stress, we established a system for real-time tracking of parental histones, which characterize the pre-damage chromatin state. Focusing on histone H3 dynamics after local UVC irradiation in human cells, we demonstrate that parental histones rapidly redistribute around damaged regions by a dual mechanism combining chromatin opening and histone mobilization on chromatin. Importantly, parental histones almost entirely recover and mix with new histones in repairing chromatin. Our data further define a close coordination of parental histone dynamics with DNA repair progression through the damage sensor DDB2 (DNA damage-binding protein 2). We speculate that this mechanism may contribute to maintaining a memory of the original chromatin landscape and may help preserve epigenome stability in response to DNA damage.

  16. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs): multitargeted anticancer agents

    PubMed Central

    Ververis, Katherine; Hiong, Alison; Karagiannis, Tom C; Licciardi, Paul V

    2013-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are an emerging class of therapeutics with potential as anticancer drugs. The rationale for developing HDAC inhibitors (and other chromatin-modifying agents) as anticancer therapies arose from the understanding that in addition to genetic mutations, epigenetic changes such as dysregulation of HDAC enzymes can alter phenotype and gene expression, disturb homeostasis, and contribute to neoplastic growth. The family of HDAC inhibitors is large and diverse. It includes a range of naturally occurring and synthetic compounds that differ in terms of structure, function, and specificity. HDAC inhibitors have multiple cell type-specific effects in vitro and in vivo, such as growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptosis in malignant cells. HDAC inhibitors have the potential to be used as monotherapies or in combination with other anticancer therapies. Currently, there are two HDAC inhibitors that have received approval from the US FDA for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma: vorinostat (suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid, Zolinza) and depsipeptide (romidepsin, Istodax). More recently, depsipeptide has also gained FDA approval for the treatment of peripheral T-cell lymphoma. Many more clinical trials assessing the effects of various HDAC inhibitors on hematological and solid malignancies are currently being conducted. Despite the proven anticancer effects of particular HDAC inhibitors against certain cancers, many aspects of HDAC enzymes and HDAC inhibitors are still not fully understood. Increasing our understanding of the effects of HDAC inhibitors, their targets and mechanisms of action will be critical for the advancement of these drugs, especially to facilitate the rational design of HDAC inhibitors that are effective as antineoplastic agents. This review will discuss the use of HDAC inhibitors as multitargeted therapies for malignancy. Further, we outline the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of HDAC inhibitors while

  17. A chimeric mouse histone H4 gene containing either an intron or poly(A) addition signal behaves like a basal histone.

    PubMed Central

    Seiler-Tuyns, A; Paterson, B M

    1986-01-01

    We have modified the basic structure of the mouse H4 histone gene by introducing, in one case, the IVS-II of the human beta globin gene in the middle of the H4 coding region and, in the second case, the poly(A) addition signal from either the chicken vimentin gene or the alpha globin gene, displacing the hairpin loop structure in the 3' direction. Constructs were placed into the vector, PSV2gpt, and stably transformed into L cells. Pools of 100-500 independent transformants were analyzed for H4 expression. Even though the intron is processed correctly, the growth regulated expression of the modified gene is lost and the gene is now expressed at a constant basal level. Furthermore, unprocessed transcripts accumulate in the nucleus of Go cells when compared to exponentially growing cultures. Polyadenylated H4 RNA is correctly processed but expressed at reduced levels (30 fold) in a constitutive manner, independent of the growth state of the cell. The altered expression of these chimeric H4 genes compared to the endogenous copy or the transfected wild type gene suggests a structural model to explain the cell cycle independent expression of the basal histones. Images PMID:3024121

  18. Rapid purification of recombinant histones.

    PubMed

    Klinker, Henrike; Haas, Caroline; Harrer, Nadine; Becker, Peter B; Mueller-Planitz, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods to assemble nucleosomes from recombinant histones decades ago has transformed chromatin research. Nevertheless, nucleosome reconstitution remains time consuming to this day, not least because the four individual histones must be purified first. Here, we present a streamlined purification protocol of recombinant histones from bacteria. We termed this method "rapid histone purification" (RHP) as it circumvents isolation of inclusion bodies and thereby cuts out the most time-consuming step of traditional purification protocols. Instead of inclusion body isolation, whole cell extracts are prepared under strongly denaturing conditions that directly solubilize inclusion bodies. By ion exchange chromatography, the histones are purified from the extracts. The protocol has been successfully applied to all four canonical Drosophila and human histones. RHP histones and histones that were purified from isolated inclusion bodies had similar purities. The different purification strategies also did not impact the quality of octamers reconstituted from these histones. We expect that the RHP protocol can be readily applied to the purification of canonical histones from other species as well as the numerous histone variants.

  19. Lateral Thinking: How Histone Modifications Regulate Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Moyra; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The DNA of each cell is wrapped around histone octamers, forming so-called 'nucleosomal core particles'. These histone proteins have tails that project from the nucleosome and many residues in these tails can be post-translationally modified, influencing all DNA-based processes, including chromatin compaction, nucleosome dynamics, and transcription. In contrast to those present in histone tails, modifications in the core regions of the histones had remained largely uncharacterised until recently, when some of these modifications began to be analysed in detail. Overall, recent work has shown that histone core modifications can not only directly regulate transcription, but also influence processes such as DNA repair, replication, stemness, and changes in cell state. In this review, we focus on the most recent developments in our understanding of histone modifications, particularly those on the lateral surface of the nucleosome. This region is in direct contact with the DNA and is formed by the histone cores. We suggest that these lateral surface modifications represent a key insight into chromatin regulation in the cell. Therefore, lateral surface modifications form a key area of interest and a focal point of ongoing study in epigenetics.

  20. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Implications of Histone Epigenetic Modulators in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Louise; Gallagher, William M; O'Connor, Darran P; Ní Chonghaile, Tríona

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and great advancements have been made for individualised patient treatment. Through understanding the underlying altered biology in the different subtypes of breast cancer, targeted therapeutics have been developed. Unfortunately, resistance to targeted therapy, intrinsic or acquired, is a recurring theme in cancer treatment. Epigenetic-mediated resistance to targeted therapy has been identified across different types of cancer. In addition, tumorigenesis has also been linked to altered expression of epigenetic modifiers. Due to the reversible nature of epigenetic modifications, epigenetic proteins are appealing as therapeutic targets in both the primary and relapsed/resistant setting. In this review, we will discuss the current state of targetable epigenetic histone modifications and their diagnostic and therapeutic implications in breast cancer.

  1. Physicochemical modifications of histones and their impact on epigenomics.

    PubMed

    Andreoli, Federico; Del Rio, Alberto

    2014-09-01

    The study of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) has made extraordinary progress over the past few years and many epigenetic modifications have been identified and found to be associated with fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Most histone-modifying enzymes produce specific covalent modifications on histone tails that, taken together, elicit complex and concerted processes. An even higher level of complexity is generated by the action of small molecules that are able to modulate pharmacologically epigenetic enzymes and interfere with these biochemical mechanisms. In this article, we provide an overview of histone PTMs by reviewing and discussing them in terms of their physicochemical properties, emphasizing these concepts in view of recent research efforts to elucidate epigenetic mechanisms and devise future epigenetic drugs.

  2. Trichostatin-A induces differential changes in histone protein dynamics and expression in HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Jyothsna; Bhattacharya, Dipanjan; Banerjee, Bidisha; Sarin, Apurva; Shivashankar, G.V.

    2007-11-16

    Trichostatin-A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, results in enhanced acetylation of core histones thereby disrupting chromatin organization within living cells. We report on changes in chromatin organization and the resultant alteration in nuclear architecture following treatment with TSA using fluorescence imaging. TSA triggers an expected increase in the euchromatin fraction which is accompanied by a significant increase in nuclear volume and alterations in chromatin compaction mapped using fluorescence anisotropy imaging. We observe differential changes in the mobility of core and linker histones as measured by fluorescence recovery after photo-bleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) methods. Further TSA induces a differential increase in linker histone transcription and increased phosphorylation of linker histone proteins accompanying an expected increase in core histone acetylation patterns. Thus subtle feedback responses triggered by changes in chromatin configurations impinge selectively on linker histone mobility and its expression. These observations have implications for understanding the role of HDAC in the dynamic maintenance of chromatin organization.

  3. Brownian dynamics simulation of the effect of histone modification on nucleosome structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Xie, Ping; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2007-05-01

    Using Brownian dynamics we simulate the effect of histone modification, such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and methylation, on nucleosome structure by varying the interaction force between DNA and the histone octamer. The simulation shows that the structural stability of nucleosome is very sensitive to the interaction force, and the DNA unwrapping from the modified histone octamer usually occurs turn by turn. Furthermore, the effects of temperature and DNA break as well as the competition between modified and normal histone octamers are investigated, with the simulation results being in agreement with the experimental observation that phosphorylated nucleosomes near DNA breaks are more easily depleted. Though the simulation study may only give a coarse grained view of the DNA unwrapping process for the modified histone octamer, it may provide insight into the mechanism of DNA repair.

  4. `Up-regulation of histone acetylation induced by social defeat mediates the conditioned rewarding effects of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Montagud-Romero, S; Montesinos, J; Pascual, M; Aguilar, M A; Roger-Sanchez, C; Guerri, C; Miñarro, J; Rodríguez-Arias, M

    2016-10-03

    Social defeat (SD) induces a long-lasting increase in the rewarding effects of psychostimulants measured using the self-administration and conditioned place procedures (CPP). However, little is known about the epigenetic changes induced by social stress and about their role in the increased response to the rewarding effects of psychostimulants. Considering that histone acetylation regulates transcriptional activity and contributes to drug-induced behavioral changes, we addressed the hypothesis that SD induces transcriptional changes by histone modifications associated with the acquisition of place conditioning. After a fourth defeat, H3(K9) acetylation was decreased in the hippocampus, while there was an increase of HAT and a decrease of HDAC levels in the cortex. Three weeks after the last defeat, mice displayed an increase in histone H4(K12) acetylation and an upregulation of histone acetyl transferase (HAT) activity in the hippocampus. In addition, H3(K4)me3, which is closely associated with transcriptional initiation, was also augmented in the hippocampus three weeks after the last defeat. Inhibition of HAT by curcumin (100mg/kg) before each SD blocked the increase in the conditioned reinforcing effects of 1mg/kg of cocaine, while inhibition of HDAC by valproic acid (500mg/kg) before social stress potentiated cocaine-induced CPP. Preference was reinstated when animals received a priming dose of 0.5mg/kg of cocaine, an effect that was absent in untreated defeated mice. These results suggest that the experience of SD induces chromatin remodeling, alters histone acetylation and methylation, and modifies the effects of cocaine on place conditioning. They also point to epigenetic mechanisms as potential avenues leading to new treatments for the long-term effects of social stress on drug addiction.

  5. Global histone post-translational modifications and cancer: Biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shafqat Ali; Reddy, Divya; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Global alterations in epigenetic landscape are now recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning and non-coding RNAs are proven to have strong association with cancer. In particular, covalent post-translational modifications of histone proteins are known to play an important role in chromatin remodeling and thereby in regulation of gene expression. Further, histone modifications have also been associated with different aspects of carcinogenesis and have been studied for their role in the better management of cancer patients. In this review, we will explore and discuss how histone modifications are involved in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. PMID:26629316

  6. Histone acetylation in insect chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Allfrey, V G; Pogo, B G; Littau, V C; Gershey, E L; Mirsky, A E

    1968-01-19

    Acetylation of histones takes place along the salivary gland chromosomes of Chironomus thummi when RNA synthesis is active. It can be observed but not measured quantitatively by autoradiography of chromosome squashes. The "fixatives" commonly used in preparing squashes of insect chromosomes preferentially extract the highly acetylated "arginine-rich" histone fractions; the use of such fixatives may explain the reported absence of histone acetylation in Drosophila melanogaster.

  7. Glycated-H2A histone is better bound by serum anti-DNA autoantibodies in SLE patients: glycated-histones as likely trigger for SLE?

    PubMed

    Alam, Sana; Arif, Zarina; Alam, Khursheed

    2015-02-01

    Histones are the most abundant proteins associated with genomic DNA. Recent observations show that histones are quite susceptible to non-enzymatic glycation which results in the generation of free radicals causing structural perturbations. In this study, our aim is to define the role of deoxyribose-modified H2A histone in SLE initiation/progression. Glycation reaction was carried out by incubating H2A histone with 10 mM deoxyribose for 21 days at 37 °C. Structural changes in glycated-H2A were studied by various physico-chemical techniques. The antigen-antibody interaction was studied by direct binding, inhibition ELISA and mobility shift assay. Deoxyribose-modified-H2A histone showed increased hyperchromicity and increased fluorescence intensity. CD results demonstrated almost 50% loss in alpha helix conformation as a consequence of glycation. This was supported by an increase in Tm value vis-à-vis thermal stability. Glycated-H2A showed cross linking in SDS-PAGE. SLE sera positive for anti-nDNA autoantibodies showed preference for deoxyribose-modified-H2A histone compared to native H2A histone or native DNA. Inhibition ELISA supported the above findings. Band shift assay further reiterated the preferential recognition of glycated-H2A over native H2A by SLE IgG autoantibodies. Deoxyribose-modified-H2A histone exhibited damage as revealed by various physico-chemical studies. Glycation of H2A has resulted in the generation of neo-epitopes on H2A histone, which are preferably bound by SLE anti-nDNA autoantibodies. It implies that deoxyribose-modified-H2A may trigger immune response resulting in the generation of anti-glycated H2A antibodies with DNA cross reacting properties.

  8. Developmental exposure to 50 parts-per-billion arsenic influences histone modifications and associated epigenetic machinery in a region- and sex-specific manner in the adult mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Christina R.; Hafez, Alexander K.; Solomon, Elizabeth R.; Allan, Andrea M.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies report that arsenic exposure via drinking water adversely impacts cognitive development in children and, in adults, can lead to greater psychiatric disease susceptibility, among other conditions. While it is known that arsenic toxicity alters the epigenome, very few studies have investigated its effects on chromatin architecture in the brain. We have previously demonstrated that exposure to a low level of arsenic (50 ppb) during all three trimesters of fetal/neonatal development induces deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG), depressive-like symptoms, and alterations in gene expression in the adult mouse brain. As epigenetic processes control these outcomes, here we assess the impact of our developmental arsenic exposure (DAE) paradigm on global histone posttranslational modifications and expression of associated chromatin-modifying proteins in the dentate gyrus and frontal cortex (FC) of adult male and female mice. DAE influenced histone 3 K4 trimethylation with increased levels in the male DG and FC and decreased levels in the female DG (no change in female FC). The histone methyltransferase MLL exhibited a similar sex- and region- specific expression profile as H3K4me3 levels, while histone demethylase KDM5B expression trended in the opposite direction. DAE increased histone 3 K9 acetylation levels in the male DG along with histone acetyltransferase (HAT) expression of GCN5 and decreased H3K9ac levels in the male FC along with decreased HAT expression of GCN5 and PCAF. DAE decreased expression of histone deacetylase enzymes HDAC1 and HDAC2, which were concurrent with increased H3K9ac levels but only in the female DG. Levels of H3 and H3K9me3 were not influenced by DAE in either brain region of either sex. These findings suggest that exposure to a low, environmentally relevant level of arsenic during development induces alterations in the adult brain via histone modifications and chromatin modifiers a sex- and

  9. Altered expression of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in a mouse model whose glycemic status is controlled by a low carbohydrate ketogenic diet.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Tetsuya; Fukui, Asami; Morita, Naoki

    2013-11-01

    Abnormal modification of proteins by O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is known to be associated with the pathology induced by hyperglycemia. However, the dynamic mechanism of O-GlcNAc modification under hyperglycemic conditions in vivo has not been fully characterized. To understand the mechanism, we established an animal model in which the glycemic status is controlled by the diet. A mutant mouse (ob/ob) which exhibits diet-induced hyperglycemia when fed a regular chow (chow) was used to establish this model; the mice were fed a very low carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD) to improve hyperglycemia. Using this model, we evaluated the levels of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in tissues under a hyperglycemic or its improved condition. ELISA and Western blot analyses revealed that altered expression of certain proteins modified by O-GlcNAc were found in the mice tissues, although global O-GlcNAc levels in the tissues remained unaltered by improvement of hyperglycemia. We also found the Akt protein kinase was modified by O-GlcNAc in the liver of ob/ob mice, and the modification levels were decreased by improvement of hyperglycemia. Furthermore, aberrant phosphorylation of Akt was found in the liver of ob/ob mice under hyperglycemic condition. In conclusion, our established mouse model is useful for evaluating the dynamics of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins in tissues associated with glycemic status. This study revealed that the expression level of certain proteins modified by O-GlcNAc is altered when KD improves the hyperglycemia. These proteins could be prospective indexes for nutritional therapy for hyperglycemia-associated diseases, such as diabetes mellitus.

  10. Structural basis for the recognition and cleavage of histone H3 by cathepsin L

    PubMed Central

    Adams-Cioaba, Melanie A.; Krupa, Joanne C.; Xu, Chao; Mort, John S.; Min, Jinrong

    2011-01-01

    Proteolysis of eukaryotic histone tails has emerged as an important factor in the modulation of cell-cycle progression and cellular differentiation. The recruitment of lysosomal cathepsin L to the nucleus where it mediates proteolysis of the mouse histone H3 tail has been described recently. Here, we report the three-dimensional crystal structures of a mature, inactive mutant of human cathepsin L alone and in complex with a peptide derived from histone H3. Canonical substrate–cathepsin L interactions are observed in the complex between the protease and the histone H3 peptide. Systematic analysis of the impact of posttranslational modifications at histone H3 on substrate selectivity suggests cathepsin L to be highly accommodating of all modified peptides. This is the first report of cathepsin L–histone H3 interaction and the first structural description of cathepsin L in complex with a substrate. PMID:21326229

  11. Histone Methylation by Temozolomide; A Classic DNA Methylating Anticancer Drug

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Amanda J.; Diaz, Anthony Joseph; Mura, Hugo; Nyuwen, Lila; Coello, Daniel; Sheva, Saif; Maria, Nava; Gallo, James M.; Wang, Tieli

    2017-01-01

    Background/Aim The alkylating agent, temozolomide (TMZ), is considered the standard-of-care for high-grade astrocytomas –known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)– an aggressive type of tumor with poor prognosis. The therapeutic benefit of TMZ is attributed to formation of DNA adducts involving the methylation of purine bases in DNA. We investigated the effects of TMZ on arginine and lysine amino acids, histone H3 peptides and histone H3 proteins. Materials and Methods Chemical modification of amino acids, histone H3 peptide and protein by TMZ was performed in phosphate buffer at physiological pH. The reaction products were examined by mass spectrometry and western blot analysis. Results Our results showed that TMZ following conversion to a methylating cation, can methylate histone H3 peptide and histone H3 protein, suggesting that TMZ exerts its anticancer activity not only through its interaction with DNA, but also through alterations of protein post-translational modifications. Conclusion The possibility that TMZ can methylate histones involved with epigenetic regulation of protein indicates a potentially unique mechanism of action. The study will contribute to the understanding the anticancer activity of TMZ in order to develop novel targeted molecular strategies to advance the cancer treatment. PMID:27354585

  12. Synthesis, Acetylation, and Phosphorylation of Histone IV and Its Binding to DNA During Spermatogenesis in Trout*

    PubMed Central

    Louie, Andrew J.; Dixon, Gordon H.

    1972-01-01

    During spermatogenesis in trout testis, histone IV is extensively modified by acetylation and phosphorylation. To examine the relationship of synthesis of histone IV to its modification, histone IV labeled with [3H]aminoacids and inorganic [32P]phosphate was prepared from testis cells by acid extraction and column chromatography. Purified histone IV was resolved by starch gel electrophoresis into 10 bands, of which nine are modified by acetylation and/or phosphorylation. In the first 4 hr of labeling, the diacetyl-histone IV band showed the highest proportion of [3H]aminoacid label. After 12 hr of incorporation, more label was found in the triacetyl and tetraacetyl bands. A significant amount of amino-acid label in the two major bands (the unsubstituted and monoacetyl bands) of histone IV was not seen until 16 hr of incubation. From 1 to 12 days, the proportion of label in the unsubstituted and monoacetylated bands increased, while that in the tetra-, tri-, and monoacetyl bands decreased. Very little [3H]aminoacid was found in the phosphorylated bands of histone IV in the first 12 hr. However, after 16 hr about 20% of the total 3H was found in the phosphorylated bands. The proportion increased to 33% and remained at this level between 1 and 8 days, but, by 16 days, had decreased to 12% of the total. These data suggest that an “obligatory” acetylation of recently synthesized histone IV is involved in the correct binding of newly synthesized histone IV to DNA. We propose that ε-amino acetylation of lysyl residues 5, 8, 12, and 16 neutralizes their positive charges and allows the NH2-terminal region of histone IV to assume the correct conformation (in this case, an α-helix), and fit into the major groove of DNA. Deacetylation then “locks” histone IV to DNA by ionic linkages. The biological significance of phosphorylation of histone IV is not known. Images PMID:4505675

  13. Calcium-mediated histone modifications regulate alternative splicing in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Alok; Nguyen, Hieu; Geng, Cuiyu; Hinman, Melissa N; Luo, Guangbin; Lou, Hua

    2014-11-18

    In cardiomyocytes, calcium is known to control gene expression at the level of transcription, whereas its role in regulating alternative splicing has not been explored. Here we report that, in mouse primary or embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes, increased calcium levels induce robust and reversible skipping of several alternative exons from endogenously expressed genes. Interestingly, we demonstrate a calcium-mediated splicing regulatory mechanism that depends on changes of histone modifications. Specifically, the regulation occurs through changes in calcium-responsive kinase activities that lead to alterations in histone modifications and subsequent changes in the transcriptional elongation rate and exon skipping. We demonstrate that increased intracellular calcium levels lead to histone hyperacetylation along the body of the genes containing calcium-responsive alternative exons by disrupting the histone deacetylase-to-histone acetyltransferase balance in the nucleus. Consequently, the RNA polymerase II elongation rate increases significantly on those genes, resulting in skipping of the alternative exons. These studies reveal a mechanism by which calcium-level changes in cardiomyocytes impact on the output of gene expression through altering alternative pre-mRNA splicing patterns.

  14. Histone Ketoamide Adduction by 4-Oxo-2-nonenal Is a Reversible Posttranslational Modification Regulated by Sirt2.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yiwen; Li, Xin; Lin, Jianwei; Hao, Quan; Li, Xiang David

    2017-01-20

    Lipid-derived electrophiles (LDEs) directly modify proteins to modulate cellular signaling pathways in response to oxidative stress. One such LDE, 4-oxo-2-nonenal (4-ONE), has recently been found to target histones and interfere with histone assembly into nucleosomes. Unlike other LDEs that preferentially modify cysteine via nucleophilic Michael addition, 4-ONE reacts with histone lysine residues to form a new histone modification, gamma-oxononanoylation (Kgon). However, it remains unclear whether Kgon can cause irreversible damage or be regulated by enzymes "erasing" this nonenzymatic modification. Here, we report that human Sirt2 catalyzes the removal of histone Kgon. Among the tested human sirtuins, Sirt2 showed robust deacylase activity toward the Kgon-carrying histone peptides in vitro. We use alkynyl-4-ONE as a chemical reporter for Kgon to demonstrate that Sirt2 is responsible for removing histone Kgon in cells. Furthermore, we develop a ketone-reactive chemical probe to detect histones modified by endogenous 4-ONE in macrophages in response to inflammatory stimulation. Using this probe, we show Sirt2 as a deacylase able to control histone Kgon in stimulated macrophages. This study unravels a new mechanism for the regulation of LDE-derived protein posttranslational modifications, as well as a novel role played by Sirt2 as a histone Kgon deacylase in cytoprotective signaling responses.

  15. Alcohol induced epigenetic alterations to developmentally crucial genes regulating neural stemness and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Veazey, Kylee J.; Carnahan, Mindy N.; Muller, Daria; Miranda, Rajesh C.; Golding, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    Background From studies using a diverse range of model organisms, we now acknowledge that epigenetic changes to chromatin structure provide a plausible link between environmental teratogens and alterations in gene expression leading to disease. Observations from a number of independent laboratories indicate ethanol has the capacity to act as a powerful epigenetic disruptor and potentially derail the coordinated processes of cellular differentiation. In this study, we sought to examine whether primary neurospheres cultured under conditions maintaining stemness were susceptible to alcohol-induced alterations of the histone code. We focused our studies on trimethylated histone 3 lysine 4 and trimethylated histone 3 lysine 27, as these are two of the most prominent post-translational histone modifications regulating stem cell maintenance and neural differentiation. Methods Primary neurosphere cultures were maintained under conditions promoting the stem cell state and treated with ethanol for five days. Control and ethanol treated cellular extracts were examined using a combination of quantitative RT-PCR and chromatin immunoprecipitation techniques. Results We find that the regulatory regions of genes controlling both neural precursor cell identity and processes of differentiation exhibited significant declines in the enrichment of the chromatin marks examined. Despite these widespread changes in chromatin structure, only a small subset of genes including Dlx2, Fabp7, Nestin, Olig2, and Pax6 displayed ethanol induced alterations in transcription. Unexpectedly, the majority of chromatin modifying enzymes examined including members of the Polycomb Repressive Complex displayed minimal changes in expression and localization. Only transcripts encoding Dnmt1, Uhrf1, Ehmt1, Ash2l, Wdr5, and Kdm1b exhibited significant differences. Conclusions Our results indicate primary neurospheres maintained as stem cells in vitro are susceptible to alcohol-induced perturbation of the

  16. Direct interplay among histones, histone chaperones, and a chromatin boundary protein in the control of histone gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zunder, Rachel M; Rine, Jasper

    2012-11-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the histone chaperone Rtt106 binds newly synthesized histone proteins and mediates their delivery into chromatin during transcription, replication, and silencing. Rtt106 is also recruited to histone gene regulatory regions by the HIR histone chaperone complex to ensure S-phase-specific expression. Here we showed that this Rtt106:HIR complex included Asf1 and histone proteins. Mutations in Rtt106 that reduced histone binding reduced Rtt106 enrichment at histone genes, leading to their increased transcription. Deletion of the chromatin boundary element Yta7 led to increased Rtt106:H3 binding, increased Rtt106 enrichment at histone gene regulatory regions, and decreased histone gene transcription at the HTA1-HTB1 locus. These results suggested a unique regulatory mechanism in which Rtt106 sensed the level of histone proteins to maintain the proper level of histone gene transcription. The role of these histone chaperones and Yta7 differed markedly among the histone gene loci, including the two H3-H4 histone gene pairs. Defects in silencing in rtt106 mutants could be partially accounted for by Rtt106-mediated changes in histone gene repression. These studies suggested that feedback mediated by histone chaperone complexes plays a pivotal role in regulating histone gene transcription.

  17. Chatting histone modifications in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin can be highly dynamic and can continuously exchange between an open transcriptionally active conformation and a compacted silenced one. Post-translational modifications of histones have a pivotal role in regulating chromatin states, thus influencing all chromatin dependent processes. Methylation is currently one of the best characterized histone modification and occurs on arginine and lysine residues. Histone methylation can regulate other modifications (e.g. acetylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination) in order to define a precise functional chromatin environment. In this review we focus on histone methylation and demethylation, as well as on the enzymes responsible for setting these marks. In particular we are describing novel concepts on the interdependence of histone modifications marks and discussing the molecular mechanisms governing this cross-talks. PMID:21266346

  18. D1/D5 receptors and histone deacetylation mediate the Gateway Effect of LTP in hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yan-You; Levine, Amir; Kandel, Denise B; Yin, Deqi; Colnaghi, Luca; Drisaldi, Bettina; Kandel, Eric R

    2014-02-18

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is critical for spatial memory and is also thought to be involved in the formation of drug-related associative memory. Here, we attempt to test an aspect of the Gateway Hypothesis, by studying the effect of consecutive exposure to nicotine and cocaine on long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) in the DG. We find that a single injection of cocaine does not alter LTP. However, pretreatment with nicotine followed by a single injection of cocaine causes a substantial enhancement of LTP. This priming effect of nicotine is unidirectional: There is no enhancement of LTP if cocaine is administrated prior to nicotine. The facilitation induced by nicotine and cocaine can be blocked by oral administration of the dopamine D1/D5 receptor antagonist (SKF 83566) and enhanced by the D1/D5 agonist (SKF 38393). Application of the histone deacetylation inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) simulates the priming effect of nicotine on cocaine. By contrast, the priming effect of nicotine on cocaine is blocked in genetically modified mice that are haploinsufficient for the CREB-binding protein (CBP) and possess only one functional CBP allele and therefore exhibit a reduction in histone acetylation. These results demonstrate that the DG of the hippocampus is an important brain region contributing to the priming effect of nicotine on cocaine. Moreover, both activation of dopamine-D1 receptor/PKA signaling pathway and histone deacetylation/CBP mediated transcription are required for the nicotine priming effect in the DG.

  19. Structural plasticity of histones H3-H4 facilitates their allosteric exchange between RbAp48 and ASF1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Tyl, Marek; Ward, Richard; Sobott, Frank; Maman, Joseph; Murthy, Andal S.; Watson, Aleksandra A.; Fedorov, Oleg; Bowman, Andrew; Owen-Hughes, Tom; EL-Mkami, Hassane; Murzina, Natalia V.; Norman, David; Laue, Ernest D.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which histones are disassembled and reassembled into nucleosomes and chromatin structure during DNA replication, repair and transcription are poorly understood. A better understanding of the processes involved is, however, crucial if we are to understand whether and how histone variants and post-translationally modified histones are inherited in an epigenetic manner. To this end we have studied the interaction of histones H3–H4 with the human retinoblastoma-associated protein RbAp48 and their exchange with a second histone chaperone, anti-silencing function protein 1 (ASF1). Exchange of histones H3–H4 between these two histone chaperones plays a central role in the assembly of new nucleosomes and we show here that the H3–H4 complex has a surprising structural plasticity, which is important for this exchange. PMID:23178455

  20. Structural plasticity of histones H3-H4 facilitates their allosteric exchange between RbAp48 and ASF1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Tyl, Marek; Ward, Richard; Sobott, Frank; Maman, Joseph; Murthy, Andal S; Watson, Aleksandra A; Fedorov, Oleg; Bowman, Andrew; Owen-Hughes, Tom; El Mkami, Hassane; Murzina, Natalia V; Norman, David G; Laue, Ernest D

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which histones are disassembled and reassembled into nucleosomes and chromatin structure during DNA replication, repair and transcription are poorly understood. A better understanding of the processes involved is, however, crucial if we are to understand whether and how histone variants and post-translationally modified histones are inherited in an epigenetic manner. To this end we have studied the interaction of the histone H3-H4 complex with the human retinoblastoma-associated protein RbAp48 and their exchange with a second histone chaperone, anti-silencing function protein 1 (ASF1). Exchange of histones H3-H4 between these two histone chaperones has a central role in the assembly of new nucleosomes, and we show here that the H3-H4 complex has an unexpected structural plasticity, which is important for this exchange.

  1. Erasers of Histone Acetylation: The Histone Deacetylase Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Seto, Edward; Yoshida, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that catalyze the removal of acetyl functional groups from the lysine residues of both histone and nonhistone proteins. In humans, there are 18 HDAC enzymes that use either zinc- or NAD+-dependent mechanisms to deacetylate acetyl lysine substrates. Although removal of histone acetyl epigenetic modification by HDACs regulates chromatin structure and transcription, deacetylation of nonhistones controls diverse cellular processes. HDAC inhibitors are already known potential anticancer agents and show promise for the treatment of many diseases. PMID:24691964

  2. Histone deacetylases govern cellular mechanisms underlying behavioral and synaptic plasticity in the developing and adult brain

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Michael J.; Karra, Aroon S.; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2010-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of enzymes that alter gene expression patterns by modifying chromatin architecture. There are 11 mammalian HDACs that are classified by homology into four subfamilies, all with distinct expression patterns in brain. Through the use of pharmacological HDAC inhibitors, and more recently HDAC knockout mice, the role of these enzymes in the central nervous system are starting to be elucidated. We will discuss the latest findings on the specific or redundant roles of individual HDACs in brain as well as the impact of HDAC function on complex behavior, with a focus on learning, memory formation, and affective behavior. Potential HDAC-mediated cellular mechanisms underlying those behaviors are discussed. PMID:20555253

  3. Histone modifications silence the GATA transcription factor genes in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Caslini, C; Capo-chichi, C D; Roland, I H; Nicolas, E; Yeung, A T; Xu, X-X

    2006-08-31

    Altered expression of GATA factors was found and proposed as the underlying mechanism for dedifferentiation in ovarian carcinogenesis. In particular, GATA6 is lost or excluded from the nucleus in 85% of ovarian tumors and GATA4 expression is absent in majority of ovarian cancer cell lines. Here, we evaluated their DNA and histone epigenetic modifications in five ovarian epithelial and carcinoma cell lines (human 'immortalized' ovarian surface epithelium (HIO)-117, HIO-114, A2780, SKOV3 and ES2). GATA4 and GATA6 gene silencing was found to correlate with hypoacetylation of histones H3 and H4 and loss of histone H3/lysine K4 tri-methylation at their promoters in all lines. Conversely, histone H3/lysine K9 di-methylation and HP1gamma association were not observed, excluding reorganization of GATA genes into heterochromatic structures. The histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A, but not the DNA methylation inhibitor 5'-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, re-established the expression of GATA4 and/or GATA6 in A2780 and HIO-114 cells, correlating with increased histone H3 and H4 acetylation, histone H3 lysine K4 methylation and DNase I sensitivity at the promoters. Therefore, altered histone modification of the promoter loci is one mechanism responsible for the silencing of GATA transcription factors and the subsequent loss of a target gene, the tumor suppressor Disabled-2, in ovarian carcinogenesis.

  4. A quantitative multiplexed mass spectrometry assay for studying the kinetic of residue-specific histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yin-Ming; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J

    2014-12-01

    Histone acetylation is involved in gene regulation and, most importantly, aberrant regulation of histone acetylation is correlated with major human diseases. Although many lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) have been characterized as being capable of acetylating multiple lysine residues on histones, how different factors such as enzyme complexes or external stimuli (e.g. KAT activators or inhibitors) alter KAT specificity remains elusive. In order to comprehensively understand how the homeostasis of histone acetylation is maintained, a method that can quantitate acetylation levels of individual lysines on histones is needed. Here we demonstrate that our mass spectrometry (MS)-based method accomplishes this goal. In addition, the high throughput, high sensitivity, and high dynamic range of this method allows for effectively and accurately studying steady-state kinetics. Based on the kinetic parameters from in vitro enzymatic assays, we can determine the specificity and selectivity of a KAT and use this information to understand what factors influence histone acetylation. These approaches can be used to study the enzymatic mechanisms of histone acetylation as well as be adapted to other histone modifications. Understanding the post-translational modification of individual residues within the histones will provide a better picture of chromatin regulation in the cell.

  5. Two distinct modes for propagation of histone PTMs across the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Alabert, Constance; Barth, Teresa K; Reverón-Gómez, Nazaret; Sidoli, Simone; Schmidt, Andreas; Jensen, Ole N; Imhof, Axel; Groth, Anja

    2015-03-15

    Epigenetic states defined by chromatin can be maintained through mitotic cell division. However, it remains unknown how histone-based information is transmitted. Here we combine nascent chromatin capture (NCC) and triple-SILAC (stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture) labeling to track histone modifications and histone variants during DNA replication and across the cell cycle. We show that post-translational modifications (PTMs) are transmitted with parental histones to newly replicated DNA. Di- and trimethylation marks are diluted twofold upon DNA replication, as a consequence of new histone deposition. Importantly, within one cell cycle, all PTMs are restored. In general, new histones are modified to mirror the parental histones. However, H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) and H3K27me3 are propagated by continuous modification of parental and new histones because the establishment of these marks extends over several cell generations. Together, our results reveal how histone marks propagate and demonstrate that chromatin states oscillate within the cell cycle.

  6. Butyrate suppression of histone deacetylation leads to accumulation of multiacetylated forms of histones H3 and H4 and increased DNase I sensitivity of the associated DNA sequences.

    PubMed Central

    Vidali, G; Boffa, L C; Bradbury, E M; Allfrey, V G

    1978-01-01

    Exposure of HeLa cells to Na butyrate leads to an accumulation of multiacetylated forms of histones H3 and H4. Our studies of histone acetylation in HeLa S-3 cells show that 7 mM butyrate suppresses the deacetylation of histones without influencing the rate of radioactive acetate incorporation. An alteration in nucleosome structure in highly acetylated chromatin is indicated by an increased rate of DNA degradation by DNase I. A close association of acetylated histones with the DNase I-sensitive sequences is confirmed by the finding that histones remaining after limited DNase I digestion are depleted in the multiacetylated forms of histones H3 and H4. DNase I treatment has also been found to selectively release [3H]acetyl-labeled H3 and H4 from avian erythrocyte nuclei under conditions previously shown to preferentially degrade the globlin genes in erthyrocyte chromatin. Our results are consistent with the view that histone acetylation provides a key to the mechanism for altering chromatin structure at the nucleosomal level, and that this may explain the selective DNase I sensitivity of transcriptionally active DNA sequences in different cell types. PMID:276864

  7. Histone deacetylases: unique players in shaping the epigenetic histone code.

    PubMed

    Thiagalingam, Sam; Cheng, Kuang-Hung; Lee, Hyunjoo J; Mineva, Nora; Thiagalingam, Arunthathi; Ponte, Jose F

    2003-03-01

    The epigenome is defined by DNA methylation patterns and the associated posttranslational modifications of histones. This histone code determines the expression status of individual genes dependent upon their localization on the chromatin. The silencing of gene expression is associated with deacetylated histones, which are often found to be associated with regions of DNA methylation as well as methylation at the lysine 4 residue of histone 3. In contrast, the activation of gene expression is associated with acetylated histones and methylation at the lysine 9 residue of histone 3. The histone deactylases play a major role in keeping the balance between the acetylated and deacetylated states of chromatin. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are divided into three classes: class I HDACs (HDACs 1, 2, 3, and 8) are similar to the yeast RPD3 protein and localize to the nucleus; class II HDACs (HDACs 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, and 10) are homologous to the yeast HDA1 protein and are found in both the nucleus and cytoplasm; and class III HDACs form a structurally distinct class of NAD-dependent enzymes that are similar to the yeast SIR2 proteins. Since inappropriate silencing of critical genes can result in one or both hits of tumor suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation in cancer, theoretically the reactivation of affected TSGs could have an enormous therapeutic value in preventing and treating cancer. Indeed, several HDAC inhibitors are currently being developed and tested for their potency in cancer chemotherapy. Importantly, these agents are also potentially applicable to chemoprevention if their toxicity can be minimized. Despite the toxic side effects and lack of specificity of some of the inhibitors, progress is being made. With the elucidation of the structures, functions and modes of action of HDACs, finding agents that may be targeted to specific HDACs and potentially reactivate expression of only a defined set of affected genes in cancer will be more attainable.

  8. K4, K9 and K18 in human histone H3 are targets for biotinylation by biotinidase.

    PubMed

    Kobza, Keyna; Camporeale, Gabriela; Rueckert, Brian; Kueh, Alice; Griffin, Jacob B; Sarath, Gautam; Zempleni, Janos

    2005-08-01

    Histones are modified post-translationally, e.g. by methylation of lysine and arginine residues, and by phosphorylation of serine residues. These modifications regulate processes such as gene expression, DNA repair, and mitosis and meiosis. Recently, evidence has been provided that histones are also modified by covalent binding of the vitamin biotin. The aims of this study were to identify biotinylation sites in histone H3, and to investigate the crosstalk among histone biotinylation, methylation and phosphorylation. Synthetic peptides based on the sequence of human histone H3 were used as substrates for enzymatic biotinylation by biotinidase; biotin in peptides was probed using streptavidin peroxidase. These studies provided evidence that K4, K9 and K18 in histone H3 are good targets for biotinylation; K14 and K23 are relatively poor targets. Antibodies were generated to histone H3, biotinylated either at K4, K9 or K18. These antibodies localized to nuclei in human placental cells in immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting experiments, suggesting that lysines in histone H3 are biotinylated in vivo. Dimethylation of R2, R8 and R17 increased biotinylation of K4, K9 and K18, respectively, by biotinidase; phosphorylation of S10 abolished biotinylation of K9. These observations are consistent with crosstalk between biotinylation of histones and other known modifications of histones. We speculate that this crosstalk provides a link to known roles for biotin in gene expression and cell proliferation.

