Science.gov

Sample records for altered nanotube dimension

  1. Collective diffusion in carbon nanotubes: Crossover between one dimension and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Rong; Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Gu, Yu; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2016-08-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, we study the collective diffusion of helium in carbon nanotubes. The results show that the collective diffusion coefficient (CDC) increases with the dimension of the channel. The collective diffusion coefficient has a linear relationship with the temperature and the concentration. There exist a ballistic transport in short carbon nanotubes and a diffusive transport in long carbon nanotubes. Fick’s law has an invalid region in the nanoscale channel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11004082 and 11291240477), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2014A030313367), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, Jinan University (Grant No. 11614341).

  2. Controlling nanotube dimensions: correlation between composition, diameter, and internal energy of single-walled mixed oxide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Konduri, Suchitra; Mukherjee, Sanjoy; Nair, Sankar

    2007-12-01

    Control over the diameter of nanotubes is of significance in manipulating their properties, which depend on their dimensions in addition to their structure and composition. This aspect has remained a challenge in both carbon and inorganic nanotubes, since there is no obvious aspect of the formation mechanism that allows facile control over nanotube curvature. Here we develop and analyze a quantitative correlation between the composition, diameter, and internal energy of a class of single-walled mixed oxide aluminosilicogermanate (AlSiGeOH) nanotubes. A series of synthetic AlSiGeOH nanotubes with varying Si/Ge ratio are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction to relate their compositions and diameters. We then study these nanotubes computationally by first parametrizing and validating a suitable interatomic potential model, and then using this potential model to investigate the internal energy of the nanotube as a function of diameter and composition via molecular dynamics simulations. There are minima in the internal energy as a function of diameter which progressively shift to larger nanotube diameters with increasing Ge content. An approximate analytical theory of nanotube diameter control, which contains a small number of physically significant fitted parameters, well describes the computational data by relating the composition and geometry to the strain energy of bending into a nanotube. The predicted composition-dependent shift in the energetically favored diameter follows the experimental trends. We suggest related methods of controlling nanotube energetics and their role in engineering nanotubes of controlled dimensions by liquid-phase chemistry.

  3. Wall-selective chemical alteration of silicon nanotube molecular carriers.

    PubMed

    Ben-Ishai, Moshit; Patolsky, Fernando

    2011-02-09

    Recently, there has been significant interest in the synthesis and potential applications of semiconductor nanotubes (NTs). In this context, many efforts have been invested in developing new routes to control and engineer their surface chemistry. We report herein on a simple route to differentially and selectively functionalize the inner and outer surfaces of silicon nanotubes (SiNTs) with organic molecular layers containing different functional groups and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity chemical nature, via covalent binding, to give nanotubular structures with dual chemical properties. Significantly, our unique synthetic approach can be further extended to directly form hollow crystalline nanotubular structures with their inner/outer surfaces independently and selectively altered chemically. Additionally, SiNTs inner and/or outer walls can be selectively decorated with metal nanoparticles. Both inner and outer walls can be individually and separately modified with the same metal nanoparticles, with different metal NPs in the inside and outside walls or with a combination of metal NPs decoration and molecular layers, if so required. Furthermore, the dually modified nanotubes were then exploited as phase extraction nanocarriers to demonstrate their potential in future chemical and biological separation, extraction, and filtering applications.

  4. Image formation mechanisms in scanning electron microscopy of carbon nanotubes, and retrieval of their intrinsic dimensions.

    PubMed

    Jackman, H; Krakhmalev, P; Svensson, K

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the image formation mechanisms that are involved in the imaging of carbon nanotubes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We show how SEM images can be modelled by accounting for surface enhancement effects together with the absorption coefficient for secondary electrons, and the electron-probe shape. Images can then be deconvoluted, enabling retrieval of the intrinsic nanotube dimensions. Accurate estimates of their dimensions can thereby be obtained even for structures that are comparable to the electron-probe size (on the order of 2 nm). We also present a simple and robust model for obtaining the outer diameter of nanotubes without any detailed knowledge about the electron-probe shape.

  5. Dimension and morphology controlled fabrication of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes by electrochemical anodization method

    SciTech Connect

    Tamilselvan, A.; Balakumar, S.

    2015-06-24

    We report the fabrication of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotubes by electrochemical anodization of titanium foils using fluoride-based electrolytes such as ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol and glycerol. The effects of anodization voltage, time and electrolytes on the morphology and dimensions (length and pore diameter) of the tubes were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). On increasing anodization voltage and time, the tube length and pore diameter were varied. In addition to this, various tubes morphologies such as circular and hexagonal structures were obtained under different electrolytic conditions. The Raman spectroscopy studies revealed the anatase phase of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes.

  6. Fermionic condensate and Casimir densities in the presence of compact dimensions with applications to nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the fermionic condensate and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor for a massive fermionic field in the geometry of two parallel plates on the background of Minkowski spacetime with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions, in the presence of a constant gauge field. Bag boundary conditions are imposed on the plates and periodicity conditions with arbitrary phases are considered along the compact dimensions. The nontrivial topology of the background spacetime leads to an Aharonov-Bohm effect for the vacuum expectation values induced by the gauge field. The fermionic condensate and the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with period equal to the flux quantum. The boundary induced parts in the fermionic condensate and the vacuum energy density are negative, with independence of the phases in the periodicity conditions and of the value of the gauge potential. Interaction forces between the plates are thus always attractive. However, in physical situations where the quantum field is confined to the region between the plates, the pure topological part contributes as well, and then the resulting force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the specific phases encoded in the periodicity conditions along the compact dimensions, and on the gauge potential, too. Applications of the general formulas to cylindrical carbon nanotubes are considered, within the framework of a Dirac-like theory for the electronic states in graphene. In the absence of a magnetic flux, the energy density for semiconducting nanotubes is always negative. For metallic nanotubes the energy density is positive for long tubes and negative for short ones. The resulting Casimir forces acting on the edges of the nanotube are attractive for short tubes with independence of the tube chirality. The sign of the force for long nanotubes can be controlled by tuning the magnetic flux

  7. Fermionic Casimir effect for parallel plates in the presence of compact dimensions with applications to nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bellucci, S.; Saharian, A. A.

    2009-11-15

    We evaluate the Casimir energy and force for a massive fermionic field in the geometry of two parallel plates on background of Minkowski spacetime with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions. The bag boundary conditions are imposed on the plates and periodicity conditions with arbitrary phases are considered along the compact dimensions. The Casimir energy is decomposed into purely topological, single plate and interaction parts. With independence of the lengths of the compact dimensions and the phases in the periodicity conditions, the interaction part of the Casimir energy is always negative. In order to obtain the resulting force, the contributions from both sides of the plates must be taken into account. Then, the forces coming from the topological parts of the vacuum energy cancel out and only the interaction term contributes to the Casimir force. Applications of the general formulae to Kaluza-Klein-type models and carbon nanotubes are given. In particular, we show that for finite-length metallic nanotubes, the Casimir forces acting on the tube edges are always attractive, whereas for semiconducting-type ones, they are attractive for small lengths of the nanotube and repulsive for large lengths.

  8. White matter alterations associate with onset symptom dimension in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Bollettini, Irene; Mazza, Mario G; Muzzarelli, Laura; Dallaspezia, Sara; Poletti, Sara; Vai, Benedetta; Smeraldi, Enrico; Benedetti, Francesco

    2017-08-16

    The high heterogeneity of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is best described by a multidimensional model involving symptom dimensions. We aimed to investigate white matter alterations associated with OCD, focusing on the impact of long-lasting effect of symptom dimensions assessed at onset of illness. Furthermore, we investigated white matter alterations associated with this disorder, controlling for the impact of medications and for the prevailing current symptom dimension. We studied 58 patients affected by OCD and 58 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We divided patients according to symptom dimension at onset of illness, assessed with the five-factor model. T-tests were performed in order to investigate differences between subgroups. Similar analyses were performed considering the prevailing current symptom dimension. Analyses were conducted with tract-based spatial statistics on diffusion tensor imaging. Doubt/checking and rituals/superstition symptom dimensions at onset and symmetry/perfectionism current symptom dimensions were characterized by significant alterations in diffusion tensor imaging measures. An association of white matter alterations and symmetry/perfectionism current dimension was found only when controlling for the effect of doubt/checking dimension at onset. Finally, results pointed out that the observed differences between patients and healthy controls were carried by the effect of previous and current medications. Our findings evidenced that onset symptom dimensions are associated with enduring alterations of white matter microstructure. Onset symptom dimensions may reflect underlying endophenotypes. In addition, present results confirm the effect of medications on white matter in OCD, showing a large effect of current treatment on myelination. © 2017 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2017 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  9. Titania nanotubes dimensions-dependent protein adsorption and its effect on the growth of osteoblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weihu; Xi, Xingfeng; Shen, Xinkun; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yan; Cai, Kaiyong

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we report the influence of titania nanotubes (TiNTs) dimensions on the adsorption of collagen (COL) and fibronectin (FN), and its subsequent effect on the growth of osteoblasts. TiNTs with different diameters of around 30 and 100 nm were prepared with anodization. The adsorption profiles of proteins and cell behaviors were evaluated using spectrophotometric measurement, immunofluorescence staining, cell viability, and cytoskeleton morphology, respectively. The results showed that although the growth of osteoblasts was highly sensitive to the dimensions TiNTs, the preadsorbed COL and FN could reduce the difference. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation results confirmed that the main driving force for protein adsorption was the physical adsorption. The TiNTs with bigger dimensions had higher interaction energies, and thus leading to higher proteins (COL and FN) adsorption and obvious influences on cell behaviors. MD simulation revealed that the orientation and conformation of proteins adsorbed onto surfaces of TiNTs was critical for cell integrins to recognize specific sites. When FN molecules adsorbed onto the surfaces of TiNTs, their RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) sites were easily exposed to outside and more likely to bond with the fibronectin receptors, in turn regulating the cellular behaviors.

  10. The investigation of the diameter dimension effect on the Si nano-tube transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, M.-H.; Yeh, C.-H.; Lee, C.-C.; Wang, C.-P.

    2016-03-01

    The vertical gate-all-around (V-GAA) Si nano-tube (NT) devices with different diameter dimensions are studied in this work with the promising device performance. The V-GAA structure makes the transistor easy to be scaled down continuously to meet the complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) scaling requirements of the 7/10 nm technology node and beyond. The Si NT device with the hollow structure is demonstrated to have the capability to "deplete" and "screen-out" the out-of gate control carriers in the center of the NT and further result in the better device short channel control. Based on the study in this work, the V-GAA Si NT device with the optimized diameter dimension (=20 nm) can benefit the Ion-state current and reduce the Ioff-state stand-by power simultaneously, due to the less surface roughness scattering and the better short channel control characteristics. The proposed V-GAA Si NT device is regarded as one of the most promising candidates for the future application of the sub-7/10 nm logic era.

  11. Alterations of papilla dimensions after orthodontic closure of the maxillary midline diastema: a retrospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate alterations of papilla dimensions after orthodontic closure of the diastema between maxillary central incisors. Methods Sixty patients who had a visible diastema between maxillary central incisors that had been closed by orthodontic approximation were selected for this study. Various papilla dimensions were assessed on clinical photographs and study models before the orthodontic treatment and at the follow-up examination after closure of the diastema. Influences of the variables assessed before orthodontic treatment on the alterations of papilla height (PH) and papilla base thickness (PBT) were evaluated by univariate regression analysis. To analyze potential influences of the 3-dimensional papilla dimensions before orthodontic treatment on the alterations of PH and PBT, a multiple regression model was formulated including the 3-dimensional papilla dimensions as predictor variables. Results On average, PH decreased by 0.80 mm and PBT increased after orthodontic closure of the diastema (P<0.01). Univariate regression analysis revealed that the PH (P=0.002) and PBT (P=0.047) before orthodontic treatment influenced the alteration of PH. With respect to the alteration of PBT, the diastema width (P=0.045) and PBT (P=0.000) were found to be influential factors. PBT before the orthodontic treatment significantly influenced the alteration of PBT in the multiple regression model. Conclusions PH decreased but PBT increased after orthodontic closure of the diastema. The papilla dimensions before orthodontic treatment influenced the alterations of PH and PBT after closure of the diastema. The PBT increased more when the diastema width before the orthodontic treatment was larger. PMID:27382507

  12. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-01-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips. PMID:27840664

  13. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  14. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  15. Influence of the titania nanotubes dimensions on adsorption of collagen: an experimental and computational study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weihu; Xi, Xingfeng; Ran, Qichun; Liu, Peng; Hu, Yan; Cai, Kaiyong

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the influence of the titanium nanotube (TiNT) diameters on the adsorption of collagen type I (Col-I), TiNTs with different diameters were prepared with anodization. The adsorption amount of Col-I on the different TiNTs substrates was evaluated by spectrophotometric measurement and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The results showed that the diameters of TiNTs played a key role in the adsorption process of Col-I. TiNTs with diameters around 100nm displayed a higher adsorption amount and faster adsorption speed than that of 30nm TiNTs. Furthermore, more collagen molecules were aggregated in the tubes of 100nm TiNTs. Molecular dynamics simulation was performed to elucidate the adsorption mechanism. The simulation results confirmed that physical adsorption was the main driving force, including van der Waals force and hydrogen bond between Col-I molecules and TiNTs. The calculated interaction energies indicated that the TiNTs with bigger dimensions had higher interaction energies, thus leading to the higher collagen adsorption.

  16. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, O. A.; Bykov, Al. V.; Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G.

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  17. Relationship between symptom dimensions and white matter alterations in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Yagi, Michiyo; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nakazato, Michiko; Nemoto, Kiyotaka; Ishikawa, Kazuhiro; Sutoh, Chihiro; Miyata, Haruko; Matsumoto, Junko; Matsumoto, Koji; Masuda, Yoshitada; Obata, Takayuki; Iyo, Masaomi; Shimizu, Eiji; Nakagawa, Akiko

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between the severities of symptom dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and white matter alterations. We applied tract-based spatial statistics for diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) acquired by 3T magnetic resonance imaging. First, we compared fractional anisotropy (FA) between 20 OCD patients and 30 healthy controls (HC). Then, applying whole brain analysis, we searched the brain regions showing correlations between the severities of symptom dimensions assessed by Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised and FA in all participants. Finally, we calculated the correlations between the six symptom dimensions and multiple DTI measures [FA, axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), mean diffusivity (MD)] in a region-of-interest (ROI) analysis and explored the differences between OCD patients and HC. There were no between-group differences in FA or brain region correlations between the severities of symptom dimensions and FA in any of the participants. ROI analysis revealed negative correlations between checking severity and left inferior frontal gyrus white matter and left middle temporal gyrus white matter and a positive correlation between ordering severity and right precuneus in FA in OCD compared with HC. We also found negative correlations between ordering severity and right precuneus in RD, between obsessing severities and right supramarginal gyrus in AD and MD, and between hoarding severity and right insular gyrus in AD. Our study supported the hypothesis that the severities of respective symptom dimensions are associated with different patterns of white matter alterations.

  18. Dependence of the degree of reinforcement of polymer/carbon nanotubes nanocomposites on the nanofiller dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikitaev, A. K.; Kozlov, G. V.

    2015-05-01

    The dependence of the degree of reinforcement of polymethylmethacrylate/carbon nanotubes on the nanofiller content at ultrasmall concentrations of the latter is investigated. It is shown that the extreme character of this dependence is determined by the structural features of the nanofiller. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes gives a positive effect only below their percolation threshold.

  19. Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N; Satishkumar, B C; Govindaraj, A; Nath, M

    2001-02-16

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered soon after the successful laboratory synthesis of fullerenes. Since their discovery in 1991, there has been intensive research activity in the area of carbon nanotubes, not only because of their fascinating structural features and properties, but also because of their potential technological applications. There is increasing experimental evidence to show that carbon nanotubes may find use in nanoelectronic devices, displays, and in hydrogen storage. In this article, we discuss various important aspects related to the synthesis, structure, characterization, and mechanism of formation of multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a presentation of the important electronic, mechanical, hydrogen storage, and other properties of the nanotubes. Doping, as well as other chemical manipulations with boron and nitrogen, bring about significant changes in the properties of the nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes also serve as useful templates to make other nanostructures. Layered metal chalcogenides, boron nitride, and other materials form nanotubes and provide considerable scope for study.

  20. Altered sleep in Borderline Personality Disorder in relation to the core dimensions of psychopathology.

    PubMed

    Simor, Péter; Horváth, Klára

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was to review the literature regarding sleep disturbances in Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and to relate the reported sleep alterations to the underlying core dimensions of BPD pathology. We present a qualitative and theoretical review regarding the empirical studies that investigated objective and subjective sleep quality in BPD and in different psychiatric conditions showing high co-morbidity with this disorder. We show that disturbed sleep including sleep fragmentation, alterations in Slow Wave Sleep and REM sleep, and dysphoric dreaming are prevalent symptoms in BPD. We provide a framework relating the specific sleep alterations to the core dimensions of BPD pathology in order to clarify the inconsistencies of the different findings. The specific sleep disturbances in BPD seem to be related to different dimensions of psychopathological functioning and may have detrimental consequences on waking affect and cognition. Investigating disturbed sleep in BPD in relation to waking symptoms and underlying neural functioning would shed more light on the nature of this complex disorder. Moreover, a stronger emphasis on sleep disturbances would enrich the treatment protocols of BPD. © 2013 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2013 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  1. Does altering the occlusal vertical dimension produce temporomandibular disorders? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Hay, I; Okeson, J P

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to present a comprehensive review of the scientific evidence available in the literature regarding the effect of altering the occlusal vertical dimens-ion (OVD) on producing temporomandibular disorders. The authors conducted a PubMed search with the following search terms 'temporoman-dibular disorders', 'occlusal vertical dimension', 'stomatognatic system', 'masticatory muscles' and 'skeletal muscle'. Bibliographies of all retrieved articles were consulted for additional publications. Hand-searched publications from 1938 were included. The literature review revealed a lack of well-designed studies. Traditional beliefs have been based on case reports and anecdotal opinions rather than on well-controlled clinical trials. The available evidence is weak and seems to indicate that the stomatognathic system has the ability to adapt rapidly to moderate changes in occlusal vertical dimension (OVD). Nevertheless, it should be taken into consideration that in some patients mild transient symptoms may occur, but they are most often self-limiting and without major consequence. In conclusion, there is no indication that permanent alteration in the OVD will produce long-lasting TMD symptoms. However, additional studies are needed.

  2. Histopathological alterations in the gills of Nile tilapia exposed to carbofuran and multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Campos-Garcia, Janaína; Martinez, Diego Stéfani Teodoro; Rezende, Karina Fernandes Oliveira; da Silva, José Roberto Machado Cunha; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz; Barbieri, Edison

    2016-11-01

    Carbofuran is a nematicide insecticide with a broad spectrum of action. Carbofuran has noxious effects in several species and has been banned in the USA and Europe; however, it is still used in Brazil. Aquatic organisms are not only exposed to pesticides but also to manufactured nanoparticles, and the potential interaction of these compounds therefore requires investigation. The aim of this study was to examine the histopathological alterations in the gills of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to determine possible effects of exposure to carbofuran, nitric acid-treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HNO3-MWCNTs) and the combination of carbofuran with nanotubes. Juvenile fish were exposed to different concentrations of carbofuran (0.1, 0.5, 2.0, 4.0 and 8.0mg/L), different concentrations of HNO3-MWCNTs (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mg/L) or different concentrations of carbofuran (0.1, 0.5, 2.0, 4.0 and 8.0mg/L) with 1.0mg/L of HNO3-MWCNTs. After 24h of exposure, the animals were removed from the aquarium, the spinal cord was transversely sectioned, and the second gill arch was removed for histological evaluation. Common histological changes included dislocation of the epithelial cells, hyperplasia of the epithelial cells along the secondary lamellae, aneurism, and dilation and disarrangement of the capillaries. All the groups exposed to carbofuran demonstrated a dose-dependent correlation in the Histological Alteration Index; the values found for carbofuran and carbon nanotubes were up to 25% greater than for carbofuran alone. This result indicates an interaction between these toxicants, with enhanced ecotoxic effects. This work contributes to the understanding of the environmental impacts of nanomaterials on aquatic organisms, which is necessary for the sustainable development of nanotechnologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Titania nanotubes with adjustable dimensions for drug reservoir sites and enhanced cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Nazlı; Bayram, Cem; Erdal, Ebru; Karahaliloğlu, Zeynep; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to generate a bactericidal agent releasing surface via nanotube layer on titanium metal and to investigate how aspect ratio of nanotubes affects drug elution time and cell proliferation. Titania nanotube layers were generated on metal surfaces by anodic oxidation at various voltage and time parameters. Gentamicin loading was carried out via simple pipetting and the samples were tested against S. aureus for the efficacy of the applied modification. Drug releasing time and cell proliferation were also tested in vitro. Titania nanotube layers with varying diameters and lengths were prepared after anodization and anodizing duration was found as the most effective parameter for amount of loaded drug and drug releasing time. Drug elution lasted up to 4 days after anodizing for 80 min of the samples, whereas release completed in 24 h when the samples were anodized for 20 min. All processed samples had bactericidal properties against S. aureus organism except unmodified titanium, which was also subjected to drug incorporation step. The anodization also enhanced water wettability and cell adhesion results. Anodic oxidation is an effective surface modification to enhance tissue-implant interactions and also resultant titania layer can act as a drug reservoir for the release of bactericidal agents. The use of implants as local drug eluting devices is promising but further in vivo testing is required.

  4. Nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    LEONARD, FRANCOIS; KIENLE, DIEGO; & STEWART, DEREK

    2007-09-13

    This is a source code to calculate the current-voltage characteristics, the charge distribution and the electrostatic potential in carbon nanotube devices. The code utilizes the non-equilibrium Green's function method, implemented in a tight-binding scheme, to calculate the charge distribution and the energy-dependent transmission function, from which the current or the conductance are obtained. The electrostatic potential is obtained by solving Poisson's equation on a grid with boundary conditions on the electrodes, and at other interfaces. Self-consistency between the charge and the electrostatic potential is achieved using a linear mixing method. Different versions of the code allow the modeling of different types of nanotube devices: Version 1.0: Modeling of carbon nanotube electronic devices with cylindrical symmetry Version 1.1: Modeling of planar carbon nanotube electronic devices Version 1.2: Modeling of photocurrent in carbon nanotube devices

  5. Altered Cell Mechanics from the Inside: Dispersed Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Integrate with and Restructure Actin

    PubMed Central

    Holt, Brian D.; Shams, Hengameh; Horst, Travis A.; Basu, Saurav; Rape, Andrew D.; Wang, Yu-Li; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.; Islam, Mohammad F.; Dahl, Kris Noel

    2012-01-01

    With a range of desirable mechanical and optical properties, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a promising material for nanobiotechnologies. SWCNTs also have potential as biomaterials for modulation of cellular structures. Previously, we showed that highly purified, dispersed SWCNTs grossly alter F-actin inside cells. F-actin plays critical roles in the maintenance of cell structure, force transduction, transport and cytokinesis. Thus, quantification of SWCNT-actin interactions ranging from molecular, sub-cellular and cellular levels with both structure and function is critical for developing SWCNT-based biotechnologies. Further, this interaction can be exploited, using SWCNTs as a unique actin-altering material. Here, we utilized molecular dynamics simulations to explore the interactions of SWCNTs with actin filaments. Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy confirmed that SWCNTs were located within ~5 nm of F-actin in cells but did not interact with G-actin. SWCNTs did not alter myosin II sub-cellular localization, and SWCNT treatment in cells led to significantly shorter actin filaments. Functionally, cells with internalized SWCNTs had greatly reduced cell traction force. Combined, these results demonstrate direct, specific SWCNT alteration of F-actin structures which can be exploited for SWCNT-based biotechnologies and utilized as a new method to probe fundamental actin-related cellular processes and biophysics. PMID:24955540

  6. Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays with controllable dimensions on glass substrates for photocatalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee Kheng; Kumar, Manippady K; An, Wen Wen; Gao, Han

    2010-02-01

    Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays (NTAs) with controllable dimensions are grown on glass substrates via atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO(2) onto free-standing porous anodic alumina (PAA) templates. Photodegradation of aqueous methylene blue (MB) solution and solid stearic acid (SA) film using TiO(2) NTAs of various wall thicknesses are investigated. The Pd functionalized TiO(2) NTAs, with a wall thickness of 15 nm and height of 200 nm, has the highest photodegradation efficiency at 76% after 4 h of UV irradiation. These functionalized NTAs are able to photodegrade MB molecules completely as no obvious demethylated byproducts are observed during the process. It also demonstrates excellent photocatalytic activity for solid contaminants such as SA film. By using the ALD technique, the nanotube wall thickness can be precisely controlled so that it is sufficiently thin to be transparent while sufficiently thick for excellent photocatalytic performances. The transparent TiO(2) NTAs on glass substrates with excellent photocatalytic properties might have potential applications in self-cleaning coating, transparent electronics, and solar cells.

  7. Alterations of mouse lung tissue dimensions during processing for morphometry: a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-02-15

    Preservation of original tissue dimensions is an essential prerequisite for morphometric studies. Shrinkage occurring during tissue processing for histology may severely influence the appearance of structures seen under the microscope and stereological calculations. Therefore, shrinkage has to be avoided so that estimates obtained by application of unbiased stereology are indeed unbiased. The present study investigates the alterations of tissue dimensions of mouse lung samples during processing for histology. Different fixatives as well as embedding protocols are considered. Mouse lungs were fixed by instillation of either 4% formalin or a mixture of 1.5% glutaraldehyde/1.5% formaldehyde. Tissue blocks were sampled according to principles of stereology for embedding in paraffin, glycol methacrylate without treatment with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate, and glycol methacrylate including treatment with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate before dehydration. Shrinkage was investigated by stereological measurements of dimensional changes of tissue cut faces. Results show a shrinkage of the cut face areas of roughly 40% per lung during paraffin embedding, 30% during "simple" glycol methacrylate embedding, and <3% during osmium tetroxide/uranyl acetate/glycol methacrylate embedding. Furthermore, the superiority of the glutaraldehyde-containing fixative regarding shrinkage is demonstrated. In conclusion, the use of a glutaraldehyde-containing fixative and embedding in glycol methacrylate with previous treatment of the samples with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate before dehydration is recommended for stereological studies of the mouse lung.

  8. Radiofrequency ablation near the bone-muscle interface alters soft tissue lesion dimensions.

    PubMed

    Eckmann, Maxim S; Martinez, Marte A; Lindauer, Steven; Khan, Asif; Ramamurthy, Somayaji

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) lesions are safe and effective in the treatment of spine pain; however, models developed to study factors affecting lesion dimensions have been performed in homogeneous media that may not accurately simulate human anatomy and electrophysiology. We present a novel ex vivo porcine model for performing RF lesion studies and report the influence of bone on projection of RF ablation lesions into soft tissue. Radiofrequency lesions were performed in porcine rib specimens using monopolar 18-gauge, 10-mm straight active tip cannula, with a lesion temperature of 80°C for 150 seconds. Ten lesions were performed in pure porcine muscle tissue and abutting porcine rib bone with surrounding muscle. Lesions were exposed with dissection and measured with digital calipers. Maximal effective lesion radius approximately doubled against the bone compared with the pure muscle group (mean, 5.65 mm [95% CI, 5.43-5.87 mm] vs 2.68 mm [95% CI, 2.55-2.81 mm], P < .0001), although this was seen only in a vertical direction and not horizontally. In addition, the prelesion and postlesion impedance of the bone-muscle interface was consistently higher than the muscle-only interface (mean, 165.6 Ohm [95% CI, 146.6-184.6 Ohm] vs 137.8 Ohm [95% CI, 135.5-140.1 Ohm], P = 0.004; 144.3 Ohm [95% CI, 134.3-154.3 Ohm] vs 124.3 Ohm [95% CI, 119.3-129.3 Ohm], P = 0.001). Other dimensions and estimated volume were not significantly different. Bone adjacent to RF lesions alters the surrounding electrophysiological environment causing RF lesions to project further perpendicularly from the needle axis, vertically to bone, than previously expected. This phenomenon should be considered in the future modeling and clinical practice of RF.

  9. Effects of different sterilization techniques and varying anodized TiO₂ nanotube dimensions on bacteria growth.

    PubMed

    Kummer, Kim M; Taylor, Erik N; Durmas, Naside G; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Ercan, Batur; Webster, Thomas J

    2013-07-01

    Infection of titanium (Ti)-based orthopedic implants is a growing problem due to the ability of bacteria to develop a resistance to today's antibiotics. As an attempt to develop a new strategy to combat bacteria functions, Ti was anodized in the present study to possess different diameters of nanotubes. It is reported here for the first time that Ti anodized to possess 20 nm tubes then followed by heat treatment to remove fluorine deposited from the HF anodization electrolyte solution significantly reduced both S. aureus and S. epidermidis growth compared to unanodized Ti controls. It was further found that the sterilization method used for both anodized nanotubular Ti and conventional Ti played an important role in the degree of bacteria growth on these substrates. Overall, UV light and ethanol sterilized samples decreased bacteria growth, while autoclaving resulted in the highest amount of bacteria growth. In summary, this study indicated that through a simple and inexpensive process, Ti can be anodized to possess 20 nm tubes that no matter how sterilized (UV light, ethanol soaking, or autoclaving) reduces bacteria growth and, thus, shows great promise as an antibacterial implant material.

  10. A meta-analysis of carbon nanotube pulmonary toxicity studies--how physical dimensions and impurities affect the toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gernand, Jeremy M; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a regression-tree-based meta-analysis of rodent pulmonary toxicity studies of uncoated, nonfunctionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) exposure. The resulting analysis provides quantitative estimates of the contribution of CNT attributes (impurities, physical dimensions, and aggregation) to pulmonary toxicity indicators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid: neutrophil and macrophage count, and lactate dehydrogenase and total protein concentrations. The method employs classification and regression tree (CART) models, techniques that are relatively insensitive to data defects that impair other types of regression analysis: high dimensionality, nonlinearity, correlated variables, and significant quantities of missing values. Three types of analysis are presented: the RT, the random forest (RF), and a random-forest-based dose-response model. The RT shows the best single model supported by all the data and typically contains a small number of variables. The RF shows how much variance reduction is associated with every variable in the data set. The dose-response model is used to isolate the effects of CNT attributes from the CNT dose, showing the shift in the dose-response caused by the attribute across the measured range of CNT doses. It was found that the CNT attributes that contribute the most to pulmonary toxicity were metallic impurities (cobalt significantly increased observed toxicity, while other impurities had mixed effects), CNT length (negatively correlated with most toxicity indicators), CNT diameter (significantly positively associated with toxicity), and aggregate size (negatively correlated with cell damage indicators and positively correlated with immune response indicators). Increasing CNT N2 -BET-specific surface area decreased toxicity indicators.

  11. Carbon nanotube-based mode-locked wavelength-switchable fiber laser via net gain cross section alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, A. A.; Mohamad, H.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Muhammad, F. D.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a carbon nanotube-based mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser with switchable wavelength in the C-band wavelength region by varying the net gain cross section of erbium. The carbon nanotube is coated on a tapered fiber to form the saturable absorber for the purpose of mode-locking by exploiting the concept of evanescent field interaction on the tapered fiber with the carbon nanotube in a ring cavity configuration. The propagation loss is adjusted by inducing macrobend losses of the optical fiber in the cavity through a fiber spooling technique. Since the spooling radius can be gradually adjusted to achieve continuous tuning of attenuation, this passive tuning approach can be an alternative to optical tunable attenuator, with freedom of external device integration into the laser cavity. Based on this alteration, the net gain cross section of the laser system can be tailored to three different lasing wavelength ranges; 1533, 1560 nm and both (1533 and 1560 nm) with the minimum pulse duration of 734 fs. The proposed design is simple and stable with high beam quality and good reliability for multiple applications.

  12. Evaluation of dynamically dimensioned search algorithm for optimizing SWAT by altering sampling distributions and searching range

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The primary advantage of Dynamically Dimensioned Search algorithm (DDS) is that it outperforms many other optimization techniques in both convergence speed and the ability in searching for parameter sets that satisfy statistical guidelines while requiring only one algorithm parameter (perturbation f...

  13. Systemic distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a novel model: alteration of biochemical parameters, metabolic functions, liver accumulation, and inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Elisa; Girardello, Rossana; Bruno, Antonino; Manni, Isabella; Gini, Elisabetta; Pagani, Arianna; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Ivaldi, Federico; Congiu, Terenzio; De Stefano, Daniela; Piaggio, Giulia; de Eguileor, Magda; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in several industrial applications raises concerns on their potential toxicity due to factors such as tissue penetrance, small dimensions, and biopersistence. Using an in vivo model for CNT environmental exposure, mimicking CNT exposition at the workplace, we previously found that CNTs rapidly enter and disseminate in the organism, initially accumulating in the lungs and brain and later reaching the liver and kidneys via the bloodstream in CD1 mice. Here, we monitored and traced the accumulation of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs), administered systemically in mice, in different organs and the subsequent biological responses. Using the novel in vivo model, MITO-Luc bioluminescence reporter mice, we found that SWCNTs induce systemic cell proliferation, indicating a dynamic response of cells of both bone marrow and the immune system. We then examined metabolic (water/food consumption and dejections), functional (serum enzymes), and morphological (organs and tissues) alterations in CD1 mice treated with SWCNTs, using metabolic cages, performing serum analyses, and applying histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural (transmission electron microscopy) methods. We observed a transient accumulation of SWCNTs in the lungs, spleen, and kidneys of CD1 mice exposed to SWCNTs. A dose- and time-dependent accumulation was found in the liver, associated with increases in levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and bilirubinemia, which are metabolic markers associated with liver damage. Our data suggest that hepatic accumulation of SWCNTs associated with liver damage results in an M1 macrophage-driven inflammation. PMID:27621623

  14. Systemic distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a novel model: alteration of biochemical parameters, metabolic functions, liver accumulation, and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Principi, Elisa; Girardello, Rossana; Bruno, Antonino; Manni, Isabella; Gini, Elisabetta; Pagani, Arianna; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Ivaldi, Federico; Congiu, Terenzio; De Stefano, Daniela; Piaggio, Giulia; de Eguileor, Magda; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana

    The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in several industrial applications raises concerns on their potential toxicity due to factors such as tissue penetrance, small dimensions, and biopersistence. Using an in vivo model for CNT environmental exposure, mimicking CNT exposition at the workplace, we previously found that CNTs rapidly enter and disseminate in the organism, initially accumulating in the lungs and brain and later reaching the liver and kidneys via the bloodstream in CD1 mice. Here, we monitored and traced the accumulation of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs), administered systemically in mice, in different organs and the subsequent biological responses. Using the novel in vivo model, MITO-Luc bioluminescence reporter mice, we found that SWCNTs induce systemic cell proliferation, indicating a dynamic response of cells of both bone marrow and the immune system. We then examined metabolic (water/food consumption and dejections), functional (serum enzymes), and morphological (organs and tissues) alterations in CD1 mice treated with SWCNTs, using metabolic cages, performing serum analyses, and applying histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural (transmission electron microscopy) methods. We observed a transient accumulation of SWCNTs in the lungs, spleen, and kidneys of CD1 mice exposed to SWCNTs. A dose- and time-dependent accumulation was found in the liver, associated with increases in levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and bilirubinemia, which are metabolic markers associated with liver damage. Our data suggest that hepatic accumulation of SWCNTs associated with liver damage results in an M1 macrophage-driven inflammation.

  15. Fractal Dimension Change Point Model for Hydrothermal Alteration Anomalies in Silk Road Economic Belt, the Beishan Area, Gansu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, H. H.; Wang, Y. L.; Ren, G. L.; LI, J. Q.; Gao, T.; Yang, M.; Yang, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    Remote sensing plays an important role in mineral exploration of “One Belt One Road” plan. One of its applications is extracting and locating hydrothermal alteration zones that are related to mines. At present, the extracting method for alteration anomalies from principal component image mainly relies on the data's normal distribution, without considering the nonlinear characteristics of geological anomaly. In this study, a Fractal Dimension Change Point Model (FDCPM), calculated by the self-similarity and mutability of alteration anomalies, is employed to quantitatively acquire the critical threshold of alteration anomalies. The realization theory and access mechanism of the model are elaborated by an experiment with ASTER data in Beishan mineralization belt, also the results are compared with traditional method (De-Interfered Anomalous Principal Component Thresholding Technique, DIAPCTT). The results show that the findings produced by FDCPM are agree with well with a mounting body of evidence from different perspectives, with the extracting accuracy over 80%, indicating that FDCPM is an effective extracting method for remote sensing alteration anomalies, and could be used as an useful tool for mineral exploration in similar areas in Silk Road Economic Belt.

  16. Theory of B(2)O and BeB(2) nanotubes: new semiconductors and metals in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peihong; Crespi, Vincent H

    2002-07-29

    We describe two new boron-based nanotubes: B(2)O and BeB(2). Both are isoelectronic to graphite, have reasonable curvature energies, and have already been made in their bulk planar forms. The lowest energy allotrope of planar single-layer B(2)O is a semiconductor with a moderate band gap. The local density approximation band gap of the corresponding (3,0) B(2)O nanotube [similar in size to (9,0) carbon nanotube tube] is direct and around 1.6 eV, within a range inaccessible to previous C or BN nanotubes. Single-layer BeB(2) has a fascinating structure: the Be atoms rest above the boron hexagonal faces, nearly coplanar to the boron sheet. The unusual K-point pi-pi(*) Fermi-level degeneracy of graphite survives, while a new nearly pointlike Fermi surface appears at the M point. As a result, BeB(2) nanotubes are uniformly metallic.

  17. Enhancement of Dimension Uniformity of Wet-Etched Thick Insulator Holes in Triode Carbon Nanotube Field-Emission Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsiao-Fen; Hsiue, Ging-Ho; Liu, Chin-Yh; Chen, Kuo-Feng

    2008-12-01

    A triode structure carbon nanotube field-emission display was fabricated using the thick-film process. The critical dimensional uniformity of wet-etched thick insulator holes was enhanced by changing the wet etching mechanism from vertical dip-etching to horizontal spray-etching. The profile of the insulator holes fabricated using the new etcher was similar to anisotropic. After optimizing the operation conditions of the new etcher, the dimensional uniformity of the insulator holes increased to 97.7%. The optimal concentration of etchant was 2.2 wt % for achieving the least side etching of the insulator holes. The carbon nanotube paste was pattern-printed into the insulator holes. The uniform size of the insulator holes implied that the carbon nanotube distribution was similarly among the insulator holes. This result showed an improved uniform field emission image over the panel from 59 to 83.85%.

  18. Inorganic nanotube nanofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong

    The ability to manipulate charge carriers (electrons and holes) in metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) has revolutionized how information is processed and stored, and created the modern digital age. Introducing direct field effect modulation in fluidic systems would enable the manipulation of ionic and molecular species at a similar level and even logic operation. Due to strong Debye screening in aqueous solutions, field effect manipulation of ion transport arises only in systems whose dimensions are comparable to the critical Debye Length, i.e. in nanofluidic systems. Nanofluidics has already been explored in various cases, e.g. biological channel proteins and artificial solid-state nanopores. All these two terminal systems usually transport the ions the same way as passive electron conduction in a resistor. My work is aimed at developing nanotube nanofluidic units with a third terminal that can electrically turn on/off and control ion and biomolecule transport. Moreover, the systematic study on "doping" and transient phenomena can provide rich information to assess the electrokinetics theory and fluidic physics in nanoscale. Silica nanotubes were synthesized by oxidation/etching approach using vertical silicon nanowires as templates. A single nanotube was integrated into a metal-oxide-solution field effect transistor (MOSolFET) by interfacing with two microfluidic channels and a metallic gate electrode. Concentration dependence of ionic conductance through single nanotubes revealed the emergence of unipolar environment at low ionic strength regime. In this case, ionic conductance is only associated with majority ions and governed by surface potentials and charge densities. By applying a gate voltage, the ionic conductance can be quickly modulated. The gate voltages alter the surface potential of the silica nanotubes via capacitive coupling through the nanotube wall and the electrical double layer. In a negatively charged silica nanotube

  19. [Vertical dimension in the OSAHS in adults: an example of functional alteration].

    PubMed

    Raskin, S; Limme, M

    2003-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoapnea syndrome (OSAHS) is important to orthodontists for several reasons. The authors, after defining OSAHS and describing it briefly, review the literature dealing with the cranio-facial morphology of apnea patients. They report the results of their cephalometric study, which is based on an architectural analysis of 274 patients. Their facial characteristics, especially vertical dimension, are consistent with those displayed by mouth breathing children. Changes in respiratory functioning modify the mechanical behavior and the structures of the upper airways. Osseous tissues also show signs caused by these changes. The authors propose an etiopathogenic model.

