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Sample records for altered nanotube dimension

  1. Collective diffusion in carbon nanotubes: Crossover between one dimension and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pei-Rong; Xu, Zhi-Cheng; Gu, Yu; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2016-08-01

    Using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, we study the collective diffusion of helium in carbon nanotubes. The results show that the collective diffusion coefficient (CDC) increases with the dimension of the channel. The collective diffusion coefficient has a linear relationship with the temperature and the concentration. There exist a ballistic transport in short carbon nanotubes and a diffusive transport in long carbon nanotubes. Fick’s law has an invalid region in the nanoscale channel. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11004082 and 11291240477), the Natural Science Foundation of Guangdong Province, China (Grant No. 2014A030313367), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, Jinan University (Grant No. 11614341).

  2. Image formation mechanisms in scanning electron microscopy of carbon nanotubes, and retrieval of their intrinsic dimensions.

    PubMed

    Jackman, H; Krakhmalev, P; Svensson, K

    2013-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the image formation mechanisms that are involved in the imaging of carbon nanotubes with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). We show how SEM images can be modelled by accounting for surface enhancement effects together with the absorption coefficient for secondary electrons, and the electron-probe shape. Images can then be deconvoluted, enabling retrieval of the intrinsic nanotube dimensions. Accurate estimates of their dimensions can thereby be obtained even for structures that are comparable to the electron-probe size (on the order of 2 nm). We also present a simple and robust model for obtaining the outer diameter of nanotubes without any detailed knowledge about the electron-probe shape.

  3. Dimension and morphology controlled fabrication of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes by electrochemical anodization method

    SciTech Connect

    Tamilselvan, A.; Balakumar, S.

    2015-06-24

    We report the fabrication of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotubes by electrochemical anodization of titanium foils using fluoride-based electrolytes such as ethylene glycol, diethylene glycol and glycerol. The effects of anodization voltage, time and electrolytes on the morphology and dimensions (length and pore diameter) of the tubes were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM). On increasing anodization voltage and time, the tube length and pore diameter were varied. In addition to this, various tubes morphologies such as circular and hexagonal structures were obtained under different electrolytic conditions. The Raman spectroscopy studies revealed the anatase phase of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes.

  4. Fermionic condensate and Casimir densities in the presence of compact dimensions with applications to nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Elizalde, E.; Odintsov, S. D.; Saharian, A. A.

    2011-05-15

    We investigate the fermionic condensate and the vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor for a massive fermionic field in the geometry of two parallel plates on the background of Minkowski spacetime with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions, in the presence of a constant gauge field. Bag boundary conditions are imposed on the plates and periodicity conditions with arbitrary phases are considered along the compact dimensions. The nontrivial topology of the background spacetime leads to an Aharonov-Bohm effect for the vacuum expectation values induced by the gauge field. The fermionic condensate and the expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor are periodic functions of the magnetic flux with period equal to the flux quantum. The boundary induced parts in the fermionic condensate and the vacuum energy density are negative, with independence of the phases in the periodicity conditions and of the value of the gauge potential. Interaction forces between the plates are thus always attractive. However, in physical situations where the quantum field is confined to the region between the plates, the pure topological part contributes as well, and then the resulting force can be either attractive or repulsive, depending on the specific phases encoded in the periodicity conditions along the compact dimensions, and on the gauge potential, too. Applications of the general formulas to cylindrical carbon nanotubes are considered, within the framework of a Dirac-like theory for the electronic states in graphene. In the absence of a magnetic flux, the energy density for semiconducting nanotubes is always negative. For metallic nanotubes the energy density is positive for long tubes and negative for short ones. The resulting Casimir forces acting on the edges of the nanotube are attractive for short tubes with independence of the tube chirality. The sign of the force for long nanotubes can be controlled by tuning the magnetic flux

  5. Alterations of papilla dimensions after orthodontic closure of the maxillary midline diastema: a retrospective longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate alterations of papilla dimensions after orthodontic closure of the diastema between maxillary central incisors. Methods Sixty patients who had a visible diastema between maxillary central incisors that had been closed by orthodontic approximation were selected for this study. Various papilla dimensions were assessed on clinical photographs and study models before the orthodontic treatment and at the follow-up examination after closure of the diastema. Influences of the variables assessed before orthodontic treatment on the alterations of papilla height (PH) and papilla base thickness (PBT) were evaluated by univariate regression analysis. To analyze potential influences of the 3-dimensional papilla dimensions before orthodontic treatment on the alterations of PH and PBT, a multiple regression model was formulated including the 3-dimensional papilla dimensions as predictor variables. Results On average, PH decreased by 0.80 mm and PBT increased after orthodontic closure of the diastema (P<0.01). Univariate regression analysis revealed that the PH (P=0.002) and PBT (P=0.047) before orthodontic treatment influenced the alteration of PH. With respect to the alteration of PBT, the diastema width (P=0.045) and PBT (P=0.000) were found to be influential factors. PBT before the orthodontic treatment significantly influenced the alteration of PBT in the multiple regression model. Conclusions PH decreased but PBT increased after orthodontic closure of the diastema. The papilla dimensions before orthodontic treatment influenced the alterations of PH and PBT after closure of the diastema. The PBT increased more when the diastema width before the orthodontic treatment was larger. PMID:27382507

  6. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G; Orji, Ndubuisi G; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  7. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-07-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips.

  8. Evaluation of carbon nanotube probes in critical dimension atomic force microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinho; Park, Byong Chon; Ahn, Sang Jung; Kim, Dal-Hyun; Lyou, Joon; Dixson, Ronald G.; Orji, Ndubuisi G.; Fu, Joseph; Vorburger, Theodore V.

    2016-01-01

    The decreasing size of semiconductor features and the increasing structural complexity of advanced devices have placed continuously greater demands on manufacturing metrology, arising both from the measurement challenges of smaller feature sizes and the growing requirement to characterize structures in more than just a single critical dimension. For scanning electron microscopy, this has resulted in increasing sophistication of imaging models. For critical dimension atomic force microscopes (CD-AFMs), this has resulted in the need for smaller and more complex tips. Carbon nanotube (CNT) tips have thus been the focus of much interest and effort by a number of researchers. However, there have been significant issues surrounding both the manufacture and use of CNT tips. Specifically, the growth or attachment of CNTs to AFM cantilevers has been a challenge to the fabrication of CNT tips, and the flexibility and resultant bending artifacts have presented challenges to using CNT tips. The Korea Research Institute for Standards and Science (KRISS) has invested considerable effort in the controlled fabrication of CNT tips and is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology on the application of CNT tips for CD-AFM. Progress by KRISS on the precise control of CNT orientation, length, and end modification, using manipulation and focused ion beam processes, has allowed us to implement ball-capped CNT tips and bent CNT tips for CD-AFM. Using two different generations of CD-AFM instruments, we have evaluated these tip types by imaging a line/space grating and a programmed line edge roughness specimen. We concluded that these CNTs are capable of scanning the profiles of these structures, including re-entrant sidewalls, but there remain important challenges to address. These challenges include tighter control of tip geometry and careful optimization of scan parameters and algorithms for using CNT tips. PMID:27840664

  9. Study of modification methods of probes for critical-dimension atomic-force microscopy by the deposition of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ageev, O. A.; Bykov, Al. V.; Kolomiitsev, A. S.; Konoplev, B. G.; Rubashkina, M. V.; Smirnov, V. A.; Tsukanova, O. G.

    2015-12-15

    The results of an experimental study of the modification of probes for critical-dimension atomicforce microscopy (CD-AFM) by the deposition of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to improve the accuracy with which the surface roughness of vertical walls is determined in submicrometer structures are presented. Methods of the deposition of an individual CNT onto the tip of an AFM probe via mechanical and electrostatic interaction between the probe and an array of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) are studied. It is shown that, when the distance between the AFM tip and a VACNT array is 1 nm and the applied voltage is within the range 20–30 V, an individual carbon nanotube is deposited onto the tip. On the basis of the results obtained in the study, a probe with a carbon nanotube on its tip (CNT probe) with a radius of 7 nm and an aspect ratio of 1:15 is formed. Analysis of the CNT probe demonstrates that its use improves the resolution and accuracy of AFM measurements, compared with the commercial probe, and also makes it possible to determine the roughness of the vertical walls of high-aspect structures by CD-AFM. The results obtained can be used to develop technological processes for the fabrication and reconditioning of special AFM probes, including those for CD-AFM, and procedures for the interoperational express monitoring of technological process parameters in the manufacturing of elements for micro- and nanoelectronics and micro- and nanosystem engineering.

  10. Dependence of the degree of reinforcement of polymer/carbon nanotubes nanocomposites on the nanofiller dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikitaev, A. K.; Kozlov, G. V.

    2015-05-01

    The dependence of the degree of reinforcement of polymethylmethacrylate/carbon nanotubes on the nanofiller content at ultrasmall concentrations of the latter is investigated. It is shown that the extreme character of this dependence is determined by the structural features of the nanofiller. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes gives a positive effect only below their percolation threshold.

  11. Does altering the occlusal vertical dimension produce temporomandibular disorders? A literature review.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Hay, I; Okeson, J P

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this review was to present a comprehensive review of the scientific evidence available in the literature regarding the effect of altering the occlusal vertical dimens-ion (OVD) on producing temporomandibular disorders. The authors conducted a PubMed search with the following search terms 'temporoman-dibular disorders', 'occlusal vertical dimension', 'stomatognatic system', 'masticatory muscles' and 'skeletal muscle'. Bibliographies of all retrieved articles were consulted for additional publications. Hand-searched publications from 1938 were included. The literature review revealed a lack of well-designed studies. Traditional beliefs have been based on case reports and anecdotal opinions rather than on well-controlled clinical trials. The available evidence is weak and seems to indicate that the stomatognathic system has the ability to adapt rapidly to moderate changes in occlusal vertical dimension (OVD). Nevertheless, it should be taken into consideration that in some patients mild transient symptoms may occur, but they are most often self-limiting and without major consequence. In conclusion, there is no indication that permanent alteration in the OVD will produce long-lasting TMD symptoms. However, additional studies are needed.

  12. Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N; Satishkumar, B C; Govindaraj, A; Nath, M

    2001-02-16

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered soon after the successful laboratory synthesis of fullerenes. Since their discovery in 1991, there has been intensive research activity in the area of carbon nanotubes, not only because of their fascinating structural features and properties, but also because of their potential technological applications. There is increasing experimental evidence to show that carbon nanotubes may find use in nanoelectronic devices, displays, and in hydrogen storage. In this article, we discuss various important aspects related to the synthesis, structure, characterization, and mechanism of formation of multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a presentation of the important electronic, mechanical, hydrogen storage, and other properties of the nanotubes. Doping, as well as other chemical manipulations with boron and nitrogen, bring about significant changes in the properties of the nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes also serve as useful templates to make other nanostructures. Layered metal chalcogenides, boron nitride, and other materials form nanotubes and provide considerable scope for study.

  13. Histopathological alterations in the gills of Nile tilapia exposed to carbofuran and multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Campos-Garcia, Janaína; Martinez, Diego Stéfani Teodoro; Rezende, Karina Fernandes Oliveira; da Silva, José Roberto Machado Cunha; Alves, Oswaldo Luiz; Barbieri, Edison

    2016-11-01

    Carbofuran is a nematicide insecticide with a broad spectrum of action. Carbofuran has noxious effects in several species and has been banned in the USA and Europe; however, it is still used in Brazil. Aquatic organisms are not only exposed to pesticides but also to manufactured nanoparticles, and the potential interaction of these compounds therefore requires investigation. The aim of this study was to examine the histopathological alterations in the gills of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to determine possible effects of exposure to carbofuran, nitric acid-treated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (HNO3-MWCNTs) and the combination of carbofuran with nanotubes. Juvenile fish were exposed to different concentrations of carbofuran (0.1, 0.5, 2.0, 4.0 and 8.0mg/L), different concentrations of HNO3-MWCNTs (0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mg/L) or different concentrations of carbofuran (0.1, 0.5, 2.0, 4.0 and 8.0mg/L) with 1.0mg/L of HNO3-MWCNTs. After 24h of exposure, the animals were removed from the aquarium, the spinal cord was transversely sectioned, and the second gill arch was removed for histological evaluation. Common histological changes included dislocation of the epithelial cells, hyperplasia of the epithelial cells along the secondary lamellae, aneurism, and dilation and disarrangement of the capillaries. All the groups exposed to carbofuran demonstrated a dose-dependent correlation in the Histological Alteration Index; the values found for carbofuran and carbon nanotubes were up to 25% greater than for carbofuran alone. This result indicates an interaction between these toxicants, with enhanced ecotoxic effects. This work contributes to the understanding of the environmental impacts of nanomaterials on aquatic organisms, which is necessary for the sustainable development of nanotechnologies.

  14. Titania nanotubes with adjustable dimensions for drug reservoir sites and enhanced cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Çalışkan, Nazlı; Bayram, Cem; Erdal, Ebru; Karahaliloğlu, Zeynep; Denkbaş, Emir Baki

    2014-02-01

    This study aims to generate a bactericidal agent releasing surface via nanotube layer on titanium metal and to investigate how aspect ratio of nanotubes affects drug elution time and cell proliferation. Titania nanotube layers were generated on metal surfaces by anodic oxidation at various voltage and time parameters. Gentamicin loading was carried out via simple pipetting and the samples were tested against S. aureus for the efficacy of the applied modification. Drug releasing time and cell proliferation were also tested in vitro. Titania nanotube layers with varying diameters and lengths were prepared after anodization and anodizing duration was found as the most effective parameter for amount of loaded drug and drug releasing time. Drug elution lasted up to 4 days after anodizing for 80 min of the samples, whereas release completed in 24 h when the samples were anodized for 20 min. All processed samples had bactericidal properties against S. aureus organism except unmodified titanium, which was also subjected to drug incorporation step. The anodization also enhanced water wettability and cell adhesion results. Anodic oxidation is an effective surface modification to enhance tissue-implant interactions and also resultant titania layer can act as a drug reservoir for the release of bactericidal agents. The use of implants as local drug eluting devices is promising but further in vivo testing is required.

  15. Alterations of mouse lung tissue dimensions during processing for morphometry: a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Ochs, Matthias

    2014-02-15

    Preservation of original tissue dimensions is an essential prerequisite for morphometric studies. Shrinkage occurring during tissue processing for histology may severely influence the appearance of structures seen under the microscope and stereological calculations. Therefore, shrinkage has to be avoided so that estimates obtained by application of unbiased stereology are indeed unbiased. The present study investigates the alterations of tissue dimensions of mouse lung samples during processing for histology. Different fixatives as well as embedding protocols are considered. Mouse lungs were fixed by instillation of either 4% formalin or a mixture of 1.5% glutaraldehyde/1.5% formaldehyde. Tissue blocks were sampled according to principles of stereology for embedding in paraffin, glycol methacrylate without treatment with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate, and glycol methacrylate including treatment with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate before dehydration. Shrinkage was investigated by stereological measurements of dimensional changes of tissue cut faces. Results show a shrinkage of the cut face areas of roughly 40% per lung during paraffin embedding, 30% during "simple" glycol methacrylate embedding, and <3% during osmium tetroxide/uranyl acetate/glycol methacrylate embedding. Furthermore, the superiority of the glutaraldehyde-containing fixative regarding shrinkage is demonstrated. In conclusion, the use of a glutaraldehyde-containing fixative and embedding in glycol methacrylate with previous treatment of the samples with osmium tetroxide and uranyl acetate before dehydration is recommended for stereological studies of the mouse lung.

  16. Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays with controllable dimensions on glass substrates for photocatalytic applications.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee Kheng; Kumar, Manippady K; An, Wen Wen; Gao, Han

    2010-02-01

    Transparent, well-aligned TiO(2) nanotube arrays (NTAs) with controllable dimensions are grown on glass substrates via atomic layer deposition (ALD) of TiO(2) onto free-standing porous anodic alumina (PAA) templates. Photodegradation of aqueous methylene blue (MB) solution and solid stearic acid (SA) film using TiO(2) NTAs of various wall thicknesses are investigated. The Pd functionalized TiO(2) NTAs, with a wall thickness of 15 nm and height of 200 nm, has the highest photodegradation efficiency at 76% after 4 h of UV irradiation. These functionalized NTAs are able to photodegrade MB molecules completely as no obvious demethylated byproducts are observed during the process. It also demonstrates excellent photocatalytic activity for solid contaminants such as SA film. By using the ALD technique, the nanotube wall thickness can be precisely controlled so that it is sufficiently thin to be transparent while sufficiently thick for excellent photocatalytic performances. The transparent TiO(2) NTAs on glass substrates with excellent photocatalytic properties might have potential applications in self-cleaning coating, transparent electronics, and solar cells.

  17. Nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    LEONARD, FRANCOIS; KIENLE, DIEGO; & STEWART, DEREK

    2007-09-13

    This is a source code to calculate the current-voltage characteristics, the charge distribution and the electrostatic potential in carbon nanotube devices. The code utilizes the non-equilibrium Green's function method, implemented in a tight-binding scheme, to calculate the charge distribution and the energy-dependent transmission function, from which the current or the conductance are obtained. The electrostatic potential is obtained by solving Poisson's equation on a grid with boundary conditions on the electrodes, and at other interfaces. Self-consistency between the charge and the electrostatic potential is achieved using a linear mixing method. Different versions of the code allow the modeling of different types of nanotube devices: Version 1.0: Modeling of carbon nanotube electronic devices with cylindrical symmetry Version 1.1: Modeling of planar carbon nanotube electronic devices Version 1.2: Modeling of photocurrent in carbon nanotube devices

  18. A meta-analysis of carbon nanotube pulmonary toxicity studies--how physical dimensions and impurities affect the toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gernand, Jeremy M; Casman, Elizabeth A

    2014-03-01

    This article presents a regression-tree-based meta-analysis of rodent pulmonary toxicity studies of uncoated, nonfunctionalized carbon nanotube (CNT) exposure. The resulting analysis provides quantitative estimates of the contribution of CNT attributes (impurities, physical dimensions, and aggregation) to pulmonary toxicity indicators in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid: neutrophil and macrophage count, and lactate dehydrogenase and total protein concentrations. The method employs classification and regression tree (CART) models, techniques that are relatively insensitive to data defects that impair other types of regression analysis: high dimensionality, nonlinearity, correlated variables, and significant quantities of missing values. Three types of analysis are presented: the RT, the random forest (RF), and a random-forest-based dose-response model. The RT shows the best single model supported by all the data and typically contains a small number of variables. The RF shows how much variance reduction is associated with every variable in the data set. The dose-response model is used to isolate the effects of CNT attributes from the CNT dose, showing the shift in the dose-response caused by the attribute across the measured range of CNT doses. It was found that the CNT attributes that contribute the most to pulmonary toxicity were metallic impurities (cobalt significantly increased observed toxicity, while other impurities had mixed effects), CNT length (negatively correlated with most toxicity indicators), CNT diameter (significantly positively associated with toxicity), and aggregate size (negatively correlated with cell damage indicators and positively correlated with immune response indicators). Increasing CNT N2 -BET-specific surface area decreased toxicity indicators.

  19. Evaluation of dynamically dimensioned search algorithm for optimizing SWAT by altering sampling distributions and searching range

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary advantage of Dynamically Dimensioned Search algorithm (DDS) is that it outperforms many other optimization techniques in both convergence speed and the ability in searching for parameter sets that satisfy statistical guidelines while requiring only one algorithm parameter (perturbation f...

  20. Fractal Dimension Change Point Model for Hydrothermal Alteration Anomalies in Silk Road Economic Belt, the Beishan Area, Gansu, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, H. H.; Wang, Y. L.; Ren, G. L.; LI, J. Q.; Gao, T.; Yang, M.; Yang, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    Remote sensing plays an important role in mineral exploration of “One Belt One Road” plan. One of its applications is extracting and locating hydrothermal alteration zones that are related to mines. At present, the extracting method for alteration anomalies from principal component image mainly relies on the data's normal distribution, without considering the nonlinear characteristics of geological anomaly. In this study, a Fractal Dimension Change Point Model (FDCPM), calculated by the self-similarity and mutability of alteration anomalies, is employed to quantitatively acquire the critical threshold of alteration anomalies. The realization theory and access mechanism of the model are elaborated by an experiment with ASTER data in Beishan mineralization belt, also the results are compared with traditional method (De-Interfered Anomalous Principal Component Thresholding Technique, DIAPCTT). The results show that the findings produced by FDCPM are agree with well with a mounting body of evidence from different perspectives, with the extracting accuracy over 80%, indicating that FDCPM is an effective extracting method for remote sensing alteration anomalies, and could be used as an useful tool for mineral exploration in similar areas in Silk Road Economic Belt.

  1. Carbon nanotube-based mode-locked wavelength-switchable fiber laser via net gain cross section alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latif, A. A.; Mohamad, H.; Abu Bakar, M. H.; Muhammad, F. D.; Mahdi, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    We have proposed and demonstrated a carbon nanotube-based mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser with switchable wavelength in the C-band wavelength region by varying the net gain cross section of erbium. The carbon nanotube is coated on a tapered fiber to form the saturable absorber for the purpose of mode-locking by exploiting the concept of evanescent field interaction on the tapered fiber with the carbon nanotube in a ring cavity configuration. The propagation loss is adjusted by inducing macrobend losses of the optical fiber in the cavity through a fiber spooling technique. Since the spooling radius can be gradually adjusted to achieve continuous tuning of attenuation, this passive tuning approach can be an alternative to optical tunable attenuator, with freedom of external device integration into the laser cavity. Based on this alteration, the net gain cross section of the laser system can be tailored to three different lasing wavelength ranges; 1533, 1560 nm and both (1533 and 1560 nm) with the minimum pulse duration of 734 fs. The proposed design is simple and stable with high beam quality and good reliability for multiple applications.

  2. [Vertical dimension in the OSAHS in adults: an example of functional alteration].

    PubMed

    Raskin, S; Limme, M

    2003-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea and hypoapnea syndrome (OSAHS) is important to orthodontists for several reasons. The authors, after defining OSAHS and describing it briefly, review the literature dealing with the cranio-facial morphology of apnea patients. They report the results of their cephalometric study, which is based on an architectural analysis of 274 patients. Their facial characteristics, especially vertical dimension, are consistent with those displayed by mouth breathing children. Changes in respiratory functioning modify the mechanical behavior and the structures of the upper airways. Osseous tissues also show signs caused by these changes. The authors propose an etiopathogenic model.

  3. Systemic distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a novel model: alteration of biochemical parameters, metabolic functions, liver accumulation, and inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Elisa; Girardello, Rossana; Bruno, Antonino; Manni, Isabella; Gini, Elisabetta; Pagani, Arianna; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Ivaldi, Federico; Congiu, Terenzio; De Stefano, Daniela; Piaggio, Giulia; de Eguileor, Magda; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in several industrial applications raises concerns on their potential toxicity due to factors such as tissue penetrance, small dimensions, and biopersistence. Using an in vivo model for CNT environmental exposure, mimicking CNT exposition at the workplace, we previously found that CNTs rapidly enter and disseminate in the organism, initially accumulating in the lungs and brain and later reaching the liver and kidneys via the bloodstream in CD1 mice. Here, we monitored and traced the accumulation of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs), administered systemically in mice, in different organs and the subsequent biological responses. Using the novel in vivo model, MITO-Luc bioluminescence reporter mice, we found that SWCNTs induce systemic cell proliferation, indicating a dynamic response of cells of both bone marrow and the immune system. We then examined metabolic (water/food consumption and dejections), functional (serum enzymes), and morphological (organs and tissues) alterations in CD1 mice treated with SWCNTs, using metabolic cages, performing serum analyses, and applying histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural (transmission electron microscopy) methods. We observed a transient accumulation of SWCNTs in the lungs, spleen, and kidneys of CD1 mice exposed to SWCNTs. A dose- and time-dependent accumulation was found in the liver, associated with increases in levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and bilirubinemia, which are metabolic markers associated with liver damage. Our data suggest that hepatic accumulation of SWCNTs associated with liver damage results in an M1 macrophage-driven inflammation. PMID:27621623

  4. Systemic distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a novel model: alteration of biochemical parameters, metabolic functions, liver accumulation, and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Principi, Elisa; Girardello, Rossana; Bruno, Antonino; Manni, Isabella; Gini, Elisabetta; Pagani, Arianna; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Ivaldi, Federico; Congiu, Terenzio; De Stefano, Daniela; Piaggio, Giulia; de Eguileor, Magda; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana

    The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in several industrial applications raises concerns on their potential toxicity due to factors such as tissue penetrance, small dimensions, and biopersistence. Using an in vivo model for CNT environmental exposure, mimicking CNT exposition at the workplace, we previously found that CNTs rapidly enter and disseminate in the organism, initially accumulating in the lungs and brain and later reaching the liver and kidneys via the bloodstream in CD1 mice. Here, we monitored and traced the accumulation of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs), administered systemically in mice, in different organs and the subsequent biological responses. Using the novel in vivo model, MITO-Luc bioluminescence reporter mice, we found that SWCNTs induce systemic cell proliferation, indicating a dynamic response of cells of both bone marrow and the immune system. We then examined metabolic (water/food consumption and dejections), functional (serum enzymes), and morphological (organs and tissues) alterations in CD1 mice treated with SWCNTs, using metabolic cages, performing serum analyses, and applying histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural (transmission electron microscopy) methods. We observed a transient accumulation of SWCNTs in the lungs, spleen, and kidneys of CD1 mice exposed to SWCNTs. A dose- and time-dependent accumulation was found in the liver, associated with increases in levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and bilirubinemia, which are metabolic markers associated with liver damage. Our data suggest that hepatic accumulation of SWCNTs associated with liver damage results in an M1 macrophage-driven inflammation.

  5. Theory of B(2)O and BeB(2) nanotubes: new semiconductors and metals in one dimension.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peihong; Crespi, Vincent H

    2002-07-29

    We describe two new boron-based nanotubes: B(2)O and BeB(2). Both are isoelectronic to graphite, have reasonable curvature energies, and have already been made in their bulk planar forms. The lowest energy allotrope of planar single-layer B(2)O is a semiconductor with a moderate band gap. The local density approximation band gap of the corresponding (3,0) B(2)O nanotube [similar in size to (9,0) carbon nanotube tube] is direct and around 1.6 eV, within a range inaccessible to previous C or BN nanotubes. Single-layer BeB(2) has a fascinating structure: the Be atoms rest above the boron hexagonal faces, nearly coplanar to the boron sheet. The unusual K-point pi-pi(*) Fermi-level degeneracy of graphite survives, while a new nearly pointlike Fermi surface appears at the M point. As a result, BeB(2) nanotubes are uniformly metallic.

  6. Enhancement of Dimension Uniformity of Wet-Etched Thick Insulator Holes in Triode Carbon Nanotube Field-Emission Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsiao-Fen; Hsiue, Ging-Ho; Liu, Chin-Yh; Chen, Kuo-Feng

    2008-12-01

    A triode structure carbon nanotube field-emission display was fabricated using the thick-film process. The critical dimensional uniformity of wet-etched thick insulator holes was enhanced by changing the wet etching mechanism from vertical dip-etching to horizontal spray-etching. The profile of the insulator holes fabricated using the new etcher was similar to anisotropic. After optimizing the operation conditions of the new etcher, the dimensional uniformity of the insulator holes increased to 97.7%. The optimal concentration of etchant was 2.2 wt % for achieving the least side etching of the insulator holes. The carbon nanotube paste was pattern-printed into the insulator holes. The uniform size of the insulator holes implied that the carbon nanotube distribution was similarly among the insulator holes. This result showed an improved uniform field emission image over the panel from 59 to 83.85%.

  7. Inorganic nanotube nanofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong

    The ability to manipulate charge carriers (electrons and holes) in metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) has revolutionized how information is processed and stored, and created the modern digital age. Introducing direct field effect modulation in fluidic systems would enable the manipulation of ionic and molecular species at a similar level and even logic operation. Due to strong Debye screening in aqueous solutions, field effect manipulation of ion transport arises only in systems whose dimensions are comparable to the critical Debye Length, i.e. in nanofluidic systems. Nanofluidics has already been explored in various cases, e.g. biological channel proteins and artificial solid-state nanopores. All these two terminal systems usually transport the ions the same way as passive electron conduction in a resistor. My work is aimed at developing nanotube nanofluidic units with a third terminal that can electrically turn on/off and control ion and biomolecule transport. Moreover, the systematic study on "doping" and transient phenomena can provide rich information to assess the electrokinetics theory and fluidic physics in nanoscale. Silica nanotubes were synthesized by oxidation/etching approach using vertical silicon nanowires as templates. A single nanotube was integrated into a metal-oxide-solution field effect transistor (MOSolFET) by interfacing with two microfluidic channels and a metallic gate electrode. Concentration dependence of ionic conductance through single nanotubes revealed the emergence of unipolar environment at low ionic strength regime. In this case, ionic conductance is only associated with majority ions and governed by surface potentials and charge densities. By applying a gate voltage, the ionic conductance can be quickly modulated. The gate voltages alter the surface potential of the silica nanotubes via capacitive coupling through the nanotube wall and the electrical double layer. In a negatively charged silica nanotube

  8. A mutualistic endophyte alters the niche dimensions of its host plant

    PubMed Central

    Kazenel, Melanie R.; Debban, Catherine L.; Ranelli, Luciana; Hendricks, Will Q.; Chung, Y. Anny; Pendergast, Thomas H.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Young, Carolyn A.; Rudgers, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Mutualisms can play important roles in influencing species coexistence and determining community composition. However, few studies have tested whether such interactions can affect species distributions by altering the niches of partner species. In subalpine meadows of the Rocky Mountains, USA, we explored whether the presence of a fungal endophyte (genus Epichloë) may shift the niche of its partner plant, marsh bluegrass (Poa leptocoma) relative to a closely related but endophyte-free grass species, nodding bluegrass (Poa reflexa). Using observations and a 3-year field experiment, we tested two questions: (i) Do P. leptocoma and P. reflexa occupy different ecological niches? and (ii) Does endophyte presence affect the relative fitness of P. leptocoma versus P. reflexa in the putative niches of these grass species? The two species were less likely to co-occur than expected by chance. Specifically, P. leptocoma grew closer to water sources and in wetter soils than P. reflexa, and also had higher root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi. Endophyte-symbiotic P. leptocoma seeds germinated with greater frequency in P. leptocoma niches relative to P. reflexa niches, whereas neither endophyte-free (experimentally removed) P. leptocoma seeds nor P. reflexa seeds showed differential germination between the two niche types. Thus, endophyte presence constrained the germination and early survival of host plants to microsites occupied by P. leptocoma. However, endophyte-symbiotic P. leptocoma ultimately showed greater growth than endophyte-free plants across all microsites, indicating a net benefit of the symbiosis at this life history stage. Differential effects of endophyte symbiosis on different host life history stages may thus contribute to niche partitioning between the two congeneric plant species. Our study therefore identifies a symbiotic relationship as a potential mechanism facilitating the coexistence of two species, suggesting that symbiont effects on host niche may

  9. A mutualistic endophyte alters the niche dimensions of its host plant.

    PubMed

    Kazenel, Melanie R; Debban, Catherine L; Ranelli, Luciana; Hendricks, Will Q; Chung, Y Anny; Pendergast, Thomas H; Charlton, Nikki D; Young, Carolyn A; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2015-01-19

    Mutualisms can play important roles in influencing species coexistence and determining community composition. However, few studies have tested whether such interactions can affect species distributions by altering the niches of partner species. In subalpine meadows of the Rocky Mountains, USA, we explored whether the presence of a fungal endophyte (genus Epichloë) may shift the niche of its partner plant, marsh bluegrass (Poa leptocoma) relative to a closely related but endophyte-free grass species, nodding bluegrass (Poa reflexa). Using observations and a 3-year field experiment, we tested two questions: (i) Do P. leptocoma and P. reflexa occupy different ecological niches? and (ii) Does endophyte presence affect the relative fitness of P. leptocoma versus P. reflexa in the putative niches of these grass species? The two species were less likely to co-occur than expected by chance. Specifically, P. leptocoma grew closer to water sources and in wetter soils than P. reflexa, and also had higher root colonization by mycorrhizal fungi. Endophyte-symbiotic P. leptocoma seeds germinated with greater frequency in P. leptocoma niches relative to P. reflexa niches, whereas neither endophyte-free (experimentally removed) P. leptocoma seeds nor P. reflexa seeds showed differential germination between the two niche types. Thus, endophyte presence constrained the germination and early survival of host plants to microsites occupied by P. leptocoma. However, endophyte-symbiotic P. leptocoma ultimately showed greater growth than endophyte-free plants across all microsites, indicating a net benefit of the symbiosis at this life history stage. Differential effects of endophyte symbiosis on different host life history stages may thus contribute to niche partitioning between the two congeneric plant species. Our study therefore identifies a symbiotic relationship as a potential mechanism facilitating the coexistence of two species, suggesting that symbiont effects on host niche may

  10. Confinement by carbon nanotubes drastically alters the boiling and critical behavior of water droplets.

    PubMed

    Chaban, Vitaly V; Prezhdo, Victor V; Prezhdo, Oleg V

    2012-03-27

    Vapor pressure grows rapidly above the boiling temperature, and past the critical point liquid droplets disintegrate. Our atomistic simulations show that this sequence of events is reversed inside carbon nanotubes (CNT). Droplets disintegrate first and at low temperature, while pressure remains low. The droplet disintegration temperature is independent of the CNT diameter. In contrast, depending on CNT diameter, a temperature that is much higher than the bulk boiling temperature is required to raise the internal pressure. The control over pressure by CNT size can be useful for therapeutic drug delivery.

  11. Large-Scale Fabrication of Carbon Nanotube Probe Tips For Atomic Force Microscopy Critical Dimension Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi Laura; Cassell, Alan M.; Stevens, Ramsey M.; Meyyappan, Meyya; Li, Jun; Han, Jie; Liu, Hongbing; Chao, Gordon

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) probe tips for atomic force microscopy (AFM) offer several advantages over Si/Si3N4 probe tips, including improved resolution, shape, and mechanical properties. This viewgraph presentation discusses these advantages, and the drawbacks of existing methods for fabricating CNT probe tips for AFM. The presentation introduces a bottom up wafer scale fabrication method for CNT probe tips which integrates catalyst nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon cantilever microfabrication technology. This method makes mass production of CNT AFM probe tips feasible, and can be applied to the fabrication of other nanodevices with CNT elements.

  12. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Alter Cytochrome C Electron Transfer and Modulate Mitochondrial Function

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaowei; Zhang, Li-Hua; Wang, Li-Rong; Xue, Xue; Sun, Ji-Hong; Wu, Yan; Zou, Guozhang; Wu, Xia; Wang, Paul C.; Wamer, Wayne G.; Yin, Jun-Jie; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are broadly used for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, in vivo imaging and cancer photothermal therapy due to their unique physiochemical properties. However, once they enter the cells, the effects of SWCNTs to the intracellular organelles and macromolecules are not comprehensively understood. Cytochrome c (Cyt c), as a key component of the electron transport chain in mitochondria, plays an essential role in cellular energy consumption, growth and differentiation. In this study, we found the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial oxygen uptake were greatly decreased in human epithelial KB cells treated with SWCNTs, which accompanies the reduction of Cyt c. SWCNTs deoxidized Cyt c in a pH dependent manner as evidenced by the appearance of a 550 nm characteristic absorption peak, which intensity increased as pH increase. Circular dichroism measurement confirmed the pH-dependent conformational change, which facilitated closer association of SWCNTs with the heme pocket of Cyt c and thus expedited the reduction of Cyt c. The electron transfer of Cyt c is also disturbed by SWCNTs, as measured with electron spin resonance spectroscopy. In conclusion, the redox activity of Cyt c was affected by SWCNTs treatment due to attenuated electron transfer and conformational change of Cyt c, which consequently changed mitochondrial respiration of SWCNTs treated cells. This work is significant to SWCNTs research because it provided novel understanding to the disruption of SWCNTs to the mitochondria and has important implications for biomedical applications of SWCNTs. PMID:23171082

  13. Fractal dimension as a measure of altered actin cytoskeleton in MC3T3-E1 cells under simulated microgravity using 3-D/2-D clinostats.

    PubMed

    Qian, A R; Li, D; Han, J; Gao, X; Di, S M; Zhang, W; Hu, L F; Shang, Peng

    2012-05-01

    Osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, respond to various mechanical forces, such as stretch and fluid shear force in essentially similar ways. The cytoskeleton, as the load-bearing architecture of the cell, is sensitive to altered inertial forces. Disruption of the cytoskeleton will result in alteration of cellular structure and function. However, it is difficult to quantitatively illustrate cytoskeletal rearrangement because of the complexity of cytoskeletal structure. Usually, the morphological changes in actin organization caused by external stimulus are basically descriptive. In this study, fractal dimensions (D) analysis was used to quantify the morphological changes in the actin cytoskeleton of osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) under simulated microgravity using 3-D/2-D clinostats. The ImageJ software was used to count the fractal dimension of actin cytoskeleton by box-counting methods. Real-time PCR and immunofluroscent assays were used to further confirm the results obtained by fractal dimension analysis. The results showed significant decreases in D value of actin cytoskeleton, β-actin mRNA expression, and the mean fluorescence intensity of F-actin in osteoblast-like cells after 24 or 48 h of incubation under 3-D/2-D clinorotation condition compared with control. The findings indicate that 3-D/2-D clinorotation affects both actin cytoskeleton architecture and mRNA expression, and fractal may be a promising approach for quantitative analysis of the changes in cytoskeleton in different environments.