  9. Low Proteolytic Clipping of Histone H3 in Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Basilio, Jorge; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Reyes-Hernandez, Octavio D; Serafín-Higuera, Idanya; Leija-Montoya, Gabriela; Blanco-Morales, Magali; Sierra-Martínez, Monica; Ramos-Mondragon, Roberto; García, Silvia; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin in cervical cancer (CC) undergoes chemical and structural changes that alter the expression pattern of genes. Recently, a potential mechanism, which regulates gene expression at transcriptional levels is the proteolytic clipping of histone H3. However, until now this process in CC has not been reported. Using HeLa cells as a model of CC and human samples from patients with CC, we identify that the H3 cleavage was lower in CC compared with control tissue. Additionally, the histone H3 clipping was performed by serine and aspartyl proteases in HeLa cells. These results suggest that histone H3 clipping operates as part of post-translational modification system in CC.

  10. The Histone Modification Code in the Pathogenesis of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are chronic inflammatory disorders caused by a loss of self-tolerance, which is characterized by the appearance of autoantibodies and/or autoreactive lymphocytes and the impaired suppressive function of regulatory T cells. The pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is extremely complex and remains largely unknown. Recent advances indicate that environmental factors trigger autoimmune diseases in genetically predisposed individuals. In addition, accumulating results have indicated a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone modifications, in the development of autoimmune diseases. Histone modifications regulate the chromatin states and gene transcription without any change in the DNA sequence, possibly resulting in phenotype alteration in several different cell types. In this paper, we discuss the significant roles of histone modifications involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, primary biliary cirrhosis, and type 1 diabetes. PMID:28127155

  11. Low Proteolytic Clipping of Histone H3 in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Basilio, Jorge; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Reyes-Hernandez, Octavio D.; Serafín-Higuera, Idanya; Leija-Montoya, Gabriela; Blanco-Morales, Magali; Sierra-Martínez, Monica; Ramos-Mondragon, Roberto; García, Silvia; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin in cervical cancer (CC) undergoes chemical and structural changes that alter the expression pattern of genes. Recently, a potential mechanism, which regulates gene expression at transcriptional levels is the proteolytic clipping of histone H3. However, until now this process in CC has not been reported. Using HeLa cells as a model of CC and human samples from patients with CC, we identify that the H3 cleavage was lower in CC compared with control tissue. Additionally, the histone H3 clipping was performed by serine and aspartyl proteases in HeLa cells. These results suggest that histone H3 clipping operates as part of post-translational modification system in CC. PMID:27698925

  12. A novel hypothesis for histone-to-protamine transition in Bos taurus spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Sillaste, Gerly; Kaplinski, Lauris; Meier, Riho; Jaakma, Ülle; Eriste, Elo

    2016-01-01

    DNA compaction with protamines in sperm is essential for successful fertilization. However, a portion of sperm chromatin remains less tightly packed with histones, which genomic location and function remain unclear. We extracted and sequenced histone-associated DNA from sperm of nine ejaculates from three bulls. We found that the fraction of retained histones varied between samples, but the variance was similar between samples from the same and different individuals. The most conserved regions showed similar abundance across all samples, whereas in other regions, their presence correlated with the size of histone fraction. This may refer to gradual histone–protamine transition, where easily accessible genomic regions, followed by the less accessible regions are first substituted by protamines. Our results confirm those from previous studies that histones remain in repetitive genome elements, such as centromeres, and added new findings of histones in rRNA and SRP RNA gene clusters and indicated histone enrichment in some spermatogenesis-associated genes, but not in genes of early embryonic development. Our functional analysis revealed significant overrepresentation of cGMP-dependent protein kinase G (cGMP-PKG) pathway genes among histone-enriched genes. This pathway is known for its importance in pre-fertilization sperm events. In summary, a novel hypothesis for gradual histone-to-protamine transition in sperm maturation was proposed. We believe that histones may contribute structural information into early embryo by epigenetically modifying centromeric chromatin and other types of repetitive DNA. We also suggest that sperm histones are retained in genes needed for sperm development, maturation and fertilization, as these genes are transcriptionally active shortly prior to histone-to-protamine transition. PMID:27899719

  13. Histone deacetylases and their role in motor neuron degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Gómez, Rafael; Ramírez-Jarquín, Uri N.; Tovar-y-Romo, Luis B.; Tapia, Ricardo

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease, characterized by the progressive loss of motor neurons. The cause of this selective neuronal death is unknown, but transcriptional dysregulation is recently emerging as an important factor. The physical substrate for the regulation of the transcriptional process is chromatin, a complex assembly of histones and DNA. Histones are subject to several post-translational modifications, like acetylation, that are a component of the transcriptional regulation process. Histone acetylation and deacetylation is performed by a group of enzymes (histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and deacetylases, respectively) whose modulation can alter the transcriptional state of many regions of the genome, and thus may be an important target in diseases that share this pathogenic process, as is the case for ALS. This review will discuss the present evidence of transcriptional dysregulation in ALS, the role of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in disease pathogenesis, and the novel pharmacologic strategies that are being comprehensively studied to prevent motor neuron death, with focus on sirtuins (SIRT) and their effectors. PMID:24367290

  14. Altering dietary levels of protein or vitamins and minerals does not modify morphine-induced analgesia in male rats.

    PubMed

    Kanarek, R B; D'Anci, K E; Przypek, J M; Mathes, W F

    1999-02-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that chronic intake of nutritive sweet solutions, but not nonnutritive sweet solutions, enhances morphine's analgesic potency. To separate out the effects of sweet taste from other changes in dietary intake, which result when rats consume a sucrose solution, the effects of altering dietary levels of protein, or vitamins and minerals on morphine-induced analgesia were examined. In Experiment 1, 40 male Long-Evans rats were fed standard chow or a semipurified diet containing either 10, 20, or 40% protein. Three weeks later, antinociceptive responses to morphine were examined using the tail flick procedure. Tail flick latencies were measured immediately prior to and 30, 60, and 90 min after the administration of morphine sulfate (0.0, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/kg, SC). At all three measurement times, antinociceptive responses increased directly as a function of the dose of morphine, but did not differ as a function of diet. In Experiment 2, 24 rats were maintained on either standard laboratory chow or semipurified diets containing 20% protein and either 100% or 25% of the recommended levels of vitamins and minerals for 3 weeks. Tail flick latencies were measured immediately prior to and 30 min after injections (SC) of 2.5 mg/kg morphine sulfate. This procedure was repeated until a cumulative dose of 10.0 mg/kg was obtained. Tail flick latencies increased significantly as a function of drug dose, but did not differ across dietary conditions. These results demonstrate that the increase in morphine-induced analgesia seen in rats consuming a sucrose solution is not due to alterations in either protein or micronutrient intake.

  15. Chemical origins of isoform selectivity in histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Butler, Kyle V; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2008-01-01

    Histones undergo extensive posttranslational modifications that affect gene expression. Acetylation is a key histone modification that is primarily regulated by two enzymes, one of which is histone deacetylase (HDAC). The activity of HDAC causes transcriptional silencing of DNA. Eleven distinct zinc-dependent histone deacetylase isoforms have been identified in humans. Each isoform has a unique structure and function, and regulates a unique set of genes. HDAC is responsible for the regulation of many genes involved in cancer cell proliferation, and it has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological conditions. HDAC inhibitors are known to be very effective anti-cancer agents, and research has shown them to be potential treatments for many other conditions. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modify the expression of many genes, and it is possible that inhibition of one isoform could cause epigenetic changes that are beneficial to treatment of a disease, while inhibition of another isoform could cause contradictory changes. Selective HDAC inhibitors will be better able to avoid these types of situations than non-specific inhibitors, and may also be less toxic than pan-HDAC inhibitors. Many potent pan-HDAC inhibitors have already been developed, leaving the development of selective inhibitors at the forefront of HDAC drug development. Certain structural moieties may be added to HDAC inhibitors to give isoform selectivity, and these will be discussed in this review. This review will focus on the applications of selective HDAC inhibitors, inhibitors reported to show selectivity, and the relationship between inhibitor structure and selectivity.

  16. Selegiline modifies the extinction of responding following morphine self-administration, but does not alter cue-induced reinstatement, reacquisition of morphine reinforcement, or precipitated withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Grasing, Kenneth; He, Shaunteng; Li, Ning

    2005-01-01

    Selegiline is an irreversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase (MAO) with psychostimulant and neuroprotective effects which can prevent decreases in dopamine efflux that follow opiate withdrawal. The present study evaluated effects of selegiline treatment on morphine-seeking behavior and morphine reinforcement in Wistar rats (n = 26). In additional animals (n = 30), the ability of single doses of selegiline to modify naloxone-precipitated withdrawal was determined. After pretreatment with noncontingent morphine to establish opiate dependence, rats acquired self-administration of intravenous morphine. Daily intravenous treatment with saline or 2.0mg kg(-1) doses of selegiline was then initiated and continued over 14 days during extinction, reinstatement, and reacquisition of morphine self-administration. To reduce the potential for psychostimulant effects, selegiline was administered approximately 1h following self-administration, extinction, or reinstatement sessions. In some animals (n = 23), effects of saline or selegiline administration on locomotor activity were determined following extinction sessions. Daily selegiline treatment decreased the number of ratios completed and increased response latency during extinction, without modifying these measures during reinstatement or reacquisition of morphine self-administration. Chronic selegiline treatment increased locomotor activity recorded between 4 and 7h after selegiline administration on day 7 of extinction, but otherwise did not alter locomotor activity. Pretreatment with single, 2.0mg kg(-1) doses of selegiline did not modify naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. In conclusion, pretreatment with selegiline produced only a small decrease in responding during extinction of morphine self-administration and did not modify cue-induced reinstatement of morphine-seeking behavior, reacquisition or morphine reinforcement, or precipitated withdrawal.

  17. Global and specific responses of the histone acetylome to systematic perturbation.

    PubMed

    Feller, Christian; Forné, Ignasi; Imhof, Axel; Becker, Peter B

    2015-02-05

    Regulation of histone acetylation is fundamental to the utilization of eukaryotic genomes in chromatin. Aberrant acetylation contributes to disease and can be clinically combated by inhibiting the responsible enzymes. Our knowledge of the histone acetylation system is patchy because we so far lacked the methodology to describe acetylation patterns and their genesis by integrated enzyme activities. We devised a generally applicable, mass spectrometry-based strategy to precisely and accurately quantify combinatorial modification motifs. This was applied to generate a comprehensive inventory of acetylation motifs on histones H3 and H4 in Drosophila cells. Systematic depletion of known or suspected acetyltransferases and deacetylases revealed specific alterations of histone acetylation signatures, established enzyme-substrate relationships, and unveiled an extensive crosstalk between neighboring modifications. Unexpectedly, overall histone acetylation levels remained remarkably constant upon depletion of individual acetyltransferases. Conceivably, the acetylation level is adjusted to maintain the global charge neutralization of chromatin and the stability of nuclei.

  18. Butyrate Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Boosalis, Michael S.; Perrine, Susan P.; Sangerman, José

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In addition to being a part of the metabolic fatty acid fuel cycle, butyrate is also capable of inducing growth arrest in a variety of normal cell types and senescence-like phenotypes in gynecological cancer cells, inhibiting DNA synthesis and cell growth in colonic tumor cell lines, suppressing hTERT mRNA expression and telomerase activity in human prostate cancer cells, and inducing stem cell differentiation and apoptosis by DNA fragmentation. It regulates gene expression by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs), enhances memory recovery and formation in mice, stimulates neurogenesis in the ischemic brain, promotes osteoblast formation, selectively blocks cell replication in transformed cells (compared to healthy cells), and can prevent and treat diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance in mouse models of obesity, as well as stimulate fetal hemoglobin expression in individuals with hematologic diseases such as the thalassemias and sickle-cell disease, in addition to a multitude of other biochemical effects in vivo. However, efforts to exploit the potential of butyrate in the clinical treatment of cancer and other medical disorders are thwarted by its poor pharmacological properties (short half-life and first-pass hepatic clearance) and the multigram doses needed to achieve therapeutic concentrations in vivo. Herein, we review some of the methods used to overcome these difficulties with an emphasis on HDAC inhibition. PMID:23514803

  19. Histone H3 Acetyl K9 and Histone H3 Tri Methyl K4 as Prognostic Markers for Patients with Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Susanne; Zhu, Junyan; Mayr, Doris; Kuhn, Christina; Schulze, Sandra; Hofmann, Simone; Dannecker, Christian; Jeschke, Udo; Kost, Bernd P.

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin remodeling alters gene expression in carcinoma tissue. Although cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, a systematic study about the prognostic value of specific changes in the chromatin structure, such as histone acetylation or histone methylation, is missing. In this study, the expression of histone H3 acetyl K9, which is known to denote active regions at enhancers and promoters, and histone H3 tri methyl K4, which preferentially identifies active gene promoters, were examined as both show high metastatic potential. A panel of patients with cervical cancer was selected and the importance of the histone modifications concerning survival-time (overall survival and relapse-free survival) was analyzed in 250 cases. Histone H3 acetyl K9 staining was correlated with low grading, low FIGO (TNM classification and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) status, negative N-status and low T-status in cervical cancer, showing a higher expression in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic expression of histone H3 tri methyl K4 in a cervical cancer specimen was correlated with advanced T-status and poor prognosis. While cytoplasmic H3K4me3 expression seemed to be a marker of relapse-free survival, nuclear expression showed a correlation to poor prognosis in overall survival. Within this study, we analyzed the chemical modification of two histone proteins that are connected to active gene expression. Histone H3 acetyl K9 was found to be an independent marker of overall survival. Histone H3 tri methyl K4 was correlated with poor prognosis and it was found to be an independent marker of relapse-free survival. Therefore, we could show that chromatin remodeling plays an important role in cervical cancer biology. PMID:28241481

  20. Histone H3 Acetyl K9 and Histone H3 Tri Methyl K4 as Prognostic Markers for Patients with Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Susanne; Zhu, Junyan; Mayr, Doris; Kuhn, Christina; Schulze, Sandra; Hofmann, Simone; Dannecker, Christian; Jeschke, Udo; Kost, Bernd P

    2017-02-23

    Chromatin remodeling alters gene expression in carcinoma tissue. Although cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, a systematic study about the prognostic value of specific changes in the chromatin structure, such as histone acetylation or histone methylation, is missing. In this study, the expression of histone H3 acetyl K9, which is known to denote active regions at enhancers and promoters, and histone H3 tri methyl K4, which preferentially identifies active gene promoters, were examined as both show high metastatic potential. A panel of patients with cervical cancer was selected and the importance of the histone modifications concerning survival-time (overall survival and relapse-free survival) was analyzed in 250 cases. Histone H3 acetyl K9 staining was correlated with low grading, low FIGO (TNM classification and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) status, negative N-status and low T-status in cervical cancer, showing a higher expression in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic expression of histone H3 tri methyl K4 in a cervical cancer specimen was correlated with advanced T-status and poor prognosis. While cytoplasmic H3K4me3 expression seemed to be a marker of relapse-free survival, nuclear expression showed a correlation to poor prognosis in overall survival. Within this study, we analyzed the chemical modification of two histone proteins that are connected to active gene expression. Histone H3 acetyl K9 was found to be an independent marker of overall survival. Histone H3 tri methyl K4 was correlated with poor prognosis and it was found to be an independent marker of relapse-free survival. Therefore, we could show that chromatin remodeling plays an important role in cervical cancer biology.

  1. The Gene Controlling the Quantitative Trait Locus EPITHIOSPECIFIER MODIFIER1 Alters Glucosinolate Hydrolysis and Insect Resistance in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Ober, James A.; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

    2006-01-01

    Glucosinolates are sulfur-rich plant secondary metabolites whose breakdown products have a wide range of biological activities in plant–herbivore and plant–pathogen interactions and anticarcinogenic properties. In Arabidopsis thaliana, hydrolysis by the enzyme, myrosinase, produces bioactive nitriles, epithionitriles, or isothiocyanates depending upon the plant's genotype and the glucosinolate's structure. A major determinant of this structural specificity is the epithiospecifier locus (ESP), whose protein causes the formation of epithionitriles and nitriles. A quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 3 epistatically affects nitrile formation in combination with ESP; this QTL has been termed EPITHIOSPECIFIER MODIFIER1 (ESM1). We identified a myrosinase-associated protein as the ESM1 QTL in Arabidopsis using map-based cloning with recombinant inbred lines, natural variation transcriptomic analysis, and metabolic profiling. In planta and in vitro analyses with natural ESM1 alleles, ESM1 knockouts, and overexpression lines show that ESM1 represses nitrile formation and favors isothiocyanate production. The glucosinolate hydrolysis profile change influenced by ESM1 is associated with the ability to deter herbivory by Trichoplusia ni. This gene could provide unique approaches toward improving human nutrition. PMID:16679459

  2. A novel, enigmatic histone modification: biotinylation of histones by holocarboxylase synthetase.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Yousef I; Zempleni, Janos

    2008-12-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase catalyzes the covalent binding of biotin to histones in humans and other eukaryotes. Eleven biotinylation sites have been identified in histones H2A, H3, and H4. K12-biotinylated histone H4 is enriched in heterochromatin, repeat regions, and plays a role in gene repression. About 30% of the histone H4 molecules are biotinylated at K12 in histone H4 in human fibroblast telomeres. The abundance of biotinylated histones at distinct genomic loci depends on biotin availability. Decreased histone biotinylation decreases life span and stress resistance in Drosophila. Low enrichment of biotinylated histones at transposable elements impairs repression of these elements.

  3. Adrenergic drugs modify the level of noradrenaline in the insular cortex and alter extinction of conditioned taste aversion in rats.

    PubMed

    Fresquet, Nadine; Angst, Marie-Josée; Schleef, Carmen; Gobaille, Serge; Sandner, Guy

    2007-03-12

    We compared the effect of conditioned taste aversion in rats by measuring the amount of sucrose that they drunk after conditioning, which differed according to whether rats had drunk the sucrose freely (SD: self drinking) during the conditioning session, or had been forced to drink it (IO: intra-oral administration through a chronically implanted cannula). The SD procedure delayed the extinction of conditioned taste aversion. Enhanced arousal, alertness, awareness or attention in the SD condition may have strengthened the memory of the taste. Brain noradrenergic networks are involved in such processes. We administered two noradrenergic drugs that produce opposite effects on noradrenaline release in the brain, methoxy-idazoxan, RX821002 (1mg/kg, i.p.), and guanfacine (0.12mg/kg, i.p.). We evaluated their effect (i) on the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex using microdialysis, (ii) on glycaemia that is an essential factor of taste learning and (iii) on the comparative SD versus IO conditioned taste aversion protocol mentioned above. Injecting RX821001 increased the level of noradrenaline in the gustatory cortex up to two-fold of the baseline. This effect lasted 1h. The same dose of RX821002 did not elicit any alteration of glycaemia. It enhanced extinction of conditioned taste aversion in the SD group of rats. Injecting 0.12mg/kg of guanfacine produced the opposite effect. The noradrenaline level of the gustatory cortex decreased, but only down to 20% of the baseline. This decrease lasted 2h. Guanfacine increased glycaemia. Extinction of conditioned taste aversion was only marginally decreased by guanfacine in the SD group of rats. These results fit with Aston-Jones' point of view that the role of the noradrenergic coeruleo-cortical system may be to enhance arousal, alertness, awareness or attention to an event by a transient increase of cortical noradrenaline.

  4. Altered Peptide Ligands Revisited: Vaccine Design through Chemically Modified HLA-A2–Restricted T Cell Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Hoppes, Rieuwert; Oostvogels, Rimke; Luimstra, Jolien J.; Wals, Kim; Toebes, Mireille; Bies, Laura; Ekkebus, Reggy; Rijal, Pramila; Celie, Patrick H. N.; Huang, Julie H.; Emmelot, Maarten E.; Spaapen, Robbert M.; Lokhorst, Henk; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Mutis, Tuna; Ovaa, Huib

    2014-01-01

    Virus or tumor Ag–derived peptides that are displayed by MHC class I molecules are attractive starting points for vaccine development because they induce strong protective and therapeutic cytotoxic T cell responses. In thus study, we show that the MHC binding and consequent T cell reactivity against several HLA-A*02 restricted epitopes can be further improved through the incorporation of nonproteogenic amino acids at primary and secondary anchor positions. We screened more than 90 nonproteogenic, synthetic amino acids through a range of epitopes and tested more than 3000 chemically enhanced altered peptide ligands (CPLs) for binding affinity to HLA-A*0201. With this approach, we designed CPLs of viral epitopes, of melanoma-associated Ags, and of the minor histocompatibility Ag UTA2-1, which is currently being evaluated for its antileukemic activity in clinical dendritic cell vaccination trials. The crystal structure of one of the CPLs in complex with HLA-A*0201 revealed the molecular interactions likely responsible for improved binding. The best CPLs displayed enhanced affinity for MHC, increasing MHC stability and prolonging recognition by Ag-specific T cells and, most importantly, they induced accelerated expansion of antitumor T cell frequencies in vitro and in vivo as compared with the native epitope. Eventually, we were able to construct a toolbox of preferred nonproteogenic residues with which practically any given HLA-A*02 restricted epitope can be readily optimized. These CPLs could improve the therapeutic outcome of vaccination strategies or can be used for ex vivo enrichment and faster expansion of Ag-specific T cells for transfer into patients. PMID:25311806

  5. Plant species composition alters the sign and strength of an emergent multi-predator effect by modifying predator foraging behaviour.

    PubMed

    Wilby, Andrew; Anglin, Linda Anderson; Nesbit, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of pest-control functioning by multi-predator communities is hindered by the non-additive nature of species functioning. Such non-additivity, commonly termed an emergent multi-predator effect, is known to be affected by elements of the ecological context, such as the structure and composition of vegetation, in addition to the traits of the predators themselves. Here we report mesocosm experiments designed to test the influence of plant density and species composition (wheat monoculture or wheat and faba bean polyculture) on the emergence of multi-predator effects between Adalia bipunctata and Chrysoperla carnea, in their suppression of populations of the aphid Metopolophium dirhodum. The mesocosm experiments were followed by a series of behavioural observations designed to identify how interactions among predators are modified by plant species composition and whether these effects are consistent with the observed influence of plant species composition on aphid population suppression. Although plant density was shown to have no influence on the multi-predator effect on aphid population growth, plant composition had a marked effect. In wheat monoculture, Adalia and Chrysoperla mixed treatments caused greater suppression of M. dirhodum populations than expected. However this positive emergent effect was reversed to a negative multi-predator effect in wheat and faba bean polyculture. The behavioural observations revealed that although dominant individuals did not respond to the presence of faba bean plants, the behaviour of sub-dominants was affected markedly, consistent with their foraging for extra-floral nectar produced by the faba bean. This interaction between plant composition and predator community composition on the foraging behaviour of sub-dominants is thought to underlie the observed effect of plant composition on the multi-predator effect. Thus, the emergence of multi-predator effects is shown to be strongly influenced by plant species

  6. A SNP in the HTT promoter alters NF-κB binding and is a bidirectional genetic modifier of Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Bečanović, Kristina; Nørremølle, Anne; Neal, Scott J; Kay, Chris; Collins, Jennifer A; Arenillas, David; Lilja, Tobias; Gaudenzi, Giulia; Manoharan, Shiana; Doty, Crystal N; Beck, Jessalyn; Lahiri, Nayana; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Warby, Simon C; Connolly, Colúm; De Souza, Rebecca A G; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Hermanson, Ola; Langbehn, Douglas R; Hayden, Michael R; Wasserman, Wyeth W; Leavitt, Blair R

    2015-06-01

    Cis-regulatory variants that alter gene expression can modify disease expressivity, but none have previously been identified in Huntington disease (HD). Here we provide in vivo evidence in HD patients that cis-regulatory variants in the HTT promoter are bidirectional modifiers of HD age of onset. HTT promoter analysis identified a NF-κB binding site that regulates HTT promoter transcriptional activity. A non-coding SNP, rs13102260:G > A, in this binding site impaired NF-κB binding and reduced HTT transcriptional activity and HTT protein expression. The presence of the rs13102260 minor (A) variant on the HD disease allele was associated with delayed age of onset in familial cases, whereas the presence of the rs13102260 (A) variant on the wild-type HTT allele was associated with earlier age of onset in HD patients in an extreme case-based cohort. Our findings suggest a previously unknown mechanism linking allele-specific effects of rs13102260 on HTT expression to HD age of onset and have implications for HTT silencing treatments that are currently in development.

  7. A Phosphotyrosine Switch Controls the Association of Histone Mark Readers with Methylated Proteins.

    PubMed

    Irving-Hooper, Bronwyn Kate; Binda, Olivier

    2016-03-22

    Although histone post-translational modifications play a paramount role in controlling access to genetic information, our understanding of the precise mechanisms regulating chromatin signaling remains superficial. For instance, histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9(me3)) favors the association of chromodomain proteins such as heterochromatin protein 1α (HP1α) with chromatin. However, HP1α and other such chromatin proteins are not covering all specific histone marks at all times. Thus, how are these reader-histone interactions regulated? We propose tyrosine phosphorylation within the aromatic cage of histone mark readers as a molecular switch that can either turn ON or OFF and even alter the specificity of reader-histone interactions. We have identified tyrosine phosphorylation events on the chromatin proteins HP1α and M-phase phosphoprotein 8 that regulate their association with methylated histones in vitro (synthetic peptides, calf thymus purified histones, and nucleosomes), but also in cells, thus controlling access to genetic information.

  8. Histone code or not? Combinatorial pattern analyses of histone modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zang, Chongzhi; Peng, Weiqun; Wang, Zhibin; Schones, Dustin E.; Barski, Artem; Cuddapah, Suresh; Cui, Kairong; Roh, Tae-Young; Zhao, Keji; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Zhang, Michael

    2008-03-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are organized into chromatin, the structure of which plays critical role in the program of gene expression. Chromatin structure and function is regulated by a myriad of posttranslational modifications on histone tails of the nucleosomes, the fundamental unit of chromatin. It remains unclear how different modifications interact. Based on high- resolution genomic maps of close to 40 histone methylations and acetylations in human T-cells obtained experimentally by ChIP- Seq technique, we investigated the combinatorial patterns of histone modifications at gene promoter regions. We found that a very limited number of patterns dominate. Modifications within a pattern are strongly correlated and each pattern is associated with a distinct gene expression distribution. Our results suggest that it is the patterns rather than the individual modifications that affect the downstream readout.

  9. Evaluation of proteomic search engines for the analysis of histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lin, Shu; Molden, Rosalynn C; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2014-10-03

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118.

  10. Evaluation of Proteomic Search Engines for the Analysis of Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118. PMID:25167464

  11. Histone H3 Glutathionylation in Proliferating Mammalian Cells Destabilizes Nucleosomal Structure

    PubMed Central

    Olaso, Gloria; Hake, Sandra B.; Bönisch, Clemens; Wiedemann, Sonja M.; Markovic, Jelena; Dasí, Francisco; Gimeno, Amparo; Pérez-Quilis, Carme; Palacios, Òscar; Capdevila, Mercè; Viña, José

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Here we report that chromatin, the complex and dynamic eukaryotic DNA packaging structure, is able to sense cellular redox changes. Histone H3, the only nucleosomal protein that possesses cysteine(s), can be modified by glutathione (GSH). Results: Using Biotin labeled glutathione ethyl ester (BioGEE) treatment of nucleosomes in vitro, we show that GSH, the most abundant antioxidant in mammals, binds to histone H3. BioGEE treatment of NIH3T3 cells indicates that glutathionylation of H3 is maximal in fast proliferating cells, correlating well with enhanced levels of H3 glutathionylation in different tumor cell lines. Furthermore, glutathionylation of H3 in vivo decreases in livers from aged SAMP8 and C57BL/6J mice. We demonstrate biochemically and by mass spectrometry that histone variants H3.2/H3.3 are glutathionylated on their cysteine residue 110. Furthermore, circular dichroism, thermal denaturation of reconstituted nucleosomes, and molecular modeling indicate that glutathionylation of histone H3 produces structural changes affecting nucleosomal stability. Innovation: We characterize the implications of histone H3 glutathionylation in cell physiology and the modulation of core histone proteins structure affected by this modification. Conclusion: Histone H3 senses cellular redox changes through glutathionylation of Cys, which increases during cell proliferation and decreases during aging. Glutathionylation of histone H3 affects nucleosome stability structure leading to a more open chromatin structure. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1305–1320. PMID:23541030

  12. Spectroscopic detection of etoposide binding to chromatin components: The role of histone proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamani, Elham; Rabbani-Chadegani, Azra; Zahraei, Zohreh

    2014-12-01

    Chromatin has been introduced as a main target for most anticancer drugs. Etoposide is known as a topoisomerase II inhibitor, but its effect on chromatin components is unknown. This report, for the first time, describes the effect of etoposide on DNA, histones and DNA-histones complex in the structure of nucleosomes employing thermal denaturation, fluorescence, UV absorbance and circular dichroism spectroscopy techniques. The results showed that the binding of etoposide decreased UV absorbance and fluorescence emission intensity, altered secondary structure of chromatin and hypochromicity was occurred in thermal denaturation profiles. The drug exhibited higher affinity to chromatin compared to DNA. Quenching of drug chromophores with tyrosine residues of histones indicated that globular domain of histones is the site of etoposide binding. Moreover, the binding of etoposide to histones altered their secondary structure accompanied with hypochromicity revealing compaction of histones in the presence of the drug. From the results it is concludes that apart from topoisomerase II, chromatin components especially its protein moiety can be introduced as a new site of etoposide binding and histone proteins especially H1 play a fundamental role in this process and anticancer activity of etoposide.

  13. Epigenetic alterations and microRNA misexpression in cancer and autoimmune diseases: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Saito, Yoshimasa; Saito, Hidetsugu; Liang, Gangning; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2014-10-01

    Epigenetic markers such as DNA methylation and histone modifications around promoter regions modify chromatin structure and regulate expression of downstream genes. In fact, aberrant epigenetic modifications are common events in human disease including tumorigenesis and autoimmunity. Small non-coding RNAs named microRNAs (miRNAs) are modulators of gene expression and play critical roles in various cellular processes. Several miRNAs have been characterized as tumor suppressors or oncogenes in cancer, and recent reports implicate certain miRNAs in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Epigenetic investigations have shown that distinct miRNAs are directly regulated by DNA methylation and histone modifications at their promoters. Moreover, miRNAs themselves are key participants in regulating the chromatin modifying machinery. Chromatin-modifying drugs such as DNA methylation inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors have shown efficacy in human malignancies and there is some evidence that these drugs may be useful in autoimmune disease. The benefits of these drugs are at least partially mediated by restoring expression of epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor genes, including miRNAs. The complex layers regulating gene expression have yet to be fully elucidated, but it is clear that epigenetic alterations and miRNA misexpression are essential events in pathologic processes, especially cancer and autoimmune disease, and represent promising therapeutic targets.

  14. Synthesis of histone proteins by CPE ligation using a recombinant peptide as the C-terminal building block.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Toru; Yoshikawa, Ryo; Fujiyoshi, Yuki; Mishima, Yuichi; Hojo, Hironobu; Tajima, Shoji; Suetake, Isao

    2015-11-01

    The post-translational modification of histones plays an important role in gene expression. We report herein on a method for synthesizing such modified histones by ligating chemically prepared N-terminal peptides and C-terminal recombinant peptide building blocks. Based on their chemical synthesis, core histones can be categorized as two types; histones H2A, H2B and H4 which contain no Cys residues, and histone H3 which contains a Cys residue(s) in the C-terminal region. A combination of native chemical ligation and desulphurization can be simply used to prepare histones without Cys residues. For the synthesis of histone H3, the endogenous Cys residue(s) must be selectively protected, while keeping the N-terminal Cys residue of the C-terminal building block that is introduced for purposes of chemical ligation unprotected. To this end, a phenacyl group was successfully utilized to protect endogenous Cys residue(s), and the recombinant peptide was ligated with a peptide containing a Cys-Pro ester (CPE) sequence as a thioester precursor. Using this approach it was possible to prepare all of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 with any modifications. The resulting proteins could then be used to prepare a core histone library of proteins that have been post-translationally modified.

  15. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Attenuate Noise-Induced Hearing Loss.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Hill, Kayla; Sha, Su-Hua

    2016-08-01

    Loss of auditory sensory hair cells is the major pathological feature of noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Currently, no established clinical therapies for prevention or amelioration of NIHL are available. The absence of treatments is due to our lack of a comprehensive understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying noise-induced damage. Our previous study indicates that epigenetic modification of histones alters hair cell survival. In this study, we investigated the effect of noise exposure on histone H3 lysine 9 acetylation (H3K9ac) in the inner ear of adult CBA/J mice and determined if inhibition of histone deacetylases by systemic administration of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) could attenuate NIHL. Our results showed that H3K9ac was decreased in the nuclei of outer hair cells (OHCs) and marginal cells of the stria vascularis in the basal region after exposure to a traumatic noise paradigm known to induce permanent threshold shifts (PTS). Consistent with these results, levels of histone deacetylases 1, 2, and 3 (HDAC1, HDAC2 and HDAC3) were increased predominately in the nuclei of cochlear cells. Silencing of HDAC1, HDAC2, or HDAC3 with siRNA reduced the expression of the target HDAC in OHCs, but did not attenuate noise-induced PTS, whereas treatment with the pan-HDAC inhibitor SAHA, also named vorinostat, reduced OHC loss, and attenuated PTS. These findings suggest that histone acetylation is involved in the pathogenesis of noise-induced OHC death and hearing loss. Pharmacological targeting of histone deacetylases may afford a strategy for protection against NIHL.

  16. Histone variants: key players of chromatin.

    PubMed

    Biterge, Burcu; Schneider, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Histones are fundamental structural components of chromatin. Eukaryotic DNA is wound around an octamer of the core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Binding of linker histone H1 promotes higher order chromatin organization. In addition to their structural role, histones impact chromatin function and dynamics by, e.g., post-translational histone modifications or the presence of specific histone variants. Histone variants exhibit differential expression timings (DNA replication-independent) and mRNA characteristics compared to canonical histones. Replacement of canonical histones with histone variants can affect nucleosome stability and help to create functionally distinct chromatin domains. In line with this, several histone variants have been implicated in the regulation of cellular processes such as DNA repair and transcriptional activity. In this review, we focus on recent progress in the study of core histone variants H2A.X, H2A.Z, macroH2A, H3.3, and CENP-A, as well as linker histone H1 variants, their functions and their links to development and disease.

  17. Post-Translational Modifications of Histones in Human Sperm.

    PubMed

    Krejčí, Jana; Stixová, Lenka; Pagáčová, Eva; Legartová, Soňa; Kozubek, Stanislav; Lochmanová, Gabriela; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Sehnalová, Petra; Dabravolski, Siarhei; Hejátko, Jan; Bártová, Eva

    2015-10-01

    We examined the levels and distribution of post-translationally modified histones and protamines in human sperm. Using western blot immunoassay, immunofluorescence, mass spectrometry (MS), and FLIM-FRET approaches, we analyzed the status of histone modifications and the protamine P2. Among individual samples, we observed variability in the levels of H3K9me1, H3K9me2, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1, but the level of acetylated (ac) histones H4 was relatively stable in the sperm head fractions, as demonstrated by western blot analysis. Sperm heads with lower levels of P2 exhibited lower levels of H3K9ac, H3K9me1, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1. A very strong correlation was observed between the levels of P2 and H3K9me2. FLIM-FRET analysis additionally revealed that acetylated histones H4 are not only parts of sperm chromatin but also appear in a non-integrated form. Intriguingly, H4ac and H3K27me3 were detected in sperm tail fractions via western blot analysis. An appearance of specific histone H3 and H4 acetylation and H3 methylation in sperm tail fractions was also confirmed by both LC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Taken together, these data indicate that particular post-translational modifications of histones are uniquely distributed in human sperm, and this distribution varies among individuals and among the sperm of a single individual.

  18. Structural insight into histone recognition by the ING PHD fingers.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Karen S; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2009-05-01

    The Inhibitor of Growth (ING) tumor suppressors are implicated in oncogenesis, control of DNA damage repair, cellular senescence and apoptosis. All members of the ING family contain unique amino-terminal regions and a carboxy-terminal plant homeodomain (PHD) finger. While the amino-terminal domains associate with a number of protein effectors including distinct components of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, the PHD finger binds strongly and specifically to histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 4 (H3K4me3). In this review we describe the molecular mechanism of H3K4me3 recognition by the ING1-5 PHD fingers, analyze the determinants of the histone specificity and compare the biological activities and structures within subsets of PHD fingers. The atomic-resolution structures of the ING PHD fingers in complex with a H3K4me3 peptide reveal that the histone tail is bound in a large and deep binding site encompassing nearly one-third of the protein surface. An extensive network of intermolecular hydrogen bonds, hydrophobic and cation-pi contacts, and complementary surface interactions coordinate the first six residues of the H3K4me3 peptide. The trimethylated Lys4 occupies an elongated groove, formed by the highly conserved aromatic and hydrophobic residues of the PHD finger, whereas the adjacent groove accommodates Arg2. The two grooves are connected by a narrow channel, the small size of which defines the PHD finger's specificity, excluding interactions with other modified histone peptides. Binding of the ING PHD fingers to H3K4me3 plays a critical role in regulating chromatin acetylation. The ING proteins function as tethering molecules that physically link the HDAC and HAT enzymatic complexes to chromatin. In this review we also highlight progress recently made in understanding the molecular basis underlying biological and tumorigenic activities of the ING tumor suppressors.

  19. Paternal poly (ADP-ribose) metabolism modulates retention of inheritable sperm histones and early embryonic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Motomasa; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L; Leu, N Adrian; Rao, Shilpa; Li, Fan; Gregory, Brian D; Zalenskaya, Irina A; Schultz, Richard M; Meyer, Ralph G

    2014-05-01

    To achieve the extreme nuclear condensation necessary for sperm function, most histones are replaced with protamines during spermiogenesis in mammals. Mature sperm retain only a small fraction of nucleosomes, which are, in part, enriched on gene regulatory sequences, and recent findings suggest that these retained histones provide epigenetic information that regulates expression of a subset of genes involved in embryo development after fertilization. We addressed this tantalizing hypothesis by analyzing two mouse models exhibiting abnormal histone positioning in mature sperm due to impaired poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) metabolism during spermiogenesis and identified altered sperm histone retention in specific gene loci genome-wide using MNase digestion-based enrichment of mononucleosomal DNA. We then set out to determine the extent to which expression of these genes was altered in embryos generated with these sperm. For control sperm, most genes showed some degree of histone association, unexpectedly suggesting that histone retention in sperm genes is not an all-or-none phenomenon and that a small number of histones may remain associated with genes throughout the genome. The amount of retained histones, however, was altered in many loci when PAR metabolism was impaired. To ascertain whether sperm histone association and embryonic gene expression are linked, the transcriptome of individual 2-cell embryos derived from such sperm was determined using microarrays and RNA sequencing. Strikingly, a moderate but statistically significant portion of the genes that were differentially expressed in these embryos also showed different histone retention in the corresponding gene loci in sperm of their fathers. These findings provide new evidence for the existence of a linkage between sperm histone retention and gene expression in the embryo.

  20. Exercise-induced histone modifications in human skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McGee, Sean L; Fairlie, Erin; Garnham, Andrew P; Hargreaves, Mark

    2009-12-15

    Skeletal muscle adaptations to exercise confer many of the health benefits of physical activity and occur partly through alterations in skeletal muscle gene expression. The exact mechanisms mediating altered skeletal muscle gene expression in response to exercise are unknown. However, in recent years, chromatin remodelling through epigenetic histone modifications has emerged as a key regulatory mechanism controlling gene expression in general. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise on global histone modifications that mediate chromatin remodelling and transcriptional activation in human skeletal muscle in response to exercise. In addition, we sought to examine the signalling mechanisms regulating these processes. Following 60 min of cycling, global histone 3 acetylation at lysine 9 and 14, a modification associated with transcriptional initiation, was unchanged from basal levels, but was increased at lysine 36, a site associated with transcriptional elongation. We examined the regulation of the class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs), which are enzymes that suppress histone acetylation and have been implicated in the adaptations to exercise. While we found no evidence of proteasomal degradation of the class IIa HDACs, we found that HDAC4 and 5 were exported from the nucleus during exercise, thereby removing their transcriptional repressive function. We also observed activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and the calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in response to exercise, which are two kinases that induce phosphorylation-dependent class IIa HDAC nuclear export. These data delineate a signalling pathway that might mediate skeletal muscle adaptations in response to exercise.