  20. Confinement by carbon nanotubes drastically alters the boiling and critical behavior of water droplets.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Victor V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2012-03-27

    Vapor pressure grows rapidly above the boiling temperature, and past the critical point liquid droplets disintegrate. Our atomistic simulations show that this sequence of events is reversed inside carbon nanotubes (CNT). Droplets disintegrate first and at low temperature, while pressure remains low. The droplet disintegration temperature is independent of the CNT diameter. In contrast, depending on CNT diameter, a temperature that is much higher than the bulk boiling temperature is required to raise the internal pressure. The control over pressure by CNT size can be useful for therapeutic drug delivery.

  1. From two-dimension to one-dimension: the curvature effect of silicon-doped graphene and carbon nanotubes for oxygen reduction reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Hou, Xiuli; Mi, Jianli; He, Yanqiong; Lin, Lin; Jiang, Qing; Dong, Mingdong

    2014-09-07

    For the goal of practical industrial development of fuel cells, inexpensive, sustainable, and highly efficient electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORR) are highly desirable alternatives to platinum (Pt) and other rare metals. In this work, based on density functional theory, silicon (Si)-doped carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene as metal-free, low cost, and high-performance electrocatalysts for ORR are studied systematically. It is found that the curvature effect plays an important role in the adsorption and reduction of oxygen. The adsorption of O2 becomes weaker as the curvature varies from positive values (outside CNTs) to negative values (inside CNTs). The free energy change of the rate-determining step of ORR on the concave inner surface of Si-doped CNTs is smaller than that on the counterpart of Si-doped graphene, while that on the convex outer surface of Si-doped CNTs is larger than that on Si-doped graphene. Uncovering this new ORR mechanism on silicon-doped carbon electrodes is significant as the same principle could be applied to the development of various other metal-free efficient ORR catalysts for fuel cell applications.

  2. A mutualistic endophyte alters the niche dimensions of its host plant

    PubMed Central

    Kazenel, Melanie R.; Debban, Catherine L.; Ranelli, Luciana; Hendricks, Will Q.; Chung, Y. Anny; Pendergast, Thomas H.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Young, Carolyn A.; Rudgers, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutualisms can play important roles in influencing species coexistence and determining community composition. However, few studies have tested whether such interactions can affect species distributions by altering the niches of partner species. In subalpine meadows of the Rocky Mountains, USA, we explored whether the presence of a fungal endophyte (genus Epichloë) may shift the niche of its partner plant, marsh bluegrass (Poa leptocoma) relative to a closely related but endophyte-free grass species, nodding bluegrass (Poa reflexa). Using observations and a 3-year field experiment, we tested two questions: (i) Do P. leptocoma and P. reflexa occupy different ecological niches? and (ii) Does endophyte presence affect the relative fitness of P. leptocoma versus P. reflexa in the putative niches of these grass species? The two species were less likely to co-occur than expected by chance. Specifically, P. leptocoma grew closer to water sources and in wetter soils than P. reflexa, and also had higher root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi. Endophyte-symbiotic P. leptocoma seeds germinated with greater frequency in P. leptocoma niches relative to P. reflexa niches, whereas neither endophyte-free (experimentally removed) P. leptocoma seeds nor P. reflexa seeds showed differential germination between the two niche types. Thus, endophyte presence constrained the germination and early survival of host plants to microsites occupied by P. leptocoma. However, endophyte-symbiotic P. leptocoma ultimately showed greater growth than endophyte-free plants across all microsites, indicating a net benefit of the symbiosis at this life history stage. Differential effects of endophyte symbiosis on different host life history stages may thus contribute to niche partitioning between the two congeneric plant species. Our study therefore identifies a symbiotic relationship as a potential mechanism facilitating the coexistence of two species, suggesting that symbiont effects on host niche may

  3. A mutualistic endophyte alters the niche dimensions of its host plant.

    PubMed

    Kazenel, Melanie R; Debban, Catherine L; Ranelli, Luciana; Hendricks, Will Q; Chung, Y Anny; Pendergast, Thomas H; Charlton, Nikki D; Young, Carolyn A; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2015-01-19

    Mutualisms can play important roles in influencing species coexistence and determining community composition. However, few studies have tested whether such interactions can affect species distributions by altering the niches of partner species. In subalpine meadows of the Rocky Mountains, USA, we explored whether the presence of a fungal endophyte (genus Epichloë) may shift the niche of its partner plant, marsh bluegrass (Poa leptocoma) relative to a closely related but endophyte-free grass species, nodding bluegrass (Poa reflexa). Using observations and a 3-year field experiment, we tested two questions: (i) Do P. leptocoma and P. reflexa occupy different ecological niches? and (ii) Does endophyte presence affect the relative fitness of P. leptocoma versus P. reflexa in the putative niches of these grass species? The two species were less likely to co-occur than expected by chance. Specifically, P. leptocoma grew closer to water sources and in wetter soils than P. reflexa, and also had higher root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi. Endophyte-symbiotic P. leptocoma seeds germinated with greater frequency in P. leptocoma niches relative to P. reflexa niches, whereas neither endophyte-free (experimentally removed) P. leptocoma seeds nor P. reflexa seeds showed differential germination between the two niche types. Thus, endophyte presence constrained the germination and early survival of host plants to microsites occupied by P. leptocoma. However, endophyte-symbiotic P. leptocoma ultimately showed greater growth than endophyte-free plants across all microsites, indicating a net benefit of the symbiosis at this life history stage. Differential effects of endophyte symbiosis on different host life history stages may thus contribute to niche partitioning between the two congeneric plant species. Our study therefore identifies a symbiotic relationship as a potential mechanism facilitating the coexistence of two species, suggesting that symbiont effects on host niche may

  4. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  5. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  6. Alterations of the bone dimension following immediate implant placement into extraction socket: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chun-Teh; Chiu, Tzu-Shan; Chuang, Sung-Kiang; Tarnow, Dennis; Stoupel, Janet

    2014-09-01

    This systematic review was aimed at analysing bone dimensional alterations within the first year following immediate implant placement. The electronic search was conducted using MEDLINE (PubMed), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and EMBASE from January 1980 to October 2013. Quality assessment of selected articles was performed using Cochrane Collaboration's tool or Newcastle-Ottawa scale according to the design of each study. A meta-analysis was performed to estimate bone dimensional reduction. Weighted mean differences in bone dimension between baseline and follow-up measurement were calculated. Subgroup analysis and mete-regression were conducted to evaluate the effects of different variables. A total of 1348 articles were identified following the search process. Six studies were included in the present review. The weighted mean buccal horizontal bone dimensional reduction (BHDr) was 1.07 mm and buccal vertical bone dimensional reduction (BVDr) was 0.78 mm. The weighted mean palatal bone dimensional reduction was 0.62 mm horizontally (PHDr) and 0.50 mm vertically (PVDr). The initial thickness of the buccal alveolar plate (TB) of the socket was the only variable significantly correlated with BHDr and BVDr in meta-regression analysis. The bone dimensions of immediate implant sites demonstrated approximately 0.5-1.0 mm reduction in vertical and horizontal aspects 4-12 months following surgery. The results should be interpreted with care because of the data heterogeneity. The correlation of the socket buccal wall thickness, and other variables, with dimensional changes of the bony ridge should be investigated further in controlled clinical trials. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Single-walled carbon nanotubes alter cytochrome c electron transfer and modulate mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Li-Hua; Wang, Li-Rong; Xue, Xue; Sun, Ji-Hong; Wu, Yan; Zou, Guozhang; Wu, Xia; Wang, Paul C; Wamer, Wayne G; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-12-21

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are broadly used for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, in vivo imaging, and cancer photothermal therapy due to their unique physiochemical properties. However, once they enter the cells, the effects of SWCNTs on the intracellular organelles and macromolecules are not comprehensively understood. Cytochrome c (Cyt c), as a key component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, plays an essential role in cellular energy consumption, growth, and differentiation. In this study, we found the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial oxygen uptake were greatly decreased in human epithelial KB cells treated with SWCNTs, which accompanies the reduction of Cyt c. SWCNTs deoxidized Cyt c in a pH-dependent manner, as evidenced by the appearance of a 550 nm characteristic absorption peak, the intensity of which increased as the pH increased. Circular dichroism measurement confirmed the pH-dependent conformational change, which facilitated closer association of SWCNTs with the heme pocket of Cyt c and thus expedited the reduction of Cyt c. The electron transfer of Cyt c is also disturbed by SWCNTs, as measured with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, the redox activity of Cyt c was affected by SWCNTs treatment due to attenuated electron transfer and conformational change of Cyt c, which consequently changed mitochondrial respiration of SWCNTs-treated cells. This work is significant to SWCNTs research because it provides a novel understanding of SWCNTs' disruption of mitochondria function and has important implications for biomedical applications of SWCNTs.

  8. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Alter Cytochrome C Electron Transfer and Modulate Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Li-Hua; Wang, Li-Rong; Xue, Xue; Sun, Ji-Hong; Wu, Yan; Zou, Guozhang; Wu, Xia; Wang, Paul C.; Wamer, Wayne G.; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are broadly used for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, in vivo imaging and cancer photothermal therapy due to their unique physiochemical properties. However, once they enter the cells, the effects of SWCNTs to the intracellular organelles and macromolecules are not comprehensively understood. Cytochrome c (Cyt c), as a key component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, plays an essential role in cellular energy consumption, growth and differentiation. In this study, we found the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial oxygen uptake were greatly decreased in human epithelial KB cells treated with SWCNTs, which accompanies the reduction of Cyt c. SWCNTs deoxidized Cyt c in a pH dependent manner as evidenced by the appearance of a 550 nm characteristic absorption peak, which intensity increased as pH increase. Circular dichroism measurement confirmed the pH-dependent conformational change, which facilitated closer association of SWCNTs with the heme pocket of Cyt c and thus expedited the reduction of Cyt c. The electron transfer of Cyt c is also disturbed by SWCNTs, as measured with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, the redox activity of Cyt c was affected by SWCNTs treatment due to attenuated electron transfer and conformational change of Cyt c, which consequently changed mitochondrial respiration of SWCNTs treated cells. This work is significant to SWCNTs research because it provided novel understanding to the disruption of SWCNTs to the mitochondria and has important implications for biomedical applications of SWCNTs. PMID:23171082

  9. Fractal dimension as a measure of altered actin cytoskeleton in MC3T3-E1 cells under simulated microgravity using 3-D/2-D clinostats.

    PubMed

    Qian, A R; Li, D; Han, J; Gao, X; Di, S M; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Shang, Peng

    2012-05-01

    Osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, respond to various mechanical forces, such as stretch and fluid shear force in essentially similar ways. The cytoskeleton, as the load-bearing architecture of the cell, is sensitive to altered inertial forces. Disruption of the cytoskeleton will result in alteration of cellular structure and function. However, it is difficult to quantitatively illustrate cytoskeletal rearrangement because of the complexity of cytoskeletal structure. Usually, the morphological changes in actin organization caused by external stimulus are basically descriptive. In this study, fractal dimensions (D) analysis was used to quantify the morphological changes in the actin cytoskeleton of osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) under simulated microgravity using 3-D/2-D clinostats. The ImageJ software was used to count the fractal dimension of actin cytoskeleton by box-counting methods. Real-time PCR and immunofluroscent assays were used to further confirm the results obtained by fractal dimension analysis. The results showed significant decreases in D value of actin cytoskeleton, β-actin mRNA expression, and the mean fluorescence intensity of F-actin in osteoblast-like cells after 24 or 48 h of incubation under 3-D/2-D clinorotation condition compared with control. The findings indicate that 3-D/2-D clinorotation affects both actin cytoskeleton architecture and mRNA expression, and fractal may be a promising approach for quantitative analysis of the changes in cytoskeleton in different environments.

  10. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  11. Innate immune humoral factors, C1q and factor H, with differential pattern recognition properties, alter macrophage response to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pondman, Kirsten M; Pednekar, Lina; Paudyal, Basudev; Tsolaki, Anthony G; Kouser, Lubna; Khan, Haseeb A; Shamji, Mohamed H; Ten Haken, Bennie; Stenbeck, Gudrun; Sim, Robert B; Kishore, Uday

    2015-11-01

    Interaction between the complement system and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can modify their intended biomedical applications. Pristine and derivatised CNTs can activate complement primarily via the classical pathway which enhances uptake of CNTs and suppresses pro-inflammatory response by immune cells. Here, we report that the interaction of C1q, the classical pathway recognition molecule, with CNTs involves charge pattern and classical pathway activation that is partly inhibited by factor H, a complement regulator. C1q and its globular modules, but not factor H, enhanced uptake of CNTs by macrophages and modulated the pro-inflammatory immune response. Thus, soluble complement factors can interact differentially with CNTs and alter the immune response even without complement activation. Coating CNTs with recombinant C1q globular heads offers a novel way of controlling classical pathway activation in nanotherapeutics. Surprisingly, the globular heads also enhance clearance by phagocytes and down-regulate inflammation, suggesting unexpected complexity in receptor interaction. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) maybe useful in the clinical setting as targeting drug carriers. However, it is also well known that they can interact and activate the complement system, which may have a negative impact on the applicability of CNTs. In this study, the authors functionalized multi-walled CNT (MWNT), and investigated the interaction with the complement pathway. These studies are important so as to gain further understanding of the underlying mechanism in preparation for future use of CNTs in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  13. Growth inhibition, cell-cycle alteration and apoptosis in stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes by multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper.

    PubMed

    Zeni, Olga; Sannino, Anna; Romeo, Stefania; Micciulla, Federico; Bellucci, Stefano; Scarfi, Maria Rosaria

    2015-02-01

    This study was designed to investigate the cytotoxicity of multiwalled carbon nanotube buckypaper (BP) in stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Materials & methods & results: BP treatment led to a delay in the cell growth, as proven by a minor increase in the cell number over time relative to that seen in untreated cells, assessed by trypan blue, resazurin and neutral red assays. The analysis of cell-cycle profile, by propidium iodide staining, indicated that BP treatment blocked cell-cycle progression by arresting cells at the G0/G1 phase. Moreover, increased apoptosis was also recorded by Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide staining. The results presented here demonstrate an inhibitor effect of BP on cell growth that was likely through cytostatic and cytotoxic events.

  14. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  15. PEGylated Carbon Nanotubes Impair Retrieval of Contextual Fear Memory and Alter Oxidative Stress Parameters in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dal Bosco, Lidiane; Weber, Gisele E. B.; Parfitt, Gustavo M.; Paese, Karina; Gonçalves, Carla O. F.; Serodre, Tiago M.; Furtado, Clascídia A.; Santos, Adelina P.; Monserrat, José M.; Barros, Daniela M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are promising materials for biomedical applications, especially in the field of neuroscience; therefore, it is essential to evaluate the neurotoxicity of these nanomaterials. The present work assessed the effects of single-walled CNT functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG) on the consolidation and retrieval of contextual fear memory in rats and on oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus. SWCNT-PEG were dispersed in water at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.1 mg/mL and infused into the rat hippocampus. The infusion was completed immediately after training and 30 min before testing of a contextual fear conditioning task, resulting in exposure times of 24 h and 30 min, respectively. The results showed that a short exposure to SWCNT-PEG impaired fear memory retrieval and caused lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. This response was transient and overcome by the mobilization of antioxidant defenses at 24 h. These effects occurred at low and intermediate but not high concentration of SWCNT-PEG, suggesting that the observed biological response may be related to the concentration-dependent increase in particle size in SWCNT-PEG dispersions. PMID:25738149

  16. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Antoine G.; Varela, Juan A.; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P.; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  17. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Antoine G.; Varela, Juan A.; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P.; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  18. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain.

    PubMed

    Godin, Antoine G; Varela, Juan A; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  19. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  20. Altering the catalytic activity of thin metal catalyst films for controlled growth of chemical vapor deposited vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouleau, C. M.; Eres, G.; Cui, H.; Christen, H. M.; Puretzky, A. A.; Geohegan, D. B.

    2008-12-01

    The growth rate and terminal length of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VANTAs) grown by chemical vapor deposition have been dramatically improved through pulsed KrF excimer laser pretreatments of multilayer metal catalyst films. Silicon wafers coated with Al, Mo, and Fe layers were laser processed in air with single laser shots of varying fluence through circular apertures, then heated to ˜750°C and exposed to acetylene and ferrocene containing gas mixtures typically used to grow vertically aligned nanotube arrays. In situ videography was used to record the growth kinetics of the nanotube arrays in both patterned and unpatterned regions to understand the changes in catalytic activity, growth rates, and termination of growth. The height of the patterned regions varied with fluence, with the most successful treatment resulting in 1.4 cm tall posts of nanotubes embedded in a 0.4 cm tall nanotube carpet. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images from the nanotubes in the posts revealed fewer walls, smaller diameters, and a much narrower distribution of diameters compared to the nanotubes grown in the carpet. This information, along with data obtained from weighing the material from each region, suggests that pulsed laser processing can also significantly increase the areal density of VANTAs.

  1. Carbon nanotube filters.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Srivastava, O N; Talapatra, S; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus ( approximately 25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  2. Carbon nanotube filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  3. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  4. Multiwalled nanotube faceting unravelled.

    PubMed

    Leven, Itai; Guerra, Roberto; Vanossi, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio; Hod, Oded

    2016-12-01

    Nanotubes show great promise for miniaturizing advanced technologies. Their exceptional physical properties are intimately related to their morphological and crystal structure. Circumferential faceting of multiwalled nanotubes reinforces their mechanical strength and alters their tribological and electronic properties. Here, the nature of this important phenomenon is fully rationalized in terms of interlayer registry patterns. Regardless of the nanotube identity (that is, diameter, chirality, chemical composition), faceting requires the matching of the chiral angles of adjacent layers. Above a critical diameter that corresponds well with experimental results, achiral multiwalled nanotubes display evenly spaced extended axial facets whose number equals the interlayer difference in circumferential unit cells. Elongated helical facets, commonly observed in experiment, appear in nanotubes that exhibit small interlayer chiral angle mismatch. When the wall chiralities are uncorrelated, faceting is suppressed and outer layer corrugation, which is induced by the Moiré superlattice, is obtained in agreement with experiments. Finally, we offer an explanation for the higher incidence of faceting in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes with respect to their carbon-based counterparts.

  5. Multiwalled nanotube faceting unravelled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leven, Itai; Guerra, Roberto; Vanossi, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio; Hod, Oded

    2016-12-01

    Nanotubes show great promise for miniaturizing advanced technologies. Their exceptional physical properties are intimately related to their morphological and crystal structure. Circumferential faceting of multiwalled nanotubes reinforces their mechanical strength and alters their tribological and electronic properties. Here, the nature of this important phenomenon is fully rationalized in terms of interlayer registry patterns. Regardless of the nanotube identity (that is, diameter, chirality, chemical composition), faceting requires the matching of the chiral angles of adjacent layers. Above a critical diameter that corresponds well with experimental results, achiral multiwalled nanotubes display evenly spaced extended axial facets whose number equals the interlayer difference in circumferential unit cells. Elongated helical facets, commonly observed in experiment, appear in nanotubes that exhibit small interlayer chiral angle mismatch. When the wall chiralities are uncorrelated, faceting is suppressed and outer layer corrugation, which is induced by the Moiré superlattice, is obtained in agreement with experiments. Finally, we offer an explanation for the higher incidence of faceting in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes with respect to their carbon-based counterparts.

  6. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  7. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  8. Modelling encapsulation of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Thamwattana, Ngamta

    2014-02-01

    Lipid nanotubes are of particular interest for use as a template to create various one-dimensional nanostructures and as a carrier for drug and gene delivery. Understanding the encapsulation process is therefore crucial for such development. This paper models the interactions between lipid nanotubes and spheres of gold and silver nanoparticles and determines the critical dimension of lipid nanotubes that maximises the interaction with the nanoparticles. Our results confirm the acceptance of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes. Further, we find that the lipid nanotube of radius approximately 10.23 nm is most favourable to encapsulate both types of nanoparticles.

  9. Nanotube Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEuen, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    Under this project, we explored the feasibility of utilizing carbon nanotubes in sensing applications. The grant primarily supported a graduate student, who worked on a number of aspects of the electrical properties of carbon nanotubes in collaboration with other researchers in my group. The two major research accomplishments are described below. The first accomplishment is the demonstration that solution carbon nanotube transistors functioned well in an electrolyte environment. This was important for two reasons. First, it allowed us to explore the ultimate limits of nanotube electronic performance by using the electrolyte as a highly effective gate, with a dielectric constant of approximately 80 and an effective insulator thickness of approximately 1 nm. Second, it showed that nanotubes function well under biologically relevant conditions (salty water) and therefore offer great promise as biological sensors. The second accomplishment was the demonstration that a voltage pulse applied to an AFM tip could be used to electrically cut carbon nanotubes. We also showed that a carefully applied pulse could also 'nick' a nanotube, creating a tunnel barrier without completely breaking the tube. Nicking was employed to make, for example, a quantum dot within a nanotube.

  10. Nanotube Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEuen, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    Under this project, we explored the feasibility of utilizing carbon nanotubes in sensing applications. The grant primarily supported a graduate student, who worked on a number of aspects of the electrical properties of carbon nanotubes in collaboration with other researchers in my group. The two major research accomplishments are described below. The first accomplishment is the demonstration that solution carbon nanotube transistors functioned well in an electrolyte environment. This was important for two reasons. First, it allowed us to explore the ultimate limits of nanotube electronic performance by using the electrolyte as a highly effective gate, with a dielectric constant of approximately 80 and an effective insulator thickness of approximately 1 nm. Second, it showed that nanotubes function well under biologically relevant conditions (salty water) and therefore offer great promise as biological sensors. The second accomplishment was the demonstration that a voltage pulse applied to an AFM tip could be used to electrically cut carbon nanotubes. We also showed that a carefully applied pulse could also 'nick' a nanotube, creating a tunnel barrier without completely breaking the tube. Nicking was employed to make, for example, a quantum dot within a nanotube.

  11. Graphenylene Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Andrew T; Khoshaman, Amir H; Fan, Harrison D E; Sawatzky, George A; Nojeh, Alireza

    2015-10-01

    A new type of carbon nanotube, based on the graphenylene motif, is investigated using density functional and tight-binding methods. Analogous to conventional graphene-based nanotubes, a two-dimensional graphenylene sheet can be "rolled" into a seamless cylinder in armchair, zigzag, or chiral orientations. The resulting nanotube can be described using the familiar (n,m) nomenclature and possesses 4-, 6-, and 12-membered rings, with three distinct bond lengths, indicating a nonuniform distribution of the electron density. The dodecagonal rings form pores, 3.3 Å in diameter in graphenylene, which become saddle-shaped paraboloids in smaller-diameter nanotubes. Density functional theory predicts zigzag nanotubes to be small-band gap semiconductors, with a generally decreasing band gap as the diameter increases. Interestingly, the calculations predict metallic characteristics for armchair nanotubes with small diameters (<2 nm), and small-band gap semiconducting characteristics for larger-diameter ones. Graphenylene nanotubes with indices mod(n-m,3) = 0 exhibit a band gap approximately equal to that of armchair graphenylene nanotubes with comparable diameter.

  12. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2007-05-29

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  13. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2006-11-07

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  14. Controlled production of aligned-nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, M.; Grobert, N.; Olivares, J.; Zhang, J. P.; Terrones, H.; Kordatos, K.; Hsu, W. K.; Hare, J. P.; Townsend, P. D.; Prassides, K.; Cheetham, A. K.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    1997-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes might be usefully employed in nanometre-scale engineering and electronics. Electrical conductivity measurements on the bulk material, on individual multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes and on bundles of single-walled nanotubes have revealed that they may behave as metallic, insulating or semiconducting nanowires, depending on the method of production-which controls the degree of graphitization, the helicity and the diameter. Measurements of Young's modulus show that single nanotubes are stiffer than commercial carbon fibres. Methods commonly used to generate nanotubes-carbon-arc discharge techniques, catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons and condensed-phase electrolysis-generally suffer from the drawbacks that polyhedral particles are also formed and that the dimensions of the nanotubes are highly variable. Here we describe a method for generating aligned carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis of 2-amino-4,6-dichloro-s-triazine over thin films of a cobalt catalyst patterned on a silica substrate by laser etching. The use of a patterned catalyst apparently encourages the formation of aligned nanotubes. The method offers control over length (up to about 50μm) and fairly uniform diameters (30-50nm), as well as producing nanotubes in high yield, uncontaminated by polyhedral particles.

  15. Analysis of the effects of applying external fields and device dimensions alterations on GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well slow light devices based on excitonic population oscillation.

    PubMed

    Kohandani, Reza; Zandi, Ashkan; Kaatuzian, Hassan

    2014-02-20

    This paper demonstrates the effects of applying magnetic and electric fields and physical dimensions alterations on AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well (QW) slow light devices. Physical parameters include quantum well sizes and number of quantum wells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis of the effects of both applying magnetic/electric fields and physical parameters alterations and the first suggestion for matching the prefabrication and post fabrication tuning of the slow light devices based on excitonic population oscillations. The aim of our theoretical analysis is controlling the optical properties such as central frequency, bandwidth, and slow down factor (SDF) in slow light devices based on excitonic population oscillation to achieve better tuning. To reach these purposes, first we investigate the quantum well size and number of quantum wells alteration effects. Next, we analyze the effects of applying magnetic and electric fields to the multiple quantum well structure, separately. Finally, physical parameters and applied external fields are changed for measuring frequency shift and SDF for coherent population oscillation slow light devices. The results show the available central frequency shifts in about 1.6 THz at best. Also the SDF value improvement is about one order of magnitude. These results will be applicable for optical nonlinearity enhancements, all-optical signal processing, optical communications, all-optical switches, optical modulators, and variable true delays.

  16. Functional High-Intensity Circuit Training Improves Body Composition, Peak Oxygen Uptake, Strength, and Alters Certain Dimensions of Quality of Life in Overweight Women.

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Billy; Wallmann-Sperlich, Birgit; Zinner, Christoph; Von Stauffenberg, Valerie; Losert, Helena; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2017-01-01

    The effects of circuit-like functional high-intensity training (CircuitHIIT) alone or in combination with high-volume low-intensity exercise (Circuitcombined) on selected cardio-respiratory and metabolic parameters, body composition, functional strength and the quality of life of overweight women were compared. In this single-center, two-armed randomized, controlled study, overweight women performed 9-weeks (3 sessions·wk(-1)) of either CircuitHIIT (n = 11), or Circuitcombined (n = 8). Peak oxygen uptake and perception of physical pain were increased to a greater extent (p < 0.05) by CircuitHIIT, whereas Circuitcombined improved perception of general health more (p < 0.05). Both interventions lowered body mass, body-mass-index, waist-to-hip ratio, fat mass, and enhanced fat-free mass; decreased ratings of perceived exertion during submaximal treadmill running; improved the numbers of push-ups, burpees, one-legged squats, and 30-s skipping performed, as well as the height of counter-movement jumps; and improved physical and social functioning, role of physical limitations, vitality, role of emotional limitations, and mental health to a similar extent (all p < 0.05). Either forms of these multi-stimulating, circuit-like, multiple-joint training can be employed to improve body composition, selected variables of functional strength, and certain dimensions of quality of life in overweight women. However, CircuitHIIT improves peak oxygen uptake to a greater extent, but with more perception of pain, whereas Circuitcombined results in better perception of general health.

  17. Functional High-Intensity Circuit Training Improves Body Composition, Peak Oxygen Uptake, Strength, and Alters Certain Dimensions of Quality of Life in Overweight Women

    PubMed Central

    Sperlich, Billy; Wallmann-Sperlich, Birgit; Zinner, Christoph; Von Stauffenberg, Valerie; Losert, Helena; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2017-01-01

    The effects of circuit-like functional high-intensity training (CircuitHIIT) alone or in combination with high-volume low-intensity exercise (Circuitcombined) on selected cardio-respiratory and metabolic parameters, body composition, functional strength and the quality of life of overweight women were compared. In this single-center, two-armed randomized, controlled study, overweight women performed 9-weeks (3 sessions·wk−1) of either CircuitHIIT (n = 11), or Circuitcombined (n = 8). Peak oxygen uptake and perception of physical pain were increased to a greater extent (p < 0.05) by CircuitHIIT, whereas Circuitcombined improved perception of general health more (p < 0.05). Both interventions lowered body mass, body-mass-index, waist-to-hip ratio, fat mass, and enhanced fat-free mass; decreased ratings of perceived exertion during submaximal treadmill running; improved the numbers of push-ups, burpees, one-legged squats, and 30-s skipping performed, as well as the height of counter-movement jumps; and improved physical and social functioning, role of physical limitations, vitality, role of emotional limitations, and mental health to a similar extent (all p < 0.05). Either forms of these multi-stimulating, circuit-like, multiple-joint training can be employed to improve body composition, selected variables of functional strength, and certain dimensions of quality of life in overweight women. However, CircuitHIIT improves peak oxygen uptake to a greater extent, but with more perception of pain, whereas Circuitcombined results in better perception of general health. PMID:28420999

  18. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  19. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  20. Nanotube radio.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K; Weldon, J; Garcia, H; Zettl, A

    2007-11-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  1. Nanotube Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Weldon, Jeff; Garcia, Henry; Zettl, Alex

    2008-03-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  2. Graphane nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tao; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W; Martin, Richard L; Rudin, Sven P; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2012-08-28

    In this work, one-dimensional graphane nanotubes (GN, stoichiometry CH), built from 2D single-sheet graphanes, are explored theoretically. Zigzag type GN(10,0) and armchair type GN(10,10) structures with varying surface termination were investigated in detail. GN(10,10)-A is found to be the most stable configuration among the GN structures considered. An annealing analysis indicates that graphane-A and GN(10,10)-A are likely to be stable at elevated temperature. A possible reaction path to GN(10,10)-A is suggested by the reaction of single-walled carbon nanotube (10,10) + H(2); the indications are that the GN(10,10)-A can be made at low temperature and high partial pressure of H(2) gas from the corresponding nanotube. The graphane nanotubes are predicted to be wide band gap insulators. A study of the effect of the diameter of GN structures shows, unexpectedly, that the gap increases on reducing the diameter of the graphane nanotubes. We also investigated several partially hydrogenated graphenes and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT); the greater hydrogenation is, the more stable is the resulting structure. The band gap of graphene or SWNT can be tuned via hydrogenation.

  3. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Nygârd, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike in conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and valley freedom. The interplay between the two is the focus of this review. The energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are explained, together with their consequences for transport measurements through nanotube quantum dots. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly modifies their transport behavior. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, open questions for the field are also clearly stated. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both be reduced to a low level.

  4. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX−-N (NO3−-N and NO2−-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials. PMID:27279546

  5. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-06-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX‑-N (NO3‑-N and NO2‑-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials.

  6. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  7. Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.

    2004-10-05

    The large separation between the weak scale {approx} 10{sup 3} GeV and the traditional scale of gravity--the Planck scale with M{sub PI} {approx} 10{sup 19} GeV--is one of the most puzzling aspects of nature. The origin of this large ratio, as well as its stability under radiative corrections, demands explanation. This is known as the hierarchy problem. One theoretical means of solving this problem is to introduce Supersymmetry. Alternatively one may hope to address the hierarchy by exploiting the geometry of space time. Specifically, recent theories involve the idea that the 3-spatial dimensions in which we live could be a 3-spatial-dimensional ''membrane'' embedded in a much larger extra dimensional space, and that the hierarchy is generated by the geometry of the additional dimensions. Such ideas have led to extra dimensional theories which have verifiable consequences at the TeV scale. Our knowledge of the weak and strong forces extends down to scales of {approx} (100 GeV){sup -1} (or of order 10{sup -15} mm). On the other hand, we have almost no knowledge of gravity at distances less than roughly a millimeter, as direct tests of the gravitational force at the smallest distances are based on torsion-balance experiments, which are mechanically limited. It is thus conceivable that gravity may behave quite differently from the 3-dimensional Newtonian theory at small distances. This leads to the possibility that matter and non-gravitational forces are confined to our 3-dimensional subspace, whereas gravity may propagate throughout a higher dimensional volume. In this case, the gauge forces are trapped within our 3-dimensional space, unaware of the extra dimensions, and maintain their usual behavior. Gravity, on the other hand, would no longer follow the inverse-square force law at distances smaller than the size of the extra dimensions, as the gravitational equivalent of Gauss' Law mandates that the gravitational field spreads out into the full spatial volume

  8. Dimension stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2003-01-01

    Dimension stone can be defined as natural rock material quarried to obtain blocks or slabs that meet specifications as to size (width, length and thickness) and shape for architectural or engineering purposes. Color, grain texture and pattern, and surface finish of the stone are also normal requirements. Other important selection criteria are durability (based on mineral composition, hardness and past performance), strength and the ability of the stone to take a polish.

  9. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  10. Lift-up growth of aligned carbon nanotube patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Bingqing; Zhang, Z. J.; Ramanath, G.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2000-11-01

    The fabrication of three-dimensional networks of carbon nanotubes with controlled orientation will be essential for building large-scale functional devices integrated with microelectronics circuits. We describe here our recent work on the controlled synthesis of vertically aligned carbon-nanotube patterns, grown under patterned metal layers on Si substrates by combining chemical-vapor deposition and conventional lithography. We show that metal patterns are lifted up by vertically aligned nanotubes during growth. This lift-up growth links the thin-film metal patterns and the Si substrate via nanotube assemblies, giving the possibility of creating nanotube architectures in three dimensions. The possible scenarios of the growth of aligned nanotube films leading to the lift up of the metal films are discussed.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Modeling of Nanotube Materials with Variable Stiffness Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Herzog, M. N.; Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    Synthesis, mechanical testing, and modeling have been performed for carbon nanotube based materials. Tests using nanoindentation indicated a six-fold enhancement in the storage modulus when comparing the base material (no nanotubes) to the composite that contained 5.3 wt% of nanotubes. To understand how crosslinking the nanotubes may further alter the stiffness, a model of the system was constructed using nanotubes crosslinked with a variable stiffness tether (VST). The model predicted that for a composite with 5 wt% nanotubes at random orientations, crosslinked with the VST, the bulk Young's modulus was reduced by 30% compared to the noncrosslinked equivalent.

  12. Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bronkowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have shown that with suitable choices of critical dimensions, planar arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see figure) can serve as high-current-density field emitter (cold-cathode) electron sources. Whereas some hot-cathode electron sources must be operated at supply potentials of thousands of volts, these cold-cathode sources generate comparable current densities when operated at tens of volts. Consequently, arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes might prove useful as cold-cathode sources in miniature, lightweight electron-beam devices (e.g., nanoklystrons) soon to be developed. Prior to the experiments, all reported efforts to develop carbon-nanotube-based field-emission sources had yielded low current densities from a few hundred microamperes to a few hundred milliamperes per square centimeter. An electrostatic screening effect, in which taller nanotubes screen the shorter ones from participating in field emission, was conjectured to be what restricts the emission of electrons to such low levels. It was further conjectured that the screening effect could be reduced and thus emission levels increased by increasing the spacing between nanotubes to at least by a factor of one to two times the height of the nanotubes. While this change might increase the emission from individual nanotubes, it would decrease the number of nanotubes per unit area and thereby reduce the total possible emission current. Therefore, to maximize the area-averaged current density, it would be necessary to find an optimum combination of nanotube spacing and nanotube height. The present concept of using an array of bundles of nanotubes arises partly from the concept of optimizing the spacing and height of field emitters. It also arises partly from the idea that single nanotubes may have short lifetimes as field emitters, whereas bundles of nanotubes could afford redundancy so that the loss of a single nanotube would not significantly reduce the overall field emission.

  13. Nanotube News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  14. Nanotube News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  15. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  16. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  17. Membrane-targeted self-assembling cyclic peptide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Ozores, H Lionel; Guerra, Arcadio; González-Freire, Eva; Fuertes, Alberto; Panciera, Michele; Priegue, Juan M; Outeiral, Juan; Montenegro, Javier; Garcia-Fandino, Rebeca; Amorin, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanotubes are novel supramolecular nanobiomaterials that have a tubular structure. The stacking of cyclic components is one of the most promising strategies amongst the methods described in recent years for the preparation of nanotubes. This strategy allows precise control of the nanotube surface properties and the dimensions of the tube diameter. In addition, the incorporation of 3- aminocycloalkanecarboxylic acid residues in the nanotube-forming peptides allows control of the internal properties of the supramolecular tube. The research aimed at the application of membrane-interacting self-assembled cyclic peptide nanotubes (SCPNs) is summarized in this review. The cyclic peptides are designed to interact with phospholipid bilayers to induce nanotube formation. The properties and orientation of the nanotube can be tuned by tailoring the peptide sequence. Hydrophobic peptides form transmembrane pores with a hydrophilic orifice, the nature of which has been exploited to transport ions and small molecules efficiently. These synthetic ion channels are selective for alkali metal ions (Na(+), K(+) or Cs(+)) over divalent cations (Ca(2+)) or anions (Cl(-)). Unfortunately, selectivity was not achieved within the series of alkali metal ions, for which ion transport rates followed the diffusion rates in water. Amphipathic peptides form nanotubes that lie parallel to the membrane. Interestingly, nanotube formation takes place preferentially on the surface of bacterial membranes, thus making these materials suitable for the development of new antimicrobial agents.

  18. Template synthesized gold nanotube membranes for chemical separations and sensing.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Marc; Yu, Shufang; Martin, Charles R

    2002-07-01

    We have developed a new class of synthetic membranes that consist of a porous polymeric support that contains an ensemble of gold nanotubes that span the thickness of the support membrane. The support is a commercially-available microporous polycarbonate filter with cylindrical nanoscopic pores. The gold nanotubes are prepared via electroless deposition of Au onto the pore walls; i.e., the pores acts as templates for the nanotubes. We have shown that by controlling the Au deposition time, Au nanotubes that have effective inside diameters of molecular dimensions (< 1 nm) can be prepared. These membranes are a new class of molecular sieves and can be used to separate both small molecules and proteins on the basis of molecular size. In addition, the use of these membranes in new approaches to electrochemical sensing is reviewed here. In this case, a current is forced through the nanotubes, and analyte molecules present in a contacting solution phase modulate the value of this transmembrane current.

  19. Combined electron microscopy and spectroscopy characterization of as-received, acid purified, and oxidized HiPCO single-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosario-Castro, Belinda I.; Contes, Enid J.; Lebron-Colon, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.; Sanchez-Pomales, Germarie; Cabrera, Carlos R.

    2009-12-15

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are very important materials due to their combination of unique structure, dimension, strength, chemical stability, and electronic properties. Nevertheless, SWCNTs from commercial sources usually contain several impurities, which are usually removed by a purification process that includes reflux in acids and strong oxidation. This strong chemical procedure may alter the nanotube properties and it is thus important to control the extent of functionalization and oxidation during the purification procedure. In this report, we provide a comprehensive study of the structure and physical composition of SWCNTs during each step of the purification process. Techniques such as Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Infrared spectroscopy were used to track the SWCNTs structure, in terms of length and diameter distribution, and surface chemical modifications during each purification stage.

  20. Atomic Layer Deposition Coating of Carbon Nanotubes with Aluminum Oxide Alters Pro-Fibrogenic Cytokine Expression by Human Mononuclear Phagocytes In Vitro and Reduces Lung Fibrosis in Mice In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Alexia J.; McClure, Christina D.; Shipkowski, Kelly A.; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N.; Bonner, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) pose a possible human health risk for lung disease as a result of inhalation exposure. Mice exposed to MWCNTs develop pulmonary fibrosis. Lung macrophages engulf MWCNTs and produce pro-fibrogenic cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and osteopontin (OPN). Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a novel process used to enhance functional properties of MWCNTs, yet the consequence of ALD-modified MWCNTs on macrophage biology and fibrosis is unknown. Methods The purpose of this study was to determine whether ALD coating with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) would alter the fibrogenic response to MWCNTs and whether cytokine expression in human macrophage/monocytes exposed to MWCNTs in vitro would predict the severity of lung fibrosis in mice. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs or ALD-coated (A)-MWCNTs were incubated with THP-1 macrophages or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cell supernatants assayed for cytokines by ELISA. C57BL6 mice were exposed to a single dose of A- or U-MWCNTs by oropharyngeal aspiration (4 mg/kg) followed by evaluation of histopathology, lung inflammatory cell counts, and cytokine levels at day 1 and 28 post-exposure. Results ALD coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 enhanced IL-1β secretion by THP-1 and PBMC in vitro, yet reduced protein levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN production by THP-1 cells. Moreover, Al2O3 nanoparticles, but not carbon black NPs, increased IL-1β but decreased OPN and IL-6 in THP-1 and PBMC. Mice exposed to U-MWCNT had increased levels of all four cytokines assayed and developed pulmonary fibrosis by 28 days, whereas ALD-coating significantly reduced fibrosis and cytokine levels at the mRNA or protein level. Conclusion These findings indicate that ALD thin film coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 reduces fibrosis in mice and that in vitro phagocyte expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN, but not IL-1β, predict MWCNT-induced fibrosis in the lungs of mice in vivo

  1. Atomic layer deposition coating of carbon nanotubes with aluminum oxide alters pro-fibrogenic cytokine expression by human mononuclear phagocytes in vitro and reduces lung fibrosis in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Alexia J; McClure, Christina D; Shipkowski, Kelly A; Thompson, Elizabeth A; Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Parsons, Gregory N; Bonner, James C

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) pose a possible human health risk for lung disease as a result of inhalation exposure. Mice exposed to MWCNTs develop pulmonary fibrosis. Lung macrophages engulf MWCNTs and produce pro-fibrogenic cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and osteopontin (OPN). Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a novel process used to enhance functional properties of MWCNTs, yet the consequence of ALD-modified MWCNTs on macrophage biology and fibrosis is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ALD coating with aluminum oxide (Al2O3) would alter the fibrogenic response to MWCNTs and whether cytokine expression in human macrophage/monocytes exposed to MWCNTs in vitro would predict the severity of lung fibrosis in mice. Uncoated (U)-MWCNTs or ALD-coated (A)-MWCNTs were incubated with THP-1 macrophages or human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cell supernatants assayed for cytokines by ELISA. C57BL6 mice were exposed to a single dose of A- or U-MWCNTs by oropharyngeal aspiration (4 mg/kg) followed by evaluation of histopathology, lung inflammatory cell counts, and cytokine levels at day 1 and 28 post-exposure. ALD coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 enhanced IL-1β secretion by THP-1 and PBMC in vitro, yet reduced protein levels of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN production by THP-1 cells. Moreover, Al2O3 nanoparticles, but not carbon black NPs, increased IL-1β but decreased OPN and IL-6 in THP-1 and PBMC. Mice exposed to U-MWCNT had increased levels of all four cytokines assayed and developed pulmonary fibrosis by 28 days, whereas ALD-coating significantly reduced fibrosis and cytokine levels at the mRNA or protein level. These findings indicate that ALD thin film coating of MWCNTs with Al2O3 reduces fibrosis in mice and that in vitro phagocyte expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and OPN, but not IL-1β, predict MWCNT-induced fibrosis in the lungs of mice in vivo.