  14. PEGylated Carbon Nanotubes Impair Retrieval of Contextual Fear Memory and Alter Oxidative Stress Parameters in the Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Dal Bosco, Lidiane; Weber, Gisele E. B.; Parfitt, Gustavo M.; Paese, Karina; Gonçalves, Carla O. F.; Serodre, Tiago M.; Furtado, Clascídia A.; Santos, Adelina P.; Monserrat, José M.; Barros, Daniela M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are promising materials for biomedical applications, especially in the field of neuroscience; therefore, it is essential to evaluate the neurotoxicity of these nanomaterials. The present work assessed the effects of single-walled CNT functionalized with polyethylene glycol (SWCNT-PEG) on the consolidation and retrieval of contextual fear memory in rats and on oxidative stress parameters in the hippocampus. SWCNT-PEG were dispersed in water at concentrations of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.1 mg/mL and infused into the rat hippocampus. The infusion was completed immediately after training and 30 min before testing of a contextual fear conditioning task, resulting in exposure times of 24 h and 30 min, respectively. The results showed that a short exposure to SWCNT-PEG impaired fear memory retrieval and caused lipid peroxidation in the hippocampus. This response was transient and overcome by the mobilization of antioxidant defenses at 24 h. These effects occurred at low and intermediate but not high concentration of SWCNT-PEG, suggesting that the observed biological response may be related to the concentration-dependent increase in particle size in SWCNT-PEG dispersions. PMID:25738149

  15. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  16. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Antoine G.; Varela, Juan A.; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P.; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2016-11-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  17. Single-nanotube tracking reveals the nanoscale organization of the extracellular space in the live brain.

    PubMed

    Godin, Antoine G; Varela, Juan A; Gao, Zhenghong; Danné, Noémie; Dupuis, Julien P; Lounis, Brahim; Groc, Laurent; Cognet, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The brain is a dynamic structure with the extracellular space (ECS) taking up almost a quarter of its volume. Signalling molecules, neurotransmitters and nutrients transit via the ECS, which constitutes a key microenvironment for cellular communication and the clearance of toxic metabolites. The spatial organization of the ECS varies during sleep, development and aging and is probably altered in neuropsychiatric and degenerative diseases, as inferred from electron microscopy and macroscopic biophysical investigations. Here we show an approach to directly observe the local ECS structures and rheology in brain tissue using super-resolution imaging. We inject single-walled carbon nanotubes into rat cerebroventricles and follow the near-infrared emission of individual nanotubes as they diffuse inside the ECS for tens of minutes in acute slices. Because of the interplay between the nanotube geometry and the ECS local environment, we can extract information about the dimensions and local viscosity of the ECS. We find a striking diversity of ECS dimensions down to 40 nm, and as well as of local viscosity values. Moreover, by chemically altering the extracellular matrix of the brains of live animals before nanotube injection, we reveal that the rheological properties of the ECS are affected, but these alterations are local and inhomogeneous at the nanoscale.

  18. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  19. Carbon nanotube filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  20. Carbon nanotube filters.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Srivastava, O N; Talapatra, S; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus ( approximately 25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  1. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  2. Multiwalled nanotube faceting unravelled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leven, Itai; Guerra, Roberto; Vanossi, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio; Hod, Oded

    2016-12-01

    Nanotubes show great promise for miniaturizing advanced technologies. Their exceptional physical properties are intimately related to their morphological and crystal structure. Circumferential faceting of multiwalled nanotubes reinforces their mechanical strength and alters their tribological and electronic properties. Here, the nature of this important phenomenon is fully rationalized in terms of interlayer registry patterns. Regardless of the nanotube identity (that is, diameter, chirality, chemical composition), faceting requires the matching of the chiral angles of adjacent layers. Above a critical diameter that corresponds well with experimental results, achiral multiwalled nanotubes display evenly spaced extended axial facets whose number equals the interlayer difference in circumferential unit cells. Elongated helical facets, commonly observed in experiment, appear in nanotubes that exhibit small interlayer chiral angle mismatch. When the wall chiralities are uncorrelated, faceting is suppressed and outer layer corrugation, which is induced by the Moiré superlattice, is obtained in agreement with experiments. Finally, we offer an explanation for the higher incidence of faceting in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes with respect to their carbon-based counterparts.

  3. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  4. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  5. Analysis of the effects of applying external fields and device dimensions alterations on GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well slow light devices based on excitonic population oscillation.

    PubMed

    Kohandani, Reza; Zandi, Ashkan; Kaatuzian, Hassan

    2014-02-20

    This paper demonstrates the effects of applying magnetic and electric fields and physical dimensions alterations on AlGaAs/GaAs multiple quantum well (QW) slow light devices. Physical parameters include quantum well sizes and number of quantum wells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis of the effects of both applying magnetic/electric fields and physical parameters alterations and the first suggestion for matching the prefabrication and post fabrication tuning of the slow light devices based on excitonic population oscillations. The aim of our theoretical analysis is controlling the optical properties such as central frequency, bandwidth, and slow down factor (SDF) in slow light devices based on excitonic population oscillation to achieve better tuning. To reach these purposes, first we investigate the quantum well size and number of quantum wells alteration effects. Next, we analyze the effects of applying magnetic and electric fields to the multiple quantum well structure, separately. Finally, physical parameters and applied external fields are changed for measuring frequency shift and SDF for coherent population oscillation slow light devices. The results show the available central frequency shifts in about 1.6 THz at best. Also the SDF value improvement is about one order of magnitude. These results will be applicable for optical nonlinearity enhancements, all-optical signal processing, optical communications, all-optical switches, optical modulators, and variable true delays.

  6. Modelling encapsulation of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Thamwattana, Ngamta

    2014-02-01

    Lipid nanotubes are of particular interest for use as a template to create various one-dimensional nanostructures and as a carrier for drug and gene delivery. Understanding the encapsulation process is therefore crucial for such development. This paper models the interactions between lipid nanotubes and spheres of gold and silver nanoparticles and determines the critical dimension of lipid nanotubes that maximises the interaction with the nanoparticles. Our results confirm the acceptance of gold and silver nanoparticles inside lipid nanotubes. Further, we find that the lipid nanotube of radius approximately 10.23 nm is most favourable to encapsulate both types of nanoparticles.

  7. Nanotube Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEuen, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    Under this project, we explored the feasibility of utilizing carbon nanotubes in sensing applications. The grant primarily supported a graduate student, who worked on a number of aspects of the electrical properties of carbon nanotubes in collaboration with other researchers in my group. The two major research accomplishments are described below. The first accomplishment is the demonstration that solution carbon nanotube transistors functioned well in an electrolyte environment. This was important for two reasons. First, it allowed us to explore the ultimate limits of nanotube electronic performance by using the electrolyte as a highly effective gate, with a dielectric constant of approximately 80 and an effective insulator thickness of approximately 1 nm. Second, it showed that nanotubes function well under biologically relevant conditions (salty water) and therefore offer great promise as biological sensors. The second accomplishment was the demonstration that a voltage pulse applied to an AFM tip could be used to electrically cut carbon nanotubes. We also showed that a carefully applied pulse could also 'nick' a nanotube, creating a tunnel barrier without completely breaking the tube. Nicking was employed to make, for example, a quantum dot within a nanotube.

  8. Graphenylene Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Andrew T; Khoshaman, Amir H; Fan, Harrison D E; Sawatzky, George A; Nojeh, Alireza

    2015-10-01

    A new type of carbon nanotube, based on the graphenylene motif, is investigated using density functional and tight-binding methods. Analogous to conventional graphene-based nanotubes, a two-dimensional graphenylene sheet can be "rolled" into a seamless cylinder in armchair, zigzag, or chiral orientations. The resulting nanotube can be described using the familiar (n,m) nomenclature and possesses 4-, 6-, and 12-membered rings, with three distinct bond lengths, indicating a nonuniform distribution of the electron density. The dodecagonal rings form pores, 3.3 Å in diameter in graphenylene, which become saddle-shaped paraboloids in smaller-diameter nanotubes. Density functional theory predicts zigzag nanotubes to be small-band gap semiconductors, with a generally decreasing band gap as the diameter increases. Interestingly, the calculations predict metallic characteristics for armchair nanotubes with small diameters (<2 nm), and small-band gap semiconducting characteristics for larger-diameter ones. Graphenylene nanotubes with indices mod(n-m,3) = 0 exhibit a band gap approximately equal to that of armchair graphenylene nanotubes with comparable diameter.

  9. Controlled production of aligned-nanotube bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, M.; Grobert, N.; Olivares, J.; Zhang, J. P.; Terrones, H.; Kordatos, K.; Hsu, W. K.; Hare, J. P.; Townsend, P. D.; Prassides, K.; Cheetham, A. K.; Kroto, H. W.; Walton, D. R. M.

    1997-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes might be usefully employed in nanometre-scale engineering and electronics. Electrical conductivity measurements on the bulk material, on individual multi-walled and single-walled nanotubes and on bundles of single-walled nanotubes have revealed that they may behave as metallic, insulating or semiconducting nanowires, depending on the method of production-which controls the degree of graphitization, the helicity and the diameter. Measurements of Young's modulus show that single nanotubes are stiffer than commercial carbon fibres. Methods commonly used to generate nanotubes-carbon-arc discharge techniques, catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons and condensed-phase electrolysis-generally suffer from the drawbacks that polyhedral particles are also formed and that the dimensions of the nanotubes are highly variable. Here we describe a method for generating aligned carbon nanotubes by pyrolysis of 2-amino-4,6-dichloro-s-triazine over thin films of a cobalt catalyst patterned on a silica substrate by laser etching. The use of a patterned catalyst apparently encourages the formation of aligned nanotubes. The method offers control over length (up to about 50μm) and fairly uniform diameters (30-50nm), as well as producing nanotubes in high yield, uncontaminated by polyhedral particles.

  10. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2007-05-29

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  11. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2006-11-07

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  12. Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.

    2004-10-05

    The large separation between the weak scale {approx} 10{sup 3} GeV and the traditional scale of gravity--the Planck scale with M{sub PI} {approx} 10{sup 19} GeV--is one of the most puzzling aspects of nature. The origin of this large ratio, as well as its stability under radiative corrections, demands explanation. This is known as the hierarchy problem. One theoretical means of solving this problem is to introduce Supersymmetry. Alternatively one may hope to address the hierarchy by exploiting the geometry of space time. Specifically, recent theories involve the idea that the 3-spatial dimensions in which we live could be a 3-spatial-dimensional ''membrane'' embedded in a much larger extra dimensional space, and that the hierarchy is generated by the geometry of the additional dimensions. Such ideas have led to extra dimensional theories which have verifiable consequences at the TeV scale. Our knowledge of the weak and strong forces extends down to scales of {approx} (100 GeV){sup -1} (or of order 10{sup -15} mm). On the other hand, we have almost no knowledge of gravity at distances less than roughly a millimeter, as direct tests of the gravitational force at the smallest distances are based on torsion-balance experiments, which are mechanically limited. It is thus conceivable that gravity may behave quite differently from the 3-dimensional Newtonian theory at small distances. This leads to the possibility that matter and non-gravitational forces are confined to our 3-dimensional subspace, whereas gravity may propagate throughout a higher dimensional volume. In this case, the gauge forces are trapped within our 3-dimensional space, unaware of the extra dimensions, and maintain their usual behavior. Gravity, on the other hand, would no longer follow the inverse-square force law at distances smaller than the size of the extra dimensions, as the gravitational equivalent of Gauss' Law mandates that the gravitational field spreads out into the full spatial volume

  13. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-06-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX‑-N (NO3‑-N and NO2‑-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials.

  14. Carbon nanotubes affect the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to denitrification in marine sediments by altering cellular internalization of nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Chen, Yinguang; Wan, Rui; Li, Mu; Huang, Haining; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Denitrification is an important pathway for nitrate transformation in marine sediments, and this process has been observed to be negatively affected by engineered nanomaterials. However, previous studies only focused on the potential effect of a certain type of nanomaterial on microbial denitrification. Here we show that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) to denitrification in marine sediments is highly affected by the presence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). It was found that the removal efficiency of total NOX−-N (NO3−-N and NO2−-N) in the presence of CuO NPs was only 62.3%, but it increased to 81.1% when CNTs appeared in this circumstance. Our data revealed that CuO NPs were more easily attached to CNTs rather than cell surface because of the lower energy barrier (3.5 versus 36.2 kT). Further studies confirmed that the presence of CNTs caused the formation of large, incompact, non-uniform dispersed, and more negatively charged CuO-CNTs heteroaggregates, and thus reduced the nanoparticle internalization by cells, leading to less toxicity to metabolism of carbon source, generation of reduction equivalent, and activities of nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase. These results indicate that assessing nanomaterial-induced risks in real circumstances needs to consider the “mixed” effects of nanomaterials. PMID:27279546

  15. Carbon Nanotubes and Human Cells?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, G. Angela

    2005-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes that were chemically altered to be water soluble are shown to enter fibroblasts, T cells, and HL60 cells. Nanoparticles adversely affect immortalized HaCaT human keratinocyte cultures, indicating that they may enter cells.

  16. Dimension stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dolley, T.P.

    2003-01-01

    Dimension stone can be defined as natural rock material quarried to obtain blocks or slabs that meet specifications as to size (width, length and thickness) and shape for architectural or engineering purposes. Color, grain texture and pattern, and surface finish of the stone are also normal requirements. Other important selection criteria are durability (based on mineral composition, hardness and past performance), strength and the ability of the stone to take a polish.

  17. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Nygârd, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike in conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and valley freedom. The interplay between the two is the focus of this review. The energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are explained, together with their consequences for transport measurements through nanotube quantum dots. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly modifies their transport behavior. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, open questions for the field are also clearly stated. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both be reduced to a low level.

  18. Nanotube Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Weldon, Jeff; Garcia, Henry; Zettl, Alex

    2008-03-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  19. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  20. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, and Modeling of Nanotube Materials with Variable Stiffness Tethers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankland, S. J. V.; Herzog, M. N.; Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    Synthesis, mechanical testing, and modeling have been performed for carbon nanotube based materials. Tests using nanoindentation indicated a six-fold enhancement in the storage modulus when comparing the base material (no nanotubes) to the composite that contained 5.3 wt% of nanotubes. To understand how crosslinking the nanotubes may further alter the stiffness, a model of the system was constructed using nanotubes crosslinked with a variable stiffness tether (VST). The model predicted that for a composite with 5 wt% nanotubes at random orientations, crosslinked with the VST, the bulk Young's modulus was reduced by 30% compared to the noncrosslinked equivalent.

  2. Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bronkowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have shown that with suitable choices of critical dimensions, planar arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see figure) can serve as high-current-density field emitter (cold-cathode) electron sources. Whereas some hot-cathode electron sources must be operated at supply potentials of thousands of volts, these cold-cathode sources generate comparable current densities when operated at tens of volts. Consequently, arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes might prove useful as cold-cathode sources in miniature, lightweight electron-beam devices (e.g., nanoklystrons) soon to be developed. Prior to the experiments, all reported efforts to develop carbon-nanotube-based field-emission sources had yielded low current densities from a few hundred microamperes to a few hundred milliamperes per square centimeter. An electrostatic screening effect, in which taller nanotubes screen the shorter ones from participating in field emission, was conjectured to be what restricts the emission of electrons to such low levels. It was further conjectured that the screening effect could be reduced and thus emission levels increased by increasing the spacing between nanotubes to at least by a factor of one to two times the height of the nanotubes. While this change might increase the emission from individual nanotubes, it would decrease the number of nanotubes per unit area and thereby reduce the total possible emission current. Therefore, to maximize the area-averaged current density, it would be necessary to find an optimum combination of nanotube spacing and nanotube height. The present concept of using an array of bundles of nanotubes arises partly from the concept of optimizing the spacing and height of field emitters. It also arises partly from the idea that single nanotubes may have short lifetimes as field emitters, whereas bundles of nanotubes could afford redundancy so that the loss of a single nanotube would not significantly reduce the overall field emission.

  3. Nanotube News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  4. Carbon Nanotube Tape Vibrating Gyroscope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis Stephen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibrating gyroscope includes a piezoelectric strip having length and width dimensions. The piezoelectric strip includes a piezoelectric material and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) substantially aligned and polled along the strip's length dimension. A spindle having an axis of rotation is coupled to the piezoelectric strip. The axis of rotation is parallel to the strip's width dimension. A first capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The first capacitance sensor is positioned at one of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from one of the strip's opposing faces. A second capacitance sensor is mechanically coupled to the spindle for rotation therewith. The second capacitance sensor is positioned at another of the strip's opposing ends and is spaced apart from another of the strip's opposing faces. A voltage source applies an AC voltage to the piezoelectric strip.

  5. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  6. Template synthesized gold nanotube membranes for chemical separations and sensing.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Marc; Yu, Shufang; Martin, Charles R

    2002-07-01

    We have developed a new class of synthetic membranes that consist of a porous polymeric support that contains an ensemble of gold nanotubes that span the thickness of the support membrane. The support is a commercially-available microporous polycarbonate filter with cylindrical nanoscopic pores. The gold nanotubes are prepared via electroless deposition of Au onto the pore walls; i.e., the pores acts as templates for the nanotubes. We have shown that by controlling the Au deposition time, Au nanotubes that have effective inside diameters of molecular dimensions (< 1 nm) can be prepared. These membranes are a new class of molecular sieves and can be used to separate both small molecules and proteins on the basis of molecular size. In addition, the use of these membranes in new approaches to electrochemical sensing is reviewed here. In this case, a current is forced through the nanotubes, and analyte molecules present in a contacting solution phase modulate the value of this transmembrane current.

  7. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  8. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, Guzeliya

    Carbon nanotubes have unique properties that make them attractive for different engineering applications. However, because of their chemical inertness, carbon nanotubes have to be functionalized in order to acquire additional physico-chemical properties. Large multiwalled carbon nanotubes are different from fullerenes and singlewalled nanotubes because the stresses in their walls are almost relaxed while most chemical methods for fullerene functionalization exploit this effect of stressed bonds. The objective of this work is to develop new methods for functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This work is dedicated to study two functionalization methods. The first deals with physico-chemical functionalization by filling the nanotube interior with colloidal suspensions. Irreversible adsorption of functional nanoparticles on the nanotube wall leads to the nanotube functionalization. The second method is purely chemical functionalization, which uses the reaction of cyclopropanation to break pi-bonds in the benzene rings of the nanotubes with formation of new σ-bonds with deprotonated malonate. This so-called Bingel reaction has been used in fullerene chemistry and in this work was applied for the first time to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes. While capillary filling of carbon nanotubes was known long ago, the research community was skeptical about possibility of engulfing nanoparticles into nanotubes by capillary forces. We developed and implemented capillary method to fill nanotubes with different nanoparticles. Using this method, magnetic carbon nanotubes were produced for the first time. Synthesized nanotubes have very high magnetic moment and allow to manipulate them by magnetic field. These magnetic nanotubes have been successfully used in fabrication of carbon nanotube-tipped pipettes for biological probes. The Bingel reaction was studied on three sets of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters: 20nm, 100nm, and 300nm. To estimate the

  9. Biomimetic Nanotubes Based on Cyclodextrins for Ion-Channel Applications.

    PubMed

    Mamad-Hemouch, Hajar; Ramoul, Hassen; Abou Taha, Mohammad; Bacri, Laurent; Huin, Cécile; Przybylski, Cédric; Oukhaled, Abdelghani; Thiébot, Bénédicte; Patriarche, Gilles; Jarroux, Nathalie; Pelta, Juan

    2015-11-11

    Biomimetic membrane channels offer a great potential for fundamental studies and applications. Here, we report the fabrication and characterization of short cyclodextrin nanotubes, their insertion into membranes, and cytotoxicity assay. Mass spectrometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to confirm the synthesis pathway leading to the formation of short nanotubes and to describe their structural parameters in terms of length, diameter, and number of cyclodextrins. Our results show the control of the number of cyclodextrins threaded on the polyrotaxane leading to nanotube synthesis. Structural parameters obtained by electron microscopy are consistent with the distribution of the number of cyclodextrins evaluated by mass spectrometry from the initial polymer distribution. An electrophysiological study at single molecule level demonstrates the ion channel formation into lipid bilayers, and the energy penalty for the entry of ions into the confined nanotube. In the presence of nanotubes, the cell physiology is not altered.

  10. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buranova, Yu. S. Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-15

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  11. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buranova, Yu. S.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  12. Doing without dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgin, C. B.

    1986-03-01

    The author discusses the concept of dimensions of a physical quantity, and the relationship between derived units (expressed in terms of their base units) and the dimensions of the derived quantities. He calls for the replacement of 'dimensions' by base units in the GCE A-level syllabus and provides some recommendations to GCE examining boards.

  13. Dimension of chaotic attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, J.D.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J.A.

    1982-09-01

    Dimension is perhaps the most basic property of an attractor. In this paper we discuss a variety of different definitions of dimension, compute their values for a typical example, and review previous work on the dimension of chaotic attractors. The relevant definitions of dimension are of two general types, those that depend only on metric properties, and those that depend on probabilistic properties (that is, they depend on the frequency with which a typical trajectory visits different regions of the attractor). Both our example and the previous work that we review support the conclusion that all of the probabilistic dimensions take on the same value, which we call the dimension of the natural measure, and all of the metric dimensions take on a common value, which we call the fractal dimension. Furthermore, the dimension of the natural measure is typically equal to the Lyapunov dimension, which is defined in terms of Lyapunov numbers, and thus is usually far easier to calculate than any other definition. Because it is computable and more physically relevant, we feel that the dimension of the natural measure is more important than the fractal dimension.

  14. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  15. Carbon nanotube inner phase chemistry: the Cl- exchange SN2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Halls, Mathew D; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2005-10-01

    Density functional calculations have been carried out to investigate the nature of the inner phase of a (6,6) carbon nanotube, using the Cl(-) exchange S(N)2 reaction as an indicator. Inside the carbon nanotube the classical barrier height increases by 6.6 kcal/mol due to the nanotube polarizability. This suggests that the inner phase environment can be considered a form of solid solvation, offering the possibility of obtaining altered guest properties and reactivity through dielectric stabilization.

  16. Carbon-nanotube based nano-electro-mechanical oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadakis, S. J.; Hall, A. R.; Spivak, D. M.; Falvo, M. R.; Superfine, R.; Washburn, S.

    2004-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and performance of nanometer-scale electromechanical oscillators which use multi-walled carbon nanotubes as torsional springs. Carbon nanotube devices may offer high quality factors due to the inert surface of the torsional member, and high sensitivity due to their nanoscale dimensions. They also provide a means to study the effects of torsion on nanotube transport. The devices have a paddle-oscillator geometry and are driven electrostatically. In previous work we manipulated these devices directly with a scanning probe to measure the torsional properties of the nanotube, its shear modulus, and its subsequent stiffening under repeated strain [1]. Here we use both optical and electron-beam techniques to measure the response of the devices to applied voltages. We demonstrate both quasi-static and on-resonance performance characteristics. 1. P. A. Williams, S. J. Papadakis, A. M. Patel, M. R. Falvo, S. Washburn, and R. Superfine, Phys. Rev. Lett. 89, 255502 (2002).

  17. Chemical reactions confined within carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Miners, Scott A; Rance, Graham A; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2016-08-22

    In this critical review, we survey the wide range of chemical reactions that have been confined within carbon nanotubes, particularly emphasising how the pairwise interactions between the catalysts, reactants, transition states and products of a particular molecular transformation with the host nanotube can be used to control the yields and distributions of products of chemical reactions. We demonstrate that nanoscale confinement within carbon nanotubes enables the control of catalyst activity, morphology and stability, influences the local concentration of reactants and products thus affecting equilibria, rates and selectivity, pre-arranges the reactants for desired reactions and alters the relative stability of isomeric products. We critically evaluate the relative advantages and disadvantages of the confinement of chemical reactions inside carbon nanotubes from a chemical perspective and describe how further developments in the controlled synthesis of carbon nanotubes and the incorporation of multifunctionality are essential for the development of this ever-expanding field, ultimately leading to the effective control of the pathways of chemical reactions through the rational design of multi-functional carbon nanoreactors.

  18. Serpentine Nanotubes in CM Chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zega, Thomas J.; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Dodony, Istvan; Buseck, Peter R.

    2004-01-01

    The CM chondrites are primitive meteorites that formed during the early solar system. Although they retain much of their original physical character, their matrices and fine-grained rims (FGRs) sustained aqueous alteration early in their histories [1- 3]. Serpentine-group minerals are abundant products of such alteration, and information regarding their structures, compositions, and spatial relationships is important for determining the reactions that produced them and the conditions under which they formed. Our recent work on FGRs and matrices of the CM chondrites has revealed new information on the structures and compositions of serpentine-group minerals [4,5] and has provided insights into the evolution of these primitive meteorites. Here we report on serpentine nanotubes from the Mighei and Murchison CM chondrites [6].

  19. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Composite Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Altalhi, Tariq; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Han, Ninghui; Clarke, Stephen; Losic, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA) membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm), and thickness (5–100 μm), was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal) used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule. PMID:24957494

  20. Formation and growth mechanisms of single-walled metal oxide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yucelen, Gulfem Ipek

    In this thesis, main objectives are to discover the first molecular-level mechanistic framework governing the formation and growth of single-walled metal-oxide nanotubes, apply this framework to demonstrate the engineering of nanotubular materials of controlled dimensions, and to progress towards a quantitative multiscale understanding of nanotube formation. In Chapter 2, the identification and elucidation of the mechanistic role of molecular precursors and nanoscale (1-3 nm) intermediates with intrinsic curvature, in the formation of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes is reported. The structural and compositional evolution of molecular and nanoscale species over a length scale of 0.1-100 nm, are characterized by electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. DFT calculations revealed the intrinsic curvature of nanoscale intermediates with bonding environments similar to the structure of the final nanotube product. It is shown that curved nano-intermediates form in aqueous synthesis solutions immediately after initial hydrolysis of reactants at 25 °C, disappear from the solution upon heating to 95 °C due to condensation, and finally rearrange to form ordered single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes. Integration of all results leads to the construction of the first molecular-level mechanism of single-walled metal oxide nanotube formation, incorporating the role of monomeric and polymeric aluminosilicate species as well as larger nanoparticles. Then, in Chapter 3, new molecular-level concepts for constructing nanoscopic metal oxide objects are demonstrated. The diameters of metal oxide nanotubes are shaped with Angstrom-level precision by controlling the shape of nanometer-scale precursors. The subtle relationships between precursor shape and structure and final nanotube curvature are measured (at the molecular level). Anionic ligands (both organic and inorganic) are used to exert fine control over precursor

  1. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  2. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; ...

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  3. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  4. Air-gating and chemical-gating in transistors and sensing devices made from hollow TiO2 semiconductor nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alivov, Yahya; Funke, Hans; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-07-24

    Rapid miniaturization of electronic devices down to the nanoscale, according to Moore's law, has led to some undesirable effects like high leakage current in transistors, which can offset additional benefits from scaling down. Development of three-dimensional transistors, by spatial extension in the third dimension, has allowed higher contact area with a gate electrode and better control over conductivity in the semiconductor channel. However, these devices do not utilize the large surface area and interfaces for new electronic functionality. Here, we demonstrate air gating and chemical gating in hollow semiconductor nanotube devices and highlight the potential for development of novel transistors that can be modulated using channel bias, gate voltage, chemical composition, and concentration. Using chemical gating, we reversibly altered the conductivity of nanoscaled semiconductor nanotubes (10-500 nm TiO2 nanotubes) by six orders of magnitude, with a tunable rectification factor (ON/OFF ratio) ranging from 1-10(6). While demonstrated air- and chemical-gating speeds were slow here (∼seconds) due to the mechanical-evacuation rate and size of our chamber, the small nanoscale volume of these hollow semiconductors can enable much higher switching speeds, limited by the rate of adsorption/desorption of molecules at semiconductor interfaces. These chemical-gating effects are completely reversible, additive between different chemical compositions, and can enable semiconductor nanoelectronic devices for 'chemical transistors', 'chemical diodes', and very high-efficiency sensing applications.

  5. Dimensions of Educational Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johns, Roe L., Ed.; And Others

    Roe L. Johns and J. Alan Thomas survey the problem of educational need; and Kern Alexander considers the implications of the dimensions of educational need for school financing. Dimensions of need in the following areas are defined: early childhood and basic elementary and secondary education, by William P. McLure; educational programs for…

  6. The Qualitative Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodge-Peters, Dianne S.

    The qualitative dimension of educational research methodology is explored, and the literature of qualitative methodology is reviewed so researchers may (1) understand more fully the qualitative dimension as it, in turn, fits within the parameters of educational research as a whole, and (2) have more informed access to the sometimes daunting array…

  7. Navigating between the Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleron, Julian F.; Ecke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Generations have been inspired by Edwin A. Abbott's profound tour of the dimensions in his novella "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" (1884). This well-known satire is the story of a flat land inhabited by geometric shapes trying to navigate the subtleties of their geometric, social, and political positions. In this article, the authors…

  8. Microstructure Analysis of Boron Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    boron nitride nanotube and nanoparticles in thin film boron nitride prepared by CVD method. Electron micrographs show single...walled nanotubes containing these nonoparticles. The electron diffraction pattern confirms this boron nitride has a hexagonal crystal structure. 15... boron nitride thin film CONCLUSIONS The boron evaporated thin film revealed a large number of nanotubes and nanoparticles. These nanotubes are 25

  9. Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect

    Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

    2007-05-01

    Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

  10. Enhanced Photovoltaic Properties of Potassium-Adsorbed Titania Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, C.; Jaye, C; Fischer, D; Lewis, L; Willey, R; Menon, L

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that vertically-aligned titania nanotube planar arrays fabricated by electrochemical anodization using standard potassium-containing electrolytes invariably contain a significant amount of surface-adsorbed potassium ions, hitherto undetected, that affect the titania photoelectrochemical or PEC performance. Synchrotron-based near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy reveals the strong ionic nature of surface potassium-titania bonds that alters the PEC performance over that of pure titania nanotubes through reduction of the external electrical bias needed to produce hydrogen at maximum efficiency. This result implies that the external electrical energy input required per liter of solar hydrogen produced with potassium-adsorbed titania nanotubes may be reduced. Tailoring the potassium content may thus be an alternative means to fine-tune the photoelectrochemical response of TiO2 nanotube-based PEC electrodes.

  11. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  12. Vacuum template synthesis of multifunctional nanotubes with tailored nanostructured walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippin, A. Nicolas; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Saghi, Zineb; Idígoras, Jesús; Burdet, Pierre; Barranco, Angel; Midgley, Paul; Anta, Juan A.; Borras, Ana

    2016-02-01

    A three-step vacuum procedure for the fabrication of vertical TiO2 and ZnO nanotubes with three dimensional walls is presented. The method combines physical vapor deposition of small-molecules, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic functional thin films and layers and a post-annealing process in vacuum in order to remove the organic template. As a result, an ample variety of inorganic nanotubes are made with tunable length, hole dimensions and shapes and tailored wall composition, microstructure, porosity and structure. The fabrication of multishell nanotubes combining different semiconducting oxides and metal nanoparticles is as well explored. This method provides a feasible and reproducible route for the fabrication of high density arrays of vertically alligned nanotubes on processable substrates. The emptying mechanism and microstructure of the nanotubes have been elucidated through SEM, STEM, HAADF-STEM tomography and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In this article, as a proof of concept, it is presented the straightforward integration of ZnO nanotubes as photoanode in a photovoltaic cell and as a photonic oxygen gas sensor.

  13. Vacuum template synthesis of multifunctional nanotubes with tailored nanostructured walls

    PubMed Central

    Filippin, A. Nicolas; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Saghi, Zineb; Idígoras, Jesús; Burdet, Pierre; Barranco, Angel; Midgley, Paul; Anta, Juan A.; Borras, Ana

    2016-01-01

    A three-step vacuum procedure for the fabrication of vertical TiO2 and ZnO nanotubes with three dimensional walls is presented. The method combines physical vapor deposition of small-molecules, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of inorganic functional thin films and layers and a post-annealing process in vacuum in order to remove the organic template. As a result, an ample variety of inorganic nanotubes are made with tunable length, hole dimensions and shapes and tailored wall composition, microstructure, porosity and structure. The fabrication of multishell nanotubes combining different semiconducting oxides and metal nanoparticles is as well explored. This method provides a feasible and reproducible route for the fabrication of high density arrays of vertically alligned nanotubes on processable substrates. The emptying mechanism and microstructure of the nanotubes have been elucidated through SEM, STEM, HAADF-STEM tomography and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In this article, as a proof of concept, it is presented the straightforward integration of ZnO nanotubes as photoanode in a photovoltaic cell and as a photonic oxygen gas sensor. PMID:26860367

  14. Effective Hamiltonian for surface states of topological insulator nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B A

    2017-04-03

    In this work we derive an effective Hamiltonian for the surface states of a hollow topological insulator (TI) nanotube with finite width walls. Unlike a solid TI cylinder, a TI nanotube possesses both an inner as well as outer surface on which the states localized at each surface are coupled together. The curvature along the circumference of the nanotube leads to a spatial variation of the spin orbit interaction field experienced by the charge carriers as well as an asymmetry between the inner and outer surfaces of the nanotube. Both of these features result in terms in the effective Hamiltonian for a TI nanotube absent in that of a flat TI thin film of the same thickness. We calculate the numerical values of the parameters for a Bi2Se3 nanotube as a function of the inner and outer radius, and show that the differing relative magnitudes between the parameters result in qualitatively differing behaviour for the eigenstates of tubes of different dimensions.

  15. Effective Hamiltonian for surface states of topological insulator nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this work we derive an effective Hamiltonian for the surface states of a hollow topological insulator (TI) nanotube with finite width walls. Unlike a solid TI cylinder, a TI nanotube possesses both an inner as well as outer surface on which the states localized at each surface are coupled together. The curvature along the circumference of the nanotube leads to a spatial variation of the spin orbit interaction field experienced by the charge carriers as well as an asymmetry between the inner and outer surfaces of the nanotube. Both of these features result in terms in the effective Hamiltonian for a TI nanotube absent in that of a flat TI thin film of the same thickness. We calculate the numerical values of the parameters for a Bi2Se3 nanotube as a function of the inner and outer radius, and show that the differing relative magnitudes between the parameters result in qualitatively differing behaviour for the eigenstates of tubes of different dimensions. PMID:28367970

  16. Hemotoxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Methven, Laura; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes may enter into the bloodstream and interact with blood components indirectly via translocation following unintended exposure or directly after an intended administration for biomedical purposes. Once introduced into systemic circulation, nanotubes will encounter various proteins, biomolecules or cells which have specific roles in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. It is therefore essential to determine whether those interactions will lead to adverse effects or not. Advances in the understanding of how carbon nanotubes interact with blood proteins, the complement system, red blood cells and the hemostatic system are reviewed in this article. While many studies on carbon nanotube health risk assessment and their biomedical applications have appeared in the last few years, reports on the hemocompatibility of these nanomaterials remain surprisingly limited. Yet, defining the hemotoxicological profile is a mandatory step toward the development of clinically-relevant medications or contrast agents based on carbon nanotubes.

  17. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2010-01-10

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  18. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  19. The dimensions of indexing.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, W John; Kim, Won

    2003-01-01

    Indexing of documents is an important strategy intended to make the literature more readily available to the user. Here we describe several dimensions of indexing that are important if indexing is to be optimal. These dimensions are coverage, predictability, and transparency. MeSH terms and text words are compared in MEDLINE in regard to these dimensions. Part of our analysis consists in applying AdaBoost with decisions trees as the weak learners to estimate how reliably index terms are being assigned and how complex the criteria are by which they are being assigned. Our conclusions are that MeSH terms are more predictable and more transparent than text words.

  20. Elaboration of nanostructured biointerfaces with tunable degree of coverage by protein nanotubes using electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Kalaskar, Deepak M; Poleunis, Claude; Dupont-Gillain, Christine; Demoustier-Champagne, Sophie

    2011-11-14

    This study shows that electrophoretic deposition (EPD) is a fast and efficient technique for producing protein nanotube-based biointerfaces. Well-shaped collagen-based nanotubes of controlled dimensions are synthesized by a template method combined with the layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly technique. Separation of nanotubes from the template material and collection of nanotubes on ITO glass carried out by EPD leads to a fairly homogeneous distribution of protein nanotubes at the support surface. Biointerfaces with different and tunable densities of protein nanotubes are obtained by changing either the applied voltage, solution concentration of nanotubes, or deposition time. Moreover, it is proved that the collected nanotubes are template-free and keep their biofunctional outermost layer after EPD. A preliminary study of the behavior of preosteoblasts cells with the elaborated biointerfaces indicates a specific interaction of cells with the nanotubes through filopodia. This contribution paves the way to the easy preparation of a large variety of useful nanostructured collagen and other protein-based interfaces for controlling cell-surface interactions in diverse biomaterials applications.

  1. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Parilla, P.A.; Jones, K.M.; Riker, G.; Heben, M.J.

    1998-08-01

    Carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are essentially elongated pores of molecular dimensions and are capable of adsorbing hydrogen at relatively high temperatures and low pressures. This behavior is unique to these materials and indicates that SWNTs are the ideal building block for constructing safe, efficient, and high energy density adsorbents for hydrogen storage applications. In past work the authors developed methods for preparing and opening SWNTs, discovered the unique adsorption properties of these new materials, confirmed that hydrogen is stabilized by physical rather than chemical interactions, measured the strength of interaction to be {approximately} 5 times higher than for adsorption on planar graphite, and performed infrared absorption spectroscopy to determine the chemical nature of the surface terminations before, during, and after oxidation. This year the authors have made significant advances in synthesis and characterization of SWNT materials so that they can now prepare gram quantities of high-purity SWNT samples and measure and control the diameter distribution of the tubes by varying key parameters during synthesis. They have also developed methods which purify nanotubes and cut nanotubes into shorter segments. These capabilities provide a means for opening the tubes which were unreactive to the oxidation methods that successfully opened tubes, and offer a path towards organizing nanotube segments to enable high volumetric hydrogen storage densities. They also performed temperature programmed desorption spectroscopy on high purity carbon nanotube material obtained from collaborator Prof. Patrick Bernier and finished construction of a high precision Seivert`s apparatus which will allow the hydrogen pressure-temperature-composition phase diagrams to be evaluated for SWNT materials.