  1. Histone acetylation in heterochromatin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Workman, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    Histone acetylation is generally considered a mark involved in activating gene expression by making chromatin structures less compact. In the April 1, 2010, issue of Genes & Development, Xhemalce and Kouzarides (pp. 647–652) demonstrate that the acetylation of histone H3 at Lys 4 (H3K4) plays a role in the formation of repressive heterochromatin in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. H3K4 acetylation mediates a switch of chromodomain proteins associated with methylated H3K9 during heterochromatin assembly. PMID:20395362

  2. Diversity and Divergence of Dinoflagellate Histone Proteins.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Lynch, Michael

    2015-12-08

    Histone proteins and the nucleosomal organization of chromatin are near-universal eukaroytic features, with the exception of dinoflagellates. Previous studies have suggested that histones do not play a major role in the packaging of dinoflagellate genomes, although several genomic and transcriptomic surveys have detected a full set of core histone genes. Here, transcriptomic and genomic sequence data from multiple dinoflagellate lineages are analyzed, and the diversity of histone proteins and their variants characterized, with particular focus on their potential post-translational modifications and the conservation of the histone code. In addition, the set of putative epigenetic mark readers and writers, chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones are examined. Dinoflagellates clearly express the most derived set of histones among all autonomous eukaryote nuclei, consistent with a combination of relaxation of sequence constraints imposed by the histone code and the presence of numerous specialized histone variants. The histone code itself appears to have diverged significantly in some of its components, yet others are conserved, implying conservation of the associated biochemical processes. Specifically, and with major implications for the function of histones in dinoflagellates, the results presented here strongly suggest that transcription through nucleosomal arrays happens in dinoflagellates. Finally, the plausible roles of histones in dinoflagellate nuclei are discussed.

  3. Warfarin is an effective modifier of multiple UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes: evaluation of its potential to alter the pharmacokinetics of zidovudine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hua; Zhang, Tianpeng; Wu, Zhufeng; Wu, Baojian

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to determine the modulatory effects of warfarin (an extensively used anticoagulant drug) and its metabolites on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity and to assess the potential of warfarin to alter the pharmacokinetics of zidovudine (AZT). The effects of warfarin and its metabolites on glucuronidation were determined using human and rat liver microsomes (HLM and RLM) as well as expressed UGTs. The mechanisms of warfarin-UGT interactions were explored through kinetic characterization and modeling. Pharmacokinetic studies with rats were performed to evaluate the potential of warfarin to alter the pharmacokinetics of AZT. We found that warfarin was an effective modifier of a panel of UGT enzymes. The effects of warfarin on glucuronidation were inhibitory for UGT1A1, 2B7, and 2B17, but activating for UGT1A3. Mixed effects were observed for UGT1A7 and 1A9. Consistent with its inhibitory effects on UGT2B7 activity, warfarin inhibited AZT glucuronidation in HLM (Ki = 74.9-96.3 μM) and RLM (Ki = 190-230 μM). Inhibition of AZT glucuronidation by UGT2B7, HLM, and RLM was also observed with several hydroxylated metabolites of warfarin. Moreover, the systemic exposure (AUC) of AZT in rats was increased by a 1.5- to 2.1-fold upon warfarin coadministration. The elevated AUC was associated with suppressed glucuronidation that was probably attained through a combined action of warfarin and its hydroxylated metabolites. In conclusion, the activities of multiple UGT enzymes can be modulated by warfarin and the nature of modulation was isoform dependent. Also, pharmacokinetic interactions of zidovudine with warfarin were highly possible through inhibition of UGT metabolism.

  4. Epigenetic Modulation using Small Molecules - Targeting Histone Acetyltransferases in Disease.

    PubMed

    Richters, André; Koehler, Angela N

    2017-02-23

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are epigenetic drivers that catalyze the acetyl transfer from acetyl-CoA to lysines of both histone and non-histone substrates and thereby induce transcription either by chromatin remodeling or direct transcription factor activation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) conduct the reverse reaction to counter HAT activity. Physiological processes such as cell cycle progression or apoptosis require a thoroughly balanced equilibrium of the interplay between acetylation and deacetylation processes to maintain or, if required, alter the global acetylome status. Aberrant HAT activity has recently been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the progression of various diseases such as prostate, lung, and colon cancers as well as glioblastomas and neurodegenerative diseases. Recent investigations have aimed for the identification of HAT modulators to further decipher the complexity of acetyl transferase related signaling cascades and discover potential leads for drug design approaches. HDACs have been extensively characterized and targeted by small molecules, including four FDA-approved HDAC inhibitors; in contrast, HATs have not been active targets for therapeutic development. This review will summarize the status of HAT associated diseases and the arsenal of currently known and available HAT inhibitors with respect to their discovery, further improvements, and current applications.

  5. Chromatin dynamics: Interplay between remodeling enzymes and histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Swygert, Sarah G.; Peterson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin dynamics play an essential role in regulating the accessibility of genomic DNA for a variety of nuclear processes, including gene transcription and DNA repair. The posttranslational modification of the core histones and the action of ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes represent two primary mechanisms by which chromatin dynamics are controlled and linked to nuclear events. Although there are examples in which a histone modification or a remodeling enzyme may be sufficient to drive a chromatin transition, these mechanisms typically work in concert to integrate regulatory inputs, leading to a coordinated alteration in chromatin structure and function. Indeed, site-specific histone modifications can facilitate the recruitment of chromatin remodeling enzymes to particular genomic regions, or they can regulate the efficiency or the outcome of a chromatin remodeling reaction. Conversely, chromatin remodeling enzymes can also influence, and sometimes directly modulate, the modification state of histones. These functional interactions are generally complex, frequently transient, and often require the association of myriad additional factors. PMID:24583555

  6. The Role of Co-transcriptional Histone Methylations

    PubMed Central

    Buratowski, Stephen; Kim, TaeSoo

    2011-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (CTD) of the RNA polymerase II subunit Rpb1 undergoes dynamic phosphorylation, with different phosphorylation sites predominating at different stages of transcription. Our lab studies how various mRNA processing and chromatin-modifying enzymes interact with the phosphorylated CTD to efficiently produce mRNAs. The H3K36 methyltransferase Set2 interacts with CTD carrying phosphorylations characteristic of downstream elongation complexes, and the resulting co-transcriptional H3K36 methylation targets the Rpd3S histone deacetylase to downstream transcribed regions. Although positively correlated with gene activity, this pathway actually inhibits transcription elongation as well as initiation from cryptic promoters within genes. During early elongation, CTD serine 5 phosphorylation helps recruit the H3K4 methyltransferase complex containing Set1. Within 5' transcribed regions, co-transcriptional H3K4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) by Set1 recruits the deacetylase complex Set3C. Finally, H3K4 trimethylation at the most promoter-proximal nucleosomes is thought to stimulate transcription by promoting histone acetylation by complexes containing the ING/Yng PHD finger proteins. Surprisingly, the Rpd3L histone deacetylase complex, normally a transcription repressor, may also recognize H3K4me3. Together, the cotranscriptional histone methylations appear to primarily function to distinguish active promoter regions, which are marked by high levels of acetylation and nucleosome turnover, from the deacetylated, downstream transcribed regions of genes. PMID:21447819

  7. Structure and mechanism of non-histone protein acetyltransferase enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Post translational modification (PTM) of proteins is ubiquitous and mediates many cellular processes including intracellular localization, protein-protein interactions, enzyme activity, transcriptional regulation and protein stability. While the role of phosphorylation as a key PTM has been well studied, the more evolutionarily conserved acetylation PTM has only recently attracted attention as a key regulator of cellular events. Protein acetylation has been largely studied in the context of its role in histone modification and gene regulation, where histones are modified by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) to promote transcription. However, more recent acetylomic and biochemical studies have revealed that acetylation is mediated by a broader family of protein acetyltransferases (PATs). The recent structure determination of several PATs has provided a wealth of molecular information regarding structural features of PATs, their enzymatic mechanisms, their mode of substrate-specific recognition and their regulatory elements. In this minireview, we will briefly describe what is known about non-histone protein substrates, but mainly focus on a few recent structures of PATs to compare and contrast them with HATs to better understand the molecular basis for protein recognition and modification by this burgeoning family of protein modification enzymes. PMID:23742047

  8. Regulation of Cellular Immune Responses in Sepsis by Histone Modifications.

    PubMed

    Carson, W F; Kunkel, S L

    2017-01-01

    Severe sepsis, septic shock, and related inflammatory syndromes are driven by the aberrant expression of proinflammatory mediators by immune cells. During the acute phase of sepsis, overexpression of chemokines and cytokines drives physiological stress leading to organ failure and mortality. Following recovery from sepsis, the immune system exhibits profound immunosuppression, evidenced by an inability to produce the same proinflammatory mediators that are required for normal responses to infectious microorganisms. Gene expression in inflammatory responses is influenced by the transcriptional accessibility of the chromatin, with histone posttranslational modifications determining whether inflammatory gene loci are set to transcriptionally active, repressed, or poised states. Experimental evidence indicates that histone modifications play a central role in governing the cytokine storm of severe sepsis, and that aberrant chromatin modifications induced during the acute phase of sepsis may mediate chronic immunosuppression in sepsis survivors. This review will focus on the role of histone modifications in governing immune responses in severe sepsis, with an emphasis on specific leukocyte subsets and the histone modifications observed in these cells during chronic stages of sepsis. Additionally, the expression and function of chromatin-modifying enzymes (CMEs) will be discussed in the context of severe sepsis, as potential mediators of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in sepsis responses. In summary, this review will argue for the use of chromatin modifications and CME expression in leukocytes as potential biomarkers of immunosuppression in patients with severe sepsis.

  9. Regulation of histone mRNA in the unperturbed cell cycle: evidence suggesting control at two posttranscriptional steps.

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M E; Böhni, R; Schneiderman, M H; Ramamurthy, L; Schümperli, D; Marzluff, W F

    1991-01-01

    The levels of histone mRNA increase 35-fold as selectively detached mitotic CHO cells progress from mitosis through G1 and into S phase. Using an exogenous gene with a histone 3' end which is not sensitive to transcriptional or half-life regulation, we show that 3' processing is regulated as cells progress from G1 to S phase. The half-life of histone mRNA is similar in G1- and S-phase cells, as measured after inhibition of transcription by actinomycin D (dactinomycin) or indirectly after stabilization by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Taken together, these results suggest that the change in histone mRNA levels between G1- and S-phase cells must be due to an increase in the rate of biosynthesis, a combination of changes in transcription rate and processing efficiency. In G2 phase, there is a rapid 35-fold decrease in the histone mRNA concentration which our results suggest is due primarily to an altered stability of histone mRNA. These results are consistent with a model for cell cycle regulation of histone mRNA levels in which the effects on both RNA 3' processing and transcription, rather than alterations in mRNA stability, are the major mechanisms by which low histone mRNA levels are maintained during G1. Images PMID:2017161

  10. Extracting histones for the specific purpose of label‐free MS

    PubMed Central

    Govaert, Elisabeth; Van Steendam, Katleen; Scheerlinck, Ellen; Vossaert, Liesbeth; Meert, Paulien; Stella, Martina; Willems, Sander; De Clerck, Laura; Dhaenens, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Extracting histones from cells is the first step in studies that aim to characterize histones and their post‐translational modifications (hPTMs) with MS. In the last decade, label‐free quantification is more frequently being used for MS‐based histone characterization. However, many histone extraction protocols were not specifically designed for label‐free MS. While label‐free quantification has its advantages, it is also very susceptible to technical variation. Here, we adjust an established histone extraction protocol according to general label‐free MS guidelines with a specific focus on minimizing sample handling. These protocols are first evaluated using SDS‐PAGE. Hereafter, a selection of extraction protocols was used in a complete histone workflow for label‐free MS. All protocols display nearly identical relative quantification of hPTMs. We thus show that, depending on the cell type under investigation and at the cost of some additional contaminating proteins, minimizing sample handling can be done during histone isolation. This allows analyzing bigger sample batches, leads to reduced technical variation and minimizes the chance of in vitro alterations to the hPTM snapshot. Overall, these results allow researchers to determine the best protocol depending on the resources and goal of their specific study. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002885. PMID:27718312

  11. Therapeutic Targeting of Histone Modifications in Adult and Pediatric High-Grade Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Maria J.; Singleton, Will G. B.; Lowis, Stephen P.; Malik, Karim; Kurian, Kathreena M.

    2017-01-01

    Recent exciting work partly through The Cancer Genome Atlas has implicated epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications in the development of both pediatric and adult high-grade glioma (HGG). Histone lysine methylation has emerged as an important player in regulating gene expression and chromatin function. Lysine (K) 27 (K27) is a critical residue in all seven histone 3 variants and the subject of posttranslational histone modifications, as it can be both methylated and acetylated. In pediatric HGG, two critical single-point mutations occur in the H3F3A gene encoding the regulatory histone variant H3.3. These mutations occur at lysine (K) 27 (K27M) and glycine (G) 34 (G34R/V), both of which are involved with key regulatory posttranscriptional modifications. Therefore, these mutations effect gene expression, cell differentiation, and telomere maintenance. In recent years, alterations in histone acetylation have provided novel opportunities to explore new pharmacological targeting, with histone deacetylase (HDAC) overexpression reported in high-grade, late-stage proliferative tumors. HDAC inhibitors have shown promising therapeutic potential in many malignancies. This review focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms propagating pediatric and adult HGGs, as well as summarizing the current advances in clinical trials using HDAC inhibitors.

  12. Extracting histones for the specific purpose of label-free MS.

    PubMed

    Govaert, Elisabeth; Van Steendam, Katleen; Scheerlinck, Ellen; Vossaert, Liesbeth; Meert, Paulien; Stella, Martina; Willems, Sander; De Clerck, Laura; Dhaenens, Maarten; Deforce, Dieter

    2016-12-01

    Extracting histones from cells is the first step in studies that aim to characterize histones and their post-translational modifications (hPTMs) with MS. In the last decade, label-free quantification is more frequently being used for MS-based histone characterization. However, many histone extraction protocols were not specifically designed for label-free MS. While label-free quantification has its advantages, it is also very susceptible to technical variation. Here, we adjust an established histone extraction protocol according to general label-free MS guidelines with a specific focus on minimizing sample handling. These protocols are first evaluated using SDS-PAGE. Hereafter, a selection of extraction protocols was used in a complete histone workflow for label-free MS. All protocols display nearly identical relative quantification of hPTMs. We thus show that, depending on the cell type under investigation and at the cost of some additional contaminating proteins, minimizing sample handling can be done during histone isolation. This allows analyzing bigger sample batches, leads to reduced technical variation and minimizes the chance of in vitro alterations to the hPTM snapshot. Overall, these results allow researchers to determine the best protocol depending on the resources and goal of their specific study. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002885.

  13. Robust methods for purification of histones from cultured mammalian cells with the preservation of their native modifications.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Collazo, Pedro; Leuba, Sanford H; Zlatanova, Jordanka

    2009-06-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones play a role in modifying chromatin structure for DNA-templated processes in the eukaryotic nucleus, such as transcription, replication, recombination and repair; thus, histone PTMs are considered major players in the epigenetic control of these processes. Linking specific histone PTMs to gene expression is an arduous task requiring large amounts of highly purified and natively modified histones to be analyzed by various techniques. We have developed robust and complementary procedures, which use strong protein denaturing conditions and yield highly purified core and linker histones from unsynchronized proliferating, M-phase arrested and butyrate-treated cells, fully preserving their native PTMs without using enzyme inhibitors. Cell hypotonic swelling and lysis, nuclei isolation/washing and chromatin solubilization under mild conditions are bypassed to avoid compromising the integrity of histone native PTMs. As controls for our procedures, we tested the most widely used conventional methodologies and demonstrated that they indeed lead to drastic histone dephosphorylation. Additionally, we have developed methods for preserving acid-labile histone modifications by performing non-acid extractions to obtain highly purified H3 and H4. Importantly, isolation of histones H3, H4 and H2A/H2B is achieved without the use of HPLC. Functional supercoiling assays reveal that both hyper- and hypo-phosphorylated histones can be efficiently assembled into polynucleosomes. Notably, the preservation of fully phosphorylated mitotic histones and their assembly into polynucleosomes should open new avenues to investigate an important but overlooked question: the impact of mitotic phosphorylation in chromatin structure and function.

  14. Cell cycle-dependent O-GlcNAc modification of tobacco histones and their interaction with the tobacco lectin.

    PubMed

    Delporte, Annelies; De Zaeytijd, Jeroen; De Storme, Nico; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Geelen, Danny; Smagghe, Guy; Guisez, Yves; Van Damme, Els J M

    2014-10-01

    The Nicotiana tabacum agglutinin or Nictaba is a nucleocytoplasmic lectin that is expressed in tobacco after the plants have been exposed to jasmonate treatment or insect herbivory. Nictaba specifically recognizes GlcNAc residues. Recently, it was shown that Nictaba is interacting in vitro with the core histone proteins from calf thymus. Assuming that plant histones - similar to their animal counterparts - undergo O-GlcNAcylation, this interaction presumably occurs through binding of the lectin to the O-GlcNAc modification present on the histones. Hereupon, the question was raised whether this modification also occurs in plants and if it is cell cycle dependent. To this end, histones were purified from tobacco BY-2 suspension cells and the presence of O-GlcNAc modifications was checked. Concomitantly, O-GlcNAcylation of histone proteins was studied. Our data show that similar to animal histones plant histones are modified by O-GlcNAc in a cell cycle-dependent fashion. In addition, the interaction between Nictaba and tobacco histones was confirmed using lectin chromatography and far Western blot analysis. Collectively these findings suggest that Nictaba can act as a modulator of gene transcription through its interaction with core histones.

  15. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Histone Proteoforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Arnaudo, Anna M.; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2014-06-01

    Histones play important roles in chromatin, in the forms of various posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and sequence variants, which are called histone proteoforms. Investigating modifications and variants is an ongoing challenge. Previous methods are based on antibodies, and because they usually detect only one modification at a time, they are not suitable for studying the various combinations of modifications on histones. Fortunately, mass spectrometry (MS) has emerged as a high-throughput technology for histone analysis and does not require prior knowledge about any modifications. From the data generated by mass spectrometers, both identification and quantification of modifications, as well as variants, can be obtained easily. On the basis of this information, the functions of histones in various cellular contexts can be revealed. Therefore, MS continues to play an important role in the study of histone proteoforms. In this review, we discuss the analysis strategies of MS, their applications on histones, and some key remaining challenges.

  16. TRIM24 Links a Non-canonical Histone Signature to Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    W Tsai; Z Wang; T Yiu; K Akdemir; W Xia; S Winter; C Tsai; X Shi; D Schwarzer; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Recognition of modified histone species by distinct structural domains within 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of gene expression. Readers that simultaneously recognize histones with multiple marks allow transduction of complex chromatin modification patterns into specific biological outcomes. Here we report that chromatin regulator tripartite motif-containing 24 (TRIM24) functions in humans as a reader of dual histone marks by means of tandem plant homeodomain (PHD) and bromodomain (Bromo) regions. The three-dimensional structure of the PHD-Bromo region of TRIM24 revealed a single functional unit for combinatorial recognition of unmodified H3K4 (that is, histone H3 unmodified at lysine 4, H3K4me0) and acetylated H3K23 (histone H3 acetylated at lysine 23, H3K23ac) within the same histone tail. TRIM24 binds chromatin and oestrogen receptor to activate oestrogen-dependent genes associated with cellular proliferation and tumour development. Aberrant expression of TRIM24 negatively correlates with survival of breast cancer patients. The PHD-Bromo of TRIM24 provides a structural rationale for chromatin activation through a non-canonical histone signature, establishing a new route by which chromatin readers may influence cancer pathogenesis.

  17. Effect of histone acetylation on the formation and removal of B(a)P chromatin adducts.

    PubMed Central

    Kootstra, A

    1982-01-01

    The modification of core histone proteins in mouse 10T1/2 cells and human lung epitheloid (A549) cells by B(a)PDE in vivo and in vitro was found to be similar. Only histones H2A and H3 were extensively modified. Also other proteins, possibly A24 protein and the minor histone H1 species seem to be binding relatively high levels of this ultimate carcinogen. Butyrate treatment which causes hyperacetylation of the core histones, did not change the specificity of B(a)PDE binding to core histones, nor did it affect the initial level of DNA modification. The acetylated species of histone H3 were all accessible to B(a)PDE, suggesting that these epsilon-amino-groups of the lysine residues are not the targets of the B(a)PDE. The rate of removal of B(a)P-DNA adducts was not affected by butyrate treatment in either normal human or XP fibroblasts. Furthermore the B(a)P-core histones were not preferentially removed from normal human fibroblast chromatin during a 24 h post-treatment incubation. Images PMID:6285308

  18. A seasonal switch in histone deacetylase gene expression in the hypothalamus and their capacity to modulate nuclear signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Stoney, Patrick N; Rodrigues, Diana; Helfer, Gisela; Khatib, Thabat; Ashton, Anna; Hay, Elizabeth A; Starr, Robert; Kociszewska, Dagmara; Morgan, Peter; McCaffery, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Seasonal animals undergo changes in physiology and behavior between summer and winter conditions. These changes are in part driven by a switch in a series of hypothalamic genes under transcriptional control by hormones and, of recent interest, inflammatory factors. Crucial to the control of transcription are histone deacetylases (HDACs), generally acting to repress transcription by local histone modification. Seasonal changes in hypothalamic HDAC transcripts were investigated in photoperiod-sensitive F344 rats by altering the day-length (photoperiod). HDAC4, 6 and 9 were found to change in expression. The potential influence of HDACs on two hypothalamic signaling pathways that regulate transcription, inflammatory and nuclear receptor signaling, was investigated. For inflammatory signaling the focus was on NF-κB because of the novel finding made that its expression is seasonally regulated in the rat hypothalamus. For nuclear receptor signaling it was discovered that expression of retinoic acid receptor beta was regulated seasonally. HDAC modulation of NF-κB-induced pathways was examined in a hypothalamic neuronal cell line and primary hypothalamic tanycytes. HDAC4/5/6 inhibition altered the control of gene expression (Fos, Prkca, Prkcd and Ptp1b) by inducers of NF-κB that activate inflammation. These inhibitors also modified the action of nuclear receptor ligands thyroid hormone and retinoic acid. Thus seasonal changes in HDAC4 and 6 have the potential to epigenetically modify multiple gene regulatory pathways in the hypothalamus that could act to limit inflammatory pathways in the hypothalamus during long-day summer-like conditions.

  19. Histone H2A variants in nucleosomes and chromatin: more or less stable?

    PubMed Central

    Bönisch, Clemens; Hake, Sandra B.

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is organized together with histones and non-histone proteins into a highly complex nucleoprotein structure called chromatin, with the nucleosome as its monomeric subunit. Various interconnected mechanisms regulate DNA accessibility, including replacement of canonical histones with specialized histone variants. Histone variant incorporation can lead to profound chromatin structure alterations thereby influencing a multitude of biological processes ranging from transcriptional regulation to genome stability. Among core histones, the H2A family exhibits highest sequence divergence, resulting in the largest number of variants known. Strikingly, H2A variants differ mostly in their C-terminus, including the docking domain, strategically placed at the DNA entry/exit site and implicated in interactions with the (H3–H4)2-tetramer within the nucleosome and in the L1 loop, the interaction interface of H2A–H2B dimers. Moreover, the acidic patch, important for internucleosomal contacts and higher-order chromatin structure, is altered between different H2A variants. Consequently, H2A variant incorporation has the potential to strongly regulate DNA organization on several levels resulting in meaningful biological output. Here, we review experimental evidence pinpointing towards outstanding roles of these highly variable regions of H2A family members, docking domain, L1 loop and acidic patch, and close by discussing their influence on nucleosome and higher-order chromatin structure and stability. PMID:23002134

  20. Weaver Syndrome‐Associated EZH2 Protein Variants Show Impaired Histone Methyltransferase Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Damian B.; Lewis, M.E. Suzanne; Chijiwa, Chieko; Ramos‐Arroyo, Maria A.; Tkachenko, Natália; Milano, Valentina; Fradin, Mélanie; McKinnon, Margaret L.; Townsend, Katelin N.; Xu, Jieqing; Van Allen, M.I.; Ross, Colin J.D.; Dobyns, William B.; Weaver, David D.; Gibson, William T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weaver syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by generalized overgrowth, macrocephaly, specific facial features, accelerated bone age, intellectual disability, and susceptibility to cancers. De novo mutations in the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) have been shown to cause WS. EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase that acts as the catalytic agent of the polycomb‐repressive complex 2 (PRC2) to maintain gene repression via methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27). Functional studies investigating histone methyltransferase activity of mutant EZH2 from various cancers have been reported, whereas WS‐associated mutations remain poorly characterized. To investigate the role of EZH2 in WS, we performed functional studies using artificially assembled PRC2 complexes containing mutagenized human EZH2 that reflected the codon changes predicted from patients with WS. We found that WS‐associated amino acid alterations reduce the histone methyltransferase function of EZH2 in this in vitro assay. Our results support the hypothesis that WS is caused by constitutional mutations in EZH2 that alter the histone methyltransferase function of PRC2. However, histone methyltransferase activities of different EZH2 variants do not appear to correlate directly with the phenotypic variability between WS patients and individuals with a common c.553G>C (p.Asp185His) polymorphism in EZH2. PMID:26694085

  1. Histone deacetylases: salesmen and customers in the post-translational modification market.

    PubMed

    Brandl, André; Heinzel, Thorsten; Krämer, Oliver H

    2009-04-01

    HDACs (histone deacetylases) are enzymes that remove the acetyl moiety from N-epsilon-acetylated lysine residues in histones and non-histone proteins. In recent years, it has turned out that HDACs themselves are also subject to post-translational modification. Such structural alterations can determine the stability, localization, activity and protein-protein interactions of HDACs. This subsequently affects the modification of their substrates and the co-ordination of cellular signalling networks. Intriguingly, physiologically relevant non-histone proteins are increasingly found to be deacetylated by HDACs, and aberrant deacetylase activity contributes to several severe human diseases. Targeting the catalytic activity of these enzymes and their post-translational modifications are therefore attractive targets for therapeutical intervention strategies. To achieve this ambitious goal, details on the molecular mechanisms regulating post-translational modifications of HDACs are required. This review summarizes aspects of the current knowledge on the biological role and enzymology of the phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation and sumoylation of HDACs.

  2. Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors - Emerging Roles in Neuronal Memory, Learning, Synaptic Plasticity and Neural Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad Ganai, Shabir; Ramadoss, Mahalakshmi; Mahadevan, Vijayalakshmi

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of neuronal signalling through histone acetylation dictates transcription programs that govern neuronal memory, plasticity and learning paradigms. Histone Acetyl Transferases (HATs) and Histone Deacetylases (HDACs) are antagonistic enzymes that regulate gene expression through acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins around which DNA is wrapped inside a eukaryotic cell nucleus. The epigenetic control of HDACs and the cellular imbalance between HATs and HDACs dictate disease states and have been implicated in muscular dystrophy, loss of memory, neurodegeneration and autistic disorders. Altering gene expression profiles through inhibition of HDACs is now emerging as a powerful technique in therapy. This review presents evolving applications of HDAC inhibitors as potential drugs in neurological research and therapy. Mechanisms that govern their expression profiles in neuronal signalling, plasticity and learning will be covered. Promising and exciting possibilities of HDAC inhibitors in memory formation, fear conditioning, ischemic stroke and neural regeneration have been detailed. PMID:26487502

  3. Site-specific ADP-ribosylation of histone H2B in response to DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rakhimova, Alina; Ura, Seiji; Hsu, Duen-Wei; Wang, Hong-Yu; Pears, Catherine J.; Lakin, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) modify proteins with single units or polymers of ADP-ribose to regulate DNA repair. However, the substrates for these enzymes are ill-defined. For example, although histones are modified by ARTs, the sites on these proteins ADP-ribosylated following DNA damage and the ARTs that catalyse these events are unknown. This, in part, is due to the lack of a eukaryotic model that contains ARTs, in addition to histone genes that can be manipulated to assess ADP-ribosylation events in vivo. Here we exploit the model Dictyostelium to identify site-specific histone ADP-ribosylation events in vivo and define the ARTs that mediate these modifications. Dictyostelium histones are modified in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in vivo by the ARTs Adprt1a and Adprt2. Adprt1a is a mono-ART that modifies H2BE18 in vitro, although disruption of this site allows ADP-ribosylation at H2BE19. Although redundancy between H2BE18 and H2BE19 ADP-ribosylation is also apparent following DSBs in vivo, by generating a strain with mutations at E18/E19 in the h2b locus we demonstrate these are the principal sites modified by Adprt1a/Adprt2. This identifies DNA damage induced histone mono-ADP-ribosylation sites by specific ARTs in vivo, providing a unique platform to assess how histone ADP-ribosylation regulates DNA repair. PMID:28252050

  4. Homocitrullination Is a Novel Histone H1 Epigenetic Mark Dependent on Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Recruitment of Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthase 1*

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Aditya D.; Mustafa, Mehnaz G.; Lichti, Cheryl F.; Elferink, Cornelis J.

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a regulator of xenobiotic toxicity, is a member of the eukaryotic Per-Arnt-Sim domain protein family of transcription factors. Recent evidence identified a novel AhR DNA recognition sequence called the nonconsensus xenobiotic response element (NC-XRE). AhR binding to the NC-XRE in response to activation by the canonical ligand 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin resulted in concomitant recruitment of carbamoyl phosphate synthase 1 (CPS1) to the NC-XRE. Studies presented here demonstrate that CPS1 is a bona fide nuclear protein involved in homocitrullination (hcit), including a key lysine residue on histone H1 (H1K34hcit). H1K34hcit represents a hitherto unknown epigenetic mark implicated in enhanced gene expression of the peptidylarginine deiminase 2 gene, itself a chromatin-modifying protein. Collectively, our data suggest that AhR activation promotes CPS1 recruitment to DNA enhancer sites in the genome, resulting in a specific enzyme-independent post-translational modification of the linker histone H1 protein (H1K34hcit), pivotal in altering local chromatin structure and transcriptional activation. PMID:26424795

  5. Histone demethylase JMJD2B is required for tumor cell proliferation and survival and is overexpressed in gastric cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wenjuan; Zhao, Li; Zang, Wen; Liu, Zhifang; Chen, Long; Liu, Tiantian; Jia, Jihui

    2011-12-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B is required for cell proliferation and in vivo tumorigenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B depletion induces apoptosis and/or cell cycle arrest. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B depletion activates DNA damage response and enhances p53 stabilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JMJD2B is overexpressed in human primary gastric cancer. -- Abstract: Epigenetic alterations such as aberrant expression of histone-modifying enzymes have been implicated in tumorigenesis. Jumonji domain containing 2B (JMJD2B) is a newly identified histone demethylase that regulates chromatin structure or gene expression by removing methyl residues from trimethylated lysine 9 on histone H3. Recent observations have shown oncogenic activity of JMJD2B. We explored the functional role of JMJD2B in cancer cell proliferation, survival and tumorigenesis, and determined its expression profile in gastric cancer. Knocking down JMJD2B expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in gastric and other cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation and/or induced apoptosis and elevated the expression of p53 and p21{sup CIP1} proteins. The enhanced p53 expression resulted from activation of the DNA damage response pathway. JMJD2B knockdown markedly suppressed xenograft tumor growth in vivo in mice. Moreover, JMJD2B expression was increased in primary gastric-cancer tissues of humans. Thus, JMJD2B is required for sustained proliferation and survival of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo, and its aberrant expression may contribute to the pathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  6. D1/D5 receptors and histone deacetylation mediate the Gateway Effect of LTP in hippocampal dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-You; Levine, Amir; Kandel, Denise B.; Yin, Deqi; Colnaghi, Luca; Drisaldi, Bettina; Kandel, Eric R.

    2014-01-01

    The dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus is critical for spatial memory and is also thought to be involved in the formation of drug-related associative memory. Here, we attempt to test an aspect of the Gateway Hypothesis, by studying the effect of consecutive exposure to nicotine and cocaine on long-term synaptic potentiation (LTP) in the DG. We find that a single injection of cocaine does not alter LTP. However, pretreatment with nicotine followed by a single injection of cocaine causes a substantial enhancement of LTP. This priming effect of nicotine is unidirectional: There is no enhancement of LTP if cocaine is administrated prior to nicotine. The facilitation induced by nicotine and cocaine can be blocked by oral administration of the dopamine D1/D5 receptor antagonist (SKF 83566) and enhanced by the D1/D5 agonist (SKF 38393). Application of the histone deacetylation inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) simulates the priming effect of nicotine on cocaine. By contrast, the priming effect of nicotine on cocaine is blocked in genetically modified mice that are haploinsufficient for the CREB-binding protein (CBP) and possess only one functional CBP allele and therefore exhibit a reduction in histone acetylation. These results demonstrate that the DG of the hippocampus is an important brain region contributing to the priming effect of nicotine on cocaine. Moreover, both activation of dopamine-D1 receptor/PKA signaling pathway and histone deacetylation/CBP mediated transcription are required for the nicotine priming effect in the DG. PMID:24549570

  7. Histone Deacetylase 3 Coordinates Deacetylase-independent Epigenetic Silencing of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) to Orchestrate Second Heart Field Development*

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Sara L.; Janardhan, Harish P.; Trivedi, Chinmay M.

    2015-01-01

    About two-thirds of human congenital heart disease involves second heart field-derived structures. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone deacetylases (HDACs), regulate the epigenome; however, their functions within the second heart field remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) orchestrates epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1, a causative factor in congenital heart disease pathogenesis, in a deacetylase-independent manner to regulate development of second heart field-derived structures. In murine embryos lacking HDAC3 in the second heart field, increased TGF-β1 bioavailability is associated with ascending aortic dilatation, outflow tract malrotation, overriding aorta, double outlet right ventricle, aberrant semilunar valve development, bicuspid aortic valve, ventricular septal defects, and embryonic lethality. Activation of TGF-β signaling causes aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and altered extracellular matrix homeostasis in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves, and pharmacological inhibition of TGF-β rescues these defects. HDAC3 recruits components of the PRC2 complex, methyltransferase EZH2, EED, and SUZ12, to the NCOR complex to enrich trimethylation of Lys-27 on histone H3 at the Tgf-β1 regulatory region and thereby maintains epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 specifically within the second heart field-derived mesenchyme. Wild-type HDAC3 or catalytically inactive HDAC3 expression rescues aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves. These findings reveal that epigenetic dysregulation within the second heart field is a predisposing factor for congenital heart disease. PMID:26420484

  8. Histone Deacetylase 3 Coordinates Deacetylase-independent Epigenetic Silencing of Transforming Growth Factor-β1 (TGF-β1) to Orchestrate Second Heart Field Development.

    PubMed

    Lewandowski, Sara L; Janardhan, Harish P; Trivedi, Chinmay M

    2015-11-06

    About two-thirds of human congenital heart disease involves second heart field-derived structures. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone deacetylases (HDACs), regulate the epigenome; however, their functions within the second heart field remain elusive. Here we demonstrate that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) orchestrates epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1, a causative factor in congenital heart disease pathogenesis, in a deacetylase-independent manner to regulate development of second heart field-derived structures. In murine embryos lacking HDAC3 in the second heart field, increased TGF-β1 bioavailability is associated with ascending aortic dilatation, outflow tract malrotation, overriding aorta, double outlet right ventricle, aberrant semilunar valve development, bicuspid aortic valve, ventricular septal defects, and embryonic lethality. Activation of TGF-β signaling causes aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and altered extracellular matrix homeostasis in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves, and pharmacological inhibition of TGF-β rescues these defects. HDAC3 recruits components of the PRC2 complex, methyltransferase EZH2, EED, and SUZ12, to the NCOR complex to enrich trimethylation of Lys-27 on histone H3 at the Tgf-β1 regulatory region and thereby maintains epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 specifically within the second heart field-derived mesenchyme. Wild-type HDAC3 or catalytically inactive HDAC3 expression rescues aberrant endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition and epigenetic silencing of Tgf-β1 in HDAC3-null outflow tracts and semilunar valves. These findings reveal that epigenetic dysregulation within the second heart field is a predisposing factor for congenital heart disease.

  9. Astrocyte Reactivity Following Blast Exposure Involves Aberrant Histone Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zachary S; Grinter, Michael B; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2016-01-01

    Blast induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a prevalent injury within military and civilian populations. The injury is characterized by persistent inflammation at the cellular level which manifests as a multitude of cognitive and functional impairments. Epigenetic regulation of transcription offers an important control mechanism for gene expression and cellular function which may underlie chronic inflammation and result in neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that altered histone acetylation patterns may be involved in blast induced inflammation and the chronic activation of glial cells. This study aimed to elucidate changes to histone acetylation occurring following injury and the roles these changes may have within the pathology. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to either a 10 or 17 psi blast overpressure within an Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS). Sham animals underwent the same procedures without blast exposure. Memory impairments were measured using the Novel Object Recognition (NOR) test at 2 and 7 days post-injury. Tissues were collected at 7 days for Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Sham animals showed intact memory at each time point. The novel object discrimination decreased significantly between two and 7 days for each injury group (p < 0.05). This is indicative of the onset of memory impairment. Western blot analysis showed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a known marker of activated astrocytes, was elevated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) following blast exposure for both injury groups. Analysis of histone protein extract showed no changes in the level of any total histone proteins within the PFC. However, acetylation levels of histone H2b, H3, and H4 were decreased in both groups (p < 0.05). Co-localization immunofluorescence was used to further investigate any potential correlation between decreased histone acetylation and astrocyte activation. These experiments showed a similar decrease in H3 acetylation in astrocytes exposed to a 17

  10. Astrocyte Reactivity Following Blast Exposure Involves Aberrant Histone Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Zachary S.; Grinter, Michael B.; VandeVord, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Blast induced neurotrauma (BINT) is a prevalent injury within military and civilian populations. The injury is characterized by persistent inflammation at the cellular level which manifests as a multitude of cognitive and functional impairments. Epigenetic regulation of transcription offers an important control mechanism for gene expression and cellular function which may underlie chronic inflammation and result in neurodegeneration. We hypothesize that altered histone acetylation patterns may be involved in blast induced inflammation and the chronic activation of glial cells. This study aimed to elucidate changes to histone acetylation occurring following injury and the roles these changes may have within the pathology. Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to either a 10 or 17 psi blast overpressure within an Advanced Blast Simulator (ABS). Sham animals underwent the same procedures without blast exposure. Memory impairments were measured using the Novel Object Recognition (NOR) test at 2 and 7 days post-injury. Tissues were collected at 7 days for Western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis. Sham animals showed intact memory at each time point. The novel object discrimination decreased significantly between two and 7 days for each injury group (p < 0.05). This is indicative of the onset of memory impairment. Western blot analysis showed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a known marker of activated astrocytes, was elevated in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) following blast exposure for both injury groups. Analysis of histone protein extract showed no changes in the level of any total histone proteins within the PFC. However, acetylation levels of histone H2b, H3, and H4 were decreased in both groups (p < 0.05). Co-localization immunofluorescence was used to further investigate any potential correlation between decreased histone acetylation and astrocyte activation. These experiments showed a similar decrease in H3 acetylation in astrocytes exposed to a 17

  11. Quantitative Histone Mass Spectrometry Identifies Elevated Histone H3 Lysine 27 (Lys27) Trimethylation in Melanoma*

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Deepanwita; Byrum, Stephanie D.; Avaritt, Nathan L.; Davis, Lauren; Shields, Bradley; Mahmoud, Fade; Reynolds, Matthew; Orr, Lisa M.; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Shalin, Sara C.; Tackett, Alan J.