  2. Improved photocatalytic degradation of textile dye using titanium dioxide nanotubes formed over titanium wires.

    PubMed

    Kar, Archana; Smith, York R; Subramanian, Vaidyanathan

    2009-05-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes formed by anodization over titanium wires show a significant improvement in photocatalytic activity compared to the nanotubes formed over foils. This is evident when the fractional conversion of a textile dye, methyl orange, increased from 19% over a foil to 40% over wires in the presence of nanotubes of identical dimensions illuminated over the same geometrical area. Higher degradation rates with Pt-TiO2 nanotubes over foils are matched by the Pt-free TiO2 nanotubes over the wires. The higher photocatalytic activity over the anodized wires can be attributed to the efficient capture of reflected and refracted light by the radially outward oriented TiO2 nanotubes formed over the circumference of the titanium wire. The formation of TiO2 nanotubes over wires can be considered as an effective alternate to improve photodegradation rates by avoiding expensive additives.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Carbon nanotubes for biological and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenrong; Thordarson, Pall; Gooding, J. Justin; Ringer, Simon P.; Braet, Filip

    2007-10-01

    Ever since the discovery of carbon nanotubes, researchers have been exploring their potential in biological and biomedical applications. The recent expansion and availability of chemical modification and bio-functionalization methods have made it possible to generate a new class of bioactive carbon nanotubes which are conjugated with proteins, carbohydrates, or nucleic acids. The modification of a carbon nanotube on a molecular level using biological molecules is essentially an example of the 'bottom-up' fabrication principle of bionanotechnology. The availability of these biomodified carbon nanotube constructs opens up an entire new and exciting research direction in the field of chemical biology, finally aiming to target and to alter the cell's behaviour at the subcellular or molecular level. This review covers the latest advances of bio-functionalized carbon nanotubes with an emphasis on the development of functional biological nano-interfaces. Topics that are discussed herewith include methods for biomodification of carbon nanotubes, the development of hybrid systems of carbon nanotubes and biomolecules for bioelectronics, and carbon nanotubes as transporters for a specific delivery of peptides and/or genetic material to cells. All of these current research topics aim at translating these biotechnology modified nanotubes into potential novel therapeutic approaches.

  4. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  5. Electrooptical properties of aqueous suspensions of nickel hydrosilicate nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voitylov, A. V.; Vojtylov, V. V.; Dolgov, I. S.; Klemeshev, S. A.; Korytkova, E. N.; Maslennikova, T. P.; Petrov, M. P.; Pivovarova, L. N.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our investigations of electrooptical effects that occur as a result of light scattering by an aqueous polydisperse system the disperse phase of which consists of nickel hydrosilicate nanotubes with a chrysotile structure. Multilayer nanotubes were synthesized by the hydrothermal method and had the composition Ni3Si2O5. The dimensions of nanotubes were as follows: the length was 0.1-1 μm or more, the outer diameter was 10-15 nm, and the inner diameter was 3 nm. We have studied relative changes in the intensities of light transmitted and scattered by the suspension that were caused by the orientation of nanotubes in an external electric field. Experiments have been performed at different directions of the linear polarization of the incident and scattered light, different scattering angles, and different degrees of orientation of nanotubes along the field. These measurements allowed us to determine the magnitude of electrooptical effects, such as the conservative dichroism, the light scattering, and the influence of the orientation of nanotubes in the field on the intensity and degree of depolarization of light scattered by them. Curves of free relaxation of electrooptical effects and their field dependences allowed us to determine the distributions of nanotubes and their aggregates in the colloid over lengths and polarizability anisotropy values. The dependences of the degree of depolarization of the scattered radiation on the scattering angle and the relaxation dependences of electrooptical effects allowed us to characterize the aggregation stability of nanotubes in water.

  6. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, Guzeliya

    Carbon nanotubes have unique properties that make them attractive for different engineering applications. However, because of their chemical inertness, carbon nanotubes have to be functionalized in order to acquire additional physico-chemical properties. Large multiwalled carbon nanotubes are different from fullerenes and singlewalled nanotubes because the stresses in their walls are almost relaxed while most chemical methods for fullerene functionalization exploit this effect of stressed bonds. The objective of this work is to develop new methods for functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This work is dedicated to study two functionalization methods. The first deals with physico-chemical functionalization by filling the nanotube interior with colloidal suspensions. Irreversible adsorption of functional nanoparticles on the nanotube wall leads to the nanotube functionalization. The second method is purely chemical functionalization, which uses the reaction of cyclopropanation to break pi-bonds in the benzene rings of the nanotubes with formation of new σ-bonds with deprotonated malonate. This so-called Bingel reaction has been used in fullerene chemistry and in this work was applied for the first time to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes. While capillary filling of carbon nanotubes was known long ago, the research community was skeptical about possibility of engulfing nanoparticles into nanotubes by capillary forces. We developed and implemented capillary method to fill nanotubes with different nanoparticles. Using this method, magnetic carbon nanotubes were produced for the first time. Synthesized nanotubes have very high magnetic moment and allow to manipulate them by magnetic field. These magnetic nanotubes have been successfully used in fabrication of carbon nanotube-tipped pipettes for biological probes. The Bingel reaction was studied on three sets of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters: 20nm, 100nm, and 300nm. To estimate the

  7. Biomimetic Nanotubes Based on Cyclodextrins for Ion-Channel Applications.

    PubMed

    Mamad-Hemouch, Hajar; Ramoul, Hassen; Abou Taha, Mohammad; Bacri, Laurent; Huin, Cécile; Przybylski, Cédric; Oukhaled, Abdelghani; Thiébot, Bénédicte; Patriarche, Gilles; Jarroux, Nathalie; Pelta, Juan

    2015-11-11

    Biomimetic membrane channels offer a great potential for fundamental studies and applications. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of short cyclodextrin nanotubes, their insertion into membranes, and cytotoxicity assay. Mass spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to confirm the synthesis pathway leading to the formation of short nanotubes and to describe their structural parameters in terms of length, diameter, and number of cyclodextrins. Our results show the control of the number of cyclodextrins threaded on the polyrotaxane leading to nanotube synthesis. Structural parameters obtained by electron microscopy are consistent with the distribution of the number of cyclodextrins evaluated by mass spectrometry from the initial polymer distribution. An electrophysiological study at single molecule level demonstrates the ion channel formation into lipid bilayers, and the energy penalty for the entry of ions into the confined nanotube. In the presence of nanotubes, the cell physiology is not altered.

  8. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buranova, Yu. S.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  9. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buranova, Yu. S. Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-15

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  10. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  11. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  12. Electrical anisotropy in multiscale nanotube/fiber hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Gangloff, John J.; Li, Chunyu; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2009-08-01

    This letter reports an experimental and theoretical study on the electrical properties of carbon nanotube/glass fiber composites. Experimental measurements on unidirectional glass fiber composites with nanotubes dispersed in the polymer matrix show a high degree of anisotropy. The composites, manufactured with a vacuum infusion technique, do not show any significant process-induced anisotropy. Theoretical modeling reveals that the microstructure of the fiber composite plays a dominant role in the electrical behavior due to alteration of percolating paths in the carbon nanotube network.

  13. Carbon nanotube inner phase chemistry: the Cl- exchange SN2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Halls, Mathew D; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2005-10-01

    Density functional calculations have been carried out to investigate the nature of the inner phase of a (6,6) carbon nanotube, using the Cl(-) exchange S(N)2 reaction as an indicator. Inside the carbon nanotube the classical barrier height increases by 6.6 kcal/mol due to the nanotube polarizability. This suggests that the inner phase environment can be considered a form of solid solvation, offering the possibility of obtaining altered guest properties and reactivity through dielectric stabilization.

  14. Carbon-nanotube based nano-electro-mechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, S. J.; Hall, A. R.; Spivak, D. M.; Falvo, M. R.; Superfine, R.; Washburn, S.

    2004-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and performance of nanometer-scale electromechanical oscillators which use multi-walled carbon nanotubes as torsional springs. Carbon nanotube devices may offer high quality factors due to the inert surface of the torsional member, and high sensitivity due to their nanoscale dimensions. They also provide a means to study the effects of torsion on nanotube transport. The devices have a paddle-oscillator geometry and are driven electrostatically. In previous work we manipulated these devices directly with a scanning probe to measure the torsional properties of the nanotube, its shear modulus, and its subsequent stiffening under repeated strain [1]. Here we use both optical and electron-beam techniques to measure the response of the devices to applied voltages. We demonstrate both quasi-static and on-resonance performance characteristics. 1. P. A. Williams, S. J. Papadakis, A. M. Patel, M. R. Falvo, S. Washburn, and R. Superfine, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 255502 (2002).

  15. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  16. Working Toward Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga; Hadjiev, Victor G.; Scott, Carl D.; Files, Bradley S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most attractive applications of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is found in the area of structural materials. Nanotubes have a unique combination of high strength, modulus, and elongation to failure, and therefore have potential to significantly enhance the mechanical properties of today's composites. This is especially attractive for the aerospace industry looking for any chance to save weight. This is why NASA has chosen to tackle this difficult application of SWNT. Nanotube properties differ significantly from that of conventional carbon fibers, and a whole new set of problems, including adhesion and dispersion in the adhesive polymer matrix, must be resolved in order to engineer superior composite materials. From recent work on a variety of applications it is obvious that the wide range of research in nanotubes will lead to advances in physics, chemistry, and engineering. However, the possibility of ultralightweight structures is what causes dreamers to really get excited. One of the important issues in composite engineering is aspect ratio of the fibers, since it affects load transfer in composites. Nanotube length was a gray area for years, since they are formed in bundles, making it impossible to monitor individual nanotube length. Even though bundles are observed to be tens and hundreds of microns long, they can be built of relatively short tubes weakly bound by Van der Waals forces. Nanotube length can be affected by subsequent purification and ultrasound processing, which has been necessary in order to disperse nanotubes and introduce them into a polymer matrix. Some calculations show that nanotubes with 10(exp 5) aspect ratio may be necessary to achieve good load transfer. We show here that nanotubes produced in our laser system are as much as tens of microns long and get cut into lengths of hundreds of nanometers during ultrasound processing. Nanotube length was measured by AFM on pristine nanotube specimens as well, as after sonication

  17. Investigation of Thermal Expansion Properties of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes by Raman Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimir, Daniel

    The mechanical properties of nano-sized materials seem to differ significantly from the predicted behavior of their bulk macroscopic counterparts (Smart, 2014, 16). The former tend to be stronger, more malleable and exhibit greater flexibility. The thermal properties of materials have also been shown to be altered significantly after having been shrunken to nanometer dimensions. The nano material that exhibits this peculiar behavior that is studied in this dissertation are single walled carbon nanotubes. Single walled carbon nanotubes are hollow cylindrical tubes that are one atomic layer in thickness and made up of sp2 hybridized carbon atoms. The majority of samples have diameters on the order 1 nm, with lengths ranging from 1 micron to sometimes a centimeter (Tomanek, 2008, v). The thermo-mechanical quantity that I specifically examine in this research is the linear and volume thermal expansion coefficients of SWCNTs. The mean linear thermal expansion coefficient is the ratio of the change in unit length in response to a 1 degree Celsius rise in temperature. The "true" value of this quantity is obtained in the theoretical limit of a vanishing temperature range DeltaT in the ratio stated above. However, this simply stated thermo-mechanical quantity for Carbon Nanotubes still remains a controversial topic, with widespread discrepancies among results of certain magnitudes - such as the temperature at the occurrence of maximum contraction, and at the transition from contraction to expansion. In conclusion, there is much incentive in examining the somewhat controversial variation in the behavior and quoted values of the thermal expansion of these quasi one-dimensional objects. In this study, I examine this important property of single walled carbon nanotubes using Resonant Raman Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics Simulation based on the Adaptive Intermolecular Reactive Empirical Bond Order potential. The latter is a well established potential that is well-suited to

  18. Serpentine Nanotubes in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    The CM chondrites are primitive meteorites that formed during the early solar system. Although they retain much of their original physical character, their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained aqueous alteration early in their histories [1- 3]. Serpentine-group minerals are abundant products of such alteration, and information regarding their structures, compositions, and spatial relationships is important for determining the reactions that produced them and the conditions under which they formed. Our recent work on FGRs and matrices of the CM chondrites has revealed new information on the structures and compositions of serpentine-group minerals [4,5] and has provided insights into the evolution of these primitive meteorites. Here we report on serpentine nanotubes from the Mighei and Murchison CM chondrites [6].

  19. Filling carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, D.; Stöckli, T.; Bonard, J. M.; Châtelain, A.; de Heer, W. A.

    Filling hollow carbon nanotubes with chosen materials opens new possibilities of generating nearly one-dimensional nanostrutures. One simple approach to fill nanotubes is to use capillarity forces. Here, we have studied the wetting and capillarity by metal salts. First, nanotubes were opened by oxidation in air; subsequently, nanotubes were immersed in molten salts. We have observed a size-dependence filling indicating a lowering of the cavity-salt interface energy with decreasing diameter. By expressing the wetting conditions as a function of polarizabilities, it is possible to predict the threshold diameter for capillary filling of different materials.

  20. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  1. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  2. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; ...

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  3. Dimension of chaotic attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J.A.

    1982-09-01

    Dimension is perhaps the most basic property of an attractor. In this paper we discuss a variety of different definitions of dimension, compute their values for a typical example, and review previous work on the dimension of chaotic attractors. The relevant definitions of dimension are of two general types, those that depend only on metric properties, and those that depend on probabilistic properties (that is, they depend on the frequency with which a typical trajectory visits different regions of the attractor). Both our example and the previous work that we review support the conclusion that all of the probabilistic dimensions take on the same value, which we call the dimension of the natural measure, and all of the metric dimensions take on a common value, which we call the fractal dimension. Furthermore, the dimension of the natural measure is typically equal to the Lyapunov dimension, which is defined in terms of Lyapunov numbers, and thus is usually far easier to calculate than any other definition. Because it is computable and more physically relevant, we feel that the dimension of the natural measure is more important than the fractal dimension.

  4. Doing without dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, C. B.

    1986-03-01

    The author discusses the concept of dimensions of a physical quantity, and the relationship between derived units (expressed in terms of their base units) and the dimensions of the derived quantities. He calls for the replacement of 'dimensions' by base units in the GCE A-level syllabus and provides some recommendations to GCE examining boards.

  5. Formation and growth mechanisms of single-walled metal oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucelen, Gulfem Ipek

    In this thesis, main objectives are to discover the first molecular-level mechanistic framework governing the formation and growth of single-walled metal-oxide nanotubes, apply this framework to demonstrate the engineering of nanotubular materials of controlled dimensions, and to progress towards a quantitative multiscale understanding of nanotube formation. In Chapter 2, the identification and elucidation of the mechanistic role of molecular precursors and nanoscale (1-3 nm) intermediates with intrinsic curvature, in the formation of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes is reported. The structural and compositional evolution of molecular and nanoscale species over a length scale of 0.1-100 nm, are characterized by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. DFT calculations revealed the intrinsic curvature of nanoscale intermediates with bonding environments similar to the structure of the final nanotube product. It is shown that curved nano-intermediates form in aqueous synthesis solutions immediately after initial hydrolysis of reactants at 25 °C, disappear from the solution upon heating to 95 °C due to condensation, and finally rearrange to form ordered single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes. Integration of all results leads to the construction of the first molecular-level mechanism of single-walled metal oxide nanotube formation, incorporating the role of monomeric and polymeric aluminosilicate species as well as larger nanoparticles. Then, in Chapter 3, new molecular-level concepts for constructing nanoscopic metal oxide objects are demonstrated. The diameters of metal oxide nanotubes are shaped with Angstrom-level precision by controlling the shape of nanometer-scale precursors. The subtle relationships between precursor shape and structure and final nanotube curvature are measured (at the molecular level). Anionic ligands (both organic and inorganic) are used to exert fine control over precursor

  6. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Composite Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Altalhi, Tariq; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Han, Ninghui; Clarke, Stephen; Losic, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA) membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm), and thickness (5–100 μm), was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal) used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule. PMID:24957494

  7. Pure carbon nanoscale devices: Nanotube heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Chico, L.; Crespi, V.H.; Benedict, L.X.; Louie, S.G.; Cohen, M.L. |

    1996-02-01

    Introduction of pentagon-heptagon pair defects into the hexagonal network of a single carbon nanotube can change the helicity of the tube and alter its electronic structure. Using a tight-binding method to calculate the electronic structure of such systems we show that they behave as nanoscale metal/semiconductor or semiconductor/semiconductor junctions. These junctions could be the building blocks of nanoscale electronic devices made entirely of carbon. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. On Dipole Moment of Impurity Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konobeeva, N. N.; Ten, A. V.; Belonenko, M. B.

    2017-04-01

    Propagation of a two-dimensional electromagnetic pulse in an array of semiconductor carbon nanotubes with impurities is investigated. The parameters of dipole moments of impurities are determined. The Maxwell equation and the equation of motion for dipole polarization are jointly solved. The dynamics of the electromagnetic pulse is examined as a function of the dipole moment. It is shown that taking polarization into account does not have a substantial effect on the propagation process, but alters the optical pulse shape.

  9. Air-gating and chemical-gating in transistors and sensing devices made from hollow TiO2 semiconductor nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alivov, Yahya; Funke, Hans; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-07-24

    Rapid miniaturization of electronic devices down to the nanoscale, according to Moore's law, has led to some undesirable effects like high leakage current in transistors, which can offset additional benefits from scaling down. Development of three-dimensional transistors, by spatial extension in the third dimension, has allowed higher contact area with a gate electrode and better control over conductivity in the semiconductor channel. However, these devices do not utilize the large surface area and interfaces for new electronic functionality. Here, we demonstrate air gating and chemical gating in hollow semiconductor nanotube devices and highlight the potential for development of novel transistors that can be modulated using channel bias, gate voltage, chemical composition, and concentration. Using chemical gating, we reversibly altered the conductivity of nanoscaled semiconductor nanotubes (10-500 nm TiO2 nanotubes) by six orders of magnitude, with a tunable rectification factor (ON/OFF ratio) ranging from 1-10(6). While demonstrated air- and chemical-gating speeds were slow here (∼seconds) due to the mechanical-evacuation rate and size of our chamber, the small nanoscale volume of these hollow semiconductors can enable much higher switching speeds, limited by the rate of adsorption/desorption of molecules at semiconductor interfaces. These chemical-gating effects are completely reversible, additive between different chemical compositions, and can enable semiconductor nanoelectronic devices for 'chemical transistors', 'chemical diodes', and very high-efficiency sensing applications.

  10. Enhanced Photovoltaic Properties of Potassium-Adsorbed Titania Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.; Jaye, C; Fischer, D; Lewis, L; Willey, R; Menon, L

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that vertically-aligned titania nanotube planar arrays fabricated by electrochemical anodization using standard potassium-containing electrolytes invariably contain a significant amount of surface-adsorbed potassium ions, hitherto undetected, that affect the titania photoelectrochemical or PEC performance. Synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy reveals the strong ionic nature of surface potassium-titania bonds that alters the PEC performance over that of pure titania nanotubes through reduction of the external electrical bias needed to produce hydrogen at maximum efficiency. This result implies that the external electrical energy input required per liter of solar hydrogen produced with potassium-adsorbed titania nanotubes may be reduced. Tailoring the potassium content may thus be an alternative means to fine-tune the photoelectrochemical response of TiO2 nanotube-based PEC electrodes.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  12. Hemotoxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Methven, Laura; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes may enter into the bloodstream and interact with blood components indirectly via translocation following unintended exposure or directly after an intended administration for biomedical purposes. Once introduced into systemic circulation, nanotubes will encounter various proteins, biomolecules or cells which have specific roles in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. It is therefore essential to determine whether those interactions will lead to adverse effects or not. Advances in the understanding of how carbon nanotubes interact with blood proteins, the complement system, red blood cells and the hemostatic system are reviewed in this article. While many studies on carbon nanotube health risk assessment and their biomedical applications have appeared in the last few years, reports on the hemocompatibility of these nanomaterials remain surprisingly limited. Yet, defining the hemotoxicological profile is a mandatory step toward the development of clinically-relevant medications or contrast agents based on carbon nanotubes.

  13. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2010-01-10

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  14. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong [Berkeley, CA; He, Rongrui [El Cerrito, CA; Goldberger, Joshua [Berkeley, CA; Fan, Rong [El Cerrito, CA; Wu, Yiying [Albany, CA; Li, Deyu [Albany, CA; Majumdar, Arun [Orinda, CA

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  15. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  16. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  17. Effective Hamiltonian for surface states of topological insulator nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B A

    2017-04-03

    In this work we derive an effective Hamiltonian for the surface states of a hollow topological insulator (TI) nanotube with finite width walls. Unlike a solid TI cylinder, a TI nanotube possesses both an inner as well as outer surface on which the states localized at each surface are coupled together. The curvature along the circumference of the nanotube leads to a spatial variation of the spin orbit interaction field experienced by the charge carriers as well as an asymmetry between the inner and outer surfaces of the nanotube. Both of these features result in terms in the effective Hamiltonian for a TI nanotube absent in that of a flat TI thin film of the same thickness. We calculate the numerical values of the parameters for a Bi2Se3 nanotube as a function of the inner and outer radius, and show that the differing relative magnitudes between the parameters result in qualitatively differing behaviour for the eigenstates of tubes of different dimensions.

  18. Effective Hamiltonian for surface states of topological insulator nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2017-04-01

    In this work we derive an effective Hamiltonian for the surface states of a hollow topological insulator (TI) nanotube with finite width walls. Unlike a solid TI cylinder, a TI nanotube possesses both an inner as well as outer surface on which the states localized at each surface are coupled together. The curvature along the circumference of the nanotube leads to a spatial variation of the spin orbit interaction field experienced by the charge carriers as well as an asymmetry between the inner and outer surfaces of the nanotube. Both of these features result in terms in the effective Hamiltonian for a TI nanotube absent in that of a flat TI thin film of the same thickness. We calculate the numerical values of the parameters for a Bi2Se3 nanotube as a function of the inner and outer radius, and show that the differing relative magnitudes between the parameters result in qualitatively differing behaviour for the eigenstates of tubes of different dimensions.

  19. Effective Hamiltonian for surface states of topological insulator nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we derive an effective Hamiltonian for the surface states of a hollow topological insulator (TI) nanotube with finite width walls. Unlike a solid TI cylinder, a TI nanotube possesses both an inner as well as outer surface on which the states localized at each surface are coupled together. The curvature along the circumference of the nanotube leads to a spatial variation of the spin orbit interaction field experienced by the charge carriers as well as an asymmetry between the inner and outer surfaces of the nanotube. Both of these features result in terms in the effective Hamiltonian for a TI nanotube absent in that of a flat TI thin film of the same thickness. We calculate the numerical values of the parameters for a Bi2Se3 nanotube as a function of the inner and outer radius, and show that the differing relative magnitudes between the parameters result in qualitatively differing behaviour for the eigenstates of tubes of different dimensions. PMID:28367970

  20. Vacuum template synthesis of multifunctional nanotubes with tailored nanostructured walls

    PubMed Central

    Filippin, A. Nicolas; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Saghi, Zineb; Idígoras, Jesús; Burdet, Pierre; Barranco, Angel; Midgley, Paul; Anta, Juan A.; Borras, Ana

    2016-01-01

    A three-step vacuum procedure for the fabrication of vertical TiO2 and ZnO nanotubes with three dimensional walls is presented. The method combines physical vapor deposition of small-molecules, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic functional thin films and layers and a post-annealing process in vacuum in order to remove the organic template. As a result, an ample variety of inorganic nanotubes are made with tunable length, hole dimensions and shapes and tailored wall composition, microstructure, porosity and structure. The fabrication of multishell nanotubes combining different semiconducting oxides and metal nanoparticles is as well explored. This method provides a feasible and reproducible route for the fabrication of high density arrays of vertically alligned nanotubes on processable substrates. The emptying mechanism and microstructure of the nanotubes have been elucidated through SEM, STEM, HAADF-STEM tomography and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In this article, as a proof of concept, it is presented the straightforward integration of ZnO nanotubes as photoanode in a photovoltaic cell and as a photonic oxygen gas sensor. PMID:26860367

  1. Vacuum template synthesis of multifunctional nanotubes with tailored nanostructured walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippin, A. Nicolas; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Saghi, Zineb; Idígoras, Jesús; Burdet, Pierre; Barranco, Angel; Midgley, Paul; Anta, Juan A.; Borras, Ana

    2016-02-01

    A three-step vacuum procedure for the fabrication of vertical TiO2 and ZnO nanotubes with three dimensional walls is presented. The method combines physical vapor deposition of small-molecules, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic functional thin films and layers and a post-annealing process in vacuum in order to remove the organic template. As a result, an ample variety of inorganic nanotubes are made with tunable length, hole dimensions and shapes and tailored wall composition, microstructure, porosity and structure. The fabrication of multishell nanotubes combining different semiconducting oxides and metal nanoparticles is as well explored. This method provides a feasible and reproducible route for the fabrication of high density arrays of vertically alligned nanotubes on processable substrates. The emptying mechanism and microstructure of the nanotubes have been elucidated through SEM, STEM, HAADF-STEM tomography and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In this article, as a proof of concept, it is presented the straightforward integration of ZnO nanotubes as photoanode in a photovoltaic cell and as a photonic oxygen gas sensor.

  2. Elaboration of nanostructured biointerfaces with tunable degree of coverage by protein nanotubes using electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Kalaskar, Deepak M; Poleunis, Claude; Dupont-Gillain, Christine; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie

    2011-11-14

    This study shows that electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a fast and efficient technique for producing protein nanotube-based biointerfaces. Well-shaped collagen-based nanotubes of controlled dimensions are synthesized by a template method combined with the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. Separation of nanotubes from the template material and collection of nanotubes on ITO glass carried out by EPD leads to a fairly homogeneous distribution of protein nanotubes at the support surface. Biointerfaces with different and tunable densities of protein nanotubes are obtained by changing either the applied voltage, solution concentration of nanotubes, or deposition time. Moreover, it is proved that the collected nanotubes are template-free and keep their biofunctional outermost layer after EPD. A preliminary study of the behavior of preosteoblasts cells with the elaborated biointerfaces indicates a specific interaction of cells with the nanotubes through filopodia. This contribution paves the way to the easy preparation of a large variety of useful nanostructured collagen and other protein-based interfaces for controlling cell-surface interactions in diverse biomaterials applications.

  3. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J.

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  4. Biochips Containing Arrays of Carbon-Nanotube Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica; Cassell, Alan; Chen, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Biochips containing arrays of nanoelectrodes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are being developed as means of ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of specific deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) biomarkers for purposes of medical diagnosis and bioenvironmental monitoring. In mass production, these biochips could be relatively inexpensive (hence, disposable). These biochips would be integrated with computer-controlled microfluidic and microelectronic devices in automated hand-held and bench-top instruments that could be used to perform rapid in vitro genetic analyses with simplified preparation of samples. Carbon nanotubes are attractive for use as nanoelectrodes for detection of biomolecules because of their nanoscale dimensions and their chemical properties.

  5. Specific cerebral perfusion patterns in three schizophrenia symptom dimensions.

    PubMed

    Stegmayer, Katharina; Strik, Werner; Federspiel, Andrea; Wiest, Roland; Bohlhalter, Stephan; Walther, Sebastian

    2017-03-17

    Dimensional concepts such as the Research Domain Criteria initiative have been proposed to disentangle the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. One model introduced three neurobiologically informed behavioral dimensions: language, affectivity and motor behavior. To study the brain-behavior associations of these three dimensions, we investigated whether current behavioral alterations were linked to resting state perfusion in distinct brain circuits in schizophrenia. In total, 47 patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders and 44 healthy controls were included. Psychopathology was assessed with the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale and the Bern Psychopathology scale (BPS). The BPS provides severity ratings of three behavioral dimensions (language, affectivity and motor). Patients were classified according to the severity of alterations (severe, mild, no) in each dimension. Whole brain resting state cerebral blood flow (CBF) was compared between patient subgroups and controls. Two symptom dimensions were associated with distinct CBF changes. Behavioral alterations in the language dimension were linked to increased CBF in Heschl's gyrus. Altered affectivity was related to increased CBF in amygdala. The ratings of motor behavior instead were not specifically associated with CBF. Investigating behavioral alterations in three schizophrenia symptom dimensions identified distinct regional CBF changes in the language and limbic brain circuits. The results demonstrate a hitherto unknown segregation of pathophysiological pathways underlying a limited number of specific symptom dimensions in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement. PMID:22655070

  7. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W Ch

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  8. Structure of BN Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik-Aktas, Ayten; Tao, Jing; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2004-03-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes have been the subject of intensive scientific study in recent years due to their unique properties. BN nanotubes have uniform wide gap semiconducting properties regardless of their chirality and diameter [1]. On the other hand electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) depend on their chirality. This unique difference between BN and CNTs makes BN nanotubes a better candidate for nano electronics and/or other nano technology applications. HRTEM and nano area electron diffraction (NAD) studies have been conducted to better understand the microstructure of BN nanotubes. In addition to TEM analysis we would like to present the results of image simulations and compare the NAD patterns with the simulated diffraction patterns. Preliminary results suggest that the BN nanotubes that have been investigated in this study showed overwhelmingly near zigzag chirality. Average diameter of the BN tubes are about 35-40 nm. Regular patches of perfect crystals have been observed along the length of the tubes except tubes with very large diameters (Dng 150 nm). Other regions of the BN nanotubes were quite defective. CNT templates have been employed in the synthesis of our samples. [1] X. Blasé, A. Rubio, S.G. Louie, M.L. Cohen, Europhysics Letters, 28 (1994) 335.

  9. Laser-induced exfoliation of amorphous carbon layer on an individual multiwall carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Rice, P.; Hurst, K. E.; Lehman, J. H.; Mahajan, R. L.

    2007-07-01

    Pulsed laser treatment of an individual multiwall carbon nanotube induced selective exfoliation of the amorphous carbon contamination layer. The multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) was exposed to a 248nm excimer laser. After the treatment, transmission electron microscopy images show that the amorphous layer has expanded and separated from the crystalline MWCNT walls. This interesting observation has implications for laser cleaning and possible thinning of MWCNTs to reduce the radial dimensions.

  10. Dimensions of Educational Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Roe L., Ed.; And Others

    Roe L. Johns and J. Alan Thomas survey the problem of educational need; and Kern Alexander considers the implications of the dimensions of educational need for school financing. Dimensions of need in the following areas are defined: early childhood and basic elementary and secondary education, by William P. McLure; educational programs for…

  11. Navigating between the Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleron, Julian F.; Ecke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Generations have been inspired by Edwin A. Abbott's profound tour of the dimensions in his novella "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" (1884). This well-known satire is the story of a flat land inhabited by geometric shapes trying to navigate the subtleties of their geometric, social, and political positions. In this article, the authors…

  12. Navigating between the Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleron, Julian F.; Ecke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Generations have been inspired by Edwin A. Abbott's profound tour of the dimensions in his novella "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" (1884). This well-known satire is the story of a flat land inhabited by geometric shapes trying to navigate the subtleties of their geometric, social, and political positions. In this article, the authors…

  13. The Qualitative Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodge-Peters, Dianne S.

    The qualitative dimension of educational research methodology is explored, and the literature of qualitative methodology is reviewed so researchers may (1) understand more fully the qualitative dimension as it, in turn, fits within the parameters of educational research as a whole, and (2) have more informed access to the sometimes daunting array…

  14. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  15. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  16. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K [Kensington, CA; Jensen, Kenneth J [Berkeley, CA; Girit, Caglar [Albany, CA; Mickelson, William E [San Francisco, CA; Grossman, Jeffrey C [Berkeley, CA

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  17. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  18. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tortorich, Ryan P; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-07-29

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  19. Flame Synthesis Used to Create Metal-Catalyzed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    2001-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are highly ordered carbon structures of nanoscale dimensions. They may be thought of as hollow cylinders whose walls are formed by single atomic layers of graphite. Such cylinders may be composed of many nested, concentric atomic layers of carbon or only a single layer, the latter forming a single-walled carbon nanotube. This article reports unique results using a flame for their synthesis. Only recently were carbon nanotubes discovered within an arc discharge and recognized as fullerene derivatives. Today metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are of great interest for many reasons. They can be used as supports for the metal catalysts like those found in catalytic converters. Open-ended nanotubes are highly desirable because they can be filled by other elements, metals or gases, for battery and fuel cell applications. Because of their highly crystalline structure, they are significantly stronger than the commercial carbon fibers that are currently available (10 times as strong as steel but possessing one-sixth of the weight). This property makes them highly desirable for strengthening polymer and ceramic composite materials. Current methods of synthesizing carbon nanotubes include thermal pyrolysis of organometallics, laser ablation of metal targets within hydrocarbon atmospheres at high temperatures, and arc discharges. Each of these methods is costly, and it is unclear if they can be scaled for the commercial synthesis of carbon nanotubes. In contrast, flame synthesis is an economical means of bulk synthesis of a variety of aerosol materials such as carbon black. Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes could potentially realize an economy of scale that would enable their use in common structural materials such as car-body panels. The top figure is a transmission electron micrograph of a multiwalled carbon nanotube. The image shows a cross section of the atomic structure of the nanotube. The dark lines are individual atomic layer planes of

  20. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  1. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  2. Storage of Hydrogen in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A. C.; Jones, K. M.; Bekkedahl, T. A.; Kiang, C. H.; Bethune, D. S.; Heben, M. J.

    1997-03-27

    Pores of molecular dimensions can adsorb large quantities of gases owing to the enhanced density of the adsorbed material inside the pores, a consequence of the attractive potential of the pore walls. Pederson and Broughton have suggested that carbon nanotubes, which have diameters of typically a few nanometres, should be able to draw up liquids by capillarity, and this effect has been seen for low-surface-tension liquids in large-diameter, multi-walled nanotubes. Here we show that a gas can condense to high density inside narrow, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). Temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy shows that hydrogen will condense inside SWNTs under conditions that do not induce adsorption within a standard mesoporous activated carbon. The very high hydrogen uptake in these materials suggests that they might be effective as a hydrogen-storage material for fuel-cell electric vehicles.

  3. Single-color pyrometry of individual incandescent multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, S. B.; Mecklenburg, Matthew; White, E. R.; Regan, B. C.

    2011-11-01

    Objects that are small compared to their thermal photon wavelengths violate the assumptions underlying optical pyrometry and can show unusual coherence effects. To investigate this regime, we measure the absolute light intensity from individual, incandescent multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The nanotube filaments’ physical dimensions and composition are determined using transmission electron microscopy and their emissivities are calculated in terms of bulk conductivities. A single-color pyrometric analysis then returns a temperature value for each wavelength, polarization, and applied bias measured. Compared to the more common multiwavelength analysis, single-color pyrometry supports a more consistent and complete picture of the carbon nanotube lamps, one that describes their emissivity, optical conductivity, and thermal conductivity in the range 1600-2400 K.

  4. Negative index photonic crystal lenses based on carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butt, Haider; Dai, Qing; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2012-10-01

    We report a novel utilization of periodic arrays of carbon nanotubes in the realization of diffractive photonic crystal lenses. Carbon nanotube arrays with nanoscale dimensions (lattice constant 400 nm and tube radius 50 nm) displayed a negative refractive index in the optical regime where the wavelength is of the order of array spacing. A detailed computational analysis of band gaps and optical transmission through the nanotubes based planar, convex and concave shaped lenses was performed. Due to the negative-index these lenses behaved in an opposite fashion compared to their conventional counter parts. A plano-concave lens was established and numerically tested, displaying ultra-small focal length of 1.5 μm (∼2.3 λ) and a near diffraction-limited spot size of 400 nm (∼0.61 λ).

  5. Polymer composites containing nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to polymer composite materials containing carbon nanotubes, particularly to those containing singled-walled nanotubes. The invention provides a polymer composite comprising one or more base polymers, one or more functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers and carbon nanotubes. The invention also relates to functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers, particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having side chain functionalization, and more particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having olefin side chains and alkyl epoxy side chains. The invention further relates to methods of making polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

  6. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  7. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  8. Multifunctional composites using reinforced laminae with carbon-nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veedu, Vinod P.; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Xuesong; Ma, Kougen; Soldano, Caterina; Kar, Swastik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2006-06-01

    Traditional fibre-reinforced composite materials with excellent in-plane properties fare poorly when out-of-plane through-thickness properties are important. Composite architectures with fibres designed orthogonal to the two-dimensional (2D) layout in traditional composites could alleviate this weakness in the transverse direction, but all of the efforts so far have only produced limited success. Here, we unveil an approach to the 3D composite challenge, without altering the 2D stack design, on the basis of the concept of interlaminar carbon-nanotube forests that would provide enhanced multifunctional properties along the thickness direction. The carbon-nanotube forests allow the fastening of adjacent plies in the 3D composite. We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the surface of micro-fibre fabric cloth layouts, normal to the fibre lengths, resulting in a 3D effect between plies under loading. These nanotube-coated fabric cloths serve as building blocks for the multilayered 3D composites, with the nanotube forests providing much-needed interlaminar strength and toughness under various loading conditions. For the fabricated 3D composites with nanotube forests, we demonstrate remarkable improvements in the interlaminar fracture toughness, hardness, delamination resistance, in-plane mechanical properties, damping, thermoelastic behaviour, and thermal and electrical conductivities making these structures truly multifunctional.

  9. Modeling encapsulation of acetylene molecules into carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tran-Duc, Thien; Thamwattana, Ngamta

    2011-06-08

    Polyacetylene is a well-known conductive polymer and when doped its conductivity can be altered by up to 12 orders of magnitude. However, due to entropy effects a polyacetylene chain usually suffers from distortions and interchain couplings which lead to unpredictable changes in its conducting property. Encapsulating a polyacetylene chain into a carbon nanotube can resolve these issues. Furthermore, since the carbon nanotube itself possesses excellent electrical conductivity, the combination of the carbon nanotube and polyacetylene may give rise to a new material with superior transport behavior. In this paper, we model mathematically the molecular interaction between an acetylene molecule and a carbon nanotube in order to determine conditions at which configurations of the acetylene molecule are accepted into the carbon nanotube as well as its equilibrium configurations inside various sizes of carbon nanotubes. For special cases of the acetylene molecule lying on the tube axis, standing vertically with its center on the tube axis and staying far inside the tube, explicit analytical expressions for the interaction energy are obtained.

  10. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  11. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W [Newport News, VA; Jordan, Kevin [Newport News, VA; Park, Cheol [Yorktown, VA

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  12. The dimensions of indexing.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, W John; Kim, Won

    2003-01-01

    Indexing of documents is an important strategy intended to make the literature more readily available to the user. Here we describe several dimensions of indexing that are important if indexing is to be optimal. These dimensions are coverage, predictability, and transparency. MeSH terms and text words are compared in MEDLINE in regard to these dimensions. Part of our analysis consists in applying AdaBoost with decisions trees as the weak learners to estimate how reliably index terms are being assigned and how complex the criteria are by which they are being assigned. Our conclusions are that MeSH terms are more predictable and more transparent than text words.