  2. Biochips Containing Arrays of Carbon-Nanotube Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica; Cassell, Alan; Chen, Hua

    2008-01-01

    Biochips containing arrays of nanoelectrodes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are being developed as means of ultrasensitive electrochemical detection of specific deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) biomarkers for purposes of medical diagnosis and bioenvironmental monitoring. In mass production, these biochips could be relatively inexpensive (hence, disposable). These biochips would be integrated with computer-controlled microfluidic and microelectronic devices in automated hand-held and bench-top instruments that could be used to perform rapid in vitro genetic analyses with simplified preparation of samples. Carbon nanotubes are attractive for use as nanoelectrodes for detection of biomolecules because of their nanoscale dimensions and their chemical properties.

  3. Polyhedra and Higher Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Describes the definition and characteristics of a regular polyhedron, tessellation, and pseudopolyhedra with diagrams. Discusses the nature of simplex, hypercube, and cross-polytope in the fourth dimension and beyond. (YP)

  4. Dimensions of Aesthetic Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biaggio, Mary Kay; Supplee, Katherine A.

    1983-01-01

    Examines the validity of three dimensions of aesthetic perception: hedonic value, arousal, and uncertainty. Hedonic interest and arousal factors were found to differ from factors previously reported, while the uncertainty factor paralleled that previously reported. (Author/RH)

  5. Rokhlin Dimension for Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirshberg, Ilan; Szabó, Gábor; Winter, Wilhelm; Wu, Jianchao

    2016-10-01

    We introduce a notion of Rokhlin dimension for one parameter automorphism groups of {C^*} -algebras. This generalizes Kishimoto's Rokhlin property for flows, and is analogous to the notion of Rokhlin dimension for actions of the integers and other discrete groups introduced by the authors and Zacharias in previous papers. We show that finite nuclear dimension and absorption of a strongly self-absorbing {C^*} -algebra are preserved under forming crossed products by flows with finite Rokhlin dimension, and that these crossed products are stable. Furthermore, we show that a flow on a commutative {C^*} -algebra arising from a free topological flow has finite Rokhlin dimension, whenever the spectrum is a locally compact metrizable space with finite covering dimension. For flows that are both free and minimal, this has strong consequences for the associated crossed product {C^{*}} -algebras: Those containing a non-zero projection are classified by the Elliott invariant (for compact manifolds this consists of topological {K} -theory together with the space of invariant probability measures and a natural pairing given by the Ruelle-Sullivan map).

  6. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W Ch

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  7. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  8. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K [Kensington, CA; Jensen, Kenneth J [Berkeley, CA; Girit, Caglar [Albany, CA; Mickelson, William E [San Francisco, CA; Grossman, Jeffrey C [Berkeley, CA

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  9. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  10. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity. PMID:23091380

  11. Functionalized carbon nanotubes: biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Vardharajula, Sandhya; Ali, Sk Z; Tiwari, Pooja M; Eroğlu, Erdal; Vig, Komal; Dennis, Vida A; Singh, Shree R

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are emerging as novel nanomaterials for various biomedical applications. CNTs can be used to deliver a variety of therapeutic agents, including biomolecules, to the target disease sites. In addition, their unparalleled optical and electrical properties make them excellent candidates for bioimaging and other biomedical applications. However, the high cytotoxicity of CNTs limits their use in humans and many biological systems. The biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity of CNTs are attributed to size, dose, duration, testing systems, and surface functionalization. The functionalization of CNTs improves their solubility and biocompatibility and alters their cellular interaction pathways, resulting in much-reduced cytotoxic effects. Functionalized CNTs are promising novel materials for a variety of biomedical applications. These potential applications are particularly enhanced by their ability to penetrate biological membranes with relatively low cytotoxicity. This review is directed towards the overview of CNTs and their functionalization for biomedical applications with minimal cytotoxicity.

  12. Perceptual dimensions differentiate emotions.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, Lisa A; MacInnis, Deborah J; Weiss, Allen M

    2015-08-26

    Individuals often describe objects in their world in terms of perceptual dimensions that span a variety of modalities; the visual (e.g., brightness: dark-bright), the auditory (e.g., loudness: quiet-loud), the gustatory (e.g., taste: sour-sweet), the tactile (e.g., hardness: soft vs. hard) and the kinaesthetic (e.g., speed: slow-fast). We ask whether individuals use perceptual dimensions to differentiate emotions from one another. Participants in two studies (one where respondents reported on abstract emotion concepts and a second where they reported on specific emotion episodes) rated the extent to which features anchoring 29 perceptual dimensions (e.g., temperature, texture and taste) are associated with 8 emotions (anger, fear, sadness, guilt, contentment, gratitude, pride and excitement). Results revealed that in both studies perceptual dimensions differentiate positive from negative emotions and high arousal from low arousal emotions. They also differentiate among emotions that are similar in arousal and valence (e.g., high arousal negative emotions such as anger and fear). Specific features that anchor particular perceptual dimensions (e.g., hot vs. cold) are also differentially associated with emotions.

  13. Flame Synthesis Used to Create Metal-Catalyzed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.

    2001-01-01

    Metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are highly ordered carbon structures of nanoscale dimensions. They may be thought of as hollow cylinders whose walls are formed by single atomic layers of graphite. Such cylinders may be composed of many nested, concentric atomic layers of carbon or only a single layer, the latter forming a single-walled carbon nanotube. This article reports unique results using a flame for their synthesis. Only recently were carbon nanotubes discovered within an arc discharge and recognized as fullerene derivatives. Today metal-catalyzed carbon nanotubes are of great interest for many reasons. They can be used as supports for the metal catalysts like those found in catalytic converters. Open-ended nanotubes are highly desirable because they can be filled by other elements, metals or gases, for battery and fuel cell applications. Because of their highly crystalline structure, they are significantly stronger than the commercial carbon fibers that are currently available (10 times as strong as steel but possessing one-sixth of the weight). This property makes them highly desirable for strengthening polymer and ceramic composite materials. Current methods of synthesizing carbon nanotubes include thermal pyrolysis of organometallics, laser ablation of metal targets within hydrocarbon atmospheres at high temperatures, and arc discharges. Each of these methods is costly, and it is unclear if they can be scaled for the commercial synthesis of carbon nanotubes. In contrast, flame synthesis is an economical means of bulk synthesis of a variety of aerosol materials such as carbon black. Flame synthesis of carbon nanotubes could potentially realize an economy of scale that would enable their use in common structural materials such as car-body panels. The top figure is a transmission electron micrograph of a multiwalled carbon nanotube. The image shows a cross section of the atomic structure of the nanotube. The dark lines are individual atomic layer planes of

  14. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  15. Storage of Hydrogen in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A. C.; Jones, K. M.; Bekkedahl, T. A.; Kiang, C. H.; Bethune, D. S.; Heben, M. J.

    1997-03-27

    Pores of molecular dimensions can adsorb large quantities of gases owing to the enhanced density of the adsorbed material inside the pores, a consequence of the attractive potential of the pore walls. Pederson and Broughton have suggested that carbon nanotubes, which have diameters of typically a few nanometres, should be able to draw up liquids by capillarity, and this effect has been seen for low-surface-tension liquids in large-diameter, multi-walled nanotubes. Here we show that a gas can condense to high density inside narrow, single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs). Temperature-programmed desorption spectroscopy shows that hydrogen will condense inside SWNTs under conditions that do not induce adsorption within a standard mesoporous activated carbon. The very high hydrogen uptake in these materials suggests that they might be effective as a hydrogen-storage material for fuel-cell electric vehicles.

  16. Multifunctional composites using reinforced laminae with carbon-nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veedu, Vinod P.; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Xuesong; Ma, Kougen; Soldano, Caterina; Kar, Swastik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2006-06-01

    Traditional fibre-reinforced composite materials with excellent in-plane properties fare poorly when out-of-plane through-thickness properties are important. Composite architectures with fibres designed orthogonal to the two-dimensional (2D) layout in traditional composites could alleviate this weakness in the transverse direction, but all of the efforts so far have only produced limited success. Here, we unveil an approach to the 3D composite challenge, without altering the 2D stack design, on the basis of the concept of interlaminar carbon-nanotube forests that would provide enhanced multifunctional properties along the thickness direction. The carbon-nanotube forests allow the fastening of adjacent plies in the 3D composite. We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the surface of micro-fibre fabric cloth layouts, normal to the fibre lengths, resulting in a 3D effect between plies under loading. These nanotube-coated fabric cloths serve as building blocks for the multilayered 3D composites, with the nanotube forests providing much-needed interlaminar strength and toughness under various loading conditions. For the fabricated 3D composites with nanotube forests, we demonstrate remarkable improvements in the interlaminar fracture toughness, hardness, delamination resistance, in-plane mechanical properties, damping, thermoelastic behaviour, and thermal and electrical conductivities making these structures truly multifunctional.

  17. Modeling encapsulation of acetylene molecules into carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tran-Duc, Thien; Thamwattana, Ngamta

    2011-06-08

    Polyacetylene is a well-known conductive polymer and when doped its conductivity can be altered by up to 12 orders of magnitude. However, due to entropy effects a polyacetylene chain usually suffers from distortions and interchain couplings which lead to unpredictable changes in its conducting property. Encapsulating a polyacetylene chain into a carbon nanotube can resolve these issues. Furthermore, since the carbon nanotube itself possesses excellent electrical conductivity, the combination of the carbon nanotube and polyacetylene may give rise to a new material with superior transport behavior. In this paper, we model mathematically the molecular interaction between an acetylene molecule and a carbon nanotube in order to determine conditions at which configurations of the acetylene molecule are accepted into the carbon nanotube as well as its equilibrium configurations inside various sizes of carbon nanotubes. For special cases of the acetylene molecule lying on the tube axis, standing vertically with its center on the tube axis and staying far inside the tube, explicit analytical expressions for the interaction energy are obtained.

  18. Selective Attention to Perceptual Dimensions and Switching between Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meiran, Nachshon; Dimov, Eduard; Ganel, Tzvi

    2013-01-01

    In the present experiments, the question being addressed was whether switching attention between perceptual dimensions and selective attention to dimensions are processes that compete over a common resource? Attention to perceptual dimensions is usually studied by requiring participants to ignore a never-relevant dimension. Selection failure…

  19. Polymer composites containing nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to polymer composite materials containing carbon nanotubes, particularly to those containing singled-walled nanotubes. The invention provides a polymer composite comprising one or more base polymers, one or more functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers and carbon nanotubes. The invention also relates to functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers, particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having side chain functionalization, and more particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having olefin side chains and alkyl epoxy side chains. The invention further relates to methods of making polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

  20. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  1. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  2. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  3. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W [Newport News, VA; Jordan, Kevin [Newport News, VA; Park, Cheol [Yorktown, VA

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  4. Unravelling the mechanisms behind mixed catalysts for the high yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tetali, Sailaja; Zaka, Mujtaba; Schönfelder, Ronny; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Börrnert, Felix; Ibrahim, Imad; Lin, Jarrn H; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2009-12-22

    The use of mixed catalysts for the high-yield production of single-walled carbon nanotubes is well-known. The mechanisms behind the improved yield are poorly understood. In this study, we systematically explore different catalyst combinations from Ni, Co, and Mo for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes via laser evaporation. Our findings reveal that the mixing of catalysts alters the catalyst cluster size distribution, maximizing the clusters' potential to form a hemispherical cap at nucleation and, hence, form a single-walled carbon nanotube. This process significantly improves the single-walled carbon nanotube yields.

  5. Moving between Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephenson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The first word of this item is "imagine". This instruction has the potential to signal a journey through a world of geometry that might leave you spellbound. On the other hand, it could be the start of a roller-coaster ride through three dimensions that will tax both your imagination, and your powers of visualisation. It is likely that you will…

  6. Physics in One Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertel, Erminald

    2013-01-01

    Due to progress in nanotechnology high-quality quantum wires can nowadays be fabricated. The behavior of particles in one dimension differs significantly from that in three-dimensional (3D) systems, yet the physics of such low-dimensional systems is generally not very well represented in standard undergraduate or graduate curricula. For instance,…

  7. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-06-10

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  8. Dimensions of Nonverbal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overmier, Mary; And Others

    After a brief description of the dimensions of nonverbal communication, this booklet presents 21 activities that deal with nonverbal communication. Activities in the booklet involve body movements (kinesics), facial expressions, eye movements, perception and use of space (proxemics), haptics (touch), paralinguistics (vocal elements that accompany…

  9. Constructing gravitational dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Matthew

    2003-07-01

    It would be extremely useful to know whether a particular low energy effective theory might have come from a compactification of a higher dimensional space. Here, this problem is approached from the ground up by considering theories with multiple interacting massive gravitons. It is actually very difficult to construct discrete gravitational dimensions which have a local continuum limit. In fact, any model with only nearest neighbor interactions is doomed. If we could find a non-linear extension for the Fierz-Pauli Lagrangian for a graviton of mass mg, which does not break down until the scale Λ2=(mgMPl), this could be used to construct a large class of models whose continuum limit is local in the extra dimension. But this is shown to be impossible: a theory with a single graviton must break down by Λ3=(m2gMPl)1/3. Next, we look at how the discretization prescribed by the truncation of the Kaluza-Klein tower of an honest extra dimension raises the scale of strong coupling. It dictates an intricate set of interactions among various fields which conspire to soften the strongest scattering amplitudes and allow for a local continuum limit, at least at the tree level. A number of candidate symmetries associated with locality in the discretized dimension are also discussed.

  10. Big Mysteries: Extra Dimensions

    ScienceCinema

    Lincoln, Don

    2016-07-12

    The weakness of gravity compared to the other subatomic forces is a real mystery. While nobody knows the answer, one credible solution is that gravity has access to more spatial dimensions than the other three known forces. In this video, Fermilab's Dr. Don Lincoln describes this idea, with the help of some very urbane characters.

  11. Extra Dimensions of Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Don

    2013-01-01

    They say that there is no such thing as a stupid question. In a pedagogically pure sense, that's probably true. But some questions do seem to flirt dangerously close to being really quite ridiculous. One such question might well be, "How many dimensions of space are there?" I mean, it's pretty obvious that there are three:…

  12. Synthesis and growth mechanism of multilayer TiO2 nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Dongsheng; Wang, Ying

    2012-04-01

    High-aspect-ratio TiO2 nanotube arrays formed by anodic oxidation have drawn extensive attention due to their easy fabrication and various excellent optical, electrical and biomedical properties. In contrast to conventional single-layer TiO2 nanotubes prepared via constant-voltage anodization, we synthesize multilayer TiO2 nanotube arrays with high surface area by using alternating-voltage anodization steps. This work presents synthesis and growth mechanisms of single-layer smooth TiO2 nanotubes, bamboo-type nanotubes and double-layer nanotubes, by tuning various parameters such as voltage, time, and water content in the electrolyte. It is found that ion diffusion inside the nanotubes dominates growth of these three structures. A stable pH and ion-diffusion profile allows the steady growth of smooth TiO2 tubes in NH4F-containing ethylene glycol (EG). The addition of a low-voltage anodization step reduces the pH and ion-diffusion gradient in the nanotubes and induces formation of bamboo-type nanotubes and double-layer nanotubes when a second high-voltage anodization is conducted. Ion diffusion through a nanotube takes time; thus formation of lower-layer TO2 nanotubes costs more time if longer nanotubes are grown in the upper layer, since ions diffuse through these longer nanotubes. This ion-diffusion controlled growth mechanism is further confirmed by tailoring the water content (0-20 vol%) in the electrolyte and the voltage gaps to control the time needed for initiation of lower-layer TiO2 nanotube arrays. The fundamental understanding of the growth characteristics of double-layer TiO2 nanotubes presented in this paper offers us more flexibility in engineering morphology, tuning dimensions and phase compositions of multilayer TiO2 nanotubes. In addition, we synthesize double-layer TiO2 nanotube arrays composed of one layer of anatase phase and another layer of amorphous phase.High-aspect-ratio TiO2 nanotube arrays formed by anodic oxidation have drawn extensive

  13. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  14. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  15. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica; Letant, Sonia; Stadermann, Michael; Artyukhin, Alexander B.

    2010-06-29

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  16. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  17. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation deals with the use of carbon nanotubes as a transport system. Contact, defects, tubular bend, phonons, and mechanical deformations all contribute to reflection within the nanotube wire. Bragg reflection, however, is native to an ideal energy transport system. Transmission resistance depends primarily on the level of energy present. Finally, the details regarding coupling between carbon nanotubes and simple metals are presented.

  18. Majorana fermion wavefunctions in carbon nanotubes and carbynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, N. R.; Aporoski, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    Electron properties of semiconducting zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be described by two uncoupled Dirac equations of dimension (1+1) for the particle with nonzero mass. The solutions of these equations are two charge-neutral Majorana fields. An analogous equation is obtained for the carbon chains. We use the approach, wherein wavefunction of charged particle is represented as the production of a rapidly oscillating exponent and the slowly varying function amplitude depending on the longitudinal coordinate.

  19. Cultural dimensions of learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyford, Glen A.

    1990-06-01

    How, what, when and where we learn is frequently discussed, as are content versus process, or right brain versus left brain learning. What is usually missing is the cultural dimension. This is not an easy concept to define, but various aspects can be identified. The World Decade for Cultural Development emphasizes the need for a counterbalance to a quantitative, economic approach. In the last century poets also warned against brutalizing materialism, and Sorokin and others have described culture more recently in terms of cohesive basic values expressed through aesthetics and institutions. Bloom's taxonomy incorporates the category of affective learning, which internalizes values. If cultural learning goes beyond knowledge acquisition, perhaps the surest way of understanding the cultural dimension of learning is to examine the aesthetic experience. This can use myths, metaphors and symbols, and to teach and learn by using these can help to unlock the human potential for vision and creativity.

  20. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  1. Dimensions of Intelligent Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    strategies - the intelligent parts of a cognitive model. This was necessary to achieve effective time performance - conventional AI techniques were too slow...Dimensions of Intelligent Systems Dr. Gary Berg-Cross Knowledge Strategies Division, SLAG, Inc. Potomac, Maryland 20854, USA 1. Abstract As...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) SLAG, Inc,Knowledge Strategies Division,Potomac,MD,20854 8

  2. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.

    2010-07-12

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  3. Introduction to Extra Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2010-04-29

    Extra dimensions provide a very useful tool in addressing a number of the fundamental problems faced by the Standard Model. The following provides a very basic introduction to this very broad subject area as given at the VIII School of the Gravitational and Mathematical Physics Division of the Mexican Physical Society in December 2009. Some prospects for extra dimensional searches at the 7 TeV LHC with {approx}1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity are provided.

  4. Infinitely Large New Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Dimopoulos, Savas; Dvali, Gia; Kaloper, Nemanja

    1999-07-29

    We construct intersecting brane configurations in Anti-de-Sitter space localizing gravity to the intersection region, with any number n of extra dimensions. This allows us to construct two kinds of theories with infinitely large new dimensions, TeV scale quantum gravity and sub-millimeter deviations from Newton's Law. The effective 4D Planck scale M{sub Pl} is determined in terms of the fundamental Planck scale M{sub *} and the AdS radius of curvature L via the familiar relation M{sub Pl}{sup 2} {approx} M{sub *}{sup 2+n} L{sup n}; L acts as an effective radius of compactification for gravity on the intersection. Taking M{sub *} {approx} TeV and L {approx} sub-mm reproduces the phenomenology of theories with large extra dimensions. Alternately, taking M{sub *} {approx} L{sup -1} {approx} M{sub Pl}, and placing our 3-brane a distance {approx} 100M{sub Pl}{sup -1} away from the intersection gives us a theory with an exponential determination of the Weak/Planck hierarchy.

  5. Sorting Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by their electronic and atomic structures in liquid phases is reviewed in this chapter. We first introduce the sorting problem, and then provide an overview of several sorting methodologies, following roughly the chronological order of their development over the past 15 years or so. Major methods discussed include ion-exchange chromatography, density-gradient ultracentrifugation, selective extraction in organic solvents, gel chromatography, and aqueous two-phase extraction. A main focus of the review is on the common mechanisms underlining all sorting processes. We propose that differences in solvation among different nanotube species are the ultimate driving force of sorting, and we corroborate this proposal by presenting analysis on how the differences are realized in electronic-structure-based sorting and atomic-structure-based sorting. In the end, we offer some suggestions on future directions that may grow out of carbon nanotube sorting. In particular, the prospect of expanding the function of DNA/carbon nanotube hybrid to control inter-particle interactions both inside and outside the nanotube is discussed.

  6. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  7. Carbon nanotubes as liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanju; Kumar, Satish

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the best of known materials with a combination of excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. To fully exploit individual nanotube properties for various applications, the grand challenge is to fabricate macroscopic ordered nanotube assemblies. Liquid-crystalline behavior of the nanotubes provides a unique opportunity toward reaching this challenge. In this Review, the recent developments in this area are critically reviewed by discussing the strategies for fabricating liquid-crystalline phases, addressing the solution properties of liquid-crystalline suspensions, and exploiting the practical techniques of liquid-crystal routes to prepare macroscopic nanotube fibers and films.

  8. Thermal rectification in inhomogeneous nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2016-12-01

    Heat transfer in axially inhomogeneous nanotubes is known to be asymmetric with respect to the direction of transfer. This phenomenon is known as the thermal rectification. We demonstrate that thermal rectification in such nanotubes arises due to the interference of phonons excited in the different parts of the nanotube. It is shown that the rectification does not vanish when the thickness of nanotube increases, but it vanishes as the external diameter of nanotubes decreases to a few nanometers. The understanding of the origin of thermal rectification opens a way to the design of devices controlling heat flows that could perform as efficiently as their electronic counterparts controlling electric currents.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  10. Carbon nanotubes: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongjie

    2002-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are graphene sheets rolled-up into cylinders with diameters as small as one nanometer. Extensive work carried out worldwide in recent years has revealed the intriguing electrical and mechanical properties of these novel molecular scale wires. It is now well established that carbon nanotubes are ideal model systems for studying the physics in one-dimensional solids and have significant potential as building blocks for various practical nanoscale devices. Nanotubes have been shown to be useful for miniaturized electronic, mechanical, electromechanical, chemical and scanning probe devices and materials for macroscopic composites. Progress in nanotube growth has facilitated the fundamental study and applications of nanotubes. Gaining control over challenging nanotube growth issues is critical to the future advancement of nanotube science and technology, and is being actively pursued by researchers.

  11. Copper-philic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgamwar, Sachin U.; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotube is having poor wet-ability with copper metal. Wet-ability of carbon nanotube was improved by exposing and creating more active sites on the surface of carbon nanotube. Carbon nanotubes were subjected to the prolong ultrasonication treatment of 20×103 Hz and 500W, which helped in disentanglement of carbon nanotube agglomerates and in breaking the weak bonds like pentagonal or heptagonal structure on the surface and on the CNT cap. Disentanglement of the carbon nanotube, resulted in exposing the defective sites on the surface and breaking of weak bonds, which assisted in creating the new defects on the surface. This process results in generates more active sites on the surface and it helps in improving the wet-ability of the carbon nanotube in copper.

  12. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  13. Confinement and surface effects of aqueous solutions within charged carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Calixte, Emvia I; Samoylova, Olga N; Shuford, Kevin L

    2016-04-28

    We have examined the structure of water and aqueous solutions in carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. We find confinement changes the structure of water as well as the interactions between ions and their solvation shells. The density and orientation of water at the nanotube walls are strongly dependent on the surface charge and cations/anions present at the interfaces. Decreasing the nanotube diameter alters the ion hydration properties as well as hydrogen bonding structure and formation dynamics. The results indicate that fluid structure and hydrogen bond characteristics in nano-channels can be tuned through modification of tube charge and with ion selection.

  14. Single crystalline magnetite nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuqin; Zhang, Daihua; Han, Song; Li, Chao; Lei, Bo; Lu, Weigang; Fang, Jiye; Zhou, Chongwu

    2005-01-12

    We descried a method to synthesize single crystalline Fe3O4 nanotubes by wet-etching the MgO inner cores of MgO/Fe3O4 core-shell nanowires. Homogeneous Fe3O4 nanotubes with controllable length, diameter, and wall thickness have been obtained. Resistivity of the Fe3O4 nanotubes was estimated to be approximately 4 x 10-2 Omega cm at room temperature. Magnetoresistance of approximately 1% was observed at T = 77 K when a magnetic field of B = 0.7 T was applied. The synthetic strategy presented here may be extended to a variety of materials such as YBCO, PZT, and LCMO which should provide ideal candidates for fundamental studies of superconductivity, piezoelectricity, and ferromagnetism in nanoscale structures.

  15. Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Supriyo; Anatram, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    The recent report of quantized conductance in a 4 m long multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) raises the exciting possibility of ballistic transport at room temperature over relatively long distances. We argue that this is made possible by the special symmetry of the eigenstates of the lowest propagating modes in metallic nanotubes which suppresses backscattering. This unusual effect is absent for the higher propagating modes so that transport is not ballistic once the bias exceeds the cut-off energy for the higher modes, which is estimated to be approximately 75 meV for nanotubes of diameter approximately 15 nm. Also, we show that the symmetry of the eigenstates can significantly affect their coupling to the reservoir and hence the contact resistance. A simple model is presented that can be used to understand the observed conductance-voltage characteristics.

  16. Functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with urethane segments and their interaction with solvents and a polyurethane elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-d'Arlas, Borja; Eceiza, Arantxa

    2014-01-01

    Manipulation of nanoparticles is easier when they are appropriately functionalized with adequate chemical groups. In this work, multiwalled carbon nanotubes were functionalized with different chemical groups and the influence of functionalization on their stability in different solutions and the impact on elastomeric polyurethane composites were studied. It was observed that the functionalization yielded in all cases nanotubes with approximately the same dimensions (diameter: ˜8-40 nm; length: ˜1-25 μm) and 24-29 wt% of organic tallow per mass of nanotube. The chemical behaviour of nanotubes in solutions was highly dependent on functionality. The impact on mechanical properties was function of the chemical nature of the nanotube functional groups and moderately followed the expected tendency according to their solubility in solvents.

  17. Bond percolation in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, Eric I.; Stinchcombe, Robin; Thorpe, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    We collect results for bond percolation on various lattices from two to fourteen dimensions that, in the limit of large dimension d or number of neighbors z, smoothly approach a randomly diluted Erdős-Rényi graph. We include results on bond-diluted hypersphere packs in up to nine dimensions, which show the mean coordination, excess kurtosis, and skewness evolving smoothly with dimension towards the Erdős-Rényi limit.

  18. Structural stability and electronic properties of sp3 type silicon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hever, Alon; Bernstein, Jonathan; Hod, Oded

    2012-12-01

    A density functional theory study of the structural and electronic properties and relative stability of narrow hydrogen passivated sp3 silicon nanotubes of different growth orientations is presented. All nanotubes studied and their corresponding wire structures are found to be meta-stable with the wires being more energetically stable. Silicon nanotubes show a dramatic bandgap increase of up to 68% with respect to the corresponding wires. Furthermore, a direct relation between the bandgap of the system and the molar fraction of the passivating hydrogen contents is found. These results suggest that by careful control over their crystallographic growth orientation, dimensions, and chemical composition it should be possible to design and fabricate silicon nanotubes with desired electronic properties.

  19. Physico-chemical studies of amorphous carbon nanotubes synthesized at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Kim Han; Ahmad, Roslina; Leo, Bey Fen; Yew, Ming Chian; Ang, Bee Chin; Johan, Mohd Rafie

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Amorphous carbon nanotubes are successfully produced via a simple method at low temperature. ► Nanotubes in straight morphologies with open ends. ► Acid treatment increases the extent of amorphous for nanotubes. ► Amorphous nanotubes exhibit phenomena of π plasmon absorbance and possess higher bandgap. -- Abstract: This work provides better understanding on the nature of amorphous carbon nanotubes, which are synthesized via a simple chemical route. Amorphous carbon nanotubes (α-CNTs) are successfully synthesized by heating a mixture of ferrocene and ammonium chloride at temperature as low as 200 °C and are treated with hydrochloric acid. Transmission and field emission scanning electron microscopy techniques are performed to examine the morphology and dimension of the samples. X-ray diffraction tests confirm the amorphous structure of the nanotubes. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman studies indicate that the treated α-CNTs consist of many defective walls and are more amorphous compared with the untreated α-CNTs. Ultraviolet–visible absorption studies reveal that the untreated and treated α-CNTs exhibit plasmon absorbance with high bandgaps of 4 eV and 4.35 eV, respectively.

  20. Flying in Two Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Manu; Bardon, Thibaut

    2012-11-01

    It has long been proposed that insect flight might have evolved on a fluid interface. Surface of a pond provides an ecological niche which is exploited by a large number of species capable of locomotion on a fluid interface. Here we describe the discovery of constrained flight in two dimensions as a novel mode of locomotion used by water lily beetles (genus Galerucella). Because water lily beetles are also capable of three-dimensional free flight, this novel two-dimensional locomotion provides us with a unique model system to explore both the transition between two and three dimensional flight and the associated energetics. Here we present a comparative analysis of this transition in terms of wing stroke angles associated with two and three dimensional flight, as well as modeling surface tension forces on both the horizontal and vertical axes. Special attention is paid to the dynamics and energetics of flight in two-dimensions, focusing on the interaction of the wing strokes with the fluid interface and the capillary-gravity wave drag associated with two-dimensional propulsion. Current Address: Ecole Polytechnique, France.

  1. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  2. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  3. Torsional Resonators Based on Inorganic Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Divon, Yiftach; Levi, Roi; Garel, Jonathan; Golberg, Dmitri; Tenne, Reshef; Ya'akobovitz, Assaf; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2017-01-11

    We study for the first time the resonant torsional behaviors of inorganic nanotubes, specifically tungsten disulfide (WS2) and boron nitride (BN) nanotubes, and compare them to that of carbon nanotubes. We have found WS2 nanotubes to have the highest quality factor (Q) and torsional resonance frequency, followed by BN nanotubes and carbon nanotubes. Dynamic and static torsional spring constants of the various nanotubes were found to be different, especially in the case of WS2, possibly due to a velocity-dependent intershell friction. These results indicate that inorganic nanotubes are promising building blocks for high-Q nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  4. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    PubMed

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  5. FRACTAL DIMENSION OF GALAXY ISOPHOTES

    SciTech Connect

    Thanki, Sandip; Rhee, George; Lepp, Stephen E-mail: grhee@physics.unlv.edu

    2009-09-15

    In this paper we investigate the use of the fractal dimension of galaxy isophotes in galaxy classification. We have applied two different methods for determining fractal dimensions to the isophotes of elliptical and spiral galaxies derived from CCD images. We conclude that fractal dimension alone is not a reliable tool but that combined with other parameters in a neural net algorithm the fractal dimension could be of use. In particular, we have used three parameters to segregate the ellipticals and lenticulars from the spiral galaxies in our sample. These three parameters are the correlation fractal dimension D {sub corr}, the difference between the correlation fractal dimension and the capacity fractal dimension D {sub corr} - D {sub cap}, and, thirdly, the B - V color of the galaxy.

  6. Action languages: Dimensions, effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Daniel G.; Streeter, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    Dimensions of action languages are discussed for communication between humans and machines, and the message handling capabilities of object oriented programming systems are examined. Design of action languages is seen to be very contextual. Economical and effective design will depend on features of situations, the tasks intended to be accomplished, and the nature of the devices themselves. Current object oriented systems turn out to have fairly simple and straightforward message handling facilities, which in themselves do little to buffer action or even in some cases to handle competing messages. Even so, it is possible to program a certain amount of discretion about how they react to messages. Such thoughtfulness and perhaps relative autonomy of program modules seems prerequisite to future systems to handle complex interactions in changing situations.

  7. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  8. Growth of GaN nanotubes and nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Maoqi; Zhou, Piezhen; Mohammad, S. Noor; Halpern, Joshua; Jacobs, Randy; Sarney, Wendy; Salamanca-Riba, Lourdes

    2001-03-01

    We have grown GaN nanowires and nanotubes by direct reaction of Ga metal vapor with NH3 in a simple tube furnace. By varying the ammonia flow rate (20-120 sccm) and temperature (800-1000 ^oC) we have been able to control onset of growth, and the diameters of these cylindrically symmetric nanostructures. The length of the nanowires and nanotubes is determined by the duration of the growth cycle. The nanowires and nanotubes that we have studied are single crystal and have a wurtzite structure. In the first 90 minutes, a 1 or 2 μ thick amorphous GaN matrix is deposited. Soon after pebble like polycrystalline hillocks form. Single crystal nanowires sprout from the sides of the platelets. The diameter of the nanowire is the same as the thickness of the plate, that is the smallest dimension of the face from which it grows. Since the platelet thickness depends on temperature and the ammonia, the thickness of the nanowires is proportional to the temperature and ammonia flow rate. At higher temperatures and flow rates nanotubes and rods start to grow from the flat surface of the plates

  9. Light-scattering and dispersion behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saltiel, Craig; Manickavasagam, Siva; Pinar Mengüc, M.; Andrews, Rodney

    2005-08-01

    Elliptically polarized light-scattering measurements were performed to investigate the dispersion behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT). Xylene- and pyridine-derived MWNT powders were dispersed in water and ethanol in separate optic cells and allowed to sit undisturbed over a two-week time period after probe sonication. Continuous light-scattering measurements taken between scattering angles of 10-170 deg and repeated over several days showed that the nanotubes formed fractal-like networks. The pyridine-derived MWNTs showed greater dispersion variation over time, tending to aggregate and clump much faster than the xylene-derived tubes. The water suspensions appeared much more stable than the ethanol suspensions, which transformed into nonfractal morphology after a few hours. We relate the dispersion stability to size and fringe patterns on the outer surface of the nanotubes. Measured values of fractal dimension were distinctly lower than those in previous studies of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Profiles of both diagonal and off-diagonal scattering matrix elements are presented.

  10. FABRICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A CARBON NANOTUBE-BASED NANOKNIFE

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G.; Rice, P.; Mahajan, R. L.; McIntosh, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate construction and testing of a prototype microtome knife for cutting ~100 nm thick slices of frozen-hydrated biological samples based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT). A piezoelectric-based 3-D manipulator was used inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to select and position individual MWCNTs, which were subsequently welded in place using electron beam-induced deposition (EBID). The knife is built on a pair of tungsten needles with provision to adjust the distance between the needle tips, accommodating various lengths of MWCNTs. We performed experiments to test the mechanical strength of MWCNT in the completed device using an atomic force microscope (AFM) tip. An increasing force was applied at the midpoint of nanotube until failure, which was observed in situ in the SEM. The maximum breaking force was approximately (8 × 10−7) N which corresponds well with the typical microtome cutting forces reported in the literature. In situ cutting experiments were performed on a cell biological embedding plastic (epoxy) by pushing it against the nanotube. Initial experiments show indentation marks on the epoxy surface. Quantitative analysis is currently limited by the surface asperities which have the same dimensions as the nanotube. PMID:19417497

  11. Fabrication and characterization of a carbon nanotube-based nanoknife

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G.; Rice, P.; Mahajan, R. L.; McIntosh, J. R.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication and testing of a prototype microtome knife based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) for cutting ~100 nm thick slices of frozen-hydrated biological samples. A piezoelectric-based 3D manipulator was used inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM) to select and position individual MWCNTs, which were subsequently welded in place using electron beam-induced deposition. The knife is built on a pair of tungsten needles with provision to adjust the distance between the needle tips, accommodating various lengths of MWCNTs. We performed experiments to test the mechanical strength of a MWCNT in the completed device using an atomic force microscope tip. An increasing force was applied at the mid-point of the nanotube until failure occurred, which was observed in situ in the SEM. The maximum breaking force was approximately (8 × 10-7) N which corresponds well with the typical microtome cutting forces reported in the literature. In situ cutting experiments were performed on a cell biological embedding plastic (epoxy) by pushing it against the nanotube. Initial experiments show indentation marks on the epoxy surface. Quantitative analysis is currently limited by the surface asperities, which have the same dimensions as the nanotube.

  12. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  13. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Punyani, Supriya; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Yang, Hoichang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Kane, Ravi S.

    2008-01-01

    Conjugating proteins onto carbon nanotubes has numerous applications in biosensing, imaging and cellular delivery. However, remotely controlling the activity of proteins in these conjugates has never been demonstrated. Here we show that upon near-infrared irradiation, carbon nanotubes mediate the selective deactivation of proteins in situ by photochemical effects. We designed nanotube-peptide conjugates to selectively destroy the anthrax toxin, and also optically transparent coatings that can self-clean following either visible or near-infrared irradiation. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation may be broadly applicable to the selective destruction of pathogens and cells, and will have applications ranging from antifouling coatings to functional proteomics.

  14. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  15. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  16. Accelerated dynamics simulations of nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, B. P.; Stuart, S. J.; Voter, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the application of accelerated dynamics techniques to the study of carbon nanotubes. We have used the parallel replica method and temperature accelerated dynamics simulations are currently in progress. In the parallel replica study, we have stretched tubes at a rate significantly lower than that used in previous studies. In these preliminary results, we find that there are qualitative differences in the rupture of the nanotubes at different temperatures. We plan on extending this investigation to include nanotubes of various chiralities. We also plan on exploring unique geometries of nanotubes.