    2016-01-01

    Normal cell growth is characterized by a regulated epigenetic program that drives cellular activities such as gene transcription, DNA replication, and DNA damage repair. Perturbation of this epigenetic program can lead to events such as mis-regulation of gene transcription and diseases such as cancer. To begin to understand the epigenetic program correlated to the development of melanoma, we performed a novel quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of histone post-translational modifications mis-regulated in melanoma cell culture as well as patient tumors. Aggressive melanoma cell lines as well as metastatic melanoma were found to have elevated histone H3 Lys27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) accompanied by overexpressed methyltransferase EZH2 that adds the specific modification. The altered epigenetic program that led to elevated H3K27me3 in melanoma cell culture was found to directly silence transcription of the tumor suppressor genes RUNX3 and E-cadherin. The EZH2-mediated silencing of RUNX3 and E-cadherin transcription was also validated in advanced stage human melanoma tissues. This is the first study focusing on the detailed epigenetic mechanisms leading to EZH2-mediated silencing of RUNX3 and E-cadherin tumor suppressors in melanoma. This study underscores the utility of using high resolution mass spectrometry to identify mis-regulated epigenetic programs in diseases such as cancer, which could ultimately lead to the identification of biological markers for diagnostic and prognostic applications. PMID:26621846

  12. Properties of the yeast nuclear histone deacetylase.

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez del Pino, M M; Lopez-Rodas, G; Sendra, R; Tordera, V

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear histone deacetylase from yeast was partially purified and some of its characteristics were studied. Histone deacetylase activity was stimulated in vitro by high-mobility-group nonhistone chromatin proteins 1 and 2 and ubiquitin and inhibited by spermine and spermidine, whereas n-butyrate had no significant inhibitory effect. Like the mammalian enzyme, partially purified histone deacetylase from yeast was strongly inhibited by trichostatin A. However, in crude extract preparations the yeast enzyme was not inhibited and treatment with trichostatin in vivo did not show any effect, either on the histone acetylation level or on cell viability. At low ionic strength, the enzyme can be isolated as a complex of high molecular mass that is much less inhibited by trichostatin A than is partially purified histone deacetylase activity. Furthermore, radiolabelled oligonucleosomes were more efficiently deacetylated by the complex than by the low-molecular-mass form of the enzyme. The histone deacetylase activity was separated from a polyamine deacetylase activity and its specificity studied. Using h.p.l.c.-purified core histone species as substrate, histone deacetylase from yeast is able to deacetylate all core histones with a slight preference for H3. Our results support the idea that the yeast histone deacetylase may act as a high-molecular-mass complex in vivo. Images Figure 3 PMID:7980438

  13. Histone acetylation: from code to web and router via intrinsically disordered regions.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Structural changes of chromatin, which consists of nucleosomes and nucleosome-associated factors, lead to functional changes that are important determinants of eukaryotic gene regulation. These structural changes are regulated by modifications of histones and DNA, both of which are components of nucleosomes, as well as by replacement of histone variants and the actions of noncoding RNAs. In studies of chromatin modifications, a great deal of attention has been paid to histone acetylation. Progress in understanding this subject has been extensive, including i) elucidation of the relationship of histone acetylation and gene activity; ii) the first isolation of a histonemodifying enzyme; iii) the first identification of a factor that recognizes a modified site; iv) elucidation of the mechanism by which histone modification leads to structural changes in nucleosomes; and v) elucidation of the mechanism of border formation between euchromatin and heterochromatin. Histone acetylation is considered to be fundamental in several fields, including studies of a) the role of chromatin and epigenetics in higher-order biochemical systems such as transcription, DNA replication, and repair; b) biological phenomena such as cell proliferation and differentiation; and c) cancer and aging, potentially leading to clinical applications. In this review, I will discuss the histone code hypothesis, at one time believed to represent a unified theory regarding the functions of histone modification. In addition, I will describe the "modification web theory, " by which the problems in the histone code hypothesis can be overcome, as well as the "signal router theory, " which explains the mechanisms of formation, development, and evolution of the modification web from a structural viewpoint. Lastly, I will illustrate how these novel theories partially explain the robustness of biological systems against various perturbations, and elucidate the strategy that a cell employs to avoid fatal

  14. Histone modifications: Targeting head and neck cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Le, John M; Squarize, Cristiane H; Castilho, Rogerio M

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide, and is responsible for a quarter of a million deaths annually. The survival rate for HNSCC patients is poor, showing only minor improvement in the last three decades. Despite new surgical techniques and chemotherapy protocols, tumor resistance to chemotherapy remains a significant challenge for HNSCC patients. Numerous mechanisms underlie chemoresistance, including genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer cells that may be acquired during treatment and activation of mitogenic signaling pathways, such as nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer-of activated B cell, that cause reduced apoptosis. In addition to dysfunctional molecular signaling, emerging evidence reveals involvement of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in tumor development and in tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. These observations have sparked interest in understanding the mechanisms involved in the control of CSC function and fate. Post-translational modifications of histones dynamically influence gene expression independent of alterations to the DNA sequence. Recent findings from our group have shown that pharmacological induction of post-translational modifications of tumor histones dynamically modulates CSC plasticity. These findings suggest that a better understanding of the biology of CSCs in response to epigenetic switches and pharmacological inhibitors of histone function may directly translate to the development of a mechanism-based strategy to disrupt CSCs. In this review, we present and discuss current knowledge on epigenetic modifications of HNSCC and CSC response to DNA methylation and histone modifications. In addition, we discuss chromatin modifications and their role in tumor resistance to therapy. PMID:25426249

  15. Dissecting the Molecular Roles of Histone Chaperones in Histone Acetylation by Type B Histone Acetyltransferases (HAT-B).

    PubMed

    Haigney, Allison; Ricketts, M Daniel; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2015-12-18

    The HAT-B enzyme complex is responsible for acetylating newly synthesized histone H4 on lysines K5 and K12. HAT-B is a multisubunit complex composed of the histone acetyltransferase 1 (Hat1) catalytic subunit and the Hat2 (rbap46) histone chaperone. Hat1 is predominantly localized in the nucleus as a member of a trimeric NuB4 complex containing Hat1, Hat2, and a histone H3-H4 specific histone chaperone called Hif1 (NASP). In addition to Hif1 and Hat2, Hat1 interacts with Asf1 (anti-silencing function 1), a histone chaperone that has been reported to be involved in both replication-dependent and -independent chromatin assembly. To elucidate the molecular roles of the Hif1 and Asf1 histone chaperones in HAT-B histone binding and acetyltransferase activity, we have characterized the stoichiometry and binding mode of Hif1 and Asf1 to HAT-B and the effect of this binding on the enzymatic activity of HAT-B. We find that Hif1 and Asf1 bind through different modes and independently to HAT-B, whereby Hif1 binds directly to Hat2, and Asf1 is only capable of interactions with HAT-B through contacts with histones H3-H4. We also demonstrate that HAT-B is significantly more active against an intact H3-H4 heterodimer over a histone H4 peptide, independent of either Hif1 or Asf1 binding. Mutational studies further demonstrate that HAT-B binding to the histone tail regions is not sufficient for this enhanced activity. Based on these data, we propose a model for HAT-B/histone chaperone assembly and acetylation of H3-H4 complexes.

  16. Dietary Flavones as Dual Inhibitors of DNA Methyltransferases and Histone Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Kanwal, Rajnee; Datt, Manish; Liu, Xiaoqi; Gupta, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of DNA and histone proteins are mutually involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression mediated by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) and histone methyltransferases (HMTs). DNMTs methylate cytosine residues within gene promoters, whereas HMTs catalyze the transfer of methyl groups to lysine and arginine residues of histone proteins, thus causing chromatin condensation and transcriptional repression, which play an important role in the pathogenesis of cancer. The potential reversibility of epigenetic alterations has encouraged the development of dual pharmacologic inhibitors of DNA and histone methylation as anticancer therapeutics. Dietary flavones can affect epigenetic modifications that accumulate over time and have shown anticancer properties, which are undefined. Through DNA binding and in silico protein-ligand docking studies with plant flavones viz. Apigenin, Chrysin and Luteolin, the effect of flavones on DNA and histone methylation was assessed. Spectroscopic analysis of flavones with calf-thymus DNA revealed intercalation as the dominant binding mode, with specific binding to a GC-rich sequence in the DNA duplex. A virtual screening approach using a model of the catalytic site of DNMT and EZH2 demonstrated that plant flavones are tethered at both ends inside the catalytic pocket of DNMT and EZH2 by means of hydrogen bonding. Epigenetic studies performed with flavones exhibited a decrease in DNMT enzyme activity and a reversal of the hypermethylation of cytosine bases in the DNA and prevented cytosine methylation in the GC-rich promoter sequence incubated with the M.SssI enzyme. Furthermore, a marked decrease in HMT activity and a decrease in EZH2 protein expression and trimethylation of H3K27 were noted in histones isolated from cancer cells treated with plant flavones. Our results suggest that dietary flavones can alter DNMT and HMT activities and the methylation of DNA and histone proteins that regulate epigenetic modifications, thus

  17. Cell cycle regulation of a mouse histone H4 gene requires the H4 promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Seiler-Tuyns, A; Paterson, B M

    1987-01-01

    The mouse histone H4 gene, when stably transformed into L cells on the PSV2gpt shuttle vector, is cell cycle regulated in parallel with the endogenous H4 genes. This was determined in exponentially growing pools of transformants fractionated into cell cycle-specific stages by centrifugal elutriation, a method for purifying cells at each stage of the cell cycle without the use of treatments that arrest growth. Linker additions in the 5' noncoding region of the H4 RNA or in the coding region of the gene did not affect the cell cycle-regulated expression of the modified H4 gene even though the overall level of expression was altered. However, replacing the H4 promoter with the human alpha-2 globin promoter, so that the histone transcript produced by the chimeric gene remains essentially unchanged, resulted in the constitutive expression of H4 mRNA during all phases of the cell cycle with no net increase in H4 mRNA levels during the G1-to-S transition. From these results we conclude that all the information necessary for the cell cycle-regulated expression of the H4 gene is contained in the 5.2-kilobase subclone used in these studies with 228 nucleotides of 5'-flanking DNA and that the increase in H4 mRNA during the G1-to-S transition in the cell cycle is mediated by the H4 promoter and not by the increased stability of the H4 RNA. Images PMID:3561406

  18. Histone chaperone specificity in Rtt109 activation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Young-Jun; Sudhoff, Keely B; Andrews, Andrew J; Stargell, Laurie A; Luger, Karolin

    2008-01-01

    Rtt109 is a histone acetyltransferase that requires a histone chaperone for the acetylation of histone 3 at lysine 56 (H3K56). Rtt109 forms a complex with the chaperone Vps75 in vivo and is implicated in DNA replication and repair. Here we show that both Rtt109 and Vps75 bind histones with high affinity, but only the complex is efficient for catalysis. The C-terminal acidic domain of Vps75 contributes to activation of Rtt109 and is necessary for in vivo functionality of Vps75, but it is not required for interaction with either Rtt109 or histones. We demonstrate that Vps75 is a structural homolog of yeast Nap1 by solving its crystal structure. Nap1 and Vps75 interact with histones and Rtt109 with comparable affinities. However, only Vps75 stimulates Rtt109 enzymatic activity. Our data highlight the functional specificity of Vps75 in Rtt109 activation. PMID:19172749

  19. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3-H4 at replication forks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia; Hödl, Martina; Strandsby, Anne; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Chen, Shoudeng; Groth, Anja; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-08-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase, chaperones histones H3-H4. Our first structure shows an H3-H4 tetramer bound by two MCM2 histone-binding domains (HBDs), which hijack interaction sites used by nucleosomal DNA. Our second structure reveals MCM2 and ASF1 cochaperoning an H3-H4 dimer. Mutational analyses show that the MCM2 HBD is required for MCM2-7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3-H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling histones genome wide during DNA replication.

  20. H2A.Z and H3.3 histone variants affect nucleosome structure: biochemical and biophysical studies.

    PubMed

    Thakar, Amit; Gupta, Pooja; Ishibashi, Toyotaka; Finn, Ron; Silva-Moreno, Begonia; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi; Tomschik, Miroslav; Ausio, Juan; Zlatanova, Jordanka

    2009-11-24

    Histone variants play important roles in regulation of chromatin structure and function. To understand the structural role played by histone variants H2A.Z and H3.3, both of which are implicated in transcription regulation, we conducted extensive biochemical and biophysical analysis on mononucleosomes reconstituted from either random-sequence DNA derived from native nucleosomes or a defined DNA nucleosome positioning sequence and recombinant human histones. Using established electrophoretic and sedimentation analysis methods, we compared the properties of nucleosomes containing canonical histones and histone variants H2A.Z and H3.3 (in isolation or in combination). We find only subtle differences in the compaction and stability of the particles. Interestingly, both H2A.Z and H3.3 affect nucleosome positioning, either creating new positions or altering the relative occupancy of the existing nucleosome position space. On the other hand, only H2A.Z-containing nucleosomes exhibit altered linker histone binding. These properties could be physiologically significant as nucleosome positions and linker histone binding partly determine factor binding accessibility.

  1. Epigenetic histone modification regulates developmental lead exposure induced hyperactivity in rats.

    PubMed

    Luo, Man; Xu, Yi; Cai, Rong; Tang, Yuqing; Ge, Meng-Meng; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Xu, Li; Hu, Fan; Ruan, Di-Yun; Wang, Hui-Li

    2014-02-10

    Lead (Pb) exposure was commonly considered as a high environmental risk factor for the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, the molecular basis of this pathological process still remains elusive. In light of the role of epigenetics in modulating the neurological disease and the causative environment, the alterations of histone modifications in the hippocampus of rats exposed by various doses of lead, along with concomitant behavioral deficits, were investigated in this study. According to the free and forced open field test, there showed that in a dosage-dependent manner, lead exposure could result in the increased locomotor activity of rats, that is, hyperactivity: a subtype of ADHD. Western blotting assays revealed that the levels of histone acetylation increased significantly in the hippocampus by chronic lead exposure, while no dramatic changes were detected in terms of expression yields of ADHD-related dopaminergic proteins, indicating that histone acetylation plays essential roles in this toxicant-involved pathogenesis. In addition, the increased level of histone acetylation might be attributed to the enzymatic activity of p300, a typical histone acetyltransferase, as the transcriptional level of p300 was significantly increased upon higher-dose Pb exposure. In summary, this study first discovered the epigenetic mechanism bridging the environmental influence (Pb) and the disease itself (ADHD) in the histone modification level, paving the way for the comprehensive understanding of ADHD's etiology and in further steps, establishing the therapy strategy of this widespread neurological disorder.

  2. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Libo; Yang, Yongtao; Bode, Liv; Huang, Hua; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Liang; and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  3. A NAP-Family Histone Chaperone Functions in Abiotic Stress Response and Adaptation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Pareek, Ashwani; Singla-Pareek, Sneh Lata

    2016-01-01

    Modulation of gene expression is one of the most significant molecular mechanisms of abiotic stress response in plants. Via altering DNA accessibility, histone chaperones affect the transcriptional competence of genomic loci. However, in contrast to other factors affecting chromatin dynamics, the role of plant histone chaperones in abiotic stress response and adaptation remains elusive. Here, we studied the physiological function of a stress-responsive putative rice (Oryza sativa) histone chaperone of the NAP superfamily: OsNAPL6. We show that OsNAPL6 is a nuclear-localized H3/H4 histone chaperone capable of assembling a nucleosome-like structure. Utilizing overexpression and knockdown approaches, we found a positive correlation between OsNAPL6 expression levels and adaptation to multiple abiotic stresses. Results of comparative transcriptome profiling and promoter-recruitment studies indicate that OsNAPL6 functions during stress response via modulation of expression of various genes involved in diverse functions. For instance, we show that OsNAPL6 is recruited to OsRad51 promoter, activating its expression and leading to more efficient DNA repair and abrogation of programmed cell death under salinity and genotoxic stress conditions. These results suggest that the histone chaperone OsNAPL6 may serve a regulatory role in abiotic stress physiology possibly via modulating nucleosome dynamics at various stress-associated genomic loci. Taken together, our findings establish a hitherto unknown link between histone chaperones and abiotic stress response in plants. PMID:27342307

  4. Nitric oxide regulates gene expression in cancers by controlling histone posttranslational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Divya; Hickok, Jason R.; Bovee, Rhea C.; Pham, Vy; Mantell, Lin L.; Bahroos, Neil; Kanabar, Pinal; Cao, Xing-Jun; Maienschein-Cline, Mark; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Thomas, Douglas D.

    2015-01-01

    Altered nitric oxide (•NO) metabolism underlies cancer pathology, but mechanisms explaining many •NO-associated phenotypes remain unclear. We have found that cellular exposure to •NO changes histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) by directly inhibiting the catalytic activity of JmjC-domain containing histone demethylases. Herein, we describe how •NO exposure links modulation of histone PTMs to gene expression changes that promote oncogenesis. Through high-resolution mass spectrometry, we generated an extensive map of •NO-mediated histone PTM changes at 15 critical lysine residues on the core histones H3 and H4. Concomitant microarray analysis demonstrated that exposure to physiologic •NO resulted in the differential expression of over 6,500 genes in breast cancer cells. Measurements of the association of H3K9me2 and H3K9ac across genomic loci revealed that differential distribution of these particular PTMs correlated with changes in the level of expression of numerous oncogenes, consistent with epigenetic code. Our results establish that •NO functions as an epigenetic regulator of gene expression mediated by changes in histone PTMs. PMID:26542213

  5. Charge State of the Globular Histone Core Controls Stability of the Nucleosome

    PubMed Central

    Fenley, Andrew T.; Adams, David A.; Onufriev, Alexey V.

    2010-01-01

    Presented here is a quantitative model of the wrapping and unwrapping of the DNA around the histone core of the nucleosome that suggests a mechanism by which this transition can be controlled: alteration of the charge state of the globular histone core. The mechanism is relevant to several classes of posttranslational modifications such as histone acetylation and phosphorylation; several specific scenarios consistent with recent in vivo experiments are considered. The model integrates a description based on an idealized geometry with one based on the atomistic structure of the nucleosome, and the model consistently accounts for both the electrostatic and nonelectrostatic contributions to the nucleosome free energy. Under physiological conditions, isolated nucleosomes are predicted to be very stable (38 ± 7 kcal/mol). However, a decrease in the charge of the globular histone core by one unit charge, for example due to acetylation of a single lysine residue, can lead to a significant decrease in the strength of association with its DNA. In contrast to the globular histone core, comparable changes in the charge state of the histone tail regions have relatively little effect on the nucleosome's stability. The combination of high stability and sensitivity explains how the nucleosome is able to satisfy the seemingly contradictory requirements for thermodynamic stability while allowing quick access to its DNA informational content when needed by specific cellular processes such as transcription. PMID:20816070

  6. Point mutation of H3/H4 histones affects acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of acetic acid tolerance in yeast remains unclear despite of its importance for efficient cellulosic ethanol production. In this study, we examined the effects of histone H3/H4 point mutations on yeast acetic acid tolerance by comprehensively screening a histone H3/H4 mutant library. A total of 24 histone H3/H4 mutants (six acetic acid resistant and 18 sensitive) were identified. Compared to the wild-type strain, the histone acetic acid-resistant mutants exhibited improved ethanol fermentation performance under acetic acid stress. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that changes in the gene expression in the acetic acid-resistant mutants H3 K37A and H4 K16Q were mainly related to energy production, antioxidative stress. Our results provide novel insights into yeast acetic acid tolerance on the basis of histone, and suggest a novel approach to improve ethanol production by altering the histone H3/H4 sequences.

  7. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: a suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity.

    PubMed

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor alpha=0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor beta=0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  8. Mass Spectrometric Quantification of Histone Post-translational Modifications by a Hybrid Chemical Labeling Method

    PubMed Central

    Maile, Tobias M.; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Cheung, Tommy; Guler, Gulfem D.; Tindell, Charles; Masselot, Alexandre; Liang, Jun; Zhao, Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Classon, Marie; Arnott, David

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful alternative to antibody-based methods for the analysis of histone post-translational modifications (marks). A key development in this approach was the deliberate propionylation of histones to improve sequence coverage across the lysine-rich and hydrophilic tails that bear most modifications. Several marks continue to be problematic however, particularly di- and tri-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3 which we found to be subject to substantial and selective losses during sample preparation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We developed a new method employing a “one-pot” hybrid chemical derivatization of histones, whereby an initial conversion of free lysines to their propionylated forms under mild aqueous conditions is followed by trypsin digestion and labeling of new peptide N termini with phenyl isocyanate. High resolution mass spectrometry was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data, and a novel web-based software application (Fishtones) was developed for viewing and quantifying histone marks in the resulting data sets. Recoveries of 53 methyl, acetyl, and phosphoryl marks on histone H3.1 were improved by an average of threefold overall, and over 50-fold for H3K4 di- and tri-methyl marks. The power of this workflow for epigenetic research and drug discovery was demonstrated by measuring quantitative changes in H3K4 trimethylation induced by small molecule inhibitors of lysine demethylases and siRNA knockdown of epigenetic modifiers ASH2L and WDR5. PMID:25680960

  9. Boric acid inhibits embryonic histone deacetylases: A suggested mechanism to explain boric acid-related teratogenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Di Renzo, Francesca; Cappelletti, Graziella; Broccia, Maria L.; Giavini, Erminio; Menegola, Elena . E-mail: elena.menegola@unimi.it

    2007-04-15

    Histone deacetylases (HDAC) control gene expression by changing histonic as well as non histonic protein conformation. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) are considered to be among the most promising drugs for epigenetic treatment for cancer. Recently a strict relationship between histone hyperacetylation in specific tissues of mouse embryos exposed to two HDACi (valproic acid and trichostatin A) and specific axial skeleton malformations has been demonstrated. The aim of this study is to verify if boric acid (BA), that induces in rodents malformations similar to those valproic acid and trichostatin A-related, acts through similar mechanisms: HDAC inhibition and histone hyperacetylation. Pregnant mice were treated intraperitoneally with a teratogenic dose of BA (1000 mg/kg, day 8 of gestation). Western blot analysis and immunostaining were performed with anti hyperacetylated histone 4 (H4) antibody on embryos explanted 1, 3 or 4 h after treatment and revealed H4 hyperacetylation at the level of somites. HDAC enzyme assay was performed on embryonic nuclear extracts. A significant HDAC inhibition activity (compatible with a mixed type partial inhibition mechanism) was evident with BA. Kinetic analyses indicate that BA modifies substrate affinity by a factor {alpha} = 0.51 and maximum velocity by a factor {beta} = 0.70. This work provides the first evidence for HDAC inhibition by BA and suggests such a molecular mechanism for the induction of BA-related malformations.

  10. Interactions of Histone Acetyltransferase p300 with the Nuclear Proteins Histone and HMGB1, As Revealed by Single Molecule Atomic Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, S; Rakshit, T; Sett, S; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2015-10-22

    One of the important properties of the transcriptional coactivator p300 is histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity that enables p300 to influence chromatin action via histone modulation. p300 can exert its HAT action upon the other nuclear proteins too--one notable example being the transcription-factor-like protein HMGB1, which functions also as a cytokine, and whose accumulation in the cytoplasm, as a response to tissue damage, is triggered by its acetylation. Hitherto, no information on the structure and stability of the complexes between full-length p300 (p300FL) (300 kDa) and the histone/HMGB1 proteins are available, probably due to the presence of unstructured regions within p300FL that makes it difficult to be crystallized. Herein, we have adopted the high-resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach, which allows molecularly resolved three-dimensional contour mapping of a protein molecule of any size and structure. From the off-rate and activation barrier values, obtained using single molecule dynamic force spectroscopy, the biochemical proposition of preferential binding of p300FL to histone H3, compared to the octameric histone, can be validated. Importantly, from the energy landscape of the dissociation events, a model for the p300-histone and the p300-HMGB1 dynamic complexes that HAT forms, can be proposed. The lower unbinding forces of the complexes observed in acetylating conditions, compared to those observed in non-acetylating conditions, indicate that upon acetylation, p300 tends to weakly associate, probably as an outcome of charge alterations on the histone/HMGB1 surface and/or acetylation-induced conformational changes. To our knowledge, for the first time, a single molecule level treatment of the interactions of HAT, where the full-length protein is considered, is being reported.

  11. Dynamic and distinct histone modifications modulate the expression of key adipogenesis regulatory genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiongyi; Ramlee, Muhammad Khairul; Brunmeir, Reinhard; Villanueva, Claudio J; Halperin, Daniel; Xu, Feng

    2012-12-01

    Histone modifications and their modifying enzymes are fundamentally involved in the epigenetic regulation of adipogenesis. This study aimed to define the roles of various histone modifications and their "division of labor" in fat cell differentiation. To achieve these goals, we examined the distribution patterns of eight core histone modifications at five key adipogenic regulatory genes, Pref-1, C/EBPβ, C/EBPα, PPARγ2 and aP2, during the adipogenesis of C3H 10T1/2 mouse mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. We found that the examined histone modifications are globally stable throughout adipogenesis but show distinct and highly dynamic distribution patterns at specific genes. For example, the Pref-1 gene has lower levels of active chromatin markers and significantly higher H3 K27 tri-methylation in MSCs compared with committed preadipocytes; the C/EBPβ gene is enriched in active chromatin markers at its 3'-UTR; the C/EBPα gene is predominantly marked by H3 K27 tri-methylation in adipogenic precursor cells, and this repressive marker decreases dramatically upon induction; the PPARγ2 and aP2 genes show increased histone acetylation on both H3 and H4 tails during adipogenesis. Further functional studies revealed that the decreased level of H3 K27 tri-methylation leads to de-repression of Pref-1 gene, while the increased level of histone acetylation activates the transcription of PPARγ2 and aP2 genes. Moreover, the active histone modification-marked 3'-UTR of C/EBPβ gene was demonstrated as a strong enhancer element by luciferase assay. Our results indicate that histone modifications are gene-specific at adipogenic regulator genes, and they play distinct roles in regulating the transcriptional network during adipogenesis.

  12. Transcription initiation factor IID-interactive histone chaperone CIA-II implicated in mammalian spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Takashi; Horikoshi, Masami

    2003-09-12

    Histones are thought to have specific roles in mammalian spermatogenesis, because several subtypes of histones emerge that are post-translationally modified during spermatogenesis. Though regular assembly of nucleosome is guaranteed by histone chaperones, their involvement in spermatogenesis is yet to be characterized. Here we identified a histone chaperone-related factor, which we designated as CCG1-interacting factor A-II (CIA-II), through interaction with bromodomains of TAFII250/CCG1, which is the largest subunit of human transcription initiation factor IID (TFIID). We found that human CIA-II (hCIA-II) localizes in HeLa nuclei and is highly expressed in testis and other proliferating cell-containing tissues. Expression of mouse CIA-II (mCIA-II) does not occur in the germ cell-lacking testes of adult WBB6F1-W/Wv mutant mice, indicating its expression in testis to be specific to germ cells. Fractionation of testicular germ cells revealed that mCIA-II transcripts accumulate in pachytene spermatocytes but not in spermatids. In addition, the mCIA-II transcripts in testis were present as early as 4 days after birth and decreased at 56 days after birth. These findings indicate that mCIA-II expression in testis is restricted to premeiotic to meiotic stages during spermatogenesis. Also, we found that hCIA-II interacts with histone H3 in vivo and with histones H3/H4 in vitro and that it facilitates supercoiling of circular DNA when it is incubated with core histones and topoisomerase I in vitro. These data suggest that CIA-II is a histone chaperone and is implicated in the regulation of mammalian spermatogenesis.

  13. Histone as future drug target for malaria.

    PubMed

    Rawat, D S; Lumb, V; Sharma, Y D; Pasha, S T; Singh, G

    2007-06-01

    Malaria continues to be a major cause of mortality and morbidity in tropical countries and affecting around 100 countries of the world. As per WHO estimates, 300-500 million are being infected and 1-3 million deaths annually due to malaria. With the emerging knowledge about genome sequence of all the three counterparts involved in the disease of malaria, the parasite Plasmodium, vector Anopheles and host Homo sapien have helped the scientists to understand interactions between them. Simultaneous advancement in technology further improves the prospects to discover new targets for vaccines and drugs. Though the malaria vaccine is still far away in this situation there is need to develop a potent and affordable drug(s). Histones are the key protein of chromatin and play an important role in DNA packaging, replication and gene expression. They also show frequent post-translation modifications. The specific combinations of these posttranslational modifications are thought to alter chromatin structure by forming epigenetic bar codes that specify either transient or heritable patterns of genome function. Chromatin regulators and upstream pathways are therefore seen as promising targets for development of therapeutic drugs.

  14. Canonical and variant histones of protozoan parasites.

    PubMed

    Dalmasso, Maria Carolina; Sullivan, William Joseph; Angel, Sergio Oscar

    2011-06-01

    Protozoan parasites have tremendously diverse lifestyles that require adaptation to a remarkable assortment of different environmental conditions. In order to complete their life cycles, protozoan parasites rely on fine-tuning gene expression. In general, protozoa use novel regulatory elements, transcription factors, and epigenetic mechanisms to regulate their transcriptomes. One of the most surprising findings includes the nature of their histones--these primitive eukaryotes lack some histones yet harbor novel histone variants of unknown function. In this review, we describe the histone components of different protozoan parasites based on literature and database searching. We summarize the key discoveries regarding histones and histone variants and their impact on chromatin regulation in protozoan parasites. In addition, we list histone genes IDs, sequences, and genomic localization of several protozoan parasites and Microsporidia histones, obtained from a thorough search of genome databases. We then compare these findings with those observed in higher eukaryotes, allowing us to highlight some novel aspects of epigenetic regulation in protists and to propose questions to be addressed in the upcoming years.

  15. The PHD finger of p300 influences its ability to acetylate histone and non-histone targets.

    PubMed

    Rack, Johannes G M; Lutter, Timo; Kjæreng Bjerga, Gro Elin; Guder, Corina; Ehrhardt, Christine; Värv, Signe; Ziegler, Mathias; Aasland, Rein

    2014-12-12

    In enzymes that regulate chromatin structure, the combinatorial occurrence of modules that alter and recognise histone modifications is a recurrent feature. In this study, we explored the functional relationship between the acetyltransferase domain and the adjacent bromodomain/PHD finger (bromo/PHD) region of the transcriptional coactivator p300. We found that the bromo/PHD region of p300 can bind to the acetylated catalytic domain in vitro and augment the catalytic activity of the enzyme. Deletion of the PHD finger, but not the bromodomain, impaired the ability of the enzyme to acetylate histones in vivo, whilst it enhanced p300 self-acetylation. A point mutation in the p300 PHD finger that is related to the Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome resulted in increased self-acetylation but retained the ability to acetylate histones. Hence, the PHD finger appears to negatively regulate self-acetylation. Furthermore, our data suggest that the PHD finger has a role in the recruitment of p300 to chromatin.

  16. Histone H2A mobility is regulated by its tails and acetylation of core histone tails

    SciTech Connect

    Higashi, Tsunehito; Matsunaga, Sachihiro; Isobe, Keisuke; Morimoto, Akihiro; Shimada, Tomoko; Kataoka, Shogo; Watanabe, Wataru; Uchiyama, Susumu; Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Fukui, Kiichi . E-mail: kfukui@bio.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2007-06-08

    Histone tail domains play important roles in cellular processes, such as replication, transcription, and chromosome condensation. Histone H2A has one central and two tail domains, and their functions have mainly been studied from a biochemical perspective. In addition, analyses based on visualization have been employed for functional analysis of some chromatin proteins. In this study, we analyzed histone H2A mobility in vivo by two-photon FRAP, and elucidated that the histone H2A N- and C-terminal tails regulate its mobility. We found that histone H2A mobility was increased following treatment of host cells with a histone deacetylase inhibitor. Our results support a model in which core histone tails directly regulate transcription by interacting with nucleosome DNA via electrostatic interactions.

  17. Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor influences specific histone modifications

    PubMed Central

    Montes de Oca, Rocío; Andreassen, Paul R.

    2011-01-01

    Defects in the nuclear envelope or nuclear ‘lamina’ networks cause disease and can perturb histone posttranslational (epigenetic) regulation. Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor (BAF) is an essential but enigmatic lamina component that binds lamins, LEM-domain proteins, DNA and histone H3 directly. We report that BAF copurified with nuclease-digested mononucleosomes and associated with modified histones in vivo. BAF overexpression significantly reduced global histone H3 acetylation by 18%. In cells that stably overexpressed BAF 3-fold, silencing mark H3-K27-Me1/3 and active marks H4-K16-Ac and H4-Ac5 decreased significantly. Significant increases were also seen for silencing mark H3-K9-Me3, active marks H3-K4-Me2, H3-K9/K14-Ac and H4-K5-Ac and a mark (H3-K79-Me2) associated with both active and silent chromatin. Other increases (H3-S10-P, H3-S28-P and silencing mark H3-K9-Me2) did not reach statistical significance. BAF overexpression also significantly influenced cell cycle distribution. Moreover, BAF associated in vivo with SET/I2PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor; blocks H3 dephosphorylation) and G9a (H3-K9 methyltransferase), but showed no detectable association with HDAC1 or HATs. These findings reveal BAF as a novel epigenetic regulator and are discussed in relation to BAF deficiency phenotypes, which include a hereditary progeria syndrome and loss of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. PMID:22127260

  18. Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor influences specific histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Montes de Oca, Rocío; Andreassen, Paul R; Wilson, Katherine L

    2011-01-01

    Defects in the nuclear envelope or nuclear 'lamina' networks cause disease and can perturb histone posttranslational (epigenetic) regulation. Barrier-to-Autointegration Factor (BAF) is an essential but enigmatic lamina component that binds lamins, LEM-domain proteins, DNA and histone H3 directly. We report that BAF copurified with nuclease-digested mononucleosomes and associated with modified histones in vivo. BAF overexpression significantly reduced global histone H3 acetylation by 18%. In cells that stably overexpressed BAF 3-fold, silencing mark H3-K27-Me1/3 and active marks H4-K16-Ac and H4-Ac5 decreased significantly. Significant increases were also seen for silencing mark H3-K9-Me3, active marks H3-K4-Me2, H3-K9/K14-Ac and H4-K5-Ac and a mark (H3-K79-Me2) associated with both active and silent chromatin. Other increases (H3-S10-P, H3-S28-P and silencing mark H3-K9-Me2) did not reach statistical significance. BAF overexpression also significantly influenced cell cycle distribution. Moreover, BAF associated in vivo with SET/I2PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A inhibitor; blocks H3 dephosphorylation) and G9a (H3-K9 methyltransferase), but showed no detectable association with HDAC1 or HATs. These findings reveal BAF as a novel epigenetic regulator and are discussed in relation to BAF deficiency phenotypes, which include a hereditary progeria syndrome and loss of pluripotency in embryonic stem cells.

  19. Transcriptional regulation by histone modifications: towards a theory of chromatin re-organization during stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binder, Hans; Steiner, Lydia; Przybilla, Jens; Rohlf, Thimo; Prohaska, Sonja; Galle, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Chromatin-related mechanisms, as e.g. histone modifications, are known to be involved in regulatory switches within the transcriptome. Only recently, mathematical models of these mechanisms have been established. So far they have not been applied to genome-wide data. We here introduce a mathematical model of transcriptional regulation by histone modifications and apply it to data of trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and 27 (H3K27me3) in mouse pluripotent and lineage-committed cells. The model describes binding of protein complexes to chromatin which are capable of reading and writing histone marks. Molecular interactions of the complexes with DNA and modified histones create a regulatory switch of transcriptional activity. The regulatory states of the switch depend on the activity of histone (de-) methylases, the strength of complex-DNA-binding and the number of nucleosomes capable of cooperatively contributing to complex-binding. Our model explains experimentally measured length distributions of modified chromatin regions. It suggests (i) that high CpG-density facilitates recruitment of the modifying complexes in embryonic stem cells and (ii) that re-organization of extended chromatin regions during lineage specification into neuronal progenitor cells requires targeted de-modification. Our approach represents a basic step towards multi-scale models of transcriptional control during development and lineage specification.

  20. Transcriptional regulation by histone modifications: towards a theory of chromatin re-organization during stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Binder, Hans; Steiner, Lydia; Przybilla, Jens; Rohlf, Thimo; Prohaska, Sonja; Galle, Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Chromatin-related mechanisms, as e.g. histone modifications, are known to be involved in regulatory switches within the transcriptome. Only recently, mathematical models of these mechanisms have been established. So far they have not been applied to genome-wide data. We here introduce a mathematical model of transcriptional regulation by histone modifications and apply it to data of trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and 27 (H3K27me3) in mouse pluripotent and lineage-committed cells. The model describes binding of protein complexes to chromatin which are capable of reading and writing histone marks. Molecular interactions of the complexes with DNA and modified histones create a regulatory switch of transcriptional activity. The regulatory states of the switch depend on the activity of histone (de-) methylases, the strength of complex-DNA-binding and the number of nucleosomes capable of cooperatively contributing to complex-binding. Our model explains experimentally measured length distributions of modified chromatin regions. It suggests (i) that high CpG-density facilitates recruitment of the modifying complexes in embryonic stem cells and (ii) that re-organization of extended chromatin regions during lineage specification into neuronal progenitor cells requires targeted de-modification. Our approach represents a basic step towards multi-scale models of transcriptional control during development and lineage specification.

  1. Histone Modifications and Nuclear Architecture: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bártová, Eva; Krejčí, Jana; Harničarová, Andrea; Galiová, Gabriela; Kozubek, Stanislav

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, such as acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and ADP ribosylation, of the highly conserved core histones, H2A, H2B, H3, and H4, influence the genetic potential of DNA. The enormous regulatory potential of histone modification is illustrated in the vast array of epigenetic markers found throughout the genome. More than the other types of histone modification, acetylation and methylation of specific lysine residues on N-terminal histone tails are fundamental for the formation of chromatin domains, such as euchromatin, and facultative and constitutive heterochromatin. In addition, the modification of histones can cause a region of chromatin to undergo nuclear compartmentalization and, as such, specific epigenetic markers are non-randomly distributed within interphase nuclei. In this review, we summarize the principles behind epigenetic compartmentalization and the functional consequences of chromatin arrangement within interphase nuclei. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:711–721, 2008) PMID:18474937

  2. Histone lysine methylation and chromatin replication.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Carlos; Gurard-Levin, Zachary A; Almouzni, Geneviève; Loyola, Alejandra

    2014-12-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, the replication of the DNA sequence and its organization into chromatin are critical to maintain genome integrity. Chromatin components, such as histone variants and histone post-translational modifications, along with the higher-order chromatin structure, impact several DNA metabolic processes, including replication, transcription, and repair. In this review we focus on lysine methylation and the relationships between this histone mark and chromatin replication. We first describe studies implicating lysine methylation in regulating early steps in the replication process. We then discuss chromatin reassembly following replication fork passage, where the incorporation of a combination of newly synthesized histones and parental histones can impact the inheritance of lysine methylation marks on the daughter strands. Finally, we elaborate on how the inheritance of lysine methylation can impact maintenance of the chromatin landscape, using heterochromatin as a model chromatin domain, and we discuss the potential mechanisms involved in this process.

  3. Structure and Functions of Linker Histones.

    PubMed

    Lyubitelev, A V; Nikitin, D V; Shaytan, A K; Studitsky, V M; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2016-03-01

    Linker histones such as variants H1, H5, and other similar proteins play an important role in regulation of chromatin structure and dynamics. However, interactions of linker histones with DNA and proteins, as well as specific functions of their different variants, are poorly studied. This is because they acquire tertiary structure only when interacting with a nucleosome, and because of limitations of currently available methods. However, deeper investigation of linker histones and their interactions with other proteins will address a number of important questions - from structure of compacted chromatin to regulation of early embryogenesis. In this review, structures of histone H1 variants and its interaction with chromatin DNA are considered. A possible functional significance of different H1 variants, a role of these proteins in maintaining interphase chromatin structure, and interactions of linker histones with other cellular proteins are also discussed.