  13. On universal quantum dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mkrtchyan, R. L.

    2017-08-01

    We represent in the universal form restricted one-instanton partition function of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. It is based on the derivation of universal expressions for quantum dimensions (universal characters) of Cartan powers of adjoint and some other series of irreps of simple Lie algebras. These formulae also provide a proof of formulae for universal quantum dimensions for low-dimensional representations, needed in derivation of universal knot polynomials (i.e. colored Wilson averages of Chern-Simons theory on 3d sphere). As a check of the (complicated) formulae for universal quantum dimensions we prove numerically Deligne's hypothesis on universal characters for symmetric cube of adjoint representation.

  14. Composition Based Strategies for Controlling Radii in Lipid Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kurczy, Michael E.; Mellander, Lisa J.; Najafinobar, Neda; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Nature routinely carries out small-scale chemistry within lipid bound cells and organelles. Liposome–lipid nanotube networks are being developed by many researchers in attempt to imitate these membrane enclosed environments, with the goal to perform small-scale chemical studies. These systems are well characterized in terms of the diameter of the giant unilamellar vesicles they are constructed from and the length of the nanotubes connecting them. Here we evaluate two methods based on intrinsic curvature for adjusting the diameter of the nanotube, an aspect of the network that has not previously been controllable. This was done by altering the lipid composition of the network membrane with two different approaches. In the first, the composition of the membrane was altered via lipid incubation of exogenous lipids; either with the addition of the low intrinsic curvature lipid soy phosphatidylcholine (soy-PC) or the high intrinsic curvature lipid soy phosphatidylethanolamine (soy-PE). In the second approach, exogenous lipids were added to the total lipid composition during liposome formation. Here we show that for both lipid augmentation methods, we observed a decrease in nanotube diameter following soy-PE additions but no significant change in size following the addition of soy-PC. Our results demonstrate that the effect of soy-PE on nanotube diameter is independent of the method of addition and suggests that high curvature soy-PE molecules facilitate tube membrane curvature. PMID:24392077

  15. Dimensions of Aesthetic Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaggio, Mary Kay; Supplee, Katherine A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the validity of three dimensions of aesthetic perception: hedonic value, arousal, and uncertainty. Hedonic interest and arousal factors were found to differ from factors previously reported, while the uncertainty factor paralleled that previously reported. (Author/RH)

  16. Polyhedra and Higher Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Describes the definition and characteristics of a regular polyhedron, tessellation, and pseudopolyhedra with diagrams. Discusses the nature of simplex, hypercube, and cross-polytope in the fourth dimension and beyond. (YP)

  17. Dimensions of Aesthetic Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaggio, Mary Kay; Supplee, Katherine A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the validity of three dimensions of aesthetic perception: hedonic value, arousal, and uncertainty. Hedonic interest and arousal factors were found to differ from factors previously reported, while the uncertainty factor paralleled that previously reported. (Author/RH)

  18. Synthesis and growth mechanism of multilayer TiO2 nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Dongsheng; Wang, Ying

    2012-04-01

    High-aspect-ratio TiO2 nanotube arrays formed by anodic oxidation have drawn extensive attention due to their easy fabrication and various excellent optical, electrical and biomedical properties. In contrast to conventional single-layer TiO2 nanotubes prepared via constant-voltage anodization, we synthesize multilayer TiO2 nanotube arrays with high surface area by using alternating-voltage anodization steps. This work presents synthesis and growth mechanisms of single-layer smooth TiO2 nanotubes, bamboo-type nanotubes and double-layer nanotubes, by tuning various parameters such as voltage, time, and water content in the electrolyte. It is found that ion diffusion inside the nanotubes dominates growth of these three structures. A stable pH and ion-diffusion profile allows the steady growth of smooth TiO2 tubes in NH4F-containing ethylene glycol (EG). The addition of a low-voltage anodization step reduces the pH and ion-diffusion gradient in the nanotubes and induces formation of bamboo-type nanotubes and double-layer nanotubes when a second high-voltage anodization is conducted. Ion diffusion through a nanotube takes time; thus formation of lower-layer TO2 nanotubes costs more time if longer nanotubes are grown in the upper layer, since ions diffuse through these longer nanotubes. This ion-diffusion controlled growth mechanism is further confirmed by tailoring the water content (0-20 vol%) in the electrolyte and the voltage gaps to control the time needed for initiation of lower-layer TiO2 nanotube arrays. The fundamental understanding of the growth characteristics of double-layer TiO2 nanotubes presented in this paper offers us more flexibility in engineering morphology, tuning dimensions and phase compositions of multilayer TiO2 nanotubes. In addition, we synthesize double-layer TiO2 nanotube arrays composed of one layer of anatase phase and another layer of amorphous phase.High-aspect-ratio TiO2 nanotube arrays formed by anodic oxidation have drawn extensive

  19. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  20. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Letant, Sonia [Livermore, CA; Stadermann, Michael [Dublin, CA; Artyukhin, Alexander B [Menlo Park, CA

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  1. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Letant, Sonia [Livermore, CA; Stadermann, Michael [Dublin, CA; Artyukhin, Alexander B [Menlo Park, CA

    2010-06-29

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  2. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  3. Electron beam detection of a Nanotube Scanning Force Microscope.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Niguès, Antoine

    2017-09-14

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to probe matter at atomic scale by measuring the perturbation of a nanomechanical oscillator induced by near-field interaction forces. The quest to improve sensitivity and resolution of AFM forced the introduction of a new class of resonators with dimensions at the nanometer scale. In this context, nanotubes are the ultimate mechanical oscillators because of their one dimensional nature, small mass and almost perfect crystallinity. Coupled to the possibility of functionalisation, these properties make them the perfect candidates as ultra sensitive, on-demand force sensors. However their dimensions make the measurement of the mechanical properties a challenging task in particular when working in cavity free geometry at ambient temperature. By using a focused electron beam, we show that the mechanical response of nanotubes can be quantitatively measured while approaching to a surface sample. By coupling electron beam detection of individual nanotubes with a custom AFM we image the surface topography of a sample by continuously measuring the mechanical properties of the nanoresonators. The combination of very small size and mass together with the high resolution of the electron beam detection method offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of a new class of nanotube-based scanning force microscopy.

  4. Rokhlin Dimension for Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshberg, Ilan; Szabó, Gábor; Winter, Wilhelm; Wu, Jianchao

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a notion of Rokhlin dimension for one parameter automorphism groups of {C^*} -algebras. This generalizes Kishimoto's Rokhlin property for flows, and is analogous to the notion of Rokhlin dimension for actions of the integers and other discrete groups introduced by the authors and Zacharias in previous papers. We show that finite nuclear dimension and absorption of a strongly self-absorbing {C^*} -algebra are preserved under forming crossed products by flows with finite Rokhlin dimension, and that these crossed products are stable. Furthermore, we show that a flow on a commutative {C^*} -algebra arising from a free topological flow has finite Rokhlin dimension, whenever the spectrum is a locally compact metrizable space with finite covering dimension. For flows that are both free and minimal, this has strong consequences for the associated crossed product {C^{*}} -algebras: Those containing a non-zero projection are classified by the Elliott invariant (for compact manifolds this consists of topological {K} -theory together with the space of invariant probability measures and a natural pairing given by the Ruelle-Sullivan map).

  5. Rokhlin Dimension for Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshberg, Ilan; Szabó, Gábor; Winter, Wilhelm; Wu, Jianchao

    2017-07-01

    We introduce a notion of Rokhlin dimension for one parameter automorphism groups of {C^*}-algebras. This generalizes Kishimoto's Rokhlin property for flows, and is analogous to the notion of Rokhlin dimension for actions of the integers and other discrete groups introduced by the authors and Zacharias in previous papers. We show that finite nuclear dimension and absorption of a strongly self-absorbing {C^*}-algebra are preserved under forming crossed products by flows with finite Rokhlin dimension, and that these crossed products are stable. Furthermore, we show that a flow on a commutative {C^*}-algebra arising from a free topological flow has finite Rokhlin dimension, whenever the spectrum is a locally compact metrizable space with finite covering dimension. For flows that are both free and minimal, this has strong consequences for the associated crossed product {C^{*}}-algebras: Those containing a non-zero projection are classified by the Elliott invariant (for compact manifolds this consists of topological {K}-theory together with the space of invariant probability measures and a natural pairing given by the Ruelle-Sullivan map).

  6. Unravelling the mechanisms behind mixed catalysts for the high yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tetali, Sailaja; Zaka, Mujtaba; Schönfelder, Ronny; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Börrnert, Felix; Ibrahim, Imad; Lin, Jarrn H; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2009-12-22

    The use of mixed catalysts for the high-yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes is well-known. The mechanisms behind the improved yield are poorly understood. In this study, we systematically explore different catalyst combinations from Ni, Co, and Mo for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via laser evaporation. Our findings reveal that the mixing of catalysts alters the catalyst cluster size distribution, maximizing the clusters' potential to form a hemispherical cap at nucleation and, hence, form a single-walled carbon nanotube. This process significantly improves the single-walled carbon nanotube yields.

  7. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation deals with the use of carbon nanotubes as a transport system. Contact, defects, tubular bend, phonons, and mechanical deformations all contribute to reflection within the nanotube wire. Bragg reflection, however, is native to an ideal energy transport system. Transmission resistance depends primarily on the level of energy present. Finally, the details regarding coupling between carbon nanotubes and simple metals are presented.

  8. Underwater Acoustic Carbon Nanotube Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300042 1 of 10 UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC CARBON NANOTUBE THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube underwater acoustic source which acts as a thermophone...development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An

  9. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  10. Majorana fermion wavefunctions in carbon nanotubes and carbynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, N. R.; Aporoski, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    Electron properties of semiconducting zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be described by two uncoupled Dirac equations of dimension (1+1) for the particle with nonzero mass. The solutions of these equations are two charge-neutral Majorana fields. An analogous equation is obtained for the carbon chains. We use the approach, wherein wavefunction of charged particle is represented as the production of a rapidly oscillating exponent and the slowly varying function amplitude depending on the longitudinal coordinate.

  11. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  12. Perceptual dimensions differentiate emotions.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Lisa A; MacInnis, Deborah J; Weiss, Allen M

    2015-08-26

    Individuals often describe objects in their world in terms of perceptual dimensions that span a variety of modalities; the visual (e.g., brightness: dark-bright), the auditory (e.g., loudness: quiet-loud), the gustatory (e.g., taste: sour-sweet), the tactile (e.g., hardness: soft vs. hard) and the kinaesthetic (e.g., speed: slow-fast). We ask whether individuals use perceptual dimensions to differentiate emotions from one another. Participants in two studies (one where respondents reported on abstract emotion concepts and a second where they reported on specific emotion episodes) rated the extent to which features anchoring 29 perceptual dimensions (e.g., temperature, texture and taste) are associated with 8 emotions (anger, fear, sadness, guilt, contentment, gratitude, pride and excitement). Results revealed that in both studies perceptual dimensions differentiate positive from negative emotions and high arousal from low arousal emotions. They also differentiate among emotions that are similar in arousal and valence (e.g., high arousal negative emotions such as anger and fear). Specific features that anchor particular perceptual dimensions (e.g., hot vs. cold) are also differentially associated with emotions.

  13. Thermal rectification in inhomogeneous nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2016-12-01

    Heat transfer in axially inhomogeneous nanotubes is known to be asymmetric with respect to the direction of transfer. This phenomenon is known as the thermal rectification. We demonstrate that thermal rectification in such nanotubes arises due to the interference of phonons excited in the different parts of the nanotube. It is shown that the rectification does not vanish when the thickness of nanotube increases, but it vanishes as the external diameter of nanotubes decreases to a few nanometers. The understanding of the origin of thermal rectification opens a way to the design of devices controlling heat flows that could perform as efficiently as their electronic counterparts controlling electric currents.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  16. Carbon nanotubes as liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanju; Kumar, Satish

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the best of known materials with a combination of excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. To fully exploit individual nanotube properties for various applications, the grand challenge is to fabricate macroscopic ordered nanotube assemblies. Liquid-crystalline behavior of the nanotubes provides a unique opportunity toward reaching this challenge. In this Review, the recent developments in this area are critically reviewed by discussing the strategies for fabricating liquid-crystalline phases, addressing the solution properties of liquid-crystalline suspensions, and exploiting the practical techniques of liquid-crystal routes to prepare macroscopic nanotube fibers and films.

  17. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  18. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  19. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m2/gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm3, an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm.

  20. Sorting Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by their electronic and atomic structures in liquid phases is reviewed in this chapter. We first introduce the sorting problem, and then provide an overview of several sorting methodologies, following roughly the chronological order of their development over the past 15 years or so. Major methods discussed include ion-exchange chromatography, density-gradient ultracentrifugation, selective extraction in organic solvents, gel chromatography, and aqueous two-phase extraction. A main focus of the review is on the common mechanisms underlining all sorting processes. We propose that differences in solvation among different nanotube species are the ultimate driving force of sorting, and we corroborate this proposal by presenting analysis on how the differences are realized in electronic-structure-based sorting and atomic-structure-based sorting. In the end, we offer some suggestions on future directions that may grow out of carbon nanotube sorting. In particular, the prospect of expanding the function of DNA/carbon nanotube hybrid to control inter-particle interactions both inside and outside the nanotube is discussed.

  1. The Dimensions of Indexing

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, W. John; Kim, Won

    2003-01-01

    Indexing of documents is an important strategy intended to make the literature more readily available to the user. Here we describe several dimensions of indexing that are important if indexing is to be optimal. These dimensions are coverage, predictability, and transparency. MeSH® terms and text words are compared in MEDLINE® in regard to these dimensions. Part of our analysis consists in applying AdaBoost with decision trees as the weak learners to estimate how reliably index terms are being assigned and how complex the criteria are by which they are being assigned. Our conclusions are that MeSH terms are more predictable and more transparent than text words. PMID:14728266

  2. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  3. Carbon nanotubes: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongjie

    2002-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are graphene sheets rolled-up into cylinders with diameters as small as one nanometer. Extensive work carried out worldwide in recent years has revealed the intriguing electrical and mechanical properties of these novel molecular scale wires. It is now well established that carbon nanotubes are ideal model systems for studying the physics in one-dimensional solids and have significant potential as building blocks for various practical nanoscale devices. Nanotubes have been shown to be useful for miniaturized electronic, mechanical, electromechanical, chemical and scanning probe devices and materials for macroscopic composites. Progress in nanotube growth has facilitated the fundamental study and applications of nanotubes. Gaining control over challenging nanotube growth issues is critical to the future advancement of nanotube science and technology, and is being actively pursued by researchers.

  4. Copper-philic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgamwar, Sachin U.; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotube is having poor wet-ability with copper metal. Wet-ability of carbon nanotube was improved by exposing and creating more active sites on the surface of carbon nanotube. Carbon nanotubes were subjected to the prolong ultrasonication treatment of 20×103 Hz and 500W, which helped in disentanglement of carbon nanotube agglomerates and in breaking the weak bonds like pentagonal or heptagonal structure on the surface and on the CNT cap. Disentanglement of the carbon nanotube, resulted in exposing the defective sites on the surface and breaking of weak bonds, which assisted in creating the new defects on the surface. This process results in generates more active sites on the surface and it helps in improving the wet-ability of the carbon nanotube in copper.

  5. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  6. Selective Attention to Perceptual Dimensions and Switching between Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiran, Nachshon; Dimov, Eduard; Ganel, Tzvi

    2013-01-01

    In the present experiments, the question being addressed was whether switching attention between perceptual dimensions and selective attention to dimensions are processes that compete over a common resource? Attention to perceptual dimensions is usually studied by requiring participants to ignore a never-relevant dimension. Selection failure…

  7. Selective Attention to Perceptual Dimensions and Switching between Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiran, Nachshon; Dimov, Eduard; Ganel, Tzvi

    2013-01-01

    In the present experiments, the question being addressed was whether switching attention between perceptual dimensions and selective attention to dimensions are processes that compete over a common resource? Attention to perceptual dimensions is usually studied by requiring participants to ignore a never-relevant dimension. Selection failure…

  8. Single crystalline magnetite nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuqin; Zhang, Daihua; Han, Song; Li, Chao; Lei, Bo; Lu, Weigang; Fang, Jiye; Zhou, Chongwu

    2005-01-12

    We descried a method to synthesize single crystalline Fe3O4 nanotubes by wet-etching the MgO inner cores of MgO/Fe3O4 core-shell nanowires. Homogeneous Fe3O4 nanotubes with controllable length, diameter, and wall thickness have been obtained. Resistivity of the Fe3O4 nanotubes was estimated to be approximately 4 x 10-2 Omega cm at room temperature. Magnetoresistance of approximately 1% was observed at T = 77 K when a magnetic field of B = 0.7 T was applied. The synthetic strategy presented here may be extended to a variety of materials such as YBCO, PZT, and LCMO which should provide ideal candidates for fundamental studies of superconductivity, piezoelectricity, and ferromagnetism in nanoscale structures.

  9. Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Supriyo; Anatram, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    The recent report of quantized conductance in a 4 m long multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) raises the exciting possibility of ballistic transport at room temperature over relatively long distances. We argue that this is made possible by the special symmetry of the eigenstates of the lowest propagating modes in metallic nanotubes which suppresses backscattering. This unusual effect is absent for the higher propagating modes so that transport is not ballistic once the bias exceeds the cut-off energy for the higher modes, which is estimated to be approximately 75 meV for nanotubes of diameter approximately 15 nm. Also, we show that the symmetry of the eigenstates can significantly affect their coupling to the reservoir and hence the contact resistance. A simple model is presented that can be used to understand the observed conductance-voltage characteristics.

  10. Nematic Nanotubes Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodh, A. G.; Islam, M. F.; Alsayed, A. M.; Dogic, Z.; Zhang, J.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2003-03-01

    Composites of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are among the most sought after materials in nanotube science. We report the production of one such medium, containing large domains of oriented SWNTs. We call these materials nematic nanotube gels. We have created them by first dispersing SWNTs at low volume fraction in a gel, and then inducing a volume-compression transition of the gel. We identify hallmark liquid crystalline defects in these materials, as well as a novel buckling of the walls accompanying defect formation. Quantitative measurements of the tube order parameter reveal a concentration-dependent crossover from isotropic to nematic phases. This work has been partially supported by the NSF through the MRSEC grant DMR 00-79909, DMR-0203378, and by NASA through grant NAG8-2172.

  11. Optically driven nanotube actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shaoxin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2005-11-01

    Optically driven actuators have been fabricated from single-wall carbon nanotube-polymer composite sheets. Like natural muscles, the millimetre-scale actuators are assemblies of millions of individual nanotube actuators processed into macroscopic length scales and bonded to an acrylic elastomer sheet to form an actuator that have been shown to generate higher stress than natural muscles and higher strains than high-modulus piezoelectric materials. Strain measurements revealed 0.01%-0.3% elastic strain generated due to electrostatic and thermal effects under visible light intensities of 5-120 mW cm-2. An optically actuated nanotube gripper is demonstrated to show manipulation of small objects. This actuation technology overcomes some of the fundamental limitations such as the use of high voltages or electrochemical solutions for actuation, opening up possibilities for remote light-induced actuation technologies.

  12. Substrate-induced Band Gap Renormalization in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lanzillo, Nicholas A.; Kharche, Neerav; Nayak, Saroj K.

    2014-01-01

    The quasiparticle band gaps of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) supported on a weakly-interacting hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) substrate are computed using density functional theory and the GW Approximation. We find that the direct band gaps of the (7,0), (8,0) and (10,0) carbon nanotubes are renormalized to smaller values in the presence of the dielectric h-BN substrate. The decrease in the band gap is the result of a polarization-induced screening effect, which alters the correlation energy of the frontier CNT orbitals and stabilizes valence band maximum and conduction band minimum. The value of the band gap renormalization is on the order of 0.25 to 0.5 eV in each case. Accounting for polarization-induced band gap changes is crucial in comparing computed values with experiment, since nanotubes are almost always grown on substrates. PMID:24402238

  13. Confinement and surface effects of aqueous solutions within charged carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Calixte, Emvia I; Samoylova, Olga N; Shuford, Kevin L

    2016-04-28

    We have examined the structure of water and aqueous solutions in carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. We find confinement changes the structure of water as well as the interactions between ions and their solvation shells. The density and orientation of water at the nanotube walls are strongly dependent on the surface charge and cations/anions present at the interfaces. Decreasing the nanotube diameter alters the ion hydration properties as well as hydrogen bonding structure and formation dynamics. The results indicate that fluid structure and hydrogen bond characteristics in nano-channels can be tuned through modification of tube charge and with ion selection.

  14. Dimensions of Dialect.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evertts, Eldonna L., Ed.

    This collection of articles discusses social dialects, the problems that dialects cause the disadvantaged, and how these problems can be overcome in curriculum planning and classroom practice. Articles are (1) "English: New Dimensions and New Demands" by Muriel Crosby, (2) "A Checklist of Significant Features for Discriminating Social Dialects" by…

  15. Physics in One Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertel, Erminald

    2013-01-01

    Due to progress in nanotechnology high-quality quantum wires can nowadays be fabricated. The behavior of particles in one dimension differs significantly from that in three-dimensional (3D) systems, yet the physics of such low-dimensional systems is generally not very well represented in standard undergraduate or graduate curricula. For instance,…

  16. Constructing gravitational dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Matthew

    2003-07-01

    It would be extremely useful to know whether a particular low energy effective theory might have come from a compactification of a higher dimensional space. Here, this problem is approached from the ground up by considering theories with multiple interacting massive gravitons. It is actually very difficult to construct discrete gravitational dimensions which have a local continuum limit. In fact, any model with only nearest neighbor interactions is doomed. If we could find a non-linear extension for the Fierz-Pauli Lagrangian for a graviton of mass mg, which does not break down until the scale Λ2=(mgMPl), this could be used to construct a large class of models whose continuum limit is local in the extra dimension. But this is shown to be impossible: a theory with a single graviton must break down by Λ3=(m2gMPl)1/3. Next, we look at how the discretization prescribed by the truncation of the Kaluza-Klein tower of an honest extra dimension raises the scale of strong coupling. It dictates an intricate set of interactions among various fields which conspire to soften the strongest scattering amplitudes and allow for a local continuum limit, at least at the tree level. A number of candidate symmetries associated with locality in the discretized dimension are also discussed.

  17. Dimensions of Nonverbal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overmier, Mary; And Others

    After a brief description of the dimensions of nonverbal communication, this booklet presents 21 activities that deal with nonverbal communication. Activities in the booklet involve body movements (kinesics), facial expressions, eye movements, perception and use of space (proxemics), haptics (touch), paralinguistics (vocal elements that accompany…

  18. Moving between Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The first word of this item is "imagine". This instruction has the potential to signal a journey through a world of geometry that might leave you spellbound. On the other hand, it could be the start of a roller-coaster ride through three dimensions that will tax both your imagination, and your powers of visualisation. It is likely that you will…

  19. Dimensions of Delinquency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wunderlich, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    In response to research questioning the utility of the Jesness Inventory in predicting and differentiating delinquency, this study isolated the personality dimensions of 422 adjudicated, noninstitutionalized adolescents by item level factor analysis. The resulting three factors--Mistrust, Social Pessimism, and Hypersensitivity--were compared with…

  20. Moving between Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The first word of this item is "imagine". This instruction has the potential to signal a journey through a world of geometry that might leave you spellbound. On the other hand, it could be the start of a roller-coaster ride through three dimensions that will tax both your imagination, and your powers of visualisation. It is likely that you will…

  1. Extra Dimensions of Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    They say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. In a pedagogically pure sense, that's probably true. But some questions do seem to flirt dangerously close to being really quite ridiculous. One such question might well be, "How many dimensions of space are there?" I mean, it's pretty obvious that there are three:…

  2. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-10

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  3. Extra Dimensions of Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    They say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. In a pedagogically pure sense, that's probably true. But some questions do seem to flirt dangerously close to being really quite ridiculous. One such question might well be, "How many dimensions of space are there?" I mean, it's pretty obvious that there are three:…

  4. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  5. Functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with urethane segments and their interaction with solvents and a polyurethane elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-d'Arlas, Borja; Eceiza, Arantxa

    2014-01-01

    Manipulation of nanoparticles is easier when they are appropriately functionalized with adequate chemical groups. In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with different chemical groups and the influence of functionalization on their stability in different solutions and the impact on elastomeric polyurethane composites were studied. It was observed that the functionalization yielded in all cases nanotubes with approximately the same dimensions (diameter: ˜8-40 nm; length: ˜1-25 μm) and 24-29 wt% of organic tallow per mass of nanotube. The chemical behaviour of nanotubes in solutions was highly dependent on functionality. The impact on mechanical properties was function of the chemical nature of the nanotube functional groups and moderately followed the expected tendency according to their solubility in solvents.

  6. Electronic Transport and Possible Superconductivity at Van Hove Singularities in Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Fedorov, G; Shafranjuk, S E; Klapwijk, T M; Cooper, B K; Lewis, R M; Lobb, C J; Barbara, P

    2015-12-09

    Van Hove singularities (VHSs) are a hallmark of reduced dimensionality, leading to a divergent density of states in one and two dimensions and predictions of new electronic properties when the Fermi energy is close to these divergences. In carbon nanotubes, VHSs mark the onset of new subbands. They are elusive in standard electronic transport characterization measurements because they do not typically appear as notable features and therefore their effect on the nanotube conductance is largely unexplored. Here we report conductance measurements of carbon nanotubes where VHSs are clearly revealed by interference patterns of the electronic wave functions, showing both a sharp increase of quantum capacitance, and a sharp reduction of energy level spacing, consistent with an upsurge of density of states. At VHSs, we also measure an anomalous increase of conductance below a temperature of about 30 K. We argue that this transport feature is consistent with the formation of Cooper pairs in the nanotube.

  7. Structural stability and electronic properties of sp3 type silicon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hever, Alon; Bernstein, Jonathan; Hod, Oded

    2012-12-01

    A density functional theory study of the structural and electronic properties and relative stability of narrow hydrogen passivated sp3 silicon nanotubes of different growth orientations is presented. All nanotubes studied and their corresponding wire structures are found to be meta-stable with the wires being more energetically stable. Silicon nanotubes show a dramatic bandgap increase of up to 68% with respect to the corresponding wires. Furthermore, a direct relation between the bandgap of the system and the molar fraction of the passivating hydrogen contents is found. These results suggest that by careful control over their crystallographic growth orientation, dimensions, and chemical composition it should be possible to design and fabricate silicon nanotubes with desired electronic properties.

  8. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  9. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  10. Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of Eu-Doped Y2O3 Nanosheets and Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    H Sun; T Chaudhuri; E Kenik; H Zhu; Y Ma

    2011-12-31

    A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize high-purity Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanosheets and nanotubes with an approximate molar ratio of (0.1):(1.0) for Eu:Y. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis and synchrotron X-ray diffraction were used to characterize these nanomaterials. A body-centered cubic structure was confirmed for the nanotubes. The lattice parameter of Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanotubes were 0.12% larger as compared to that of pure Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} which was attributed to the larger ionic radius of Eu{sup 3+} (0.947 {angstrom}) than that of Y{sup 3+} (0.900 {angstrom}). The nanosheets had a similar structure. Nanosheets of approximate dimensions 600 to 800 nm length and width were obtained using a slightly lower pH value, and they were highly textured. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy images showed that the nanotubes are fully crystalline. The nanotubes were typically 1.5-3 {micro}m in length and 50-200 nm in diameter. Using a pH value of approximately 10, stable nanotubes were obtained. It is anticipated that nanosheets might have rolled to form more stable nanotubes.

  11. Physico-chemical studies of amorphous carbon nanotubes synthesized at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Kim Han; Ahmad, Roslina; Leo, Bey Fen; Yew, Ming Chian; Ang, Bee Chin; Johan, Mohd Rafie

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Amorphous carbon nanotubes are successfully produced via a simple method at low temperature. ► Nanotubes in straight morphologies with open ends. ► Acid treatment increases the extent of amorphous for nanotubes. ► Amorphous nanotubes exhibit phenomena of π plasmon absorbance and possess higher bandgap. -- Abstract: This work provides better understanding on the nature of amorphous carbon nanotubes, which are synthesized via a simple chemical route. Amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs) are successfully synthesized by heating a mixture of ferrocene and ammonium chloride at temperature as low as 200 °C and are treated with hydrochloric acid. Transmission and field emission scanning electron microscopy techniques are performed to examine the morphology and dimension of the samples. X-ray diffraction tests confirm the amorphous structure of the nanotubes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman studies indicate that the treated α-CNTs consist of many defective walls and are more amorphous compared with the untreated α-CNTs. Ultraviolet–visible absorption studies reveal that the untreated and treated α-CNTs exhibit plasmon absorbance with high bandgaps of 4 eV and 4.35 eV, respectively.

  12. Nanotube electronics: large-scale assembly of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Saleem G; Huang, Ling; Setyawan, Wahyu; Hong, Seunghun

    2003-09-04

    Nanoscale electronic devices made from carbon nanotubes, such as transistors and sensors, are much smaller and more versatile than those that rely on conventional microelectronic chips, but their development for mass production has been thwarted by difficulties in aligning and integrating the millions of nanotubes required. Inspired by biomolecular self-assembly processes, we have created chemically functionalized patterns on a surface, to which pre-grown nanotubes in solution can align themselves in huge numbers. This method allows wafer-scale fabrication of millions of carbon-nanotube circuits with single-nanotube precision, and may enable nanotube-based devices, such as computer chips and high-density sensor arrays, to be produced industrially.

  13. Torsional Resonators Based on Inorganic Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Divon, Yiftach; Levi, Roi; Garel, Jonathan; Golberg, Dmitri; Tenne, Reshef; Ya'akobovitz, Assaf; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2017-01-11

    We study for the first time the resonant torsional behaviors of inorganic nanotubes, specifically tungsten disulfide (WS2) and boron nitride (BN) nanotubes, and compare them to that of carbon nanotubes. We have found WS2 nanotubes to have the highest quality factor (Q) and torsional resonance frequency, followed by BN nanotubes and carbon nanotubes. Dynamic and static torsional spring constants of the various nanotubes were found to be different, especially in the case of WS2, possibly due to a velocity-dependent intershell friction. These results indicate that inorganic nanotubes are promising building blocks for high-Q nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  14. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    PubMed

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  15. Influence of formalin fixation on tissue dimensions in palatal tonsils.

    PubMed

    Vent, J; Zimmermann, Ch; Drebber, U; Wedemeyer, I; Eckel, H E; Huettenbrink, K B; Preuss, S F

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the change of tissue dimensions after formalin fixation, and to determine the optimal time of fixation. Formalin fixation may lead to shrinkage in tissue dimensions and may thus alter tumor stages. It is often observed in tumor surgery that the dimensions in vivo seem larger than after resection, and tissue appears to shrink further after formalin fixation. This might alter dimensions and assessment of spread of the tumor and thus lead to a lesser tumor classification and stage. In cases where the decision for adjuvant chemoradiation is based upon the stage, it may thus be of relevance for the patient to evaluate the pathologic and not the in vivo dimensions of the tumor. In order to obtain comparable tissues, we investigated 100 palatal tonsils after cold steel dissection tonsillectomy for chronic tonsillitis. There were four time points investigated: directly after excision in the operating room and after four, 24 and 72 h of fixation in formaldehyde (4% Formaldehyde in phosphate buffer pH 7.4). The tissue was measured in the following dimensions: volume (ml), weight (g) and length, broadness and width (mm). The tissue size did not change significantly in dimensions except for an increase in length. The time of fixation did not influence the size. Formalin fixation does not significantly influence the tissue dimensions of palatal tonsils in comparison to direct ex vivo measurements. A minimal time of fixation of 20 h is required in order to stop all degenerative processes; however, longer fixation does not change the dimensions of the specimen. The null hypothesis has to be withdrawn that tissue dimensions are altered by formalin fixation. Thus, the histopathological measurements do not influence TNM staging. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Cultural dimensions of learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyford, Glen A.

    1990-06-01

    How, what, when and where we learn is frequently discussed, as are content versus process, or right brain versus left brain learning. What is usually missing is the cultural dimension. This is not an easy concept to define, but various aspects can be identified. The World Decade for Cultural Development emphasizes the need for a counterbalance to a quantitative, economic approach. In the last century poets also warned against brutalizing materialism, and Sorokin and others have described culture more recently in terms of cohesive basic values expressed through aesthetics and institutions. Bloom's taxonomy incorporates the category of affective learning, which internalizes values. If cultural learning goes beyond knowledge acquisition, perhaps the surest way of understanding the cultural dimension of learning is to examine the aesthetic experience. This can use myths, metaphors and symbols, and to teach and learn by using these can help to unlock the human potential for vision and creativity.

  17. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2010-04-29

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  18. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2010-07-12

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  19. Infinitely Large New Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Dimopoulos, Savas; Dvali, Gia; Kaloper, Nemanja

    1999-07-29

    We construct intersecting brane configurations in Anti-de-Sitter space localizing gravity to the intersection region, with any number n of extra dimensions. This allows us to construct two kinds of theories with infinitely large new dimensions, TeV scale quantum gravity and sub-millimeter deviations from Newton's Law. The effective 4D Planck scale M{sub Pl} is determined in terms of the fundamental Planck scale M{sub *} and the AdS radius of curvature L via the familiar relation M{sub Pl}{sup 2} {approx} M{sub *}{sup 2+n} L{sup n}; L acts as an effective radius of compactification for gravity on the intersection. Taking M{sub *} {approx} TeV and L {approx} sub-mm reproduces the phenomenology of theories with large extra dimensions. Alternately, taking M{sub *} {approx} L{sup -1} {approx} M{sub Pl}, and placing our 3-brane a distance {approx} 100M{sub Pl}{sup -1} away from the intersection gives us a theory with an exponential determination of the Weak/Planck hierarchy.

  20. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  1. Retinal Light Processing Using Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J. (Inventor); Leng, Theodore (Inventor); Fishman, Harvey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Method and system for processing light signals received by the eye of a human or other animal, where the eye may be compromised or non-functioning. Incident light is received at first and second pixels in a photodetector array and provides a pixel electrical signal representing the received light. Each of an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) towers is connected to a pixel, has a first tower end penetrating a retinal active layer of the animal and has a second tower end positioned to receive to receive and transport the pixel electrical signal to the retinal active layer. The CNT tower may be coated with a biologically active substance or chemically modified to promote neurite connections with the tower. The photoreceptor array can be provide with a signal altering mechanism that alters at least one of light intensity and wavelength intensity sensed by a first pixel relative to a second pixel, to correct for one or more selected eye problems.

  2. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  3. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  4. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Punyani, Supriya; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Yang, Hoichang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Kane, Ravi S.

    2008-01-01

    Conjugating proteins onto carbon nanotubes has numerous applications in biosensing, imaging and cellular delivery. However, remotely controlling the activity of proteins in these conjugates has never been demonstrated. Here we show that upon near-infrared irradiation, carbon nanotubes mediate the selective deactivation of proteins in situ by photochemical effects. We designed nanotube-peptide conjugates to selectively destroy the anthrax toxin, and also optically transparent coatings that can self-clean following either visible or near-infrared irradiation. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation may be broadly applicable to the selective destruction of pathogens and cells, and will have applications ranging from antifouling coatings to functional proteomics.

  5. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  6. Accelerated dynamics simulations of nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, B. P.; Stuart, S. J.; Voter, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the application of accelerated dynamics techniques to the study of carbon nanotubes. We have used the parallel replica method and temperature accelerated dynamics simulations are currently in progress. In the parallel replica study, we have stretched tubes at a rate significantly lower than that used in previous studies. In these preliminary results, we find that there are qualitative differences in the rupture of the nanotubes at different temperatures. We plan on extending this investigation to include nanotubes of various chiralities. We also plan on exploring unique geometries of nanotubes.

  7. Carbon nanotube transistors scaled to a 40-nanometer footprint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qing; Tersoff, Jerry; Farmer, Damon B.; Zhu, Yu; Han, Shu-Jen

    2017-06-01

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors challenges the device research community to reduce the transistor footprint containing all components to 40 nanometers within the next decade. We report on a p-channel transistor scaled to such an extremely small dimension. Built on one semiconducting carbon nanotube, it occupies less than half the space of leading silicon technologies, while delivering a significantly higher pitch-normalized current density—above 0.9 milliampere per micrometer at a low supply voltage of 0.5 volts with a subthreshold swing of 85 millivolts per decade. Furthermore, we show transistors with the same small footprint built on actual high-density arrays of such nanotubes that deliver higher current than that of the best-competing silicon devices under the same overdrive, without any normalization. We achieve this using low-resistance end-bonded contacts, a high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube source, and self-assembly to pack nanotubes into full surface-coverage aligned arrays.

  8. Growth of GaN nanotubes and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Maoqi; Zhou, Piezhen; Mohammad, S. Noor; Halpern, Joshua; Jacobs, Randy; Sarney, Wendy; Salamanca-Riba, Lourdes

    2001-03-01

    We have grown GaN nanowires and nanotubes by direct reaction of Ga metal vapor with NH3 in a simple tube furnace. By varying the ammonia flow rate (20-120 sccm) and temperature (800-1000 ^oC) we have been able to control onset of growth, and the diameters of these cylindrically symmetric nanostructures. The length of the nanowires and nanotubes is determined by the duration of the growth cycle. The nanowires and nanotubes that we have studied are single crystal and have a wurtzite structure. In the first 90 minutes, a 1 or 2 μ thick amorphous GaN matrix is deposited. Soon after pebble like polycrystalline hillocks form. Single crystal nanowires sprout from the sides of the platelets. The diameter of the nanowire is the same as the thickness of the plate, that is the smallest dimension of the face from which it grows. Since the platelet thickness depends on temperature and the ammonia, the thickness of the nanowires is proportional to the temperature and ammonia flow rate. At higher temperatures and flow rates nanotubes and rods start to grow from the flat surface of the plates

  9. Self-assembling DNA nanotubes to connect molecular landmarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Abdul M.; Šulc, Petr; Zenk, John; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-05-01

    Within cells, nanostructures are often organized using local assembly rules that produce long-range order. Because these rules can take into account the cell's current structure and state, they can enable complexes, organelles or cytoskeletal structures to assemble around existing cellular components to form architectures. Although many methods for self-assembling biomolecular nanostructures have been developed, few can be programmed to assemble structures whose form depends on the identity and organization of structures already present in the environment. Here, we demonstrate that DNA nanotubes can grow to connect pairs of molecular landmarks with different separation distances and relative orientations. DNA tile nanotubes nucleate at these landmarks and grow while their free ends diffuse. The nanotubes can then join end to end to form stable connections, with unconnected nanotubes selectively melted away. Connections form between landmark pairs separated by 1-10 µm in more than 75% of cases and can span a surface or three dimensions. This point-to-point assembly process illustrates how self-assembly kinetics can be designed to produce structures with a desired physical property rather than a specific shape.

  10. Light-scattering and dispersion behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Craig; Manickavasagam, Siva; Pinar Mengüc, M.; Andrews, Rodney

    2005-08-01

    Elliptically polarized light-scattering measurements were performed to investigate the dispersion behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Xylene- and pyridine-derived MWNT powders were dispersed in water and ethanol in separate optic cells and allowed to sit undisturbed over a two-week time period after probe sonication. Continuous light-scattering measurements taken between scattering angles of 10-170 deg and repeated over several days showed that the nanotubes formed fractal-like networks. The pyridine-derived MWNTs showed greater dispersion variation over time, tending to aggregate and clump much faster than the xylene-derived tubes. The water suspensions appeared much more stable than the ethanol suspensions, which transformed into nonfractal morphology after a few hours. We relate the dispersion stability to size and fringe patterns on the outer surface of the nanotubes. Measured values of fractal dimension were distinctly lower than those in previous studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Profiles of both diagonal and off-diagonal scattering matrix elements are presented.