  17. The Dimension of Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, Lucien

    2008-11-01

    To implement Jaynes' vision [1] of applications of Shannon's ideas outside Communication Theory proper, the dimension of information must be clarified, mainly because general applications provide no ready-made set of discrete, mutually exclusive and exhaustive "events" which could play a rôle similar to that of the alphabet which communication theory implicitely supposes known from the outset. For instance, a doctor's "alphabet" may be said to consist of readily distinguishable bundles of symptoms, cures, etc., each of which he considers specific enough to describe an illness of interest. Setting up an appropriate alphabet requires learning, in the same way as a child painfully learns to read letters, and a quantitative assessment of this task depends crucially on the dimension of information. Information is an extensive property, as explicited by the standard equation I = N.H for the amount of information delivered by a succession of N events. All other things remaining equal, doubling the length of a message doubles the amount of information. But by definition, Shannon's uncertainty H on the right-hand side of the equation is a rate, i.e. an intensive property, as illustrated by the fact that the simultaneous throw of two true and identical dice removes less than twice the uncertainty removed by the throw of a single die, as is well-known to poker-players. If the above equation is to be dimensionally consistent, N can not be a pure number, but must have an extensive dimension of its own. The obvious question "which?" was swept under the rug by von Neumann's famous quip [3], which advised to call H an entropy, thereby suggesting improperly that H by itself-without the factor N-is an extensive property like physical entropy. But H only evaluates an amount of information when multiplied by N, which measures an amount of order akin to the chronological order without which any message becomes garbage. In analogy with the decomposition E S.T of energy E into the pair

  18. Carbon nanotubes and nanowires for biological sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Ng, Hou Tee; Chen, Hua

    2005-01-01

    This chapter reviews the recent development in biological sensing using nanotechnologies based on carbon nanotubes and various nanowires. These 1D materials have shown unique properties that are efficient in interacting with biomolecules of similar dimensions, i.e., on a nanometer scale. Various aspects including synthesis, materials properties, device fabrication, biofunctionalization, and biological sensing applications of such materials are reviewed. The potential of such integrated nanobiosensors in providing ultrahigh sensitivity, fast response, and high-degree multiplex detection, yet with minimum sample requirements is demonstrated. This chapter is intended to provide comprehensive updated information for people from a variety of backgrounds but with common interests in the fast-moving interdisciplinary field of nanobiotechnology.

  19. Neocortical Maturation during Adolescence: Change in Neuronal Soma Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowicz, Theodore; Petetot, Jean MacDonald-Comber; Khoury, Jane C.; de Courten-Myers, Gabrielle M.

    2009-01-01

    During adolescence, cognitive abilities increase robustly. To search for possible related structural alterations of the cerebral cortex, we measured neuronal soma dimension (NSD = width times height), cortical thickness and neuronal densities in different types of neocortex in post-mortem brains of five 12-16 and five 17-24 year-olds (each 2F,…

  20. Scientific Visualization of Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Don V.

    2010-10-01

    In the 21st Century, many theoretical physicists claim that higher dimensions may indeed exist. Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos, & Dvali (ADD) and Randall-Sundrum (RS), in addition to Kaluza-Klein (KK) and M-string theorists, have introduced reasonable explanations for the existence of heretofore ``invisible'' higher dimensions. Whether or not these extra dimensions actually exist is irrelevant to their contributions to the visionary conceptualization associated with novel and improved mathematical and physical analysis. Envisioning extra dimensions beyond the three of common experience is a daunting challenge for three dimensional observers. Intuition relies on experience gained in a three dimensional environment. Gaining experience with virtual four dimensional objects and virtual three manifolds in four-space on a personal computer may provide the basis for an intuitive grasp of four dimensions. This presentation is a video ``outtake'' of the author's research into ``Visualizing Extra Spatial Dimensions'' at the University of California at Irvine.

  1. Johannes Kepler and Extra Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, Archibald W.

    2004-02-01

    How many dimensions are there? The answer used to be four — three spatial and one time dimension. Maybe it still is, though nowadays we hear that the answer may be more, perhaps many more. Many of our students have heard about this on television or read about it. They want to know more. Why do physicists think we need more than three spatial dimensions? What's the point of it all?

  2. Physics in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Houselt, A.; Schäfer, J.; Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Claessen, R.

    2013-01-01

    With modern microelectronics moving towards smaller and smaller length scales on the (sub-) nm scale, quantum effects (apart from band structure and band gaps) have begun to play an increasingly important role. This especially concerns dimensional confinement to 2D (high electron mobility transistors and integer/fractional quantum Hall effect physics, graphene and topological insulators) and 1D (with electrical connections eventually reaching the quantum limit). Recent developments in the above-mentioned areas have revealed that the properties of electron systems become increasingly exotic as one progresses from the 3D case into lower dimensions. As compared to 2D electron systems, much less experimental progress has been achieved in the field of 1D electron systems. The main reason for the lack of experimental results in this field is related to the difficulty of realizing 1D electron systems. Atom chains created in quantum mechanical break junction set-ups are too short to exhibit the typically 1D signatures. As an alternative, atomic chains can be produced on crystal surfaces, either via assembling them one-by-one using a scanning tunnelling microscope or via self-assembly. The drawback of the latter systems is that the atomic chains are not truly 1D since they are coupled to the underlying crystal and sometimes even to the neighbouring chains. In retrospect, this coupling turns out to be an absolute necessity in the experiment since true 1D systems are disordered at any non-zero temperature [1]. The coupling to the crystal and/or neighbouring chains shifts the phase transition, for example, a Peierls instability, to a non-zero temperature and thus allows experiments to be performed in the ordered state. Here, we want to emphasize that the electronic properties of the 1D electron system are fundamentally different from its 2D and 3D counterparts. The Fermi liquid theory, which is applicable to 2D and 3D electron systems, breaks down spectacularly in the 1D case

  3. Nonminimal universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Flacke, Thomas; Menon, A.; Phalen, Daniel J.

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate the phenomenological implications of boundary localized terms (BLTs) in the model of universal extra dimensions (UED). In particular, we study the electroweak Kaluza-Klein mass spectrum resulting from BLTs and their effect on electroweak symmetry breaking via the five-dimensional Higgs mechanism. We find that the addition of BLTs to massive five-dimensional fields induces a nontrivial extra-dimensional profile for the zero and nonzero Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes. Hence BLTs generically lead to a modification of standard model parameters and are therefore experimentally constrained, even at tree level. We study standard model constraints on three representative nonminimal UED models in detail and find that the constraints on BLTs are weak. On the contrary, nonzero BLTs have a major impact on the spectrum and couplings of nonzero KK modes. For example, there are regions of parameter space where the lightest Kaluza-Klein particle is either the Kaluza-Klein Higgs boson or the first KK mode of the W{sup 3}.

  4. Adhesion to Carbon Nanotube Conductive Scaffolds Forces Action-Potential Appearance in Immature Rat Spinal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies. PMID:23951361

  5. Sacrificial template growth of CdS nanotubes from Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xuemei; Chu Haibin; Li Yan . E-mail: yanli@pku.edu.cn

    2006-01-15

    A diffusion-controlled process was proposed for the preparation of inorganic nanotubes from nanowires. The preformed Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowires were used as the sacrificial templates to generate CdS nanotubes with different wall thickness. The axle-sleeve transition state found in-between the precursor and the formation of products proves the diffusion-controlled mechanism. CdS nanotubes can be prepared via this method at different temperature and with various sulfide sources. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results showed that all obtained CdS nanotubes consist conglomerated crystallites, and the crystallinity can be altered by changing the temperature of the growth process. The wall thickness of the produced CdS nanotubes can be controlled by changing the concentration of the sulfide source and stopping the reaction at different stages. -- Graphical abstract: CdS nanotubes were prepared with Cd(OH){sub 2} nanowires as the sacrificial templates. Diffusion played an important role in the process. The morphology of the produced nanotubes can be varied by alternating the reaction conditions.

  6. Adhesion to carbon nanotube conductive scaffolds forces action-potential appearance in immature rat spinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Sucapane, Antonietta; Toma, Francesca Maria; Calura, Enrica; Rizzetto, Lisa; Carrieri, Claudia; Roncaglia, Paola; Martinelli, Valentina; Scaini, Denis; Masten, Lara; Turco, Antonio; Gustincich, Stefano; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, carbon nanotube growth substrates have been used to investigate neurons and neuronal networks formation in vitro when guided by artificial nano-scaled cues. Besides, nanotube-based interfaces are being developed, such as prosthesis for monitoring brain activity. We recently described how carbon nanotube substrates alter the electrophysiological and synaptic responses of hippocampal neurons in culture. This observation highlighted the exceptional ability of this material in interfering with nerve tissue growth. Here we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote the development of immature neurons isolated from the neonatal rat spinal cord, and maintained in vitro. To address this issue we performed electrophysiological studies associated to gene expression analysis. Our results indicate that spinal neurons plated on electro-conductive carbon nanotubes show a facilitated development. Spinal neurons anticipate the expression of functional markers of maturation, such as the generation of voltage dependent currents or action potentials. These changes are accompanied by a selective modulation of gene expression, involving neuronal and non-neuronal components. Our microarray experiments suggest that carbon nanotube platforms trigger reparative activities involving microglia, in the absence of reactive gliosis. Hence, future tissue scaffolds blended with conductive nanotubes may be exploited to promote cell differentiation and reparative pathways in neural regeneration strategies.

  7. Thermal dimension of quantum spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelino-Camelia, Giovanni; Brighenti, Francesco; Gubitosi, Giulia; Santos, Grasiele

    2017-04-01

    Recent results suggest that a crucial crossroad for quantum gravity is the characterization of the effective dimension of spacetime at short distances, where quantum properties of spacetime become significant. This is relevant in particular for various scenarios of "dynamical dimensional reduction" which have been discussed in the literature. We are here concerned with the fact that the related research effort has been based mostly on analyses of the "spectral dimension", which involves an unphysical Euclideanization of spacetime and is highly sensitive to the off-shell properties of a theory. As here shown, different formulations of the same physical theory can have wildly different spectral dimension. We propose that dynamical dimensional reduction should be described in terms of the "thermal dimension" which we here introduce, a notion that only depends on the physical content of the theory. We analyze a few models with dynamical reduction both of the spectral dimension and of our thermal dimension, finding in particular some cases where thermal and spectral dimension agree, but also some cases where the spectral dimension has puzzling properties while the thermal dimension gives a different and meaningful picture.

  8. Exterior dimension of fat fractals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grebogi, C.; Mcdonald, S. W.; Ott, E.; Yorke, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Geometric scaling properties of fat fractal sets (fractals with finite volume) are discussed and characterized via the introduction of a new dimension-like quantity which is called the exterior dimension. In addition, it is shown that the exterior dimension is related to the 'uncertainty exponent' previously used in studies of fractal basin boundaries, and it is shown how this connection can be exploited to determine the exterior dimension. Three illustrative applications are described, two in nonlinear dynamics and one dealing with blood flow in the body. Possible relevance to porous materials and ballistic driven aggregation is also noted.

  9. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    PubMed

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  10. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  11. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  12. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  13. Nanotubes in biological applications.

    PubMed

    Mundra, Ruchir V; Wu, Xia; Sauer, Jeremy; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2014-08-01

    Researchers over the last few years have recognized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as promising materials for a number of biological applications. CNTs are increasingly being explored as potent drug carriers for cancer treatment, for biosensing, and as scaffolds for stem cell culture. Moreover, the integration of CNTs with proteins has led to the development of functional nanocomposites with antimicrobial properties. This review aims at understanding the critical role of CNTs in biological applications with a particular emphasis on more recent studies.

  14. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    We describe current and possible future developments in nanotechnology for biological and medical applications. Nanostructured, composite materials for drug delivery, biosensors, diagnostics and tumor therapy are reviewed as examples, placing special emphasis on silica composites. Carbon nanotubes are discussed as a primary example of emerging nanomaterials for many of the above-mentioned applications. Toxicity effects of this novel nanomaterial are discussed and the need for further study of potential hazards for human health, professionally exposed workers and the environment is motivated.

  16. Boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chopra, N G; Luyken, R J; Cherrey, K; Crespi, V H; Cohen, M L; Louie, S G; Zettl, A

    1995-08-18

    The successful synthesis of pure boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is reported here. Multi-walled tubes with inner diameters on the order of 1 to 3 nanometers and with lengths up to 200 nanometers were produced in a carbon-free plasma discharge between a BN-packed tungsten rod and a cooled copper electrode. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on individual tubes yielded B:N ratios of approximately 1, which is consistent with theoretical predictions of stable BN tube structures.

  17. BOOK REVIEW: Quantum Physics in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, David

    2004-05-01

    To a casual ostrich the world of quantum physics in one dimension may sound a little one-dimensional, suitable perhaps for those with an unhealthy obsession for the esoteric. Nothing of course could be further from the truth. The field is remarkably rich and broad, and for more than fifty years has thrown up innumerable challenges. Theorists, realising that the role of interactions in 1D is special and that well known paradigms of higher dimensions (Fermi liquid theory for example) no longer apply, took up the challenge of developing new concepts and techniques to understand the undoubted pecularities of one-dimensional systems. And experimentalists have succeeded in turning pipe dreams into reality, producing an impressive and ever increasing array of experimental realizations of 1D systems, from the molecular to the mesoscopic---spin and ladder compounds, organic superconductors, carbon nanotubes, quantum wires, Josephson junction arrays and so on. Many books on the theory of one-dimensional systems are however written by experts for experts, and tend as such to leave the non-specialist a touch bewildered. This is understandable on both fronts, for the underlying theoretical techniques are unquestionably sophisticated and not usually part of standard courses in many-body theory. A brave author it is then who aims to produce a well rounded, if necessarily partial, overview of quantum physics in one dimension, accessible to a beginner yet taking them to the edge of current research, and providing en route a thorough grounding in the fundamental ideas, basic methods and essential phenomenology of the field. It is of course the brave who succeed in this world, and Thierry Giamarchi does just that with this excellent book, written by an expert for the uninitiated. Aimed in particular at graduate students in theoretical condensed matter physics, and assumimg little theoretical background on the part of the reader (well just a little), Giamarchi writes in a refreshingly

  18. Half-metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2012-04-17

    Half-metallicity in carbon nanotubes is achieved and controlled by hydrogen adsorption patterns. The edge states in carbon nanotubes are unstable under an electric field due to the spin-conserving electron transfer between the edges, but a large enough transfer barrier between the edge states, obtained by controlling the adsorption patterns, renders the CNTs half-metallic.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Based Flexible Supercapacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Electrochemical double layer capacitors are fabricated using carbon nanotube (CNT)/paper flexible electrodes. An extensive...TERMS Carbon nanotube, supercapacitor, electrochemical double layer capacitor 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18...layer capacitors (Supercapacitors) are expected to play a significant role in future hybrid power systems due to their high specific power, cycle

  20. Nanotubes for noisy signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ian Yenyin

    Nanotubes can process noisy signals. We present two central results in support of this general thesis and make an informed extrapolation that uses nanotubes to improve body armor. The first result is that noise can help nanotubes detect weak signals. The finding confirmed a stochastic-resonance theoretical prediction that noise can enhance detection at the nano-level. Laboratory experiments with nanotubes showed that three types of noise improved three measures of detection. Small amounts of Gaussian, uniform, and Cauchy additive white noise increased mutual-information, cross-correlation, and bit-error-rate measures before degrading them with further increases in noise. Nanotubes can apply this noise-enhancement and nanotube electrical and mechanical properties to improve signal processing. Similar noise enhancement may benefit a proposed nanotube-array cochlear-model spectral processing. The second result is that nanotube antennas can directly detect narrowband electromagnetic (EM) signals. The finding showed that nanotube and thin-wire dipoles are similar: They are resonant and narrowband and can implement linear-array designs if the EM waves in the nanotubes propagate at or near the free-space velocity of light. The nanotube-antenna prediction is based on a Fresnel-zone or near-zone analysis of antenna impedance using a quantum-conductor model. The analysis also predicts a failure to resonate if the nanotube EM-wave propagation is much slower than free-space light propagation. We extrapolate based on applied and theoretical analysis of body armor. Field experiments used a baseball comparison and statistical and other techniques to model body-armor bruising effects. A baseball comparison showed that a large caliber handgun bullet can hit an armored chest as hard as a fast baseball can hit a bare chest. Adaptive fuzzy systems learned to predict a bruise profile directly from the experimental data and also from statistical analysis of the data. Nanotube signal

  1. Electrical Conduction Mechanism in Chemical Vapour Deposition Grown Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Film.

    PubMed

    Al-Hazmi, F S

    2015-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes are interesting systems where different aspects of conduction are observed, mostly due to their low dimensionalities and small dimensions. Electrical conduction mechanism in multi wall carbon nanotubes film is studied. The studied multi-walled nanotubes are grown by a low pressure chemical vapour deposition system. To understand the conduction mechanism in these nanotubes, temperature dependence of conductivity of the multi wall nanotubes film over a temperature range of (400-200 K) is studied. On the basis of the results, one may suggest the thermally activated conduction mechanism for the temperature range (400-300 K). The low temperature data is fitted with the hopping conduction for the transport of charge carriers in the temperature range of 300-200 K. This hopping conduction mechanism is characterized by variable range hopping (VRH), which shows complete agreement with the Mott's type of VRH mechanism. Applying this model, a number of Mott's parameters such as density of states, hopping distance, hopping energy are calculated. The calculated values of all the studied parameters matches well the reported results on other multi-wall nanotubes film.

  2. Optoelectronics with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    The carbon nanotube is a promising material for future micro- and nano-scale electronics because of its unique electronic properties, high carrier mobility and extraordinary capacity for high current density. In particular, semiconducting carbon nanotubes are direct bandgap materials with a typical energy gap in the order of 1 eV, which means they emit light in the near-infrared range, making them an attractive option in telecommunications applications. However, there have been few systematic investigations of electrically-induced light emission (i.e. electroluminescence) from carbon nanotubes, and their emission properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, we explore the characteristics of electroluminescence in three different types of carbon-nanotube devices. The first is a single-tube field-effect transistor (CNTFET), whose emission has previously been found to have a very broad spectral shape and low emission efficiency. We analyze the spectral shape in detail, which reveals that a high electric field near metal contacts contributes most to the bias-dependent component of broadening, in addition to smaller contributions from tube nonuniformity, inelastic scattering of phonons, high temperature, etc. In the second part of the study, single-tube light-emitting diodes are constructed by employing a split top-gate scheme. The split gate creates p- and n-doped regions electrostatically, so that electrons and holes combine between the two sections and can decay radiatively. This configuration creates electron-hole pairs under much lower electric fields and gives us a greater control over carrier distribution in the device channel, resulting in much narrower spectral linewidths and an emission intensity several orders of magnitude larger than that of CNTFETs. The much better signal-to-noise also leads to the observation of emission from defect-induced states. Finally, we extend the idea of the single-tube p-n diode and fabricate CNT film diodes from many

  3. Dimensions of temperament: an analysis.

    PubMed

    Lorr, M; Stefic, E C

    1976-01-01

    The TDOT recast into a single stimulus format was administered to 150 college Ss. A factor analysis of the items followed by an analysis of item clusters that define each factor indicated the presence of 14 dimensions. Of the 10 bipolar scales of the TDOT, 3 were confirmed as independent dimensions, and 5 were confirmed in part or split into unipolar factors.

  4. Mathematics Teachers' Criteria of Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ural, Alattin

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study is to determine mathematics teachers' decisions about dimensions of the geometric figures, criteria of dimension and consistency of decision-criteria. The research is a qualitative research and the model applied in the study is descriptive method on the basis of general scanning model. 15 mathematics teachers attended the…

  5. Dimensioning, Tolerancing, and Machine Finishes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, George C.

    Intended for use with the vocational education student interested in technical drawing, this guide provides answers to questions relating to dimensioning and tolerancing machine drawings. It also gives examples of standard dimensioning practices, tolerancing applications, and finish applications. The problems and examples presented are based on…

  6. String universality in ten dimensions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allan; Taylor, Washington; Dewolfe, Oliver

    2010-08-13

    We show that the N=1 supergravity theories in ten dimensions with gauge groups U(1){496} and E{8}×U(1){248} are not consistent quantum theories. Cancellation of anomalies cannot be made compatible with supersymmetry and Abelian gauge invariance. Thus, in ten dimensions all supersymmetric theories of gravity without known inconsistencies are realized in string theory.

  7. The Dimensions of Maltreatment: Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Diana J.; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I.; Runyan, Desmond K.

    2005-01-01

    This special issue includes an introduction and seven papers exploring dimensions of maltreatment including type, severity, chronicity, and substantiation status of referrals to CPS, utilizing a subsample of the LONGSCAN studies. Each paper examines one of the dimensions of maltreatment from various perspectives to determine if different…

  8. Synthesis, properties and applications of 3D carbon nanotube-graphene junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Yu; Zhao, Zhenghang; Niu, Jianbing; Xia, Zhenhai

    2016-11-01

    Integration of 1D carbon nanotubes and 2D graphene sheets through covalent bonding can create novel 3D nanoporous hybrid nanostructures that inherit unique mechanical, thermal, electrical and chemical properties of their building blocks and even have new properties in three dimensions. Great progress has been made in developing 3D carbon nanotube-graphene nanoarchitectures for various applications such as mechanical cushions, thermal sinkers, transistors, and renewable energy conversion. This review presents the recent advances in synthesis and analysis of the 3D nanostructures. Emphasis is put on design principles, molecular structures, processes and properties of the materials.

  9. Genotoxicity and carcinogenicity risk of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Toyokuni, Shinya

    2013-12-01

    Novel materials are often commercialized without a complete assessment of the risks they pose to human health because such assessments are costly and time-consuming; additionally, sometimes the methodology needed for such an assessment does not exist. Carbon nanotubes have the potential for widespread application in engineering, materials science and medicine. However, due to the needle-like shape and high durability of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), concerns have been raised that they may induce asbestos-like pathogenicity when inhaled. Indeed, experiments in rodents supported this hypothesis. Notably, the genetic alterations in MWCNT-induced rat malignant mesothelioma were similar to those induced by asbestos. Single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) cause mitotic disturbances in cultured cells, but thus far, there has been no report that SWCNTs are carcinogenic. This review summarizes the recent noteworthy publications on the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of CNTs and explains the possible molecular mechanisms responsible for this carcinogenicity. The nanoscale size and needle-like rigid structure of CNTs appear to be associated with their pathogenicity in mammalian cells, where carbon atoms are major components in the backbone of many biomolecules. Publishing adverse events associated with novel materials is critically important for alerting people exposed to such materials. CNTs still have a bright future with superb economic and medical merits. However, appropriate regulation of the production, distribution and secondary manufacturing processes is required, at least to protect the workers.

  10. Carbon Nanotubes in Cancer Therapy and Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Elhissi, Abdelbary M. A.; Ahmed, Waqar; Hassan, Israr Ul; Dhanak, Vinod. R.; D'Emanuele, Antony

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced recently as a novel carrier system for both small and large therapeutic molecules. CNTs can be functionalized (i.e., surface engineered) with certain functional groups in order to manipulate their physical or biological properties. In addition to the ability of CNTs to act as carriers for a wide range of therapeutic molecules, their large surface area and possibility to manipulate their surfaces and physical dimensions have been exploited for use in the photothermal destruction of cancer cells. This paper paper will discuss the therapeutic applications of CNTs with a major focus on their applications for the treatment of cancer. PMID:22028974

  11. Carbon nanotubes: a potential concept for drug delivery applications.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rakesh; Dhanawat, Meenakshi; Kumar, Sudhir; Singh, Brahma N; Pandit, Jayant K; Sinha, Vivek R

    2014-04-01

    The unique properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them a highly interesting and demandable nanocarrier in the field of nanoscience. CNTs facilitate efficient delivery of therapeutics like drugs, proteins, genes, nucleic acids, vitamins and lot more. Even though highly beneficial, the biocompatibility of CNTs is a major issue in their questioning their potential application in targeting drug delivery. Studies confirmed subdued toxicity of CNTs following slight modifications like functionalization, controlled dimensions, purification etc. A well-established mechanism for cellular internalization is an insistent need to attain a more efficient and targeted delivery. Recent patents have been thoroughly discussed in the text below.

  12. Nanotube networks in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, Martin; Lagerwall, Jan Peter F.; Scalia, Giusy

    2016-03-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are very attractive hosts for the organization of anisotropic nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) because of the macroscopic organization resulting in properties of nanoparticles manifest at a macroscopic scale. Different types of LCs have demonstrated the ability to organize nanotubes, showing the generality of the approach, i.e., that the liquid crystallinity per se is the driving factor for the organization. Compared to standard nanotube composites (e.g. with disordered polymer hosts) the introduction of carbon nanotubes into an LC allows not only the transfer of the outstanding CNT properties to the macroscopic phase, providing strength and conductivity, but these properties also become anisotropic, following the transfer of the orientational order from the LC to the CNTs. The LC molecular structure plays an important even if ancillary role since it enters in the surface interactions, fulfilling a mediating action between the particle and the bulk of the LC. Isolated nanotubes can be obtained by optimized dispersions at lower concentrations and this process requires the use or development of tailored strategies like using solvents or even another LC for pre-dispersing CNTs. Aggregates or networks can be observed in poor dispersions and at higher nanoparticle concentrations. In those, due to surface interactions, the LC behaviour can be strongly affected with changes in phase sequences or transition temperatures and the effect is expected to be more pronounced as the concentration of nanotubes increases. We present preliminary investigations and observations on nanotube - LC systems based on a smectic LC host.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes for Polymer Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anctil, Annick; Dileo, Roberta; Schauerman, Chris; Landi, Brian; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being investigated for optical absorption, exciton dissociation, and carrier transport in polymer photovoltaic devices. In the present work, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by an Alexandrite pulsed laser vaporization reactor at standard conditions and purified based upon our previously reported TOP procedure. The SWNTs were dispersed in polymer composites for pure MEH-PPV, pure P3HT, and [C60]-PCBM-P3HT (1:1 by weight) as a function of nanotube weight loading (0.1 -- 5% w/w). The AM0 current-voltage measurements for structures sandwiched between PEDOT/PSS coated ITO substrates and an evaporated aluminum contact demonstrate the dramatic effect of SWNT content on the short circuit current density, with conversions efficiencies consistently greater than 1%. The temperature coefficient for nanotube-containing polymer photovoltaics has been compared to conventional PCBM-P3HT devices, and the general relationship of increasing efficiency with increasing temperature is observed. However, the necessity to control nanotube percolation to prevent device shunting has led to recent developments which focus on controlling nanotube length through oxidative cutting, the deposition of intrinsic polymer layers, and the use of aligned carbon nanotube arrays for preferential charge transport.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  15. Carbon nanotube sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liming

    2002-07-01

    Measurement represents one of the oldest methods used by human beings to better understand and control the world. Many measurement systems are primarily physical sensors, which measure time, temperature, weight, distance, and various other physical parameters. The need for cheaper, faster, and more accurate meansurements has been a driving force for the development of new systems and technologies for measurements of materials, both chemical and biological. In fact, chemical and biological sensors (or biosensors) are the evolved products of physical measurement technologies. Chemical sensors are measurement devices that convert a chemical or physical change of a specific analyte into a measurable signal, whose magnitude is normally proportional to the concentration of the analyte. On the other hand, biosensors are a subset of chemical sensors that employ a biological sensing element connected to a transducer to recognize the physiochemical change and to produce the measurable signal from particular analytes, which are not necessary to be biological materials themselves, although sometimes they are. Depending on the basis of the transduction principle, chemical and biological sensors can be classified into three major classes with different transducers: sensors with electrical transducers, sensors with optical transducers, and sensors with other transducers (e.g. mass change). The unique properties of carbon nanotubes have led to their use in areas as diverse as sensors, actuators, field-emitting flat panel displays, energy and gas storages (Dai and Mau, 2001). As we shall see below, the principles for carbon nanotube sensors to detect the nature of gases and to determine their concentrations are based on change in electrical properties induced by charge transfer with the gas molecules (e.g. O2, H2, CO2) or in mass due to physical adsorption. This article provides a status report on the research and development of carbon nanotube sensors.

  16. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  17. Production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  18. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  19. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Thermoelectric Coolers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-06

    The cooling cycle : The electric current pulls out the electron and hole excitations from the central region of the nanotube. (c) The heating cycle ...thermoelectric heating and cooling cycles . The sharp features in the  eG V curve corresponding to energy levels EC localized in the active region...liquid nitrogen temperature 77T  K up to hot 134 8T  K, or decreases from 77T  K down to about cold 20 6T  K, thus evidencing a strong

  2. NASA Innovation Builds Better Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Nanotailor Inc., based in Austin, Texas, licensed Goddard Space Flight Center's unique single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) fabrication process with plans to make high-quality, low-cost SWCNTs available commercially. Carbon nanotubes are being used in a wide variety of applications, and NASA's improved production method will increase their applicability in medicine, microelectronics, advanced materials, and molecular containment. Nanotailor built and tested a prototype based on Goddard's process, and is using this technique to lower the cost and improve the integrity of nanotubes, offering a better product for use in biomaterials, advanced materials, space exploration, highway and building construction, and many other applications.

  3. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V

    2013-12-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs.

  4. Method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor); Frazier, Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for manufacturing carbon nanotubes, including a step of inducing electrical current through a carbon anode and a carbon cathode under conditions effective to produce the carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon cathode is larger than the carbon anode. Preferably, a welder is used to induce the electrical current via an arc welding process. Preferably, an exhaust hood is placed on the anode, and the process does not require a closed or pressurized chamber. The process provides high-quality, single-walled carbon nanotubes, while eliminating the need for a metal catalyst.

  5. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the the current carrying capacity of nanotube wires. Information is given on the motivation for the research, models and assumptions, Bragg reflection and Zener tunneling effects, and the influence of defects. Results show that dI/dv versus V does not increase in a manner commensurate with the increase in the number of subbands; in small diameter nanotubes, Zener tunneling is ineffective; Zener tunneling contributes to current with increase in nanotube diameter; and the increase in dI/dV with bias is much smaller than the increase in the number of subbands.

  6. Carbon nanotubes as vaccine scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Dao, Tao; Mulvey, Justin J.; Feinberg, Evan; Alidori, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes display characteristics that are potentially useful in their development as scaffolds for vaccine compositions. These features include stability in vivo, lack of intrinsic immunogenicity, low toxicity, and the ability to be appended with multiple copies of antigens. In addition, the particulate nature of carbon nanotubes and their unusual properties of rapid entry into antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, make them especially useful as carriers of antigens. Early attempts demonstrating carbon nanotube-based vaccines can be used in both infectious disease settings and cancer are promising. PMID:23899863

  7. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single-and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs. PMID:23933617

  8. The Dimensions of Creative Prose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melvin H.

    1975-01-01

    The thesis in this paper centered around the meaning of "effective" speaking and "effective" writing. The dimensions of effective prose are analyzed as one method of determining what is involved. (Author/RK)

  9. Fourier dimension of random images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekström, Fredrik

    2016-10-01

    Given a compact set of real numbers, a random C^{m + α}-diffeomorphism is constructed such that the image of any measure concentrated on the set and satisfying a certain condition involving a real number s, almost surely has Fourier dimension greater than or equal to s / (m + α). This is used to show that every Borel subset of the real numbers of Hausdorff dimension s is C^{m + α}-equivalent to a set of Fourier dimension greater than or equal to s / (m + α ). In particular every Borel set is diffeomorphic to a Salem set, and the Fourier dimension is not invariant under Cm-diffeomorphisms for any m.

  10. Radiation reaction in various dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal'Tsov, Dmitri V.

    2002-07-01

    We discuss the radiation reaction problem for an electric charge moving in flat space-time of arbitrary dimensions. It is shown that four is the unique dimension where a local differential equation exists accounting for the radiation reaction and admitting a consistent mass renormalization (the Lorentz-Dirac equation). In odd dimensions Huygens's principle does not hold, and, as a result, the radiation reaction force depends on the whole past history of a charge (radiative tail). We show that the divergence in the tail integral can be removed by the mass renormalization only in the 2+1 theory. In even dimensions higher than four, divergences cannot be removed by the mass renormalization.

  11. Phenomenology of universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Kyoungchul; Matchev, Konstantin T.; /Florida U.

    2006-10-01

    In this proceeding, the phenomenology of Universal Extra Dimensions (UED), in which all the Standard Model fields propagate, is explored. We focus on models with one universal extra dimension, compactified on an S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. We revisit calculations of Kaluza-Klein (KK) dark matter without an assumption of the KK mass degeneracy including all possible coannihilations. We then contrast the experimental signatures of low energy supersymmetry and UED.

  12. Timbre Dimensions for Musical Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giese, Gregory Roy

    This dissertation addresses the folowing question: Given the technologies to develop and implement any kind of sound generating and controlling device, what will the instrument designer, the composer, and the performer need to know in order to more fully utilize the dimensions of timbre in music and musical performance? This question is approached from the standpoint of music theory. Definitions of timbre and a few examples of related physical and perceptual research are reviewed. Included is a discussion of the essential elements of musical control and of intelligent organization of sound in music. This discussion raises more questions than can be answered simply. It is an attempt to unravel the nature of sound clues and sound qualities as they convey sound identities and musical gesture. A theoretical simplification of sound dimensions for musical use is proposed. Sounds which can be sustained indefinitely consist of steady-state acoustical dimensions. These dimensions rely upon the perceptual phenomenon of simultaneous fusion (synance). Sounds which can not be sustained indefinitely consist of transitions. Transitions may cause successive fusion (sonance). The discussion of steady-state and transition dimensions includes a review of a few informal experiments. This work reveals problems that will influence the musical use of timbre dimensions. It also leads to a theory for the organization and control of timbre dimensions in music. Among the timbre dimensions discussed are: spectral envelope, harmonic content, brightness, phase, inharmonicity, aperiodicity, and temporal transitions. Questions are raised regarding the perception of harmonic content. The effect of register on perception of tones consisting of from two to nine partials is explored and discussed. The size of interval between partials determines a unique quality. This is most apparent with tones consisting of only two or three partials (dions or trions).

  13. The Sirens of Eleven Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramond, Pierre

    While most theorists are tied to the mast of four dimensions, some have found it irresistible to speculate about eleven dimensions, the domain of M-theory. We outline a program which starts from the light-cone description of supergravity, and tracks its divergences to suggest the existence of an infinite component theory which in the lightcone relies on the coset F4/SO(9), long known to be linked to the Exceptional Jordan Algebra

  14. Large-Scale Processing of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John; Sridhar, K. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Scale-up difficulties and high energy costs are two of the more important factors that limit the availability of various types of nanotube carbon. While several approaches are known for producing nanotube carbon, the high-powered reactors typically produce nanotubes at rates measured in only grams per hour and operate at temperatures in excess of 1000 C. These scale-up and energy challenges must be overcome before nanotube carbon can become practical for high-consumption structural and mechanical applications. This presentation examines the issues associated with using various nanotube production methods at larger scales, and discusses research being performed at NASA Ames Research Center on carbon nanotube reactor technology.

  15. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  16. Nano-oxidation and in situ faradaic current detection using dynamic carbon nanotube probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramochi, H.; Ando, K.; Shikakura, Y.; Yasutake, M.; Tokizaki, T.; Yokoyama, H.

    2004-09-01

    Carbon nanotube-attached atomic force microscope probes were successfully used without nanotube bending to make simultaneous precision nano-oxidation and faradaic current measurements in the dynamic mode. Probe oxidation on H-passivated Si(001) surfaces was carried out by two methods involving vector-scan and raster-scan with a much higher resolution and precision compared to the nanofabrication by standard cantilevers. Faradaic current of the order of a sub-picoampere was detected during nano-oxidation using a carbon nanotube probe, accurately reflecting the subtle difference in the oxidation reaction. The minute current detection through the AFM tip is sensitive enough for the detection of very thin oxides and small-sized features. The dimension of the meniscus during nano-oxidation, which is indispensable for establishing the mechanism model, was evaluated, based on the in situ faradaic current detection and edge broadening.

  17. Stimuli-responsive transformation in carbon nanotube/expanding microsphere-polymer composites

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, James; Xu, Peng; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Our work introduces a class of stimuli-responsive expanding polymer composites with ability to unidirectionally transform physical dimensions, elastic modulus, density, and electrical resistance. Carbon nanotubes and core-shell acrylic microspheres were dispersed in polydimethylsiloxane, resulting in composites that exhibit a binary set of material properties. Upon thermal or infrared stimuli, liquid cores encapsulated within the microspheres vaporize, expanding the surrounding shells and stretching the matrix. Microsphere expansion results in visible dimensional changes, regions of reduced polymeric chain mobility, nanotube tensioning, and overall elastic to plastic-like transformation of the composite. Here we show composite transformations including macroscopic volume expansion (>500%), density reduction (>80%), and elastic modulus increase (>675%). Additionally, conductive nanotubes allow for remote expansion monitoring and exhibit distinct loading-dependent electrical responses. With ability to pattern regions of tailorable expansion, strength, and electrical resistance into a single polymer skin, these composites present opportunities as structural and electrical building blocks in smart systems. PMID:23574648

  18. Functional materials based on carbon nanotubes: Carbon nanotube actuators and noncovalent carbon nanotube modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, Leonard S.

    Carbon nanotubes have attractive inherent properties that encourage the development of new functional materials and devices based on them. The use of single wall carbon nanotubes as electromechanical actuators takes advantage of the high mechanical strength, surface area and electrical conductivity intrinsic to these molecules. The work presented here investigates the mechanisms that have been discovered for actuation of carbon nanotube paper: electrostatic, quantum chemical charge injection, pneumatic and viscoelastic. A home-built apparatus for the measurement of actuation strain is developed and utilized in the investigation. An optical fiber switch, the first demonstrated macro-scale device based on the actuation of carbon nanotubes, is described and its performance evaluated. Also presented here is a new general process designed to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes in a non-covalent, non-destructive way. This method can be used to impart new functionalities to carbon nanotube samples for a variety of applications including sensing, solar energy conversion and chemical separation. The process described involves the achievement of large degrees of graphitic surface coverage with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the use of supercritical fluids. These molecules are bifunctional agents that anchor a desired chemical group to the aromatic surface of the carbon nanotubes without adversely disrupting the conjugated backbone that gives rise the attractive electronic and physical properties of the nanotubes. Both the nanotube functionalization work and the actuator work presented here emphasize how an understanding and control of nanoscale structure and phenomena can be of vital importance in achieving desired performance for active materials. Opportunities for new devices with improved function over current state-of-the-art can be envisioned and anticipated based on this understanding and control.