  4. Profiling Analysis of Histone Modifications and Gene Expression in Lewis Lung Carcinoma Murine Cells Resistant to Anti-VEGF Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yanhua; Chen, Kaiming; Liu, Zhenping; Li, Bing; Li, Jie; Tao, Fei; Gu, Hua; Jiang, Cizhong; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cells become resistant after long-term use of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents. Our previous study shows that treatment with a VEGF inhibitor (VEGF-Trap) facilitates to develop tumor resistance through regulating angiogenesis-related genes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Histone modifications as a key epigenetic factor play a critical role in regulation of gene expression. Here, we explore the potential epigenetic gene regulatory functions of key histone modifications during tumor resistance in a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cell line. We generated high resolution genome-wide maps of key histone modifications in sensitive tumor sample (LLC-NR) and resistant tumor sample (LLC-R) after VEGF-Trap treatment. Profiling analysis of histone modifications shows that histone modification levels are effectively predictive for gene expression. Composition of promoters classified by histone modification state is different between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines regardless of CpG content. Histone modification state change between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines shows different patterns in CpG-rich and CpG-poor promoters. As a consequence, genes with different level of CpG content whose gene expression level are altered are enriched in distinct functions. Notably, histone modification state change in promoters of angiogenesis-related genes consists with their expression alteration. Taken together, our findings suggest that treatment with anti-VEGF therapy results in extensive histone modification state change in promoters with multiple functions, particularly, biological processes related to angiogenesis, likely contributing to tumor resistance development. PMID:27362259

  5. Clinical Significance of Epigenetic Alterations in Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Its Association with Genetic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Naoshi; Kudo, Masatoshi

    Accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations is a hallmark of cancer genomes, including those in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Particularly, in human HCC, epigenetic changes are more frequently observed than genetic changes in a variety of cancer-related genes, suggesting a potential role for epigenetic alterations during hepatocarcinogenesis. Several environmental factors, such as inflammation, obesity, and steatosis, are reported to affect the epigenetic status in hepatocytes, which could play a role in HCC development. In addition, genetic mutations in histone modulators and chromatin regulators would be critical for the acceleration of epigenetic alteration. It is also possible that major genetic mutations of HCC, such as TP53 and CNTTB1 mutations, are associated with the disturbance of epigenetic integrity. For example, specific TP53 mutations frequently induced by aflatoxin B1 exposure might affect histone modifiers and nucleosome remodelers. Generally, epigenetic alteration is reversible, because of which dysregulation of transcription takes place, without affecting protein structure. Therefore, differentiation therapy is one of the potential approaches for HCC with advanced epigenetic alterations. On the other hand, a tumor carrying an accumulation of genetic mutations would result in many abnormal proteins that could be recognized as non-self and could be targets for immune reactions; thus, immune-checkpoint blockers should be effective for HCCs with genetic hypermutation. Although the emergence of genetic and epigenetic alterations could be linked to each other and there could be some crossover or convergence between these cancer pathways, characterization of the mutation spectrum of genetic and epigenetic alterations could influence future HCC treatment.

  6. Coupling between Histone Conformations and DNA Geometry in Nucleosomes on a Microsecond Timescale: Atomistic Insights into Nucleosome Functions.

    PubMed

    Shaytan, Alexey K; Armeev, Grigoriy A; Goncearenco, Alexander; Zhurkin, Victor B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-16

    An octamer of histone proteins wraps about 200bp of DNA into two superhelical turns to form nucleosomes found in chromatin. Although the static structure of the nucleosomal core particle has been solved, details of the dynamic interactions between histones and DNA remain elusive. We performed extensively long unconstrained, all-atom microsecond molecular dynamics simulations of nucleosomes including linker DNA segments and full-length histones in explicit solvent. For the first time, we were able to identify and characterize the rearrangements in nucleosomes on a microsecond timescale including the coupling between the conformation of the histone tails and the DNA geometry. We found that certain histone tail conformations promoted DNA bulging near its entry/exit sites, resulting in the formation of twist defects within the DNA. This led to a reorganization of histone-DNA interactions, suggestive of the formation of initial nucleosome sliding intermediates. We characterized the dynamics of the histone tails upon their condensation on the core and linker DNA and showed that tails may adopt conformationally constrained positions due to the insertion of "anchoring" lysines and arginines into the DNA minor grooves. Potentially, these phenomena affect the accessibility of post-translationally modified histone residues that serve as important sites for epigenetic marks (e.g., at H3K9, H3K27, H4K16), suggesting that interactions of the histone tails with the core and linker DNA modulate the processes of histone tail modifications and binding of the effector proteins. We discuss the implications of the observed results on the nucleosome function and compare our results to different experimental studies.

  7. Specific post-translational histone modifications of neutrophil extracellular traps as immunogens and potential targets of lupus autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Autoreactivity to histones is a pervasive feature of several human autoimmune disorders, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Specific post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones within neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) may potentially drive the process by which tolerance to these chromatin-associated proteins is broken. We hypothesized that NETs and their unique histone PTMs might be capable of inducing autoantibodies that target histones. Methods We developed a novel and efficient method for the in vitro production, visualization, and broad profiling of histone-PTMs of human and murine NETs. We also immunized Balb/c mice with murine NETs and profiled their sera on autoantigen and histone peptide microarrays for evidence of autoantibody production to their immunogen. Results We confirmed specificity toward acetyl-modified histone H2B as well as to other histone PTMs in sera from patients with SLE known to have autoreactivity against histones. We observed enrichment for distinctive histone marks of transcriptionally silent DNA during NETosis triggered by diverse stimuli. However, NETs derived from human and murine sources did not harbor many of the PTMs toward which autoreactivity was observed in patients with SLE or in MRL/lpr mice. Further, while murine NETs were weak autoantigens in vivo, there was only partial overlap in the immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM autoantibody profiles induced by vaccination of mice with NETs and those seen in patients with SLE. Conclusions Isolated in vivo exposure to NETs is insufficient to break tolerance and may involve additional factors that have yet to be identified. PMID:22300536

  8. A Mouse Model of X-linked Intellectual Disability Associated with Impaired Removal of Histone Methylation.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Shigeki; Brookes, Emily; Agarwal, Saurabh; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ito, Hikaru; Vallianatos, Christina N; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Kasza, Tomas; Lin, Grace; Thompson, Andrew; Gu, Lei; Kwan, Kenneth Y; Chen, Chinfei; Sartor, Maureen A; Egan, Brian; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yang

    2016-02-09

    Mutations in a number of chromatin modifiers are associated with human neurological disorders. KDM5C, a histone H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methyl (H3K4me2/3)-specific demethylase, is frequently mutated in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) patients. Here, we report that disruption of the mouse Kdm5c gene recapitulates adaptive and cognitive abnormalities observed in XLID, including impaired social behavior, memory deficits, and aggression. Kdm5c-knockout brains exhibit abnormal dendritic arborization, spine anomalies, and altered transcriptomes. In neurons, Kdm5c is recruited to promoters that harbor CpG islands decorated with high levels of H3K4me3, where it fine-tunes H3K4me3 levels. Kdm5c predominantly represses these genes, which include members of key pathways that regulate the development and function of neuronal circuitries. In summary, our mouse behavioral data strongly suggest that KDM5C mutations are causal to XLID. Furthermore, our findings suggest that loss of KDM5C function may impact gene expression in multiple regulatory pathways relevant to the clinical phenotypes.

  9. A mouse model of X-linked intellectual disability associated with impaired removal of histone methylation

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Shigeki; Brookes, Emily; Agarwal, Saurabh; Badeaux, Aimee I; Ito, Hikaru; Vallianatos, Christina N; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Kasza, Tomas; Lin, Grace; Thompson, Andrew; Gu, Lei; Kwan, Kenneth Y.; Chen, Chinfei; Sartor, Maureen A.; Egan, Brian; Xu, Jun; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in a number of chromatin modifiers are associated with human neurological disorders. KDM5C, a histone H3 lysine 4 di- and tri-methyl (H3K4me2/3)-specific demethylase, is frequently mutated in X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) patients. Here, we report that disruption of the mouse Kdm5c gene recapitulates adaptive and cognitive abnormalities observed in XLID, including impaired social behavior and memory, and aggression. Kdm5c-knockout brains exhibit impaired dendritic arborization, spine abnormalities, and altered transcriptomes. In neurons, Kdm5c is recruited to promoters that harbor CpG islands decorated with high levels of H3K4me3, where it fine-tunes H3K4me3 levels. Kdm5c predominantly represses these genes, which include members of key pathways that regulate the development and function of neuronal circuitries. In summary, our mouse behavioral data strongly suggests that KDM5C mutations are causal to XLID. Furthermore, our findings suggest that loss of KDM5C function may impact gene expression in multiple regulatory pathways relevant to the clinical phenotypes. PMID:26804915

  10. Histone tail modifications and noncanonical functions of histones: perspectives in cancer epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Hadnagy, Annamaria; Beaulieu, Raymond; Balicki, Danuta

    2008-04-01

    Over the past few years, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors have occupied an important place in the effort to develop novel, but less toxic, anticancer therapy. HDAC inhibitors block HDACs, which are the enzymes responsible for histone deacetylation, and therefore they modulate gene expression. The cellular effects of HDAC inhibitors include growth arrest and the induction of differentiation. Early successes in cancer therapeutics obtained using these drugs alone or in combination with other anticancer drugs emphasize the important place of posttranslational modifications of histones in cancer therapy. Histone tail modifications along with DNA methylation are the most studied epigenetic events related to cancer progression. Moreover, extranuclear functions of histones have also been described. Because HDAC inhibitors block HDACs and thereby increase histone acetylation, we propose a model wherein exogenous acetylated histones or other related acetylated proteins that are introduced into the nucleus become HDAC substrates and thereby compete with endogenous histones for HDACs. This competition may lead to the increased acetylation of the endogenous histones, as in the case of HDAC inhibitor therapy. Moreover, other mechanisms of action, such as binding to chromatin and modulating gene expression, are also possible for exogenously introduced histones.

  11. The human histone chaperone sNASP interacts with linker and core histones through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huanyu; Ge, Zhongqi; Walsh, Scott T R; Parthun, Mark R

    2012-01-01

    Somatic nuclear autoantigenic sperm protein (sNASP) is a human homolog of the N1/N2 family of histone chaperones. sNASP contains the domain structure characteristic of this family, which includes a large acidic patch flanked by several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs. sNASP possesses a unique binding specificity in that it forms specific complexes with both histone H1 and histones H3/H4. Based on the binding affinities of sNASP variants to histones H1, H3.3, H4 and H3.3/H4 complexes, sNASP uses distinct structural domains to interact with linker and core histones. For example, one of the acidic patches of sNASP was essential for linker histone binding but not for core histone interactions. The fourth TPR of sNASP played a critical role in interactions with histone H3/H4 complexes, but did not influence histone H1 binding. Finally, analysis of cellular proteins demonstrated that sNASP existed in distinct complexes that contained either linker or core histones.

  12. Identification and characterization of lysine-methylated sites on histones and non-histone proteins.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Lu, Cheng-Tzung; Cheng, Tzu-Hsiu; Chang, Tzu-Hao

    2014-06-01

    Protein methylation is a kind of post-translational modification (PTM), and typically takes place on lysine and arginine amino acid residues. Protein methylation is involved in many important biological processes, and most recent studies focused on lysine methylation of histones due to its critical roles in regulating transcriptional repression and activation. Histones possess highly conserved sequences and are homologous in most species. However, there is much less sequence conservation among non-histone proteins. Therefore, mechanisms for identifying lysine-methylated sites may greatly differ between histones and non-histone proteins. Nevertheless, this point of view was not considered in previous studies. Here we constructed two support vector machine (SVM) models by using lysine-methylated data from histones and non-histone proteins for predictions of lysine-methylated sites. Numerous features, such as the amino acid composition (AAC) and accessible surface area (ASA), were used in the SVM models, and the predictive performance was evaluated using five-fold cross-validations. For histones, the predictive sensitivity was 85.62% and specificity was 80.32%. For non-histone proteins, the predictive sensitivity was 69.1% and specificity was 88.72%. Results showed that our model significantly improved the predictive accuracy of histones compared to previous approaches. In addition, features of the flanking region of lysine-methylated sites on histones and non-histone proteins were also characterized and are discussed. A gene ontology functional analysis of lysine-methylated proteins and correlations of lysine-methylated sites with other PTMs in histones were also analyzed in detail. Finally, a web server, MethyK, was constructed to identify lysine-methylated sites. MethK now is available at http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/MethK/.

  13. Genetic Incorporation of ε-N-2-Hydroxyisobutyryl-lysine into Recombinant Histones

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Han; Xuan, Weimin; Shao, Sida; Liu, Tao; Schultz, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the evolution of an orthogonal amber suppressor pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS)/tRNACUAPyl pair that genetically encodes the post-translationally modified amino acid, ε-N-2-hydroxyisobutyryl-lysine (HibK), in bacteria and mammalian cells. HibK is a new type of histone mark that is widely distributed in histone proteins. The ability to site-specifically incorporate HibK into proteins provides a useful tool to probe the biological function of this newly identified post-translational modification. PMID:25909834

  14. Loss of a DNA binding site within the tail of prelamin A contributes to altered heterochromatin anchorage by progerin

    PubMed Central

    Bruston, Francine; Delbarre, Erwan; Östlund, Cecilia; Worman, Howard J.; Buendia, Brigitte; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the LMNA gene that cause Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) lead to expression of a protein called progerin with 50 amino acids deleted from the tail of prelamin A. In cells from patients with HGPS, both the amount and distribution of heterochromatin are altered. We designed in vitro assays to ask whether such alterations might reflect changes in chromatin, DNA and/or histone binding properties of progerin compared to wild-type lamin C-terminal tails. We show that progerin tail has a reduced DNA/chromatin binding capacity and modified trimethylated H3K27 binding pattern, offering a molecular mechanism for heterochromatin alterations related to HGPS. PMID:20580717

  15. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms.

  16. HistoneDB 2.0: a histone database with variants--an integrated resource to explore histones and their variants.

    PubMed

    Draizen, Eli J; Shaytan, Alexey K; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Talbert, Paul B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Compaction of DNA into chromatin is a characteristic feature of eukaryotic organisms. The core (H2A, H2B, H3, H4) and linker (H1) histone proteins are responsible for this compaction through the formation of nucleosomes and higher order chromatin aggregates. Moreover, histones are intricately involved in chromatin functioning and provide a means for genome dynamic regulation through specific histone variants and histone post-translational modifications. 'HistoneDB 2.0--with variants' is a comprehensive database of histone protein sequences, classified by histone types and variants. All entries in the database are supplemented by rich sequence and structural annotations with many interactive tools to explore and compare sequences of different variants from various organisms. The core of the database is a manually curated set of histone sequences grouped into 30 different variant subsets with variant-specific annotations. The curated set is supplemented by an automatically extracted set of histone sequences from the non-redundant protein database using algorithms trained on the curated set. The interactive web site supports various searching strategies in both datasets: browsing of phylogenetic trees; on-demand generation of multiple sequence alignments with feature annotations; classification of histone-like sequences and browsing of the taxonomic diversity for every histone variant. HistoneDB 2.0 is a resource for the interactive comparative analysis of histone protein sequences and their implications for chromatin function. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/HistoneDB2.0.

  17. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples.

    PubMed

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-03-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbiased and quantitative MS-analysis of hPTM patterns on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. In pairwise comparisons, histone extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues showed patterns similar to fresh frozen samples for 24 differentially modified peptides from histone H3. In addition, when coupled with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC approach, this method allows the accurate quantification of modification changes among breast cancer patient samples. As an initial application of the PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry method, we analyzed breast cancer samples, revealing significant changes in histone H3 methylation patterns among Luminal A-like and Triple Negative disease subtypes. These results pave the way for retrospective epigenetic studies that combine the power of MS-based hPTM analysis with the extensive clinical information associated with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives.

  18. Linker histones: History and current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Crane-Robinson, C

    2016-03-01

    Although the overall structure of the fifth histone (linker histone, H1) is understood, its location on the nucleosome is only partially defined. Whilst it is clear that H1 helps condense the chromatin fibre, precisely how this is achieved remains to be determined. H1 is not a general gene repressor in that although it must be displaced from transcription start sites for activity to occur, there is only partial loss along the body of genes. How the deposition and removal of H1 occurs in particular need of further study. Linker histones are highly abundant nuclear proteins about which we know too little.

  19. Histone Methylation in Nickel-Smelting Industrial Workers

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Bai, Yana; Pu, Hongquan; Gou, Faxiang; Dai, Min; Wang, Hui; He, Jie; Zheng, Tongzhang; Cheng, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Background Nickel is an essential trace metal naturally found in the environment. It is also common in occupational settings, where it associates with various levels of both occupational and nonoccupational exposure In vitro studies have shown that nickel exposure can lead to intracellular accumulation of Ni2+, which has been associated with global decreases in DNA methylation, increases in chromatin condensation, reductions in H3K9me2, and elevated levels of H3K4me3. Histone modifications play an important role in modulating chromatin structure and gene expression. For example, tri-methylation of histone H3k4 has been found to be associated with transcriptional activation, and tri-methylation of H3k27 has been found to be associated with transcriptional repression. Aberrant histone modifications have been found to be associated with various human diseases, including cancer. The purpose of this work was to identify biomarkers for populations with occupational nickel exposure and to examine the relationship between histone methylation and nickel exposure. This may provide a scientific indicator of early health impairment and facilitate exploration of the molecular mechanism underlying cancer pathogenesis. Methods One hundred and forty subjects with occupational exposure to Ni and 140 referents were recruited. H3K4 and H3K27 trimethylation levels were measured in subjects’ blood cells. Results H3K4me3 levels were found to be higher in nickel smelting workers (47.24±20.85) than in office workers (22.65±8.81; P = 0.000), while the opposite was found for levels of H3K27me3(nickel smelting workers, 13.88± 4.23; office workers, 20.67± 5.96; P = 0.000). H3K4me3 was positively (r = 0.267, P = 0.001) and H3K27 was negatively (r = -0.684, P = 0.000) associated with age and length of service in smelting workers. Conclusion This study indicated that occupational exposure to Ni is associated with alterations in levels of histone modification. PMID:26474320

  20. [Histone-antihistone interactions in the Escherichia coli-Tetrahymena pyriformis association].

    PubMed

    Bukharin, O V; Plotnikov, A O; Nemtseva, N V; Kovbyk, L V

    2008-01-01

    Using the Escherichia coli-Tetrahymena pyriformis system, we revealed the involvement of bacterial antihistone activity and protozoan histones in interactions between pro- and eukaryotic microorganisms. Antihistone activity enhanced the viability of E. coli in association with T. pyriformis, according to our data on the dynamics of E. coli cell numbers. The strain with antihistone activity induced incomplete phagocytosis in the infusorians, resulting in cytological changes and ultrastructural alterations that indicated the retention of bacterial cells in phagosomes. Bacteria with antihistone activity located in the T. pyriformis cytoplasm influenced the eukaryotic nucleus. This manifested itself in macronucleus decompactization and a decrease in the average histone content in the population of infusorians. The data obtained suggest that protozoan histone inactivation by bacteria is one of the mechanisms involved in prokaryote persistence in associations with eukaryotic microorganisms.

  1. Essential Role of the Histone Methyltransferase G9a in Cocaine-induced Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Maze, Ian; Covington, Herbert E.; Dietz, David M.; LaPlant, Quincey; Renthal, William; Russo, Scott J.; Mechanic, Max; Mouzon, Ezekiell; Neve, Rachael L.; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Ren, Yanhua; Sampath, Srihari C.; Hurd, Yasmin L.; Greengard, Paul; Tarakhovsky, Alexander; Schaefer, Anne; Nestler, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    Cocaine-induced alterations in gene expression cause changes in neuronal morphology and behavior that may underlie cocaine addiction. We identified an essential role for histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) dimethylation and the lysine dimethyltransferase G9a in cocaine-induced structural and behavioral plasticity. Repeated cocaine administration reduced global levels of H3K9 dimethylation in the nucleus accumbens. This reduction in histone methylation was mediated through the repression of G9a in this brain region, which was regulated by the cocaine-induced transcription factor ΔFosB. Using conditional mutagenesis and viral-mediated gene transfer, we found that G9a downregulation increased dendritic spine plasticity of nucleus accumbens neurons and enhanced preference for cocaine, thereby establishing a crucial role for histone methylation in the long-term actions of cocaine. PMID:20056891

  2. The role dietary of bioactive compounds on the regulation of histone acetylases and deacetylases: a review.

    PubMed

    Vahid, F; Zand, H; Nosrat-Mirshekarlou, E; Najafi, R; Hekmatdoost, A

    2015-05-10

    Nutrigenomics is an area of epigenomics that explores and defines the rapidly evolving field of diet-genome interactions. Lifestyle and diet can significantly influence epigenetic mechanisms, which cause heritable changes in gene expression without changes in DNA sequence. Nutrient-dependent epigenetic variations can significantly affect genome stability, mRNA and protein expression, and metabolic changes, which in turn influence food absorption and the activity of its constituents. Dietary bioactive compounds can affect epigenetic alterations, which are accumulated over time and are shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of age-related diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Histone acetylation is an epigenetic modification mediated by histone acetyl transferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDACs) critically involved in regulating affinity binding between the histones and DNA backbone. The HDAC-mediated increase in histone affinity to DNA causes DNA condensation, preventing transcription, whereas HAT-acetylated chromatin is transcriptionally active. HDAC and HAT activities are reported to be associated with signal transduction, cell growth and death, as well as with the pathogenesis of various diseases. The aim of this review was to evaluate the role of diet and dietary bioactive compounds on the regulation of HATs and HDACs in epigenetic diseases. Dietary bioactive compounds such as genistein, phenylisothiocyanate, curcumin, resveratrol, indole-3-carbinol, and epigallocatechin-3-gallate can regulate HDAC and HAT activities and acetylation of histones and non-histone chromatin proteins, and their health benefits are thought to be attributed to these epigenetic mechanisms. The intake of dietary compounds that regulate epigenetic modifications can provide significant health effects and may prevent various pathological processes involved in the development of cancer and other life-threatening diseases.

  3. Adding a Lysine Mimic in the Design of Potent Inhibitors of Histone Lysine Methyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yanqi; Ganesh, Thota; Horton, John R.; Spannhoff, Astrid; Liu, Jin; Sun, Aiming; Zhang, Xing; Bedford, Mark T.; Shinkai, Yoichi; Snyder, James P.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2010-07-19

    Dynamic histone lysine methylation involves the activities of modifying enzymes (writers), enzymes removing modifications (erasers), and readers of the histone code. One common feature of these activities is the recognition of lysines in methylated and unmethylated states, whether they are substrates, reaction products, or binding partners. We applied the concept of adding a lysine mimic to an established inhibitor (BIX-01294) of histone H3 lysine 9 methyltransferases G9a and G9a-like protein by including a 5-aminopentyloxy moiety, which is inserted into the target lysine-binding channel and becomes methylated by G9a-like protein, albeit slowly. The compound enhances its potency in vitro and reduces cell toxicity in vivo. We suggest that adding a lysine or methyl-lysine mimic should be considered in the design of small-molecule inhibitors for other methyl-lysine writers, erasers, and readers.

  4. Transcription-coupled replacement of histones: degradation or recycling?

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Shan; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2012-11-20

    Histone modifications are proposed to constitute a "histone code" for epigenetic regulation of gene expression. However, recent studies demonstrate that histones have to be disassembled from chromatin during transcription. Recent evidence, though not conclusive, suggests that histones might be degradable after being removed from chromatin during transcription. Degradation of overexpressed excessive histones, instead of native histones, has been shown to be dependent on proteasomes and ubiquitination. Since the 26S proteasome usually recognizes polyubiquitinated substrates, it is critical to demonstrate whether degradation of histones is mediated by polyubiquitination. Unexpectedly, there is almost no evidence that any ubiquitin ligase can promote polyubiquitination-dependent degradation of constitutive histones. Meanwhile, acetylation and phosphorylation are also associated with histone degradation. This review attempts to summarize the current knowledge on the transcription-coupled degradation of histones and its regulation by posttranslational protein modifications.

  5. Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase AtDNMT2 associates with histone deacetylase AtHD2s activity

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yuan; Wu, Keqiang; Dhaubhadel, Sangeeta; An, Lizhe; Tian, Lining

    2010-05-28

    DNA methyltransferase2 (DNMT2) is always deemed to be enigmatic, because it contains highly conserved DNA methyltransferase motifs but lacks the DNA methylation catalytic capability. Here we show that Arabidopsis DNA methyltransferase2 (AtDNMT2) is localized in nucleus and associates with histone deacetylation. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and pull-down assays show AtDNMT2 interacts with type-2 histone deacetylases (AtHD2s), a unique type of histone deacetylase family in plants. Through analyzing the expression of AtDNMT2: ss-glucuronidase (GUS) fusion protein, we demonstrate that AtDNMT2 has the ability to repress gene expression at transcription level. Meanwhile, the expression of AtDNMT2 gene is altered in athd2c mutant plants. We propose that AtDNMT2 possibly involves in the activity of histone deacetylation and plant epigenetic regulatory network.

  6. ADP-ribosylation of histones by ARTD1: an additional module of the histone code?

    PubMed

    Hottiger, Michael O

    2011-06-06

    ADP-ribosylation is a covalent post-translational protein modification catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases and is involved in important processes such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, replication or transcription. Histones are ADP-ribosylated by ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 at specific amino acid residues, in particular lysines, of the histones tails. Specific ADP-ribosyl hydrolases and poly-ADP-ribose glucohydrolases degrade the ADP-ribose polymers. The ADP-ribose modification is read by zinc finger motifs or macrodomains, which then regulate chromatin structure and transcription. Thus, histone ADP-ribosylation may be considered an additional component of the histone code.

  7. Nucleosome linker proteins HMGB1 and histone H1 differentially enhance DNA ligation reactions.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Shiho; Katayama, Eisaku; Yoshioka, Ken-ichi; Nagaki, Sumiko; Yoshida, Michiteru; Teraoka, Hirobumi

    2002-03-22

    We previously reported that HMGB1, which originally binds to chromatin in a manner competitive with linker histone H1 to modulate chromatin structure, enhances both intra-molecular and inter-molecular ligations. In this paper, we found that histone H1 differentially enhances ligation reaction of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Histone H1 stimulated exclusively inter-molecular ligation reaction of DSB with DNA ligase IIIbeta and IV, whereas HMGB1 enhanced mainly intra-molecular ligation reaction. Electron microscopy of direct DNA-protein interaction without chemical cross-linking visualized that HMGB1 bends and loops linear DNA to form compact DNA structure and that histone H1 is capable of assembling DNA in tandem arrangement with occasional branches. These results suggest that differences in the enhancement of DNA ligation reaction are due to those in alteration of DNA configuration induced by these two linker proteins. HMGB1 and histone H1 may function in non-homologous end-joining of DSB repair and V(D)J recombination in different manners.

  8. Regulation of RNA polymerase II activation by histone acetylation in single living cells.

    PubMed

    Stasevich, Timothy J; Hayashi-Takanaka, Yoko; Sato, Yuko; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Sakata-Sogawa, Kumiko; Tokunaga, Makio; Nagase, Takahiro; Nozaki, Naohito; McNally, James G; Kimura, Hiroshi

    2014-12-11

    In eukaryotic cells, post-translational histone modifications have an important role in gene regulation. Starting with early work on histone acetylation, a variety of residue-specific modifications have now been linked to RNA polymerase II (RNAP2) activity, but it remains unclear if these markers are active regulators of transcription or just passive byproducts. This is because studies have traditionally relied on fixed cell populations, meaning temporal resolution is limited to minutes at best, and correlated factors may not actually be present in the same cell at the same time. Complementary approaches are therefore needed to probe the dynamic interplay of histone modifications and RNAP2 with higher temporal resolution in single living cells. Here we address this problem by developing a system to track residue-specific histone modifications and RNAP2 phosphorylation in living cells by fluorescence microscopy. This increases temporal resolution to the tens-of-seconds range. Our single-cell analysis reveals histone H3 lysine-27 acetylation at a gene locus can alter downstream transcription kinetics by as much as 50%, affecting two temporally separate events. First acetylation enhances the search kinetics of transcriptional activators, and later the acetylation accelerates the transition of RNAP2 from initiation to elongation. Signatures of the latter can be found genome-wide using chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing. We argue that this regulation leads to a robust and potentially tunable transcriptional response.

  9. ESET/SETDB1 gene expression and histone H3 (K9) trimethylation in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hoon; Lee, Junghee; Hagerty, Sean W; Soh, Byoung Yul; McAlpin, Sara E; Cormier, Kerry A; Smith, Karen M; Ferrante, Robert J

    2006-12-12

    Chromatin remodeling and transcription regulation are tightly controlled under physiological conditions. It has been suggested that altered chromatin modulation and transcription dysfunction may play a role in the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease (HD). Increased histone methylation, a well established mechanism of gene silencing, results in transcriptional repression. ERG-associated protein with SET domain (ESET), a histone H3 (K9) methyltransferase, mediates histone methylation. We show that ESET expression is markedly increased in HD patients and in transgenic R6/2 HD mice. Similarly, the protein level of trimethylated histone H3 (K9) was also elevated in HD patients and in R6/2 mice. We further demonstrate that both specificity protein 1 (Sp1) and specificity protein 3 (Sp3) act as transcriptional activators of the ESET promoter in neurons and that mithramycin, a clinically approved guanosine-cytosine-rich DNA binding antitumor antibiotic, interferes with the DNA binding of these Sp family transcription factors, suppressing basal ESET promoter activity in a dose dependent manner. The combined pharmacological treatment with mithramycin and cystamine down-regulates ESET gene expression and reduces hypertrimethylation of histone H3 (K9). This polytherapy significantly ameliorated the behavioral and neuropathological phenotype in the R6/2 mice and extended survival over 40%, well beyond any existing reported treatment in HD mice. Our data suggest that modulation of gene silencing mechanisms, through regulation of the ESET gene is important to neuronal survival and, as such, may be a promising treatment in HD patients.

  10. JNK1 regulates histone acetylation in trigeminal neurons following chemical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Zhang, Xuan; Nauta, Haring J; Lin, Qing; Li, Junfa; Fang, Li

    2008-11-28

    Trigeminal nerve fibers in nasal and oral cavities are sensitive to various environmental hazardous stimuli, which trigger many neurotoxic problems such as chronic migraine headache and trigeminal irritated disorders. However, the role of JNK kinase cascade and its epigenetic modulation of histone remodeling in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons activated by environmental neurotoxins remains unknown. Here we investigated the role of JNK/c-Jun cascade in the regulation of acetylation of H3 histone in TG neurons following in vitro stimulation by a neuro-inflammatory agent, mustard oil (MO). We found that MO stimulation elicited JNK/c-Jun pathway significantly by enhancing phospho-JNK1, phospho-c-Jun expression, and c-Jun activity, which were correlated with an elevated acetylated H3 histone in TG neurons. However, increases in phospho-c-Jun and c-Jun activity were significantly blocked by a JNK inhibitor, SP600125. We also found that altered H3 histone remodeling, assessed by H3 acetylation in triggered TG neurons, was reduced by SP600125. The study suggests that the activated JNK signaling in regulation of histone remodeling may contribute to neuro-epigentic changes in peripheral sensory neurons following environmental neurotoxic exposure.

  11. Histone ADP-Ribosylation Facilitates Gene Transcription by Directly Remodeling Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Zamudio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes imposes obstacles on gene transcription, and histone-modifying and nucleosome-remodeling complexes work in concert to alleviate these obstacles so as to facilitate transcription. Emerging evidence shows that chromatin-associated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and its enzymatic activity facilitate inflammatory gene transcription and modulate the inflammatory response in animal models. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PARP-1 enzymatic activity facilitates transcription are not well understood. Here we show that through an intracellular signaling pathway, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induces PARP-1 enzymatic activity and the ADP-ribosylation of histones at transcriptionally active and accessible chromatin regions in macrophages. In vitro DNase I footprinting and restriction endonuclease accessibility assays reveal that histone ADP-ribosylation directly destabilizes histone-DNA interactions in the nucleosome and increases the site accessibility of the nucleosomal DNA to nucleases. Consistent with this, LPS stimulation-induced ADP-ribosylation at the nucleosome-occupied promoters of il-1β, mip-2, and csf2 facilitates NF-κB recruitment and the transcription of these genes in macrophages. Therefore, our data suggest that PARP-1 enzymatic activity facilitates gene transcription through increasing promoter accessibility by histone ADP-ribosylation. PMID:22547677

  12. Analysis of Histones H3 and H4 Reveals Novel and Conserved Post-Translational Modifications in Sugarcane.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Izabel; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Liu, Shichong; Souza, Glaucia Mendes; Garcia, Benjamin A; Casas-Mollano, J Armando

    2015-01-01

    Histones are the main structural components of the nucleosome, hence targets of many regulatory proteins that mediate processes involving changes in chromatin. The functional outcome of many pathways is "written" in the histones in the form of post-translational modifications that determine the final gene expression readout. As a result, modifications, alone or in combination, are important determinants of chromatin states. Histone modifications are accomplished by the addition of different chemical groups such as methyl, acetyl and phosphate. Thus, identifying and characterizing these modifications and the proteins related to them is the initial step to understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation and in the future may even provide tools for breeding programs. Several studies over the past years have contributed to increase our knowledge of epigenetic gene regulation in model organisms like Arabidopsis, yet this field remains relatively unexplored in crops. In this study we identified and initially characterized histones H3 and H4 in the monocot crop sugarcane. We discovered a number of histone genes by searching the sugarcane ESTs database. The proteins encoded correspond to canonical histones, and their variants. We also purified bulk histones and used them to map post-translational modifications in the histones H3 and H4 using mass spectrometry. Several modifications conserved in other plants, and also novel modified residues, were identified. In particular, we report O-acetylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine, a recently identified modification conserved in several eukaryotes. Additionally, the sub-nuclear localization of some well-studied modifications (i.e., H3K4me3, H3K9me2, H3K27me3, H3K9ac, H3T3ph) is described and compared to other plant species. To our knowledge, this is the first report of histones H3 and H4 as well as their post-translational modifications in sugarcane, and will provide a starting point for the study of chromatin regulation in

  13. Bivalent histone modifications in early embryogenesis.

    PubMed

    Vastenhouw, Nadine L; Schier, Alexander F

    2012-06-01

    Histone modifications influence the interactions of transcriptional regulators with chromatin. Studies in embryos and embryonic stem (ES) cells have uncovered histone modification patterns that are diagnostic for different cell types and developmental stages. For example, bivalent domains consisting of regions of H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) mark lineage control genes in ES cells and zebrafish blastomeres. Such bivalent domains have garnered attention because the H3K27me3 mark might help repress lineage-regulatory genes during pluripotency while the H3K4me3 mark could poise genes for activation upon differentiation. Despite the prominence of the bivalent domain concept, studies in other model organisms have questioned its universal nature, and the function of bivalent domains has remained unclear. Histone marks are also associated with developmental regulatory genes in sperm. These observations have raised the possibility that specific histone modification patterns might persist from parent to offspring, but it is unclear whether histone marks are inherited or formed de novo. Here, we review the potential roles of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 marks in embryos and ES cells and discuss how histone marks might be established, maintained and resolved during embryonic development.

  14. Vanadates form insoluble complexes with histones.

    PubMed

    Michele, D E; Thomsen, D; Louters, L L

    1997-07-01

    Vanadium oxoanions are known to have a variety of physiological effects including insulin-like activity, inhibition of phosphotyrosine phosphatases, as well as direct interactions with a variety of cellular proteins, such as microtubules. In this study, vanadate was found to form insoluble complexes with histones, as well as other positively charged proteins, in a concentration dependent fashion. This interaction occurred over a 0.5-10 mM range which corresponds to the concentration range required for many of vanadate's known physiological effects. Results from precipitation experiments using vanadate solutions with or without the yellow-orange decavanadate indicated that the decamer form is primarily responsible for this precipitation. Vanadate was able to selectively precipitate histones from soluble chromatin as well as from a soluble bacterial protein extract to which a low concentration of histones had been added. Vanadate was also able to effectively precipitate histone from solutions as low as 0.006 mg/mL histone. Thus, the selective precipitation of histones and other positively charged proteins by vanadate can be utilized as a tool for protein purification. In addition, this interaction may provide insight into the mechanisms for the physiological effects of vanadate.

  15. Extracellular histones in tissue injury and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Allam, Ramanjaneyulu; Kumar, Santhosh V R; Darisipudi, Murthy N; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-05-01

    Neutrophil NETosis is an important element of host defense as it catapults chromatin out of the cell to trap bacteria, which then are killed, e.g., by the chromatin's histone component. Also, during sterile inflammation TNF-alpha and other mediators trigger NETosis, which elicits cytotoxic effects on host cells. The same mechanism should apply to other forms of regulated necrosis including pyroptosis, necroptosis, ferroptosis, and cyclophilin D-mediated regulated necrosis. Beyond these toxic effects, extracellular histones also trigger thrombus formation and innate immunity by activating Toll-like receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome. Thereby, extracellular histones contribute to the microvascular complications of sepsis, major trauma, small vessel vasculitis as well as acute liver, kidney, brain, and lung injury. Finally, histones prevent the degradation of extracellular DNA, which promotes autoimmunization, anti-nuclear antibody formation, and autoimmunity in susceptible individuals. Here, we review the current evidence on the pathogenic role of extracellular histones in disease and discuss how to target extracellular histones to improve disease outcomes.

  16. Histone Lysine Methylation in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guang-dong; Cui, Wen-peng; Guo, Qiao-yan; Miao, Li-ning

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) belongs to debilitating microvascular complications of diabetes and is the leading cause of end-stage renal diseases worldwide. Furthermore, outcomes from the DCCT/EDIC study showed that DN often persists and progresses despite intensive glucose control in many diabetes patients, possibly as a result of prior episode of hyperglycemia, which is called “metabolic memory.” The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of DN remain poorly understood. Activation of multiple signaling pathways and key transcription factors can lead to aberrant expression of DN-related pathologic genes in target renal cells. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms in chromatin such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and methylation can influence the pathophysiology of DN and metabolic memory. Exciting researches from cell culture and experimental animals have shown that key histone methylation patterns and the related histone methyltransferases and histone demethylases can play important roles in the regulation of inflammatory and profibrotic genes in renal cells under diabetic conditions. Because histone methylation is dynamic and potentially reversible, it can provide a window of opportunity for the development of much-needed novel therapeutic potential for DN in the future. In this minireview, we discuss recent advances in the field of histone methylation and its roles in the pathogenesis and progression of DN. PMID:25215303

  17. A novel role for protein arginine deiminase 4 in pluripotency: the emerging role of citrullinated histone H1 in cellular programming.

    PubMed

    Slade, Daniel J; Horibata, Sachi; Coonrod, Scott A; Thompson, Paul R

    2014-08-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) alter the chromatin architecture, generating "open" and "closed" states, and these structural changes can modulate gene expression under specific cellular conditions. While methylation and acetylation are the best-characterized histone PTMs, citrullination by the protein arginine deiminases (PADs) represents another important player in this process. In addition to "fine tuning" chromatin structure at specific loci, histone citrullination can also promote rapid global chromatin decondensation during the formation of extracellular traps (ETs) in immune cells. Recent studies now show that PAD4-mediated citrullination of histone H1 at promoter elements can also promote localized chromatin decondensation in stem cells, thus regulating the pluripotent state. These observations suggest that PAD-mediated histone deimination profoundly affects chromatin structure, possibly above and beyond that of other PTMs. Additionally, these recent findings further enhance our understanding of PAD biology and the important contributions that these enzymes play in development, health, and disease.

  18. Nonpeptide Macrocyclic Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Oyelere, Adegboyega K.; Chen, Po C.; Guerrant, William; Mwakwari, Sandra C.; Hood, Rebecca; Zhang, Yunzhe; Fan, Yuhong

    2009-01-01

    Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) hold great promise in cancer therapy due to their demonstrated ability to arrest proliferation of nearly all transformed cell types. Of the several structurally distinct small molecules HDACi reported, macrocyclic depsipeptides have the most complex recognition cap-group moieties and present an excellent opportunity for the modulation of the biological activities of HDACi. Unfortunately, the structure–activity relationship (SAR) studies for this class of compounds have been impaired largely because most macrocyclic HDACi known to date are comprised of complex peptide macrocycles. In addition to retaining the pharmacologically disadvantaged peptidyl-backbone, they offer only limited opportunity for side-chain modifications. Here we report the discovery of a new class of macrocyclic HDACi based on the macrolide antibiotics skeletons. SAR studies revealed that these compounds displayed both linker-length and macrolide-type dependent HDAC inhibition activities with IC50 in low nanomolar range. In addition, these nonpeptide macrocyclic HDACi are more selective against HDAC 1 and 2 relative to HDAC 8, another class I HDAC isoform, hence have sub-class HDAC isoform selectivity. PMID:19093884

  19. Histone H4 acetylation required for chromatin decompaction during DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Kun; Yamamoto, Takaharu G; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Chikashige, Yuji; Kimura, Hiroshi; Masukata, Hisao; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hiraoka, Yasushi

    2015-07-30

    Faithful DNA replication is a prerequisite for cell proliferation. Several cytological studies have shown that chromosome structures alter in the S-phase of the cell cycle. However, the molecular mechanisms behind the alteration of chromosome structures associated with DNA replication have not been elucidated. Here, we investigated chromatin structures and acetylation of specific histone residues during DNA replication using the meiotic nucleus of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The S. pombe meiotic nucleus provides a unique opportunity for measuring the levels of compaction of chromatin along the chromosome in a defined orientation. By direct measurement of chromatin compaction in living cells, we demonstrated that decompaction of chromatin occurs during meiotic DNA replication. This chromatin decompaction was suppressed by depletion of histone acetyltransferase Mst1 or by arginine substitution of specific lysine residues (K8 and K12) of histone H4. These results suggest that acetylation of histone H4 residues K8 and K12 plays a critical role in loosening chromatin structures during DNA replication.