  11. Carbon nanotube transistors scaled to a 40-nanometer footprint.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Tersoff, Jerry; Farmer, Damon B; Zhu, Yu; Han, Shu-Jen

    2017-06-30

    The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors challenges the device research community to reduce the transistor footprint containing all components to 40 nanometers within the next decade. We report on a p-channel transistor scaled to such an extremely small dimension. Built on one semiconducting carbon nanotube, it occupies less than half the space of leading silicon technologies, while delivering a significantly higher pitch-normalized current density-above 0.9 milliampere per micrometer at a low supply voltage of 0.5 volts with a subthreshold swing of 85 millivolts per decade. Furthermore, we show transistors with the same small footprint built on actual high-density arrays of such nanotubes that deliver higher current than that of the best-competing silicon devices under the same overdrive, without any normalization. We achieve this using low-resistance end-bonded contacts, a high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube source, and self-assembly to pack nanotubes into full surface-coverage aligned arrays. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  12. FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A CARBON NANOTUBE-BASED NANOKNIFE

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Rice, P.; Mahajan, R. L.; McIntosh, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate construction and testing of a prototype microtome knife for cutting ~100 nm thick slices of frozen-hydrated biological samples based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT). A piezoelectric-based 3-D manipulator was used inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to select and position individual MWCNTs, which were subsequently welded in place using electron beam-induced deposition (EBID). The knife is built on a pair of tungsten needles with provision to adjust the distance between the needle tips, accommodating various lengths of MWCNTs. We performed experiments to test the mechanical strength of MWCNT in the completed device using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. An increasing force was applied at the midpoint of nanotube until failure, which was observed in situ in the SEM. The maximum breaking force was approximately (8 × 10−7) N which corresponds well with the typical microtome cutting forces reported in the literature. In situ cutting experiments were performed on a cell biological embedding plastic (epoxy) by pushing it against the nanotube. Initial experiments show indentation marks on the epoxy surface. Quantitative analysis is currently limited by the surface asperities which have the same dimensions as the nanotube. PMID:19417497

  13. Fabrication and characterization of a carbon nanotube-based nanoknife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Rice, P.; Mahajan, R. L.; McIntosh, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication and testing of a prototype microtome knife based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) for cutting ~100 nm thick slices of frozen-hydrated biological samples. A piezoelectric-based 3D manipulator was used inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to select and position individual MWCNTs, which were subsequently welded in place using electron beam-induced deposition. The knife is built on a pair of tungsten needles with provision to adjust the distance between the needle tips, accommodating various lengths of MWCNTs. We performed experiments to test the mechanical strength of a MWCNT in the completed device using an atomic force microscope tip. An increasing force was applied at the mid-point of the nanotube until failure occurred, which was observed in situ in the SEM. The maximum breaking force was approximately (8 × 10-7) N which corresponds well with the typical microtome cutting forces reported in the literature. In situ cutting experiments were performed on a cell biological embedding plastic (epoxy) by pushing it against the nanotube. Initial experiments show indentation marks on the epoxy surface. Quantitative analysis is currently limited by the surface asperities, which have the same dimensions as the nanotube.

  14. Inhomogeneous compact extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Budaev, R. I.; Grobov, A. V.; Dmitriev, A. E.; Rubin, Sergey G.

    2017-10-01

    We show that an inhomogeneous compact extra space possesses two necessary features— their existence does not contradict the observable value of the cosmological constant Λ4 in pure f(R) theory, and the extra dimensions are stable relative to the "radion mode" of perturbations, the only mode considered. For a two-dimensional extra space, both analytical and numerical solutions for the metric are found, able to provide a zero or arbitrarily small Λ4. A no-go theorem has also been proved, that maximally symmetric compact extra spaces are inconsistent with 4D Minkowski space in the framework of pure f(R) gravity.

  15. Extra Dimensions of Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-09-01

    They say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. In a pedagogically pure sense, that's probably true. But some questions do seem to flirt dangerously close to being really quite ridiculous. One such question might well be, "How many dimensions of space are there?" I mean, it's pretty obvious that there are three: left/right, up/down, and forward/backward. No matter how you express an object's coordinate, be it Cartesian, spherical, cylindrical, or something exotic, it's eminently clear that we live in a three-dimensional universe.

  16. Thermoacoustic transduction in individual suspended carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mason, Blake J; Chang, Shun-Wen; Chen, Jihan; Cronin, Stephen B; Bushmaker, Adam W

    2015-05-26

    We report an experimental measurement of the acoustic signal emitted from an individual suspended carbon nanotube (CNT) approximate 2 μm in length, 1 nm in diameter, and 10(-21) kg in mass. This system represents the smallest thermoacoustic system studied to date. By applying an AC voltage of 1.4 V at 8 kHz to the suspended CNT, we are able to detect the acoustic signal using a commercial microphone. The acoustic power detected is found to span a range from 0.1 to 2.4 attoWatts or 0.2 to 1 μPa of sound pressure. This corresponds to thermoacoustic efficiencies ranging from 0.007 to 0.6 Pa/W for the seven devices that were measured in this study. Here, the small lateral dimensions of these devices cause large heat losses due to thermal conduction, which result in the relatively small observed thermoacoustic efficiencies.

  17. Carbon nanotubes and nanowires for biological sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Ng, Hou Tee; Chen, Hua

    2005-01-01

    This chapter reviews the recent development in biological sensing using nanotechnologies based on carbon nanotubes and various nanowires. These 1D materials have shown unique properties that are efficient in interacting with biomolecules of similar dimensions, i.e., on a nanometer scale. Various aspects including synthesis, materials properties, device fabrication, biofunctionalization, and biological sensing applications of such materials are reviewed. The potential of such integrated nanobiosensors in providing ultrahigh sensitivity, fast response, and high-degree multiplex detection, yet with minimum sample requirements is demonstrated. This chapter is intended to provide comprehensive updated information for people from a variety of backgrounds but with common interests in the fast-moving interdisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology.

  18. Carbon nanotubes and nanowires for biological sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Ng, Hou Tee; Chen, Hua

    2005-01-01

    This chapter reviews the recent development in biological sensing using nanotechnologies based on carbon nanotubes and various nanowires. These 1D materials have shown unique properties that are efficient in interacting with biomolecules of similar dimensions, i.e., on a nanometer scale. Various aspects including synthesis, materials properties, device fabrication, biofunctionalization, and biological sensing applications of such materials are reviewed. The potential of such integrated nanobiosensors in providing ultrahigh sensitivity, fast response, and high-degree multiplex detection, yet with minimum sample requirements is demonstrated. This chapter is intended to provide comprehensive updated information for people from a variety of backgrounds but with common interests in the fast-moving interdisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology.

  19. Bond percolation in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, Eric I.; Stinchcombe, Robin; Thorpe, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    We collect results for bond percolation on various lattices from two to fourteen dimensions that, in the limit of large dimension d or number of neighbors z, smoothly approach a randomly diluted Erdős-Rényi graph. We include results on bond-diluted hypersphere packs in up to nine dimensions, which show the mean coordination, excess kurtosis, and skewness evolving smoothly with dimension towards the Erdős-Rényi limit.

  20. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  1. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    PubMed

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  2. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  3. Carbon nanotubes: artificial nanomaterials to engineer single neurons and neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Bosi, Susanna; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2012-08-15

    In the past decade, nanotechnology applications to the nervous system have often involved the study and the use of novel nanomaterials to improve the diagnosis and therapy of neurological diseases. In the field of nanomedicine, carbon nanotubes are evaluated as promising materials for diverse therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Besides, carbon nanotubes are increasingly employed in basic neuroscience approaches, and they have been used in the design of neuronal interfaces or in that of scaffolds promoting neuronal growth in vitro. Ultimately, carbon nanotubes are thought to hold the potential for the development of innovative neurological implants. In this framework, it is particularly relevant to document the impact of interfacing such materials with nerve cells. Carbon nanotubes were shown, when modified with biologically active compounds or functionalized in order to alter their charge, to affect neurite outgrowth and branching. Notably, purified carbon nanotubes used as scaffolds can promote the formation of nanotube-neuron hybrid networks, able per se to affect neuron integrative abilities, network connectivity, and synaptic plasticity. We focus this review on our work over several years directed to investigate the ability of carbon nanotube platforms in providing a new tool for nongenetic manipulations of neuronal performance and network signaling.

  4. Adhesion to Carbon Nanotube Conductive Scaffolds Forces Action-Potential Appearance in Immature Rat Spinal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies. PMID:23951361

  5. Sacrificial template growth of CdS nanotubes from Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xuemei; Chu Haibin; Li Yan . E-mail: yanli@pku.edu.cn

    2006-01-15

    A diffusion-controlled process was proposed for the preparation of inorganic nanotubes from nanowires. The preformed Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowires were used as the sacrificial templates to generate CdS nanotubes with different wall thickness. The axle-sleeve transition state found in-between the precursor and the formation of products proves the diffusion-controlled mechanism. CdS nanotubes can be prepared via this method at different temperature and with various sulfide sources. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results showed that all obtained CdS nanotubes consist conglomerated crystallites, and the crystallinity can be altered by changing the temperature of the growth process. The wall thickness of the produced CdS nanotubes can be controlled by changing the concentration of the sulfide source and stopping the reaction at different stages. -- Graphical abstract: CdS nanotubes were prepared with Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowires as the sacrificial templates. Diffusion played an important role in the process. The morphology of the produced nanotubes can be varied by alternating the reaction conditions.

  6. Adhesion to carbon nanotube conductive scaffolds forces action-potential appearance in immature rat spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Sucapane, Antonietta; Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies.

  7. Carbon Nanotubes Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    We describe current and possible future developments in nanotechnology for biological and medical applications. Nanostructured, composite materials for drug delivery, biosensors, diagnostics and tumor therapy are reviewed as examples, placing special emphasis on silica composites. Carbon nanotubes are discussed as a primary example of emerging nanomaterials for many of the above-mentioned applications. Toxicity effects of this novel nanomaterial are discussed and the need for further study of potential hazards for human health, professionally exposed workers and the environment is motivated.

  8. Morphing Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-20

    would operate by swelling of an active material in a direction locally perpendicular to the CNTs. This shape change, in combination with the mechanical... materials and active surfaces. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS Morphing Structures, Plant-mimetic Design, Cabon Nanotube, Active Polymers 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...and it was proposed that morphing CNT microstructures would operate by swelling of an active material in a direction locally perpendicular to the

  9. Boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chopra, N G; Luyken, R J; Cherrey, K; Crespi, V H; Cohen, M L; Louie, S G; Zettl, A

    1995-08-18

    The successful synthesis of pure boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is reported here. Multi-walled tubes with inner diameters on the order of 1 to 3 nanometers and with lengths up to 200 nanometers were produced in a carbon-free plasma discharge between a BN-packed tungsten rod and a cooled copper electrode. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on individual tubes yielded B:N ratios of approximately 1, which is consistent with theoretical predictions of stable BN tube structures.

  10. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  11. Nanotubes in biological applications.

    PubMed

    Mundra, Ruchir V; Wu, Xia; Sauer, Jeremy; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2014-08-01

    Researchers over the last few years have recognized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as promising materials for a number of biological applications. CNTs are increasingly being explored as potent drug carriers for cancer treatment, for biosensing, and as scaffolds for stem cell culture. Moreover, the integration of CNTs with proteins has led to the development of functional nanocomposites with antimicrobial properties. This review aims at understanding the critical role of CNTs in biological applications with a particular emphasis on more recent studies.

  12. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  13. Flying in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu; Bardon, Thibaut

    2012-11-01

    It has long been proposed that insect flight might have evolved on a fluid interface. Surface of a pond provides an ecological niche which is exploited by a large number of species capable of locomotion on a fluid interface. Here we describe the discovery of constrained flight in two dimensions as a novel mode of locomotion used by water lily beetles (genus Galerucella). Because water lily beetles are also capable of three-dimensional free flight, this novel two-dimensional locomotion provides us with a unique model system to explore both the transition between two and three dimensional flight and the associated energetics. Here we present a comparative analysis of this transition in terms of wing stroke angles associated with two and three dimensional flight, as well as modeling surface tension forces on both the horizontal and vertical axes. Special attention is paid to the dynamics and energetics of flight in two-dimensions, focusing on the interaction of the wing strokes with the fluid interface and the capillary-gravity wave drag associated with two-dimensional propulsion. Current Address: Ecole Polytechnique, France.

  14. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale.

  15. Half-metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2012-04-17

    Half-metallicity in carbon nanotubes is achieved and controlled by hydrogen adsorption patterns. The edge states in carbon nanotubes are unstable under an electric field due to the spin-conserving electron transfer between the edges, but a large enough transfer barrier between the edge states, obtained by controlling the adsorption patterns, renders the CNTs half-metallic.

  16. Anisotropic Plasticity of BN Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhu, Menon; Srivastava, Deepak; Woo, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Plastic collapse of compressed BN nanotubes are investigated and compared with carbon nanotubes of similar nature. Using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GTBMD) method for system containing B, N and C atoms we compute stiffness and plastic collapse of BN and C nanotubes under axial compression. For small compressional strain, BN nanotubes are found to be about 92% as stiff as similar C nanotubes. Due to BN bond buckling effect, however, the elastic limit of BN nanotubes is found to be more than C nanotubes. A route to plasticity is explored in which we find that at elastic limit the accumulated strain is released by a local plastic deformation of the nanotube. The mechanism of strain release and the resulting plastic deformation, however. are anisotropic in nature. The strain is released preferentially towards N as leading edge of a buckled BN bond and the tube, compressed at both ends, plastically collapses preferentially towards one end. Details of the anisotropic plasticity and prospective applications will be discussed in this presentation.

  17. Magnetic nanotubes for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic nanotubes hold the potential for neuroscience applications because of their capability to deliver chemicals or biomolecules and the feasibility of controlling the orientation or movement of these magnetic nanotubes by an external magnetic field thus facilitating directed growth of neurites. Therefore, we sought to investigate the effects of laminin treated magnetic nanotubes and external alternating magnetic fields on the growth of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in cell culture. Magnetic nanotubes were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and characterized to confirm their hollow structure, the hematite and maghemite phases, and the magnetic properties. DRG neurons were cultured in the presence of magnetic nanotubes under alternating magnetic fields. Electron microscopy showed a close interaction between magnetic nanotubes and the growing neurites Phase contrast microscopy revealed live growing neurons suggesting that the combination of the presence of magnetic nanotubes and the alternating magnetic field were tolerated by DRG neurons. The synergistic effect, from both laminin treated magnetic nanotubes and the applied magnetic fields on survival, growth and electrical activity of the DRG neurons are currently being investigated.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Based Flexible Supercapacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Electrochemical double layer capacitors are fabricated using carbon nanotube (CNT)/paper flexible electrodes. An extensive...TERMS Carbon nanotube, supercapacitor, electrochemical double layer capacitor 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18...layer capacitors (Supercapacitors) are expected to play a significant role in future hybrid power systems due to their high specific power, cycle

  19. Transport of a liquid water and methanol mixture through carbon nanotubes under a chemical potential gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Jie; Lennon, Erin M.; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we report a dual-control-volume grand canonical molecular dynamics simulation study of the transport of a water and methanol mixture under a fixed concentration gradient through nanotubes of various diameters and surface chemistries. Methanol and water are selected as fluid molecules since water represents a strongly polar molecule while methanol is intermediate between nonpolar and strongly polar molecules. Carboxyl acid (-COOH) groups are anchored onto the inner wall of a carbon nanotube to alter the hydrophobic surface into a hydrophilic one. Results show that the transport of the mixture through hydrophilic tubes is faster than through hydrophobic nanotubes although the diffusion of the mixture is slower inside hydrophilic than hydrophobic pores due to a hydrogen network. Thus, the transport of the liquid mixture through the nanotubes is controlled by the pore entrance effect for which hydrogen bonding plays an important role.

  20. Nanotubes for noisy signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ian Yenyin

    Nanotubes can process noisy signals. We present two central results in support of this general thesis and make an informed extrapolation that uses nanotubes to improve body armor. The first result is that noise can help nanotubes detect weak signals. The finding confirmed a stochastic-resonance theoretical prediction that noise can enhance detection at the nano-level. Laboratory experiments with nanotubes showed that three types of noise improved three measures of detection. Small amounts of Gaussian, uniform, and Cauchy additive white noise increased mutual-information, cross-correlation, and bit-error-rate measures before degrading them with further increases in noise. Nanotubes can apply this noise-enhancement and nanotube electrical and mechanical properties to improve signal processing. Similar noise enhancement may benefit a proposed nanotube-array cochlear-model spectral processing. The second result is that nanotube antennas can directly detect narrowband electromagnetic (EM) signals. The finding showed that nanotube and thin-wire dipoles are similar: They are resonant and narrowband and can implement linear-array designs if the EM waves in the nanotubes propagate at or near the free-space velocity of light. The nanotube-antenna prediction is based on a Fresnel-zone or near-zone analysis of antenna impedance using a quantum-conductor model. The analysis also predicts a failure to resonate if the nanotube EM-wave propagation is much slower than free-space light propagation. We extrapolate based on applied and theoretical analysis of body armor. Field experiments used a baseball comparison and statistical and other techniques to model body-armor bruising effects. A baseball comparison showed that a large caliber handgun bullet can hit an armored chest as hard as a fast baseball can hit a bare chest. Adaptive fuzzy systems learned to predict a bruise profile directly from the experimental data and also from statistical analysis of the data. Nanotube signal

  1. Optoelectronics with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    The carbon nanotube is a promising material for future micro- and nano-scale electronics because of its unique electronic properties, high carrier mobility and extraordinary capacity for high current density. In particular, semiconducting carbon nanotubes are direct bandgap materials with a typical energy gap in the order of 1 eV, which means they emit light in the near-infrared range, making them an attractive option in telecommunications applications. However, there have been few systematic investigations of electrically-induced light emission (i.e. electroluminescence) from carbon nanotubes, and their emission properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, we explore the characteristics of electroluminescence in three different types of carbon-nanotube devices. The first is a single-tube field-effect transistor (CNTFET), whose emission has previously been found to have a very broad spectral shape and low emission efficiency. We analyze the spectral shape in detail, which reveals that a high electric field near metal contacts contributes most to the bias-dependent component of broadening, in addition to smaller contributions from tube nonuniformity, inelastic scattering of phonons, high temperature, etc. In the second part of the study, single-tube light-emitting diodes are constructed by employing a split top-gate scheme. The split gate creates p- and n-doped regions electrostatically, so that electrons and holes combine between the two sections and can decay radiatively. This configuration creates electron-hole pairs under much lower electric fields and gives us a greater control over carrier distribution in the device channel, resulting in much narrower spectral linewidths and an emission intensity several orders of magnitude larger than that of CNTFETs. The much better signal-to-noise also leads to the observation of emission from defect-induced states. Finally, we extend the idea of the single-tube p-n diode and fabricate CNT film diodes from many

  2. Correlation dimension of financial market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Chun-Xiao

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, correlation dimension is applied to financial data analysis. We calculate the correlation dimensions of some real market data and find that the dimensions are significantly smaller than those of the simulation data based on geometric Brownian motion. Based on the analysis of the Chinese and US stock market data, the main results are as follows. First, by calculating three data sets for the Chinese and US market, we find that large market volatility leads to a significant decrease in the dimensions. Second, based on 5-min stock price data, we find that the Chinese market dimension is significantly larger than the US market; this shows a significant difference between the two markets for high frequency data. Third, we randomly extract stocks from a stock set and calculate the correlation dimensions, and find that the average value of these dimensions is close to the dimension of the original set. In addition, we analyse the intuitional meaning of the relevant dimensions used in this paper, which are directly related to the average degree of the financial threshold network. The dimension measures the speed of the average degree that varies with the threshold value. A smaller dimension means that the rate of change is slower.

  3. FRACTAL DIMENSION OF GALAXY ISOPHOTES

    SciTech Connect

    Thanki, Sandip; Rhee, George; Lepp, Stephen E-mail: grhee@physics.unlv.edu

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we investigate the use of the fractal dimension of galaxy isophotes in galaxy classification. We have applied two different methods for determining fractal dimensions to the isophotes of elliptical and spiral galaxies derived from CCD images. We conclude that fractal dimension alone is not a reliable tool but that combined with other parameters in a neural net algorithm the fractal dimension could be of use. In particular, we have used three parameters to segregate the ellipticals and lenticulars from the spiral galaxies in our sample. These three parameters are the correlation fractal dimension D {sub corr}, the difference between the correlation fractal dimension and the capacity fractal dimension D {sub corr} - D {sub cap}, and, thirdly, the B - V color of the galaxy.

  4. Effect of sonication on the mechanical properties of poly (vinyl alcohol)/carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truong, Van-Tan; Tsang, Kelly M. C.; Keough, Shannon J.; St John, Nigel A.

    2006-12-01

    Several sonication procedures were performed on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in water by varying the length of time, the output power and the type of sonicating horn. Depending on the sonicating conditions, the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) could be well or poorly exfoliated and dispersed. Poly (vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and MNWT (0.5 wt%) composites were cast from the PVA/MWNT aqueous mixture. Enhancement of the mechanical properties of the composites was related to two factors: (1) crystallinity formed at the PVA and MWNT interface and (2) the size of nanotube agglomerates. The poorly dispersed solution produced nanotube agglomerates with the size of 50-100 μm that did not induce crystallization at the polymer/nanotube interface. They became stress concentrators reducing the Young's modulus and the tensile strength. Optimized sonication procedures resulted in well-dispersed nanotube agglomerates of submicron dimensions efficiently enhancing the mechanical properties. As centrifugation facilitated the removal of large agglomerates, noticeable enhancement of mechanical properties of the composites was achieved.

  5. Electrical Conduction Mechanism in Chemical Vapour Deposition Grown Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Film.

    PubMed

    Al-Hazmi, F S

    2015-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes are interesting systems where different aspects of conduction are observed, mostly due to their low dimensionalities and small dimensions. Electrical conduction mechanism in multi wall carbon nanotubes film is studied. The studied multi-walled nanotubes are grown by a low pressure chemical vapour deposition system. To understand the conduction mechanism in these nanotubes, temperature dependence of conductivity of the multi wall nanotubes film over a temperature range of (400-200 K) is studied. On the basis of the results, one may suggest the thermally activated conduction mechanism for the temperature range (400-300 K). The low temperature data is fitted with the hopping conduction for the transport of charge carriers in the temperature range of 300-200 K. This hopping conduction mechanism is characterized by variable range hopping (VRH), which shows complete agreement with the Mott's type of VRH mechanism. Applying this model, a number of Mott's parameters such as density of states, hopping distance, hopping energy are calculated. The calculated values of all the studied parameters matches well the reported results on other multi-wall nanotubes film.

  6. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  7. Phenomenology of Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.; /SLAC

    2006-11-07

    If the structure of spacetime is different than that readily observed, gravitational physics, particle physics and cosmology are all immediately affected. The physics of extra dimensions offers new insights and solutions to fundamental questions arising in these fields. Novel ideas and frameworks are continuously born and evolved. They make use of string theoretical features and tools and they may reveal if and how the 11-dimensional string theory is relevant to our four-dimensional world. We have outlined some of the experimental observations in particle and gravitational physics as well as astrophysical and cosmological considerations that can constrain or confirm these scenarios. These developing ideas and the wide interdisciplinary experimental program that is charted out to investigate them mark a renewed effort to describe the dynamics behind spacetime. We look forward to the discovery of a higher dimensional spacetime.

  8. Synthesis, properties and applications of 3D carbon nanotube-graphene junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Zhao, Zhenghang; Niu, Jianbing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2016-11-01

    Integration of 1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene sheets through covalent bonding can create novel 3D nanoporous hybrid nanostructures that inherit unique mechanical, thermal, electrical and chemical properties of their building blocks and even have new properties in three dimensions. Great progress has been made in developing 3D carbon nanotube-graphene nanoarchitectures for various applications such as mechanical cushions, thermal sinkers, transistors, and renewable energy conversion. This review presents the recent advances in synthesis and analysis of the 3D nanostructures. Emphasis is put on design principles, molecular structures, processes and properties of the materials.

  9. Application of Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy for Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (Review)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, N.; Jain, S.; Mittal, J.

    2015-03-01

    Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is among the few techniques that are available for the characterization of modified single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) having nanometer dimensions (~1-3 nm). CNTs can be modified either by surface functionalization or coating, between bundles of nanotubes by doping, intercalation and fully or partially filling the central core. EELS is an exclusive technique for the identification, composition analysis, and crystallization studies of the chemicals and materials used for the modification of SWCNTs. The present paper serves as a compendium of research work on the application of EELS for the characterization of modified SWCNTs.

  10. The Dimension of Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, Lucien

    2008-11-01

    To implement Jaynes' vision [1] of applications of Shannon's ideas outside Communication Theory proper, the dimension of information must be clarified, mainly because general applications provide no ready-made set of discrete, mutually exclusive and exhaustive "events" which could play a rôle similar to that of the alphabet which communication theory implicitely supposes known from the outset. For instance, a doctor's "alphabet" may be said to consist of readily distinguishable bundles of symptoms, cures, etc., each of which he considers specific enough to describe an illness of interest. Setting up an appropriate alphabet requires learning, in the same way as a child painfully learns to read letters, and a quantitative assessment of this task depends crucially on the dimension of information. Information is an extensive property, as explicited by the standard equation I = N.H for the amount of information delivered by a succession of N events. All other things remaining equal, doubling the length of a message doubles the amount of information. But by definition, Shannon's uncertainty H on the right-hand side of the equation is a rate, i.e. an intensive property, as illustrated by the fact that the simultaneous throw of two true and identical dice removes less than twice the uncertainty removed by the throw of a single die, as is well-known to poker-players. If the above equation is to be dimensionally consistent, N can not be a pure number, but must have an extensive dimension of its own. The obvious question "which?" was swept under the rug by von Neumann's famous quip [3], which advised to call H an entropy, thereby suggesting improperly that H by itself-without the factor N-is an extensive property like physical entropy. But H only evaluates an amount of information when multiplied by N, which measures an amount of order akin to the chronological order without which any message becomes garbage. In analogy with the decomposition E S.T of energy E into the pair

  11. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes for Polymer Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anctil, Annick; Dileo, Roberta; Schauerman, Chris; Landi, Brian; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being investigated for optical absorption, exciton dissociation, and carrier transport in polymer photovoltaic devices. In the present work, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by an Alexandrite pulsed laser vaporization reactor at standard conditions and purified based upon our previously reported TOP procedure. The SWNTs were dispersed in polymer composites for pure MEH-PPV, pure P3HT, and [C60]-PCBM-P3HT (1:1 by weight) as a function of nanotube weight loading (0.1 -- 5% w/w). The AM0 current-voltage measurements for structures sandwiched between PEDOT/PSS coated ITO substrates and an evaporated aluminum contact demonstrate the dramatic effect of SWNT content on the short circuit current density, with conversions efficiencies consistently greater than 1%. The temperature coefficient for nanotube-containing polymer photovoltaics has been compared to conventional PCBM-P3HT devices, and the general relationship of increasing efficiency with increasing temperature is observed. However, the necessity to control nanotube percolation to prevent device shunting has led to recent developments which focus on controlling nanotube length through oxidative cutting, the deposition of intrinsic polymer layers, and the use of aligned carbon nanotube arrays for preferential charge transport.

  14. Nanotube networks in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, Martin; Lagerwall, Jan Peter F.; Scalia, Giusy

    2016-03-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are very attractive hosts for the organization of anisotropic nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) because of the macroscopic organization resulting in properties of nanoparticles manifest at a macroscopic scale. Different types of LCs have demonstrated the ability to organize nanotubes, showing the generality of the approach, i.e., that the liquid crystallinity per se is the driving factor for the organization. Compared to standard nanotube composites (e.g. with disordered polymer hosts) the introduction of carbon nanotubes into an LC allows not only the transfer of the outstanding CNT properties to the macroscopic phase, providing strength and conductivity, but these properties also become anisotropic, following the transfer of the orientational order from the LC to the CNTs. The LC molecular structure plays an important even if ancillary role since it enters in the surface interactions, fulfilling a mediating action between the particle and the bulk of the LC. Isolated nanotubes can be obtained by optimized dispersions at lower concentrations and this process requires the use or development of tailored strategies like using solvents or even another LC for pre-dispersing CNTs. Aggregates or networks can be observed in poor dispersions and at higher nanoparticle concentrations. In those, due to surface interactions, the LC behaviour can be strongly affected with changes in phase sequences or transition temperatures and the effect is expected to be more pronounced as the concentration of nanotubes increases. We present preliminary investigations and observations on nanotube - LC systems based on a smectic LC host.

  15. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers.

  16. Scientific Visualization of Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Don V.

    2010-10-01

    In the 21st Century, many theoretical physicists claim that higher dimensions may indeed exist. Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, & Dvali (ADD) and Randall-Sundrum (RS), in addition to Kaluza-Klein (KK) and M-string theorists, have introduced reasonable explanations for the existence of heretofore ``invisible'' higher dimensions. Whether or not these extra dimensions actually exist is irrelevant to their contributions to the visionary conceptualization associated with novel and improved mathematical and physical analysis. Envisioning extra dimensions beyond the three of common experience is a daunting challenge for three dimensional observers. Intuition relies on experience gained in a three dimensional environment. Gaining experience with virtual four dimensional objects and virtual three manifolds in four-space on a personal computer may provide the basis for an intuitive grasp of four dimensions. This presentation is a video ``outtake'' of the author's research into ``Visualizing Extra Spatial Dimensions'' at the University of California at Irvine.

  17. Carbon nanotube sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liming

    2002-07-01

    Measurement represents one of the oldest methods used by human beings to better understand and control the world. Many measurement systems are primarily physical sensors, which measure time, temperature, weight, distance, and various other physical parameters. The need for cheaper, faster, and more accurate meansurements has been a driving force for the development of new systems and technologies for measurements of materials, both chemical and biological. In fact, chemical and biological sensors (or biosensors) are the evolved products of physical measurement technologies. Chemical sensors are measurement devices that convert a chemical or physical change of a specific analyte into a measurable signal, whose magnitude is normally proportional to the concentration of the analyte. On the other hand, biosensors are a subset of chemical sensors that employ a biological sensing element connected to a transducer to recognize the physiochemical change and to produce the measurable signal from particular analytes, which are not necessary to be biological materials themselves, although sometimes they are. Depending on the basis of the transduction principle, chemical and biological sensors can be classified into three major classes with different transducers: sensors with electrical transducers, sensors with optical transducers, and sensors with other transducers (e.g. mass change). The unique properties of carbon nanotubes have led to their use in areas as diverse as sensors, actuators, field-emitting flat panel displays, energy and gas storages (Dai and Mau, 2001). As we shall see below, the principles for carbon nanotube sensors to detect the nature of gases and to determine their concentrations are based on change in electrical properties induced by charge transfer with the gas molecules (e.g. O2, H2, CO2) or in mass due to physical adsorption. This article provides a status report on the research and development of carbon nanotube sensors.

  18. Johannes Kepler and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Archibald W.

    2004-02-01

    How many dimensions are there? The answer used to be four — three spatial and one time dimension. Maybe it still is, though nowadays we hear that the answer may be more, perhaps many more. Many of our students have heard about this on television or read about it. They want to know more. Why do physicists think we need more than three spatial dimensions? What's the point of it all?

  19. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  20. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  1. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  2. Production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  4. VQS (vapor-quasiliquid-solid, vapor-quasisolid-solid) mechanism presents a unified foundation for the syntheses of nanotubes, primarily carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, S. Noor

    2017-09-01

    Nanotubes are synthesized almost entirely by metal-catalyst-free and metal-catalyst-mediated non-eutectic mechanism(s). An investigation has been carried out to understand the basics of this mechanism. Various possible chemical and physical processes involved in nanotube synthesis have been researched. Various components and attributes of nanotube synthesis have been evaluated. Phase transitions, alloy formation, porosity, carrier transport and the fundamentals underlying them have been examined. Nanoparticle surfaces conducive to nanotube synthesis have been examined. The role of surface treatment, which includes oxidation, oxygenation, acid treatment, plasma treatment, water treatment, sputtering, etc in creating such surfaces, has been investigated. The role of surface treatment and phase transitions as functions of temperature, pressure, ambient, contaminants, surface amorphicity, etc in creating diffusion paths for the diffusion of growth species for supersaturation and nucleation has been explored. Interdiffusion of catalyst and source materials, and hence exchange of materials, on the nanoparticle surface, have been elucidated. This exchange of materials on catalyst surface appears to add a new dimension to the synthesis kinetics. Integrated together, they reveal a general mechanism for probably all metal-catalyst-free and metal-catalyst-mediated non-eutectic nanotube synthesis. Available experiments strongly support the proposed mechanism; they suggest that this mechanism has a broad appeal.

  5. Endogeneity in High Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    Most papers on high-dimensional statistics are based on the assumption that none of the regressors are correlated with the regression error, namely, they are exogenous. Yet, endogeneity can arise incidentally from a large pool of regressors in a high-dimensional regression. This causes the inconsistency of the penalized least-squares method and possible false scientific discoveries. A necessary condition for model selection consistency of a general class of penalized regression methods is given, which allows us to prove formally the inconsistency claim. To cope with the incidental endogeneity, we construct a novel penalized focused generalized method of moments (FGMM) criterion function. The FGMM effectively achieves the dimension reduction and applies the instrumental variable methods. We show that it possesses the oracle property even in the presence of endogenous predictors, and that the solution is also near global minimum under the over-identification assumption. Finally, we also show how the semi-parametric efficiency of estimation can be achieved via a two-step approach. PMID:25580040

  6. Electrons in one dimension

    PubMed Central

    Berggren, K.-F.; Pepper, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we present a summary of the current status of the study of the transport of electrons confined to one dimension in very low disorder GaAs–AlGaAs heterostructures. By means of suitably located gates and application of a voltage to ‘electrostatically squeeze’ the electronic wave functions, it is possible to produce a controllable size quantization and a transition from two-dimensional transport. If the length of the electron channel is sufficiently short, then transport is ballistic and the quantized subbands each have a conductance equal to the fundamental quantum value 2e2/h, where the factor of 2 arises from the spin degeneracy. This mode of conduction is discussed, and it is shown that a number of many-body effects can be observed. These effects are discussed as in the spin-incoherent regime, which is entered when the separation of the electrons is increased and the exchange energy is less than kT. Finally, results are presented in the regime where the confinement potential is decreased and the electron configuration relaxes to minimize the electron–electron repulsion to move towards a two-dimensional array. It is shown that the ground state is no longer a line determined by the size quantization alone, but becomes two distinct rows arising from minimization of the electrostatic energy and is the precursor of a two-dimensional Wigner lattice. PMID:20123751

  7. Physics in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houselt, A.; Schäfer, J.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Claessen, R.

    2013-01-01

    With modern microelectronics moving towards smaller and smaller length scales on the (sub-) nm scale, quantum effects (apart from band structure and band gaps) have begun to play an increasingly important role. This especially concerns dimensional confinement to 2D (high electron mobility transistors and integer/fractional quantum Hall effect physics, graphene and topological insulators) and 1D (with electrical connections eventually reaching the quantum limit). Recent developments in the above-mentioned areas have revealed that the properties of electron systems become increasingly exotic as one progresses from the 3D case into lower dimensions. As compared to 2D electron systems, much less experimental progress has been achieved in the field of 1D electron systems. The main reason for the lack of experimental results in this field is related to the difficulty of realizing 1D electron systems. Atom chains created in quantum mechanical break junction set-ups are too short to exhibit the typically 1D signatures. As an alternative, atomic chains can be produced on crystal surfaces, either via assembling them one-by-one using a scanning tunnelling microscope or via self-assembly. The drawback of the latter systems is that the atomic chains are not truly 1D since they are coupled to the underlying crystal and sometimes even to the neighbouring chains. In retrospect, this coupling turns out to be an absolute necessity in the experiment since true 1D systems are disordered at any non-zero temperature [1]. The coupling to the crystal and/or neighbouring chains shifts the phase transition, for example, a Peierls instability, to a non-zero temperature and thus allows experiments to be performed in the ordered state. Here, we want to emphasize that the electronic properties of the 1D electron system are fundamentally different from its 2D and 3D counterparts. The Fermi liquid theory, which is applicable to 2D and 3D electron systems, breaks down spectacularly in the 1D case

  8. Nonminimal universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Flacke, Thomas; Menon, A.; Phalen, Daniel J.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the phenomenological implications of boundary localized terms (BLTs) in the model of universal extra dimensions (UED). In particular, we study the electroweak Kaluza-Klein mass spectrum resulting from BLTs and their effect on electroweak symmetry breaking via the five-dimensional Higgs mechanism. We find that the addition of BLTs to massive five-dimensional fields induces a nontrivial extra-dimensional profile for the zero and nonzero Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes. Hence BLTs generically lead to a modification of standard model parameters and are therefore experimentally constrained, even at tree level. We study standard model constraints on three representative nonminimal UED models in detail and find that the constraints on BLTs are weak. On the contrary, nonzero BLTs have a major impact on the spectrum and couplings of nonzero KK modes. For example, there are regions of parameter space where the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle is either the Kaluza-Klein Higgs boson or the first KK mode of the W{sup 3}.

  9. Neocortical Maturation during Adolescence: Change in Neuronal Soma Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowicz, Theodore; Petetot, Jean MacDonald-Comber; Khoury, Jane C.; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M.

    2009-01-01

    During adolescence, cognitive abilities increase robustly. To search for possible related structural alterations of the cerebral cortex, we measured neuronal soma dimension (NSD = width times height), cortical thickness and neuronal densities in different types of neocortex in post-mortem brains of five 12-16 and five 17-24 year-olds (each 2F,…

  10. Neocortical Maturation during Adolescence: Change in Neuronal Soma Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowicz, Theodore; Petetot, Jean MacDonald-Comber; Khoury, Jane C.; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M.

    2009-01-01

    During adolescence, cognitive abilities increase robustly. To search for possible related structural alterations of the cerebral cortex, we measured neuronal soma dimension (NSD = width times height), cortical thickness and neuronal densities in different types of neocortex in post-mortem brains of five 12-16 and five 17-24 year-olds (each 2F,…

  11. Exterior dimension of fat fractals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebogi, C.; Mcdonald, S. W.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Geometric scaling properties of fat fractal sets (fractals with finite volume) are discussed and characterized via the introduction of a new dimension-like quantity which is called the exterior dimension. In addition, it is shown that the exterior dimension is related to the 'uncertainty exponent' previously used in studies of fractal basin boundaries, and it is shown how this connection can be exploited to determine the exterior dimension. Three illustrative applications are described, two in nonlinear dynamics and one dealing with blood flow in the body. Possible relevance to porous materials and ballistic driven aggregation is also noted.

  12. Thermal dimension of quantum spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Brighenti, Francesco; Gubitosi, Giulia; Santos, Grasiele

    2017-04-01

    Recent results suggest that a crucial crossroad for quantum gravity is the characterization of the effective dimension of spacetime at short distances, where quantum properties of spacetime become significant. This is relevant in particular for various scenarios of "dynamical dimensional reduction" which have been discussed in the literature. We are here concerned with the fact that the related research effort has been based mostly on analyses of the "spectral dimension", which involves an unphysical Euclideanization of spacetime and is highly sensitive to the off-shell properties of a theory. As here shown, different formulations of the same physical theory can have wildly different spectral dimension. We propose that dynamical dimensional reduction should be described in terms of the "thermal dimension" which we here introduce, a notion that only depends on the physical content of the theory. We analyze a few models with dynamical reduction both of the spectral dimension and of our thermal dimension, finding in particular some cases where thermal and spectral dimension agree, but also some cases where the spectral dimension has puzzling properties while the thermal dimension gives a different and meaningful picture.

  13. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single-and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs. PMID:23933617

  14. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V

    2013-12-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs.

  15. NASA Innovation Builds Better Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Nanotailor Inc., based in Austin, Texas, licensed Goddard Space Flight Center's unique single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) fabrication process with plans to make high-quality, low-cost SWCNTs available commercially. Carbon nanotubes are being used in a wide variety of applications, and NASA's improved production method will increase their applicability in medicine, microelectronics, advanced materials, and molecular containment. Nanotailor built and tested a prototype based on Goddard's process, and is using this technique to lower the cost and improve the integrity of nanotubes, offering a better product for use in biomaterials, advanced materials, space exploration, highway and building construction, and many other applications.

  16. Method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor); Frazier, Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for manufacturing carbon nanotubes, including a step of inducing electrical current through a carbon anode and a carbon cathode under conditions effective to produce the carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon cathode is larger than the carbon anode. Preferably, a welder is used to induce the electrical current via an arc welding process. Preferably, an exhaust hood is placed on the anode, and the process does not require a closed or pressurized chamber. The process provides high-quality, single-walled carbon nanotubes, while eliminating the need for a metal catalyst.

  17. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the the current carrying capacity of nanotube wires. Information is given on the motivation for the research, models and assumptions, Bragg reflection and Zener tunneling effects, and the influence of defects. Results show that dI/dv versus V does not increase in a manner commensurate with the increase in the number of subbands; in small diameter nanotubes, Zener tunneling is ineffective; Zener tunneling contributes to current with increase in nanotube diameter; and the increase in dI/dV with bias is much smaller than the increase in the number of subbands.

  18. Carbon nanotubes as vaccine scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Dao, Tao; Mulvey, Justin J.; Feinberg, Evan; Alidori, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes display characteristics that are potentially useful in their development as scaffolds for vaccine compositions. These features include stability in vivo, lack of intrinsic immunogenicity, low toxicity, and the ability to be appended with multiple copies of antigens. In addition, the particulate nature of carbon nanotubes and their unusual properties of rapid entry into antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, make them especially useful as carriers of antigens. Early attempts demonstrating carbon nanotube-based vaccines can be used in both infectious disease settings and cancer are promising. PMID:23899863

  19. Carbon nanotubes: a potential concept for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Dhanawat, Meenakshi; Kumar, Sudhir; Singh, Brahma N; Pandit, Jayant K; Sinha, Vivek R

    2014-04-01

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them a highly interesting and demandable nanocarrier in the field of nanoscience. CNTs facilitate efficient delivery of therapeutics like drugs, proteins, genes, nucleic acids, vitamins and lot more. Even though highly beneficial, the biocompatibility of CNTs is a major issue in their questioning their potential application in targeting drug delivery. Studies confirmed subdued toxicity of CNTs following slight modifications like functionalization, controlled dimensions, purification etc. A well-established mechanism for cellular internalization is an insistent need to attain a more efficient and targeted delivery. Recent patents have been thoroughly discussed in the text below.