  19. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  20. Confinement effects and why carbon nanotube bundles can work as gas sensors.

    PubMed

    Amorim, Rodrigo G; Fazzio, A; da Silva, Antônio J R; Rocha, Alexandre R

    2013-04-07

    Carbon nanotubes have been at the forefront of nanotechnology, leading not only to a better understanding of the basic properties of charge transport in one dimensional materials, but also to the perspective of a variety of possible applications, including highly sensitive sensors. Practical issues, however, have led to the use of bundles of nanotubes in devices, instead of isolated single nanotubes. From a theoretical perspective, the understanding of charge transport in such bundles, and how it is affected by the adsorption of molecules, has been very limited, one of the reasons being the sheer size of the calculations. A frequent option has been the extrapolation of knowledge gained from single tubes to the properties of bundles. In the present work we show that such procedure is not correct, and that there are qualitative differences in the effects caused by molecules on the charge transport in bundles versus isolated nanotubes. Using a combination of density functional theory and recursive Green's function techniques we show that the adsorption of molecules randomly distributed onto the walls of carbon nanotube bundles leads to changes in the charge density and consequently to significant alterations in the conductance even in pristine tubes. We show that this effect is driven by confinement which is not present in isolated nanotubes. Furthermore, a low concentration of dopants randomly adsorbed along a two-hundred nm long bundle drives a change in the transport regime; from ballistic to diffusive, which can account for the high sensitivity to different molecules.

  1. Light-induced disassembly of self-assembled vesicle-capped nanotubes observed in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coleman, Anthony C.; Beierle, John M.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Maciá, Beatriz; Caroli, Giuseppe; Mika, Jacek T.; van Dijken, Derk Jan; Chen, Jiawen; Browne, Wesley R.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2011-09-01

    Molecular self-assembly is the basis for the formation of numerous artificial nanostructures. The self-organization of peptides, amphiphilic molecules composed of fused benzene rings and other functional molecules into nanotubes is of particular interest. However, the design of dynamic, complex self-organized systems that are responsive to external stimuli remains a significant challenge. Here, we report self-assembled, vesicle-capped nanotubes that can be selectively disassembled by irradiation. The walls of the nanotubes are 3-nm-thick bilayers and are made from amphiphilic molecules with two hydrophobic legs that interdigitate when the molecules self-assemble into bilayers. In the presence of phospholipids, a phase separation between the phospholipids and the amphiphilic molecules creates nanotubes, which are end-capped by vesicles that can be chemically altered or removed and reattached without affecting the nanotubes. The presence of a photoswitchable and fluorescent core in the amphiphilic molecules allows fast and highly controlled disassembly of the nanotubes on irradiation, and distinct disassembly processes can be observed in real time using fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Effect of calcination temperature on the photocatalytic reduction and oxidation processes of hydrothermally synthesized titania nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Viayan, B.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Rajh, T.; Gray, K.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-08-05

    Titania nanotubes having diameters 8 to 12 nm and lengths of 50-300 nm were prepared using a hydrothermal method. Further, the titania nanotubes were calcined over the temperature range 200-800 C in order to enhance their photocatalytic properties by altering their morphology. The calcined titania nanotubes were characterized by using X-ray diffraction and surface area analysis and their morphological features were studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Nanotubes calcined at 400 C showed the maximum extent of photocatalyitc reduction of carbon dioxide to methane, whereas samples calcined at 600 C produced maximum photocatalytic oxidation of acetaldehyde. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to interrogate the effects of nanotube structure on the charge separation and trapping as a function of calcination temperature. EPR results indicated that undercoordinated titania sites are associated with maximum CO{sub 2} reduction occurring in nanotubes calcined at 400 C. Despite the collapse of the nantube structure to form nanorods and the concomitant loss of surface area, the enhanced charge separation associated with increased crystallinity promoted high rates of oxidation of acetaldehyde in titania materials calcined at 600 C. These results illustrate that calcination temperature allows us to tune the morphological and surface features of the titania nanostructures for particular photocatalytic reactions.

  3. Elastic modulus of viral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ge, Zhibin; Fang, Jiyu

    2008-09-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the radial elasticity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanotubes. An atomic force microscope tip is used to apply small radial indentations to deform TMV nanotubes. The initial elastic response of TMV nanotubes can be described by finite-element analysis in 5nm indentation depths and Hertz theory in 1.5nm indentation depths. The derived radial Young’s modulus of TMV nanotubes is 0.92±0.15GPa from finite-element analysis and 1.0±0.2GPa from the Hertz model, which are comparable with the reported axial Young’s modulus of 1.1GPa [Falvo , Biophys. J. 72, 1396 (1997)].

  4. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  5. Filling carbon nanotubes with particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byong M; Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H

    2005-05-01

    The filling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with fluorescent particles was studied experimentally and theoretically. The fluorescent signals emitted by the particles were visible through the walls of the nanotubes, and the particles inside the tubes were observable with an electron microscope. Taking advantage of the template-grown carbon nanotubes' transparency to fluorescent light, we measured the filling rate of the tubes with particles at room conditions. Liquids such as ethylene glycol, water, and ethylene glycol/water mixtures, laden with 50 nm diameter fluorescent particles, were brought into contact with 500 nm diameter CNTs. The liquid and the particles' transport were observed, respectively, with optical and fluorescence microscopy. The CNTs were filled controllably with particles by the complementary action of capillary forces and the evaporation of the liquid. The experimental results were compared and favorably agreed with theoretical predictions. This is the first report on fluorescence studies of particle transport in carbon nanotubes.

  6. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  7. Dimension-based statistical learning of vowels.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ran; Holt, Lori L

    2015-12-01

    Speech perception depends on long-term representations that reflect regularities of the native language. However, listeners rapidly adapt when speech acoustics deviate from these regularities due to talker idiosyncrasies such as foreign accents and dialects. To better understand these dual aspects of speech perception, we probe native English listeners' baseline perceptual weighting of 2 acoustic dimensions (spectral quality and vowel duration) toward vowel categorization and examine how they subsequently adapt to an "artificial accent" that deviates from English norms in the correlation between the 2 dimensions. At baseline, listeners rely relatively more on spectral quality than vowel duration to signal vowel category, but duration nonetheless contributes. Upon encountering an "artificial accent" in which the spectral-duration correlation is perturbed relative to English language norms, listeners rapidly down-weight reliance on duration. Listeners exhibit this type of short-term statistical learning even in the context of nonwords, confirming that lexical information is not necessary to this form of adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Moreover, learning generalizes to both novel lexical contexts and acoustically distinct altered voices. These findings are discussed in the context of a mechanistic proposal for how supervised learning may contribute to this type of adaptive plasticity in speech perception.

  8. DIMENSION-BASED STATISTICAL LEARNING OF VOWELS

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ran; Holt, Lori L.

    2015-01-01

    Speech perception depends on long-term representations that reflect regularities of the native language. However, listeners rapidly adapt when speech acoustics deviate from these regularities due to talker idiosyncrasies such as foreign accents and dialects. To better understand these dual aspects of speech perception, we probe native English listeners’ baseline perceptual weighting of two acoustic dimensions (spectral quality and vowel duration) towards vowel categorization and examine how they subsequently adapt to an “artificial accent” that deviates from English norms in the correlation between the two dimensions. At baseline, listeners rely relatively more on spectral quality than vowel duration to signal vowel category, but duration nonetheless contributes. Upon encountering an “artificial accent” in which the spectral-duration correlation is perturbed relative to English language norms, listeners rapidly down-weight reliance on duration. Listeners exhibit this type of short-term statistical learning even in the context of nonwords, confirming that lexical information is not necessary to this form of adaptive plasticity in speech perception. Moreover, learning generalizes to both novel lexical contexts and acoustically-distinct altered voices. These findings are discussed in the context of a mechanistic proposal for how supervised learning may contribute to this type of adaptive plasticity in speech perception. PMID:26280268

  9. Directing peptide crystallization through curvature control of nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gobeaux, Frédéric; Tarabout, Christophe; Fay, Nicolas; Meriadec, Cristelle; Ligeti, Melinda; Buisson, David-Alexandre; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Artzner, Franck; Paternostre, Maïté

    2014-07-01

    In the absence of efficient crystallization methods, the molecular structures of fibrous assemblies have so far remained rather elusive. In this paper, we present a rational method to crystallize the lanreotide octapeptide by modification of a residue involved in a close contact. Indeed, we show that it is possible to modify the curvature of the lanreotide nanotubes and hence their diameter. This fine tuning leads to crystallization because the radius of curvature of the initially bidimensional peptide wall can be increased up to a point where the wall is essentially flat and a crystal is allowed to grow along a third dimension. By comparing X-ray diffraction data and Fourier transform Raman spectra, we show that the nanotubes and the crystals share similar cell parameters and molecular conformations, proving that there is indeed a structural continuum between these two morphologies. These results illustrate a novel approach to crystallization and represent the first step towards the acquisition of an Å-resolution structure of the lanreotide nanotubes β-sheet assembly.

  10. Field emission from open ended aluminum nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondare, V. N.; Balasubramanian, C.; Shende, S. V.; Joag, D. S.; Godbole, V. P.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Bhadbhade, M.

    2002-06-01

    This letter reports the field emission measurements from the nanotubes of aluminum nitride which were synthesized by gas phase condensation using the solid-vapor equilibria. A dc arc plasma reactor was used for producing the vapors of aluminum in a reactive nitrogen atmosphere. Nanoparticles and nanotubes of aluminum nitride were first characterized by transmission electron microscope and tube dimensions were found to be varying from 30 to 200 nm in diameter and 500 to 700 nm in length. These tubes were mixed with nanoparticles of size range between 5 and 200 nm in diameter. Tungsten tips coated with these nanoparticles and tubes were used as a field emitter. The field emission patterns display very interesting features consisting of sharp rings which were often found to change their shapes. The patterns are attributed to the open ended nanotubes of aluminum nitride. A few dot patterns corresponding to the nanoparticles were also seen to occur. The Fowler-Nordheim plots were seen to be nonlinear in nature, which reflects the semi-insulating behavior of the emitter. The field enhancement factor is estimated to be 34 500 indicating that the field enhancement due to the nanometric size of the emitter is an important cause for the observed emission.

  11. Microwave absorption in nanocomposite material of magnetically functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labunov, V. A.; Danilyuk, A. L.; Prudnikava, A. L.; Komissarov, I.; Shulitski, B. G.; Speisser, C.; Antoni, F.; Le Normand, F.; Prischepa, S. L.

    2012-07-01

    The interaction of electromagnetic radiation in X and Ka bands with magnetic nanocomposite of disordered carbon nanotubes arrays has been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Samples were synthesized on the quartz reactor walls by decomposition of ferrocene and xylene which provided random intercalation of iron phase nanoparticles in carbon nanotube array. The exhaustive characterization of the samples by means of the scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and x-ray photoemission spectroscopy was performed. It was found that the absorption of the electromagnetic wave monotonically increases with the frequency. To describe these experimental data, we extended the Bruggeman effective medium theory to a more complex case of a magnetic nanocomposite with randomly distributed spherical ferromagnetic nanoparticles in a conducting medium. The essential feature of the developed model is the consideration of the complex nature of the studied material. In particular, such important parameters as magnetic and dielectric properties of both the carbon nanotube medium and the nanoparticles, the volume concentration and the dimensions of the nanoparticles, the wave impedance of the resistive-capacitive shells of the conductive nanoparticles are explicitly taken into account in our model. Moreover, analysing the experimental results, we were able to obtain the frequency dependencies of permittivity and permeability of the studied nanocomposite.

  12. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  13. Sensor and Macroelectronic Applications of C Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Eric

    2004-03-01

    The unique structure of the SWNT produces near-ballistic electron transport and a high sensitivity to its local chemical environment. This combination of high electronic quality and chemical sensitivity forms the basis for a promising nanocomponent for electronic and sensor applications. In order to bypass the assembly problems associated with fabricating SWNT-based devices we utilize the interface properties of internanotube contacts. A strong van der Waals interaction between crossed SWNTs produces a high internanotube tunneling probability. We use this feature to form a new electronic material that is composed of an electrically interconnected network of C nanotubes. In such C nanotube networks (CNNs) the individual SWNTs are interwoven into a semiconducting film that is electrically continuous over macroscopic dimensions. Macroscopic CNN devices average the properties of many individual SWNTs and allow us to fabricate devices with high yield using conventional fabrication technology. For macroelectronic applications, CNNs can be fabricated into both n- and p-type thin-film transistors (TFTs) with a field-effect mobility an order of magnitude higher than commercial TFT materials. In addition, CNN TFTs have the advantage that they can be deposited at room temperature onto arbitrary substrates, including polymeric and flexible materials. For sensor applications we show that the adsorption of certain molecular analytes onto the surface of SWNTs perturbs their electronic properties to such a degree that CNN-based sensors can detect the presence of chemical warfare agents and other toxic chemicals with a sensitivity much higher than commercial chemical detectors. In addition, we can achieve a high degree of chemical specificity and additional gain in the sensor response by coating the SWNTs with a chemoselective polymer that concentrates the analyte of choice.

  14. Single Nanotube Spectral Imaging To Determine Molar Concentrations of Isolated Carbon Nanotube Species.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Thomas V; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2017-01-17

    Electronic and biological applications of carbon nanotubes can be highly dependent on the species (chirality) of nanotube, purity, and concentration. Existing bulk methods, such as absorbance spectroscopy, can quantify sp(2) carbon based on spectral bands, but nanotube length distribution, defects, and carbonaceous impurities can complicate quantification of individual particles. We present a general method to relate the optical density of a photoluminescent nanotube sample to the number of individual nanotubes. By acquiring 3-dimensional images of nanotubes embedded in a gel matrix with a reducing environment, we quantified all emissive nanotubes in a volume. Via spectral imaging, we assessed structural impurities and precisely determined molar concentrations of the (8,6) and (9,4) nanotube species. We developed an approach to obtain the molarity of any structurally enriched semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube preparation on a per-nanotube basis.

  15. Boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Huang, Yang; Terao, Takeshi; Mitome, Masanori; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2010-06-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered material with a graphite-like structure in which planar networks of BN hexagons are regularly stacked. As the structural analogue of a carbon nanotube (CNT), a BN nanotube (BNNT) was first predicted in 1994; since then, it has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanotubes. Compared with metallic or semiconducting CNTs, a BNNT is an electrical insulator with a band gap of ca. 5 eV, basically independent of tube geometry. In addition, BNNTs possess a high chemical stability, excellent mechanical properties, and high thermal conductivity. The same advantages are likely applicable to a graphene analogue-a monatomic layer of a hexagonal BN. Such unique properties make BN nanotubes and nanosheets a promising nanomaterial in a variety of potential fields such as optoelectronic nanodevices, functional composites, hydrogen accumulators, electrically insulating substrates perfectly matching the CNT, and graphene lattices. This review gives an introduction to the rich BN nanotube/nanosheet field, including the latest achievements in the synthesis, structural analyses, and property evaluations, and presents the purpose and significance of this direction in the light of the general nanotube/nanosheet developments.

  16. Fractal dimension of alumina aggregates grown in two dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larosa, Judith L.; Cawley, James D.

    1992-01-01

    The concepts of fractal geometry are applied to the analysis of 0.4-micron alumina constrained to agglomerate in two dimensions. Particles were trapped at the bottom surface of a drop of a dilute suspension, and the agglomeration process was directly observed, using an inverted optical microscope. Photographs were digitized and analyzed, using three distinct approaches. The results indicate that the agglomerates are fractal, having a dimension of approximately 1.5, which agrees well with the predictions of the diffusion-limited cluster-cluster aggregation model.

  17. Carbon nanotube-based polymer nanocomposites: Fractal network to hierarchical morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Tirtha

    The dispersion of anisotropic nanoparticles such as single-walled carbon nanotubes in polymeric matrices promises the ability to develop advanced materials with controlled and tailored combinations of properties. However, dispersion of such nanotubes in a polymer matrix is an extremely challenging task due to strong attractive interactions between the nanotubes. The successful dispersion of single-walled carbon nanotubes in poly(ethylene oxide) using an anionic surfactant (lithium dodecyl sulfate) as compatibilizer is reported here. The geometrical percolation threshold (pc, in vol %) of nanotubes, as revealed by melt-state rheological measurements, is found to be at ˜ 0.09 vol % loading, which corresponds to an effective tube anisotropy of ˜ 650. The system shows an even earlier development of the electrical percolation at 0.03 vol % SWNT loading as obtained by electrical conductivity measurements. In their quiescent state, the nanotubes show hierarchical fractal network (mass fractal dimension ˜ 2.3 +/- 0.2) made of aggregated flocs. Inside the floc, individual or small bundles of nanotubes overlap each other to form a dense mesh. The interfloc interactions provides the stress bearing capacity for these nano composites and are responsible for the unique modulus scaling of these systems (˜(p-pc)delta, 3.0 ≤ delta ≤ 4.5). The interaction is inversely related to the particle dispersion state, which influences the absolute values of the viscoelastic parameters. As a direct consequence of the self-similar fractal network, the linear flow properties display 'time-temperature-composition' superposition. This superposability can be extended for non-linear deformations when the non-linear properties are scaled by the local strain experienced by the elements of the network. More interestingly, under steady shear, these nanocomposites show network-independent behavior. The absolute stress value is a function of the nanotube loading, but the characteristic time

  18. Influence of the structural properties on the pseudocritical magnetic behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Enríquez, C. D.; Restrepo-Parra, E.; Restrepo, J.

    2012-04-01

    In this work we address the influence of the crystalline structure, concretely when the system under study is formed by square or hexagonal unit cells, upon the magnetic properties and pseudocritical behavior of single-wall ferromagnetic nanotubes. We focus not only on the effect of the geometrical shape of the unit cell but also on their dimensions. The model employed is based on the Monte Carlo method, the Metropolis dynamics and a nearest neighbors classical Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Magnetization per magnetic site, magnetic susceptibility, specific heat and magnetic energy were computed. These properties were computed varying the system size, unit cell dimension and temperature. The dependence of the nearest neighbor exchange integral on the nanotubes geometrical characteristics is also discussed. Results revealed a strong influence of the system topology on the magnetic properties caused by the difference in the coordination number between square and hexagonal unit cell. Moreover, the nanotubes diameter influence on magnetic properties is only observed at very low values, when the distance between atoms is less than it, presented by the 2D sheet. On the other hand, it was concluded that the surface-related finite-size effects do not influence the magnetic nanotubes properties, contrary to the case of other nano-systems as thin films and nanoparticles among others.

  19. Dimension of fractal basin boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Park, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    In many dynamical systems, multiple attractors coexist for certain parameter ranges. The set of initial conditions that asymptotically approach each attractor is its basin of attraction. These basins can be intertwined on arbitrary small scales. Basin boundary can be either smooth or fractal. Dynamical systems that have fractal basin boundary show final state sensitivity of the initial conditions. A measure of this sensitivity (uncertainty exponent {alpha}) is related to the dimension of the basin boundary d = D - {alpha}, where D is the dimension of the phase space and d is the dimension of the basin boundary. At metamorphosis values of the parameter, there might happen a conversion from smooth to fractal basin boundary (smooth-fractal metamorphosis) or a conversion from fractal to another fractal basin boundary characteristically different from the previous fractal one (fractal-fractal metamorphosis). The dimension changes continuously with the parameter except at the metamorphosis values where the dimension of the basin boundary jumps discontinuously. We chose the Henon map and the forced damped pendulum to investigate this. Scaling of the basin volumes near the metamorphosis values of the parameter is also being studied for the Henon map. Observations are explained analytically by using low dimensional model map.

  20. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  1. Computational Nanotechnology of Nanotubes, Composites, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, D.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses carbon nanotubes, their mechanical and thermal properties, and their structure, as well as possible miniature devices which may be assembled in the future from carbon nanotubes.

  2. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  3. Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Intelligence Bulletin 65: Occupational Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... composed of engineered nanoparticles, such as metal oxides, nanotubes, nanowires, quantum dots, and carbon fullerenes (buckyballs), among ...

  4. Nanotube Interactions with Nanoparticles and Peptides

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    store hydrogen due to the expandable sp2 bond; as a substitute of ITO, nanotubes can act as transparent thin film in solar cells . Other applications...lattice vector which defines the length along the nanotube unit cell as 3 Since , and can be calculated as and where is the...transistors and sensors; nanotubes are also used in killing cancer cells due to their infrared band gaps; nanotubes are an excellent candidate to

  5. Carbon nanotubes by the metallocene route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Rahul; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1997-03-01

    Pyrolysis of metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and nickelocene, is shown to yield carbon nanotubes and metal-filled onion-like structures. Pyrolysis of benzene in the presence of a metallocene gives high yields of nanotubes, the wall thickness of the nanotubes depending on the metallocene content. Pyrolysis of benzene in the absence of any metal however gives monodispersed nanospheres of carbon rather than nanotubes.

  6. Removal of some impurities from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yongcheng; Zhou, Gumin; Wang, Guoping; Qu, Meizhen; Yu, Zuolong

    2003-07-01

    A non-destructive mild oxidation method of removing some impurities from as-grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), by H 2O 2 oxidation and HCl treatment, has been investigated, and somewhat pure carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The CNTs from which some impurities were removed have been evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and temperature programmed oxidation and gas chromatography (TPO-GC).

  7. Peridynamic modeling and simulation of polymer-nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henke, Steven F.

    In this document, we develop and demonstrate a framework for simulating the mechanics of polymer materials that are reinforced by carbon nanotubes. Our model utilizes peridynamic theory to describe the mechanical response of the polymer and polymer-nanotube interfaces. We benefit from the continuum formulation used in peridynamics because (1) it allows the polymer material to be coarse-grained to the scale of the reinforcing nanofibers, and (2) failure via nanotube pull-out and matrix tearing are possible based on energetic considerations alone (i.e. without special treatment). To reduce the degrees of freedom that must be simulated, the reinforcement effect of the nanotubes is represented by a mesoscale bead-spring model. This approach permits the arbitrary placement of reinforcement ``strands'' in the problem domain and motivates the need for irregular quadrature point distributions, which have not yet been explored in the peridynamic setting. We address this matter in detail and report on aspects of mesh sensitivity that we uncovered in peridynamic simulations. Using a manufactured solution, we study the effects of quadrature point placement on the accuracy of the solution scheme in one and two dimensions. We demonstrate that square grids and the generator points of a centroidal Voronoi tessellation (CVT) support solutions of similar accuracy, but CVT grids have desirable characteristics that may justify the additional computational cost required for their construction. Impact simulations provide evidence that CVT grids support fracture patterns that resemble those obtained on higher resolution cubic Cartesian grids with a reduced computational burden. With the efficacy of irregular meshing schemes established, we exercise our model by dynamically stretching a cylindrical specimen composed of the polymer-nanotube composite. We vary the number of reinforcements, alignment of the filler, and the properties of the polymer-nanotube interface. Our results suggest

  8. Collider searches for extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Landsberg, Greg; /Brown U.

    2004-12-01

    Searches for extra spatial dimensions remain among the most popular new directions in our quest for physics beyond the Standard Model. High-energy collider experiments of the current decade should be able to find an ultimate answer to the question of their existence in a variety of models. Until the start of the LHC in a few years, the Tevatron will remain the key player in this quest. In this paper, we review the most recent results from the Tevatron on searches for large, TeV{sup -1}-size, and Randall-Sundrum extra spatial dimensions, which have reached a new level of sensitivity and currently probe the parameter space beyond the existing constraints. While no evidence for the existence of extra dimensions has been found so far, an exciting discovery might be just steps away.

  9. Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Bonesteel, Nicholas E

    2015-01-31

    This report summarizes the work accomplished under the support of US DOE grant # DE-FG02-97ER45639, "Correlated Electrons in Reduced Dimensions." The underlying hypothesis of the research supported by this grant has been that studying the unique behavior of correlated electrons in reduced dimensions can lead to new ways of understanding how matter can order and how it can potentially be used. The systems under study have included i) fractional quantum Hall matter, which is realized when electrons are confined to two-dimensions and placed in a strong magnetic field at low temperature, ii) one-dimensional chains of spins and exotic quasiparticle excitations of topologically ordered matter, and iii) electrons confined in effectively ``zero-dimensional" semiconductor quantum dots.

  10. In vivo evaluation of anodic TiO2 nanotubes: an experimental study in the pig.

    PubMed

    von Wilmowsky, Cornelius; Bauer, Sebastian; Lutz, Rainer; Meisel, Mark; Neukam, Friedrich Wilhelm; Toyoshima, Takeshi; Schmuki, Patrik; Nkenke, Emeka; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2009-04-01

    Because of their ability to mimic the dimensions of constituent components of natural bone and the possibility to serve as a gene and drug-delivery carrier, nanotubes seem to be a promising coating for medical implants. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a TiO(2) nanotube structured surface on periimplant bone formation in vivo when compared with an untreated standard titanium surface. Twenty-five titanium implants covered with an ordered TiO(2) nanotube layer with an individual tube diameter of 30 nm and 25 commercially pure titanium (cp-Ti) implants were placed in the frontal skull of 25 domestic pigs. To evaluate the effects of the nanotube structured implants on the periimplant bone formation, bone-implant contact (BIC), and immunohistochemistry analysis were performed at day 3, 7, 14, 30, and 90. Evaluating immunohistochemistry, a significantly higher collagen type- I expression occurred at day 7 (p = 0.003), day 14 (p = 0.016), and day 30 (p = 0.044), for the nanostructured implants in comparison with the control group. It could be found that a nanotube structured implant surface with a diameter of 30 nm does influence bone formation and bone development by enhancing osteoblast function. SEM evaluation of the specimen surfaces revealed that the nanotube coatings do resist shearing forces that evoked by implant insertion. Because of their simple, low cost, flexible manufacturing and the possibility for the usage as drug or growth factor delivery system, nanotubes seem to be a promising method for future medical implant coatings.

  11. DNA nanotubes self-assembled from triple-crossover tiles as templates for conductive nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dage; Park, Sung Ha; Reif, John H.; LaBean, Thomas H.

    2004-01-01

    DNA-based nanotechnology is currently being developed as a general assembly method for nanopatterned materials that may find use in electronics, sensors, medicine, and many other fields. Here we present results on the construction and characterization of DNA nanotubes, a self-assembling superstructure composed of DNA tiles. Triple-crossover tiles modified with thiol-containing double-stranded DNA stems projected out of the tile plane were used as the basic building blocks. Triple-crossover nanotubes display a constant diameter of ≈25 nm and have been observed with lengths up to 20 μm. We present high-resolution images of the constructs, experimental evidence of their tube-like nature as well as data on metallization of the nanotubes to form nanowires, and electrical conductivity measurements through the nanowires. DNA nanotubes represent a potential breakthrough in the self-assembly of nanometer-scale circuits for electronics layout because they can be targeted to connect at specific locations on larger-scale structures and can subsequently be metallized to form nanometer-scale wires. The dimensions of these nanotubes are also perfectly suited for applications involving interconnection of molecular-scale devices with macroscale components fabricated by conventional photolithographic methods. PMID:14709674

  12. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  15. Toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xu, Yuanzhi; Yang, Zhi; Huang, Renhuan; Chen, Jing; Wang, Raorao; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) find their extensive application as a promising material in medicine due to unique characteristics. However, such materials have been accompanied with potentially hazardous effects on human health. The toxicity of CNTs may vary depending on their structural characteristics, surface properties and chemical composition. To gain insight into the toxicity of CNTs in vivo and in vitro, we summarize contributing factors for the toxic effects of CNTs in this review. In addition, we elaborate on the toxic effects and mechanisms in target sites at systemic, organic, cellular, and biomacromolecule levels. Various issues are reported to be effected when exposed to CNTs including (1) blood circulation, (2) lymph circulation, (3) lung, (4) heart, (5) kidney, (6) spleen, (7) bone marrow, and (8) blood brain barrier. Though there have been published reports on the toxic effects of CNTs to date, more studies will still be needed to gain full understanding of their potential toxicity and underlying mechanisms.

  16. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  17. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  18. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  19. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  20. Low dimensional molecular dynamics of water inside a carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Lin, Yuan; Amberg, Gustav; Maruyama, Shigeo

    2008-11-01

    While carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted a number of researches as the key building blocks for nanotechnology, they have also caught attentions as ideal materials that realize quasi-one-dimensional channel environment, a key system in bioscience. Such materials stimulate studies in fluid dynamics under low dimensional confinement, which is restricted and departs significantly from that in three-dimension. The current study serves to explore such atomic scale dynamics by performing a series of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on water confined in a CNT with a diameter of the order of 1 nm. The MD simulations have successfully probed the phase transition of a water cluster confined in a CNT to an ice-nanotube with anomalous diameter dependence. It has also been applied to investigate the possibility of transporting water through a CNT by a temperature gradient. In this study, we particularly highlight the dielectric properties of water confined inside a CNT. The confinement gives rise to strongly anisotropic dielectric relaxation, where the relaxation becomes faster and slower in the cross sectional and axial directions, respectively. The diameter dependences of the dielectric properties are discussed in connection with water dynamics and structures in quasi-one-dimension.

  1. Image Segmentation via Fractal Dimension

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    statistical expectation K = a proportionality constant H = the Hurst exponent , in interval [0,1] (14:249) Eq (4) is a mathematical generalization of...ease, negatively correlated (24:16). The Hurst exponent is directly related to the fractal diment.ion of the process being modelled by the relation (24...24) DzE.I -H (5) where D = the fractal dimension E m the Euclidean dimension H = the Hurst exponent The effect of N1 on a typical trace can be seen

  2. Theoretical Studies of the Interaction of Excitons with Charged Impurities in Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayo, Benjamin O.

    A fundamental theory of the electronic and optical properties of semiconductors shows the importance of impurities, which are often unavoidable and can alter intrinsic properties of semiconductor materials substantially. While the subject of impurity doping is well understood in bulk semiconductors, the role and impact of doping in low dimensional materials like carbon nanotubes is still under investigation and there exists significant debate on the exact nature of electronic impurity levels in single-walled carbon nanotubes associated with adatoms. In this work, we address the role of impurities in single-walled carbon nanotubes. A simple model is developed for studying the interaction of bright (singlet) excitons in semiconducting single-wall nanotubes with charged impurities. The model reveals a red shift in the energy of excitonic states in the presence of an impurity, thus indicating binding of excitons in the impurity potential well. Signatures of several bound states were found in the absorption spectrum below the onset of excitonic optical transitions in the bare nanotube. The dependence of the binding energy on the model parameters, such as impurity charge and position, was determined and analytical fits were derived for a number of tubes of different diameter. The nanotube family splitting is seen in the diameter dependence, gradually decreasing with the diameter. By calculating the partial absorption coefficient for a small segment of nanotube the local nature of the wave function of the bound states was derived. Our studies provide useful insights into the role of the physical environment (here, a charged impurity atom) in the manipulation of the excited states of carbon nanotubes. We performed very detailed calculations of the electronic and optical properties of carbon nanotubes in the presence of an immobile impurity atom, thus going beyond previous many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) studies in which the carbon nanotubes were considered in vacuum

  3. Nanotubes in Nanoelectronics: Transport, Growth and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M.; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) baud nanotechnology appears to be promising for future Theoretical analysis and results for the ballistic current carrying capacity of nanotube wires am presented. Aspects of metal-nanotube coupling are examined. Results am also presented for chemical vapor deposition of CNT from hydrocarbon feedstock.

  4. Improved Process for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Cassell, A.; Delzeit, L.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    An improved process has been developed for the efficient fabrication of carbon nanotube probes for use in atomic-force microscopes (AFMs) and nanomanipulators. Relative to prior nanotube tip production processes, this process offers advantages in alignment of the nanotube on the cantilever and stability of the nanotube's attachment. A procedure has also been developed at Ames that effectively sharpens the multiwalled nanotube, which improves the resolution of the multiwalled nanotube probes and, combined with the greater stability of multiwalled nanotube probes, increases the effective resolution of these probes, making them comparable in resolution to single-walled carbon nanotube probes. The robust attachment derived from this improved fabrication method and the natural strength and resiliency of the nanotube itself produces an AFM probe with an extremely long imaging lifetime. In a longevity test, a nanotube tip imaged a silicon nitride surface for 15 hours without measurable loss of resolution. In contrast, the resolution of conventional silicon probes noticeably begins to degrade within minutes. These carbon nanotube probes have many possible applications in the semiconductor industry, particularly as devices are approaching the nanometer scale and new atomic layer deposition techniques necessitate a higher resolution characterization technique. Previously at Ames, the use of nanotube probes has been demonstrated for imaging photoresist patterns with high aspect ratio. In addition, these tips have been used to analyze Mars simulant dust grains, extremophile protein crystals, and DNA structure.

  5. Conductance Oscillations in Squashed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrez, H.; Anantram, M. P.; Svizhenko, A.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics and electrical conductance calculations are used to probe the electromechanical properties of squashed metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance and bandgap of armchair nanotubes show oscillations upon squashing. The physical origin of these oscillations is attributed to interaction of carbon atoms with a fourth neighbor. Squashing of armchair and zigzag nanotubes ultimately leads to metallic behavior.

  6. Multilayer Film Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie; Arnold, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An approach to assemble multilayers of carbon nanotubes on a substrate is presented. Chemical vapor deposition using a transition metal catalyst formulation is used to grow the nanotubes. Results show a bilayer assembly of nanotubes each with a different density of tubes.

  7. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  8. The Visuospatial Dimension of Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olive, Thierry; Passerault, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    The authors suggest that writing should be conceived of not only as a verbal activity but also as a visuospatial activity, in which writers process and construct visuospatial mental representations. After briefly describing research on visuospatial cognition, they look at how cognitive researchers have investigated the visuospatial dimension of…

  9. The Feeling Dimension in Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    The feeling dimension of students cannot be ignored in teaching and learning situations. Feelings are there and must not be ignored. Reading stresses word recognition, comprehension of subject matter at diverse levels of complexity, and application of what has been learned. A major ingredient so frequently left out is student appreciation of the…

  10. Heat conduction in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danza, T. M.; Fesler, L. W.; Mongan, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Multidimensional heat conduction program computes transient temperature history and steady state temperatures of complex body geometries in three dimensions. Emphasis is placed on type of problems associated with Space Shuttle thermal protection system, but program could be used in thermal analysis of most three dimensional systems.

  11. The European Dimension in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Europe, Strasbourg (France). Directorate of Education, Culture and Sport, Documentation Section.

    This paper addresses concerns about a European dimension in education that has been created by the enlargement of the European Union (EU) (the inclusion of Austria, Finland, and Sweden) and the gradual transformations of institutions into a future federal state. Sections of the paper include: (1) "Introduction"; (2) "Defining the…

  12. Warping the universal extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2009-07-15

    We develop the necessary ingredients for the construction of realistic models with warped universal extra dimensions. Our investigations are based on the seven-dimensional (7D) spacetime AdS{sub 5}xT{sup 2}/Z{sub 2} and we derive the Kaluza-Klein (KK) spectra for gravitons, bulk vectors, and the TeV brane localized Higgs boson. We show that, starting with a massive 7D fermion, one may obtain a single chiral massless mode whose profile is readily localized towards the Planck or TeV brane. This allows one to place the standard model fermions in the bulk and construct models of flavor as in Randall-Sundrum models. Our solution also admits the familiar KK parity of models with universal extra dimensions so that the lightest odd KK state is stable and may be a dark matter candidate. As an additional feature the AdS{sub 5} warping ensures that the excited modes on the torus, including the dark matter candidate, appear at TeV energies (as is usually assumed in models with universal extra dimensions) even though the Planck scale sets the dimensions for the torus.