  20. The Histone Demethylase PHF8 Is Essential for Endothelial Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lunda; Hitzel, Juliane; Moll, Franziska; Kruse, Christoph; Malik, Randa Abdel; Preussner, Jens; Looso, Mario; Leisegang, Matthias S.; Steinhilber, Dieter; Brandes, Ralf P.; Fork, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic marks critically control gene expression and thus the cellular activity state. The functions of many epigenetic modifiers in the vascular system have not yet been studied. We screened for histone modifiers in endothelial cells and observed a fairly high expression of the histone plant homeodomain finger protein 8 (PHF8). Given its high expression, we hypothesize that this histone demethylase is important for endothelial cell function. Overexpression of PHF8 catalyzed the removal of methyl-groups from histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and H4K20, whereas knockdown of the enzyme increased H3K9 methylation. Knockdown of PHF8 by RNAi also attenuated endothelial proliferation and survival. As a functional readout endothelial migration and tube formation was studied. PHF8 siRNA attenuated the capacity for migration and developing of capillary-like structures. Given the impact of PHF8 on cell cycle genes, endothelial E2F transcription factors were screened, which led to the identification of the gene repressor E2F4 to be controlled by PHF8. Importantly, PHF8 maintains E2F4 but not E2F1 expression in endothelial cells. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that PHF8 reduces the H3K9me2 level at the E2F4 transcriptional start site, demonstrating a direct function of PHF8 in endothelial E2F4 gene regulation. Conclusion: PHF8 by controlling E2F4 expression maintains endothelial function. PMID:26751588

  1. The Histone Demethylase PHF8 Is Essential for Endothelial Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Gu, Lunda; Hitzel, Juliane; Moll, Franziska; Kruse, Christoph; Malik, Randa Abdel; Preussner, Jens; Looso, Mario; Leisegang, Matthias S; Steinhilber, Dieter; Brandes, Ralf P; Fork, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic marks critically control gene expression and thus the cellular activity state. The functions of many epigenetic modifiers in the vascular system have not yet been studied. We screened for histone modifiers in endothelial cells and observed a fairly high expression of the histone plant homeodomain finger protein 8 (PHF8). Given its high expression, we hypothesize that this histone demethylase is important for endothelial cell function. Overexpression of PHF8 catalyzed the removal of methyl-groups from histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and H4K20, whereas knockdown of the enzyme increased H3K9 methylation. Knockdown of PHF8 by RNAi also attenuated endothelial proliferation and survival. As a functional readout endothelial migration and tube formation was studied. PHF8 siRNA attenuated the capacity for migration and developing of capillary-like structures. Given the impact of PHF8 on cell cycle genes, endothelial E2F transcription factors were screened, which led to the identification of the gene repressor E2F4 to be controlled by PHF8. Importantly, PHF8 maintains E2F4 but not E2F1 expression in endothelial cells. Consistently, chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that PHF8 reduces the H3K9me2 level at the E2F4 transcriptional start site, demonstrating a direct function of PHF8 in endothelial E2F4 gene regulation. Conclusion: PHF8 by controlling E2F4 expression maintains endothelial function.

  2. The Histone Methyltransferase SUV39H1 Suppresses Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma Formation in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Langdon, Erin M.; DiBiase, Anthony; Zhou, Yi; Langenau, David M.; Zon, Leonard I.

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetics, or the reversible and heritable marks of gene regulation not including DNA sequence, encompasses chromatin modifications on both the DNA and histones and is as important as the DNA sequence itself. Chromatin-modifying factors are playing an increasingly important role in tumorigenesis, particularly among pediatric rhabdomyosarcomas (RMS), revealing potential novel therapeutic targets. We performed an overexpression screen of chromatin-modifying factors in a KRASG12D-driven zebrafish model for RMS. Here, we describe the identification of a histone H3 lysine 9 histone methyltransferase, SUV39H1, as a suppressor of embryonal RMS formation in zebrafish. This suppression is specific to the histone methyltransferase activity of SUV39H1, as point mutations in the SET domain lacked the effect. SUV39H1-overexpressing and control tumors have a similar proliferation rate, muscle differentiation state, and tumor growth rate. Strikingly, SUV39H1-overexpressing fish initiate fewer tumors, which results in the observed suppressive phenotype. We demonstrate that the delayed tumor onset occurs between 5 and 7 days post fertilization. Gene expression profiling at these stages revealed that in the context of KRASG12D overexpression, SUV39H1 may suppress cell cycle progression. Our studies provide evidence for the role of SUV39H1 as a tumor suppressor. PMID:23705022

  3. Organ distribution of histones after intravenous infusion of FITC histones or after sepsis.

    PubMed

    Fattahi, Fatemeh; Grailer, Jamison J; Jajou, Lawrence; Zetoune, Firas S; Andjelkovic, Anuska V; Ward, Peter A

    2015-03-01

    Histones appear in plasma during infectious or non-infectious sepsis and are associated with multiorgan injury. In the current studies, intravenous infusion of histones resulted in their localization in major organs. In vitro exposure of mouse macrophages to histones caused a buildup of histones on cell membranes followed by localization into cytosol and into the nucleus. After polymicrobial sepsis (cecal ligation and puncture), histones appeared in plasma as well as in a multiorgan pattern, peaking at 8 h followed by decline. In lungs, histones and neutrophils appeared together, with evidence for formation of neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which represent an innate immune response to trap and kill bacteria and other infectious agents. In liver, there was intense NET formation, featuring linear patterns containing histones and strands of DNA. When neutrophils were activated in vitro with C5a or phorbol myristate acetate, NET formation ensued. While formation of NETs represents entrapment and killing of infectious agents, the simultaneous release from neutrophils of histones often results in tissue/organ damage.

  4. A brief histone in time: understanding the combinatorial functions of histone PTMs in the nucleosome context.

    PubMed

    Ng, Marlee K; Cheung, Peter

    2016-02-01

    It has been over 50 years since Allfrey et al. proposed that histone acetylation regulates RNA synthesis, and the study of histone modifications has progressed at an extraordinary pace for the past two decades. In this review, we provide a perspective on some key events and advances in our understanding of histone modifications. We also highlight reagents and tools from past to present that facilitated progress in this research field. Using histone H3 phosphorylation as an underlying thread, we review the rationale that led to the proposal of the histone code hypothesis, as well as examples that illustrate the concepts of combinatorial histone modifications and cross-talk pathways. We further highlight the importance of investigating these mechanisms in the context of nucleosomes rather than just at the histone level and present current and developing approaches for such studies. Overall, research on histone modifications has yielded great mechanistic insights into the regulation of genomic functions, and extending these studies using nucleosomes will further elucidate the complexity of these pathways in a more physiologically relevant context.

  5. Histone availability as a strategy to control gene expression.

    PubMed

    Prado, Félix; Jimeno-González, Silvia; Reyes, José C

    2017-03-04

    Histone proteins are main structural components of the chromatin and major determinants of gene regulation. Expression of canonical histone genes is strictly controlled during the cell cycle in order to couple DNA replication with histone deposition. Indeed, reductions in the levels of canonical histones or defects in chromatin assembly cause genetic instability. Early data from yeast demonstrated that severe histone depletion also causes strong gene expression changes. We have recently reported that a moderated depletion of canonical histones in human cells leads to an open chromatin configuration, which in turn increases RNA polymerase II elongation rates and causes pre-mRNA splicing defects. Interestingly, some of the observed defects accompany the scheduled histone depletion that is associated with several senescence and aging processes. Thus, our comparison of induced and naturally-occurring histone depletion processes suggests that a programmed reduction of the level of canonical histones might be a strategy to control gene expression during specific physiological processes.

  6. Global histone modification fingerprinting in human cells using epigenetic reverse phase protein array

    PubMed Central

    Partolina, Marina; Thoms, Hazel C; MacLeod, Kenneth G; Rodriguez-Blanco, Giovanny; Clarke, Matthew N; Venkatasubramani, Anuroop V; Beesoo, Rima; Larionov, Vladimir; Neergheen-Bhujun, Vidushi S; Serrels, Bryan; Kimura, Hiroshi; Carragher, Neil O; Kagansky, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The balance between acetylation and deacetylation of histone proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of genomic functions. Aberrations in global levels of histone modifications are linked to carcinogenesis and are currently the focus of intense scrutiny and translational research investments to develop new therapies, which can modify complex disease pathophysiology through epigenetic control. However, despite significant progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of epigenetic machinery in various genomic contexts and cell types, the links between epigenetic modifications and cellular phenotypes are far from being clear. For example, enzymes controlling histone modifications utilize key cellular metabolites associated with intra- and extracellular feedback loops, adding a further layer of complexity to this process. Meanwhile, it has become increasingly evident that new assay technologies which provide robust and precise measurement of global histone modifications are required, for at least two pressing reasons: firstly, many approved drugs are known to influence histone modifications and new cancer therapies are increasingly being developed towards targeting histone deacetylases (HDACs) and other epigenetic readers and writers. Therefore, robust assays for fingerprinting the global effects of such drugs on preclinical cell, organoid and in vivo models is required; and secondly, robust histone-fingerprinting assays applicable to patient samples may afford the development of next-generation diagnostic and prognostic tools. In our study, we have used a panel of monoclonal antibodies to determine the relative changes in the global abundance of post-translational modifications on histones purified from cancer cell lines treated with HDAC inhibitors using a novel technique, called epigenetic reverse phase protein array. We observed a robust increase in acetylation levels within 2–24 h after inhibition of HDACs in different cancer cell lines

  7. A Selective Phenelzine Analogue Inhibitor of Histone Demethylase LSD1

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is an epigenetic enzyme that oxidatively cleaves methyl groups from monomethyl and dimethyl Lys4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me1, H3K4Me2) and can contribute to gene silencing. This study describes the design and synthesis of analogues of a monoamine oxidase antidepressant, phenelzine, and their LSD1 inhibitory properties. A novel phenelzine analogue (bizine) containing a phenyl-butyrylamide appendage was shown to be a potent LSD1 inhibitor in vitro and was selective versus monoamine oxidases A/B and the LSD1 homologue, LSD2. Bizine was found to be effective at modulating bulk histone methylation in cancer cells, and ChIP-seq experiments revealed a statistically significant overlap in the H3K4 methylation pattern of genes affected by bizine and those altered in LSD1–/– cells. Treatment of two cancer cell lines, LNCaP and H460, with bizine conferred a reduction in proliferation rate, and bizine showed additive to synergistic effects on cell growth when used in combination with two out of five HDAC inhibitors tested. Moreover, neurons exposed to oxidative stress were protected by the presence of bizine, suggesting potential applications in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:24707965

  8. A selective phenelzine analogue inhibitor of histone demethylase LSD1.

    PubMed

    Prusevich, Polina; Kalin, Jay H; Ming, Shonoi A; Basso, Manuela; Givens, Jeffrey; Li, Xin; Hu, Jianfei; Taylor, Martin S; Cieniewicz, Anne M; Hsiao, Po-Yuan; Huang, Rong; Roberson, Heather; Adejola, Nkosi; Avery, Lindsay B; Casero, Robert A; Taverna, Sean D; Qian, Jiang; Tackett, Alan J; Ratan, Rajiv R; McDonald, Oliver G; Feinberg, Andrew P; Cole, Philip A

    2014-06-20

    Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) is an epigenetic enzyme that oxidatively cleaves methyl groups from monomethyl and dimethyl Lys4 of histone H3 (H3K4Me1, H3K4Me2) and can contribute to gene silencing. This study describes the design and synthesis of analogues of a monoamine oxidase antidepressant, phenelzine, and their LSD1 inhibitory properties. A novel phenelzine analogue (bizine) containing a phenyl-butyrylamide appendage was shown to be a potent LSD1 inhibitor in vitro and was selective versus monoamine oxidases A/B and the LSD1 homologue, LSD2. Bizine was found to be effective at modulating bulk histone methylation in cancer cells, and ChIP-seq experiments revealed a statistically significant overlap in the H3K4 methylation pattern of genes affected by bizine and those altered in LSD1-/- cells. Treatment of two cancer cell lines, LNCaP and H460, with bizine conferred a reduction in proliferation rate, and bizine showed additive to synergistic effects on cell growth when used in combination with two out of five HDAC inhibitors tested. Moreover, neurons exposed to oxidative stress were protected by the presence of bizine, suggesting potential applications in neurodegenerative disease.

  9. Inhibition of histone deacetylase as a new mechanism of teratogenesis.

    PubMed

    Menegola, Elena; Di Renzo, Francesca; Broccia, Maria Luisa; Giavini, Erminio

    2006-12-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are nuclear and cytoplasmic enzymes that deacetylate a number of substrates, of which histones are the best known and described in the literature. HDACs are present in eukaryotic and bacteria cells, and are fundamental for a number of cellular functions, including correct gene expression. Surprisingly, only up to 20% of the whole genome is controlled by HDACs, but key processes for survival, proliferation, and differentiation have been strictly linked to HDAC enzyme functioning. The use of HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) has been proposed for the treatment of neoplastic diseases. Their effectiveness has been suggested for a number of liquid and solid tumors, particularly acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). The role of HDACs in embryo development is currently under investigation. Published data indicate knockout phenotype analysis to be of particular interest, in which a number of HDACs play a key role during development. Little data have been published on the effects of HDACi on embryonic development, although for valproic acid (VPA), literature from the 1980s described its teratogenic effects in experimental animals and humans. To date, all tested HDACi have shown teratogenic effects similar to those described for VPA when tested in zebrafish, Xenopus laevis, and mice. HDACs were also able to alter embryo development in invertebrates and plants. A model, similar to that proposed in APL, involving retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and tissue specific Hox gene expression, is suggested to explain the HDAC effects on embryo development.

  10. Chromatin Landscape Defined by Repressive Histone Methylation during Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Magri, Laura; Zhang, Fan; Marsh, Nidaa O.; Albrecht, Stefanie; Huynh, Jimmy L.; Kaur, Jasbir; Kuhlmann, Tanja; Zhang, Weijia; Slesinger, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    In many cell types, differentiation requires an interplay between extrinsic signals and transcriptional changes mediated by repressive and activating histone modifications. Oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPCs) are electrically responsive cells receiving synaptic input. The differentiation of these cells into myelinating oligodendrocytes is characterized by temporal waves of gene repression followed by activation of myelin genes and progressive decline of electrical responsiveness. In this study, we used chromatin isolated from rat OPCs and immature oligodendrocytes, to characterize the genome-wide distribution of the repressive histone marks, H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, during differentiation. Although both marks were present at the OPC stage, only H3K9me3 marks (but not H3K27me3) were found to be increased during differentiation, at genes related to neuronal lineage and regulation of membrane excitability. Consistent with these findings, the levels and activity of H3K9 methyltransferases (H3K9 HMT), but not H3K27 HMT, increased more prominently upon exposure to oligodendrocyte differentiating stimuli and were detected in stage-specific repressive protein complexes containing the transcription factors SOX10 or YY1. Silencing H3K9 HMT, but not H3K27 HMT, impaired oligodendrocyte differentiation and functionally altered the response of oligodendrocytes to electrical stimulation. Together, these results identify repressive H3K9 methylation as critical for gene repression during oligodendrocyte differentiation. PMID:25568127

  11. The interplay of histone modifications – writers that read

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianyi; Cooper, Sarah; Brockdorff, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Histones are subject to a vast array of posttranslational modifications including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, and ubiquitylation. The writers of these modifications play important roles in normal development and their mutation or misregulation is linked with both genetic disorders and various cancers. Readers of these marks contain protein domains that allow their recruitment to chromatin. Interestingly, writers often contain domains which can read chromatin marks, allowing the reinforcement of modifications through a positive feedback loop or inhibition of their activity by other modifications. We discuss how such positive reinforcement can result in chromatin states that are robust and can be epigenetically maintained through cell division. We describe the implications of these regulatory systems in relation to modifications including H3K4me3, H3K79me3, and H3K36me3 that are associated with active genes and H3K27me3 and H3K9me3 that have been linked to transcriptional repression. We also review the crosstalk between active and repressive modifications, illustrated by the interplay between the Polycomb and Trithorax histone-modifying proteins, and discuss how this may be important in defining gene expression states during development. PMID:26474904

  12. Elevated paternal glucocorticoid exposure alters the small noncoding RNA profile in sperm and modifies anxiety and depressive phenotypes in the offspring

    PubMed Central

    Short, A K; Fennell, K A; Perreau, V M; Fox, A; O'Bryan, M K; Kim, J H; Bredy, T W; Pang, T Y; Hannan, A J

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that physiological and behavioral traits may be transgenerationally inherited through the paternal lineage, possibly via non-genomic signals derived from the sperm. To investigate how paternal stress might influence offspring behavioral phenotypes, a model of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis dysregulation was used. Male breeders were administered water supplemented with corticosterone (CORT) for 4 weeks before mating with untreated female mice. Female, but not male, F1 offspring of CORT-treated fathers displayed altered fear extinction at 2 weeks of age. Only male F1 offspring exhibited altered patterns of ultrasonic vocalization at postnatal day 3 and, as adults, showed decreased time in open on the elevated-plus maze and time in light on the light–dark apparatus, suggesting a hyperanxiety-like behavioral phenotype due to paternal CORT treatment. Interestingly, expression of the paternally imprinted gene Igf2 was increased in the hippocampus of F1 male offspring but downregulated in female offspring. Male and female F2 offspring displayed increased time spent in the open arm of the elevated-plus maze, suggesting lower levels of anxiety compared with control animals. Only male F2 offspring showed increased immobility time on the forced-swim test and increased latency to feed on the novelty-supressed feeding test, suggesting a depression-like phenotype in these animals. Collectively, these data provide evidence that paternal CORT treatment alters anxiety and depression-related behaviors across multiple generations. Analysis of the small RNA profile in sperm from CORT-treated males revealed marked effects on the expression of small noncoding RNAs. Sperm from CORT-treated males contained elevated levels of three microRNAs, miR-98, miR-144 and miR-190b, which are predicted to interact with multiple growth factors, including Igf2 and Bdnf. Sustained elevation of glucocorticoids is therefore involved in the transmission of

  13. Histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hsiu-Fang; Liu, Zi-Ning; Chow, Sih-Yao; Lu, Yi-Han; Li, Hsin

    2015-01-01

    A huge amount of information is stored in genomic DNA and this stored information resides inside the nucleus with the aid of chromosomal condensation factors. It has been reported that the repeat nucleosome core particle (NCP) consists of 147-bp of DNA and two copies of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4. Regulation of chromosomal structure is important to many processes inside the cell. In vivo, a group of histone chaperones facilitate and regulate nucleosome assembly. How NCPs are constructed with the aid of histone chaperones remains unclear. In this study, the histone chaperone-mediated nucleosome assembly process was investigated using single-molecule tethered particle motion (TPM) experiments. It was found that Asf1 is able to exert more influence than Nap1 and poly glutamate acid (PGA) on the nucleosome formation process, which highlights Asf1's specific role in tetrasome formation. Thermodynamic parameters supported a model whereby energetically favored nucleosomal complexes compete with non-nucleosomal complexes. In addition, our kinetic findings propose the model that histone chaperones mediate nucleosome assembly along a path that leads to enthalpy-favored products with free histones as reaction substrates.

  14. DNA-histone interactions in nucleosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Van Holde, K.E.; Allen, J.R.; Tatchell, K.; Weischet, W.O.; Lohr, D.

    1980-10-01

    We have utilized micrococcal nuclease digestion and thermal denaturation studies to investigate the binding of DNA to the histone core of the nucleosome. We conclude that a total of approx. 168 base pairs (bp) of DNA can interact with the histone core under appropriate solution conditions, even in the absence of lysine-rich histones. The interactions in this total length of DNA can be divided into three classes: (a) approx. 22 bp at the ends is bound only at moderate ionic strength. It is easily displaced, and its removal yields the 146 bp core particle; (b) approx. 46 bp near the ends of the core DNA are quite weakly bound to the core, and are displaced at quite moderate temperatures; (c) the remaining central 100 bp are strongly bound, and interact with all of the sites on the histones which strongly protect DNA against DNAse I digestion. A theoretical analysis of the cleavage of nucleosomal DNA by DNAse I has been used to develop evidence that the pattern of protection offered by the histone core is very similar in nuclei to that in isolated core particles.

  15. The role of histone ubiquitination during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Kai; Liang, Xiaotong; Huang, Sizhou; Xu, Wenming

    2014-01-01

    Protein ubiquitin-proteasome (ubiquitin-proteasome) system is the major mechanism responsible for protein degradation in eukaryotic cell. During spermatogenesis, the replacement of histone by protamine is vital for normal sperm formation, which is involved in ubiquitination enzymes expressed in testis. Recently, histone ubiquitin ligases have been shown to play critical roles in several aspects of spermatogenesis, such as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), DNA damage response, and spermiogenesis. In this review, we highlight recent progress in the discovery of several histone ubiquitin ligases and elaborate mechanisms of how these enzymes are involved in these processes through knockout mouse model. Using Huwe1, UBR2, and RNF8 as examples, we emphasized the diverse functions for each enzyme and the broad involvement of these enzymes in every stage, from spermatogonia differentiation and meiotic division to spermiogenesis; thus histone ubiquitin ligases represent a class of enzymes, which play important roles in spermatogenesis through targeting histone for ubiquitination and therefore are involved in transcription regulation, epigenetic modification, and other processes essential for normal gametes formation.

  16. Epigenetic Modifications of Histones in Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, M D; Jiao, Y; Larsson, L; Almeida, L O; Garaicoa-Pazmino, C; Le, J M; Squarize, C H; Inohara, N; Giannobile, W V; Castilho, R M

    2016-02-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease driven by dysbiosis, an imbalance between commensal bacteria and the host organism. Periodontitis is a leading cause of tooth loss in adults and occurs in about 50% of the US population. In addition to the clinical challenges associated with treating periodontitis, the progression and chronic nature of this disease seriously affect human health. Emerging evidence suggests that periodontitis is associated with mechanisms beyond bacteria-induced protein and tissue degradation. Here, we hypothesize that bacteria are able to induce epigenetic modifications in oral epithelial cells mediated by histone modifications. In this study, we found that dysbiosis in vivo led to epigenetic modifications, including acetylation of histones and downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1. In addition, in vitro exposure of oral epithelial cells to lipopolysaccharides resulted in histone modifications, activation of transcriptional coactivators, such as p300/CBP, and accumulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Given that oral epithelial cells are the first line of defense for the periodontium against bacteria, we also evaluated whether activation of pathogen recognition receptors induced histone modifications. We found that activation of the Toll-like receptors 1, 2, and 4 and the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 1 induced histone acetylation in oral epithelial cells. Our findings corroborate the emerging concept that epigenetic modifications play a role in the development of periodontitis.

  17. Histone modifications are associated with the persistence or silencing of vector-mediated transgene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Riu, Efren; Chen, Zhi-Ying; Xu, Hui; He, Chen-Yi; Kay, Mark A

    2007-07-01

    One of the major obstacles to success in non-viral gene therapy is transcriptional silencing of the DNA vector. The mechanisms underlying gene silencing/repression in mammalian cells are complex and remain unclear. Because changes in chromatin structure and, in particular, histone modifications are involved in transcriptional regulation of endogenous genes, we hypothesized that changes in the pattern of histone modifications were related to the observed transcriptional silencing of exogenous DNA vectors. We used antibodies against specific modified histones to perform chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses on liver lysates from mice transfected with two types of plasmids: (i) DNA minicircles (MCs) devoid of bacterial plasmid backbone DNA, which showed marked persistence of transgene expression, and (ii) their parental plasmids, which were silenced over time. Silencing of the transgene from the parental vectors was accompanied by an increase in heterochromatin-associated histone modifications and a decrease in modifications typically associated with euchromatin. Conversely, the pattern of histone modifications on the MC DNA was consistent with euchromatin. Our data indicates that (i) episomal vectors undergo chromatinization in vivo, and (ii) both persistence and silencing of transgene expression are associated with specific histone modifications.

  18. Drawbacks in the use of unconventional hydrophobic anhydrides for histone derivatization in bottom-up proteomics PTM analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sidoli, Simone; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lin, Shu; Karch, Kelly; Wang, Xiaoshi; Bhanu, Natarajan; Arnaudo, Anna M.; Britton, Laura-Mae; Cao, Xing-Jun; Gonzales-Cope, Michelle; Han, Yumiao; Liu, Shichong; Molden, Rosalynn C.; Wein, Samuel; Afjehi-Sadat, Leila; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics has become the most utilized tool to characterize histone post-translational modifications (PTMs). Since histones are highly enriched in lysine and arginine residues, lysine derivatization has been developed to prevent the generation of short peptides (3-6 residues) during trypsin digestion. One of the most adopted protocols applies propionic anhydride for derivatization. However, the propionyl group is not sufficiently hydrophobic to fully retain the shortest histone peptides in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, and such procedure also hampers the discovery of natural propionylation events. In this work we tested 12 commercially available anhydrides, selected based on their safety and hydrophobicity. Performance was evaluated in terms of yield of the reaction, MS/MS fragmentation efficiency and drift in retention time by using the following samples: (i) a synthetic unmodified histone H3 tail, (ii) synthetic modified histone peptides and (iii) a histone extract from cell lysate. Results highlighted that 7 of the selected anhydrides increased peptide retention time as compared to propionic, and several anhydrides such as benzoic and valeric led to high MS/MS spectra quality. However, propionic anhydride derivatization still resulted in our opinion as the best protocol to achieve high MS sensitivity and more even ionization efficiency among the analyzed peptides. PMID:25641854

  19. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors (HDACi) Cause the Selective Depletion of Bromodomain Containing Proteins (BCPs).

    PubMed

    Mackmull, Marie-Therese; Iskar, Murat; Parca, Luca; Singer, Stephan; Bork, Peer; Ori, Alessandro; Beck, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and acetyltransferases control the epigenetic regulation of gene expression through modification of histone marks. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) are small molecules that interfere with histone tail modification, thus altering chromatin structure and epigenetically controlled pathways. They promote apoptosis in proliferating cells and are promising anticancer drugs. While some HDACi have already been approved for therapy and others are in different phases of clinical trials, the exact mechanism of action of this drug class remains elusive. Previous studies have shown that HDACis cause massive changes in chromatin structure but only moderate changes in gene expression. To what extent these changes manifest at the protein level has never been investigated on a proteome-wide scale. Here, we have studied HDACi-treated cells by large-scale mass spectrometry based proteomics. We show that HDACi treatment affects primarily the nuclear proteome and induces a selective decrease of bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs), the main readers of acetylated histone marks. By combining time-resolved proteome and transcriptome profiling, we show that BCPs are affected at the protein level as early as 12 h after HDACi treatment and that their abundance is regulated by a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms. Using gene silencing, we demonstrate that the decreased abundance of BCPs is sufficient to mediate important transcriptional changes induced by HDACi. Our data reveal a new aspect of the mechanism of action of HDACi that is mediated by an interplay between histone acetylation and the abundance of BCPs. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001660 and NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus with identifier GSE64689.

  20. DNA, histones and neutrophil extracellular traps exert anti-fibrinolytic effects in a plasma environment.

    PubMed

    Varjú, Imre; Longstaff, Colin; Szabó, László; Farkas, Ádám Zoltán; Varga-Szabó, Veronika Judit; Tanka-Salamon, Anna; Machovich, Raymund; Kolev, Krasimir

    2015-06-01

    In response to various inflammatory stimuli, neutrophils secrete neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), web-like meshworks of DNA, histones and granular components forming supplementary scaffolds in venous and arterial thrombi. Isolated DNA and histones are known to promote thrombus formation and render fibrin clots more resistant to mechanical forces and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA)-induced enzymatic digestion. The present study extends our earlier observations to a physiologically more relevant environment including plasma clots and NET-forming neutrophils. A range of techniques was employed including imaging (scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser microscopy, and photoscanning of macroscopic lysis fronts), clot permeability measurements, turbidimetric lysis and enzyme inactivation assays. Addition of DNA and histones increased the median fibre diameter of plasma clots formed with 16 nM thrombin from 108 to 121 and 119 nm, respectively, and decreased their permeability constant from 6.4 to 3.1 and 3.7×10(-9) cm(2). Histones effectively protected thrombin from antithrombin-induced inactivation, while DNA inhibited plasminogen activation on the surface of plasma clots and their plasmin-induced resolution by 20 and 40 %, respectively. DNA and histones, as well as NETs secreted by phorbol-myristate-acetate-activated neutrophils, slowed down the tPA-driven lysis of plasma clots and the latter effect could be reversed by the addition of DNase (streptodornase). SEM images taken after complete digestion of fibrin in NET-containing plasma clots evidenced retained NET scaffold that was absent in DNase-treated clots. Our results show that DNA and histones alter the fibrin architecture in plasma clots, while NETs contribute to a decreased lytic susceptibility that can be overcome by DNase.

  1. Molecular morphology and function of bull spermatozoa linked to histones and associated with fertility.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Rodrigo V; Dogan, Sule; Belser, Lauren E; Kaya, Abdullah; Topper, Einko; Moura, Arlindo; Thibaudeau, Giselle; Memili, Erdogan

    2013-09-01

    Sub-par fertility in bulls is influenced by alterations in sperm chromatin, and it might not be solved with increased sperm concentration in artificial insemination. Appropriate histone retention during sperm chromatin condensation plays critical roles in male fertility. The objective of this study was to determine failures of sperm chromatin condensation associated with abnormal persistence or accessibility of histones by aniline blue (ANBL) test, expression levels, and cellular localizations of one variant and two core histones (H3.3, H2B, and H4 respectively) in the spermatozoa of low-fertility (LF) vs high-fertility (HF) bulls. The expression levels and cellular localizations of histones in spermatozoa were studied using immunoblotting, immunocytochemistry, and staining methods. The bioinformatics focused on the sequence identity and evolutionary distance of these proteins among three mammalian species: bovine, mouse, and human. We demonstrated that ANBL staining was different within the LF (1.73 (0.55, 0.19)) and HF (0.67 (0.17, 0.06)) groups (P<0.0001), which was also negatively correlated with in vivo bull fertility (r=-0.90, P<0.0001). Although these histones were consistently detectable and specifically localized in bull sperm cells, they were not different between the two groups. Except H2B variants, H3.3 and H4 showed 100% identity and were evolutionarily conserved in bulls, mice and humans. The H2B variants were more conserved between bulls and humans, than in mice. In conclusion, we showed that H2B, H3.3, and H4 were detectable in bull spermatozoa and that sperm chromatin condensation status, changed by histone retention, is related to bull fertility.

  2. Zygote injection of CRISPR/Cas9 RNA successfully modifies the target gene without delaying blastocyst development or altering the sex ratio in pigs.

    PubMed

    Whitworth, Kristin M; Benne, Joshua A; Spate, Lee D; Murphy, Stephanie L; Samuel, Melissa S; Murphy, Clifton N; Richt, Jürgen A; Walters, Eric; Prather, Randall S; Wells, Kevin D

    2017-02-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing tool has increased the efficiency of creating genetically modified pigs for use as biomedical or agricultural models. The objectives were to determine if DNA editing resulted in a delay in development to the blastocyst stage or in a skewing of the sex ratio. Six DNA templates (gBlocks) that were designed to express guide RNAs that target the transmembrane protease, serine S1, member 2 (TMPRSS2) gene were in vitro transcribed. Pairs of CRISPR guide RNAs that flanked the start codon and polyadenylated Cas9 were co-injected into the cytoplasm of zygotes and cultured in vitro to the blastocyst stage. Blastocysts were collected as they formed on days 5, 6 or 7. PCR was performed to determine genotype and sex of each embryo. Separately, embryos were surgically transferred into recipient gilts on day 4 of estrus. The rate of blastocyst development was not significantly different between CRISPR injection embryos or the non-injected controls at day 5, 6 or 7 (p = 0.36, 0.09, 0.63, respectively). Injection of three CRISPR sets of guides resulted in a detectable INDEL in 92-100 % of the embryos analyzed. There was not a difference in the number of edits or sex ratio of male to female embryos when compared between days 5, 6 and 7 to the controls (p > 0.22, >0.85). There were 12 resulting piglets and all 12 had biallelic edits of TMRPSS2. Zygote injection with CRISPR/Cas9 continues to be a highly efficient tool to genetically modify pig embryos.

  3. Analyses of Histone Proteoforms Using Front-end Electron Transfer Dissociation-enabled Orbitrap Instruments*

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Lissa C.; Karch, Kelly R.; Ugrin, Scott A.; Coradin, Mariel; English, A. Michelle; Sidoli, Simone; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Hunt, Donald F.

    2016-01-01

    Histones represent a class of proteins ideally suited to analyses by top-down mass spectrometry due to their relatively small size, the high electron transfer dissociation-compatible charge states they exhibit, and the potential to gain valuable information concerning combinatorial post-translational modifications and variants. We recently described new methods in mass spectrometry for the acquisition of high-quality MS/MS spectra of intact proteins (Anderson, L. C., English, A. M., Wang, W., Bai, D. L., Shabanowitz, J., and Hunt, D. F. (2015) Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 377, 617–624). Here, we report an extension of these techniques. Sequential ion/ion reactions carried out in a modified Orbitrap Velos Pro/EliteTM capable of multiple fragment ion fills of the C-trap, in combination with data-dependent and targeted HPLC-MS experiments, were used to obtain high resolution MS/MS spectra of histones from butyrate-treated HeLa cells. These spectra were used to identify several unique intact histone proteoforms with up to 81% sequence coverage. We also demonstrate that parallel ion parking during ion/ion proton transfer reactions can be used to separate species of overlapping m/z that are not separated chromatographically, revealing previously indiscernible signals. Finally, we characterized several truncated forms of H2A and H2B found within the histone fractions analyzed, achieving up to 93% sequence coverage by electron transfer dissociation MS/MS. Results of follow-up in vitro experiments suggest that some of the truncated histone H2A proteoforms we observed can be generated by cathepsin L, an enzyme known to also catalyze clipping of histone H3. PMID:26785730

  4. Preferential occupancy of histone variant H2AZ at inactive promoters influences local histone modifications and chromatin remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Pattenden, Samantha G.; Lee, Daeyoup; Gutiérrez, José; Chen, Jie; Seidel, Chris; Gerton, Jennifer; Workman, Jerry L.

    2005-01-01

    The yeast histone variant H2AZ (Htz1) is implicated in transcription activation, prevention of the ectopic spread of heterochromatin, and genome integrity. Our genome-wide localization analysis revealed that Htz1 is widely, but nonrandomly, distributed throughout the genome in an SWR1-dependent manner. We found that Htz1 is enriched in intergenic regions compared with coding regions. Its occupancy is inversely proportional to transcription rates and the enrichment of the RNA polymerase II under different growth conditions. However, Htz1 does not seem to directly regulate transcription repression genome-wide; instead, the presence of Htz1 under the inactivated condition is essential for optimal activation of a subset of genes. In addition, Htz1 is not generally responsible for nucleosome positioning, even at those promoters where Htz1 is highly enriched. Finally, using a biochemical approach, we demonstrate that incorporation of Htz1 into nucleosomes inhibits activities of histone modifiers associated with transcription, Dot1, Set2, and NuA4 and reduces the nucleosome mobilization driven by chromatin remodeling complexes. These lines of evidence collectively suggest that Htz1 may serve to mark quiescent promoters for proper activation. PMID:16344463

  5. Acetylation of retinal histones in diabetes increases inflammatory proteins: effects of minocycline and manipulation of histone acetyltransferase (HAT) and histone deacetylase (HDAC).

    PubMed

    Kadiyala, Chandra Sekhar Rao; Zheng, Ling; Du, Yunpeng; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Kao, Hung-Ying; Miyagi, Masaru; Kern, Timothy S

    2012-07-27

    Histone acetylation was significantly increased in retinas from diabetic rats, and this acetylation was inhibited in diabetics treated with minocycline, a drug known to inhibit early diabetic retinopathy in animals. Histone acetylation and expression of inflammatory proteins that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic retinopathy were increased likewise in cultured retinal Müller glia grown in a diabetes-like concentration of glucose. Both the acetylation and induction of the inflammatory proteins in elevated glucose levels were significantly inhibited by inhibitors of histone acetyltransferase (garcinol and antisense against the histone acetylase, p300) or activators of histone deacetylase (theophylline and resveratrol) and were increased by the histone deacetylase inhibitor, suberolylanilide hydroxamic acid. We conclude that hyperglycemia causes acetylation of retinal histones (and probably other proteins) and that the acetylation contributes to the hyperglycemia-induced up-regulation of proinflammatory proteins and thereby to the development of diabetic retinopathy.

  6. Arsenic Trioxide Reduces Global Histone H4 Acetylation at Lysine 16 through Direct Binding to Histone Acetyltransferase hMOF in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Da; Wu, Donglu; Zhao, Linhong; Yang, Yang; Ding, Jian; Dong, Liguo; Hu, Lianghai; Wang, Fei; Zhao, Xiaoming; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modification heritably regulates gene expression involved in most cellular biological processes. Experimental studies suggest that alteration of histone modifications affects gene expression by changing chromatin structure, causing various cellular responses to environmental influences. Arsenic (As), a naturally occurring element and environmental pollutant, is an established human carcinogen. Recently, increasing evidence suggests that As-mediated epigenetic mechanisms may be involved in its toxicity and carcinogenicity, but how this occurs is still unclear. Here we present evidence that suggests As-induced global histone H4K16 acetylation (H4K16ac) partly due to the direct physical interaction between As and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) hMOF (human male absent on first) protein, leading to the loss of hMOF HAT activity. Our data show that decreased global H4K16ac and increased deacetyltransferase HDAC4 expression occurred in arsenic trioxide (As2O3)-exposed HeLa or HEK293T cells. However, depletion of HDAC4 did not affect global H4K16ac, and it could not raise H4K16ac in cells exposed to As2O3, suggesting that HDAC4 might not directly be involved in histone H4K16 de-acetylation. Using As-immobilized agarose, we confirmed that As binds directly to hMOF, and that this interaction was competitively inhibited by free As2O3. Also, the direct interaction of As and C2CH zinc finger peptide was verified by MAIDI-TOF mass and UV absorption. In an in vitro HAT assay, As2O3 directly inhibited hMOF activity. hMOF over-expression not only increased resistance to As and caused less toxicity, but also effectively reversed reduced H4K16ac caused by As exposure. These data suggest a theoretical basis for elucidating the mechanism of As toxicity. PMID:26473953

  7. The Cajal Body and Histone Locus Body

    PubMed Central

    Nizami, Zehra; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear organelle present in all eukaryotes that have been carefully studied. It is identified by the signature protein coilin and by CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). CBs contain high concentrations of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and other RNA processing factors, suggesting that they are sites for assembly and/or posttranscriptional modification of the splicing machinery of the nucleus. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors required for processing histone pre-mRNAs. As its name implies, the HLB is associated with the genes that code for histones, suggesting that it may function to concentrate processing factors at their site of action. CBs and HLBs are present throughout the interphase of the cell cycle, but disappear during mitosis. The biogenesis of CBs shows the features of a self-organizing structure. PMID:20504965

  8. H1 histones: current perspectives and challenges.

    PubMed

    Harshman, Sean W; Young, Nicolas L; Parthun, Mark R; Freitas, Michael A

    2013-11-01

    H1 and related linker histones are important both for maintenance of higher-order chromatin structure and for the regulation of gene expression. The biology of the linker histones is complex, as they are evolutionarily variable, exist in multiple isoforms and undergo a large variety of posttranslational modifications in their long, unstructured, NH2- and COOH-terminal tails. We review recent progress in understanding the structure, genetics and posttranslational modifications of linker histones, with an emphasis on the dynamic interactions of these proteins with DNA and transcriptional regulators. We also discuss various experimental challenges to the study of H1 and related proteins, including limitations of immunological reagents and practical difficulties in the analysis of posttranslational modifications by mass spectrometry.