  20. Carbon Nanotubes in Cancer Therapy and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Elhissi, Abdelbary M. A.; Ahmed, Waqar; Hassan, Israr Ul; Dhanak, Vinod. R.; D'Emanuele, Antony

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced recently as a novel carrier system for both small and large therapeutic molecules. CNTs can be functionalized (i.e., surface engineered) with certain functional groups in order to manipulate their physical or biological properties. In addition to the ability of CNTs to act as carriers for a wide range of therapeutic molecules, their large surface area and possibility to manipulate their surfaces and physical dimensions have been exploited for use in the photothermal destruction of cancer cells. This paper paper will discuss the therapeutic applications of CNTs with a major focus on their applications for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22028974

  1. Deconstructing Dimensions: Adventures in Theory Space (Large Extra Dimension)

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima

    2009-11-28

    Theories of gravity and gauge forces in more than four dimensions offer a new paradigm for physics beyond the standard model. We present some of the most interesting recent ideas, and explain how signals for extra dimensions could appear in experiments at a linear e+e- collider.

  2. Calculating the hydrodynamic volume of poly(ethylene oxylated) single-walled carbon nanotubes and hydrophilic carbon clusters.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla, Alfredo D; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M; Seminario, Jorge M

    2013-01-10

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is widely used to render CNTs suitable as vectors for targeted drug delivery. One recently described PEGylated version uses an oxidized single-walled carbon nanotube called a hydrophilic carbon cluster (HCC). The resulting geometric dimension of the hybrid PEG-CNT or PEG-HCC is an important factor determining its ability to permeate the cellular membrane and to maintain its blood circulation. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to estimate the maximum length and width dimensions for a PEGylated single-walled carbon nanotube in water solution as a model for the PEG-HCC. We ensured maximum PEGylation by functionalizing each carbon atom in a CNT ring with an elongated PEG molecule, avoiding overlapping between PEGs attached to different CNT rings. We suggest that maximum PEGylation is important to achieve an optimal drug delivery platform.

  3. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Physics in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, David

    2004-05-01

    To a casual ostrich the world of quantum physics in one dimension may sound a little one-dimensional, suitable perhaps for those with an unhealthy obsession for the esoteric. Nothing of course could be further from the truth. The field is remarkably rich and broad, and for more than fifty years has thrown up innumerable challenges. Theorists, realising that the role of interactions in 1D is special and that well known paradigms of higher dimensions (Fermi liquid theory for example) no longer apply, took up the challenge of developing new concepts and techniques to understand the undoubted pecularities of one-dimensional systems. And experimentalists have succeeded in turning pipe dreams into reality, producing an impressive and ever increasing array of experimental realizations of 1D systems, from the molecular to the mesoscopic---spin and ladder compounds, organic superconductors, carbon nanotubes, quantum wires, Josephson junction arrays and so on. Many books on the theory of one-dimensional systems are however written by experts for experts, and tend as such to leave the non-specialist a touch bewildered. This is understandable on both fronts, for the underlying theoretical techniques are unquestionably sophisticated and not usually part of standard courses in many-body theory. A brave author it is then who aims to produce a well rounded, if necessarily partial, overview of quantum physics in one dimension, accessible to a beginner yet taking them to the edge of current research, and providing en route a thorough grounding in the fundamental ideas, basic methods and essential phenomenology of the field. It is of course the brave who succeed in this world, and Thierry Giamarchi does just that with this excellent book, written by an expert for the uninitiated. Aimed in particular at graduate students in theoretical condensed matter physics, and assumimg little theoretical background on the part of the reader (well just a little), Giamarchi writes in a refreshingly

  4. Large-Scale Processing of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John; Sridhar, K. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Scale-up difficulties and high energy costs are two of the more important factors that limit the availability of various types of nanotube carbon. While several approaches are known for producing nanotube carbon, the high-powered reactors typically produce nanotubes at rates measured in only grams per hour and operate at temperatures in excess of 1000 C. These scale-up and energy challenges must be overcome before nanotube carbon can become practical for high-consumption structural and mechanical applications. This presentation examines the issues associated with using various nanotube production methods at larger scales, and discusses research being performed at NASA Ames Research Center on carbon nanotube reactor technology.

  5. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  6. Transport Study of Carbon Nanotube Networks with Different Ratios of Semiconducting and Metallic Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Hároz, Erik; Zhang, Qi; Kono, Junichiro

    2013-03-01

    An important goal of current nanotechnology research is to obtain a quantitative understanding of how electrons drift and tunnel through junctions of nanostructures and how the overall electrical conductivity of networks of nanostructures is determined. Here, we present a comprehensive study of DC transport properties of macroscopic single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) networks with different ratios of metallic and semiconducting nanotubes. The temperature-dependent resistivity shows that when the length of SWCNT is orders of magnitude smaller than the dimensions of the network, the resistance mainly comes from inter-tube junctions. However, the transport mechanism changes from fluctuation-induced tunneling in metallic-enriched networks to variable range hopping in semiconductor-enriched networks. The magneto resistance (MR) of these two networks also show distinct features. In a metallic enriched network, MR is negative up to 10 Tesla below 70 K which can be explained based on weak localization theory. One the other hand, in a semiconductor-enriched network, MR is mostly positive up to 10 Tesla below 10 K, which can be explained based on the shrinking of electron wave function due to the magnetic field.

  7. Functional materials based on carbon nanotubes: Carbon nanotube actuators and noncovalent carbon nanotube modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, Leonard S.

    Carbon nanotubes have attractive inherent properties that encourage the development of new functional materials and devices based on them. The use of single wall carbon nanotubes as electromechanical actuators takes advantage of the high mechanical strength, surface area and electrical conductivity intrinsic to these molecules. The work presented here investigates the mechanisms that have been discovered for actuation of carbon nanotube paper: electrostatic, quantum chemical charge injection, pneumatic and viscoelastic. A home-built apparatus for the measurement of actuation strain is developed and utilized in the investigation. An optical fiber switch, the first demonstrated macro-scale device based on the actuation of carbon nanotubes, is described and its performance evaluated. Also presented here is a new general process designed to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes in a non-covalent, non-destructive way. This method can be used to impart new functionalities to carbon nanotube samples for a variety of applications including sensing, solar energy conversion and chemical separation. The process described involves the achievement of large degrees of graphitic surface coverage with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the use of supercritical fluids. These molecules are bifunctional agents that anchor a desired chemical group to the aromatic surface of the carbon nanotubes without adversely disrupting the conjugated backbone that gives rise the attractive electronic and physical properties of the nanotubes. Both the nanotube functionalization work and the actuator work presented here emphasize how an understanding and control of nanoscale structure and phenomena can be of vital importance in achieving desired performance for active materials. Opportunities for new devices with improved function over current state-of-the-art can be envisioned and anticipated based on this understanding and control.

  8. Modulating electronic transport properties of carbon nanotubes to improve the thermoelectric power factor via nanoparticle decoration.

    PubMed

    Yu, Choongho; Ryu, Yeontack; Yin, Liang; Yang, Hongjoo

    2011-02-22

    Nanoparticle decoration on carbon nanotubes was employed to modulate their electrical conductance and thermopower and thereby improved the thermoelectric power factor. Nanotubes were made into films by spraying nanotube solutions on glass substrates, and then the films were immersed in different concentrations of CuSO(4) or HAuCl(4) solutions for various time periods. Copper ions in the solutions were reduced on nanotubes by obtaining electrons from zinc electrodes, whose reduction potential is lower than that of copper (galvanic displacement). Gold ions were reduced on nanotubes by both silver counter electrodes and spontaneous reaction due to larger reduction potentials than those of nanotubes. These reactions made electrons donated to (copper incorporation) or withdrawn from (gold incorporation) nanotubes depending on the difference in their work functions and reduction potentials, resulting in considerable changes in electron transport. In this paper, a series of experiments at different ion concentrations and reaction time periods were systematically performed in order to find optimum nanoparticle formation conditions and corresponding electronic transport changes for better thermoelectric power factor. Transport measurement results show that electronic properties can be considerably altered and modulated, resulting in 2-fold improvement in the thermoelectric power factor with 1 mM/30 min reaction. Reactions with solutions of a low metal ion concentration, such as 1 mM, yielded well-distributed small particles over large surface areas, which strongly affected electron transfer between nanoparticles and nanotubes. Successive copper and gold decorations on nanotubes made electrical conductance (or thermopower) serially decreased and increased (or increased and decreased) upon precipitating different metal particles. This transport behavior is believed to be from the changes in the Fermi level as a result of electron exchanges between reduced metals and nanotubes

  9. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  10. Advanced carbon nanotubes functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setaro, A.

    2017-10-01

    Similar to graphene, carbon nanotubes are materials made of pure carbon in its sp2 form. Their extended conjugated π-network provides them with remarkable quantum optoelectronic properties. Frustratingly, it also brings drawbacks. The π–π stacking interaction makes as-produced tubes bundle together, blurring all their quantum properties. Functionalization aims at modifying and protecting the tubes while hindering π–π stacking. Several functionalization strategies have been developed to circumvent this limitation in order for nanotubes applications to thrive. In this review, we summarize the different approaches established so far, emphasizing the balance between functionalization efficacy and the preservation of the tubes’ properties. Much attention will be given to a functionalization strategy overcoming the covalent–noncovalent dichotomy and to the implementation of two advanced functionalization schemes: (a) conjugation with molecular switches, to yield hybrid nanosystems with chemo-physical properties that can be tuned in a controlled and reversible way, and; (b) plasmonic nanosystems, whose ability to concentrate and enhance the electromagnetic fields can be taken advantage of to enhance the optical response of the tubes.

  11. Amygdala activation and symptom dimensions in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Via, Esther; Cardoner, Narcís; Pujol, Jesús; Alonso, Pino; López-Solà, Marina; Real, Eva; Contreras-Rodríguez, Oren; Deus, Joan; Segalàs, Cinto; Menchón, José M; Soriano-Mas, Carles; Harrison, Ben J

    2014-01-01

    Despite knowledge of amygdala involvement in fear and anxiety, its contribution to the pathophysiology of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) remains controversial. In the context of neuroimaging studies, it seems likely that the heterogeneity of the disorder might have contributed to a lack of consistent findings. To assess the influence of OCD symptom dimensions on amygdala responses to a well-validated emotional face-matching paradigm. Cross-sectional functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of 67 patients with OCD and 67 age-, gender- and education-level matched healthy controls. The severity of aggression/checking and sexual/religious symptom dimensions were significantly associated with heightened amygdala activation in those with OCD when responding to fearful faces, whereas no such correlations were seen for other symptom dimensions. Amygdala functional alterations in OCD appear to be specifically modulated by symptom dimensions whose origins may be more closely linked to putative amygdala-centric processes, such as abnormal fear processing.

  12. Stimuli-responsive transformation in carbon nanotube/expanding microsphere-polymer composites

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, James; Xu, Peng; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Our work introduces a class of stimuli-responsive expanding polymer composites with ability to unidirectionally transform physical dimensions, elastic modulus, density, and electrical resistance. Carbon nanotubes and core-shell acrylic microspheres were dispersed in polydimethylsiloxane, resulting in composites that exhibit a binary set of material properties. Upon thermal or infrared stimuli, liquid cores encapsulated within the microspheres vaporize, expanding the surrounding shells and stretching the matrix. Microsphere expansion results in visible dimensional changes, regions of reduced polymeric chain mobility, nanotube tensioning, and overall elastic to plastic-like transformation of the composite. Here we show composite transformations including macroscopic volume expansion (>500%), density reduction (>80%), and elastic modulus increase (>675%). Additionally, conductive nanotubes allow for remote expansion monitoring and exhibit distinct loading-dependent electrical responses. With ability to pattern regions of tailorable expansion, strength, and electrical resistance into a single polymer skin, these composites present opportunities as structural and electrical building blocks in smart systems. PMID:23574648

  13. Nano-oxidation and in situ faradaic current detection using dynamic carbon nanotube probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramochi, H.; Ando, K.; Shikakura, Y.; Yasutake, M.; Tokizaki, T.; Yokoyama, H.

    2004-09-01

    Carbon nanotube-attached atomic force microscope probes were successfully used without nanotube bending to make simultaneous precision nano-oxidation and faradaic current measurements in the dynamic mode. Probe oxidation on H-passivated Si(001) surfaces was carried out by two methods involving vector-scan and raster-scan with a much higher resolution and precision compared to the nanofabrication by standard cantilevers. Faradaic current of the order of a sub-picoampere was detected during nano-oxidation using a carbon nanotube probe, accurately reflecting the subtle difference in the oxidation reaction. The minute current detection through the AFM tip is sensitive enough for the detection of very thin oxides and small-sized features. The dimension of the meniscus during nano-oxidation, which is indispensable for establishing the mechanism model, was evaluated, based on the in situ faradaic current detection and edge broadening.

  14. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  15. Filling carbon nanotubes with particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byong M; Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H

    2005-05-01

    The filling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with fluorescent particles was studied experimentally and theoretically. The fluorescent signals emitted by the particles were visible through the walls of the nanotubes, and the particles inside the tubes were observable with an electron microscope. Taking advantage of the template-grown carbon nanotubes' transparency to fluorescent light, we measured the filling rate of the tubes with particles at room conditions. Liquids such as ethylene glycol, water, and ethylene glycol/water mixtures, laden with 50 nm diameter fluorescent particles, were brought into contact with 500 nm diameter CNTs. The liquid and the particles' transport were observed, respectively, with optical and fluorescence microscopy. The CNTs were filled controllably with particles by the complementary action of capillary forces and the evaporation of the liquid. The experimental results were compared and favorably agreed with theoretical predictions. This is the first report on fluorescence studies of particle transport in carbon nanotubes.

  16. Elastic modulus of viral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ge, Zhibin; Fang, Jiyu

    2008-09-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the radial elasticity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanotubes. An atomic force microscope tip is used to apply small radial indentations to deform TMV nanotubes. The initial elastic response of TMV nanotubes can be described by finite-element analysis in 5nm indentation depths and Hertz theory in 1.5nm indentation depths. The derived radial Young’s modulus of TMV nanotubes is 0.92±0.15GPa from finite-element analysis and 1.0±0.2GPa from the Hertz model, which are comparable with the reported axial Young’s modulus of 1.1GPa [Falvo , Biophys. J. 72, 1396 (1997)].

  17. Computational Validation of Protein Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Idit; Brooks, Bernard R.; Wolfson, Haim J.; Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel generic computational method to assess protein nanotubes with variable diameter sizes, at the atomic level, given their low resolution protomeric structures. The method is based on the symmetrical assembly of a repeating protein subunit into a nanotube. Given the protein unit-cell, and the tube diameter and helicity, we carry out all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, combined with a unique mathematical transformation. This allows us to mimic nanotubes of even huge sizes, without end or edge effects. All our simulation setups attempt to explicitly adhere to the conditions under which the experiments were conducted. Thus, we are able to obtain high resolution atomic-scale structures at reasonable computational costs. We expect that our approach would prove useful in assessing protein nanotubes, as well as in silico constructions of novel nano-biomaterials. PMID:19199488

  18. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  19. Dimensions of temperament: an analysis.

    PubMed

    Lorr, M; Stefic, E C

    1976-01-01

    The TDOT recast into a single stimulus format was administered to 150 college Ss. A factor analysis of the items followed by an analysis of item clusters that define each factor indicated the presence of 14 dimensions. Of the 10 bipolar scales of the TDOT, 3 were confirmed as independent dimensions, and 5 were confirmed in part or split into unipolar factors.

  20. The Dimensions of Maltreatment: Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Diana J.; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.; Runyan, Desmond K.

    2005-01-01

    This special issue includes an introduction and seven papers exploring dimensions of maltreatment including type, severity, chronicity, and substantiation status of referrals to CPS, utilizing a subsample of the LONGSCAN studies. Each paper examines one of the dimensions of maltreatment from various perspectives to determine if different…

  1. String universality in ten dimensions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allan; Taylor, Washington; Dewolfe, Oliver

    2010-08-13

    We show that the N=1 supergravity theories in ten dimensions with gauge groups U(1){496} and E{8}×U(1){248} are not consistent quantum theories. Cancellation of anomalies cannot be made compatible with supersymmetry and Abelian gauge invariance. Thus, in ten dimensions all supersymmetric theories of gravity without known inconsistencies are realized in string theory.

  2. Mathematics Teachers' Criteria of Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ural, Alattin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine mathematics teachers' decisions about dimensions of the geometric figures, criteria of dimension and consistency of decision-criteria. The research is a qualitative research and the model applied in the study is descriptive method on the basis of general scanning model. 15 mathematics teachers attended the…

  3. Mathematics Teachers' Criteria of Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ural, Alattin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine mathematics teachers' decisions about dimensions of the geometric figures, criteria of dimension and consistency of decision-criteria. The research is a qualitative research and the model applied in the study is descriptive method on the basis of general scanning model. 15 mathematics teachers attended the…

  4. The dimension of product spaces

    PubMed Central

    Wage, Michael L.

    1978-01-01

    The covering dimension of a product space can exceed the sum of the dimensions of its factors. A separable metric space X and a paracompact space Y are constructed such that dim X + dim Y = 0 < 1 = dim(X × Y). Related results are also discussed. PMID:16592575

  5. The dimension of product spaces.

    PubMed

    Wage, M L

    1978-10-01

    The covering dimension of a product space can exceed the sum of the dimensions of its factors. A separable metric space X and a paracompact space Y are constructed such that dim X + dim Y = 0 < 1 = dim(X x Y). Related results are also discussed.

  6. Dimensioning, Tolerancing, and Machine Finishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, George C.

    Intended for use with the vocational education student interested in technical drawing, this guide provides answers to questions relating to dimensioning and tolerancing machine drawings. It also gives examples of standard dimensioning practices, tolerancing applications, and finish applications. The problems and examples presented are based on…

  7. Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardy, Melissa Anne

    In recent years semiconductor nanowires and nanotubes have garnered increased attention for their unique properties. With their nanoscale dimensions comes high surface area and quantum confinement, promising enhancements in a wide range of applications. 1-dimensional nanostructures are especially attractive for energy conversion applications where photons, phonons, and electrons come into play. Since the bohr exciton radius and phonon and electron mean free paths are on the same length scales as nanowire diameters, optical, thermal, and electrical properties can be tuned by simple nanowire size adjustments. In addition, the high surface area inherent to nanowires and nanotubes lends them towards efficient charge separation and superior catalytic performance. In thermoelectric power generation, the nanoscale wire diameter can effectively scatter phonons, promoting reductions in thermal conductivity and enhancements in the thermoelectric figure of merit. To that end, single-crystalline arrays of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanowires have been synthesized by a chemical vapor transport approach. The electrical and thermal transport properties of the nanowires were characterized to investigate their potential as thermoelectric materials. Compared to bulk, the lead chalcogenide nanowires exhibit reduced thermal conductivity below 100 K by up to 3 orders of magnitude, suggesting that they may be promising thermoelectric materials. Smaller diameters and increased surface roughness are expected to give additional enhancements. The solution-phase synthesis of PbSe nanowires via oriented attachment of nanoparticles enables facile surface engineering and diameter control. Branched PbSe nanowires synthesized by this approach showed near degenerately doped charge carrier concentrations. Compared to the bulk, the PbSe nanowires exhibited a similar Seebeck coefficient and a significant reduction in thermal conductivity in the temperature range 20 K to 300 K. Thermal annealing of the Pb

  8. Nanostructured water and carbon dioxide inside collapsing carbon nanotubes at high pressure.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wenwen; Cerqueira, Tiago F T; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A L; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2016-07-20

    We present simulations of the collapse under hydrostatic pressure of carbon nanotubes containing either water or carbon dioxide. We show that the molecules inside the tube alter the dynamics of the collapse process, providing either mechanical support and increasing the collapse pressure, or reducing mechanical stability. At the same time the nanotube acts as a nanoanvil, and the confinement leads to the nanostructuring of the molecules inside the collapsed tube. In this way, depending on the pressure and on the concentration of water or carbon dioxide inside the nanotube, we observe the formation of 1D molecular chains, 2D nanoribbons, and even molecular single and multi-walled nanotubes. The structure of the encapsulated molecules correlates with the mechanical response of the nanotube, opening up opportunities for the development of new devices or composite materials. Our analysis is quite general and it can be extended to other molecules in carbon nanotube nanoanvils, providing a strategy to obtain a variety of nano-objects with controlled features.

  9. Effect of calcination temperature on the photocatalytic reduction and oxidation processes of hydrothermally synthesized titania nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Viayan, B.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Rajh, T.; Gray, K.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-08-05

    Titania nanotubes having diameters 8 to 12 nm and lengths of 50-300 nm were prepared using a hydrothermal method. Further, the titania nanotubes were calcined over the temperature range 200-800 C in order to enhance their photocatalytic properties by altering their morphology. The calcined titania nanotubes were characterized by using X-ray diffraction and surface area analysis and their morphological features were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Nanotubes calcined at 400 C showed the maximum extent of photocatalyitc reduction of carbon dioxide to methane, whereas samples calcined at 600 C produced maximum photocatalytic oxidation of acetaldehyde. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to interrogate the effects of nanotube structure on the charge separation and trapping as a function of calcination temperature. EPR results indicated that undercoordinated titania sites are associated with maximum CO{sub 2} reduction occurring in nanotubes calcined at 400 C. Despite the collapse of the nantube structure to form nanorods and the concomitant loss of surface area, the enhanced charge separation associated with increased crystallinity promoted high rates of oxidation of acetaldehyde in titania materials calcined at 600 C. These results illustrate that calcination temperature allows us to tune the morphological and surface features of the titania nanostructures for particular photocatalytic reactions.

  10. Light-induced disassembly of self-assembled vesicle-capped nanotubes observed in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Anthony C.; Beierle, John M.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Maciá, Beatriz; Caroli, Giuseppe; Mika, Jacek T.; van Dijken, Derk Jan; Chen, Jiawen; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2011-09-01

    Molecular self-assembly is the basis for the formation of numerous artificial nanostructures. The self-organization of peptides, amphiphilic molecules composed of fused benzene rings and other functional molecules into nanotubes is of particular interest. However, the design of dynamic, complex self-organized systems that are responsive to external stimuli remains a significant challenge. Here, we report self-assembled, vesicle-capped nanotubes that can be selectively disassembled by irradiation. The walls of the nanotubes are 3-nm-thick bilayers and are made from amphiphilic molecules with two hydrophobic legs that interdigitate when the molecules self-assemble into bilayers. In the presence of phospholipids, a phase separation between the phospholipids and the amphiphilic molecules creates nanotubes, which are end-capped by vesicles that can be chemically altered or removed and reattached without affecting the nanotubes. The presence of a photoswitchable and fluorescent core in the amphiphilic molecules allows fast and highly controlled disassembly of the nanotubes on irradiation, and distinct disassembly processes can be observed in real time using fluorescence microscopy.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes: Artificial Nanomaterials to Engineer Single Neurons and Neuronal Networks

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the past decade, nanotechnology applications to the nervous system have often involved the study and the use of novel nanomaterials to improve the diagnosis and therapy of neurological diseases. In the field of nanomedicine, carbon nanotubes are evaluated as promising materials for diverse therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Besides, carbon nanotubes are increasingly employed in basic neuroscience approaches, and they have been used in the design of neuronal interfaces or in that of scaffolds promoting neuronal growth in vitro. Ultimately, carbon nanotubes are thought to hold the potential for the development of innovative neurological implants. In this framework, it is particularly relevant to document the impact of interfacing such materials with nerve cells. Carbon nanotubes were shown, when modified with biologically active compounds or functionalized in order to alter their charge, to affect neurite outgrowth and branching. Notably, purified carbon nanotubes used as scaffolds can promote the formation of nanotube–neuron hybrid networks, able per se to affect neuron integrative abilities, network connectivity, and synaptic plasticity. We focus this review on our work over several years directed to investigate the ability of carbon nanotube platforms in providing a new tool for nongenetic manipulations of neuronal performance and network signaling. PMID:22896805

  12. Confinement effects and why carbon nanotube bundles can work as gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Rodrigo G; Fazzio, A; da Silva, Antônio J R; Rocha, Alexandre R

    2013-04-07

    Carbon nanotubes have been at the forefront of nanotechnology, leading not only to a better understanding of the basic properties of charge transport in one dimensional materials, but also to the perspective of a variety of possible applications, including highly sensitive sensors. Practical issues, however, have led to the use of bundles of nanotubes in devices, instead of isolated single nanotubes. From a theoretical perspective, the understanding of charge transport in such bundles, and how it is affected by the adsorption of molecules, has been very limited, one of the reasons being the sheer size of the calculations. A frequent option has been the extrapolation of knowledge gained from single tubes to the properties of bundles. In the present work we show that such procedure is not correct, and that there are qualitative differences in the effects caused by molecules on the charge transport in bundles versus isolated nanotubes. Using a combination of density functional theory and recursive Green's function techniques we show that the adsorption of molecules randomly distributed onto the walls of carbon nanotube bundles leads to changes in the charge density and consequently to significant alterations in the conductance even in pristine tubes. We show that this effect is driven by confinement which is not present in isolated nanotubes. Furthermore, a low concentration of dopants randomly adsorbed along a two-hundred nm long bundle drives a change in the transport regime; from ballistic to diffusive, which can account for the high sensitivity to different molecules.

  13. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    replacement of air space with the polymer matrix. A similar affinity is not known to exist between CNTs and aluminum , where the wetting angle between...Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites by Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna ARL-TR-5252 August 2010...Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  15. Coasts: the ethical dimension.

    PubMed

    Olsen, S; Hale, L Z

    1994-01-01

    Rapidly increasing numbers of people are profoundly altering the very qualities of coastal regions that make them the preferred home for the majority of the world's population. Along with masses of people, coastal areas contain a high proportion of the world's productive and diverse ecosystems, produce most of the world's fish catch, and support major portions of the world's agriculture, industry, and tourism. Over years of development, changes have been noted to local environments. Along coastlines, global change is manifested in terms of major shifts in rainfall patterns, an increase in the number of violent and destructive storms, and a rise in sea level. However, much of the degradation and conflict noted is considered avoidable and unnecessary. National coastal management programs should prioritize bringing order and control to the process of change and consider equity issues in the development process. Moreover, a ¿two-track approach¿, which uses local-level demonstration projects to discover, test, and apply innovative governance and technical solutions to the complex matrix of coastal management issues, is recommended.

  16. Electrocatalytic oxygen evolution at surface-oxidized multiwall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xunyu; Yim, Wai-Leung; Suryanto, Bryan H R; Zhao, Chuan

    2015-03-04

    Large-scale storage of renewable energy in the form of hydrogen (H2) fuel via electrolytic water splitting requires the development of water oxidation catalysts that are efficient and abundant. Carbon-based nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes have attracted significant applications for use as substrates for anchoring metal-based nanoparticles. We show that, upon mild surface oxidation, hydrothermal annealing and electrochemical activation, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) themselves are effective water oxidation catalysts, which can initiate the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) at overpotentials of 0.3 V in alkaline media. Oxygen-containing functional groups such as ketonic C═O generated on the outer wall of MWCNTs are found to play crucial roles in catalyzing OER by altering the electronic structures of the adjacent carbon atoms and facilitates the adsorption of OER intermediates. The well-preserved microscopic structures and highly conductive inner walls of MWCNTs enable efficient transport of the electrons generated during OER.

  17. Single Nanotube Spectral Imaging To Determine Molar Concentrations of Isolated Carbon Nanotube Species.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Thomas V; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2017-01-17

    Electronic and biological applications of carbon nanotubes can be highly dependent on the species (chirality) of nanotube, purity, and concentration. Existing bulk methods, such as absorbance spectroscopy, can quantify sp(2) carbon based on spectral bands, but nanotube length distribution, defects, and carbonaceous impurities can complicate quantification of individual particles. We present a general method to relate the optical density of a photoluminescent nanotube sample to the number of individual nanotubes. By acquiring 3-dimensional images of nanotubes embedded in a gel matrix with a reducing environment, we quantified all emissive nanotubes in a volume. Via spectral imaging, we assessed structural impurities and precisely determined molar concentrations of the (8,6) and (9,4) nanotube species. We developed an approach to obtain the molarity of any structurally enriched semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube preparation on a per-nanotube basis.

  18. Microwave absorption in nanocomposite material of magnetically functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labunov, V. A.; Danilyuk, A. L.; Prudnikava, A. L.; Komissarov, I.; Shulitski, B. G.; Speisser, C.; Antoni, F.; Le Normand, F.; Prischepa, S. L.

    2012-07-01

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation in X and Ka bands with magnetic nanocomposite of disordered carbon nanotubes arrays has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Samples were synthesized on the quartz reactor walls by decomposition of ferrocene and xylene which provided random intercalation of iron phase nanoparticles in carbon nanotube array. The exhaustive characterization of the samples by means of the scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy was performed. It was found that the absorption of the electromagnetic wave monotonically increases with the frequency. To describe these experimental data, we extended the Bruggeman effective medium theory to a more complex case of a magnetic nanocomposite with randomly distributed spherical ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a conducting medium. The essential feature of the developed model is the consideration of the complex nature of the studied material. In particular, such important parameters as magnetic and dielectric properties of both the carbon nanotube medium and the nanoparticles, the volume concentration and the dimensions of the nanoparticles, the wave impedance of the resistive-capacitive shells of the conductive nanoparticles are explicitly taken into account in our model. Moreover, analysing the experimental results, we were able to obtain the frequency dependencies of permittivity and permeability of the studied nanocomposite.

  19. Field emission from open ended aluminum nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondare, V. N.; Balasubramanian, C.; Shende, S. V.; Joag, D. S.; Godbole, V. P.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Bhadbhade, M.

    2002-06-01

    This letter reports the field emission measurements from the nanotubes of aluminum nitride which were synthesized by gas phase condensation using the solid-vapor equilibria. A dc arc plasma reactor was used for producing the vapors of aluminum in a reactive nitrogen atmosphere. Nanoparticles and nanotubes of aluminum nitride were first characterized by transmission electron microscope and tube dimensions were found to be varying from 30 to 200 nm in diameter and 500 to 700 nm in length. These tubes were mixed with nanoparticles of size range between 5 and 200 nm in diameter. Tungsten tips coated with these nanoparticles and tubes were used as a field emitter. The field emission patterns display very interesting features consisting of sharp rings which were often found to change their shapes. The patterns are attributed to the open ended nanotubes of aluminum nitride. A few dot patterns corresponding to the nanoparticles were also seen to occur. The Fowler-Nordheim plots were seen to be nonlinear in nature, which reflects the semi-insulating behavior of the emitter. The field enhancement factor is estimated to be 34 500 indicating that the field enhancement due to the nanometric size of the emitter is an important cause for the observed emission.

  20. Directing peptide crystallization through curvature control of nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gobeaux, Frédéric; Tarabout, Christophe; Fay, Nicolas; Meriadec, Cristelle; Ligeti, Melinda; Buisson, David-Alexandre; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Artzner, Franck; Paternostre, Maïté

    2014-07-01

    In the absence of efficient crystallization methods, the molecular structures of fibrous assemblies have so far remained rather elusive. In this paper, we present a rational method to crystallize the lanreotide octapeptide by modification of a residue involved in a close contact. Indeed, we show that it is possible to modify the curvature of the lanreotide nanotubes and hence their diameter. This fine tuning leads to crystallization because the radius of curvature of the initially bidimensional peptide wall can be increased up to a point where the wall is essentially flat and a crystal is allowed to grow along a third dimension. By comparing X-ray diffraction data and Fourier transform Raman spectra, we show that the nanotubes and the crystals share similar cell parameters and molecular conformations, proving that there is indeed a structural continuum between these two morphologies. These results illustrate a novel approach to crystallization and represent the first step towards the acquisition of an Å-resolution structure of the lanreotide nanotubes β-sheet assembly.

  1. Boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Huang, Yang; Terao, Takeshi; Mitome, Masanori; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2010-06-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered material with a graphite-like structure in which planar networks of BN hexagons are regularly stacked. As the structural analogue of a carbon nanotube (CNT), a BN nanotube (BNNT) was first predicted in 1994; since then, it has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanotubes. Compared with metallic or semiconducting CNTs, a BNNT is an electrical insulator with a band gap of ca. 5 eV, basically independent of tube geometry. In addition, BNNTs possess a high chemical stability, excellent mechanical properties, and high thermal conductivity. The same advantages are likely applicable to a graphene analogue-a monatomic layer of a hexagonal BN. Such unique properties make BN nanotubes and nanosheets a promising nanomaterial in a variety of potential fields such as optoelectronic nanodevices, functional composites, hydrogen accumulators, electrically insulating substrates perfectly matching the CNT, and graphene lattices. This review gives an introduction to the rich BN nanotube/nanosheet field, including the latest achievements in the synthesis, structural analyses, and property evaluations, and presents the purpose and significance of this direction in the light of the general nanotube/nanosheet developments.

  2. Sensor and Macroelectronic Applications of C Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Eric

    2004-03-01

    The unique structure of the SWNT produces near-ballistic electron transport and a high sensitivity to its local chemical environment. This combination of high electronic quality and chemical sensitivity forms the basis for a promising nanocomponent for electronic and sensor applications. In order to bypass the assembly problems associated with fabricating SWNT-based devices we utilize the interface properties of internanotube contacts. A strong van der Waals interaction between crossed SWNTs produces a high internanotube tunneling probability. We use this feature to form a new electronic material that is composed of an electrically interconnected network of C nanotubes. In such C nanotube networks (CNNs) the individual SWNTs are interwoven into a semiconducting film that is electrically continuous over macroscopic dimensions. Macroscopic CNN devices average the properties of many individual SWNTs and allow us to fabricate devices with high yield using conventional fabrication technology. For macroelectronic applications, CNNs can be fabricated into both n- and p-type thin-film transistors (TFTs) with a field-effect mobility an order of magnitude higher than commercial TFT materials. In addition, CNN TFTs have the advantage that they can be deposited at room temperature onto arbitrary substrates, including polymeric and flexible materials. For sensor applications we show that the adsorption of certain molecular analytes onto the surface of SWNTs perturbs their electronic properties to such a degree that CNN-based sensors can detect the presence of chemical warfare agents and other toxic chemicals with a sensitivity much higher than commercial chemical detectors. In addition, we can achieve a high degree of chemical specificity and additional gain in the sensor response by coating the SWNTs with a chemoselective polymer that concentrates the analyte of choice.

  3. Biofunctionalization and capping of template synthesized nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hillebrenner, Heather; Buyukserin, Fatih; Stewart, Jon D; Martin, Charles R

    2007-07-01

    Using alumina templates both nanotubes (open on both ends) and nano test tubes (open on only one end) have been synthesized from many different materials and these have great potential as delivery vehicles for biomedical applications. This review focuses on our recent results directed towards developing "smart" nanotubes for biomolecule delivery applications. While intensive efforts have focused on spherical nanoparticles that are easier to make, cylindrical particles or nanotubes offer many advantages. First, the tunable alumina template allows one to dictate both the pore diameter and length of the nanotube. In addition, template synthesized nanotubes can be differentially functionalized on their inner and outer surfaces. This review highlights these advantages in the contexts of drug extraction and antibody-antigen interactions, the synthesis of protein nanotubes, and recent advances in covalently capped ("corked") nanotubes designed to prevent premature payload leakage. Though diverse applications for nanotubes have already been discovered, many new and exciting paths await exploration.

  4. Computational Nanotechnology of Nanotubes, Composites, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, D.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses carbon nanotubes, their mechanical and thermal properties, and their structure, as well as possible miniature devices which may be assembled in the future from carbon nanotubes.

  5. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  6. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  7. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  8. Carbon nanotube-based polymer nanocomposites: Fractal network to hierarchical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha

    The dispersion of anisotropic nanoparticles such as single-walled carbon nanotubes in polymeric matrices promises the ability to develop advanced materials with controlled and tailored combinations of properties. However, dispersion of such nanotubes in a polymer matrix is an extremely challenging task due to strong attractive interactions between the nanotubes. The successful dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in poly(ethylene oxide) using an anionic surfactant (lithium dodecyl sulfate) as compatibilizer is reported here. The geometrical percolation threshold (pc, in vol %) of nanotubes, as revealed by melt-state rheological measurements, is found to be at ˜ 0.09 vol % loading, which corresponds to an effective tube anisotropy of ˜ 650. The system shows an even earlier development of the electrical percolation at 0.03 vol % SWNT loading as obtained by electrical conductivity measurements. In their quiescent state, the nanotubes show hierarchical fractal network (mass fractal dimension ˜ 2.3 +/- 0.2) made of aggregated flocs. Inside the floc, individual or small bundles of nanotubes overlap each other to form a dense mesh. The interfloc interactions provides the stress bearing capacity for these nano composites and are responsible for the unique modulus scaling of these systems (˜(p-pc)delta, 3.0 ≤ delta ≤ 4.5). The interaction is inversely related to the particle dispersion state, which influences the absolute values of the viscoelastic parameters. As a direct consequence of the self-similar fractal network, the linear flow properties display 'time-temperature-composition' superposition. This superposability can be extended for non-linear deformations when the non-linear properties are scaled by the local strain experienced by the elements of the network. More interestingly, under steady shear, these nanocomposites show network-independent behavior. The absolute stress value is a function of the nanotube loading, but the characteristic time

  9. Effect of static and dynamic charges on the electronic transport properties of single wall carbon nanotube transistors and interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayaraghavan, Aravind

    In recent years, carbon nanotubes have emerged as a subject of considerable curiosity and attention, due to their unique properties. From an electronic materials perspective, carbon nanotubes have been repeatedly touted as the future of micro- and nano-electronics technology. Capable of being both metallic and semiconducting, single wall carbon nanotubes have generated visions of an all-nanotube architecture in the not too distant future. Single wall carbon nanotubes have also displayed exotic behavior at low temperatures, spurring a rush of new discoveries and advances down to the level of manipulating individual electrons in nanotubes, the ultimate miniaturization. As research makes significant advances towards these goals, a number of challenges have also appeared. Particularly, it has been realized that single wall carbon nanotubes are extremely sensitive to perturbations in their immediate environment, which might drastically alter their fundamental properties. While single wall nanotubes are physically robust, they appear to electronically very fragile. On the other hand, the effect of external perturbations has actually opened a new door to providing further insights into the fundamental electronic structure and properties of these nanotubes. The research leading to this thesis has focused on unraveling the origin and effect of some such perturbations on electronic and electrical transport properties of individual single wall carbon nanotubes. In order to reach this stage, a number of recent fundamental observations pertaining to nanotube field effect transistors, single electron transistors and ballistic conductors were first reproduced. Single wall carbon nanotubes were grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition techniques on silicon dioxide substrates under optimum conditions. The nanotubes were characterized by techniques like scanning probe microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Test structures were fabricated by photolithography and electron beam

  10. Removal of some impurities from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yongcheng; Zhou, Gumin; Wang, Guoping; Qu, Meizhen; Yu, Zuolong

    2003-07-01

    A non-destructive mild oxidation method of removing some impurities from as-grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), by H 2O 2 oxidation and HCl treatment, has been investigated, and somewhat pure carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The CNTs from which some impurities were removed have been evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and temperature programmed oxidation and gas chromatography (TPO-GC).

  11. Carbon nanotubes by the metallocene route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Rahul; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1997-03-01

    Pyrolysis of metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and nickelocene, is shown to yield carbon nanotubes and metal-filled onion-like structures. Pyrolysis of benzene in the presence of a metallocene gives high yields of nanotubes, the wall thickness of the nanotubes depending on the metallocene content. Pyrolysis of benzene in the absence of any metal however gives monodispersed nanospheres of carbon rather than nanotubes.

  12. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  13. Imaging single carbon nanotubes with thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuwei; Singer, Scott; Bergstrom, Raymond; Regan, B. C.

    2009-03-01

    We have constructed tiny light bulbs, visible to the naked eye, using individual carbon nanotubes as filaments. A nanotube is suspended over a hole in a solid silicon substrate, and is heated to incandescence with electrical current. Diffraction-limited optical microscopy identifies the nanotube position and orientation, and allows direct comparison with high-resolution transmission electron micrographs of the same nanotube. Our current progress toward quantitative pyrometry will be described.

  14. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Enríquez, C. D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Restrepo, J.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others.

  15. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  16. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2017-04-01

    This review focusses on introducing the mechanics in carbon nanotubes (CNT), and the major applications of CNT and its composites in biomedicine. It emphasizes the nanomechanics of these materials by reviewing the widely followed experimental methods, theoretical models, simulations, classification, segregation and applications the aforementioned materials. First, several mechanical properties contributing to the classification of the CNT, for various biomedicine applications, are discussed in detail to provide a cursory glance at the uses of CNT. The mechanics of CNT discussed in this paper include: elasticity, stress, tension, compression, nano-scale mechanics. In addition to these basic properties, a brief introduction about nanoscale composites is given. Second, a brief review on some of the major applications of CNT in biomedicine including drug delivery, therapeutics, diagnostics and regenerative medicine is given.