  13. Interpretation and the Aesthetic Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortensen, Charles O.

    1976-01-01

    The author, utilizing a synthesis of philosophic comments on aesthetics, provides a discourse on the aesthetic dimension and offers examples of how interpreters can nurture the innate sense of beauty in man. Poetic forms, such as haiku, are used to relate the aesthetic relationship between man and the environment. (BT)

  14. Cosmology with dynamical extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Joel K.

    Nearly every attempt to unify the fundamental forces incorporates the idea of compact extra dimensions. The notion was introduced by Kaluza and Klein in the 1920s and is an essential part of contemporary string theory and M-theory. In most treatments the extra dimensions are static. We consider the consequences of extra dimensions with time-varying radii. The radii are modeled by light scalar fields. These may have unusual properties which produce observable effects, such as non-canonical kinetic energies, couplings to matter and radiation, and non-minimal coupling to gravity. Extra dimensions may be responsible for dark energy in the late universe. The simplest model of dark energy is characterized by its equation of state. We show that constraints placed on realistic models by the universality of free fall, variation of fundamental constants and metric tests of gravity are often stricter than bounds on the equation of state. Testing the equivalence principle maybe an effective way of distinguishing some quintessence models from a cosmological constant. In certain dark energy models the speed of sound is much less than the speed of light. We calculate how this affects the cosmic microwave background and show that the speed of sound may be measurable, provided dark energy is sufficiently dense at decoupling. This is another possible signature of quintessence. Dynamical extra dimensions may have consequences for the early universe. In the cyclic model, the universe is described in terms of a series of contractions and expansions of an extra dimension. The big bang is preceded by a big crunch and quantum fluctuations of the scalar field produce structure in universe. We consider how the fluctuations evolve and build over many cycles and show that there are no observable instabilities or adverse effects. In the cyclic model extra dimensions act as both dark energy and as an agent to cause contraction and a big crunch. Previous theorems suggested that contraction

  15. Compactified Vacuum in Ten Dimensions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurmser, Daniel

    1987-09-01

    Since the 1920's, theories which unify gravity with the other fundamental forces have called for more than the four observed dimensions of space-time. According to such a theory, the vacuum consists of flat four-dimensional space-time described by the Minkowski metric M ^4 and a "compactified" space B. The dimensions of B are small, and the space can only be observed at distance scales smaller than the present experimental limit. These theories have had serious difficulties. The equations of gravity severely restrict the possible choices for the space B. The allowed spaces are complicated and difficult to study. The vacuum is furthermore unstable in the sense that a small perturbation causes the compactified dimensions to expand indefinitely. There is an addition a semi-classical argument which implies that the compactified vacuum be annihilated by virtual black holes. It follows that a universe with compactified extra dimensions could not have survived to the present. These results were derived by applying the equations of general relativity to spaces of more than four dimensions. The form of these equations was assumed to be unchanged by an increase in the number of dimensions. Recently, it has been proposed that gravity in more than four dimensions may involve terms of higher order in the curvature as well as the linear terms present in ordinary general relativity. I illustrate the effect of such terms by considering the example B = S^6 where S ^6 is the six-dimensional sphere. Only when the extra terms are included is this choice of the compactified space allowed. I explore the effect of a small perturbation on such a vacuum. The ten-dimensional spherically symmetric potential is examined, and I determine conditions under which the formation of virtual black holes is forbidden. The example M^4 times S^6 is still plagued by the semi -classical instability, but this result does not hold in general. The requirement that virtual black holes be forbidden provides a

  16. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by

  17. Carbon nanotubes/TiO2 nanotubes hybrid supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Zhenhai; Li, Jinghong

    2007-09-01

    The rational selection and assembly of materials are central issues in the development of energy conversion and storage applications. Incorporating the utilization of carbon nanotubes cathode and TiO2 nanotubes anode in energy storage, a nonaqueous hybrid supercapacitor was developed in order to significantly increase the energy density of the supercapacitor. The electrochemical performance of the hybrid supercapacitor is characterized by charge/discharge test and cyclic voltam-mograms. According to the voltage value, the energy density of the asymmetric supercapacitor, by applying a potential varying from 0 to 2.8 V, is found to be 14.4 Wh/kg at upwards of 10 C, which is twice more than for the conventional symmetric supercapacitor utilizing carbon nanotubes, while maintaining desirable cycling stability and rate capability.

  18. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  20. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  1. Nanocapillarity and chemistry in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte, D.; Chatelain, A.; Heer, W.A. de

    1996-12-13

    Open carbon nanotubes were filled with molten silver nitrate by capillary forces. Only those tubes with inner diameters of 4 nanometers or more were filled, suggesting a capillarity size dependence as a result of the lowering of the nanotube-salt interface energy with increasing curvature of the nanotube walls. Nanotube cavities should also be less chemically reactive than graphite and may serve as nanosize test tubes. This property has been illustrated by monitoring the decomposition of silver nitrate within nanotubes in situ in an electron microscope, which produced chains of silver nanobeads separated by high-pressure gas pockets. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  3. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  4. Conductivity of transparent electrodes made from interacting nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maillaud, Laurent; Zakri, Cécile; Ly, Isabelle; Pénicaud, Alain; Poulin, Philippe

    2013-12-01

    Interactions in carbon nanotube (CNT) dispersions alter the morphology of films made from such dispersions. Weak attractive interactions induce an enhancement of the electrical conductivity. This phenomenon is observed in thin films that lie in a near percolated regime. Strong interactions instead induce a decrease of conductivity. In spite of strong morphological differences, the conductivity of thick films, away from percolated regimes, do not depend on interactions between the CNTs. These experiments support a recent theoretical scenario of the percolation of interacting rods and provide guidance for the optimal formulations of CNT inks in transparent electrode applications.

  5. van Hove singularities in disordered multichannel quantum wires and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügle, S.; Egger, R.

    2002-11-01

    We present a theory for the van Hove singularity (VHS) in the tunneling density of states (TDOS) of disordered multichannel quantum wires, in particular multiwall carbon nanotubes. We assume close-by gates that screen off electron-electron interactions. Diagrammatic perturbation theory within the noncrossing approximation yields analytical expressions governing the disorder-induced broadening and shift of VHS's as new subbands are opened. This problem is nontrivial because the (lowest-order) Born approximation breaks down close to the VHS. Interestingly, compared to the bulk case, the boundary TDOS shows drastically altered VHS's, even in the clean limit.

  6. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  7. Architecture and Characteristics of Bacterial Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Gyanendra P; Malli Mohan, Ganesh Babu; Dubrovsky, Anna; Amen, Triana; Tsipshtein, Shai; Rouvinski, Alex; Rosenberg, Alex; Kaganovich, Daniel; Sherman, Eilon; Medalia, Ohad; Ben-Yehuda, Sigal

    2016-02-22

    Bacteria display an array of contact-dependent interaction systems that have evolved to facilitate direct cell-to-cell communication. We have previously identified a mode of bacterial communication mediated by nanotubes bridging neighboring cells. Here, we elucidate nanotube architecture, dynamics, and molecular components. Utilizing Bacillus subtilis as a model organism, we found that at low cell density, nanotubes exhibit remarkable complexity, existing as both intercellular tubes and extending tubes, with the latter frequently surrounding the cells in a "root-like" fashion. Observing nanotube formation in real time showed that these structures are formed in the course of minutes, displaying rapid movements. Utilizing a combination of super-resolution, light, and electron microscopy, we revealed that nanotubes are composed of chains of membranous segments harboring a continuous lumen. Furthermore, we discovered that a conserved calcineurin-like protein, YmdB, presents in nanotubes and is required for both nanotube production and intercellular molecular trade.

  8. Constitutive Modeling of Crosslinked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    A non-linear, continuum-based constitutive model is developed for carbon nanotube materials in which bundles of aligned carbon nanotubes have varying amounts of crosslinks between the nanotubes. The model accounts for the non-linear elastic constitutive behavior of the material in terms of strain, and is developed using a thermodynamic energy approach. The model is used to examine the effect of the crosslinking on the overall mechanical properties of variations of the crosslinked carbon nanotube material with varying degrees of crosslinking. It is shown that the presence of the crosslinks has significant effects on the mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube materials. An increase in the transverse shear properties is observed when the nanotubes are crosslinked. However, this increase is accompanied by a decrease in axial mechanical properties of the nanotube material upon crosslinking.

  9. A DFT study of adsorption of glycine onto the surface of BC2N nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltani, Alireza; Azmoodeh, Zivar; Javan, Masoud Bezi; Lemeski, E. Tazikeh; Karami, Leila

    2016-10-01

    A theoretical study of structure and the energy interaction of amino acid glycine (NH2CH2COOH) with BC2N nanotube is crucial for apperception behavior occurring at the nanobiointerface. Herein, we studied the adsorption of glycine in their radical and zwitterionic forms upon the surface of BC2N nanotube using M06 functional and 6-311G** standard basis set. We also considered the different orientations of the glycine amino acid on the surface of adsorbent. Further, we found out that the stability of glycine from its carbonyl group is higher than hydroxyl and amine groups. Our results also indicated that the electronic structure of BC2N nanotube on the adsorption of glycine from its amine group is more altered than the other groups. Our study exhibits that opto-electronic property of adsorbent is changed after the glycine adsorption.

  10. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  11. Optical properties of chiral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, Noguez; Román-Velázquez Carlos, E.; Ariadna, Sánchez; Montes Lilia, Meza

    2004-03-01

    A recent theoretical model [1] is applied to study the optical properties chiral nanostructures like carbon nanotubes. We calculate the Circular Dichroism (CD) spectra for carbon nanotubes with different chirality. The calculated CD spectra show features that allow us to distinguish between nanotubes with different indexes of chirality. Other nanostructures, like chiral fullerenes are also investigated.These results provide theoretical support for the quantification of chirality and its measurement, using the CD lineshapes of chiral. This work has been partly financed by CONACyT grant No. 36651-E and by DGAPA-UNAM grants No. IN104201. [1] C. E. Roman-Velazquez, et al., J. of Phys. Chem. B (Letter) 107, 12035 (2003)

  12. Carbon Nanotube Material Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Leonard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Niolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2006-01-01

    The nanomaterial activities at NASA Johnson Space Center focus on carbon nanotube production, characterization and their applications for aerospace systems. Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced by arc and laser methods. Characterization of the nanotube material is performed using the NASA JSC protocol developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA. A possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be discussed. Changes in the quality of the material collected in different regions of the arc and laser production chambers is assessed using the original JSC protocol. The observed variations indicate different growth conditions in different regions of the production chambers.

  13. Self-response multi-functional composite material base on carbon nanotube paper using deicing, flame retardancy, thermal insulation, and lightning-strike protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Hetao; Zhang, Zhichun; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotube paper (CNP) based multi-functional composite material is an attractive candidate for deicing, flame retardancy, thermal insulation and lighting strike protection due to the excellent conductivity, light weight and thin dimensions. In this article, multi-functional carbon nanotube paper was fabricated successfully by using commercial carbon nanotube. As a deicing composite material, carbon nanotube was used directly without pretreatment in fabricating carbon nanotube paper. The conductivities of the carbon nanotube paper and deicing composite were 77.8S/cm and 64.9S/ respectively. Electrical heating and deicing performance were test by infrared camera with deicing time less than 220s and 450s to melt a certain amount of ice under different ambient condition. CNT was grafted by zirconium (IV) butoxide solution and dimethyl dichlorosilicane to form co-oligomers on the tube surface while oligomers decompose under a certain temperature to develop an inorganic layer of silicon zirconium oxide. The oxidizing temperature of carbon nanotube increases more than 20°C and the weight loss rate decreases 20% than the untreated carbon nanotube. Lightning protection material required high electro conductivity, due to the utmost high current in a short time. Therefore, silver nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of carbon nanotube with the diameter around 100nm. The conductivity increased sharply from 84s/cm to1756s/cm with the mount of 5.9wt% Ag of the modified carbon nanotube paper because the silver nanoparticles deposited on the surface. In addition, the silver modified also can be used as thermal insulation material decreasing the infrared radiation.

  14. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  15. Novel Nanotube Manufacturing Streamlines Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Nanotubes have novel qualities that make them uniquely qualified for a plethora of uses, including applications in electronics, optics, and other scientific and industrial fields. The NASA process for creating these nanostructures involves using helium arc welding to vaporize an amorphous carbon rod and then form nanotubes by depositing the vapor onto a water-cooled carbon cathode, which then yields bundles, or ropes, of single-walled nanotubes at a rate of 2 grams per hour using a single setup. This eliminates costs associated with the use of metal catalysts, including the cost of product purification, resulting in a relatively inexpensive, high-quality, very pure end product. While managing to be less expensive, safer, and simpler, the process also increases the quality of the nanotubes. Goddard's Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) Office promoted the technology, and in 2005, Boise-based Idaho Space Materials Inc. (ISM) was formed and applied for a nonexclusive license for the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing technology. ISM commercialized its products, and the inexpensive, robust nanotubes are now in the hands of the scientists who will create the next generation of composite polymers, metals, and ceramics that will impact the way we live. In fact, researchers are examining ways for these newfound materials to be used in the manufacture of transistors and fuel cells, large screen televisions, ultra-sensitive sensors, high-resolution atomic force microscopy probes, supercapacitors, transparent conducting films, drug carriers, catalysts, and advanced composite materials, to name just a few of the myriad technologies to benefit.

  16. Diameter-dependent hydrophobicity in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyakuno, Haruka; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Ichimura, Ryota; Matsuda, Kazuyuki; Nakai, Yusuke; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Saito, Takeshi; Maniwa, Yutaka

    2016-08-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are a good model system that provides atomically smooth nanocavities. It has been reported that water-SWCNTs exhibit hydrophobicity depending on the temperature T and the SWCNT diameter D. SWCNTs adsorb water molecules spontaneously in their cylindrical pores around room temperature, whereas they exhibit a hydrophilic-hydrophobic transition or wet-dry transition (WDT) at a critical temperature Twd ≈ 220-230 K and above a critical diameter Dc ≈ 1.4-1.6 nm. However, details of the WDT phenomenon and its mechanism remain unknown. Here, we report a systematic experimental study involving X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry. It is found that water molecules inside thick SWCNTs (D > Dc) evaporate and condense into ice Ih outside the SWCNTs at Twd upon cooling, and the ice Ih evaporates and condenses inside the SWCNTs upon heating. On the other hand, residual water trapped inside the SWCNTs below Twd freezes. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that upon lowering T, the hydrophobicity of thick SWCNTs increases without any structural transition, while the water inside thin SWCNTs (D < Dc) exhibits a structural transition, forming an ordered ice. This ice has a well-developed hydrogen bonding network adapting to the cylindrical pores of the SWCNTs. Thus, the unusual diameter dependence of the WDT is attributed to the adaptability of the structure of water to the pore dimension and shape.

  17. Carbon nanotubes and graphene towards soft electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Young Hee

    2014-04-01

    Although silicon technology has been the main driving force for miniaturizing device dimensions to improve cost and performance, the current application of Si to soft electronics (flexible and stretchable electronics) is limited due to material rigidity. As a result, various prospective materials have been proposed to overcome the rigidity of conventional Si technology. In particular, nano-carbon materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene are promising due to outstanding elastic properties as well as an excellent combination of electronic, optoelectronic, and thermal properties compared to conventional rigid silicon. The uniqueness of these nano-carbon materials has opened new possibilities for soft electronics, which is another technological trend in the market. This review covers the recent progress of soft electronics research based on CNTs and graphene. We discuss the strategies for soft electronics with nano-carbon materials and their preparation methods (growth and transfer techniques) to devices as well as the electrical characteristics of transparent conducting films (transparency and sheet resistance) and device performances in field effect transistor (FET) (structure, carrier type, on/off ratio, and mobility). In addition to discussing state of the art performance metrics, we also attempt to clarify trade-off issues and methods to control the trade-off on/off versus mobility). We further demonstrate accomplishments of the CNT network in flexible integrated circuits on plastic substrates that have attractive characteristics. A future research direction is also proposed to overcome current technological obstacles necessary to realize commercially feasible soft electronics.

  18. Processing and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Can, Roberto J.; Grimsley, Brian W.; Czabaj, Michael W.; Siochi, Emilie J.; Hull, Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in the synthesis of large-scale quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have provided the opportunity to study the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites using these novel materials as reinforcement. Nanocomp Technologies, Inc. currently supplies large sheets with dimensions up to 122 cm x 244 cm containing both single-wall and few-wall CNTs. The tubes are approximately 1 mm in length with diameters ranging from 8 to 12 nm. In the present study being conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), single and multiple layers of CNT sheets were infused or coated with various polymer solutions that included commercial toughened-epoxies and bismaleimides, as well as a LaRC developed polyimide. The resulting CNT composites were tested in tension using a modified version of ASTM D882-12 to determine their strength and modulus values. The effects of solvent treatment and mechanical elongation/alignment of the CNT sheets on the tensile performance of the composite were determined. Thin composites (around 50 wt% CNT) fabricated from acetone condensed and elongated CNT sheets with either a BMI or polyimide resin solution exhibited specific tensile moduli approaching that of toughened epoxy/ IM7 carbon fiber unidirectional composites.

  19. Supersymmetric unification requires extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Fallbacher, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael

    2013-05-23

    We discuss settings that predict precision gauge unification in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We show that, if one requires anomaly freedom and fermion masses while demanding that unification is not an accident, only R symmetries can forbid the supersymmetric Higgs mass term {mu}. We then review the proof that R symmetries are not available in conventional grand unified theories (GUTs) and argue that this prevents natural solutions to the doublet-triplet splitting problem in four dimensions. On the other hand, higher-dimensional GUTs do not suffer from this problem. We briefly comment on an explicit string-derived model in which the {mu} and dimension five proton decay problems are solved by an order four discrete R symmetry, and comment on the higher-dimensional origin of this symmetry.

  20. Black Holes in Higher Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Gary T.

    2012-04-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Part I. Introduction: 1. Black holes in four dimensions Gary Horowitz; Part II. Five Dimensional Kaluza-Klein Theory: 2. The Gregory-Laflamme instability Ruth Gregory; 3. Final state of Gregory-Laflamme instability Luis Lehner and Frans Pretorius; 4. General black holes in Kaluza-Klein theory Gary Horowitz and Toby Wiseman; Part III. Higher Dimensional Solutions: 5. Myers-Perry black holes Rob Myers; 6. Black rings Roberto Emparan and Harvey Reall; Part IV. General Properties: 7. Constraints on the topology of higher dimensional black holes Greg Galloway; 8. Blackfolds Roberto Emparan; 9. Algebraically special solutions in higher dimensions Harvey Reall; 10. Numerical construction of static and stationary black holes Toby Wiseman; Part V. Advanced Topics: 11. Black holes and branes in supergravity Don Marolf; 12. The gauge/gravity duality Juan Maldacena; 13. The fluid/gravity correspondence Veronika Hubeny, Mukund Rangamani and Shiraz Minwalla; 14. Horizons, holography and condensed matter Sean Hartnoll; Index.

  1. Critical gravity in four dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lü, H; Pope, C N

    2011-05-06

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This "critical" theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical "new massive gravity" with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  2. Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, H.; Pope, C. N.

    2011-05-06

    We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

  3. Carbon nanotubes instruct physiological growth and functionally mature syncytia: nongenetic engineering of cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, Valentina; Cellot, Giada; Toma, Francesca Maria; Long, Carlin S; Caldwell, John H; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Turco, Antonio; Prato, Maurizio; Ballerini, Laura; Mestroni, Luisa

    2013-07-23

    Myocardial tissue engineering currently represents one of the most realistic strategies for cardiac repair. We have recently discovered the ability of carbon nanotube scaffolds to promote cell division and maturation in cardiomyocytes. Here, we test the hypothesis that carbon nanotube scaffolds promote cardiomyocyte growth and maturation by altering the gene expression program, implementing the cell electrophysiological properties and improving networking and maturation of functional syncytia. In our study, we combine microscopy, biological and electrophysiological methodologies, and calcium imaging, to verify whether neonatal rat ventricular myocytes cultured on substrates of multiwall carbon nanotubes acquire a physiologically more mature phenotype compared to control (gelatin). We show that the carbon nanotube substrate stimulates the induction of a gene expression profile characteristic of terminal differentiation and physiological growth, with a 2-fold increase of α-myosin heavy chain (P < 0.001) and upregulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase 2a. In contrast, markers of pathological hypertrophy remain unchanged (β-myosin heavy chain, skeletal α-actin, atrial natriuretic peptide). These modifications are paralleled by an increase of connexin-43 gene expression, gap junctions and functional syncytia. Moreover, carbon nanotubes appear to exert a protective effect against the pathologic stimulus of phenylephrine. Finally, cardiomyocytes on carbon nanotubes demonstrate a more mature electrophysiological phenotype of syncytia and intracellular calcium signaling. Thus, carbon nanotubes interacting with cardiomyocytes have the ability to promote physiological growth and functional maturation. These properties are unique in the current vexing field of tissue engineering, and offer unprecedented perspectives in the development of innovative therapies for cardiac repair.

  4. The influence of titania-zirconia-zirconium titanate nanotube characteristics on osteoblast cell adhesion.

    PubMed

    Minagar, Sepideh; Li, Yuncang; Berndt, Christopher C; Wen, Cuie

    2015-01-01

    Studies of biomaterial surfaces and their influence on cell behavior provide insights concerning the design of surface physicochemical and topography properties of implant materials. Fabrication of biocompatible metal oxide nanotubes on metallic biomaterials, especially titanium alloys such as Ti50Zr via anodization, alters the surface chemistry as well as surface topography of the alloy. In this study, four groups of TiO2-ZrO2-ZrTiO4 nanotubes that exhibit diverse nanoscale dimensional characteristics (i.e. inner diameter Di, outer diameter Do and wall thicknesses Wt) were fabricated via anodization. The nanotubes were annealed and characterized using scanning electron microscopy and 3-D profilometry. The potential applied during anodization influenced the oxidation rate of titanium and zirconium, thereby resulting in different nanoscale characteristics for the nanotubes. The different oxidation and dissolution rates both led to changes in the surface roughness parameters. The in vitro cell response to the nanotubes with different nanoscale dimensional characteristics was assessed using osteoblast cells (SaOS2). The results of the MTS assay indicated that the nanotubes with inner diameter (Di)≈40nm exhibited the highest percentage of cell adhesion of 41.0%. This result can be compared to (i) 25.9% cell adhesion at Di≈59nm, (ii) 33.1% at Di≈64nm, and (iii) 33.5% at Di≈82nm. The nanotubes with Di≈59nm exhibited the greatest roughness parameter of Sa (mean roughness), leading to the lowest ability to interlock with SaOS2 cells.

  5. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  6. Magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Kang, N.; Kong, W. J.; Hu, J. S.; Pan, Z. W.; Xie, S. S.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes bundles. At temperatures above 15 K, the magnetoresistance was found to follow exactly a scaling law as predicted by the theory of two-dimensional (2D) weak localization. Below 15 K, the 2D weak localization behavior is modified due to the formation of a Coulomb gap. This modification does not fit to those theories which treat electron-electron interaction as a perturbation. Altshular-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) resistance oscillation was observed in milli-Kelvin temperature range. The results will be discussed in terms of the interplay between electron-electron interaction and disorder scattering in multiwall carbon nanotube.

  7. Branchy alumina nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Jianping; Pu, Lin; Bao, Ximao; Feng, Duan

    2002-02-01

    Branchy alumina nanotubes (bANTs) have been shown to exist in aluminum oxide. Electron-beam evaporated 400 nm Al film on Si substrate is stepwise anodized in dilute sulfuric acid under the constant dc voltage 40 V at 10.0 °C. This electrochemical-anodizing route resulted in the formation of individual bANTs. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the length of the bANTs was around 450 nm, and the inner diameter was around 10-20 nm. We deduced that the bANTs, the completely detached multibranchy cells of anodic porous alumina (APA) film, should be evolved from the stagnant cells of the APA mother film. The bANTs may be used as templates in fabrication of individual branchy nanoscale cables, jacks, and heterojunctions. The proposed formation mechanisms of the bANTs and the stagnant cells should give some insights into the long-standing problem of APA film, i.e., the self-ordering mechanism of the cells arrangement in porous anodization of aluminum.

  8. Properties of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masood, Samina; Bullmore, Daniel; Duran, Michael; Jacobs, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Different synthesizing methods are used to create various nanostructures of carbon; we are mainly interested in single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes, (SWCNTs) and (MWCNTs) respectively. The properties of these tubes are related to their synthetic methods, chirality, and diameter. The extremely sturdy structure of CNTs, with their distinct thermal and electromagnetic properties, suggests a tremendous use of these tubes in electronics and medicines. Here, we analyze various physical properties of SWCNTs with a special emphasis on electromagnetic and chemical properties. By examining their electrical properties, we demonstrate the viability of discrete CNT based components. After considering the advantages of using CNTs over microstructures, we make a case for the advancement and development of nanostructures based electronics. As for current CNT applications, it's hard to overlook their use and functionality in the development of cancer treatment. Whether the tubes are involved in chemotherapeutic drug delivery, molecular imaging and targeting, or photodynamic therapy, we show that the remarkable properties of SWCNTs can be used in advantageous ways by many different industries.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Purification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Delzeit, Clement J. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A method for cleaning or otherwise removing amorphous carbon and other residues that arise in growth of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array. The CNT array is exposed to a plurality of hydroxyls or hydrogen, produced from a selected vapor or liquid source such as H2O or H2O2. and the hydroxyls or hydrogen (neutral or electrically charged) react with the residues to produce partly or fully dissolved or hydrogenated or hydroxylizated products that can be removed or separated from the CNT array. The hydroxyls or hydrogen can be produced by heating the CNT array, residue and selected vapor or liquid source or by application of an electromagnetic excitation signal with a selected frequency or range of frequencies to dissociate the selected vapor or liquid. The excitation frequency can be chirped to cover a selected range of frequencies corresponding to dissociation of the selected vapor or liquid. Sonication may be uscd to supplement dissociation of the H2O and/or H2O2.

  10. Dimension Reduction for Object Ranking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamishima, Toshihiro; Akaho, Shotaro

    Ordered lists of objects are widely used as representational forms. Such ordered objects include Web search results and bestseller lists. Techniques for processing such ordinal data are being developed, particularly methods for an object ranking task: i.e., learning functions used to sort objects from sample orders. In this article, we propose two dimension reduction methods specifically designed to improve prediction performance in an object ranking task.

  11. Wormholes leading to extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Skvortsova, M. V.

    2016-10-01

    In 6D general relativity with a scalar field as a source of gravity, a new type of static wormhole solutions is presented: such wormholes connect our universe with a small 2D extra subspace with a universe where this extra subspace is large, and the whole space-time is effectively 6-dimensional. We consider manifolds with the structure M0 x M1 x M2 , where M0 is 2D Lorentzian space-time while each of M1 an M2 can be a 2-sphere or a 2-torus. After selecting possible asymptotic behaviors of the metric functions compatible with the field equations, we give two explicit examples of wormhole solutions with spherical symmetry in our space-time and toroidal extra dimensions. In one example, with a massless scalar field (it is a special case of a well-known more general solution), the extra dimensions have a large constant size at the "far end"; the other example contains a nonzero potential $V(\\phi)$ which provides a 6D anti-de Sitter asymptotic, where all spatial dimensions are infinite.

  12. Gardner transition in finite dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbani, Pierfrancesco; Biroli, Giulio

    2015-03-01

    Recent works on hard spheres in the limit of infinite dimensions revealed that glass states, envisioned as metabasins in configuration space, can break up in a multitude of separate basins at low enough temperature or high enough pressure, leading to the emergence of new kinds of soft-modes and unusual properties. In this paper we study by perturbative renormalization group techniques the critical properties of this transition, which has been discovered in disordered mean-field models in the 1980s. We find that the upper-critical dimension du, above which mean-field results hold, is strictly larger than six and apparently nonuniversal, i.e., system dependent. Below du, we do not find any perturbative attractive fixed point (except for a tiny region of the one-step replica symmetry breaking parameter), thus showing that the transition in three dimensions either is governed by a nonperturbative fixed point unrelated to the Gaussian mean-field one or becomes first order or does not exist. We also discuss possible relationships with the behavior of spin glasses in a field.

  13. Safety considerations for graphene: lessons learnt from carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Ali-Boucetta, Hanene; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-03-19

    Many consider carbon nanomaterials the poster children of nanotechnology, attracting immense scientific interest from many disciplines and offering tremendous potential in a diverse range of applications due to their extraordinary properties. Graphene is the youngest in the family of carbon nanomaterials. Its isolation, description, and mass fabrication has followed that of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes. Graphene's development and its adoption by many industries will increase unintended or intentional human exposure, creating the need to determine its safety profile. In this Account, we compare the lessons learned from the development of carbon nanotubes with what is known about graphene, based on our own investigations and those of others. Despite both being carbon-based, nanotubes and graphene are two very distinct nanomaterials. We consider the key physicochemical characteristics (structure, surface, colloidal properties) for graphene and carbon nanotubes at three different physiological levels: cellular, tissue, and whole body. We summarize the evidence for health effects of both materials at all three levels. Overall, graphene and its derivatives are characterized by a lower aspect ratio, larger surface area, and better dispersibility in most solvents compared to carbon nanotubes. Dimensions, surface chemistry, and impurities are equally important for graphene and carbon nanotubes in determining both mechanistic (aggregation, cellular processes, biodistribution, and degradation kinetics) and toxicological outcomes. Colloidal dispersions of individual graphene sheets (or graphene oxide and other derivatives) can easily be engineered without metallic impurities, with high stability and less aggregation. Very importantly, graphene nanostructures are not fiber-shaped. These features theoretically offer significant advantages in terms of safety over inhomogeneous dispersions of fiber-shaped carbon nanotubes. However, studies that directly compare graphene with

  14. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  15. Multiwalled carbon nanotube CVD synthesis, modification, and composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Dali

    Well-aligned carbon multiwall nanotube (MWNT) arrays have been continuously synthesized by a floating catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method involving the pyrolysis of xylene-ferrocene mixtures. The CVD parameters have been studied to selectively synthesize nanotubes with required dimensions. A mixed tip-root growth model has been proposed for the floating catalytic CVD synthesis. Coarsening of the catalyst particle at the root end promoted MWNT wall coarsening (addition of new concentric graphene shells), while the smaller catalyst particle at the tip contributed to MWNT elongation. A two-step process in which ferrocene was fed for only five minutes to nucleate the DTs was developed to understand if a continuous supply of catalyst was necessary for continued growth. The results show that the ferrocene was only necessary for initial nucleation. To simplify the CVD process further, another two-step synthesis method was developed in which the ferrocene was pre-decomposed so that the nanotube nucleation could be isolated from the growth, enabling quantification of growth mechanisms and kinetics. Mass spectra and hydrocarbon analyses of the CVD reactor tail gas were performed to understand the pyrolysis chemistry. Well-aligned N-doped and Ru-doped MWNT arrays have been produced by pyrolysis of pyridine ferrocene mixtures and xylene-ferrocene-ruthenocene mixtures, respectively. Various material characterization techniques were used to measure the dopant distributions and correlate the catalyst phase with the novel nanotube structures. High-temperature annealing has been shown to be a viable means to remove both the catalyst particles and certain microstructural defects within the CVD-derived DTs. The phase transformation of catalyst during annealing has also been studied. Homogeneous distribution of MWNTs in polystyrene matrices was achieved by an ultrasonic assisted solution-evaporation method. Addition of only 1 wt % DTs to polystyrene increased the polymer

  16. Direct Synthesis of Long Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Strands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H. W.; Xu, C. L.; Wu, D. H.; Wei, B. Q.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2002-05-01

    In the processes that are used to produce single-walled nanotubes (electric arc, laser ablation, and chemical vapor deposition), the typical lengths of tangled nanotube bundles reach several tens of micrometers. We report that long nanotube strands, up to several centimeters in length, consisting of aligned single-walled nanotubes can be synthesized by the catalytic pyrolysis of n-hexane with an enhanced vertical floating technique. The long strands of nanotubes assemble continuously from arrays of nanotubes, which are intrinsically long.

  17. Mathematical modelling for nanotube bundle oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamwattana, Ngamta; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2009-07-01

    This paper investigates the mechanics of a gigahertz oscillator comprising a nanotube oscillating within the centre of a uniform concentric ring or bundle of nanotubes. The study is also extended to the oscillation of a fullerene inside a nanotube bundle. In particular, certain fullerene-nanotube bundle oscillators are studied, namely C60-carbon nanotube bundle, C60-boron nitride nanotube bundle, B36N36-carbon nanotube bundle and B36N36-boron nitride nanotube bundle. Using the Lennard-Jones potential and the continuum approach, we obtain a relation between the bundle radius and the radii of the nanotubes forming the bundle, as well as the optimum bundle size which gives rise to the maximum oscillatory frequency for both the fullerene and the nanotube bundle oscillators. While previous studies in this area have been undertaken through molecular dynamics simulations, this paper emphasizes the use of applied mathematical modelling techniques which provides considerable insight into the underlying mechanisms. The paper presents a synopsis of the major results derived in detail by the present authors in [1, 2].

  18. Lipid bilayers covalently anchored to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Dayani, Yasaman; Malmstadt, Noah

    2012-05-29

    The unique physical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes make them an exciting material for applications in various fields such as bioelectronics and biosensing. Due to the poor water solubility of carbon nanotubes, functionalization for such applications has been a challenge. Of particular need are functionalization methods for integrating carbon nanotubes with biomolecules and constructing novel hybrid nanostructures for bionanoelectronic applications. We present a novel method for the fabrication of dispersible, biocompatible carbon nanotube-based materials. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are covalently modified with primary amine-bearing phospholipids in a carbodiimide-activated reaction. These modified carbon nanotubes have good dispersibility in nonpolar solvents. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy shows peaks attributable to the formation of amide bonds between lipids and the nanotube surface. Simple sonication of lipid-modified nanotubes with other lipid molecules leads to the formation of a uniform lipid bilayer coating the nanotubes. These bilayer-coated nanotubes are highly dispersible and stable in aqueous solution. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows labeled lipids on the surface of bilayer-modified nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) shows the morphology of dispersed bilayer-coated MWCNTs. Fluorescence quenching of lipid-coated MWCNTs confirms the bilayer configuration of the lipids on the nanotube surface, and fluorescence anisotropy measurements show that the bilayer is fluid above the gel-to-liquid transition temperature. The membrane protein α-hemolysin spontaneously inserts into the MWCNT-supported bilayer, confirming the biomimetic membrane structure. These biomimetic nanostructures are a promising platform for the integration of carbon nanotube-based materials with biomolecules.

  19. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M.; Sahu, Rakesh P.; Wallar, Cameron J.; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g-1 and an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm-2 at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1 is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm-2.

  20. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Ahmed M; Sahu, Rakesh P; Wallar, Cameron J; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K

    2017-02-17

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g(-1) and  an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm(-2) at a scan rate of 2 mV s(-1) is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm(-2).

  1. Design, fabrication and properties of novel architectures made from carbon nanotubes and nano-porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Sumanjeet

    Nanomaterials like carbon nanotubes (CNT) have numerous potential applications due to their unique electrical, thermal and mechanical properties. Building macroscopic architectures using these nanocomponents requires new approaches for organization or assembly of these components. This can be achieved by using various techniques like capillary-induced compaction, template-assisted growth and other synthesis techniques. The vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube arrays were grown using chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Evaporation of liquid from such vertically aligned nanotube arrays induces the assembly of nanotubes into cellular patterns. The role of substrate and orientation of the carbon nanotube array was investigated and analyzed to gain more control over the pattern formation that could help in designing new structures. Electrical measurements on the CNT patterns before and after capillary-induced compaction revealed that compaction results in four-fold increase in electrical conductivity, making them a potential candidate for vertical interconnects. A new method to fabricate a syringe with nanopores by using anodization technique was demonstrated. Experimental parameters were investigated to control the dimension and morphology of the nanopores in the syringe. Capillary force was used to infiltrate and replicate the complete 3D architecture into polymers. The usefulness of syringe as a biological sampler (DNA-RNA separation) was demonstrated. Layered structure of exfoliated mica was used as a substrate for growth of CNTs. This resulted in novel layered hybrid architecture of mica and carbon nanotube arrays. Mechanical properties of such architectures were investigated. Such architectures could be very useful as foams. These simple techniques can be used to assemble nanoscale components into well-defined macroscopic architectures and thus broaden the range of applications where their unique properties can be put into use.

  2. Adsorption in carbon nanotubes and computer simulation studies of wetting on alkali surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, George

    Absorption in carbon nanotubes and computer simulation studies of the wetting properties of rare gases on alkali metals are presented. In the confining environment of nanotubes, adsorbed atoms exhibit behavior characteristic of 1, 2, and 3 dimensions as a function of thermodynamic parameters (number of particles N and temperature T), geometry (isolated tubes or nanotube bundles), and microscopic variables (relative size of atom vs. tube radius). Small atoms fit easily inside nanotubes and are strongly bound within them. At low coverage, atoms moving inside nanotubes are adsorbed in a cylindrical shell close to the tube walls, while above a threshold value, atoms start to populate the vicinity of the axis of the tube. In a nanotube bundle, interstitial channels between the tubes are even more favorable energetically for small atoms than the interior of the tubes. An extremely anisotropic condensed state is formed due to interactions between atoms in neighboring interstitial channels. Mixtures of 3He and 4He atoms in interstitial channels obey an analog of Raoult's law for ideal solutions. A similar behavior is expected for H2 - D2 mixtures. At the opposite extreme of interaction strengths, alkali metal surfaces attract rare gases more weakly than any other surfaces. Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations of the wetting behavior of such systems are reported. In the case of the most weakly attractive surfaces, Cs, Rb and Li, nonwetting behaviors of Ne are found for all temperatures within about 2 K of the critical temperature, while a drying behavior is seen only near the Cs surface. At the slightly more attractive surface of Mg, a prewetting transition is found. A study of wetting of various rare gases adsorbed at alkali metal surfaces reveals a rich variety of behaviors at the triple temperature. The heuristic model of Cheng et al. is found to agree well with the general threshold for wetting at the triple point.

  3. The optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes: Separation, characterization, and measurement in suspension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, Richard M.

    The one dimensional structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) gives rise to optical phenomena that differ from bulk materials. This dissertation studies the separation of SWNTs dissolved in aqueous media using surfactant molecules, and the measurement of their intrinsic optical properties including absorption and emission. The SWNTs were separated from the bundled form using mechanical processing techniques such as sonication and centrifugation. A processing study, which isolated the effects of sonication frequency, sonication power, and centrifugation speed, was performed to determine the factors that lead to the best separation. The results of this study suggest that the suspensions are a mixture of individual tubes and small bundles. Prior determinations of intrinsic nanotube properties based on the assumption of isolated nanotubes will have to be revisited. The transient absorption spectrum was measured for the S11 subband region using monochromatic pump excitation at wavelengths corresponding to S22 subband transitions, where the exciting pump fluence was sufficient to create many excitons on a single nanotube. The transient decay kinetics followed a linear dependence that was proportional to 1/ t on a log-log scale with a slope of -0.5, which is consistent with the diffusion limited recombination of excitons in one dimension. This result suggests that the decay of photoexcitations in nanotubes is initially governed by two-body kinetics, which becomes a one-body process only in the long time limit. Our work refutes the one-electron model for the excited state relaxation of nanotubes proposed by others. When the transient decay was studied as a function of the initial exciton population, the diffusion coefficient was found to be a different constant value at each initial population. Local thermalization of the surrounding medium may cause this difference, as thermal relaxation occurs on a time scale that is longer than that of exciton recombination in

  4. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, Francois

    2014-06-11

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  5. Terahertz detection and carbon nanotubes

    ScienceCinema

    Leonard, Francois

    2016-07-12

    Researchers at Sandia National Laboratories, along with collaborators from Rice University and the Tokyo Institute of Technology, are developing new terahertz detectors based on carbon nanotubes that could lead to significant improvements in medical imaging, airport passenger screening, food inspection and other applications.