  9. Antifungal properties of wheat histones (H1-H4) and purified wheat histone H1.

    PubMed

    De Lucca, Anthony J; Heden, Lars-Olof; Ingber, Bruce; Bhatnagar, Deepak

    2011-07-13

    Wheat ( Triticum spp.) histones H1, H2, H3, and H4 were extracted, and H1 was further purified. The effect of these histones on specific fungi that may or may not be pathogenic to wheat was determined. These fungi included Aspergillus flavus , Aspergillus fumigatus , Aspergillus niger , Fusarium oxysporum , Fusarium verticillioides , Fusarium solani , Fusarium graminearum , Penicillium digitatum , Penicillium italicum , and Greeneria uvicola . Non-germinated and germinating conidia of these fungi were bioassayed separately. The non-germinated and germinating conidia of all Fusarium species were highly susceptible to the mixture (H1-H4) as well as pure H1, with viability losses of 99-100% found to be significant (p < 0.001) at ≤10 μM or less for the histone mixture and pure H1. F. graminearum was the most sensitive to histone activity. The histones were inactive against all of the non-germinated Penicillium spp. conidia. However, they significantly reduced the viability of the germinating conidia of the Penicillium spp. conidia, with 95% loss at 2.5 μM. Non-germinated and germinating conidia viability of the Aspergillus spp. and G. uvicola were unaffected when exposed to histones up to 10 μM. Results indicate that Fusarium spp. pathogenic to wheat are susceptible to wheat histones, indicating that these proteins may be a resistance mechanism in wheat against fungal infection.

  10. Histone H1.2 is a substrate for denitrase, an activity that reduces nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Yasuyuki; Saeki, Makio; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Several reports have described an activity that modifies nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and their immunoreactivity to nitrotyrosine Abs. Without knowing the product of the reaction, this new activity has been called a “denitrase.” In those studies, some nonspecific proteins, which have multiple tyrosine residues, e.g., albumin, were used as a substrate. Therefore, the studies were based on an unknown mechanism of reaction and potentially a high background. To solve these problems, one of the most important things is to find a more suitable substrate for assay of the enzyme. We developed an assay strategy for determining the substrate for denitrase combining 2D-gel electrophoresis and an on-blot enzyme assay. The resulting substrate from RAW 264.7 cells was Histone H1.2, an isoform protein of linker histone. Histone H1.2 has only one tyrosine residue in the entire molecule, which ensures the exact position of the substrate to be involved. It has been reported that Histones are the most prominent nitrated proteins in cancer tissues. It was also demonstrated that tyrosine nitration of Histone H1 occurs in vivo. These findings lead us to the idea that Histone H1.2 might be an intrinsic substrate for denitrase. We nitrated recombinant and purified Histone H1.2 chemically and subjected it to an on-blot enzyme assay to characterize the activity. Denitrase activity behaved as an enzymatic activity because the reaction was time dependent and was destroyed by heat or trypsin treatment. The activity was shown to be specific for Histone H1.2, to differ from proteasome activity, and to require no additional cofactors. PMID:12719531

  11. HistoneDB 2.0: a histone database with variants—an integrated resource to explore histones and their variants

    PubMed Central

    Draizen, Eli J.; Shaytan, Alexey K.; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Talbert, Paul B.; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Compaction of DNA into chromatin is a characteristic feature of eukaryotic organisms. The core (H2A, H2B, H3, H4) and linker (H1) histone proteins are responsible for this compaction through the formation of nucleosomes and higher order chromatin aggregates. Moreover, histones are intricately involved in chromatin functioning and provide a means for genome dynamic regulation through specific histone variants and histone post-translational modifications. ‘HistoneDB 2.0 – with variants’ is a comprehensive database of histone protein sequences, classified by histone types and variants. All entries in the database are supplemented by rich sequence and structural annotations with many interactive tools to explore and compare sequences of different variants from various organisms. The core of the database is a manually curated set of histone sequences grouped into 30 different variant subsets with variant-specific annotations. The curated set is supplemented by an automatically extracted set of histone sequences from the non-redundant protein database using algorithms trained on the curated set. The interactive web site supports various searching strategies in both datasets: browsing of phylogenetic trees; on-demand generation of multiple sequence alignments with feature annotations; classification of histone-like sequences and browsing of the taxonomic diversity for every histone variant. HistoneDB 2.0 is a resource for the interactive comparative analysis of histone protein sequences and their implications for chromatin function. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/HistoneDB2.0 PMID:26989147

  12. Defective histone supply causes changes in RNA polymerase II elongation rate and cotranscriptional pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Payán-Bravo, Laura; Muñoz-Cabello, Ana M; Guijo, Macarena; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Prado, Félix; Reyes, José C

    2015-12-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription elongation is a highly regulated process that greatly influences mRNA levels as well as pre-mRNA splicing. Despite many studies in vitro, how chromatin modulates RNAPII elongation in vivo is still unclear. Here, we show that a decrease in the level of available canonical histones leads to more accessible chromatin with decreased levels of canonical histones and variants H2A.X and H2A.Z and increased levels of H3.3. With this altered chromatin structure, the RNAPII elongation rate increases, and the kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing is delayed with respect to RNAPII elongation. Consistent with the kinetic model of cotranscriptional splicing, the rapid RNAPII elongation induced by histone depletion promotes the skipping of variable exons in the CD44 gene. Indeed, a slowly elongating mutant of RNAPII was able to rescue this defect, indicating that the defective splicing induced by histone depletion is a direct consequence of the increased elongation rate. In addition, genome-wide analysis evidenced that histone reduction promotes widespread alterations in pre-mRNA processing, including intron retention and changes in alternative splicing. Our data demonstrate that pre-mRNA splicing may be regulated by chromatin structure through the modulation of the RNAPII elongation rate.

  13. Defective histone supply causes changes in RNA polymerase II elongation rate and cotranscriptional pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Payán-Bravo, Laura; Muñoz-Cabello, Ana M.; Guijo, Macarena; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Prado, Félix; Reyes, José C.

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription elongation is a highly regulated process that greatly influences mRNA levels as well as pre-mRNA splicing. Despite many studies in vitro, how chromatin modulates RNAPII elongation in vivo is still unclear. Here, we show that a decrease in the level of available canonical histones leads to more accessible chromatin with decreased levels of canonical histones and variants H2A.X and H2A.Z and increased levels of H3.3. With this altered chromatin structure, the RNAPII elongation rate increases, and the kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing is delayed with respect to RNAPII elongation. Consistent with the kinetic model of cotranscriptional splicing, the rapid RNAPII elongation induced by histone depletion promotes the skipping of variable exons in the CD44 gene. Indeed, a slowly elongating mutant of RNAPII was able to rescue this defect, indicating that the defective splicing induced by histone depletion is a direct consequence of the increased elongation rate. In addition, genome-wide analysis evidenced that histone reduction promotes widespread alterations in pre-mRNA processing, including intron retention and changes in alternative splicing. Our data demonstrate that pre-mRNA splicing may be regulated by chromatin structure through the modulation of the RNAPII elongation rate. PMID:26578803

  14. Modeling the dynamics of bivalent histone modifications.

    PubMed

    Ku, Wai Lim; Girvan, Michelle; Yuan, Guo-Cheng; Sorrentino, Francesco; Ott, Edward

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications to histones may promote either activation or repression of the transcription of nearby genes. Recent experimental studies show that the promoters of many lineage-control genes in stem cells have "bivalent domains" in which the nucleosomes contain both active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K27me3) marks. It is generally agreed that bivalent domains play an important role in stem cell differentiation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here we formulate a mathematical model to investigate the dynamic properties of histone modification patterns. We then illustrate that our modeling framework can be used to capture key features of experimentally observed combinatorial chromatin states.

  15. Histone deacetylases: Targets for antifungal drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kmetzsch, Livia

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of pathogens and its hosts causes a drastic change in the transcriptional landscape in both cells. Among the several mechanisms of gene regulation, transcriptional initiation is probably the main point. In such scenario, the access of transcriptional machinery to promoter is highly regulated by post-translational modification of histones, such as acetylation, phosphorylation and others. Inhibition of histone deacetylases is able to reduce fungal pathogens fitness during infection and, therefore, is currently being considered for the development of new antifungal therapy strategies. PMID:26151486

  16. Regulation and function of histone acetyltransferase MOF.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Han, Xiaofei; Guan, Jingyun; Li, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    The mammalian MOF (male absent on the first), a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2, and Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs), is the major enzyme that catalyzes the acetylation of histone H4 on lysine 16. Acetylation of K16 is a prevalent mark associated with chromatin decondensation. MOF has recently been shown to play an essential role in maintaining normal cell functions. In this study, we discuss the important roles of MOF in DNA damage repair, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. We also analyze the role of MOF as a key regulator of the core transcriptional network of embryonic stem cells.

  17. Altered excretion of modified nucleosides and beta-aminoisobutyric acid in subjects with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or at risk for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Borek, E; Sharma, O K; Buschman, F L; Cohn, D L; Penley, K A; Judson, F N; Dobozin, B S; Horsburgh, C R; Kirkpatrick, C H

    1986-05-01

    Urinary excretion of modified nucleosides and beta-aminoisobutyric acid, subsequently referred to as markers, was determined in populations of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or at risk for development of AIDS. Our results show that asymptomatic adult male homosexuals excreted elevated amounts of markers as compared to male heterosexuals. This aberrant excretion was more pronounced in asymptomatic adult male homosexuals with antibodies to HTLV-III. Significantly greater excretion of 1-methylinosine, N4-acetylcytidine, and N2-methylguanosine was observed in asymptomatic adult male homosexuals with antibodies to HTLV-III than in asymptomatic male homosexuals without antibodies to HTLV-III. Increased amounts of markers were also excreted by subjects with the generalized or chronic lymphadenopathy syndrome, AIDS related complex (ARC), or AIDS. In these subjects, the most pronounced differences between groups were between subjects with chronic lymphadenopathy syndrome and those with ARC; subjects with ARC excreted greater amounts of seven of the ten urinary markers. There were few differences between subjects with ARC and those with AIDS, Kaposi's sarcoma, or AIDS with opportunistic infections. This observation may be useful for identifying subjects who are at risk of developing AIDS. A prospective study to test this hypothesis is under way.

  18. A gamma 2(R43Q) mutation, linked to epilepsy in humans, alters GABAA receptor assembly and modifies subunit composition on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Frugier, Guillaume; Coussen, Françoise; Giraud, Marie-France; Odessa, Marie-Françoise; Emerit, Michel B; Boué-Grabot, Eric; Garret, Maurice

    2007-02-09

    Genetic defects leading to epilepsy have been identified in gamma2 GABA(A) receptor subunit. A gamma2(R43Q) substitution is linked to childhood absence epilepsy and febrile seizure, and a gamma2(K289M) mutation is associated with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus. To understand the effect of these mutations, surface targeting of GABA(A) receptors was analyzed by subunit-specific immunofluorescent labeling of living cells. We first transfected hippocampal neurons in culture with recombinant gamma2 constructs and showed that the gamma 2(R43Q) mutation prevented surface expression of the subunit, unlike gamma2(K289M) substitution. Several gamma2-subunit constructs, bearing point mutations within the Arg-43 domain, were expressed in COS-7 cells with alpha3- and beta3-subunits. R43Q and R43A substitutions dramatically reduced surface expression of the gamma2-subunit, whereas R43K, P44A, and D39A substitutions had a lesser, but still significant, impact and K289M substitution had no effect. Whereas the mutant gamma2(R43Q) was retained within intracellular compartments, alphabeta complexes were still targeted at the cell membrane. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that gamma2(R43Q) was able to associate with alpha3- or beta3-subunits, although the stoichiometry of the complex with alpha3 was altered. Our data show that gamma2(R43Q) is not a dominant negative and that the mutation leads to a modification of GABA(A) receptor subunit composition on the cell surface that impairs the synaptic targeting in neurons. This study reveals an involvement of the gamma2-Arg-43 domain in the control of receptor assembly that may be relevant to the effect of the heterozygous gamma2(R43Q) mutation leading to childhood absence epilepsy and febrile seizure.

  19. Application of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to interrogate alterations in the proteome of genetically modified crops. 1. Assessing analytical validation.

    PubMed

    Ruebelt, Martin C; Leimgruber, Nancy K; Lipp, Markus; Reynolds, Tracey L; Nemeth, Margaret A; Astwood, James D; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Jany, Klaus-Dieter

    2006-03-22

    Current tools used to assess the safety of food and feed derived from modern biotechnology emphasize the investigation of possible unintended effects caused directly by the expression of transgenes or indirectly by pleiotropy. These tools include extensive multisite and multiyear agronomic evaluations, compositional analyses, animal nutrition, and classical toxicology evaluations. Because analytical technologies are rapidly developing, proteome analysis based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE) was investigated as a complementary tool to the existing technologies. A 2DE method was established for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the seed proteome of Arabidopsis thaliana with the following validation parameters examined: (1) source and scope of variation; (2) repeatability; (3) sensitivity; and (4) linearity of the method. The 2DE method resolves proteins with isoelectric points between 4 and 9 and molecular masses (MM) of 6-120 kDa and is sensitive enough to detect protein levels in the low nanogram range. The separation of the proteins was demonstrated to be very reliable with relative position variations of 1.7 and 1.1% for the pI and MM directions, respectively. The mean coefficient of variation of 254 matched spot qualities was found to be 24.8% for the gel-to-gel and 26% for the overall variability. A linear relationship (R2 > 0.9) between protein amount and spot volume was demonstrated over a 100-fold range for the majority of selected proteins. Therefore, this method could be used to interrogate proteome alterations such as a novel protein, fusion protein, or any other change that affects molecular mass, isoelectric point, and/or quantity of a protein.

  20. The histone chaperones Nap1 and Vps75 bind histones H3 and H4 in a tetrameric conformation.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Andrew; Ward, Richard; Wiechens, Nicola; Singh, Vijender; El-Mkami, Hassane; Norman, David George; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2011-02-18

    Histone chaperones physically interact with histones to direct proper assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes regulating diverse nuclear processes such as DNA replication, promoter remodeling, transcription elongation, DNA damage, and histone variant exchange. Currently, the best-characterized chaperone-histone interaction is that between the ubiquitous chaperone Asf1 and a dimer of H3 and H4. Nucleosome assembly proteins (Nap proteins) represent a distinct class of histone chaperone. Using pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR) measurements and protein crosslinking, we show that two members of this class, Nap1 and Vps75, bind histones in the tetrameric conformation also observed when they are sequestered within the nucleosome. Furthermore, H3 and H4 trapped in their tetrameric state can be used as substrates in nucleosome assembly and chaperone-mediated lysine acetylation. This alternate mode of histone interaction provides a potential means of maintaining the integrity of the histone tetramer during cycles of nucleosome reassembly.

  1. Circulating histones exacerbate inflammation in mice with acute liver failure.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zongmei; Liu, Yan; Li, Feng; Ren, Feng; Chen, Dexi; Li, Xiuhui; Wen, Tao

    2013-10-01

    Circulating histones are a newly recognized mediator implicated in various inflammatory diseases. It is likely that the release of histones, from dying hepatocytes or inflammatory leukocytes, into the circulation initiates and amplifies inflammation during the course of acute liver failure (ALF). In this study, we investigated a putative pathogenic role of circulating histones in a murine model of ALF induced by D-galactosamine (GalN) plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Hepatic function and histological indexes, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, hepatocyte apoptosis and the levels of circulating histone were measured in GalN/LPS-treated mice. GalN/LPS caused severe liver damage and a notable increase in plasma concentration of circulating histones. To further assess the role of circulating histones in our model, we administered exogenous histones and anti-histone H4 antibody. Notably, exogenous histones aggravated GalN/LPS-induced hepatotoxicity, whereas anti-histone antibody significantly protected mice. Circulating histones may serve as both a functional marker of ALF activity and as an inflammatory mediator contributing to the progression of ALF. Blockade of circulating histones shows potent protective effects, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for ALF.

  2. Human CRP defends against the toxicity of circulating histones.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Simon T; Zhang, Nan; Dart, Caroline; Wang, Susan Siyu; Thachil, Jecko; Guan, Yunyan; Wang, Guozheng; Toh, Cheng-Hock

    2013-09-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase protein that plays an important defensive role in innate immunity against bacterial infection, but it is also upregulated in many noninfectious diseases. The generic function of this highly conserved molecule in diseases that range from infection, inflammation, trauma, and malignancy is not well understood. In this article, we demonstrate that CRP defends the human body against the toxicity of histones released into the circulation after extensive cell death. In vitro, CRP significantly alleviates histone-induced endothelial cell damage, permeability increase, and platelet aggregation. In vivo, CRP rescues mice challenged with lethal doses of histones by inhibiting endothelial damage, vascular permeability, and coagulation activation, as reflected by significant reductions in lung edema, hemorrhage, and thrombosis. In patients, elevation of CRP significantly increases the capacity to neutralize extracellular histones in the circulation. We have also confirmed that CRP interacts with individual histones in vitro and forms CRP-histone complexes in serum from patients with both elevated CRP and histones. CRP is able to compete with phospholipid-containing liposomes for the binding to histones. This explains how CRP prevents histones from integrating into cell membranes, which would otherwise induce calcium influx as the major mechanism of cytotoxicity caused by extracellular histones. Because histone elevation occurs in the acute phase of numerous critical illnesses associated with extensive cell death, CRP detoxification of circulating histones would be a generic host defense mechanism in humans.

  3. Altered Expression of Raet1e, a Major Histocompatibility Complex Class 1–Like Molecule, Underlies the Atherosclerosis Modifier Locus Ath11 10b

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, José M.; Wolfrum, Susanne; Robblee, Megan; Chen, Kwan Y.; Gilbert, Zachary N.; Choi, Jae-Hoon; Teupser, Daniel; Breslow, Jan L.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Quantitative trait locus mapping of an intercross between C57.Apoe−/− and FVB.Apoe−/− mice revealed an atherosclerosis locus controlling aortic root lesion area on proximal chromosome 10, Ath11. In a previous work, subcongenic analysis showed Ath11 to be complex with proximal (10a) and distal (10b) regions. Objective To identify the causative genetic variation underlying the atherosclerosis modifier locus Ath11 10b. Methods and Results We now report subcongenic J, which narrows the 10b region to 5 genes, Myb, Hbs1L, Aldh8a1, Sgk1, and Raet1e. Sequence analysis of these genes revealed no amino acid coding differences between the parental strains. However, comparing aortic expression of these genes between F1.Apoe−/− Chr10SubJ(B/F) and F1.Apoe−/− Chr10SubJ(F/F) uncovered a consistent difference only for Raet1e, with decreased, virtually background, expression associated with increased atherosclerosis in the latter. The key role of Raet1e was confirmed by showing that transgene-induced aortic overexpression of Raet1e in F1.Apoe−/− Chr10SubJ(F/F) mice decreased atherosclerosis. Promoter reporter constructs comparing C57 and FVB sequences identified an FVB mutation in the core of the major aortic transcription start site abrogating activity. Conclusions This nonbiased approach has revealed Raet1e, a major histocompatibility complex class 1–like molecule expressed in lesional aortic endothelial cells and macrophage-rich regions, as a novel atherosclerosis gene and represents one of the few successes of the quantitative trait locus strategy in complex diseases. PMID:23948654

  4. Single-molecule dynamics reveal an altered conformation for the autoinhibitory domain of plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase bound to oxidatively modified calmodulin.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Kenneth D; Bartlett, Ryan K; Mandal, Abhijit; Zaidi, Asma; Urbauer, Ramona J Bieber; Urbauer, Jeffrey L; Galeva, Nadya; Williams, Todd D; Johnson, Carey K

    2004-10-12

    We used single-molecule polarization modulation methods to investigate the activation of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) by oxidized calmodulin (CaM). Oxidative modification of methionine residues of CaM to their corresponding sulfoxides is known to inhibit the ability of CaM to activate PMCA. Single-molecule polarization methods were used to measure the orientational mobility of fluorescently labeled oxidized CaM bound to PMCA. We previously identified two distinct populations of PMCA-CaM complexes characterized by high and low orientational mobilities, with the low-mobility population appearing at a subsaturating Ca(2+) concentration [Osborn, K. D., et al. (2004) Biophys. J. 87, 1892-1899]. We proposed that the high-mobility population corresponds to PMCA-CaM complexes with a dissociated (and mobile) autoinhibitory domain, whereas the low-mobility population corresponds to PMCA-CaM complexes where the autoinhibitory domain is not dissociated and therefore the enzyme is not active. In the present experiments, performed with PMCA complexed with oxidatively modified CaM at a saturating Ca(2+) concentration, we found a large population of molecules with an orientationally immobile autoinhibitory domain. In contrast, native CaM bound to PMCA was characterized almost entirely by the more orientationally mobile population at a similar Ca(2+) concentration. The addition of 1 mM ATP to complexes of oxidized CaM with PMCA reduced but did not abolish the low-mobility population. These results indicate that the decline in the ability of oxidized CaM to activate PMCA results at least in part from its reduced ability to induce conformational changes in PMCA that result in dissociation of the autoinhibitory domain after CaM binding.

  5. Diet and lifestyle factors modify immune/inflammation response genes to alter breast cancer risk and prognosis: The Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study

    PubMed Central

    Lundgreen, Abbie; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Wolff, Roger K.; Hines, Lisa; Baumgartner, Kathy; John, Esther M.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and toll-like receptors (TLR) are important mediators of inflammation. We examined 10 of these genes with respect to breast cancer risk and mortality in a genetically admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases, 1585 controls) women. Additionally, we explored if diet and lifestyle factors modified associations with these genes. Overall, these genes (collectively) were associated with breast cancer risk among women with >70% NA ancestry (PARTP = 0.0008), with TLR1 rs7696175 being the primary risk contributor (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.25, 2.51). Overall, TLR1 rs7696175 (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03, 1.91; Padj=0.032), TLR4 rs5030728 (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.30, 2.95; Padj=0.014), and TNFRSF1A rs4149578 (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.28, 5.76; Padj=0.029) were associated with increased breast cancer mortality. We observed several statistically significant interactions after adjustment for multiple comparisons, including interactions between our dietary oxidative balance score and CD40LG and TNFSF1A; between cigarette smoking and TLR1, TLR4, and TNF; between body mass index (BMI) among pre-menopausal women and TRAF2; and between regular use of aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TLR3 and TRA2. In conclusion, our findings support a contributing role of certain TNF-α and TLR genes in both breast cancer risk and survival, particularly among women with higher NA ancestry. Diet and lifestyle factors appear to be important mediators of the breast cancer risk associated with these genes. PMID:25332681

  6. Diet and lifestyle factors modify immune/inflammation response genes to alter breast cancer risk and prognosis: the Breast Cancer Health Disparities Study.

    PubMed

    Slattery, Martha L; Lundgreen, Abbie; Torres-Mejia, Gabriela; Wolff, Roger K; Hines, Lisa; Baumgartner, Kathy; John, Esther M

    2014-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF) and toll-like receptors (TLR) are important mediators of inflammation. We examined 10 of these genes with respect to breast cancer risk and mortality in a genetically admixed population of Hispanic/Native American (NA) (2111 cases, 2597 controls) and non-Hispanic white (NHW) (1481 cases, 1585 controls) women. Additionally, we explored if diet and lifestyle factors modified associations with these genes. Overall, these genes (collectively) were associated with breast cancer risk among women with >70% NA ancestry (P(ARTP) = 0.0008), with TLR1 rs7696175 being the primary risk contributor (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.25, 2.51). Overall, TLR1 rs7696175 (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.03, 1.91; P(adj) = 0.032), TLR4 rs5030728 (HR 1.96, 95% CI 1.30, 2.95; P(adj) = 0.014), and TNFRSF1A rs4149578 (HR 2.71, 95% CI 1.28, 5.76; P(adj) = 0.029) were associated with increased breast cancer mortality. We observed several statistically significant interactions after adjustment for multiple comparisons, including interactions between our dietary oxidative balance score and CD40LG and TNFSF1A; between cigarette smoking and TLR1, TLR4, and TNF; between body mass index (BMI) among pre-menopausal women and TRAF2; and between regular use of aspirin/non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and TLR3 and TRA2. In conclusion, our findings support a contributing role of certain TNF-α and TLR genes in both breast cancer risk and survival, particularly among women with higher NA ancestry. Diet and lifestyle factors appear to be important mediators of the breast cancer risk associated with these genes.

  7. Genome-wide identification of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) histone modification gene families and their expression analysis during the fruit development and fruit-blue mold infection process

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jidi; Xu, Haidan; Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Xia; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, histone acetylation and methylation have been known to be involved in regulating diverse developmental processes and plant defense. These histone modification events are controlled by a series of histone modification gene families. To date, there is no study regarding genome-wide characterization of histone modification related genes in citrus species. Based on the two recent sequenced sweet orange genome databases, a total of 136 CsHMs (Citrus sinensis histone modification genes), including 47 CsHMTs (histone methyltransferase genes), 23 CsHDMs (histone demethylase genes), 50 CsHATs (histone acetyltransferase genes), and 16 CsHDACs (histone deacetylase genes) were identified. These genes were categorized to 11 gene families. A comprehensive analysis of these 11 gene families was performed with chromosome locations, phylogenetic comparison, gene structures, and conserved domain compositions of proteins. In order to gain an insight into the potential roles of these genes in citrus fruit development, 42 CsHMs with high mRNA abundance in fruit tissues were selected to further analyze their expression profiles at six stages of fruit development. Interestingly, a numbers of genes were expressed highly in flesh of ripening fruit and some of them showed the increasing expression levels along with the fruit development. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression patterns of all 136 CsHMs response to the infection of blue mold (Penicillium digitatum), which is the most devastating pathogen in citrus post-harvest process. The results indicated that 20 of them showed the strong alterations of their expression levels during the fruit-pathogen infection. In conclusion, this study presents a comprehensive analysis of the histone modification gene families in sweet orange and further elucidates their behaviors during the fruit development and the blue mold infection responses. PMID:26300904

  8. Genome-wide identification of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) histone modification gene families and their expression analysis during the fruit development and fruit-blue mold infection process.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jidi; Xu, Haidan; Liu, Yuanlong; Wang, Xia; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotes, histone acetylation and methylation have been known to be involved in regulating diverse developmental processes and plant defense. These histone modification events are controlled by a series of histone modification gene families. To date, there is no study regarding genome-wide characterization of histone modification related genes in citrus species. Based on the two recent sequenced sweet orange genome databases, a total of 136 CsHMs (Citrus sinensis histone modification genes), including 47 CsHMTs (histone methyltransferase genes), 23 CsHDMs (histone demethylase genes), 50 CsHATs (histone acetyltransferase genes), and 16 CsHDACs (histone deacetylase genes) were identified. These genes were categorized to 11 gene families. A comprehensive analysis of these 11 gene families was performed with chromosome locations, phylogenetic comparison, gene structures, and conserved domain compositions of proteins. In order to gain an insight into the potential roles of these genes in citrus fruit development, 42 CsHMs with high mRNA abundance in fruit tissues were selected to further analyze their expression profiles at six stages of fruit development. Interestingly, a numbers of genes were expressed highly in flesh of ripening fruit and some of them showed the increasing expression levels along with the fruit development. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression patterns of all 136 CsHMs response to the infection of blue mold (Penicillium digitatum), which is the most devastating pathogen in citrus post-harvest process. The results indicated that 20 of them showed the strong alterations of their expression levels during the fruit-pathogen infection. In conclusion, this study presents a comprehensive analysis of the histone modification gene families in sweet orange and further elucidates their behaviors during the fruit development and the blue mold infection responses.

  9. Oocyte-type linker histone B4 is required for transdifferentiation of somatic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Maki, Nobuyasu; Suetsugu-Maki, Rinako; Sano, Shozo; Nakamura, Kenta; Nishimura, Osamu; Tarui, Hiroshi; Del Rio-Tsonis, Katia; Ohsumi, Keita; Agata, Kiyokazu; Tsonis, Panagiotis A

    2010-09-01

    The ability to reprogram in vivo a somatic cell after differentiation is quite limited. One of the most impressive examples of such a process is transdifferentiation of pigmented epithelial cells (PECs) to lens cells during lens regeneration in newts. However, very little is known of the molecular events that allow newt cells to transdifferentiate. Histone B4 is an oocyte-type linker histone that replaces the somatic-type linker histone H1 during reprogramming mediated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). We found that B4 is expressed and required during transdifferentiation of PECs. Knocking down of B4 decreased proliferation and increased apoptosis, which resulted in considerable smaller lens. Furthermore, B4 knockdown altered gene expression of key genes of lens differentiation and nearly abolished expression of gamma-crystallin. These data are the first to show expression of oocyte-type linker histone in somatic cells and its requirement in newt lens transdifferentiation and suggest that transdifferentiation in newts might share common strategies with reprogramming after SCNT.

  10. Histone lysine methylation exhibits a distinct distribution during spermatogenesis in pigs.

    PubMed

    An, Junhui; Qin, Jinzhou; Wan, Yi; Zhang, Yaqing; Hu, Yuan; Zhang, Chunfang; Zeng, Wenxian

    2015-12-01

    Spermatogenesis is a continual process throughout the adult life of a male, which is governed by unique transcriptional regulation and massive alterations of chromatin. Histone modification was one of the underlying epigenetic mechanisms during spermatogenesis. It has been shown that methylation of histone lysine exhibits a distinct distribution in mice during spermatogenesis and some histone lysine methylation is essential for male fertility. However, the dynamic change of methylated histone in porcine testis tissue was largely unknown. Here, we studied the dynamic modulation of three types of methylation (monomethylation, dimethylation, and trimethylation) of H3K4, H3K27, and H4K20 during spermatogenesis in pigs. The results showed that H3K4me2/3, H3K27me3, and H4K20me1/2/3 were extensively localized in adult pig testis. Interestingly, we found that undifferentiated spermatogonia contained strongly H4K20me2 and H4K20me3, but little H4K20me1, whereas the differentiated spermatogonia possessed H4K20me1 and H4K20me2 and little H4K20me3. The findings of this study help for the understanding of epigenetic modifications during spermatogenesis in pigs and provide information for further studies.

  11. Differential Subnuclear Localization and Replication Timing of Histone H3 Lysine 9 Methylation States

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rong; Terry, Anna V.; Singh, Prim B.; Gilbert, David M.

    2005-01-01

    Mono-, di-, and trimethylation of specific histone residues adds an additional level of complexity to the range of histone modifications that may contribute to a histone code. However, it has not been clear whether different methylated states reside stably at different chromatin sites or whether they represent dynamic intermediates at the same chromatin sites. Here, we have used recently developed antibodies that are highly specific for mono-, di-, and trimethylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (MeK9H3) to examine the subnuclear localization and replication timing of chromatin containing these epigenetic marks in mammalian cells. Me1K9H3 was largely restricted to early replicating, small punctate domains in the nuclear interior. Me2K9H3 was the predominant MeK9 epitope at the nuclear and nucleolar periphery and colocalized with sites of DNA synthesis primarily in mid-S phase. Me3K9H3 decorated late-replicating pericentric heterochromatin in mouse cells and sites of DAPI-dense intranuclear heterochromatin in human and hamster cells that replicated throughout S phase. Disruption of the Suv39h1,2 or G9a methyltransferases in murine embryonic stem cells resulted in a redistribution of methyl epitopes, but did not alter the overall spatiotemporal replication program. These results demonstrate that mono-, di-, and trimethylated states of K9H3 largely occupy distinct chromosome domains. PMID:15788566

  12. RNA-dependent dynamic histone acetylation regulates MCL1 alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Dilshad H.; Gonzalez, Carolina; Cooper, Charlton; Sun, Jian-Min; Chen, Hou Yu; Healy, Shannon; Xu, Wayne; Smith, Karen T.; Workman, Jerry L.; Leygue, Etienne; Davie, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) and lysine acetyltransferases (KATs) catalyze dynamic histone acetylation at regulatory and coding regions of transcribed genes. Highly phosphorylated HDAC2 is recruited within corepressor complexes to regulatory regions, while the nonphosphorylated form is associated with the gene body. In this study, we characterized the nonphosphorylated HDAC2 complexes recruited to the transcribed gene body and explored the function of HDAC-complex-mediated dynamic histone acetylation. HDAC1 and 2 were coimmunoprecipitated with several splicing factors, including serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) which has roles in alternative splicing. The co-chromatin immunoprecipitation of HDAC1/2 and SRSF1 to the gene body was RNA-dependent. Inhibition of HDAC activity and knockdown of HDAC1, HDAC2 or SRSF1 showed that these proteins were involved in alternative splicing of MCL1. HDAC1/2 and KAT2B were associated with nascent pre-mRNA in general and with MCL1 pre-mRNA specifically. Inhibition of HDAC activity increased the occupancy of KAT2B and acetylation of H3 and H4 of the H3K4 methylated alternative MCL1 exon 2 nucleosome. Thus, nonphosphorylated HDAC1/2 is recruited to pre-mRNA by splicing factors to act at the RNA level with KAT2B and other KATs to catalyze dynamic histone acetylation of the MCL1 alternative exon and alter the splicing of MCL1 pre-mRNA. PMID:24234443

  13. Recognition of the centromere-specific histone Cse4 by the chaperone Scm3

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Uhn-Soo; Harrison, Stephen C.

    2011-09-20

    A specialized nucleosome is a component of all eukaryotic kinetochores. The core of this nucleosome contains a centromere-specific histone, CENP-A (the Cse4 gene product in budding yeast), instead of the usual H3. Assembly of a centromeric nucleosome depends on a specific chaperone, called Scm3 in yeast and HJURP in higher eukaryotes. We describe here the structure of a complex formed by an N-terminal fragment of Scm3 with the histone-fold domains of Cse4, and H4, all prepared as recombinant proteins derived from the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis. The contacts of Scm3 with Cse4 explain its selectivity for the centromere-specific histone; key residues at the interface are conserved in HJURP, indicating a common mechanism for centromeric-histone deposition. We also report the structure of a (Cse4 : H4)2 heterotetramer; comparison with the structure of the Scm3:Cse4:H4 complex shows that tetramer formation and DNA-binding require displacement of Scm3 from the nucleosome core. The two structures together suggest that specific contacts between the chaperone and Cse4, rather than an altered overall structure of the nucleosome core, determine the selective presence of Cse4 at centromeres.

  14. Inhibitors of DNA Methylation, Histone Deacetylation, and Histone Demethylation: A Perfect Combination for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Zahnow, C A; Topper, M; Stone, M; Murray-Stewart, T; Li, H; Baylin, S B; Casero, R A

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing and inappropriate activation of gene expression are frequent events during the initiation and progression of cancer. These events involve a complex interplay between the hypermethylation of CpG dinucleotides within gene promoter and enhancer regions, the recruitment of transcriptional corepressors and the deacetylation and/or methylation of histone tails. These epigenetic regulators act in concert to block transcription or interfere with the maintenance of chromatin boundary regions. However, DNA/histone methylation and histone acetylation states are reversible, enzyme-mediated processes and as such, have emerged as promising targets for cancer therapy. This review will focus on the potential benefits and synergistic/additive effects of combining DNA-demethylating agents and histone deacetylase inhibitors or lysine-specific demethylase inhibitors together in epigenetic therapy for solid tumors and will highlight what is known regarding the mechanisms of action that contribute to the antitumor response.

  15. Fungal Rtt109 Histone Acetyltransferase is an Unexpected Structural Homolog of Metazoan p300/CBP

    SciTech Connect

    Tang,Y.; Holbert, M.; Wurtele, H.; Meeth, K.; Rocha, W.; Gharib, M.; Jiang, E.; Thibault, P.; Verreault, A.; et al

    2008-01-01

    Rtt109, also known as KAT11, is a recently characterized fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that modifies histone H3 lysine 56 (H3K56) to promote genome stability. Rtt109 does not show sequence conservation with other known HATs and depends on association with either of two histone chaperones, Asf1 or Vps75, for HAT activity. Here we report the X-ray crystal structure of an Rtt109-acetyl coenzyme A complex and carry out structure-based mutagenesis, combined with in vitro biochemical studies of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex and studies of Rtt109 function in vivo. The Rtt109 structure reveals noteworthy homology to the metazoan p300/CBP HAT domain but exhibits functional divergence, including atypical catalytic properties and mode of cofactor regulation. The structure reveals a buried autoacetylated lysine residue that we show is also acetylated in the Rtt109 protein purified from yeast cells. Implications for understanding histone substrate and chaperone binding by Rtt109 are discussed.

  16. Caenorhabditis elegans Dosage Compensation Regulates Histone H4 Chromatin State on X Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Michael B.; Snyder, Martha J.; Custer, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Dosage compensation equalizes X-linked gene expression between the sexes. This process is achieved in Caenorhabditis elegans by hermaphrodite-specific, dosage compensation complex (DCC)-mediated, 2-fold X chromosome downregulation. How the DCC downregulates gene expression is not known. By analyzing the distribution of histone modifications in nuclei using quantitative fluorescence microscopy, we found that H4K16 acetylation (H4K16ac) is underrepresented and H4K20 monomethylation (H4K20me1) is enriched on hermaphrodite X chromosomes in a DCC-dependent manner. Depletion of H4K16ac also requires the conserved histone deacetylase SIR-2.1, while enrichment of H4K20me1 requires the activities of the histone methyltransferases SET-1 and SET-4. Our data suggest that the mechanism of dosage compensation in C. elegans involves redistribution of chromatin-modifying activities, leading to a depletion of H4K16ac and an enrichment of H4K20me1 on the X chromosomes. These results support conserved roles for histone H4 chromatin modification in worm dosage compensation analogous to those seen in flies, using similar elements and opposing strategies to achieve differential 2-fold changes in X-linked gene expression. PMID:22393255

  17. γδTCR immunoglobulin constant region domain exchange in human αβTCRs improves TCR pairing without altering TCR gene-modified T cell function.

    PubMed

    Tao, Changli; Shao, Hongwei; Zhang, Wenfeng; Bo, Huaben; Wu, Fenglin; Shen, Han; Huang, Shulin

    2017-02-15

    The adoptive genetic transfer of T cell receptors (TCRs) has been shown to be overall feasible and offer clinical potential as a treatment for different types of cancer. However, this promising clinical approach is limited by the serious potential consequence that exogenous TCR mispairing with endogenous TCR chains may lead to the risk of self-reactivity. In the present study, domain‑exchange and three‑dimensional modeling strategies were used to create a set of chimeric TCR variants, which were used to exchange the partial or complete constant region of αβTCR with corresponding γδTCR domains. The expression, assembly and function of the chimeric TCR variants were examined in Jurkat T cells and peripheral mononuclear blood cells (PBMCs). Genetically‑encoded chimeras were fused with a pair of fluorescent proteins (ECFP/EYFP) to monitor expression and the pairing between chimeric TCRα chains and TCRβ chains. The fluorescence energy transfer based on confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that the introduction of γδTCR constant sequences into the αβTCR did not result in a global reduction of mispairing with endogenous TCR. However, the TCR harboring the immunoglobulin‑like domain of the γδTCR constant region (i.e., TCR∆IgC), showed a higher expression and preferential pairing, compared with wild‑type (wt)TCR. The function analysis showed that TCR∆IgC exhibited the same levels of interferon-γ production and cytotoxic activity, compared with wtTCR. Furthermore, these modified TCR-transduced T cells retained the classic human leukocyte antigen restriction of the original TCR. The other two chimeric TCRs, had either exchange of the cp+tm+ic domain or exchange of the whole C domain (Fig. 1). Ultimately, exchange of these domains demonstrated defective function in the transduced T cells. Taken together, these findings may provide further understanding of the γδTCR constant domain with implications for the improvement of TCR gene transfer

  18. Long-term antiepileptic treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors may reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Stettner, Mark; Krämer, Günter; Strauss, Arne; Kvitkina, Tatjana; Ohle, Sandra; Kieseier, Bernd C; Thelen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Various antiepileptic drugs such as valproic acid, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine and levetiracetam are known to exert histone deacetylase inhibitory (HDACi) properties, which can modify aberrantly silenced gene expression by an epigenetic mechanism. This study was initiated to examine a potential beneficial effect of these drugs on prostate cancer (PC) development. The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 106 patients under long-term treatment with antiepileptic drugs and known HDACi properties were examined. PSA represents a hallmark in the early detection of PC, and its levels may predict an invasive disease in subsequent years. For in-vitro experiments, the PC cell line LNCaP was treated with HDACi drugs; subsequently, PSA and further PC markers were assessed. When men over 50 years of age were treated with HDACi drugs they had lower age-corrected PSA levels compared with control groups, according to the following ranking: valproic acid>levetiracetam>carbamazepine/oxcarbazepine>lamotrigine. Furthermore, there was a correlation between PSA reduction and the number of HDACi drugs within the medication, lending credence to the idea that a synergistic effect might be possible. Moreover, in vitro, HDACi drugs decrease PSA on mRNA and protein levels and exhibit further oncoprotective properties.The fact that HDACi drugs exert antiproliferative effects on neoplastic cells in vitro and in vivo, which are paralleled by expression alterations of aberrantly regulated genes, underlines the potential therapeutic value of HDACi drugs. These data suggest that long-term HDACi treatment can positively influence the characteristically slow transformation of tumour precursor cells in the prostate and may thus reduce a patient's risk of developing PC.