  17. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  18. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  19. Carbon nanotube terahertz detector.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Fujimura, Naoki; Lloyd, J Meagan; Erickson, Kristopher J; Talin, A Alec; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Weilu; Jiang, Qijia; Kawano, Yukio; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François; Kono, Junichiro

    2014-07-09

    Terahertz (THz) technologies are promising for diverse areas such as medicine, bioengineering, astronomy, environmental monitoring, and communications. However, despite decades of worldwide efforts, the THz region of the electromagnetic spectrum still continues to be elusive for solid state technology. Here, we report on the development of a powerless, compact, broadband, flexible, large-area, and polarization-sensitive carbon nanotube THz detector that works at room temperature. The detector is sensitive throughout the entire range of the THz technology gap, with responsivities as high as ∼2.5 V/W and polarization ratios as high as ∼5:1. Complete thermoelectric and opto-thermal characterization together unambiguously reveal the photothermoelectric origin of the THz photosignal, triggered by plasmonic absorption and collective antenna effects, and suggest that judicious design of thermal management and quantum engineering of Seebeck coefficients will lead to further enhancement of device performance.

  20. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  3. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  4. Toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xu, Yuanzhi; Yang, Zhi; Huang, Renhuan; Chen, Jing; Wang, Raorao; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) find their extensive application as a promising material in medicine due to unique characteristics. However, such materials have been accompanied with potentially hazardous effects on human health. The toxicity of CNTs may vary depending on their structural characteristics, surface properties and chemical composition. To gain insight into the toxicity of CNTs in vivo and in vitro, we summarize contributing factors for the toxic effects of CNTs in this review. In addition, we elaborate on the toxic effects and mechanisms in target sites at systemic, organic, cellular, and biomacromolecule levels. Various issues are reported to be effected when exposed to CNTs including (1) blood circulation, (2) lymph circulation, (3) lung, (4) heart, (5) kidney, (6) spleen, (7) bone marrow, and (8) blood brain barrier. Though there have been published reports on the toxic effects of CNTs to date, more studies will still be needed to gain full understanding of their potential toxicity and underlying mechanisms.

  5. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  6. Peridynamic modeling and simulation of polymer-nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Steven F.

    In this document, we develop and demonstrate a framework for simulating the mechanics of polymer materials that are reinforced by carbon nanotubes. Our model utilizes peridynamic theory to describe the mechanical response of the polymer and polymer-nanotube interfaces. We benefit from the continuum formulation used in peridynamics because (1) it allows the polymer material to be coarse-grained to the scale of the reinforcing nanofibers, and (2) failure via nanotube pull-out and matrix tearing are possible based on energetic considerations alone (i.e. without special treatment). To reduce the degrees of freedom that must be simulated, the reinforcement effect of the nanotubes is represented by a mesoscale bead-spring model. This approach permits the arbitrary placement of reinforcement ``strands'' in the problem domain and motivates the need for irregular quadrature point distributions, which have not yet been explored in the peridynamic setting. We address this matter in detail and report on aspects of mesh sensitivity that we uncovered in peridynamic simulations. Using a manufactured solution, we study the effects of quadrature point placement on the accuracy of the solution scheme in one and two dimensions. We demonstrate that square grids and the generator points of a centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) support solutions of similar accuracy, but CVT grids have desirable characteristics that may justify the additional computational cost required for their construction. Impact simulations provide evidence that CVT grids support fracture patterns that resemble those obtained on higher resolution cubic Cartesian grids with a reduced computational burden. With the efficacy of irregular meshing schemes established, we exercise our model by dynamically stretching a cylindrical specimen composed of the polymer-nanotube composite. We vary the number of reinforcements, alignment of the filler, and the properties of the polymer-nanotube interface. Our results suggest

  7. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  8. Improved Process for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Cassell, A.; Delzeit, L.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    An improved process has been developed for the efficient fabrication of carbon nanotube probes for use in atomic-force microscopes (AFMs) and nanomanipulators. Relative to prior nanotube tip production processes, this process offers advantages in alignment of the nanotube on the cantilever and stability of the nanotube's attachment. A procedure has also been developed at Ames that effectively sharpens the multiwalled nanotube, which improves the resolution of the multiwalled nanotube probes and, combined with the greater stability of multiwalled nanotube probes, increases the effective resolution of these probes, making them comparable in resolution to single-walled carbon nanotube probes. The robust attachment derived from this improved fabrication method and the natural strength and resiliency of the nanotube itself produces an AFM probe with an extremely long imaging lifetime. In a longevity test, a nanotube tip imaged a silicon nitride surface for 15 hours without measurable loss of resolution. In contrast, the resolution of conventional silicon probes noticeably begins to degrade within minutes. These carbon nanotube probes have many possible applications in the semiconductor industry, particularly as devices are approaching the nanometer scale and new atomic layer deposition techniques necessitate a higher resolution characterization technique. Previously at Ames, the use of nanotube probes has been demonstrated for imaging photoresist patterns with high aspect ratio. In addition, these tips have been used to analyze Mars simulant dust grains, extremophile protein crystals, and DNA structure.

  9. Multilayer Film Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie; Arnold, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An approach to assemble multilayers of carbon nanotubes on a substrate is presented. Chemical vapor deposition using a transition metal catalyst formulation is used to grow the nanotubes. Results show a bilayer assembly of nanotubes each with a different density of tubes.

  10. Conductance Oscillations in Squashed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrez, H.; Anantram, M. P.; Svizhenko, A.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics and electrical conductance calculations are used to probe the electromechanical properties of squashed metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance and bandgap of armchair nanotubes show oscillations upon squashing. The physical origin of these oscillations is attributed to interaction of carbon atoms with a fourth neighbor. Squashing of armchair and zigzag nanotubes ultimately leads to metallic behavior.

  11. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-09

    while retaining the nanotube structure. This project involves the use of computational quantum chemistry to study interactions of aluminium (Al...small clusters of 1–4 metal atoms. The effect of varying the radius of the nanotubes and the size of aluminium and titanium clusters was considered...15. SUBJECT TERMS Boron Nitride Nanotubes, composite materials, Aluminum Alloys , Titanium Alloy , Theoretical Chemistry 16. SECURITY

  12. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-20

    300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described...0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube transducer that can operate in a passive acoustic mode for data...acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An underwater acoustic

  13. Nanotubes in Nanoelectronics: Transport, Growth and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M.; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) baud nanotechnology appears to be promising for future Theoretical analysis and results for the ballistic current carrying capacity of nanotube wires am presented. Aspects of metal-nanotube coupling are examined. Results am also presented for chemical vapor deposition of CNT from hydrocarbon feedstock.

  14. NMR investigations of hydrogen in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Goze-Bac, C.; Krämer, S.; Mehring, M.; Roth, S.; Bernier, P.

    2002-10-01

    We report proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements on hydrogen loaded single walled carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes were produced with different kinds of catalysts and hydrogen loaded under 23 bar hydrogen pressure. The hydrogen adsorption properties of the carbon nanotube materials were investigated by temperature dependent analysis of the 1H-NMR spectra.

  15. In vivo evaluation of anodic TiO2 nanotubes: an experimental study in the pig.

    PubMed

    von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Bauer, Sebastian; Lutz, Rainer; Meisel, Mark; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Toyoshima, Takeshi; Schmuki, Patrik; Nkenke, Emeka; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2009-04-01

    Because of their ability to mimic the dimensions of constituent components of natural bone and the possibility to serve as a gene and drug-delivery carrier, nanotubes seem to be a promising coating for medical implants. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a TiO(2) nanotube structured surface on periimplant bone formation in vivo when compared with an untreated standard titanium surface. Twenty-five titanium implants covered with an ordered TiO(2) nanotube layer with an individual tube diameter of 30 nm and 25 commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) implants were placed in the frontal skull of 25 domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nanotube structured implants on the periimplant bone formation, bone-implant contact (BIC), and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed at day 3, 7, 14, 30, and 90. Evaluating immunohistochemistry, a significantly higher collagen type- I expression occurred at day 7 (p = 0.003), day 14 (p = 0.016), and day 30 (p = 0.044), for the nanostructured implants in comparison with the control group. It could be found that a nanotube structured implant surface with a diameter of 30 nm does influence bone formation and bone development by enhancing osteoblast function. SEM evaluation of the specimen surfaces revealed that the nanotube coatings do resist shearing forces that evoked by implant insertion. Because of their simple, low cost, flexible manufacturing and the possibility for the usage as drug or growth factor delivery system, nanotubes seem to be a promising method for future medical implant coatings.

  16. Novel Poly-Dopamine Adhesive for a Halloysite Nanotube-Ru(bpy)32+ Electrochemiluminescent Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Bo; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2009-01-01

    Herein, for the first time, the electrochemiluminescent sensor based on Ru(bpy)32+-modified electrode using dopamine as an adhesive was successfully developed. After halloysite nanotube slurry was cast on a glassy carbon electrode and dried, an alkaline dopamine solution was added on the electrode surface. Initially, polydopamine belts with dimensions of tens to hundreds of nanometers formed via oxidization of the dopamine by ambient oxygen. As the incubation time increased, the nanobelts became broader and then united with each other to form a polydopamine film. The halloysite nanotubes were embedded within the polydopamine film. The above electrode was soaked in Ru(bpy)32+ aqueous solution to adsorb Ru(bpy)32+ into the active sites of the halloysite nanotubes via cation-exchange procedure. Through this simple procedure, a Ru(bpy)32+-modified electrode was obtained using only 6.25 µg Ru(bpy)32+, 15.0 µg dopamine, and 9.0 µg halloysite nanotubes. The electrochemistry and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of the modified electrode was investigated using tripropylamine (TPA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as co-reactants. The different ECL behaviors of the modified electrode using NTA and TPA as well as the contact angle measurements reflected the hydrophilic character of the electrode. The results indicate that halloysite nanotubes have a high loading capacity for Ru(bpy)32+ and that dopamine is suitable for the preparation of modified electrodes. PMID:19649294

  17. DNA nanotubes self-assembled from triple-crossover tiles as templates for conductive nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dage; Park, Sung Ha; Reif, John H.; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    DNA-based nanotechnology is currently being developed as a general assembly method for nanopatterned materials that may find use in electronics, sensors, medicine, and many other fields. Here we present results on the construction and characterization of DNA nanotubes, a self-assembling superstructure composed of DNA tiles. Triple-crossover tiles modified with thiol-containing double-stranded DNA stems projected out of the tile plane were used as the basic building blocks. Triple-crossover nanotubes display a constant diameter of ≈25 nm and have been observed with lengths up to 20 μm. We present high-resolution images of the constructs, experimental evidence of their tube-like nature as well as data on metallization of the nanotubes to form nanowires, and electrical conductivity measurements through the nanowires. DNA nanotubes represent a potential breakthrough in the self-assembly of nanometer-scale circuits for electronics layout because they can be targeted to connect at specific locations on larger-scale structures and can subsequently be metallized to form nanometer-scale wires. The dimensions of these nanotubes are also perfectly suited for applications involving interconnection of molecular-scale devices with macroscale components fabricated by conventional photolithographic methods. PMID:14709674

  18. 1D nanocrystals with precisely controlled dimensions, compositions, and architectures.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xinchang; He, Yanjie; Jung, Jaehan; Lin, Zhiqun

    2016-09-16

    The ability to synthesize a diverse spectrum of one-dimensional (1D) nanocrystals presents an enticing prospect for exploring nanoscale size- and shape-dependent properties. Here we report a general strategy to craft a variety of plain nanorods, core-shell nanorods, and nanotubes with precisely controlled dimensions and compositions by capitalizing on functional bottlebrush-like block copolymers with well-defined structures and narrow molecular weight distributions as nanoreactors. These cylindrical unimolecular nanoreactors enable a high degree of control over the size, shape, architecture, surface chemistry, and properties of 1D nanocrystals. We demonstrate the synthesis of metallic, ferroelectric, upconversion, semiconducting, and thermoelectric 1D nanocrystals, among others, as well as combinations thereof.

  19. Theoretical Studies of the Interaction of Excitons with Charged Impurities in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayo, Benjamin O.

    A fundamental theory of the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors shows the importance of impurities, which are often unavoidable and can alter intrinsic properties of semiconductor materials substantially. While the subject of impurity doping is well understood in bulk semiconductors, the role and impact of doping in low dimensional materials like carbon nanotubes is still under investigation and there exists significant debate on the exact nature of electronic impurity levels in single-walled carbon nanotubes associated with adatoms. In this work, we address the role of impurities in single-walled carbon nanotubes. A simple model is developed for studying the interaction of bright (singlet) excitons in semiconducting single-wall nanotubes with charged impurities. The model reveals a red shift in the energy of excitonic states in the presence of an impurity, thus indicating binding of excitons in the impurity potential well. Signatures of several bound states were found in the absorption spectrum below the onset of excitonic optical transitions in the bare nanotube. The dependence of the binding energy on the model parameters, such as impurity charge and position, was determined and analytical fits were derived for a number of tubes of different diameter. The nanotube family splitting is seen in the diameter dependence, gradually decreasing with the diameter. By calculating the partial absorption coefficient for a small segment of nanotube the local nature of the wave function of the bound states was derived. Our studies provide useful insights into the role of the physical environment (here, a charged impurity atom) in the manipulation of the excited states of carbon nanotubes. We performed very detailed calculations of the electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes in the presence of an immobile impurity atom, thus going beyond previous many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) studies in which the carbon nanotubes were considered in vacuum

  20. Low dimensional molecular dynamics of water inside a carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Lin, Yuan; Amberg, Gustav; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-11-01

    While carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a number of researches as the key building blocks for nanotechnology, they have also caught attentions as ideal materials that realize quasi-one-dimensional channel environment, a key system in bioscience. Such materials stimulate studies in fluid dynamics under low dimensional confinement, which is restricted and departs significantly from that in three-dimension. The current study serves to explore such atomic scale dynamics by performing a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on water confined in a CNT with a diameter of the order of 1 nm. The MD simulations have successfully probed the phase transition of a water cluster confined in a CNT to an ice-nanotube with anomalous diameter dependence. It has also been applied to investigate the possibility of transporting water through a CNT by a temperature gradient. In this study, we particularly highlight the dielectric properties of water confined inside a CNT. The confinement gives rise to strongly anisotropic dielectric relaxation, where the relaxation becomes faster and slower in the cross sectional and axial directions, respectively. The diameter dependences of the dielectric properties are discussed in connection with water dynamics and structures in quasi-one-dimension.

  1. Adhesion and friction between individual carbon nanotubes measured using force-versus-distance curves in atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Ling, Xing

    2008-07-01

    The adhesion and friction between individual nanotubes was investigated in ambient using a dynamic atomic force microscope (AFM) operating in force-calibration mode to capture force-versus-distance curves. A multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) tip attached to a conventional AFM probe was brought into contact with and then ramped in vertical direction against a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) bridge suspended over a 2-μm -wide trench. The interaction between nanotubes altered the oscillation amplitude, phase lag, and average deflection of AFM cantilever, from which the interacting forces between nanotubes are quantitatively derived. During ramping, a stick-slip motion was found to dominate the sliding between the nanotubes. The stick was attributed to the presence of high-energy points, such as structural defects or coating of amorphous carbon, on the surface of the MWNT tip. The coefficients of static friction and shear strength between nanotubes were evaluated to be about 0.2 and 1.4 GPa, respectively. They are about 2 orders of magnitude larger than the kinetic counterparts. The kinetic values are on the same order as that measured previously by sliding a MWNT tip across a SWNT bridge in lateral direction.

  2. In Vivo Toxicity Assessment of Occupational Components of the Carbon Nanotube Life Cycle To Provide Context to Potential Health Effects.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Lindsey; Cena, Lorenzo; Orandle, Marlene; Yanamala, Naveena; Dahm, Matthew M; Birch, M Eileen; Evans, Douglas E; Kodali, Vamsi K; Eye, Tracy; Battelli, Lori; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Casuccio, Gary; Bunker, Kristin; Lupoi, Jason S; Lersch, Traci L; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Sager, Tina; Afshari, Aliakbar; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Friend, Sherri; Kang, Jonathan; Siegrist, Katelyn J; Mitchell, Constance A; Lowry, David T; Kashon, Michael L; Mercer, Robert R; Geraci, Charles L; Schubauer-Berigan, Mary K; Sargent, Linda M; Erdely, Aaron

    2017-09-26

    Pulmonary toxicity studies on carbon nanotubes focus primarily on as-produced materials and rarely are guided by a life cycle perspective or integration with exposure assessment. Understanding toxicity beyond the as-produced, or pure native material, is critical, due to modifications needed to overcome barriers to commercialization of applications. In the first series of studies, the toxicity of as-produced carbon nanotubes and their polymer-coated counterparts was evaluated in reference to exposure assessment, material characterization, and stability of the polymer coating in biological fluids. The second series of studies examined the toxicity of aerosols generated from sanding polymer-coated carbon-nanotube-embedded or neat composites. Postproduction modification by polymer coating did not enhance pulmonary injury, inflammation, and pathology or in vitro genotoxicity of as-produced carbon nanotubes, and for a particular coating, toxicity was significantly attenuated. The aerosols generated from sanding composites embedded with polymer-coated carbon nanotubes contained no evidence of free nanotubes. The percent weight incorporation of polymer-coated carbon nanotubes, 0.15% or 3% by mass, and composite matrix utilized altered the particle size distribution and, in certain circumstances, influenced acute in vivo toxicity. Our study provides perspective that, while the number of workers and consumers increases along the life cycle, toxicity and/or potential for exposure to the as-produced material may greatly diminish.

  3. Inflation from periodic extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Tatsuta, Yoshiyuki

    2017-07-01

    We discuss a realization of a small field inflation based on string inspired supergravities. In theories accompanying extra dimensions, compactification of them with small radii is required for realistic situations. Since the extra dimension can have a periodicity, there will appear (quasi-)periodic functions under transformations of moduli of the extra dimensions in low energy scales. Such a periodic property can lead to a UV completion of so-called multi-natural inflation model where inflaton potential consists of a sum of multiple sinusoidal functions with a decay constant smaller than the Planck scale. As an illustration, we construct a SUSY breaking model, and then show that such an inflaton potential can be generated by a sum of world sheet instantons in intersecting brane models on extra dimensions containing orbifold. We show also predictions of cosmic observables by numerical analyzes.

  4. The Dimensions of Creative Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melvin H.

    1975-01-01

    The thesis in this paper centered around the meaning of "effective" speaking and "effective" writing. The dimensions of effective prose are analyzed as one method of determining what is involved. (Author/RK)

  5. Fourier dimension of random images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Fredrik

    2016-10-01

    Given a compact set of real numbers, a random C^{m + α}-diffeomorphism is constructed such that the image of any measure concentrated on the set and satisfying a certain condition involving a real number s, almost surely has Fourier dimension greater than or equal to s / (m + α). This is used to show that every Borel subset of the real numbers of Hausdorff dimension s is C^{m + α}-equivalent to a set of Fourier dimension greater than or equal to s / (m + α ). In particular every Borel set is diffeomorphic to a Salem set, and the Fourier dimension is not invariant under Cm-diffeomorphisms for any m.

  6. Bubble dynamics in N dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotz, Alexander R.

    2013-08-01

    Cavitation and bubble dynamics are central concepts in engineering, the natural sciences, and the mathematics of fluid mechanics. Due to the nonlinear nature of their dynamics, the governing equations are not fully solvable. Here, the dynamics of a spherical bubble in an N-dimensional fluid are discussed in the hope that examining bubble behavior in N dimensions will add insight to their behavior in three dimensions. Several canonical results in bubble dynamics are re-derived, including the Rayleigh collapse time, the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, and the Minnaert frequency. Recent analytical approximations to the Rayleigh collapse are discussed, and the N-dimensional generalization is used to resolve a known discrepancy. Numerical simulations are used to examine the onset of nonlinear behavior. Overall, the dynamics of bubbles are faster at higher dimensions, with nonlinear behavior occurring at lower strain. Several features are found to be unique to three dimensions, including the trend of nonlinear behavior and apparent coincidences in timescales.

  7. Characterization of X-ray charge neutralizer using carbon-nanotube field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okawaki, Shuhei; Abo, Satoshi; Wakaya, Fujio; Yamashita, Hayato; Abe, Masayuki; Takai, Mikio

    2016-06-01

    An X-ray charge neutralizer using a screen-printed carbon-nanotube field emitter is demonstrated to show the possibility of a large-area flat-panel charge neutralizer, although the device dimensions in the present work are not very large. The X-ray yields and spectra are characterized to estimate the ion generation rate as one of the figures of merit of neutralizers. Charge neutralization characteristics are measured and show good performance.

  8. Timbre Dimensions for Musical Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Gregory Roy

    This dissertation addresses the folowing question: Given the technologies to develop and implement any kind of sound generating and controlling device, what will the instrument designer, the composer, and the performer need to know in order to more fully utilize the dimensions of timbre in music and musical performance? This question is approached from the standpoint of music theory. Definitions of timbre and a few examples of related physical and perceptual research are reviewed. Included is a discussion of the essential elements of musical control and of intelligent organization of sound in music. This discussion raises more questions than can be answered simply. It is an attempt to unravel the nature of sound clues and sound qualities as they convey sound identities and musical gesture. A theoretical simplification of sound dimensions for musical use is proposed. Sounds which can be sustained indefinitely consist of steady-state acoustical dimensions. These dimensions rely upon the perceptual phenomenon of simultaneous fusion (synance). Sounds which can not be sustained indefinitely consist of transitions. Transitions may cause successive fusion (sonance). The discussion of steady-state and transition dimensions includes a review of a few informal experiments. This work reveals problems that will influence the musical use of timbre dimensions. It also leads to a theory for the organization and control of timbre dimensions in music. Among the timbre dimensions discussed are: spectral envelope, harmonic content, brightness, phase, inharmonicity, aperiodicity, and temporal transitions. Questions are raised regarding the perception of harmonic content. The effect of register on perception of tones consisting of from two to nine partials is explored and discussed. The size of interval between partials determines a unique quality. This is most apparent with tones consisting of only two or three partials (dions or trions).

  9. Phenomenology of universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; /Florida U.

    2006-10-01

    In this proceeding, the phenomenology of Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which all the Standard Model fields propagate, is explored. We focus on models with one universal extra dimension, compactified on an S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. We revisit calculations of Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter without an assumption of the KK mass degeneracy including all possible coannihilations. We then contrast the experimental signatures of low energy supersymmetry and UED.

  10. The Sirens of Eleven Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramond, Pierre

    While most theorists are tied to the mast of four dimensions, some have found it irresistible to speculate about eleven dimensions, the domain of M-theory. We outline a program which starts from the light-cone description of supergravity, and tracks its divergences to suggest the existence of an infinite component theory which in the lightcone relies on the coset F4/SO(9), long known to be linked to the Exceptional Jordan Algebra

  11. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by

  12. Carbon nanotubes/TiO2 nanotubes hybrid supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Zhenhai; Li, Jinghong

    2007-09-01

    The rational selection and assembly of materials are central issues in the development of energy conversion and storage applications. Incorporating the utilization of carbon nanotubes cathode and TiO2 nanotubes anode in energy storage, a nonaqueous hybrid supercapacitor was developed in order to significantly increase the energy density of the supercapacitor. The electrochemical performance of the hybrid supercapacitor is characterized by charge/discharge test and cyclic voltam-mograms. According to the voltage value, the energy density of the asymmetric supercapacitor, by applying a potential varying from 0 to 2.8 V, is found to be 14.4 Wh/kg at upwards of 10 C, which is twice more than for the conventional symmetric supercapacitor utilizing carbon nanotubes, while maintaining desirable cycling stability and rate capability.

  13. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  14. Nanocapillarity and chemistry in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte, D.; Chatelain, A.; Heer, W.A. de

    1996-12-13

    Open carbon nanotubes were filled with molten silver nitrate by capillary forces. Only those tubes with inner diameters of 4 nanometers or more were filled, suggesting a capillarity size dependence as a result of the lowering of the nanotube-salt interface energy with increasing curvature of the nanotube walls. Nanotube cavities should also be less chemically reactive than graphite and may serve as nanosize test tubes. This property has been illustrated by monitoring the decomposition of silver nitrate within nanotubes in situ in an electron microscope, which produced chains of silver nanobeads separated by high-pressure gas pockets. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  16. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chungui; Ji, Lijun; Liu, Huiju; Hu, Guangjun; Zhang, Shimin; Yang, Mingshu; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2004-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups can extend the nanotube chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized carbon nanotubes containing highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface via the reaction between toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and carboxylated carbon nanotubes. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The content of isocyanate groups were determined by chemical titration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  17. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Chungui; Ji Lijun; Liu Huiju; Hu Guangjun; Zhang Shimin; Yang Mingshu . E-mail: yms@iccas.ac.cn; Yang Zhenzhong . E-mail: yangzz@iccas.ac.cn

    2004-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups can extend the nanotube chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized carbon nanotubes containing highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface via the reaction between toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and carboxylated carbon nanotubes. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The content of isocyanate groups were determined by chemical titration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  18. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  1. Developmental study of similarity judgments involving dimensions.

    PubMed

    Fahrmeier, E D; Medin, D L

    1977-10-01

    In order to examine the nature of dimensional processing in children, kindergarten and third grade children were asked to make similarity judgments for unidimensional sets of stimuli differing in color (hue), size, and shape, respectively. Age differences were generally confined to the color set. The judgments of the older children in their age group than were the younger children's. The frequency of good-fitting scaling solutions was also higher for the older children. The processing of color in a relational manner thus seems to develop more slowly than relational processing of size or shape. Results from any task which depends on or is facilitated by relational processing could be altered by the dimensions used. The methods developed in the paper also provide an alternate method of studying seriation .

  2. Collider Phenomenology of Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lillie, Benjamin Huntington; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2006-03-10

    In recent years there has been much interest in the possibility that there exist more spacetime dimensions than the usual four. Models of particle physics beyond the Standard Model that incorporate these extra dimensions can solve the gauge hierarchy problem and explain why the fermion masses a spread over many orders of magnitude. In this thesis we explore several possibilities for models with extra dimensions. First we examine constraints on the proposal of Arkani-Hamed and Schmaltz that the Standard Model fermions are localized to different positions in an extra dimension, thereby generating the hierarchy in fermion masses. We find strong constraints on the compactification scale of such models arising from flavor-changing neutral currents. Next we investigate the phenomenology of the Randall-Sundrum model, where the hierarchy between the electroweak and Planck scales is generated by the warping in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space. In particular, we investigate the ''Higgsless'' model of electroweak symmetry breaking due to Csaki et. al., where the Higgs has been decoupled from the spectrum by taking its vacuum expectation value to infinity. We find that this model produces many distinctive features at the LHC. However, we also find that it is strongly constrained by precision electroweak observables and the requirement that gauge-boson scattering be perturbative. We then examine the model with a finite vacuum expectation value, and find that there are observable shifts to the Higgs scalar properties. Finally, in the original large extra dimension scenario of Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, and Dvali, the hierarchy problem is solved by allowing gravity to propagate in a large extra dimensional volume, while the Standard Model fields are confined to 4 dimensions. We consider the case where there are a large number of extra dimensions (n {approx} 20). This model can solve the hierarchy problem without introducing a exponentially large radii for the extra

  3. DIMENSION-BASED STATISTICAL LEARNING OF VOWELS

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ran; Holt, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception depends on long-term representations that reflect regularities of the native language. However, listeners rapidly adapt when speech acoustics deviate from these regularities due to talker idiosyncrasies such as foreign accents and dialects. To better understand these dual aspects of speech perception, we probe native English listeners’ baseline perceptual weighting of two acoustic dimensions (spectral quality and vowel duration) towards vowel categorization and examine how they subsequently adapt to an “artificial accent” that deviates from English norms in the correlation between the two dimensions. At baseline, listeners rely relatively more on spectral quality than vowel duration to signal vowel category, but duration nonetheless contributes. Upon encountering an “artificial accent” in which the spectral-duration correlation is perturbed relative to English language norms, listeners rapidly down-weight reliance on duration. Listeners exhibit this type of short-term statistical learning even in the context of nonwords, confirming that lexical information is not necessary to this form of adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Moreover, learning generalizes to both novel lexical contexts and acoustically-distinct altered voices. These findings are discussed in the context of a mechanistic proposal for how supervised learning may contribute to this type of adaptive plasticity in speech perception. PMID:26280268

  4. Dimension-based statistical learning of vowels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran; Holt, Lori L

    2015-12-01

    Speech perception depends on long-term representations that reflect regularities of the native language. However, listeners rapidly adapt when speech acoustics deviate from these regularities due to talker idiosyncrasies such as foreign accents and dialects. To better understand these dual aspects of speech perception, we probe native English listeners' baseline perceptual weighting of 2 acoustic dimensions (spectral quality and vowel duration) toward vowel categorization and examine how they subsequently adapt to an "artificial accent" that deviates from English norms in the correlation between the 2 dimensions. At baseline, listeners rely relatively more on spectral quality than vowel duration to signal vowel category, but duration nonetheless contributes. Upon encountering an "artificial accent" in which the spectral-duration correlation is perturbed relative to English language norms, listeners rapidly down-weight reliance on duration. Listeners exhibit this type of short-term statistical learning even in the context of nonwords, confirming that lexical information is not necessary to this form of adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Moreover, learning generalizes to both novel lexical contexts and acoustically distinct altered voices. These findings are discussed in the context of a mechanistic proposal for how supervised learning may contribute to this type of adaptive plasticity in speech perception.

  5. Constitutive Modeling of Crosslinked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    A non-linear, continuum-based constitutive model is developed for carbon nanotube materials in which bundles of aligned carbon nanotubes have varying amounts of crosslinks between the nanotubes. The model accounts for the non-linear elastic constitutive behavior of the material in terms of strain, and is developed using a thermodynamic energy approach. The model is used to examine the effect of the crosslinking on the overall mechanical properties of variations of the crosslinked carbon nanotube material with varying degrees of crosslinking. It is shown that the presence of the crosslinks has significant effects on the mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube materials. An increase in the transverse shear properties is observed when the nanotubes are crosslinked. However, this increase is accompanied by a decrease in axial mechanical properties of the nanotube material upon crosslinking.

  6. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  7. Interfacial heat flow in carbon nanotube suspensions.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Scott T; Cahill, David G; Shenogin, Sergei; Xue, Liping; Ozisik, Rahmi; Barone, Paul; Usrey, Monica; Strano, Michael S; Siddons, Giles; Shim, Moonsub; Keblinski, Pawel

    2003-11-01

    The enormous amount of basic research into carbon nanotubes has sparked interest in the potential applications of these novel materials. One promising use of carbon nanotubes is as fillers in a composite material to improve mechanical behaviour, electrical transport and thermal transport. For composite materials with high thermal conductivity, the thermal conductance across the nanotube-matrix interface is of particular interest. Here we use picosecond transient absorption to measure the interface thermal conductance (G) of carbon nanotubes suspended in surfactant micelles in water. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer from a carbon nanotube to a model hydrocarbon liquid are in agreement with experiment. Our findings indicate that heat transport in a nanotube composite material will be limited by the exceptionally small interface thermal conductance (G approximately 12 MW m(-2) K(-1)) and that the thermal conductivity of the composite will be much lower than the value estimated from the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the nanotubes and their volume fraction.

  8. Optical properties of chiral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, Noguez; Román-Velázquez Carlos, E.; Ariadna, Sánchez; Montes Lilia, Meza

    2004-03-01

    A recent theoretical model [1] is applied to study the optical properties chiral nanostructures like carbon nanotubes. We calculate the Circular Dichroism (CD) spectra for carbon nanotubes with different chirality. The calculated CD spectra show features that allow us to distinguish between nanotubes with different indexes of chirality. Other nanostructures, like chiral fullerenes are also investigated.These results provide theoretical support for the quantification of chirality and its measurement, using the CD lineshapes of chiral. This work has been partly financed by CONACyT grant No. 36651-E and by DGAPA-UNAM grants No. IN104201. [1] C. E. Roman-Velazquez, et al., J. of Phys. Chem. B (Letter) 107, 12035 (2003)

  9. Carbon Nanotube Material Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Leonard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Niolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2006-01-01

    The nanomaterial activities at NASA Johnson Space Center focus on carbon nanotube production, characterization and their applications for aerospace systems. Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced by arc and laser methods. Characterization of the nanotube material is performed using the NASA JSC protocol developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA. A possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be discussed. Changes in the quality of the material collected in different regions of the arc and laser production chambers is assessed using the original JSC protocol. The observed variations indicate different growth conditions in different regions of the production chambers.

  10. Plasma CVD of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Cruden, B.; Hash, D.; Meyyappan, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes(CNT) exhibit remarkable mechanical and unique electronic properties and thus have created excitement in the research community about their potential in electronics, computing, sensor and structural applications. Realization of these applications critically depends on the ability to control the properties(such as diameter, chirality) as well purity. We have investigated CNT growth using an inductively coupled plasma(ICP) process using hydrocarbon feedstock. The catalyst required for nanotube growth consists of thin sputtered layers of aluminum and iron(10 nm each) and aligned carbon nanotubes have been obtained. Optical emission diagnostics as well as a plasma modeling effort have been undertaken to understand growth mechanisms. This presentation will discuss growth characteristics under various pressure, power and feedgas compositions and our understanding from modeling and diagnostics.

  11. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  12. Rhenium(IV) sulfide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Brorson, Michael; Hansen, Thomas W; Jacobsen, Claus J H

    2002-10-02

    Rhenium(IV) sulfide, ReS(2), has been prepared with nanotubular morphology by carbon nanotube templating. A multiwall carbon nanotube material was impregnated with solutions of NH(4)ReO(4) or ReCl(5), followed by drying and sulfidation with H(2)S at 1000 degrees C. The composite material synthesized was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. Like previously described MS(2) nanotube compounds, ReS(2) has a layered structure consisting of S-M-S layers. Re atoms in ordinary ReS(2) are octahedrally coordinated with S, and tetranuclear metal clusters are present as a consequence of metal-metal bonds.

  13. Binding of blood proteins to carbon nanotubes reduces cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ge, Cuicui; Du, Jiangfeng; Zhao, Lina; Wang, Liming; Liu, Ying; Li, Denghua; Yang, Yanlian; Zhou, Ruhong; Zhao, Yuliang; Chai, Zhifang; Chen, Chunying

    2011-10-11

    With the potential wide uses of nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes in biomedical applications, and the growing concerns of nanotoxicity of these engineered nanoparticles, the importance of nanoparticle-protein interactions cannot be stressed enough. In this study, we use both experimental and theoretical approaches, including atomic force microscope images, fluorescence spectroscopy, CD, SDS-PAGE, and molecular dynamics simulations, to investigate the interactions of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with human serum proteins, and find a competitive binding of these proteins with different adsorption capacity and packing modes. The π-π stacking interactions between SWCNTs and aromatic residues (Trp, Phe, Tyr) are found to play a critical role in determining their adsorption capacity. Additional cellular cytotoxicity assays, with human acute monocytic leukemia cell line and human umbilical vein endothelial cells, reveal that the competitive bindings of blood proteins on the SWCNT surface can greatly alter their cellular interaction pathways and result in much reduced cytotoxicity for these protein-coated SWCNTs, according to their respective adsorption capacity. These findings have shed light toward the design of safe carbon nanotube nanomaterials by comprehensive preconsideration of their interactions with human serum proteins.

  14. van Hove singularities in disordered multichannel quantum wires and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügle, S.; Egger, R.

    2002-11-01

    We present a theory for the van Hove singularity (VHS) in the tunneling density of states (TDOS) of disordered multichannel quantum wires, in particular multiwall carbon nanotubes. We assume close-by gates that screen off electron-electron interactions. Diagrammatic perturbation theory within the noncrossing approximation yields analytical expressions governing the disorder-induced broadening and shift of VHS's as new subbands are opened. This problem is nontrivial because the (lowest-order) Born approximation breaks down close to the VHS. Interestingly, compared to the bulk case, the boundary TDOS shows drastically altered VHS's, even in the clean limit.

  15. Conductivity of transparent electrodes made from interacting nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillaud, Laurent; Zakri, Cécile; Ly, Isabelle; Pénicaud, Alain; Poulin, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Interactions in carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersions alter the morphology of films made from such dispersions. Weak attractive interactions induce an enhancement of the electrical conductivity. This phenomenon is observed in thin films that lie in a near percolated regime. Strong interactions instead induce a decrease of conductivity. In spite of strong morphological differences, the conductivity of thick films, away from percolated regimes, do not depend on interactions between the CNTs. These experiments support a recent theoretical scenario of the percolation of interacting rods and provide guidance for the optimal formulations of CNT inks in transparent electrode applications.

  16. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  17. Fractal dimension of alumina aggregates grown in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosa, Judith L.; Cawley, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The concepts of fractal geometry are applied to the analysis of 0.4-micron alumina constrained to agglomerate in two dimensions. Particles were trapped at the bottom surface of a drop of a dilute suspension, and the agglomeration process was directly observed, using an inverted optical microscope. Photographs were digitized and analyzed, using three distinct approaches. The results indicate that the agglomerates are fractal, having a dimension of approximately 1.5, which agrees well with the predictions of the diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation model.

  18. Novel Nanotube Manufacturing Streamlines Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Nanotubes have novel qualities that make them uniquely qualified for a plethora of uses, including applications in electronics, optics, and other scientific and industrial fields. The NASA process for creating these nanostructures involves using helium arc welding to vaporize an amorphous carbon rod and then form nanotubes by depositing the vapor onto a water-cooled carbon cathode, which then yields bundles, or ropes, of single-walled nanotubes at a rate of 2 grams per hour using a single setup. This eliminates costs associated with the use of metal catalysts, including the cost of product purification, resulting in a relatively inexpensive, high-quality, very pure end product. While managing to be less expensive, safer, and simpler, the process also increases the quality of the nanotubes. Goddard's Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) Office promoted the technology, and in 2005, Boise-based Idaho Space Materials Inc. (ISM) was formed and applied for a nonexclusive license for the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing technology. ISM commercialized its products, and the inexpensive, robust nanotubes are now in the hands of the scientists who will create the next generation of composite polymers, metals, and ceramics that will impact the way we live. In fact, researchers are examining ways for these newfound materials to be used in the manufacture of transistors and fuel cells, large screen televisions, ultra-sensitive sensors, high-resolution atomic force microscopy probes, supercapacitors, transparent conducting films, drug carriers, catalysts, and advanced composite materials, to name just a few of the myriad technologies to benefit.

  19. A DFT study of adsorption of glycine onto the surface of BC2N nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Alireza; Azmoodeh, Zivar; Javan, Masoud Bezi; Lemeski, E. Tazikeh; Karami, Leila

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical study of structure and the energy interaction of amino acid glycine (NH2CH2COOH) with BC2N nanotube is crucial for apperception behavior occurring at the nanobiointerface. Herein, we studied the adsorption of glycine in their radical and zwitterionic forms upon the surface of BC2N nanotube using M06 functional and 6-311G** standard basis set. We also considered the different orientations of the glycine amino acid on the surface of adsorbent. Further, we found out that the stability of glycine from its carbonyl group is higher than hydroxyl and amine groups. Our results also indicated that the electronic structure of BC2N nanotube on the adsorption of glycine from its amine group is more altered than the other groups. Our study exhibits that opto-electronic property of adsorbent is changed after the glycine adsorption.

  20. pH-dependent electron-transport properties of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Back, Ju Hee; Shim, Moonsub

    2006-11-30

    Carbon nanotube electrochemical transistors integrated with microfluidic channels are utilized to examine the effects of aqueous electrolyte solutions on the electron-transport properties of single isolated carbon nanotubes. In particular, pH and concentration of supporting inert electrolytes are examined. A systematic threshold voltage shift with pH is observed while the transconductance and subthreshold swing remain independent of pH and concentration. Decreasing pH leads to a negative shift of the threshold voltage, indicating that protonation does not lead to hole doping. Changing the type of contact metal does not alter the observed pH response. The pH-dependent charging of SiO2 substrate is ruled out as the origin based on measurements with suspended nanotube transistors. Increasing the ionic strength leads to reduced pH response. Contributions from possible surface chargeable chemical groups are considered.

  1. Self-response multi-functional composite material base on carbon nanotube paper using deicing, flame retardancy, thermal insulation, and lightning-strike protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hetao; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotube paper (CNP) based multi-functional composite material is an attractive candidate for deicing, flame retardancy, thermal insulation and lighting strike protection due to the excellent conductivity, light weight and thin dimensions. In this article, multi-functional carbon nanotube paper was fabricated successfully by using commercial carbon nanotube. As a deicing composite material, carbon nanotube was used directly without pretreatment in fabricating carbon nanotube paper. The conductivities of the carbon nanotube paper and deicing composite were 77.8S/cm and 64.9S/ respectively. Electrical heating and deicing performance were test by infrared camera with deicing time less than 220s and 450s to melt a certain amount of ice under different ambient condition. CNT was grafted by zirconium (IV) butoxide solution and dimethyl dichlorosilicane to form co-oligomers on the tube surface while oligomers decompose under a certain temperature to develop an inorganic layer of silicon zirconium oxide. The oxidizing temperature of carbon nanotube increases more than 20°C and the weight loss rate decreases 20% than the untreated carbon nanotube. Lightning protection material required high electro conductivity, due to the utmost high current in a short time. Therefore, silver nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of carbon nanotube with the diameter around 100nm. The conductivity increased sharply from 84s/cm to1756s/cm with the mount of 5.9wt% Ag of the modified carbon nanotube paper because the silver nanoparticles deposited on the surface. In addition, the silver modified also can be used as thermal insulation material decreasing the infrared radiation.