  6. Thermoelectrics: Carbon nanotubes get high

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crispin, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    Waste heat can be converted to electricity by thermoelectric generators, but their development is hindered by the lack of cheap materials with good thermoelectric properties. Now, carbon-nanotube-based materials are shown to have improved properties when purified to contain only semiconducting species and then doped.

  7. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  8. Gastric Cancer: Molecular and Clinical Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwa, Roopma; Song, Shumei; Lee, Ju-Seog; Yao, Yixin; Wei, Qingyi; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2014-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) imposes a significant health burden around the globe despite its declining incidence. GC is often diagnosed in advanced stages and carries a poor prognosis. In depth understanding of molecular underpinnings of GC has lagged behind many other cancers of its magnitude, as a result our knowledge base for identifying germline susceptibility traits for risk and somatic drivers of progression (to identify novel therapeutic targets) is limited. A few germline (PLCE1) and somatic (ERBB2, ERBB3, PTEN, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, FGF, TP53, CDH1, and c-MET) alterations are emerging and some are being pursued in the clinic. Novel somatic gene targets, Arid1a, FAT4, and MLL/MLL3 are of interest. Clinically, variations in the therapeutic approaches for localized GC are evident by geographic regions. These are driven by preferences for the adjunctive strategies and the extent of surgery coupled with philosophical divides. However, there is a greater uniformity in approaches to metastatic cancer, an incurable condition. Having realized only modest successes, the momentum is building for carrying out more phase 3 comparative trials and some are using biomarker-based patient selection. Overall, rapid progress in biotechnology is improving our molecular understanding and can help with new drug discovery. The future prospects are excellent for defining biomarker-based subsets of patients and application of specific therapeutics. However, many challenges remain to be tackled. Here we review representative molecular and clinical dimensions of GC. PMID:24061039

  9. Applications and production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jason Howard

    Carbon nanotubes, a recently discovered form of carbon fiber with structural perfection similar to that of a fullerene molecule, have interesting electronic, chemical and mechanical properties due to their size and structure. Nanotubes have great potential as a bulk material for strong, lightweight composite materials, and as individual nano-scale tools or devices. Initial work on applications with individual multiwalled nanotubes as field emission sources and scanning force microscopy tips is described. The nanotubes display intriguing field emission behavior interpreted as the nanotube unraveling under the influence of the electric field. The unraveling process is believed to result in facile field emission from linear atomic carbon chains at the end of the nanotube. Such atomic wires represent an excellent field emitter. The work on multiwalled nanotube SFM tips was equally encouraging. The high aspect ratio of the nanotube allows it to image deep trenches inaccessible to commercially available Si pyramidal tips, and it reduces the interaction with the ambient water layer on the sample which perturbs image quality. The most remarkable advantage of nanotube SFM tips is a result of their mechanical properties. It was found that the nanotubes will remain rigid during normal imaging, but conveniently buckle to the side if circumstances arise which create large forces known to damage the tip and sample. This feature makes the tip more durable than Si tips, and is especially important for soft biological samples. In these two applications, as well as others, and in the measurements of novel nanotube properties, high quality, small diameter (0.5 to 2 nm) diameter single-walled nanotubes are most interesting. Such material can be produced slowly and in small amounts by catalytic arc vaporization and catalytic laser vaporization of graphite. It is well known that nanotubes can be mass produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), but the product consists only

  10. A Short Existence Proof for Correlation Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Anthony; Simon, Károly

    1998-02-01

    The Grassberger-Hentschel-Procaccia correlation dimension has been put on a rigorous basis by Pesin and Tempelman. We simplify their proof that this dimension is given in terms of the measure of neighborhoods of the diagonal.

  11. Model Pores of Molecular Dimension

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, J. A.; Anderson, J. L.; Ho, W. S.; Petzny, W. J.

    1972-01-01

    Extremely uniform pores of near molecular dimension can be formed by the irradiation-etching technique first demonstrated by Price and Walker. The technique has now been developed to the stage where it can be used to fabricate model membranes for examining the various steric, hydrodynamic, and electrodynamic phenomena encountered in transport through molecular-size pores. Methods for preparing and characterizing membranes with pores as small as 25 A (radius) are described in this paper. Results on pore size determination via Knudsen gas flow and electrolyte conduction are compared. Pore wall modification by monolayer deposition is also discussed. PMID:4339801

  12. Noncentrosymmetric superconductors in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samokhin, K. V.

    2017-02-01

    We study the fermionic boundary modes (Andreev bound states) in a time-reversal invariant one-dimensional superconductor. In the presence of a substrate, spatial inversion symmetry is broken and the electronic properties are strongly affected by an antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling. We assume an arbitrary even number of nondegenerate bands crossing the Fermi level. We show that there is only one possible pairing symmetry in one dimension, an analog of s -wave pairing. The zero-energy Andreev bound states are present if the sign of the gap function in an odd number of the bands is different from all other bands.

  13. BMS Modules in Three Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoleoni, A.; González, H. A.; Oblak, B.; Riegler, M.

    We build unitary representations of the BMS algebra and its higher-spin extensions in three dimensions, using induced representations as a guide. Our prescription naturally emerges from an ultrarelativistic limit of highest-weight representations of Virasoro and 𝒲 algebras, which is to be contrasted with nonrelativistic limits that typically give non-unitary representations. To support this dichotomy, we also point out that the ultrarelativistic and non-relativistic limits of generic 𝒲 algebras differ in the structure of their non-linear terms.

  14. Correlation dimension of complex networks.

    PubMed

    Lacasa, Lucas; Gómez-Gardeñes, Jesús

    2013-04-19

    We propose a new measure to characterize the dimension of complex networks based on the ergodic theory of dynamical systems. This measure is derived from the correlation sum of a trajectory generated by a random walker navigating the network, and extends the classical Grassberger-Procaccia algorithm to the context of complex networks. The method is validated with reliable results for both synthetic networks and real-world networks such as the world air-transportation network or urban networks, and provides a computationally fast way for estimating the dimensionality of networks which only relies on the local information provided by the walkers.

  15. Fractal dimension of bioconvection patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-01-01

    Shallow cultures of the motile algal strain, Euglena gracilis, were concentrated to 2 x 10 to the 6th organisms per ml and placed in constant temperature water baths at 24 and 38 C. Bioconvective patterns formed an open two-dimensional structure with random branches, similar to clusters encountered in the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. When averaged over several example cultures, the pattern was found to have no natural length scale, self-similar branching, and a fractal dimension (d about 1.7). These agree well with the two-dimensional DLA.

  16. Fractal Dimension of Bioconvection Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noever, David A.

    1990-10-01

    Shallow cultures of the motile algal strain, Euglena gracilis, were concentrated to 2× 106 organisms per ml and placed in constant temperature water baths at 24 and 38 C. Bioconvective patterns formed an open two-dimensional structure with random branches, similar to clusters encountered in the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) model. When averaged over several example cultures, the pattern was found to have no natural length scale, self-similar branching and a fractal dimension (d˜1.7). These agree well with the two-dimensional DLA.

  17. Extended scaling in high dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berche, B.; Chatelain, C.; Dhall, C.; Kenna, R.; Low, R.; Walter, J.-C.

    2008-11-01

    We apply and test the recently proposed 'extended scaling' scheme in an analysis of the magnetic susceptibility of Ising systems above the upper critical dimension. The data are obtained by Monte Carlo simulations using both the conventional Wolff cluster algorithm and the Prokof'ev-Svistunov worm algorithm. As already observed for other models, extended scaling is shown to extend the high-temperature critical scaling regime over a range of temperatures much wider than that achieved conventionally. It allows for an accurate determination of leading and sub-leading scaling indices, critical temperatures and amplitudes of the confluent corrections.

  18. Carbon-Nanotube Schottky Diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Wong, Eric; Schlecht, Erich; Hunt, Brian; Siegel, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Schottky diodes based on semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes are being developed as essential components of the next generation of submillimeter-wave sensors and sources. Initial performance predictions have shown that the performance characteristics of these devices can exceed those of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes that have been the components of choice for room-temperature submillimeter-wave sensors for more than 50 years. For state-of-the-art Schottky diodes used as detectors at frequencies above a few hundred gigahertz, the inherent parasitic capacitances associated with their semiconductor junction areas and the resistances associated with low electron mobilities limit achievable sensitivity. The performance of such a detector falls off approximately exponentially with frequency above 500 GHz. Moreover, when used as frequency multipliers for generating signals, state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes exhibit extremely low efficiencies, generally putting out only micro-watts of power at frequencies up to 1.5 THz. The shortcomings of the state-of-the-art solid-state Schottky diodes can be overcome by exploiting the unique electronic properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes. A single-walled carbon nanotube can be metallic or semiconducting, depending on its chirality, and exhibits high electron mobility (recently reported to be approx.= 2x10(exp 5)sq cm/V-s) and low parasitic capacitance. Because of the narrowness of nanotubes, Schottky diodes based on carbon nanotubes have ultra-small junction areas (of the order of a few square nanometers) and consequent junction capacitances of the order of 10(exp -18) F, which translates to cutoff frequency >5 THz. Because the turn-on power levels of these devices are very low (of the order of nano-watts), the input power levels needed for pumping local oscillators containing these devices should be lower than those needed for local oscillators containing state-of-the-art solid

  19. Deconvoluting hepatic processing of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidori, Simone; Bowman, Robert L.; Yarilin, Dmitry; Romin, Yevgeniy; Barlas, Afsar; Mulvey, J. Justin; Fujisawa, Sho; Xu, Ke; Ruggiero, Alessandro; Riabov, Vladimir; Thorek, Daniel L. J.; Ulmert, Hans David S.; Brea, Elliott J.; Behling, Katja; Kzhyshkowska, Julia; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes present unique opportunities for drug delivery, but have not advanced into the clinic. Differential nanotube accretion and clearance from critical organs have been observed, but the mechanism not fully elucidated. The liver has a complex cellular composition that regulates a range of metabolic functions and coincidently accumulates most particulate drugs. Here we provide the unexpected details of hepatic processing of covalently functionalized nanotubes including receptor-mediated endocytosis, cellular trafficking and biliary elimination. Ammonium-functionalized fibrillar nanocarbon is found to preferentially localize in the fenestrated sinusoidal endothelium of the liver but not resident macrophages. Stabilin receptors mediate the endocytic clearance of nanotubes. Biocompatibility is evidenced by the absence of cell death and no immune cell infiltration. Towards clinical application of this platform, nanotubes were evaluated for the first time in non-human primates. The pharmacologic profile in cynomolgus monkeys is equivalent to what was reported in mice and suggests that nanotubes should behave similarly in humans.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Composites: Strongest Engineering Material Ever?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Nikolaev, Pavel; Proft, William; Nicholson, Leonard S. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The primary goal of the carbon nanotube project at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is to fabricate structural materials with a much higher strength-to-weight ratio than any engineered material today, Single-wall nanotubes present extraordinary mechanical properties along with new challenges for materials processing. Our project includes nanotube production, characterization, purification, and incorporation into applications studies. Now is the time to move from studying individual nanotubes to applications work. Current research at JSC focuses on structural polymeric materials to attempt to lower the weight of spacecraft necessary for interplanetary missions. These nanoscale fibers present unique new challenges to composites engineers. Preliminary studies show good nanotube dispersion and wetting by the epoxy materials. Results of tensile strength tests will also be reported. Other applications of nanotubes are also of interest for energy storage, gas storage, nanoelectronics, field emission, and biomedical uses.

  1. Torsional electromechanical quantum oscillations in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Segev, Lior; Srur-Lavi, Onit; Cohen, Sidney R.; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2006-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes can be distinctly metallic or semiconducting depending on their diameter and chirality. Here we show that continuously varying the chirality by mechanical torsion can induce conductance oscillations, which can be attributed to metal-semiconductor periodic transitions. The phenomenon is observed in multiwalled carbon nanotubes, where both the torque and the current are shown to be carried predominantly by the outermost wall. The oscillation period with torsion is consistent with the theoretical shifting of the corners of the first Brillouin zone of graphene across different sub-bands allowed in the nanotube. Beyond a critical torsion, the conductance irreversibly drops due to torsional failure, allowing us to determine the torsional strength of carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes could be ideal torsional springs for nanoscopic pendulums, because electromechanical detection of motion could replace the microscopic detection techniques used at present. Our experiments indicate that carbon nanotubes could be used as electronic sensors of torsional motion in nanoelectromechanical systems.

  2. Telescopic nanotube device for hot nanolithography

    DOEpatents

    Popescu, Adrian; Woods, Lilia M

    2014-12-30

    A device for maintaining a constant tip-surface distance for producing nanolithography patterns on a surface using a telescopic nanotube for hot nanolithography. An outer nanotube is attached to an AFM cantilever opposite a support end. An inner nanotube is telescopically disposed within the outer nanotube. The tip of the inner nanotube is heated to a sufficiently high temperature and brought in the vicinity of the surface. Heat is transmitted to the surface for thermal imprinting. Because the inner tube moves telescopically along the outer nanotube axis, a tip-surface distance is maintained constant due to the vdW force interaction, which in turn eliminates the need of an active feedback loop.

  3. Double-walled carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jinquan; Jia, Yi; Shu, Qinke; Gu, Zhiyi; Wang, Kunlin; Zhuang, Daming; Zhang, Gong; Wang, Zhicheng; Luo, Jianbin; Cao, Anyuan; Wu, Dehai

    2007-08-01

    We directly configured double-walled carbon nanotubes as energy conversion materials to fabricate thin-film solar cells, with nanotubes serving as both photogeneration sites and a charge carriers collecting/transport layer. The solar cells consist of a semitransparent thin film of nanotubes conformally coated on a n-type crystalline silicon substrate to create high-density p-n heterojunctions between nanotubes and n-Si to favor charge separation and extract electrons (through n-Si) and holes (through nanotubes). Initial tests have shown a power conversion efficiency of >1%, proving that DWNTs-on-Si is a potentially suitable configuration for making solar cells. Our devices are distinct from previously reported organic solar cells based on blends of polymers and nanomaterials, where conjugate polymers generate excitons and nanotubes only serve as a transport path.

  4. Development of Carbon-Nanotube/Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    A report presents a short discussion of one company's effort to develop composites of carbon nanotubes in epoxy and other polymer matrices. The focus of the discussion is on the desirability of chemically modifying carbon nanotubes to overcome their inherent chemical nonreactivity and thereby enable the formation of strong chemical bonds between nanotubes and epoxies (or other polymeric matrix materials or their monomeric precursors). The chemical modification is effected in a process in which discrete functional groups are covalently attached to the nanotube surfaces. The functionalization process was proposed by the company and demonstrated in practice for the first time during this development effort. The covalently attached functional groups are capable of reacting with the epoxy or other matrix resin to form covalent bonds. Furthermore, the company uses this process to chemically modify the nanotube surfaces, affording tunable adhesion to polymers and solubility in select solvents. Flat-sheet composites containing functionalized nanotubes demonstrate significantly improved mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties.

  5. Purification of Carbon Nanotubes: Alternative Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Files, Bradley; Scott, Carl; Gorelik, Olga; Nikolaev, Pasha; Hulse, Lou; Arepalli, Sivaram

    2000-01-01

    Traditional carbon nanotube purification process involves nitric acid refluxing and cross flow filtration using surfactant TritonX. This is believed to result in damage to nanotubes and surfactant residue on nanotube surface. Alternative purification procedures involving solvent extraction, thermal zone refining and nitric acid refiuxing are used in the current study. The effect of duration and type of solvent to dissolve impurities including fullerenes and P ACs (polyaromatic compounds) are monitored by nuclear magnetic reasonance, high performance liquid chromatography, and thermogravimetric analysis. Thermal zone refining yielded sample areas rich in nanotubes as seen by scanning electric microscopy. Refluxing in boiling nitric acid seem to improve the nanotube content. Different procedural steps are needed to purify samples produced by laser process compared to arc process. These alternative methods of nanotube purification will be presented along with results from supporting analytical techniques.

  6. 16 CFR 1508.3 - Dimensions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dimensions. 1508.3 Section 1508.3 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES ACT REGULATIONS REQUIREMENTS FOR FULL-SIZE BABY CRIBS § 1508.3 Dimensions. Full-size baby cribs shall have dimensions as follows:...

  7. NEW DIMENSIONS IN JUNIOR COLLEGE PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BOYCE, R. DUDLEY; AND OTHERS

    THIS REPORT CONSISTS OF A SERIES OF DISCUSSIONS BY MANY AUTHORS IN FOUR BROAD DIMENSIONS RELATIVE TO JUNIOR COLLEGES. THE FIRST DIMENSION IS PURPOSES AND DEALS WITH THE UNIQUE ROLE OF THE COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGE, PROVISIONS FOR FACILITIES, PROBLEMS, AND POTENTIALITIES. THE SECOND DIMENSION FOCUSES ON PLANNING AND REPORTS ON STUDIES IN PLANNING…

  8. A Tester for Carbon Nanotube Mode Lockers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji

    2007-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a tester for laser pulsating operation of carbon nanotubes employing a circulator with the extra degree of freedom of the second port to access diversified nanotube samples. The nanotubes are deposited onto the end facet of a dummy optical fiber by spray method that guarantees simple sample loading along with the minimized perturbation of optimized laser cavity condition. Resultant optical spectra, autocorrelation traces and pulse train of the laser outputs with qualified samples are presented.

  9. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  10. Pointwise plucking of suspended carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Ouyang, Wengen; Li, Xiaopei; Jin, Zhong; Yang, Leijing; Chen, Changqing; Zhang, Jin; Li, Yan; Warner, Jamie H; Peng, Lian-Mao; Zheng, Quanshui; Zhu, Jing

    2012-07-11

    Vibration of nanotubes/wires is significant for fundamental and applied researches. However, it remains challenging to control the vibration with point-level precision. Herein, individual suspended carbon nanotubes are plucked point by point to vibrate in scanning electron microscope with the electron beam as a nanoscale pointer. The vibration is directly imaged, and its images fit well with simulations from the plucking mechanism. This demonstrates a new way to manipulate the nanotube vibration with unprecedented precision.

  11. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  12. Covalent Sidewall Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, I.W.; Saini, R. K.; Mickelson, E. T.; Billups, W. E.; Hauge, R. H.; Margrave, J. L.

    2001-01-01

    Progress of fluorination of single-wall carbon nanotubes is being reported. Covalent attachment of alkyl groups including methyl, n-butyl and n-hexyl groups to the sidewalls of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been achieved. Quantitative measurement of the alkylation was done by thermal gravimetric analysis. FTIR, Raman and UV-Vis-NIR were used to characterize these alkylated SWNTs. Application of these nanotubes are being investigated-fibers, composites, batteries, lubricants, etc.

  13. High Performance Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Bolometers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-21

    REPORT High performance multiwall carbon nanotube bolometers 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: High infrared bolometric photoresponse has...been observed in multiwall carbon nanotube MWCNT films at room temperature. The observed detectivity D in exceeding 3.3 106 cm Hz1/2 /W on MWCNT film...U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS carbon nanotube, infrared detector, bolometer

  14. Carbon Nanotube Array for Infrared Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-28

    REPORT Carbon Nanotube Array for Infrared Detection 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The core effort of this project has been the electrical...transport and infrared photoresponse properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) systems. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 13-06-2012 13...DATES COVERED (From - To) 1-Jul-2008 Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 30-Jun-2011 Carbon Nanotube Array for Infrared

  15. Amorphous Carbon-Boron Nitride Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae Woo (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Wise, Kristopher E. (Inventor); Lin, Yi (Inventor); Connell, John (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method for joining or repairing boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). In joining BNNTs, the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures. In repairing BNNTs, the damaged site of the nanotube structure is modified with amorphous carbon deposited by controlled electron beam irradiation to form well bonded hybrid a-C/BNNT structures at the damage site.

  16. Double shrinking sparse dimension reduction.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tianyi; Tao, Dacheng

    2013-01-01

    Learning tasks such as classification and clustering usually perform better and cost less (time and space) on compressed representations than on the original data. Previous works mainly compress data via dimension reduction. In this paper, we propose "double shrinking" to compress image data on both dimensionality and cardinality via building either sparse low-dimensional representations or a sparse projection matrix for dimension reduction. We formulate a double shrinking model (DSM) as an l(1) regularized variance maximization with constraint ||x||(2)=1, and develop a double shrinking algorithm (DSA) to optimize DSM. DSA is a path-following algorithm that can build the whole solution path of locally optimal solutions of different sparse levels. Each solution on the path is a "warm start" for searching the next sparser one. In each iteration of DSA, the direction, the step size, and the Lagrangian multiplier are deduced from the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. The magnitudes of trivial variables are shrunk and the importances of critical variables are simultaneously augmented along the selected direction with the determined step length. Double shrinking can be applied to manifold learning and feature selections for better interpretation of features, and can be combined with classification and clustering to boost their performance. The experimental results suggest that double shrinking produces efficient and effective data compression.

  17. Reflections from the fourth dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefranc, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The knot-theoretic characterization of three-dimensional strange attractors has proved an invaluable tool for comparing models to experiments, understanding the structure of bifurcation diagrams, constructing symbolic encodings or obtaining signatures of chaos. In four dimensions and above, however, all closed curves can be deformed into each other without crossing themselves. Therefore, the fundamental idea of topological analysis, namely that the topological structure of a strange attractor provides signatures of the stretching and folding mechanisms which organize it, must be translated into a different formalism. Here, we discuss two modest attempts to make progress in this direction. First, we illustrate the relevance of catastrophe theory in the analysis of higher-dimensional systems by describing experimental signatures of cusps in weakly coupled chaotic systems. Second, we note that determinism not only precludes intersection of two trajectories but also orientation reversal of phase space volume elements. Enforcing this principle on dynamical triangulations of periodic points advected by the flow leads to higher-dimensional analogues of braids, which in three dimensions appear to provide the same information as usual approaches.

  18. Transparent actuators and robots based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luzhuo; Weng, Mingcen; Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Zhiwei; Zhou, Yi; Xia, Dan; Li, Jiaxin; Huang, Zhigao; Liu, Changhong; Fan, Shoushan

    2016-03-28

    Transparent actuators have been attracting emerging interest recently, as they demonstrate potential applications in the fields of invisible robots, tactical displays, variable-focus lenses, and flexible cellular phones. However, previous technologies did not simultaneously realize macroscopic transparent actuators with advantages of large-shape deformation, low-voltage-driven actuation and fast fabrication. Here, we develop a fast approach to fabricate a high-performance transparent actuator based on single-layer superaligned carbon nanotube sheet and polymer composites. Various advantages of single-layer nanotube sheets including high transparency, considerable conductivity, and ultra-thin dimensions together with selected polymer materials completely realize all the above required advantages. Also, this is the first time that a single-layer nanotube sheet has been used to fabricate actuators with high transparency, avoiding the structural damage to the single-layer nanotube sheet. The transparent actuator shows a transmittance of 72% at the wavelength of 550 nm and bends remarkably with a curvature of 0.41 cm(-1) under a DC voltage for 5 s, demonstrating a significant advance in technological performances compared to previous conventional actuators. To illustrate their great potential usage, a transparent wiper and a humanoid robot "hand" were elaborately designed and fabricated, which initiate a new direction in the development of high-performance invisible robotics and other intelligent applications with transparency.

  19. Lighting up silica nanotubes transcribed from the submicron structure of a metal-peptide hybrid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Fang; Ren, Jinsong

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescent silica nanotubes are attracting increasing interest because of their versatile applicability in a range of diverse fields. By using sol-gel transcription of tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) from various soft templates, silica nanotubes can be conveniently prepared. Metal-peptide hybrids with well-defined nanostructures and outstanding functionalities are very interesting candidates to serve as templates. Herein, we demonstrate that glutathione (GSH) can act as a building block for a bioinspired structure with dimensions down to the nanoscale, based on specific interactions between metal ions and the peptide. Congo red is able to selectively stain the nanofibres obtained, and appears apple-green in colour, implying that Congo red is promising to serve as an effective and convenient probe for determining the self-assembly of GSH and copper ions. Furthermore, silica nanotubes are synthesized using the nanofibres as a template in a very simple way. The silica nanotubes can be lit up by biomolecule-templated metal nanoparticles or nanoclusters and emit bright fluorescence. This work will certainly open up new opportunities in fabricating a broad range of nanostructured materials with versatile functionalities.

  20. The necessary length of carbon nanotubes required to optimize solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Vaezzadeh, Majid; Saeedi, Mohammad Reza; Barghi, Tirdad; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2007-01-01

    Background In recent years scientists have been trying both to increase the efficiency of solar cells, whilst at the same time reducing dimensions and costs. Increases in efficiency have been brought about by implanting carbon nanotubes onto the surface of solar cells in order to reduce the reflection of sunrays, as well as through the insertion of polymeric arrays into the intrinsic layer for charge separation. Results The experimental results show power rising linearly for intrinsic layer thicknesses between 0–50 nm. Wider thicknesses increase the possibility of recombination of electrons and holes, leading to perturbation of the linear behaviour of output power. This effect is studied and formulated as a function of thickness. Recognition of the critical intrinsic layer thickness can permit one to determine the length of carbon nanotube necessary for optimizing solar cells. Conclusion In this study the behaviour of output power as a function of intrinsic layer thicknesses has been described physically and also simulated. In addition, the implantation of carbon nanotubes into the intrinsic layer and the necessary nanotube length required to optimize solar cells have been suggested. PMID:17908295

  1. Purification of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by spiral counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Knight, Martha; Lazo-Portugal, Rodrigo; Ahn, Saeyoung Nate; Stefansson, Steingrimur

    2017-02-03

    Over the last decade man-made carbon nanostructures have shown great promise in electronic applications, but they are produced as very heterogeneous mixtures with different properties so the achievement of a significant commercial application has been elusive. The dimensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes are generally a nanometer wide, up to hundreds of microns long and the carbon nanotubes have anisotropic structures. They are processed to have shorter lengths but they need to be sorted by diameter and chirality. Thus counter-current chromatography methods developed for large molecules are applied to separate these compounds. A modified mixer-settler spiral CCC rotor made with 3 D printed disks was used with a polyethylene glycol-dextran 2-phase solvent system and a surfactant gradient to purify the major species in a commercial preparation. We isolated the semi-conducting single walled carbon nanotube chiral species identified by UV spectral analysis. The further development of spiral counter-current chromatography instrumentation and methods will enable the scalable purification of carbon nanotubes useful for the next generation electronics.

  2. Fabrication of Gate-Electrode Integrated Carbon-Nanotube Bundle Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Bronikowski, Michael; Luong, Edward; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    A continuing effort to develop carbon-nanotube-based field emitters (cold cathodes) as high-current-density electron sources has yielded an optimized device design and a fabrication scheme to implement the design. One major element of the device design is to use a planar array of bundles of carbon nanotubes as the field-emission tips and to optimize the critical dimensions of the array (principally, heights of bundles and distances between them) to obtain high area-averaged current density and high reliability over a long operational lifetime a concept that was discussed in more detail in Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters (NPO-40817), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2007), page 58. Another major element of the design is to configure the gate electrodes (anodes used to extract, accelerate, and/or focus electrons) as a ring that overhangs a recess wherein the bundles of nanotubes are located, such that by virtue of the proximity between the ring and the bundles, a relatively low applied potential suffices to generate the large electric field needed for emission of electrons.

  3. Nano Size Effects of TiO2 Nanotube Array on the Glioma Cells Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yang, He; Qin, Xiaofei; Tian, Ang; Zhang, Dongyong; Xue, Xiangxin; Wu, Anhua

    2013-01-01

    In order to investigate the interplay between the cells and TiO2 nanotube array, and to explore the ability of cells to sense the size change in nano-environment, we reported on the behavior of glioma C6 cells on nanotube array coatings in terms of proliferation and apoptosis. The behavior of glioma C6 cells was obviously size-dependent on the coatings; the caliber with 15 nm diameter provided effective spacing to improve the cells proliferation and enhanced the cellular activities. C6 cells’ biological behaviors showed many similar tendencies to many phorocytes; the matching degree of geometry between nanotube and integrin defined that a spacing of 15 nm was optimal for inducing signals to nucleus, which results in achieving maximum activity of glioma cells. In addition, the immune behavior of cells was studied, a variety of inflammatory mediator’s gene expression levels were controlled by the nanoscale dimension, the expressions of IL-6 and IL-10 were higher on 30 nm than on 15 nm nanotube. PMID:23344031

  4. From carbon nanobells to nickel nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, S.; Srikanth, V. V. S. S.; Maik, D.; Zhang, G. Y.; Staedler, T.; Jiang, X.

    2009-01-01

    A generic strategy is proposed to prepare one dimensional (1D) metallic nanotubes by using 1D carbon nanostructures as the initial templates. Following the strategy, nickel (Ni) nanotubes are prepared by using carbon nanobells (CNBs) as the initial templates. CNBs are first prepared by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique. Carbon/nickel core/shell structures are then prepared by electroplating the CNBs in a nickel-Watts electrolytic cell. In the final step, the carbon core is selectively removed by employing hydrogen plasma etching to obtain Ni nanotubes. The mechanism leading to Ni nanotubes is briefly discussed.

  5. Thermal conductivity of deformed carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Wei-Rong; Zhang, Mao-Ping; Zheng, Dong-Qin; Ai, Bao-Quan

    2011-04-01

    We investigate the thermal conductivity of four types of deformed carbon nanotubes by using the nonequilibrium molecular dynamics method. It is reported that various deformations have different influences on the thermal properties of carbon nanotubes. For bending carbon nanotubes, the thermal conductivity is independent of the bending angle. However, the thermal conductivity increases lightly with xy-distortion and decreases rapidly with z-distortion. The thermal conductivity does not change with the screw ratio before the breaking of carbon nanotubes, but it decreases sharply after the critical screw ratio.

  6. Thermoelectric properties of WS2 nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Hideki; Sugahara, Mitsunari; Okada, Ryotaro; Maniwa, Yutaka; Yomogida, Yohei; Yanagi, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    We report the thermoelectric properties of WS2 nanotube networks. By using electrolyte-gating techniques, we turned on a conducting channel in the macroscopic networks of WS2 nanotubes in both the hole and electron regions and evaluated the thermoelectric properties of the networks. We manipulated the P- and N-type Seebeck coefficients in the WS2 nanotube networks by changing the shifts in the gate voltage potentials. The power factor of the WS2 nanotube networks increased as the gate voltage shifted and exhibited a high thermoelectric performance approaching that of single-crystalline WS2 flakes.

  7. Carbon nanotube coatings as chemical absorbers

    DOEpatents

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Andresen, Brian D.; Alcaraz, Armando

    2004-06-15

    Airborne or aqueous organic compound collection using carbon nanotubes. Exposure of carbon nanotube-coated disks to controlled atmospheres of chemical warefare (CW)-related compounds provide superior extraction and retention efficiencies compared to commercially available airborne organic compound collectors. For example, the carbon nanotube-coated collectors were four (4) times more efficient toward concentrating dimethylmethyl-phosphonate (DMMP), a CW surrogate, than Carboxen, the optimized carbonized polymer for CW-related vapor collections. In addition to DMMP, the carbon nanotube-coated material possesses high collection efficiencies for the CW-related compounds diisopropylaminoethanol (DIEA), and diisopropylmethylphosphonate (DIMP).

  8. A Thermal Model for Carbon Nanotube Interconnects

    PubMed Central

    Mohsin, Kaji Muhammad; Srivastava, Ashok; Sharma, Ashwani K.; Mayberry, Clay

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we have studied Joule heating in carbon nanotube based very large scale integration (VLSI) interconnects and incorporated Joule heating influenced scattering in our previously developed current transport model. The theoretical model explains breakdown in carbon nanotube resistance which limits the current density. We have also studied scattering parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) interconnects and compared with the earlier work. For 1 µm length single-wall carbon nanotube, 3 dB frequency in S12 parameter reduces to ~120 GHz from 1 THz considering Joule heating. It has been found that bias voltage has little effect on scattering parameters, while length has very strong effect on scattering parameters.

  9. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  10. Computer generated holograms for carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Butt, Haider; Butler, Tim; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2013-05-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are highly diffractive structures in the optical regime. Their metallic character and large scattering cross-section allow their usage as diffractive elements in Fraunhofer holograms. This work elaborates some important features of the far field diffraction patterns produced from periodic arrays of nanotubes. A theoretical approach for the interaction of arrays of nanotubes with light is presented and a computer generated hologram is calculated by means of periodical patterns. Based on the results, fabrication of carbon nanotube arrays (in holographic patterns) was performed. Experimentally measured diffraction patterns were in good agreement with the calculations.

  11. Computer generated holograms for carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Butt, Haider; Butler, Tim; Wilkinson, Timothy D; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2013-05-21

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are highly diffractive structures in the optical regime. Their metallic character and large scattering cross-section allow their usage as diffractive elements in Fraunhofer holograms. This work elaborates some important features of the far field diffraction patterns produced from periodic arrays of nanotubes. A theoretical approach for the interaction of arrays of nanotubes with light is presented and a computer generated hologram is calculated by means of periodical patterns. Based on the results, fabrication of carbon nanotube arrays (in holographic patterns) was performed. Experimentally measured diffraction patterns were in good agreement with the calculations.

  12. Electrical Switching in Metallic Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Young-Woo; Ihm, Jisoon; Cohen, Marvin L.; Louie, Steven G.; Choi, Hyoung Joon

    2005-11-01

    We present first-principles calculations of quantum transport which show that the resistance of metallic carbon nanotubes can be changed dramatically with homogeneous transverse electric fields if the nanotubes have impurities or defects. The change of the resistance is predicted to range over more than 2 orders of magnitude with experimentally attainable electric fields. This novel property has its origin that backscattering of conduction electrons by impurities or defects in the nanotubes is strongly dependent on the strength and/or direction of the applied electric fields. We expect this property to open a path to new device applications of metallic carbon nanotubes.

  13. Fe nanowire encapsulated in boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koi, Naruhiro; Oku, Takeo; Nishijima, Masahiko

    2005-11-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes, nanohorns, nanocoils were synthesized by annealing Fe 4N and B powders at 1000 °C for 1 h in nitrogen gas atmosphere. Especially, Fe-filled BN nanotubes were produced, and investigated by high-resolution electron microscopy, high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, which indicates that the [110] of Fe is parallel to the BN nanotube axis. Formation mechanism of Fe-filled BN nanotube was speculated based on these results.

  14. Nanomechanics and the viscoelastic behavior of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Frank Thomas

    Recent experimental results demonstrate that substantial improvements in the mechanical behavior of polymers can be attained using small amounts of carbon nanotubes as a reinforcing phase. While this suggests the potential use of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymers (NRPs) for structural applications, the development of predictive models describing NRP effective behavior will be critical in the development and ultimate employment of such materials. To date many researchers have simply studied the nanoscale behavior of NRPs using techniques developed for traditional composite materials. While such studies can be useful, this dissertation seeks to extend these traditional theories to more accurately model the nanoscale interaction of the NRP constituent phases. Motivated by micrographs showing that embedded nanotubes often exhibit significant curvature within the polymer, in the first section of this dissertation a hybrid finite element-micromechanical model is developed to incorporate nanotube waviness into micromechanical predictions of NRP effective modulus. While also suitable for other types of wavy inclusions, results from this model indicate that moderate nanotube waviness can dramatically decrease the effective modulus of these materials. The second portion of this dissertation investigates the impact of the nanotubes on the overall NRP viscoelastic behavior. Because the nanotubes are on the size scale of the individual polymer chains, nanotubes may alter the viscoelastic response of the NRP in comparison to that of the pure polymer; this behavior is distinctly different from that seen in traditional polymer matrix composites. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) results for each of three modes of viscoelastic behavior (glass transition temperature, relaxation spectrum, and physical aging) are all consistent with the hypothesis of a reduced mobility, non-bulk polymer phase in the vicinity of the embedded nanotubes. These models represent initial efforts to

  15. Carbon nanotube and graphene multiple-thread yarns.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaohua; Wang, Rui; Yangyang, Wen; Yali, Li

    2013-02-07

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene (GNS) hybrid multiple-thread yarns were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition followed by a posted-stretching processing. The as-prepared CNTs and GNS multiple-thread yarns consisted of tens of single-thread fibers with diameters of around 20 μm. The single-thread fibers are composed of double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT) bundles and GNS tablets. DWNT bundles in the single-thread fiber are highly disordered and are rounded by GNS. The content and dimensions of GNS are changeable along the fiber axial direction. The as-obtained CNT and GNS hybrid multiple-thread yarns can be twisted, forming one fiber. The mechanical measurement of the twisted yarn gave a strength of 300 MPa and the electrical conductivity is 10(5) S m(-1). These unique structures, possessing various promising properties, can be readily and directly applied in different fields. Here, the hybrid yarns of CNTs and GNS were applied as a lamp thread and woven macroscopic body, as demonstrated.

  16. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Sevilla Torres, Galo A.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2014-06-01

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective.