  19. Nitric Oxide Modulates Histone Acetylation at Stress Genes by Inhibition of Histone Deacetylases1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mengel, Alexander; Ageeva, Alexandra; Durner, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    Histone acetylation, which is an important mechanism to regulate gene expression, is controlled by the opposing action of histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs). In animals, several HDACs are subjected to regulation by nitric oxide (NO); in plants, however, it is unknown whether NO affects histone acetylation. We found that treatment with the physiological NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) increased the abundance of several histone acetylation marks in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), which was strongly diminished in the presence of the NO scavenger 2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide. This increase was likely triggered by NO-dependent inhibition of HDAC activity, since GSNO and S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine significantly and reversibly reduced total HDAC activity in vitro (in nuclear extracts) and in vivo (in protoplasts). Next, genome-wide H3K9/14ac profiles in Arabidopsis seedlings were generated by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing, and changes induced by GSNO, GSNO/2-4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide or trichostatin A (an HDAC inhibitor) were quantified, thereby identifying genes that display putative NO-regulated histone acetylation. Functional classification of these genes revealed that many of them are involved in the plant defense response and the abiotic stress response. Furthermore, salicylic acid, which is the major plant defense hormone against biotrophic pathogens, inhibited HDAC activity and increased histone acetylation by inducing endogenous NO production. These data suggest that NO affects histone acetylation by targeting and inhibiting HDAC complexes, resulting in the hyperacetylation of specific genes. This mechanism might operate in the plant stress response by facilitating the stress-induced transcription of genes. PMID:27980017

  20. miR-502 medaited histone methyltransferase SET8 expression is associated with outcome of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cuiju; Wu, Jianhua; Zhao, Yue; Guo, Zhanjun

    2016-01-01

    The histone methyltransferase SET8, whose expression is regulated by miR-502 though the binding site in the 3′ UTR of SET8, implicated in cancer development. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of rs16917496 located in the miR-502 and SET8 binding site was analyzed in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) patients, the SET8 C/C genotype was independently associated with longer post-operative survival by multivariate analysis (relative risk, 2.250; 95% CI, 1.041–4.857; p = 0.039). Moreover, the reduced SET8 expression mediated by SET8 C/C genotype was associated with longer ESCC survival. Functional assay indicated that the SET8 knock down could inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis of ESCC cells. The subsequent assay also showed the markedly inhibition of ESCC cell migration and invasion by SET8 knock down. Our data suggested that the altering SET8 expression, which is mediated at least partly by miR-502 through changing the binding affinity between miR-502 and SET8 3′ UTR, could modify the ESCC outcome by inhibiting the proliferation and invasion as well as promoting the apoptosis of ECSS cell. Our data indicated that SET8 was a new target for ESCC therapy. PMID:27605386

  1. Histones and histone modifications in perinuclear chromatin anchoring: from yeast to man.

    PubMed

    Harr, Jennifer C; Gonzalez-Sandoval, Adriana; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    It is striking that within a eukaryotic nucleus, the genome can assume specific spatiotemporal distributions that correlate with the cell's functional states. Cell identity itself is determined by distinct sets of genes that are expressed at a given time. On the level of the individual gene, there is a strong correlation between transcriptional activity and associated histone modifications. Histone modifications act by influencing the recruitment of non-histone proteins and by determining the level of chromatin compaction, transcription factor binding, and transcription elongation. Accumulating evidence also shows that the subnuclear position of a gene or domain correlates with its expression status. Thus, the question arises whether this spatial organization results from or determines a gene's chromatin status. Although the association of a promoter with the inner nuclear membrane (INM) is neither necessary nor sufficient for repression, the perinuclear sequestration of heterochromatin is nonetheless conserved from yeast to man. How does subnuclear localization influence gene expression? Recent work argues that the common denominator between genome organization and gene expression is the modification of histones and in some cases of histone variants. This provides an important link between local chromatin structure and long-range genome organization in interphase cells. In this review, we will evaluate how histones contribute to the latter, and discuss how this might help to regulate genes crucial for cell differentiation.

  2. Methylation of a histone mimic within the histone methyltransferase G9a regulates protein complex assembly.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Srihari C; Marazzi, Ivan; Yap, Kyoko L; Sampath, Srinath C; Krutchinsky, Andrew N; Mecklenbräuker, Ingrid; Viale, Agnes; Rudensky, Eugene; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Chait, Brian T; Tarakhovsky, Alexander

    2007-08-17

    Epigenetic gene silencing in eukaryotes is regulated in part by lysine methylation of the core histone proteins. While histone lysine methylation is known to control gene expression through the recruitment of modification-specific effector proteins, it remains unknown whether nonhistone chromatin proteins are targets for similar modification-recognition systems. Here we show that the histone H3 methyltransferase G9a contains a conserved methylation motif with marked sequence similarity to H3 itself. As with methylation of H3 lysine 9, autocatalytic G9a methylation is necessary and sufficient to mediate in vivo interaction with the epigenetic regulator heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1), and this methyl-dependent interaction can be reversed by adjacent G9a phosphorylation. NMR analysis indicates that the HP1 chromodomain recognizes methyl-G9a through a binding mode similar to that used in recognition of methyl-H3K9, demonstrating that the chromodomain functions as a generalized methyl-lysine binding module. These data reveal histone-like modification cassettes - or "histone mimics" - as a distinct class of nonhistone methylation targets and directly extend the principles of the histone code to the regulation of nonhistone proteins.

  3. DNA damage and Repair Modify DNA methylation and Chromatin Domain of the Targeted Locus: Mechanism of allele methylation polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Giusi; Landi, Rosaria; Pezone, Antonio; Morano, Annalisa; Zuchegna, Candida; Romano, Antonella; Muller, Mark T.; Gottesman, Max E.; Porcellini, Antonio; Avvedimento, Enrico V.

    2016-01-01

    We characterize the changes in chromatin structure, DNA methylation and transcription during and after homologous DNA repair (HR). We find that HR modifies the DNA methylation pattern of the repaired segment. HR also alters local histone H3 methylation as well chromatin structure by inducing DNA-chromatin loops connecting the 5′ and 3′ ends of the repaired gene. During a two-week period after repair, transcription-associated demethylation promoted by Base Excision Repair enzymes further modifies methylation of the repaired DNA. Subsequently, the repaired genes display stable but diverse methylation profiles. These profiles govern the levels of expression in each clone. Our data argue that DNA methylation and chromatin remodelling induced by HR may be a source of permanent variation of gene expression in somatic cells. PMID:27629060

  4. Role of extracellular histones in the cardiomyopathy of sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kalbitz, Miriam; Grailer, Jamison J; Fattahi, Fatemeh; Jajou, Lawrence; Herron, Todd J; Campbell, Katherine F; Zetoune, Firas S; Bosmann, Markus; Sarma, J Vidya; Huber-Lang, Markus; Gebhard, Florian; Loaiza, Randall; Valdivia, Hector H; Jalife, José; Russell, Mark W; Ward, Peter A

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to define the relationship in polymicrobial sepsis (in adult male C57BL/6 mice) between heart dysfunction and the appearance in plasma of extracellular histones. Procedures included induction of sepsis by cecal ligation and puncture and measurement of heart function using echocardiogram/Doppler parameters. We assessed the ability of histones to cause disequilibrium in the redox status and intracellular [Ca(2+)]i levels in cardiomyocytes (CMs) (from mice and rats). We also studied the ability of histones to disturb both functional and electrical responses of hearts perfused with histones. Main findings revealed that extracellular histones appearing in septic plasma required C5a receptors, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs), and the Nacht-, LRR-, and PYD-domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome. In vitro exposure of CMs to histones caused loss of homeostasis of the redox system and in [Ca(2+)]i, as well as defects in mitochondrial function. Perfusion of hearts with histones caused electrical and functional dysfunction. Finally, in vivo neutralization of histones in septic mice markedly reduced the parameters of heart dysfunction. Histones caused dysfunction in hearts during polymicrobial sepsis. These events could be attenuated by histone neutralization, suggesting that histones may be targets in the setting of sepsis to reduce cardiac dysfunction.

  5. Differences in histone modifications between slow- and fast-twitch muscle of adult rats and following overload, denervation, or valproic acid administration.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Fuminori; Nimura, Keisuke; Ishino, Saki; Nakai, Naoya; Nakata, Ken; Ohira, Yoshinobu

    2015-11-15

    Numerous studies have reported alterations in skeletal muscle properties and phenotypes in response to various stimuli such as exercise, unloading, and gene mutation. However, a shift in muscle fiber phenotype from fast twitch to slow twitch is not completely induced by stimuli. This limitation is hypothesized to result from the epigenetic differences between muscle types. The main purpose of the present study was to identify the differences in histone modification for the plantaris (fast) and soleus (slow) muscles of adult rats. Genome-wide analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by DNA sequencing revealed that trimethylation at lysine 4 and acetylation of histone 3, which occurs at transcriptionally active gene loci, was less prevalent in the genes specific to the slow-twitch soleus muscle. Conversely, gene loci specific to the fast-twitch plantaris muscle were associated with the aforementioned histone modifications. We also found that upregulation of slow genes in the plantaris muscle, which are related to enhanced muscular activity, is not associated with activating histone modifications. Furthermore, silencing of muscle activity by denervation caused the displacement of acetylated histone and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in 5' ends of genes in plantaris, but minor effects were observed in soleus. Increased recruitment of Pol II induced by forced acetylation of histone was also suppressed in valproic acid-treated soleus. Our present data indicate that the slow-twitch soleus muscle has a unique set of histone modifications, which may relate to the preservation of the genetic backbone against physiological stimuli.

  6. Assaying Pharmacodynamic Endpoints with Targeted Therapy: Flavopiridol and 17AAG Induced Dephosphorylation of Histone H1.5 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liwen; Harshman, Sean W.; Liu, Shujun; Ren, Chen; Xu, Hua; Sallans, Larry; Grever, Michael; Byrd, John C.; Marcucci, Guido; Freitas, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Histone H1 is commonly used to assay kinase activity in vitro. As many promising targeted therapies affect kinase activity of specific enzymes involved in cancer transformation, H1 phosphorylation can serve as potential pharmacodynamic marker for drug activity within the cell. In this report we utilized a phosphoproteomic workflow to characterize histone H1 phosphorylation changes associated with two targeted therapies in the Kasumi-1 Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) cell line. The phosphoproteomic workflow was first validated with standard casein phosphoproteins and then applied to the direct analysis of histone H1 from Kasumi-1 nuclear lysates. Ten H1 phosphorylation sites were identified on the H1 variants, H1.2, H1.3, H1.4, H1.5 and H1.x. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry profiling of intact H1s demonstrated global dephosphorylation of H1.5 associated with therapy by the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, and the Hsp90 inhibitor, 17AAG (17-(Allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin). In contrast, independent treatments with a nucleotide analog, proteosome inhibitor and histone deacetylase inhibitor did not exhibit decreased H1.5 phosphorylation. The data presented herein demonstrate that potential of histones to assess the cellular response of reagents that have direct and indirect effects on kinase activity that alters histone phosphorylation. As such, this approach may be a highly informative marker for response to targeted therapies influencing histone phosphorylation. PMID:21110323

  7. Assaying pharmacodynamic endpoints with targeted therapy: flavopiridol and 17AAG induced dephosphorylation of histone H1.5 in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liwen; Harshman, Sean W; Liu, Shujun; Ren, Chen; Xu, Hua; Sallans, Larry; Grever, Michael; Byrd, John C; Marcucci, Guido; Freitas, Michael A

    2010-12-01

    Histone H1 is commonly used to assay kinase activity in vitro. As many promising targeted therapies affect kinase activity of specific enzymes involved in cancer transformation, H1 phosphorylation can serve as potential pharmacodynamic marker for drug activity within the cell. In this study we utilized a phosphoproteomic workflow to characterize histone H1 phosphorylation changes associated with two targeted therapies in the Kasumi-1 acute myeloid leukemia cell line. The phosphoproteomic workflow was first validated with standard casein phosphoproteins and then applied to the direct analysis of histone H1 from Kasumi-1 nuclear lysates. Ten H1 phosphorylation sites were identified on the H1 variants, H1.2, H1.3, H1.4, H1.5 and H1.x. LC MS profiling of intact H1s demonstrated global dephosphorylation of H1.5 associated with therapy by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol and the Heat Shock Protein 90 inhibitor, 17-(Allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin. In contrast, independent treatments with a nucleotide analog, proteosome inhibitor and histone deacetylase inhibitor did not exhibit decreased H1.5 phosphorylation. The data presented herein demonstrate that potential of histones to assess the cellular response of reagents that have direct and indirect effects on kinase activity that alters histone phosphorylation. As such, this approach may be a highly informative marker for response to targeted therapies influencing histone phosphorylation.

  8. Histone variants and chromatin assembly in plant abiotic stress responses.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yan; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Genome organization into nucleosomes and higher-order chromatin structures has profound implications for the regulation of gene expression, DNA replication and repair. The structure of chromatin can be remodeled by several mechanisms; among others, nucleosome assembly/disassembly and replacement of canonical histones with histone variants constitute important ones. In this review, we provide a brief description on the current knowledge about histone chaperones involved in nucleosome assembly/disassembly and histone variants in Arabidopsis thaliana. We discuss recent advances in revealing crucial functions of histone chaperones, nucleosome assembly/disassembly and histone variants in plant response to abiotic stresses. It appears that chromatin structure remodeling may provide a flexible, global and stable means for the regulation of gene transcription to help plants more effectively cope with environmental stresses. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and chromatin assembly.

  9. Histones as mediators of host defense, inflammation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Hoeksema, Marloes; van Eijk, Martin; Haagsman, Henk P; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2016-01-01

    Histones are known for their ability to bind to and regulate expression of DNA. However, histones are also present in cytoplasm and extracellular fluids where they serve host defense functions and promote inflammatory responses. Histones are a major component of neutrophil extracellular traps that contribute to bacterial killing but also to inflammatory injury. Histones can act as antimicrobial peptides and directly kill bacteria, fungi, parasites and viruses, in vitro and in a variety of animal hosts. In addition, histones can trigger inflammatory responses in some cases acting through Toll-like receptors or inflammasome pathways. Extracellular histones mediate organ injury (lung, liver), sepsis physiology, thrombocytopenia and thrombin generation and some proteins can bind histones and reduce these potentially harmful effects.

  10. Structure of the histone chaperone CIA/ASF1-double bromodomain complex linking histone modifications and site-specific histone eviction.

    PubMed

    Akai, Yusuke; Adachi, Naruhiko; Hayashi, Yohei; Eitoku, Masamitsu; Sano, Norihiko; Natsume, Ryo; Kudo, Norio; Tanokura, Masaru; Senda, Toshiya; Horikoshi, Masami

    2010-05-04

    Nucleosomes around the promoter region are disassembled for transcription in response to various signals, such as acetylation and methylation of histones. Although the interactions between histone-acetylation-recognizing bromodomains and factors involved in nucleosome disassembly have been reported, no structural basis connecting histone modifications and nucleosome disassembly has been obtained. Here, we determined at 3.3 A resolution the crystal structure of histone chaperone cell cycle gene 1 (CCG1) interacting factor A/antisilencing function 1 (CIA/ASF1) in complex with the double bromodomain in the CCG1/TAF1/TAF(II)250 subunit of transcription factor IID. Structural, biochemical, and biological studies suggested that interaction between double bromodomain and CIA/ASF1 is required for their colocalization, histone eviction, and pol II entry at active promoter regions. Furthermore, the present crystal structure has characteristics that can connect histone acetylation and CIA/ASF1-mediated histone eviction. These findings suggest that the molecular complex between CIA/ASF1 and the double bromodomain plays a key role in site-specific histone eviction at active promoter regions. The model we propose here is the initial structure-based model of the biological signaling from histone modifications to structural change of the nucleosome (hi-MOST model).

  11. The distribution of repressive histone modifications on silenced FMR1 alleles provides clues to the mechanism of gene silencing in fragile X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Daman; Usdin, Karen

    2010-12-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and the most common known cause of autism. Most cases of FXS result from the expansion of a CGG·CCG repeat in the 5' UTR of the FMR1 gene that leads to gene silencing. It has previously been shown that silenced alleles are associated with histone H3 dimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Me2) and H3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27Me3), modified histones typical of developmentally repressed genes. We show here that these alleles are also associated with elevated levels of histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 9 (H3K9Me3) and histone H4 trimethylated at lysine 20 (H4K20Me3). All four of these modified histones are present on exon 1 of silenced alleles at levels comparable to that seen on pericentric heterochromatin. The two groups of histone modifications show a different distribution on fragile X alleles: H3K9Me2 and H3K27Me3 have a broad distribution, whereas H3K9Me3 and H4K20Me3 have a more focal distribution with the highest level of these marks being present in the vicinity of the repeat. This suggests that the trigger for gene silencing may be local to the repeat itself and perhaps involves a mechanism similar to that involved in the formation of pericentric heterochromatin.

  12. Epigenetic Control and Cancer: The Potential of Histone Demethylases as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Fernando; Garcia, Jeison

    2012-01-01

    The development of cancer involves an immense number of factors at the molecular level. These factors are associated principally with alterations in the epigenetic mechanisms that regulate gene expression profiles. Studying the effects of chromatin structure alterations, which are caused by the addition/removal of functional groups to specific histone residues, are of great interest as a promising way to identify markers for cancer diagnosis, classify the disease and determine its prognosis, and these markers could be potential targets for the treatment of this disease in its different forms. This manuscript presents the current point of view regarding members of the recently described family of proteins that exhibit histone demethylase activity; histone demethylases are genetic regulators that play a fundamental role in both the activation and repression of genes and whose expression has been observed to increase in many types of cancer. Some fundamental aspects of their association with the development of cancer and their relevance as potential targets for the development of new therapeutic strategies at the epigenetic level are discussed in the following manuscript. PMID:24280700

  13. Histone Methylation Dynamics and Gene Regulation Occur through the Sensing of One-Carbon Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Mentch, Samantha J; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Huang, Lei; Liu, Xiaojing; Gupta, Diwakar; Mattocks, Dwight; Gómez Padilla, Paola; Ables, Gene; Bamman, Marcas M; Thalacker-Mercer, Anna E; Nichenametla, Sailendra N; Locasale, Jason W

    2015-11-03

    S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) link one-carbon metabolism to methylation status. However, it is unknown whether regulation of SAM and SAH by nutrient availability can be directly sensed to alter the kinetics of key histone methylation marks. We provide evidence that the status of methionine metabolism is sufficient to determine levels of histone methylation by modulating SAM and SAH. This dynamic interaction led to rapid changes in H3K4me3, altered gene transcription, provided feedback regulation to one-carbon metabolism, and could be fully recovered upon restoration of methionine. Modulation of methionine in diet led to changes in metabolism and histone methylation in the liver. In humans, methionine variability in fasting serum was commensurate with concentrations needed for these dynamics and could be partly explained by diet. Together these findings demonstrate that flux through methionine metabolism and the sensing of methionine availability may allow direct communication to the chromatin state in cells.

  14. Histone Hyperacetylation Up-regulates Protein Kinase Cδ in Dopaminergic Neurons to Induce Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Kondru, Naveen; Ghosh, Anamitra; Panicker, Nikhil; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Rana, Ajay; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stress-sensitive protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ) has been implicated in dopaminergic neuronal cell death. However, little is known about the epigenetic mechanisms regulating PKCδ expression in neurons. Here, we report a novel mechanism by which the PKCδ gene can be regulated by histone acetylation. Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor sodium butyrate (NaBu) induced PKCδ expression in cultured neurons, brain slices, and animal models. Several other HDAC inhibitors also mimicked NaBu. The chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that hyperacetylation of histone H4 by NaBu is associated with the PKCδ promoter. Deletion analysis of the PKCδ promoter mapped the NaBu-responsive element to an 81-bp minimal promoter region. Detailed mutagenesis studies within this region revealed that four GC boxes conferred hyperacetylation-induced PKCδ promoter activation. Cotransfection experiments and Sp inhibitor studies demonstrated that Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 regulated NaBu-induced PKCδ up-regulation. However, NaBu did not alter the DNA binding activities of Sp proteins or their expression. Interestingly, a one-hybrid analysis revealed that NaBu enhanced transcriptional activity of Sp1/Sp3. Overexpression of the p300/cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP) potentiated the NaBu-mediated transactivation potential of Sp1/Sp3, but expressing several HDACs attenuated this effect, suggesting that p300/CBP and HDACs act as coactivators or corepressors in histone acetylation-induced PKCδ up-regulation. Finally, using genetic and pharmacological approaches, we showed that NaBu up-regulation of PKCδ sensitizes neurons to cell death in a human dopaminergic cell model and brain slice cultures. Together, these results indicate that histone acetylation regulates PKCδ expression to augment nigrostriatal dopaminergic cell death, which could contribute to the progressive neuropathogenesis of Parkinson disease. PMID:25342743

  15. Sgf29 binds histone H3K4me2/3 and is required for SAGA complex recruitment and histone H3 acetylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, Chuanbing; Xu, Chao; Ruan, Jianbin; Lee, Kenneth K.; Burke, Tara L.; Tempel, Wolfram; Barsyte, Dalia; Li, Jing; Wu, Minhao; Zhou, Bo O.; Fleharty, Brian E.; Paulson, Ariel; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Zhou, Jin-Qiu; Mer, Georges; Grant, Patrick A.; Workman, Jerry L.; Zang, Jianye; Min, Jinrong

    2011-09-28

    The SAGA (Spt-Ada-Gcn5 acetyltransferase) complex is an important chromatin modifying complex that can both acetylate and deubiquitinate histones. Sgf29 is a novel component of the SAGA complex. Here, we report the crystal structures of the tandem Tudor domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human Sgf29 and their complexes with H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 peptides, respectively, and show that Sgf29 selectively binds H3K4me2/3 marks. Our crystal structures reveal that Sgf29 harbours unique tandem Tudor domains in its C-terminus. The tandem Tudor domains in Sgf29 tightly pack against each other face-to-face with each Tudor domain harbouring a negatively charged pocket accommodating the first residue alanine and methylated K4 residue of histone H3, respectively. The H3A1 and K4me3 binding pockets and the limited binding cleft length between these two binding pockets are the structural determinants in conferring the ability of Sgf29 to selectively recognize H3K4me2/3. Our in vitro and in vivo functional assays show that Sgf29 recognizes methylated H3K4 to recruit the SAGA complex to its targets sites and mediates histone H3 acetylation, underscoring the importance of Sgf29 in gene regulation.

  16. Sgf29 binds histone H3K4me2/3 and is required for SAGA complex recruitment and histone H3 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Chuanbing; Xu, Chao; Ruan, Jianbin; Lee, Kenneth K; Burke, Tara L; Tempel, Wolfram; Barsyte, Dalia; Li, Jing; Wu, Minhao; Zhou, Bo O; Fleharty, Brian E; Paulson, Ariel; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Zhou, Jin-Qiu; Mer, Georges; Grant, Patrick A; Workman, Jerry L; Zang, Jianye; Min, Jinrong

    2011-01-01

    The SAGA (Spt–Ada–Gcn5 acetyltransferase) complex is an important chromatin modifying complex that can both acetylate and deubiquitinate histones. Sgf29 is a novel component of the SAGA complex. Here, we report the crystal structures of the tandem Tudor domains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human Sgf29 and their complexes with H3K4me2 and H3K4me3 peptides, respectively, and show that Sgf29 selectively binds H3K4me2/3 marks. Our crystal structures reveal that Sgf29 harbours unique tandem Tudor domains in its C-terminus. The tandem Tudor domains in Sgf29 tightly pack against each other face-to-face with each Tudor domain harbouring a negatively charged pocket accommodating the first residue alanine and methylated K4 residue of histone H3, respectively. The H3A1 and K4me3 binding pockets and the limited binding cleft length between these two binding pockets are the structural determinants in conferring the ability of Sgf29 to selectively recognize H3K4me2/3. Our in vitro and in vivo functional assays show that Sgf29 recognizes methylated H3K4 to recruit the SAGA complex to its targets sites and mediates histone H3 acetylation, underscoring the importance of Sgf29 in gene regulation. PMID:21685874

  17. FACT Prevents the Accumulation of Free Histones Evicted from Transcribed Chromatin and a Subsequent Cell Cycle Delay in G1

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Centeno, Mari Cruz; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Oreal, Vincent; Reddy, Gajjalaiahvari Ugander; Liang, Dun; Géli, Vincent; Gunjan, Akash; Chávez, Sebastián

    2010-01-01

    The FACT complex participates in chromatin assembly and disassembly during transcription elongation. The yeast mutants affected in the SPT16 gene, which encodes one of the FACT subunits, alter the expression of G1 cyclins and exhibit defects in the G1/S transition. Here we show that the dysfunction of chromatin reassembly factors, like FACT or Spt6, down-regulates the expression of the gene encoding the cyclin that modulates the G1 length (CLN3) in START by specifically triggering the repression of its promoter. The G1 delay undergone by spt16 mutants is not mediated by the DNA–damage checkpoint, although the mutation of RAD53, which is otherwise involved in histone degradation, enhances the cell-cycle defects of spt16-197. We reveal how FACT dysfunction triggers an accumulation of free histones evicted from transcribed chromatin. This accumulation is enhanced in a rad53 background and leads to a delay in G1. Consistently, we show that the overexpression of histones in wild-type cells down-regulates CLN3 in START and causes a delay in G1. Our work shows that chromatin reassembly factors are essential players in controlling the free histones potentially released from transcribed chromatin and describes a new cell cycle phenomenon that allows cells to respond to excess histones before starting DNA replication. PMID:20502685

  18. Histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACI) mechanisms of action: emerging insights.

    PubMed

    Bose, Prithviraj; Dai, Yun; Grant, Steven

    2014-09-01

    Initially regarded as "epigenetic modifiers" acting predominantly through chromatin remodeling via histone acetylation, HDACIs, alternatively referred to as lysine deacetylase or simply deacetylase inhibitors, have since been recognized to exert multiple cytotoxic actions in cancer cells, often through acetylation of non-histone proteins. Some well-recognized mechanisms of HDACI lethality include, in addition to relaxation of DNA and de-repression of gene transcription, interference with chaperone protein function, free radical generation, induction of DNA damage, up-regulation of endogenous inhibitors of cell cycle progression, e.g., p21, and promotion of apoptosis. Intriguingly, this class of agents is relatively selective for transformed cells, at least in pre-clinical studies. In recent years, additional mechanisms of action of these agents have been uncovered. For example, HDACIs interfere with multiple DNA repair processes, as well as disrupt cell cycle checkpoints, critical to the maintenance of genomic integrity in the face of diverse genotoxic insults. Despite their pre-clinical potential, the clinical use of HDACIs remains restricted to certain subsets of T-cell lymphoma. Currently, it appears likely that the ultimate role of these agents will lie in rational combinations, only a few of which have been pursued in the clinic to date. This review focuses on relatively recently identified mechanisms of action of HDACIs, with particular emphasis on those that relate to the DNA damage response (DDR), and discusses synergistic strategies combining HDACIs with several novel targeted agents that disrupt the DDR or antagonize anti-apoptotic proteins that could have implications for the future use of HDACIs in patients with cancer.

  19. Importance of protamine phosphorylation to histone displacement in spermatids: can the disruption of this process be used for male contraception

    SciTech Connect

    Balhorn, R.; Hud, N.V.; Corzett, M.; Mazrimas, J.

    1995-06-01

    Protamine is a small protein that packages DNA in the sperm of most vertebrates. Shortly after its synthesis, the serine and threonine residues in each protamine are phosphorylated and the modified proteins are deposited onto DNA, displacing the histones and other chromatin proteins. We have hypothesized that the phosphorylation of protamine 1 induces protamine dimerization and these dimers are required for efficient histone displacement. Histone displacement by protamines in late-step spermatids appears to be essential for the production of fertile sperm in man and other mammals, and the disruption of this process could provide a new approach for male contraception. As a first step towards testing this theory, we have initiated a set of in vitro experiments to determine whether of not protamine phosphorylation is essential for histone displacement. Thee results of these experiments, although incomplete, confirm that unphosphorylated protamine cannot effectively displace histone from DNA. Polyarginine molecules twice the size of a protamine molecule and salmine dimer were found to be more effective. These results are consistent with the theory that the disruption of protamine phosphorylation may prove to be a useful new approach for male contraception if it can be shown to facilitate or induce protamine dimerization.

  20. Histone deacetylases inhibitors effects on Cryptococcus neoformans major virulence phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Fabiana As; Derengowski, Lorena S; Albuquerque, Patrícia; Nicola, André M; Silva-Pereira, Ildinete; Poças-Fonseca, Marcio J

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans undergoes phenotypical changes during host infection in order to promote persistence and survival. Studies have demonstrated that such adaptations require alterations in gene transcription networks by distinct mechanisms. Drugs such as the histone deacetylases inhibitors (HDACi) Sodium Butyrate (NaBut) and Trichostatin A (TSA) can alter the chromatin conformation and have been used to modulate epigenetic states in the treatment of diseases such as cancer. In this work, we have studied the effect of NaBut and TSA on the expression of C. neoformans major virulence phenotypes and on the survival rate of an animal model infected with drugs-treated yeasts. Both drugs affected fungal growth at 37°C more intensely than at 30°C; nonetheless, drugs did not affect cell viability at the concentrations we studied. HDACi also provoked the reduction of the fungal capsule expansion. Phospholipases enzyme activity decreased; mating process and melanin synthesis were also affected by both inhibitors. NaBut led to an increase in the population of cells in G2/M. Treated yeast cells, which were washed in order to remove the drugs from the culture medium prior to the inoculation in the Galleria mellonela infection model, did not cause significant difference at the host survival curve when compared to non-treated cells. Overall, NaBut effects on the impairment of C. neoformans main virulence factors were more intense and stable than the TSA effects.

  1. The Histone Chaperones FACT and Spt6 Restrict H2A.Z from Intragenic Locations

    PubMed Central

    Jeronimo, Célia; Watanabe, Shinya; Kaplan, Craig D.; Peterson, Craig L.; Robert, François

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY H2A.Z is a highly conserved histone variant involved in several key nuclear processes. It is incorporated into promoters by SWR-C-related chromatin remodeling complexes, but whether it is also actively excluded from non-promoter regions is not clear. Here, we provide genomic and biochemical evidence that RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation-associated histone chaperones FACT and Spt6 both contribute to restricting H2A.Z from intragenic regions. In the absence of FACT or Spt6, the lack of efficient nucleosome reassembly coupled to pervasive incorporation of H2A.Z by mislocalized SWR-C alters chromatin composition and contributes to cryptic initiation. Thus, chaperone-mediated H2A.Z confinement is crucial for restricting the chromatin signature of gene promoters, which otherwise may license or promote cryptic transcription. PMID:25959393

  2. LSD1 Histone Demethylase Assays and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Hayward, D.; Cole, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    The lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) is a flavin-dependent amine oxidase that selectively removes one or two methyl groups from histone H3 at the Lys4 position. Along with histone deacetylases 1 and 2, LSD1 is involved in epigenetically silencing gene expression. LSD1 has been implicated as a potential therapeutic target in cancer and other diseases. In this chapter, we discuss several approaches to measure LSD1 demethylase activity and their relative strengths and limitations for inhibitor discovery and mechanistic characterization. In addition, we review the principal established chemical functional groups derived from monoamine oxidase inhibitors that have been investigated in the context of LSD1 as demethylase inhibitors. Finally, we highlight a few examples of recently developed LSD1 mechanism-based inactivators and their biomedical applications. PMID:27372757

  3. Epigenetic regulation by histone demethylases in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Rebecca L; Dunne, Kate; Walport, Louise J; Flashman, Emily; Kawamura, Akane

    2015-08-01

    The response to hypoxia is primarily mediated by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF). Levels of HIF are regulated by the oxygen-sensing HIF hydroxylases, members of the 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) dependent oxygenase family. JmjC-domain containing histone lysine demethylases (JmjC-KDMs), also members of the 2OG oxygenase family, are key epigenetic regulators that modulate the methylation levels of histone tails. Kinetic studies of the JmjC-KDMs indicate they could also act in an oxygen-sensitive manner. This may have important implications for epigenetic regulation in hypoxia. In this review we examine evidence that the levels and activity of JmjC-KDMs are sensitive to oxygen availability, and consider how this may influence their roles in early development and hypoxic disease states including cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  4. Zinc deficiency and metabolism of histones and non-histone proteins in Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Czupryn, M.; Falchuk, K.H.; Vallee, B.L.

    1987-12-15

    Histones and most other basic chromosomal proteins are not extracted from zinc-deficient (-Zn) Euglena gracilis chromatin either by 0.25 M HCl or by 0.3-0.6 M NaCl/7 M urea. Instead, a class of 3-5-kilodalton (kDa) polypeptides, which is absent in zinc-sufficient (+Zn) cells, is solubilized. These heterogeneous polypeptides are comprised of Asn, Arg, Cys, and Gln. The partial sequence of one of these, which is composed only of Arg and Asn, is Arg-Asn-Asn-Arg-Arg-Asn-Asn-Asn-Asn-Asn-. This demonstrates they are not proteolytic fragments of the histones, proteins which do not contain contiguous Arg-Asn or Asn-Asn sequences. Once -Zn chromatin is depleted of this 3-5-kDa material, nearly all of the histones and most non-histone proteins are extracted. On the other hand, if chromatin first is depleted of, and subsequently is reconstituted with, the 3-5-kDa material, the chromosomal proteins are not solubilized, as observed with intact chromatin. Histone H4 is an exception. Electrophoretic analysis of the solubilized H4 reveals that the degree to which it is acetylated in -Zn is lower than in +Zn chromatin. Jointly, these data indicate that chromosomal proteins bind much more tightly to DNA of -Zn than +Zn cells. The histone/DNA weight ratio in -Zn chromatin is 0.44 compared to 1.04 in +Zn chromatin. However, the 3-5-kDa polypeptide fraction maintains the amount of total basic proteins per unit mass of DNA at approximately 1. Further, four non-histone proteins extractable with 5% HClO/sub 4/ or 0.35 M NaCl and characterized by high electrophoretic mobility have been purified from +Zn nuclei. Only one of these proteins is found in -Zn chromatin. Thus, zinc deficiency induces changes in the amounts and types of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as in their interaction with DNA. These findings are discussed in relation to recent advances in understanding of the role of zinc in replication and transcription.

  5. Immunological aspects and therapeutic significance of an autoantibody against histone H1 in a rat model of concanavalin A-induced hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Toshiaki; Goto, Shigeru; Lai, Chia-Yun; Hsu, Li-Wen; Takaoka, Yuki; Kawamoto, Seiji; Chiang, Kuei-Chen; Shimada, Yayoi; Ohmori, Naoya; Goto, Takeshi; Sato, Shuji; Ono, Kazuhisa; Cheng, Yu-Fan; Chen, Chao-Long

    2010-04-01

    We previously demonstrated the immunosuppressive activity of anti-histone H1 autoantibody induced in experimental and clinical liver allograft tolerance. This study aimed to explore the immunological aspects of anti-histone H1 autoantibody in liver injury induced by concanavalin A (Con A). To establish a Con A-hepatitis model, 20 mg/kg Con A was intravenously injected into rats, after which liver function and histopathological analyses were performed. In this model, anti-histone H1 autoantibody was transiently induced in the sera during the natural recovery stage, 3-7 days after Con A injection. To evaluate the therapeutic significance of anti-histone H1 autoantibody, a polyclonal antibody against histone H1 was intraperitoneally injected immediately after Con A injection. We found that injection of anti-histone H1 antibody could reduce Con A-induced liver damage. Further mechanical analyses revealed that anti-histone H1 antibody altered the intracellular activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-kappaB and calcineurin via T-cell receptor signalling, suggesting that anti-histone H1 antibody may protect the liver from Con A-induced injury by inhibiting activation of effector T cells. These findings suggest that anti-histone H1 autoantibody may be a natural immune regulatory factor that protects inflamed livers suffering from autoimmune hepatitis and may lead to T-cell unresponsiveness through the selective regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/nuclear factor-kappaB and calcineurin signalling.

  6. Histone H2A significantly enhances in vitro DNA transfection.

    PubMed Central

    Balicki, D.; Beutler, E.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene transfer is a potential treatment modality of genetic disease. Efficient, practical methods of DNA transfection are currently under investigation. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A beta-galactosidase reporter plasmid interacted electrostatically with histones, poly-L-Lys, poly-L-Arg, and a combination of poly-L-Lys and poly-L-Arg. This complex was then used to transfect COS-7 cells. beta-galactosidase activity was quantified and used to compare the efficiency of gene transfection in vitro. A comparison was also made of DNA transfection with the most active histone subclass, i.e., histone H2A, in the absence and presence of an anionic liposome. RESULTS: There was a marked increase in DNA transfection in the presence of histone H2A when compared with the control, whereas each of the other histones and polycations showed little, if any, effect. The extent of activation depends strongly on the DNA/histone ratio and is also a function of the molarity of the final Tris-acetate, pH 8, solution. The anionic liposomes used demonstrated an inhibitory effect. CONCLUSIONS: Histone H2A significantly enhances in vitro DNA transfection whereas other histones and anionic liposomes do not. A study of the difference between histone H2A and other histone subclasses may serve to clarify some of the mechanisms and the essential components of efficient gene delivery. PMID:9407553

  7. Deletion of histone deacetylase 3 reveals critical roles in S phase progression and DNA damage control.

    PubMed

    Bhaskara, Srividya; Chyla, Brenda J; Amann, Joseph M; Knutson, Sarah K; Cortez, David; Sun, Zu-Wen; Hiebert, Scott W

    2008-04-11

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are enzymes that modify key residues in histones to regulate chromatin architecture, and they play a vital role in cell survival, cell-cycle progression, and tumorigenesis. To understand the function of Hdac3, a critical component of the N-CoR/SMRT repression complex, a conditional allele of Hdac3 was engineered. Cre-recombinase-mediated inactivation of Hdac3 led to a delay in cell-cycle progression, cell-cycle-dependent DNA damage, and apoptosis in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While no overt defects in mitosis were observed in Hdac3-/- MEFs, including normal H3Ser10 phosphorylation, DNA damage was observed in Hdac3-/- interphase cells, which appears to be associated with defective DNA double-strand break repair. Moreover, we noted that Hdac3-/- MEFs were protected from DNA damage when quiescent, which may provide a mechanistic basis for the action of HDAC inhibitors on cycling tumor cells.

  8. Bivalent histone modifications during tooth development.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Li-Wei; Zhang, Bin-Peng; Xu, Ruo-Shi; Xu, Xin; Ye, Ling; Zhou, Xue-Dong

    2014-12-01

    Histone methylation is one of the most widely studied post-transcriptional modifications. It is thought to be an important epigenetic event that is closely associated with cell fate determination and differentiation. To explore the spatiotemporal expression of histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) and histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) epigenetic marks and methylation or demethylation transferases in tooth organ development, we measured the expression of SET7, EZH2, KDM5B and JMJD3 via immunohistochemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis in the first molar of BALB/c mice embryos at E13.5, E15.5, E17.5, P0 and P3, respectively. We also measured the expression of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 with immunofluorescence staining. During murine tooth germ development, methylation or demethylation transferases were expressed in a spatial-temporal manner. The bivalent modification characterized by H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 can be found during the tooth germ development, as shown by immunofluorescence. The expression of SET7, EZH2 as methylation transferases and KDM5B and JMJD3 as demethylation transferases indicated accordingly with the expression of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 respectively to some extent. The bivalent