  2. Dimension of fractal basin boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Park, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    In many dynamical systems, multiple attractors coexist for certain parameter ranges. The set of initial conditions that asymptotically approach each attractor is its basin of attraction. These basins can be intertwined on arbitrary small scales. Basin boundary can be either smooth or fractal. Dynamical systems that have fractal basin boundary show final state sensitivity of the initial conditions. A measure of this sensitivity (uncertainty exponent {alpha}) is related to the dimension of the basin boundary d = D - {alpha}, where D is the dimension of the phase space and d is the dimension of the basin boundary. At metamorphosis values of the parameter, there might happen a conversion from smooth to fractal basin boundary (smooth-fractal metamorphosis) or a conversion from fractal to another fractal basin boundary characteristically different from the previous fractal one (fractal-fractal metamorphosis). The dimension changes continuously with the parameter except at the metamorphosis values where the dimension of the basin boundary jumps discontinuously. We chose the Henon map and the forced damped pendulum to investigate this. Scaling of the basin volumes near the metamorphosis values of the parameter is also being studied for the Henon map. Observations are explained analytically by using low dimensional model map.

  3. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  4. Magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Kang, N.; Kong, W. J.; Hu, J. S.; Pan, Z. W.; Xie, S. S.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes bundles. At temperatures above 15 K, the magnetoresistance was found to follow exactly a scaling law as predicted by the theory of two-dimensional (2D) weak localization. Below 15 K, the 2D weak localization behavior is modified due to the formation of a Coulomb gap. This modification does not fit to those theories which treat electron-electron interaction as a perturbation. Altshular-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) resistance oscillation was observed in milli-Kelvin temperature range. The results will be discussed in terms of the interplay between electron-electron interaction and disorder scattering in multiwall carbon nanotube.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  6. Branchy alumina nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jianping; Pu, Lin; Bao, Ximao; Feng, Duan

    2002-02-01

    Branchy alumina nanotubes (bANTs) have been shown to exist in aluminum oxide. Electron-beam evaporated 400 nm Al film on Si substrate is stepwise anodized in dilute sulfuric acid under the constant dc voltage 40 V at 10.0 °C. This electrochemical-anodizing route resulted in the formation of individual bANTs. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the length of the bANTs was around 450 nm, and the inner diameter was around 10-20 nm. We deduced that the bANTs, the completely detached multibranchy cells of anodic porous alumina (APA) film, should be evolved from the stagnant cells of the APA mother film. The bANTs may be used as templates in fabrication of individual branchy nanoscale cables, jacks, and heterojunctions. The proposed formation mechanisms of the bANTs and the stagnant cells should give some insights into the long-standing problem of APA film, i.e., the self-ordering mechanism of the cells arrangement in porous anodization of aluminum.

  7. Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina; Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, it's hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  8. Diameter-dependent hydrophobicity in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyakuno, Haruka; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Ichimura, Ryota; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Nakai, Yusuke; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Saito, Takeshi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a good model system that provides atomically smooth nanocavities. It has been reported that water-SWCNTs exhibit hydrophobicity depending on the temperature T and the SWCNT diameter D. SWCNTs adsorb water molecules spontaneously in their cylindrical pores around room temperature, whereas they exhibit a hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition or wet-dry transition (WDT) at a critical temperature Twd ≈ 220-230 K and above a critical diameter Dc ≈ 1.4-1.6 nm. However, details of the WDT phenomenon and its mechanism remain unknown. Here, we report a systematic experimental study involving X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that water molecules inside thick SWCNTs (D > Dc) evaporate and condense into ice Ih outside the SWCNTs at Twd upon cooling, and the ice Ih evaporates and condenses inside the SWCNTs upon heating. On the other hand, residual water trapped inside the SWCNTs below Twd freezes. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that upon lowering T, the hydrophobicity of thick SWCNTs increases without any structural transition, while the water inside thin SWCNTs (D < Dc) exhibits a structural transition, forming an ordered ice. This ice has a well-developed hydrogen bonding network adapting to the cylindrical pores of the SWCNTs. Thus, the unusual diameter dependence of the WDT is attributed to the adaptability of the structure of water to the pore dimension and shape.

  9. Processing and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Can, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Hull, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of large-scale quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have provided the opportunity to study the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites using these novel materials as reinforcement. Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. currently supplies large sheets with dimensions up to 122 cm x 244 cm containing both single-wall and few-wall CNTs. The tubes are approximately 1 mm in length with diameters ranging from 8 to 12 nm. In the present study being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), single and multiple layers of CNT sheets were infused or coated with various polymer solutions that included commercial toughened-epoxies and bismaleimides, as well as a LaRC developed polyimide. The resulting CNT composites were tested in tension using a modified version of ASTM D882-12 to determine their strength and modulus values. The effects of solvent treatment and mechanical elongation/alignment of the CNT sheets on the tensile performance of the composite were determined. Thin composites (around 50 wt% CNT) fabricated from acetone condensed and elongated CNT sheets with either a BMI or polyimide resin solution exhibited specific tensile moduli approaching that of toughened epoxy/ IM7 carbon fiber unidirectional composites.

  10. Carbon nanotubes and graphene towards soft electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-04-01

    Although silicon technology has been the main driving force for miniaturizing device dimensions to improve cost and performance, the current application of Si to soft electronics (flexible and stretchable electronics) is limited due to material rigidity. As a result, various prospective materials have been proposed to overcome the rigidity of conventional Si technology. In particular, nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are promising due to outstanding elastic properties as well as an excellent combination of electronic, optoelectronic, and thermal properties compared to conventional rigid silicon. The uniqueness of these nano-carbon materials has opened new possibilities for soft electronics, which is another technological trend in the market. This review covers the recent progress of soft electronics research based on CNTs and graphene. We discuss the strategies for soft electronics with nano-carbon materials and their preparation methods (growth and transfer techniques) to devices as well as the electrical characteristics of transparent conducting films (transparency and sheet resistance) and device performances in field effect transistor (FET) (structure, carrier type, on/off ratio, and mobility). In addition to discussing state of the art performance metrics, we also attempt to clarify trade-off issues and methods to control the trade-off on/off versus mobility). We further demonstrate accomplishments of the CNT network in flexible integrated circuits on plastic substrates that have attractive characteristics. A future research direction is also proposed to overcome current technological obstacles necessary to realize commercially feasible soft electronics.

  11. The influence of titania-zirconia-zirconium titanate nanotube characteristics on osteoblast cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Minagar, Sepideh; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biomaterial surfaces and their influence on cell behavior provide insights concerning the design of surface physicochemical and topography properties of implant materials. Fabrication of biocompatible metal oxide nanotubes on metallic biomaterials, especially titanium alloys such as Ti50Zr via anodization, alters the surface chemistry as well as surface topography of the alloy. In this study, four groups of TiO2-ZrO2-ZrTiO4 nanotubes that exhibit diverse nanoscale dimensional characteristics (i.e. inner diameter Di, outer diameter Do and wall thicknesses Wt) were fabricated via anodization. The nanotubes were annealed and characterized using scanning electron microscopy and 3-D profilometry. The potential applied during anodization influenced the oxidation rate of titanium and zirconium, thereby resulting in different nanoscale characteristics for the nanotubes. The different oxidation and dissolution rates both led to changes in the surface roughness parameters. The in vitro cell response to the nanotubes with different nanoscale dimensional characteristics was assessed using osteoblast cells (SaOS2). The results of the MTS assay indicated that the nanotubes with inner diameter (Di)≈40nm exhibited the highest percentage of cell adhesion of 41.0%. This result can be compared to (i) 25.9% cell adhesion at Di≈59nm, (ii) 33.1% at Di≈64nm, and (iii) 33.5% at Di≈82nm. The nanotubes with Di≈59nm exhibited the greatest roughness parameter of Sa (mean roughness), leading to the lowest ability to interlock with SaOS2 cells.

  12. Carbon nanotubes instruct physiological growth and functionally mature syncytia: nongenetic engineering of cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Valentina; Cellot, Giada; Toma, Francesca Maria; Long, Carlin S; Caldwell, John H; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Turco, Antonio; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura; Mestroni, Luisa

    2013-07-23

    Myocardial tissue engineering currently represents one of the most realistic strategies for cardiac repair. We have recently discovered the ability of carbon nanotube scaffolds to promote cell division and maturation in cardiomyocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote cardiomyocyte growth and maturation by altering the gene expression program, implementing the cell electrophysiological properties and improving networking and maturation of functional syncytia. In our study, we combine microscopy, biological and electrophysiological methodologies, and calcium imaging, to verify whether neonatal rat ventricular myocytes cultured on substrates of multiwall carbon nanotubes acquire a physiologically more mature phenotype compared to control (gelatin). We show that the carbon nanotube substrate stimulates the induction of a gene expression profile characteristic of terminal differentiation and physiological growth, with a 2-fold increase of α-myosin heavy chain (P < 0.001) and upregulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase 2a. In contrast, markers of pathological hypertrophy remain unchanged (β-myosin heavy chain, skeletal α-actin, atrial natriuretic peptide). These modifications are paralleled by an increase of connexin-43 gene expression, gap junctions and functional syncytia. Moreover, carbon nanotubes appear to exert a protective effect against the pathologic stimulus of phenylephrine. Finally, cardiomyocytes on carbon nanotubes demonstrate a more mature electrophysiological phenotype of syncytia and intracellular calcium signaling. Thus, carbon nanotubes interacting with cardiomyocytes have the ability to promote physiological growth and functional maturation. These properties are unique in the current vexing field of tissue engineering, and offer unprecedented perspectives in the development of innovative therapies for cardiac repair.

  13. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  14. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  15. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  16. Safety considerations for graphene: lessons learnt from carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-03-19

    Many consider carbon nanomaterials the poster children of nanotechnology, attracting immense scientific interest from many disciplines and offering tremendous potential in a diverse range of applications due to their extraordinary properties. Graphene is the youngest in the family of carbon nanomaterials. Its isolation, description, and mass fabrication has followed that of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. Graphene's development and its adoption by many industries will increase unintended or intentional human exposure, creating the need to determine its safety profile. In this Account, we compare the lessons learned from the development of carbon nanotubes with what is known about graphene, based on our own investigations and those of others. Despite both being carbon-based, nanotubes and graphene are two very distinct nanomaterials. We consider the key physicochemical characteristics (structure, surface, colloidal properties) for graphene and carbon nanotubes at three different physiological levels: cellular, tissue, and whole body. We summarize the evidence for health effects of both materials at all three levels. Overall, graphene and its derivatives are characterized by a lower aspect ratio, larger surface area, and better dispersibility in most solvents compared to carbon nanotubes. Dimensions, surface chemistry, and impurities are equally important for graphene and carbon nanotubes in determining both mechanistic (aggregation, cellular processes, biodistribution, and degradation kinetics) and toxicological outcomes. Colloidal dispersions of individual graphene sheets (or graphene oxide and other derivatives) can easily be engineered without metallic impurities, with high stability and less aggregation. Very importantly, graphene nanostructures are not fiber-shaped. These features theoretically offer significant advantages in terms of safety over inhomogeneous dispersions of fiber-shaped carbon nanotubes. However, studies that directly compare graphene with

  17. Image Segmentation via Fractal Dimension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    statistical expectation K = a proportionality constant H = the Hurst exponent , in interval [0,1] (14:249) Eq (4) is a mathematical generalization of...ease, negatively correlated (24:16). The Hurst exponent is directly related to the fractal diment.ion of the process being modelled by the relation (24...24) DzE.I -H (5) where D = the fractal dimension E m the Euclidean dimension H = the Hurst exponent The effect of N1 on a typical trace can be seen

  18. Maximal cuts in arbitrary dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosma, Jorrit; Sogaard, Mads; Zhang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    We develop a systematic procedure for computing maximal unitarity cuts of multiloop Feynman integrals in arbitrary dimension. Our approach is based on the Baikov representation in which the structure of the cuts is particularly simple. We examine several planar and nonplanar integral topologies and demonstrate that the maximal cut inherits IBPs and dimension shift identities satisfied by the uncut integral. Furthermore, for the examples we calculated, we find that the maximal cut functions from different allowed regions, form the Wronskian matrix of the differential equations on the maximal cut.

  19. Topological insulators in three dimensions.

    PubMed

    Fu, Liang; Kane, C L; Mele, E J

    2007-03-09

    We study three-dimensional generalizations of the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect. Unlike two dimensions, where a single Z2 topological invariant governs the effect, in three dimensions there are 4 invariants distinguishing 16 phases with two general classes: weak (WTI) and strong (STI) topological insulators. The WTI are like layered 2D QSH states, but are destroyed by disorder. The STI are robust and lead to novel "topological metal" surface states. We introduce a tight binding model which realizes the WTI and STI phases, and we discuss its relevance to real materials, including bismuth.

  20. Topological Insulators in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Liang; Kane, C. L.; Mele, E. J.

    2007-03-01

    We study three-dimensional generalizations of the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect. Unlike two dimensions, where a single Z2 topological invariant governs the effect, in three dimensions there are 4 invariants distinguishing 16 phases with two general classes: weak (WTI) and strong (STI) topological insulators. The WTI are like layered 2D QSH states, but are destroyed by disorder. The STI are robust and lead to novel “topological metal” surface states. We introduce a tight binding model which realizes the WTI and STI phases, and we discuss its relevance to real materials, including bismuth.

  1. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis of dental radiographs.

    PubMed

    Yasar, F; Akgünlü, F

    2005-09-01

    As the occlusal forces transmitted to the jaw bones during mastication might be different in dentate and edentulous regions, there might be different radiographical trabecular bone texture in these regions. Image analysis procedures are promising techniques which are used to detect structural changes of bone texture on radiographs. In this study, the differences of fractal dimension (FD) and lacunarity measurements of radiographical trabecular bone between dentate and edentulous regions were investigated. Direct digital radiographs of premolar-molar region were taken from 51 patients who were included in our study. Two rectangular regions of interest (ROIs) with the same dimensions (37x119 pixels) were created on these radiographs; one in the edentulous region and the other one in the dentate region. The ROIs were segmented as black and white areas. Box-counting fractal dimension and lacunarity of these regions were calculated. Paired samples t-test and Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated. It was found that there were differences between dentate and edentulous regions for FD and lacunarity (P=0.000). There is a negative correlation between FD and lacunarity (-0.643, P<0.01), positive correlation between dentate and edentulous regions and FD (0.819, P<0.01), and a negative correlation between lacunarity and dentate and edentulous regions (-0.541, P<0.01). The differences of occlusal forces generated in dentate and edentulous regions during mastication cause some alterations in trabecular bone structure, and fractal dimension and lacunarity can reveal these alterations quantitatively.

  2. Direct Synthesis of Long Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. W.; Xu, C. L.; Wu, D. H.; Wei, B. Q.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2002-05-01

    In the processes that are used to produce single-walled nanotubes (electric arc, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition), the typical lengths of tangled nanotube bundles reach several tens of micrometers. We report that long nanotube strands, up to several centimeters in length, consisting of aligned single-walled nanotubes can be synthesized by the catalytic pyrolysis of n-hexane with an enhanced vertical floating technique. The long strands of nanotubes assemble continuously from arrays of nanotubes, which are intrinsically long.

  3. Carbon nanotube-TiO(2) hybrid films for detecting traces of O(2).

    PubMed

    Llobet, E; Espinosa, E H; Sotter, E; Ionescu, R; Vilanova, X; Torres, J; Felten, A; Pireaux, J J; Ke, X; Van Tendeloo, G; Renaux, F; Paint, Y; Hecq, M; Bittencourt, C

    2008-09-17

    Hybrid titania films have been prepared using an adapted sol-gel method for obtaining well-dispersed hydrogen plasma-treated multiwall carbon nanotubes in either pure titania or Nb-doped titania. The drop-coating method has been used to fabricate resistive oxygen sensors based on titania or on titania and carbon nanotube hybrids. Morphology and composition studies have revealed that the dispersion of low amounts of carbon nanotubes within the titania matrix does not significantly alter its crystallization behaviour. The gas sensitivity studies performed on the different samples have shown that the hybrid layers based on titania and carbon nanotubes possess an unprecedented responsiveness towards oxygen (i.e. more than four times higher than that shown by optimized Nb-doped TiO(2) films). Furthermore, hybrid sensors containing carbon nanotubes respond at significantly lower operating temperatures than their non-hybrid counterparts. These new hybrid sensors show a strong potential for monitoring traces of oxygen (i.e. ≤10 ppm) in a flow of CO(2), which is of interest for the beverage industry.

  4. Investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with defined properties is required for both fundamental investigations and practical applications. The revealing and thorough understanding of the growth mechanism of SWCNTs is the key to the synthesis of nanotubes with required properties. This paper reviews the current status of the research on the investigation of growth dynamics of carbon nanotubes. The review starts with the consideration of the peculiarities of the growth mechanism of carbon nanotubes. The physical and chemical states of the catalyst during the nanotube growth are discussed. The chirality selective growth of nanotubes is described. The main part of the review is dedicated to the analysis and systematization of the reported results on the investigation of growth dynamics of nanotubes. The studies on the revealing of the dependence of the growth rate of nanotubes on the synthesis parameters are reviewed. The correlation between the lifetime of catalyst and growth rate of nanotubes is discussed. The reports on the calculation of the activation energy of the nanotube growth are summarized. Finally, the growth properties of inner tubes inside SWCNTs are considered. PMID:28503394

  5. Lipid Bilayers Covalently Anchored to Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-01-01

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules. PMID:22568448

  6. Lipid bilayers covalently anchored to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-05-29

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules.

  7. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M.; Sahu, Rakesh P.; Wallar, Cameron J.; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g-1 and an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm-2 at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1 is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm-2.

  8. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Ahmed M; Sahu, Rakesh P; Wallar, Cameron J; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K

    2017-02-17

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g(-1) and  an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm(-2) at a scan rate of 2 mV s(-1) is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm(-2).

  9. Photocatalytic activity of titania nanotube (tint)-carbon nanotube (CNT) composite for degradation of phenol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heltina, Desi; Wulan, Praswasti P. D. K.; Slamet

    2017-05-01

    In this study, a composite of titania nanotube (TiNT)-carbon nanotube (CNT) was synthesized using a method of mixing. The titania nanotube -carbon nanotube composite is applied to increase the photocatalytic activity for phenol degradation. The titania nanotube-carbon nanotube composites were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and spectrophotometer. The presence of carbon nanotube on composite have a beneficial effect on photocatalytic performance titania nanotube (TiNT) a marked increase in the photocatalytic degradation of phenol. The results show that the highest activity nanocomposite sample is observed for CNT load 2 wt.%. For this purpose, a morphology of the nanocomposites and crystalline phases investigated. The photocatalytic activity composite of TiNT - CNT for phenol degradation was afterward evaluated and discussed.

  10. Multiwalled carbon nanotube CVD synthesis, modification, and composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Dali

    Well-aligned carbon multiwall nanotube (MWNT) arrays have been continuously synthesized by a floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method involving the pyrolysis of xylene-ferrocene mixtures. The CVD parameters have been studied to selectively synthesize nanotubes with required dimensions. A mixed tip-root growth model has been proposed for the floating catalytic CVD synthesis. Coarsening of the catalyst particle at the root end promoted MWNT wall coarsening (addition of new concentric graphene shells), while the smaller catalyst particle at the tip contributed to MWNT elongation. A two-step process in which ferrocene was fed for only five minutes to nucleate the DTs was developed to understand if a continuous supply of catalyst was necessary for continued growth. The results show that the ferrocene was only necessary for initial nucleation. To simplify the CVD process further, another two-step synthesis method was developed in which the ferrocene was pre-decomposed so that the nanotube nucleation could be isolated from the growth, enabling quantification of growth mechanisms and kinetics. Mass spectra and hydrocarbon analyses of the CVD reactor tail gas were performed to understand the pyrolysis chemistry. Well-aligned N-doped and Ru-doped MWNT arrays have been produced by pyrolysis of pyridine ferrocene mixtures and xylene-ferrocene-ruthenocene mixtures, respectively. Various material characterization techniques were used to measure the dopant distributions and correlate the catalyst phase with the novel nanotube structures. High-temperature annealing has been shown to be a viable means to remove both the catalyst particles and certain microstructural defects within the CVD-derived DTs. The phase transformation of catalyst during annealing has also been studied. Homogeneous distribution of MWNTs in polystyrene matrices was achieved by an ultrasonic assisted solution-evaporation method. Addition of only 1 wt % DTs to polystyrene increased the polymer

  11. Mineralogical control of fracture alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, H.; Steefel, C. I.; Molins, S.; DePaolo, D.

    2016-12-01

    Fractures represent preferential flow pathways that control fluid migration in geological porous media that are subject to alteration by fluid-rock interaction. In the presence of complex mineral assemblages, fracture alteration involves changes within the fracture plane, and thus to fracture hydraulic properties, as well as changes in the near-fracture region of the rock matrix that influence the evolution of geochemical and geomechanical properties of the fracture. An example of this is the dissolution of fast-reacting minerals that are dispersed in a slower reacting mineral matrix. This can result in a porous altered layer (rather than fracture surface retreat) adjacent to the fracture surface, potentially introducing a diffusion control on bulk reaction rates within the fracture system. In this study, a novel 2.5D reactive transport model was developed to simulate fracture evolution in mineralogically complex systems. The model captures flow variations and aperture changes in the fracture plane and tracks the reaction front of each mineral in order to account for important processes in the dimension perpendicular to the fracture plane. The model was tested using data from experiments in which CO2-acidified fluid is injected into single fractures within rocks that are representative of those constituting caprock in geological storage systems. The model was applied to rock samples with a range of carbonate and clay mineral contents so as to investigate the role of mineralogical compositions in controlling fracture alteration when exposed to CO2-acidified fluid. Specifically, simulations explore the effect of different mineralogical compositions on the development of the altered layer and their impact on the evolution of the overall reaction rate and the fracture opening. The mineralogical composition of the fractured rock may also affect the stability of the altered layer and the spatial pattern of aperture change in the fracture plane, which control the

  12. Design, fabrication and properties of novel architectures made from carbon nanotubes and nano-porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Sumanjeet

    Nanomaterials like carbon nanotubes (CNT) have numerous potential applications due to their unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Building macroscopic architectures using these nanocomponents requires new approaches for organization or assembly of these components. This can be achieved by using various techniques like capillary-induced compaction, template-assisted growth and other synthesis techniques. The vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube arrays were grown using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Evaporation of liquid from such vertically aligned nanotube arrays induces the assembly of nanotubes into cellular patterns. The role of substrate and orientation of the carbon nanotube array was investigated and analyzed to gain more control over the pattern formation that could help in designing new structures. Electrical measurements on the CNT patterns before and after capillary-induced compaction revealed that compaction results in four-fold increase in electrical conductivity, making them a potential candidate for vertical interconnects. A new method to fabricate a syringe with nanopores by using anodization technique was demonstrated. Experimental parameters were investigated to control the dimension and morphology of the nanopores in the syringe. Capillary force was used to infiltrate and replicate the complete 3D architecture into polymers. The usefulness of syringe as a biological sampler (DNA-RNA separation) was demonstrated. Layered structure of exfoliated mica was used as a substrate for growth of CNTs. This resulted in novel layered hybrid architecture of mica and carbon nanotube arrays. Mechanical properties of such architectures were investigated. Such architectures could be very useful as foams. These simple techniques can be used to assemble nanoscale components into well-defined macroscopic architectures and thus broaden the range of applications where their unique properties can be put into use.

  13. Adsorption in carbon nanotubes and computer simulation studies of wetting on alkali surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, George

    Absorption in carbon nanotubes and computer simulation studies of the wetting properties of rare gases on alkali metals are presented. In the confining environment of nanotubes, adsorbed atoms exhibit behavior characteristic of 1, 2, and 3 dimensions as a function of thermodynamic parameters (number of particles N and temperature T), geometry (isolated tubes or nanotube bundles), and microscopic variables (relative size of atom vs. tube radius). Small atoms fit easily inside nanotubes and are strongly bound within them. At low coverage, atoms moving inside nanotubes are adsorbed in a cylindrical shell close to the tube walls, while above a threshold value, atoms start to populate the vicinity of the axis of the tube. In a nanotube bundle, interstitial channels between the tubes are even more favorable energetically for small atoms than the interior of the tubes. An extremely anisotropic condensed state is formed due to interactions between atoms in neighboring interstitial channels. Mixtures of 3He and 4He atoms in interstitial channels obey an analog of Raoult's law for ideal solutions. A similar behavior is expected for H2 - D2 mixtures. At the opposite extreme of interaction strengths, alkali metal surfaces attract rare gases more weakly than any other surfaces. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the wetting behavior of such systems are reported. In the case of the most weakly attractive surfaces, Cs, Rb and Li, nonwetting behaviors of Ne are found for all temperatures within about 2 K of the critical temperature, while a drying behavior is seen only near the Cs surface. At the slightly more attractive surface of Mg, a prewetting transition is found. A study of wetting of various rare gases adsorbed at alkali metal surfaces reveals a rich variety of behaviors at the triple temperature. The heuristic model of Cheng et al. is found to agree well with the general threshold for wetting at the triple point.

  14. The optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Separation, characterization, and measurement in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard M.

    The one dimensional structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) gives rise to optical phenomena that differ from bulk materials. This dissertation studies the separation of SWNTs dissolved in aqueous media using surfactant molecules, and the measurement of their intrinsic optical properties including absorption and emission. The SWNTs were separated from the bundled form using mechanical processing techniques such as sonication and centrifugation. A processing study, which isolated the effects of sonication frequency, sonication power, and centrifugation speed, was performed to determine the factors that lead to the best separation. The results of this study suggest that the suspensions are a mixture of individual tubes and small bundles. Prior determinations of intrinsic nanotube properties based on the assumption of isolated nanotubes will have to be revisited. The transient absorption spectrum was measured for the S11 subband region using monochromatic pump excitation at wavelengths corresponding to S22 subband transitions, where the exciting pump fluence was sufficient to create many excitons on a single nanotube. The transient decay kinetics followed a linear dependence that was proportional to 1/ t on a log-log scale with a slope of -0.5, which is consistent with the diffusion limited recombination of excitons in one dimension. This result suggests that the decay of photoexcitations in nanotubes is initially governed by two-body kinetics, which becomes a one-body process only in the long time limit. Our work refutes the one-electron model for the excited state relaxation of nanotubes proposed by others. When the transient decay was studied as a function of the initial exciton population, the diffusion coefficient was found to be a different constant value at each initial population. Local thermalization of the surrounding medium may cause this difference, as thermal relaxation occurs on a time scale that is longer than that of exciton recombination in

  15. Synthesis of PbI(2) single-layered inorganic nanotubes encapsulated within carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Laura; Ballesteros, Belén; Batista, Eudar; Magén, César; Arenal, Raúl; Oró-Solé, Judith; Rurali, Riccardo; Tobias, Gerard

    2014-04-02

    The template assisted growth of single-layered inorganic nanotubes is reported. Single-crystalline lead iodide single-layered nanotubes have been prepared using the inner cavities of carbon nanotubes as hosting templates. The diameter of the resulting inorganic nanotubes is merely dependent on the diameter of the host. This facile method is highly versatile opening up new horizons in the preparation of single-layered nanostructures. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Proton Beams from Nanotube Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Masakatsu; Tanaka, Motohiko

    2013-10-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) is known to have extraordinary material and mechanical properties. Here we propose a novel ion acceleration scheme with nanometer-size CNT working at such an extreme circumstance as temperatures higher than billions of degree and durations shorter than tens of femtosecond, dubbed as nanotube accelerator, with which quasimonoenergetic and collimated MeV-order proton beams are generated. In nanotube accelerators, CNTs with fragments of a hydrogen compound embedded inside are irradiated by an ultrashort ultraintense laser. Under such laser and target conditions, low-Z materials such as hydrogen and carbon will be fully ionized. Substantial amount of electrons of the system are then blown off by the brutal laser electric field within only a few laser cycles. This leads to a new type of ion acceleration, in which the nanotube and embedded materials play the roles of a gun barrel and bullets, respectively, to produce highly collimated and quasimonoenergetic proton beams. Three-dimensional particle simulations, that take all the two-body Coulomb interactions into account, demonstrate generation of quasimonoenergetic 1.5-MeV proton beams under a super-intense electrostatic field ~ 1014 V m-1.

  17. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    ScienceCinema

    Leonard, Francois

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  18. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Francois

    2014-06-11

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  19. Thermoelectrics: Carbon nanotubes get high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispin, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Waste heat can be converted to electricity by thermoelectric generators, but their development is hindered by the lack of cheap materials with good thermoelectric properties. Now, carbon-nanotube-based materials are shown to have improved properties when purified to contain only semiconducting species and then doped.

  20. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  1. Dimension independence in exterior algebra.

    PubMed

    Hawrylycz, M

    1995-03-14

    The identities between homogeneous expressions in rank 1 vectors and rank n - 1 covectors in a Grassmann-Cayley algebra of rank n, in which one set occurs multilinearly, are shown to represent a set of dimension-independent identities. The theorem yields an infinite set of nontrivial geometric identities from a given identity.

  2. The Feeling Dimension in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The feeling dimension of students cannot be ignored in teaching and learning situations. Feelings are there and must not be ignored. Reading stresses word recognition, comprehension of subject matter at diverse levels of complexity, and application of what has been learned. A major ingredient so frequently left out is student appreciation of the…

  3. Pedagogical Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, T

    2004-09-27

    Extra dimensions provide a new window on a number of problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides an introduction to this very broad subject aimed at experimental graduate students and post-docs based on a lecture given at the 2004 SLAC Summer Institute.

  4. The European Dimension in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport, Documentation Section.

    This paper addresses concerns about a European dimension in education that has been created by the enlargement of the European Union (EU) (the inclusion of Austria, Finland, and Sweden) and the gradual transformations of institutions into a future federal state. Sections of the paper include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Defining the…

  5. Heat conduction in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danza, T. M.; Fesler, L. W.; Mongan, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Multidimensional heat conduction program computes transient temperature history and steady state temperatures of complex body geometries in three dimensions. Emphasis is placed on type of problems associated with Space Shuttle thermal protection system, but program could be used in thermal analysis of most three dimensional systems.

  6. Investigation of a Creativity Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Richard T.

    This thesis provides evidence for the existence of a creativity dimension containing figural and verbal subfactors which is independent of intelligence and marginally related to school achievement. The original data of Wallach and Kogan, as well as the data from the Ward, Cropley and Maslany and Wallach and Wing studies were reanalyzed using…

  7. The Visuospatial Dimension of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Thierry; Passerault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The authors suggest that writing should be conceived of not only as a verbal activity but also as a visuospatial activity, in which writers process and construct visuospatial mental representations. After briefly describing research on visuospatial cognition, they look at how cognitive researchers have investigated the visuospatial dimension of…

  8. The Visuospatial Dimension of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Thierry; Passerault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The authors suggest that writing should be conceived of not only as a verbal activity but also as a visuospatial activity, in which writers process and construct visuospatial mental representations. After briefly describing research on visuospatial cognition, they look at how cognitive researchers have investigated the visuospatial dimension of…

  9. The European Dimension in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport, Documentation Section.

    This paper addresses concerns about a European dimension in education that has been created by the enlargement of the European Union (EU) (the inclusion of Austria, Finland, and Sweden) and the gradual transformations of institutions into a future federal state. Sections of the paper include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Defining the…

  10. Dimension independence in exterior algebra.

    PubMed Central

    Hawrylycz, M

    1995-01-01

    The identities between homogeneous expressions in rank 1 vectors and rank n - 1 covectors in a Grassmann-Cayley algebra of rank n, in which one set occurs multilinearly, are shown to represent a set of dimension-independent identities. The theorem yields an infinite set of nontrivial geometric identities from a given identity. PMID:11607520

  11. Charged polymers in high dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantor, Yacov

    1990-01-01

    A Monte Carlo study of charged polymers with either homogeneously distributed frozen charges or with mobile charges has been performed in four and five space dimensions. The results are consistent with the renormalization-group predictions and contradict the predictions of Flory-type theory. Introduction of charge mobility does not modify the behavior of the polymers.

  12. Heat conduction in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danza, T. M.; Fesler, L. W.; Mongan, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Multidimensional heat conduction program computes transient temperature history and steady state temperatures of complex body geometries in three dimensions. Emphasis is placed on type of problems associated with Space Shuttle thermal protection system, but program could be used in thermal analysis of most three dimensional systems.

  13. Warping the universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2009-07-15

    We develop the necessary ingredients for the construction of realistic models with warped universal extra dimensions. Our investigations are based on the seven-dimensional (7D) spacetime AdS{sub 5}xT{sup 2}/Z{sub 2} and we derive the Kaluza-Klein (KK) spectra for gravitons, bulk vectors, and the TeV brane localized Higgs boson. We show that, starting with a massive 7D fermion, one may obtain a single chiral massless mode whose profile is readily localized towards the Planck or TeV brane. This allows one to place the standard model fermions in the bulk and construct models of flavor as in Randall-Sundrum models. Our solution also admits the familiar KK parity of models with universal extra dimensions so that the lightest odd KK state is stable and may be a dark matter candidate. As an additional feature the AdS{sub 5} warping ensures that the excited modes on the torus, including the dark matter candidate, appear at TeV energies (as is usually assumed in models with universal extra dimensions) even though the Planck scale sets the dimensions for the torus.

  14. Interpretation and the Aesthetic Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortensen, Charles O.

    1976-01-01

    The author, utilizing a synthesis of philosophic comments on aesthetics, provides a discourse on the aesthetic dimension and offers examples of how interpreters can nurture the innate sense of beauty in man. Poetic forms, such as haiku, are used to relate the aesthetic relationship between man and the environment. (BT)

  15. Compactified Vacuum in Ten Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurmser, Daniel

    1987-09-01

    Since the 1920's, theories which unify gravity with the other fundamental forces have called for more than the four observed dimensions of space-time. According to such a theory, the vacuum consists of flat four-dimensional space-time described by the Minkowski metric M ^4 and a "compactified" space B. The dimensions of B are small, and the space can only be observed at distance scales smaller than the present experimental limit. These theories have had serious difficulties. The equations of gravity severely restrict the possible choices for the space B. The allowed spaces are complicated and difficult to study. The vacuum is furthermore unstable in the sense that a small perturbation causes the compactified dimensions to expand indefinitely. There is an addition a semi-classical argument which implies that the compactified vacuum be annihilated by virtual black holes. It follows that a universe with compactified extra dimensions could not have survived to the present. These results were derived by applying the equations of general relativity to spaces of more than four dimensions. The form of these equations was assumed to be unchanged by an increase in the number of dimensions. Recently, it has been proposed that gravity in more than four dimensions may involve terms of higher order in the curvature as well as the linear terms present in ordinary general relativity. I illustrate the effect of such terms by considering the example B = S^6 where S ^6 is the six-dimensional sphere. Only when the extra terms are included is this choice of the compactified space allowed. I explore the effect of a small perturbation on such a vacuum. The ten-dimensional spherically symmetric potential is examined, and I determine conditions under which the formation of virtual black holes is forbidden. The example M^4 times S^6 is still plagued by the semi -classical instability, but this result does not hold in general. The requirement that virtual black holes be forbidden provides a

  16. Cosmology with dynamical extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Joel K.

    Nearly every attempt to unify the fundamental forces incorporates the idea of compact extra dimensions. The notion was introduced by Kaluza and Klein in the 1920s and is an essential part of contemporary string theory and M-theory. In most treatments the extra dimensions are static. We consider the consequences of extra dimensions with time-varying radii. The radii are modeled by light scalar fields. These may have unusual properties which produce observable effects, such as non-canonical kinetic energies, couplings to matter and radiation, and non-minimal coupling to gravity. Extra dimensions may be responsible for dark energy in the late universe. The simplest model of dark energy is characterized by its equation of state. We show that constraints placed on realistic models by the universality of free fall, variation of fundamental constants and metric tests of gravity are often stricter than bounds on the equation of state. Testing the equivalence principle maybe an effective way of distinguishing some quintessence models from a cosmological constant. In certain dark energy models the speed of sound is much less than the speed of light. We calculate how this affects the cosmic microwave background and show that the speed of sound may be measurable, provided dark energy is sufficiently dense at decoupling. This is another possible signature of quintessence. Dynamical extra dimensions may have consequences for the early universe. In the cyclic model, the universe is described in terms of a series of contractions and expansions of an extra dimension. The big bang is preceded by a big crunch and quantum fluctuations of the scalar field produce structure in universe. We consider how the fluctuations evolve and build over many cycles and show that there are no observable instabilities or adverse effects. In the cyclic model extra dimensions act as both dark energy and as an agent to cause contraction and a big crunch. Previous theorems suggested that contraction

  17. Applications and production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jason Howard

    Carbon nanotubes, a recently discovered form of carbon fiber with structural perfection similar to that of a fullerene molecule, have interesting electronic, chemical and mechanical properties due to their size and structure. Nanotubes have great potential as a bulk material for strong, lightweight composite materials, and as individual nano-scale tools or devices. Initial work on applications with individual multiwalled nanotubes as field emission sources and scanning force microscopy tips is described. The nanotubes display intriguing field emission behavior interpreted as the nanotube unraveling under the influence of the electric field. The unraveling process is believed to result in facile field emission from linear atomic carbon chains at the end of the nanotube. Such atomic wires represent an excellent field emitter. The work on multiwalled nanotube SFM tips was equally encouraging. The high aspect ratio of the nanotube allows it to image deep trenches inaccessible to commercially available Si pyramidal tips, and it reduces the interaction with the ambient water layer on the sample which perturbs image quality. The most remarkable advantage of nanotube SFM tips is a result of their mechanical properties. It was found that the nanotubes will remain rigid during normal imaging, but conveniently buckle to the side if circumstances arise which create large forces known to damage the tip and sample. This feature makes the tip more durable than Si tips, and is especially important for soft biological samples. In these two applications, as well as others, and in the measurements of novel nanotube properties, high quality, small diameter (0.5 to 2 nm) diameter single-walled nanotubes are most interesting. Such material can be produced slowly and in small amounts by catalytic arc vaporization and catalytic laser vaporization of graphite. It is well known that nanotubes can be mass produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), but the product consists only

  18. Carbon-Nanotube Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Wong, Eric; Schlecht, Erich; Hunt, Brian; Siegel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Schottky diodes based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are being developed as essential components of the next generation of submillimeter-wave sensors and sources. Initial performance predictions have shown that the performance characteristics of these devices can exceed those of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes that have been the components of choice for room-temperature submillimeter-wave sensors for more than 50 years. For state-of-the-art Schottky diodes used as detectors at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz, the inherent parasitic capacitances associated with their semiconductor junction areas and the resistances associated with low electron mobilities limit achievable sensitivity. The performance of such a detector falls off approximately exponentially with frequency above 500 GHz. Moreover, when used as frequency multipliers for generating signals, state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes exhibit extremely low efficiencies, generally putting out only micro-watts of power at frequencies up to 1.5 THz. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes can be overcome by exploiting the unique electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A single-walled carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on its chirality, and exhibits high electron mobility (recently reported to be approx.= 2x10(exp 5)sq cm/V-s) and low parasitic capacitance. Because of the narrowness of nanotubes, Schottky diodes based on carbon nanotubes have ultra-small junction areas (of the order of a few square nanometers) and consequent junction capacitances of the order of 10(exp -18) F, which translates to cutoff frequency >5 THz. Because the turn-on power levels of these devices are very low (of the order of nano-watts), the input power levels needed for pumping local oscillators containing these devices should be lower than those needed for local oscillators containing state-of-the-art solid

  19. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  20. Development of Carbon-Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a short discussion of one company's effort to develop composites of carbon nanotubes in epoxy and other polymer matrices. The focus of the discussion is on the desirability of chemically modifying carbon nanotubes to overcome their inherent chemical nonreactivity and thereby enable the formation of strong chemical bonds between nanotubes and epoxies (or other polymeric matrix materials or their monomeric precursors). The chemical modification is effected in a process in which discrete functional groups are covalently attached to the nanotube surfaces. The functionalization process was proposed by the company and demonstrated in practice for the first time during this development effort. The covalently attached functional groups are capable of reacting with the epoxy or other matrix resin to form covalent bonds. Furthermore, the company uses this process to chemically modify the nanotube surfaces, affording tunable adhesion to polymers and solubility in select solvents. Flat-sheet composites containing functionalized nanotubes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.