  17. Size-Dependent Structure Relations between Nanotubes and Encapsulated Nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Eliseev, Andrei A; Falaleev, Nikolay S; Verbitskiy, Nikolay I; Volykhov, Andrei A; Yashina, Lada V; Kumskov, Andrei S; Zhigalina, Victoria G; Vasiliev, Alexander L; Lukashin, Alexey V; Sloan, Jeremy; Kiselev, Nikolay A

    2017-02-08

    The structural organization of compounds in a confined space of nanometer-scale cavities is of fundamental importance for understanding the basic principles for atomic structure design at the nanolevel. Here, we explore size-dependent structure relations between one-dimensional PbTe nanocrystals and carbon nanotube containers in the diameter range of 2.0-1.25 nm using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations. Upon decrease of the confining volume, one-dimensional crystals reveal gradual thinning, with the structure being cut from the bulk in either a <110> or a <100> growth direction until a certain limit of ∼1.3 nm. This corresponds to the situation when a stoichiometric (uncharged) crystal does not fit into the cavity dimensions. As a result of the in-tube charge compensation, one-dimensional superstructures with nanometer-scale atomic density modulations are formed by a periodic addition of peripheral extra atoms to the main motif. Structural changes in the crystallographic configuration of the composites entail the redistribution of charge density on single-walled carbon nanotube walls and the possible appearance of the electron density wave. The variation of the potential attains 0.4 eV, corresponding to charge density fluctuations of 0.14 e/atom.

  18. Generalized dimensions applied to speaker identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Limin; Wang, Shuozhong

    2004-08-01

    This paper describes an application of fractal dimensions to speech processing and speaker identification. There are several dimensions that can be used to characterize speech signals such as box dimension, correlation dimension, etc. We are mainly concerned with the generalized dimensions of speech signals as they provide more information than individual dimensions. Generalized dimensions of arbitrary orders are used in speaker identification in this work. Based on the experimental data, the artificial phase space is generated and smooth behavior of correlation integral is obtained in a straightforward and accurate analysis. Using the dimension D(2) derived from the correlation integral, the generalized dimension D(q) of an arbitrary order q is calculated. Moreover, experiments applying the generalized dimension in speaker identification have been carried out. A speaker recognition dedicated Chinese language speech corpus with PKU-SRSC, recorded by Peking University, was used in the experiments. The results are compared to a baseline speaker identification that uses MFCC features. Experimental results have indicated the usefulness of fractal dimensions in characterizing speaker's identity.

  19. Supramolecular Macrostructures of UPy-Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Micoli, Alessandra; Nieuwenhuizen, Marko; Koenigs, Marcel; Quintana, Mildred; Sijbesma, Rint; Prato, Maurizio

    2015-09-28

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered excellent materials for the construction of flexible displays due to their nanoscale dimensions and unique physical and chemical properties. By using the recognition properties of 2-ureido-4[1H]pyrimidinone (UPy), a versatile and simple methodology was demonstrated for the construction of macroscopic structures based on UPy-CNT/polymer composites prepared by a combination of two functionalization approaches: 1) covalent attachment of UPy pendants on the multiwalled CNT surface (UPy-MWCNTs) and 2) directed self-assembly of UPy-MWCNTs within polymers bearing UPy pendants (Bis-UPy 1 and Bis-UPy 2) by quadruple complementary DDAA-AADD hydrogen-bond recognition (D=donor, A=acceptor).

  20. Confinement effects and why carbon nanotube bundles can work as gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, Rodrigo G.; Fazzio, A.; da Silva, Antônio J. R.; Rocha, Alexandre R.

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been at the forefront of nanotechnology, leading not only to a better understanding of the basic properties of charge transport in one dimensional materials, but also to the perspective of a variety of possible applications, including highly sensitive sensors. Practical issues, however, have led to the use of bundles of nanotubes in devices, instead of isolated single nanotubes. From a theoretical perspective, the understanding of charge transport in such bundles, and how it is affected by the adsorption of molecules, has been very limited, one of the reasons being the sheer size of the calculations. A frequent option has been the extrapolation of knowledge gained from single tubes to the properties of bundles. In the present work we show that such procedure is not correct, and that there are qualitative differences in the effects caused by molecules on the charge transport in bundles versus isolated nanotubes. Using a combination of density functional theory and recursive Green's function techniques we show that the adsorption of molecules randomly distributed onto the walls of carbon nanotube bundles leads to changes in the charge density and consequently to significant alterations in the conductance even in pristine tubes. We show that this effect is driven by confinement which is not present in isolated nanotubes. Furthermore, a low concentration of dopants randomly adsorbed along a two-hundred nm long bundle drives a change in the transport regime; from ballistic to diffusive, which can account for the high sensitivity to different molecules.Carbon nanotubes have been at the forefront of nanotechnology, leading not only to a better understanding of the basic properties of charge transport in one dimensional materials, but also to the perspective of a variety of possible applications, including highly sensitive sensors. Practical issues, however, have led to the use of bundles of nanotubes in devices, instead of isolated single nanotubes

  1. Psychophysical dimensions of tactile perception of textures.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Shogo; Nagano, Hikaru; Yamada, Yoji

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews studies on the tactile dimensionality of physical properties of materials in order to determine a common structure for these dimensions. Based on the commonality found in a number of studies and known mechanisms for the perception of physical properties of textures, we conclude that tactile textures are composed of three prominent psychophysical dimensions that are perceived as roughness/smoothness, hardness/softness, and coldness/warmness. The roughness dimension may be divided into two dimensions: macro and fine roughness. Furthermore, it is reasonable to consider that a friction dimension that is related to the perception of moistness/dryness and stickiness/slipperiness exists. Thus, the five potential dimensions of tactile perception are macro and fine roughness, warmness/coldness, hardness/softness, and friction (moistness/dryness, stickiness/slipperiness). We also summarize methods such as psychological experiments and mathematical approaches for structuring tactile dimensions and their limitations.

  2. Multipurpose organically modified carbon nanotubes: from functionalization to nanotube composites.

    PubMed

    Georgakilas, Vasilios; Bourlinos, Athanasios; Gournis, Dimitrios; Tsoufis, Theodoros; Trapalis, Christos; Mateo-Alonso, Aurelio; Prato, Maurizio

    2008-07-09

    We show that covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) via 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition is a powerful method for enhancing the ability to process CNTs and facilitating the preparation of hybrid composites, which is achieved solely by mixing. CNTs were functionalized with phenol groups, providing stable dispersions in a range of polar solvents, including water. Additionally, the functionalized CNTs could easily be combined with polymers and layered aluminosilicate clay minerals to give homogeneous, coherent, transparent CNT thin films and gels.

  3. Novel poly-dopamine adhesive for a halloysite nanotube-Ru(bpy)(3)2+ electrochemiluminescent sensor.

    PubMed

    Xing, Bo; Yin, Xue-Bo

    2009-07-30

    Herein, for the first time, the electrochemiluminescent sensor based on Ru(bpy)(3) (2+)-modified electrode using dopamine as an adhesive was successfully developed. After halloysite nanotube slurry was cast on a glassy carbon electrode and dried, an alkaline dopamine solution was added on the electrode surface. Initially, polydopamine belts with dimensions of tens to hundreds of nanometers formed via oxidization of the dopamine by ambient oxygen. As the incubation time increased, the nanobelts became broader and then united with each other to form a polydopamine film. The halloysite nanotubes were embedded within the polydopamine film. The above electrode was soaked in Ru(bpy)(3) (2+) aqueous solution to adsorb Ru(bpy)(3) (2+) into the active sites of the halloysite nanotubes via cation-exchange procedure. Through this simple procedure, a Ru(bpy)(3) (2+)-modified electrode was obtained using only 6.25 microg Ru(bpy)(3) (2+), 15.0 microg dopamine, and 9.0 microg halloysite nanotubes. The electrochemistry and electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of the modified electrode was investigated using tripropylamine (TPA) and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) as co-reactants. The different ECL behaviors of the modified electrode using NTA and TPA as well as the contact angle measurements reflected the hydrophilic character of the electrode. The results indicate that halloysite nanotubes have a high loading capacity for Ru(bpy)(3) (2+) and that dopamine is suitable for the preparation of modified electrodes.

  4. 4-N-pyridin-2-yl-benzamide nanotubes compatible with mouse stem cell and oral delivery in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Jhillu S.; Lavanya, Madugula P.; Das, Pragna P.; Bag, Indira; Krishnan, Anita; Jagannadh, Bulusu; Mohapatra, Debendra K.; Pal Bhadra, Manika; Bhadra, Utpal

    2010-04-01

    p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), a structural moiety of many commercial drugs, is self-assembled with linker alkyl side chains to form tubular nanostructures. The tubes exhibited fluorescence either intrinsic or from fluorescent molecules embedded in the wall during self-assembly. Uptake and inter-cellular delivery of the conjugated nanotubes in human cancer cells and in mouse embryonic stem cells were demonstrated by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity and clearance were monitored both ex vivo in mouse multipotent embryonic stem cells and in vivo in adult Drosophila. Accumulation of nanotubes had no adverse effects and abnormalities on stem cell morphology and proliferation rate. A distinct distribution of two separate nanotubes in various internal organs of Drosophila interprets that accumulation of nanomaterials might be interdependent on the side chain modifications and physiological settings of cell or tissue types. Unlike carbon nanomaterials, exposure of PABA nanotubes does not produce any hazards including locomotion defects and mortality of adult flies. Despite differential uptake and clearance from multiple live tissues, the use of self-assembled nanotubes can add new dimensions and scope to the development of dual-purpose oral carriers for the fulfilment of many biological promises.

  5. 4-N-pyridin-2-yl-benzamide nanotubes compatible with mouse stem cell and oral delivery in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Jhillu S; Lavanya, Madugula P; Das, Pragna P; Bag, Indira; Krishnan, Anita; Leary, R; Bagchi, A; Jagannadh, Bulusu; Mohapatra, Debendra K; Bhadra, Manika Pal; Bhadra, Utpal

    2010-04-16

    p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), a structural moiety of many commercial drugs, is self-assembled with linker alkyl side chains to form tubular nanostructures. The tubes exhibited fluorescence either intrinsic or from fluorescent molecules embedded in the wall during self-assembly. Uptake and inter-cellular delivery of the conjugated nanotubes in human cancer cells and in mouse embryonic stem cells were demonstrated by fluorescence imaging and flow cytometry. Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity and clearance were monitored both ex vivo in mouse multipotent embryonic stem cells and in vivo in adult Drosophila. Accumulation of nanotubes had no adverse effects and abnormalities on stem cell morphology and proliferation rate. A distinct distribution of two separate nanotubes in various internal organs of Drosophila interprets that accumulation of nanomaterials might be interdependent on the side chain modifications and physiological settings of cell or tissue types. Unlike carbon nanomaterials, exposure of PABA nanotubes does not produce any hazards including locomotion defects and mortality of adult flies. Despite differential uptake and clearance from multiple live tissues, the use of self-assembled nanotubes can add new dimensions and scope to the development of dual-purpose oral carriers for the fulfilment of many biological promises.

  6. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube/Polymer Composites with Various Nanotube Orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with various orientations with respect to the bulk material coordinates. A nanotube, the local polymer adjacent to the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface have been modeled as an equivalent-continuum fiber by using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The equivalent-continuum fiber accounts for the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composite. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of a SWNT/LaRC-SI (with a PmPV interface) composite system, with aligned nanotubes, three-dimensionally randomly oriented nanotubes, and nanotubes oriented with varying degrees of axisymmetry. It is shown that the Young s modulus is highly dependent on the SWNT orientation distribution.

  7. Atomic nanotube welders: boron interstitials triggering connections in double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Endo, Morinobu; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong-Ahm; Van Lier, Gregory; Charlier, Jean-Christophe; Terrones, Humberto; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2005-06-01

    Here we demonstrate that the incorporation of boron (B) atoms between double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) during thermal annealing (1400-1600 degrees C) results in covalent nanotube "Y" junctions, DWNT coalescence, and the formation of flattened multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). These processes occur via the merging of adjacent tubes, which is triggered by B interstitial atoms. We observe that B atom interstitials between DWNTs are responsible for the rapid establishment of covalent connections between neighboring tubes (polymerization), thereby resulting in the fast annealing of the carbon cylinders with B atoms embedded in the newly created carbon nanotube network. Once B is in the lattice, tube faceting (polygonization) starts to occur, and the electronic properties are expected to change dramatically. Therefore, B atoms indeed act as atomic nanotube fusers (or welders), and this process could now be used in assembling novel electronic nanotube devices, nanotube networks, carbon nanofoams and heterojunctions exhibiting p-type electronic properties.

  8. Dirac Semimetals in Two Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Young, Steve M; Kane, Charles L

    2015-09-18

    Graphene is famous for being a host of 2D Dirac fermions. However, spin-orbit coupling introduces a small gap, so that graphene is formally a quantum spin Hall insulator. Here we present symmetry-protected 2D Dirac semimetals, which feature Dirac cones at high-symmetry points that are not gapped by spin-orbit interactions and exhibit behavior distinct from both graphene and 3D Dirac semimetals. Using a two-site tight-binding model, we construct representatives of three possible distinct Dirac semimetal phases and show that single symmetry-protected Dirac points are impossible in two dimensions. An essential role is played by the presence of nonsymmorphic space group symmetries. We argue that these symmetries tune the system to the boundary between a 2D topological and trivial insulator. By breaking the symmetries we are able to access trivial and topological insulators as well as Weyl semimetal phases.

  9. [Temporal dimensions of suicide: hypothesis].

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Camós, Eliseu

    2008-01-01

    In this article, the author examines the temporal dimensions of suicide by taking into account the multiple existing approaches-circadian physiology, psychiatric or sociological epidemiology of suicide-however promoting a socio-anthropological perspective. From this perspective, suicide is examined as a social phenomenon inscribed in time. By beginning with a concern that is characteristic of anthropology of time, knowingly the relation between time of nature and time of society, the author addresses a key issue of the study of suicide already elaborated by Durkheim, in the relation between change that is a basic expression of the passage of time and suicide. After presenting different scientific contributions on the subject, the author proposes an hypothesis allowing integration of the influence of time related to natural phenomenon (cosmobiological rhythms) and the relation of time to social phenomenon (politico-economic rhythms) in relation with suicide and this, according to Gabennesch's theory of "failed promises."

  10. Ambitwistor Strings in Four Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geyer, Yvonne; Lipstein, Arthur E.; Mason, Lionel

    2014-08-01

    We develop ambitwistor string theories for four dimensions to obtain new formulas for tree-level gauge and gravity amplitudes with arbitrary amounts of supersymmetry. Ambitwistor space is the space of complex null geodesics in complexified Minkowski space, and in contrast to earlier ambitwistor strings, we use twistors rather than vectors to represent this space. Although superficially similar to the original twistor string theories of Witten, Berkovits, and Skinner, these theories differ in the assignment of world sheet spins of the fields, rely on both twistor and dual twistor representatives for the vertex operators, and use the ambitwistor procedure for calculating correlation functions. Our models are much more flexible, no longer requiring maximal supersymmetry, and the resulting formulas for amplitudes are simpler, having substantially reduced moduli. These are supported on the solutions to the scattering equations refined according to helicity and can be checked by comparison with corresponding formulas of Witten and of Cachazo and Skinner.

  11. Plasma torches dimensioning and optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, S.

    A set of codes which enable dimensioning and optimization of non transferred plasma torches made up of two coaxial cylindrical electrodes cooled up in the 100 kW power range is described. These torches are used in ballistic, space and industrial fields. The sharp model of exchanges between the electric arc and the plasma producing gas requires a thorough knowledge of the physical properties of this plasma producing gas so a specific study was carried out on the air. Equations taken into account include mass conservation, Navier-Stokes and energy conservation equations. An experimental data bank gathers the plasma torches performances described. The modular structure of the package and its continuous feedback between theoretical and experimental data bank improves constantly with new experimentation.

  12. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Wei-Ping; Belić, Milivoj; Zhang, Yiqi

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons. -- Highlights: •Analytic solutions of a fractional Schrödinger equation are obtained. •The solutions are produced by means of self-similar method applied to the fractional Schrödinger equation with parabolic potential. •The fractional accessible solitons form crescent, asymmetric single-layer and multilayer necklace profiles. •The model applies to the propagation of optical pulses in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  13. Kolmogorov Flow in Three Dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shebalin, John V.; Woodruff, Stephen L.

    1996-01-01

    A numerical study of the long-time evolution of incompressible Navier-Stokes turbulence forced at a single long-wavelength Fourier mode, i.e., a Kolmogorov flow, has been completed. The boundary conditions are periodic in three dimensions and the forcing is effected by imposing a steady, two-dimensional, sinusoidal shear velocity which is directed along the x-direction and varies along the z-direction. A comparison with experimental data shows agreement with measured cross-correlations of the turbulent velocity components which lie in the mean-flow plane. A statistical analysis reveals that the shear-driven turbulence studied here has significant spectral anisotropy which increases with wave number.

  14. Grand unification in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Lawrence J.; Nomura, Yasunori

    2003-07-01

    We have recently proposed an alternative picture for the physics at the scale of gauge coupling unification, where the unified symmetry is realized in higher dimensions but is broken locally by a symmetry breaking defect. Gauge coupling unification, the quantum numbers of quarks and leptons and the longevity of the proton arise as phenomena of the symmetrical bulk, while the lightness of the Higgs doublets and the masses of the light quarks and leptons probe the symmetry breaking defect. Moreover, the framework is extremely predictive if the effective higher dimensional theory is valid over a large energy interval up to the scale of strong coupling. Precise agreement with experiments is obtained in the simplest theory— SU(5) in five dimensions with two Higgs multiplets propagating in the bulk. The weak mixing angle is predicted to be sin 2θw=0.2313±0.0004, which fits the data with extraordinary accuracy. The compactification scale and the strong coupling scale are determined to be M c≃5×10 14 GeV and M s≃1×10 17 GeV, respectively. Proton decay with a lifetime of order 10 34 years is expected with a variety of final states such as e+π0, and several aspects of flavor, including large neutrino mixing angles, are understood by the geometrical locations of the matter fields. When combined with a particular supersymmetry breaking mechanism, the theory predicts large lepton flavor violating μ→ e and τ→ μ transitions, with all superpartner masses determined by only two free parameters. The predicted value of the bottom quark mass from Yukawa unification agrees well with the data. This paper is mainly a review of the work presented in hep-ph/0103125, hep-ph/0111068, and hep-ph/0205067 [1-3].

  15. Carbon nanotube materials characterization and devices design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng

    The objective of this research is to characterize the electrical and mechanical properties of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) materials, and explore possible device applications for these materials. In order to achieve this goal, different forms of Carbon Nanotube materials---including Carbon Nanotubes, Carbon Nanotube Arrays, Carbon Nanotube Ribbon, Carbon Nanotube Thread, and sub-micrometer Carbon Nanotube Thread---were tested under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) using a Micromanipulator (MM). Video and sound recording of the testing in the microscope provided new understanding how thread is formed and how nanotube materials fail. As-produced and thermally treated nanotubes were also tested. The main electrical parameters measured were electrical resistivity and maximum current density. The main mechanical property measured was strength. Together, these parameters are helping to determine the strongest and most conductive forms of CNT material. Putting nanotube materials into application is the ultimate goal of this continuing research. Several aggressive application ideas were investigated in a preliminary way in this work. In biomedical applications, a bundle of CNTs was formed for use as an electrode for accurate biosensing. A simple robot was designed using CNT electrical fiber. The robot was powered by two solenoids and could act as an in-body sensor and actuator to perform some impossible tasks from the viewpoint of current medical technology. In aerospace engineering, CNT materials could replace copper wire to reduce the weight of aircraft. Based on the excellent mechanical properties of CNT materials, a challenging idea is to use CNT material to build elevators to move payloads to outer space without using rockets. This dissertation makes contributions in the characterization of nanotube materials and in the design of miniature electromagnetic devices.

  16. A Tunable Carbon Nanotube Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sazonova, Vera

    2005-03-01

    Nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS) hold promise for a number of scientific and technological applications. Carbon nanotubes (NT) are perhaps the ultimate material for realizing a NEMS device as they are the stiffest material known, have low density, ultrasmall cross sections and can be defect-free. Equally important, a nanotube can act as a transistor and thus is able to sense its own motion. Here, we report the electrical actuation and detection of the guitar-string oscillation modes of doubly-clamped NT oscillators. We observed resonance frequencies in the 5MHz to 150MHz range with quality factors in the 50 to 100 range. We showed that the resonance frequencies can be widely tuned by a gate voltage. We also report on the temperature dependence of the quality factor and present a discussion of possible loss mechanisms.

  17. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    PubMed Central

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity—unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures. PMID:28205518

  18. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  19. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube.

    PubMed

    Qin, F; Shi, W; Ideue, T; Yoshida, M; Zak, A; Tenne, R; Kikitsu, T; Inoue, D; Hashizume, D; Iwasa, Y

    2017-02-16

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity-unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  20. Torsional carbon nanotube artificial muscles.

    PubMed

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M; Wallace, Gordon G; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D W; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H

    2011-10-28

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  1. Ballistic Fracturing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Sehmus; Machado, Leonardo D; Tiwary, ChandraSekhar; Autreto, Pedro A S; Vajtai, Robert; Barrera, Enrique V; Galvao, Douglas S; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2016-09-21

    Advanced materials with multifunctional capabilities and high resistance to hypervelocity impact are of great interest to the designers of aerospace structures. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with their lightweight and high strength properties are alternative to metals and/or metallic alloys conventionally used in aerospace applications. Here we report a detailed study on the ballistic fracturing of CNTs for different velocity ranges. Our results show that the highly energetic impacts cause bond breakage and carbon atom rehybridizations, and sometimes extensive structural reconstructions were also observed. Experimental observations show the formation of nanoribbons, nanodiamonds, and covalently interconnected nanostructures, depending on impact conditions. Fully atomistic reactive molecular dynamics simulations were also carried out in order to gain further insights into the mechanism behind the transformation of CNTs. The simulations show that the velocity and relative orientation of the multiple colliding nanotubes are critical to determine the impact outcome.

  2. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  3. Theory of nanotube faraday cage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roxana Margine, Elena; Nisoli, Cristiano; Kolmogorov, Aleksey; Crespi, Vincent H.

    2003-03-01

    Charge transfer between dopants and double-wall carbon nanotubes is examined theoretically. We model the system as a triple cylindrical capacitor with the dopants forming a shell around the outer wall of the nanotube. The total energy of the system contains three terms: the band structure energies of the inner and outer tube, calculated in a tight-binding model with rigid bands, and the electrostatic energy of the tri-layer distribution. Even for metallic inner and outer tube walls, wherein the diameter dependence of the bandgap does not favor the outer wall, nearly all of the dopant charge resides on the outer layer, a nanometer-scale Faraday cage. The calculated charge distribution is in agreement with recent experimental measurements.

  4. Torsional Carbon Nanotube Artificial Muscles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foroughi, Javad; Spinks, Geoffrey M.; Wallace, Gordon G.; Oh, Jiyoung; Kozlov, Mikhail E.; Fang, Shaoli; Mirfakhrai, Tissaphern; Madden, John D. W.; Shin, Min Kyoon; Kim, Seon Jeong; Baughman, Ray H.

    2011-10-01

    Rotary motors of conventional design can be rather complex and are therefore difficult to miniaturize; previous carbon nanotube artificial muscles provide contraction and bending, but not rotation. We show that an electrolyte-filled twist-spun carbon nanotube yarn, much thinner than a human hair, functions as a torsional artificial muscle in a simple three-electrode electrochemical system, providing a reversible 15,000° rotation and 590 revolutions per minute. A hydrostatic actuation mechanism, as seen in muscular hydrostats in nature, explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and torsional rotation during the yarn volume increase caused by electrochemical double-layer charge injection. The use of a torsional yarn muscle as a mixer for a fluidic chip is demonstrated.

  5. Multibiomarker response in the earthworm Eisenia fetida as tool for assessing multi-walled carbon nanotube ecotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Calisi, A; Grimaldi, A; Leomanni, A; Lionetto, M G; Dondero, F; Schettino, T

    2016-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have received a great attention in the last years thanks to their remarkable structural, electrical, and chemical properties. Nowadays carbon nanotubes are increasingly found in terrestrial and aquatic environment and potential harmful impacts of these nanoparticles on humans and wildlife are attracting increasing research and public attention. The effects of carbon nanotubes on aquatic organisms have been explored by several authors, but comparatively the information available on the impact of these particles on soil organisms is much less. Earthworms have traditionally been considered to be convenient indicators of land use impact and soil fertility. The aim of this work was to study the integrated response of a suite of biomarkers covering molecular to whole organism endpoints for the assessment of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs) effects on earthworms (Eisenia fetida) exposed to spiked soil. Results showed that cellular and biochemical responses, such as immune cells morphometric alterations and lysosomal membrane destabilization, acetylcholinesterase inhibition and metallothionein tissue concentration changes, showed high sensitivity to MWCNTs exposure. They can improve our understanding and ability to predict chronic toxicity outcomes of MWCNTs exposure such as reproductive alterations. In this context although more investigation is needed to understand the mechanistic pathway relating the biochemical and cellular biomarker analyzed to reproductive alterations, the obtained results give an early contribution to the future development of an adverse outcomes pathways for MWCNTs exposure.

  6. Carbon Nanotube Spaceframes for Low-Density Aerospace Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-26

    Functionalization Methods Chemically sculpting carbon nanotubes into nano-objects of the type needed for synthesizing CNT spaceframe materials require two...distinct functionalization chemistries that produce distinct functional structures at the ends of the nanotubes and on the sidewalls of the nanotubes ...which are applied to the nanotubes . In this project, oxidative etching techniques were explored for end selective functionalization . Selective

  7. Oriented nanotube electrodes for lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors

    DOEpatents

    Frank, Arthur J.; Zhu, Kai; Wang, Qing

    2013-03-05

    An electrode having an oriented array of multiple nanotubes is disclosed. Individual nanotubes have a lengthwise inner pore defined by interior tube walls which extends at least partially through the length of the nanotube. The nanotubes of the array may be oriented according to any identifiable pattern. Also disclosed is a device featuring an electrode and methods of fabrication.

  8. Static and dynamic wetting measurements of single carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Barber, Asa H; Cohen, Sidney R; Wagner, H Daniel

    2004-05-07

    Individual carbon nanotubes were immersed and removed from various organic liquids using atomic force microscopy. The carbon nanotube-liquid interactions could be monitored in situ, and accurate measurements of the contact angle between liquids and the nanotube surface were made. These wetting data were used to produce Owens and Wendt plots giving the dispersive and polar components of the nanotube surface.

  9. Removing Structural Disorder from Oriented TiO2 Nanotube Arrays: Reducing the Dimensionality of Transport and Recombination in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, K.; Vinzant, T. B.; Neale, N. R.; Frank, A. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report on the influence of morphological disorder, arising from bundling of nanotubes (NTs) and microcracks in films of oriented TiO{sub 2} NT arrays, on charge transport and recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Capillary stress created during evaporation of liquids from the mesopores of dense TiO{sub 2} NT arrays was of sufficient magnitude to induce bundling and microcrack formation. The average lateral deflection of the NTs in the bundles increased with the surface tension of the liquids and with the film thicknesses. The supercritical CO{sub 2} drying technique was used to produce bundle-free and crack-free NT films. Charge transport and recombination properties of sensitized films were studied by frequency-resolved modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopies. Transport became significantly faster with decreased clustering of the NTs, indicating that bundling creates additional pathways via intertube contacts. Removing such contacts alters the transport mechanism from a combination of one and three dimensions to the expected one dimension and shortens the electron-transport pathway. Reducing intertube contacts also resulted in a lower density of surface recombination centers by minimizing distortion-induced surface defects in bundled NTs. A causal connection between transport and recombination is observed. The dye coverage was greater in the more aligned NT arrays, suggesting that reducing intertube contacts increases the internal surface area of the films accessible to dye molecules. The solar conversion efficiency and photocurrent density were highest for DSSCs incorporating films with more aligned NT arrays owing to an enhanced light-harvesting efficiency. Removing structural disorder from other materials and devices consisting of nominally one-dimensional architectures (e.g., nanowire arrays) should produce similar effects.

  10. Removing structural disorder from oriented TiO2 nanotube arrays: reducing the dimensionality of transport and recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Kai; Vinzant, Todd B; Neale, Nathan R; Frank, Arthur J

    2007-12-01

    We report on the influence of morphological disorder, arising from bundling of nanotubes (NTs) and microcracks in films of oriented TiO2 NT arrays, on charge transport and recombination in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Capillary stress created during evaporation of liquids from the mesopores of dense TiO2 NT arrays was of sufficient magnitude to induce bundling and microcrack formation. The average lateral deflection of the NTs in the bundles increased with the surface tension of the liquids and with the film thicknesses. The supercritical CO2 drying technique was used to produce bundle-free and crack-free NT films. Charge transport and recombination properties of sensitized films were studied by frequency-resolved modulated photocurrent/photovoltage spectroscopies. Transport became significantly faster with decreased clustering of the NTs, indicating that bundling creates additional pathways via intertube contacts. Removing such contacts alters the transport mechanism from a combination of one and three dimensions to the expected one dimension and shortens the electron-transport pathway. Reducing intertube contacts also resulted in a lower density of surface recombination centers by minimizing distortion-induced surface defects in bundled NTs. A causal connection between transport and recombination is observed. The dye coverage was greater in the more aligned NT arrays, suggesting that reducing intertube contacts increases the internal surface area of the films accessible to dye molecules. The solar conversion efficiency and photocurrent density were highest for DSSCs incorporating films with more aligned NT arrays owing to an enhanced light-harvesting efficiency. Removing structural disorder from other materials and devices consisting of nominally one-dimensional architectures (e.g., nanowire arrays) should produce similar effects.

  11. Self-Assembly of Hierarchical DNA Nanotube Architectures with Well-Defined Geometries.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, Tyler D; Mohammed, Abdul M; Agrawal, Deepak K; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-02-28

    An essential motif for the assembly of biological materials such as actin at the scale of hundreds of nanometers and beyond is a network of one-dimensional fibers with well-defined geometry. Here, we demonstrate the programmed organization of DNA filaments into micron-scale architectures where component filaments are oriented at preprogrammed angles. We assemble L-, T-, and Y-shaped DNA origami junctions that nucleate two or three micron length DNA nanotubes at high yields. The angles between the nanotubes mirror the angles between the templates on the junctions, demonstrating that nanoscale structures can control precisely how micron-scale architectures form. The ability to precisely program filament orientation could allow the assembly of complex filament architectures in two and three dimensions, including circuit structures, bundles, and extended materials.

  12. Nonlinear damping in mechanical resonators made from carbon nanotubes and graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, A.; Moser, J.; Chaste, J.; Zdrojek, M.; Wilson-Rae, I.; Bachtold, A.

    2011-06-01

    The theory of damping is discussed in Newton's Principia and has been tested in objects as diverse as the Foucault pendulum, the mirrors in gravitational-wave detectors and submicrometre mechanical resonators. In general, the damping observed in these systems can be described by a linear damping force. Advances in nanofabrication mean that it is now possible to explore damping in systems with one or more atomic-scale dimensions. Here we study the damping of mechanical resonators based on carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets. The damping is found to strongly depend on the amplitude of motion, and can be described by a nonlinear rather than a linear damping force. We exploit the nonlinear nature of damping in these systems to improve the figures of merit for both nanotube and graphene resonators. For instance, we achieve a quality factor of 100,000 for a graphene resonator.

  13. Single-walled carbon nanotubes are a new class of ion channel blockers.

    PubMed

    Park, Ki Ho; Chhowalla, Manish; Iqbal, Zafar; Sesti, Federico

    2003-12-12

    Here we identify a novel class of biological membrane ion channel blockers called single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs with diameter distributions peaked at approximately 0.9 and 1.3 nm, C60 fullerenes, multi wall nanotubes (MWNTs), and hyperfullerenes (nano-"onions") were synthesized by several techniques and applied to diverse channel types heterologously expressed in mammalian cells. External as-fabricated and purified SWNTs blocked K+ channel subunits in a dose-dependent manner. Blockage was dependent on the shape and dimensions of the nanoparticles used and did not require any electrochemical interaction. SWNTs were more effective than the spherical fullerenes and, for both, diameter was the determining factor. These findings postulate new uses for SWNTs in biological applications and provide unexpected insights into the current view of mechanisms governing the interaction of ion channels with blocking molecules.

  14. Nonlinear damping in mechanical resonators made from carbon nanotubes and graphene.

    PubMed

    Eichler, A; Moser, J; Chaste, J; Zdrojek, M; Wilson-Rae, I; Bachtold, A

    2011-05-15

    The theory of damping is discussed in Newton's Principia and has been tested in objects as diverse as the Foucault pendulum, the mirrors in gravitational-wave detectors and submicrometre mechanical resonators. In general, the damping observed in these systems can be described by a linear damping force. Advances in nanofabrication mean that it is now possible to explore damping in systems with one or more atomic-scale dimensions. Here we study the damping of mechanical resonators based on carbon nanotubes and graphene sheets. The damping is found to strongly depend on the amplitude of motion, and can be described by a nonlinear rather than a linear damping force. We exploit the nonlinear nature of damping in these systems to improve the figures of merit for both nanotube and graphene resonators. For instance, we achieve a quality factor of 100,000 for a graphene resonator.

  15. Induced fermionic current in toroidally compactified spacetimes with applications to cylindrical and toroidal nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bellucci, S.; Saharian, A. A.; Bardeghyan, V. M.

    2010-09-15

    The vacuum expectation value of fermionic current is evaluated for a massive spinor field in spacetimes with an arbitrary number of toroidally compactified spatial dimensions in the presence of a constant gauge field. By using the Abel-Plana type summation formula and the zeta-function technique we present the fermionic current in two different forms. Nontrivial topology of the background spacetime leads to the Aharonov-Bohm effect for the fermionic current induced by the gauge field. The current is a periodic function of the magnetic flux with the period equal to the flux quantum. In the absence of gauge field it vanishes for special cases of untwisted and twisted fields. Applications of general formulas to Kaluza-Klein type models and to cylindrical and toroidal carbon nanotubes are given. In the absence of magnetic flux the total fermionic current in carbon nanotubes vanishes, due to the cancellation of contributions from two different sublattices of the hexagonal lattice of graphene.

  16. Large Bandgap Shrinkage from Doping and Dielectric Interface in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Comfort, Everett; Lee, Ji Ung

    2016-01-01

    The bandgap of a semiconductor is one of its most important electronic properties. It is often considered to be a fixed property of the semiconductor. As the dimensions of semiconductors reduce, however, many-body effects become dominant. Here, we show that doping and dielectric, two critical features of semiconductor device manufacturing, can dramatically shrink (renormalize) the bandgap. We demonstrate this in quasi-one-dimensional semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Specifically, we use a four-gated device, configured as a p-n diode, to investigate the fundamental electronic structure of individual, partially supported nanotubes of varying diameter. The four-gated construction allows us to combine both electrical and optical spectroscopic techniques to measure the bandgap over a wide doping range. PMID:27339272

  17. Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    deposition (PE-CVD), which is a hybrid of plasma based and thermal based synthesis, and silicon carbide ( SiC ) surface decomposition which, though a true...fabrication method. 2.4.3.2. Surface Decomposition The fabrication of carbon nanotubes by surface decomposition of silicon carbide offers some unique...CNTs are vertically aligned and attached to the remaining silicon carbide substrate. Surface decomposition is achieved through high temperatures in a

  18. Topological coordinates for deformed nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    László, István; Rassat, André

    2003-10-01

    Starting from the topological arrangement of carbon atoms an algorithm is given for the construction of nanotube Cartesian coordinates. The final relaxed structures were obtained by a molecular mechanics calculation where the carbon-carbon interactions were supposed only between neighboring atoms of the initial tiling. In a given tiling we obtained toroidal or helical structures depending on the special position of the super cell parallelogram.

  19. Electron diffraction from cylindrical nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, L.C. )

    1994-09-01

    Electron diffraction intensities from cylindrical objects can be conveniently analyzed using Bessel functions. Analytic formulas and geometry of the diffraction patterns from cylindrical carbon nanotubes are presented in general forms in terms of structural parameters, such as the pitch angle and the radius of a tubule. As an example the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern from a graphitic tubule of structure [18,2] has been simulated to illustrate the characteristics of such diffraction patterns. The validity of the projection approximation is also discussed.

  20. Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Fiber Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    coagulant. The second process (patent pending) is novel in that it directly results polymer-free nanotube fibers without using a super acid spinning...chemical and electrochemical stability, hydrophobicity and viscosity . The generic structure, chemical name and abbreviations for the most common ions...modification procedure involved the electrochemical infiltration of small amounts of the polypyrrole/p-toluene sulphonate (PPy/PTS) conducting polymer

  1. Nanospot welding of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, H.; Kawamoto, Y.; Ohshima, Y.; Takayanagi, K.

    2001-08-01

    Single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) bundles protruding from the SWNT layers on self-aligned Sn apexes were brought to a distance of 30 nm by a scanning tunneling microscope inside a transmission electron microscope. A straight bundle on the tip could be observed in situ in contact electrostatically with a looped bundle on the sample by applying tip bias voltages above 2.0 V. The bundles were welded at the nanometer size contact area by local Joule heating.

  2. Carbon nanotubes - curse or blessing.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, J-P; Roesslein, M; Buerki-Thurnherr, T; Wick, P

    2011-01-01

    Although nanotechnology is a relatively new scientific field, quite many different products are already introduced in the market containing nanosized particles. A special class of nanosized materials namely the carbon nanotubes (CNT) possesses outstanding new properties and extraordinary potential for creating new products. Carbon nanotubes are already used in various consumer products, industrial applications and science. It is not as this time clear how CNT are able to affect human health since most types of CNTs differ significantly in terms of structural characteristics (morphology, size, shape and length), surface properties (surface chemistry and surface charge) and chemical composition. This review provides an overview about contradicting reports that are found in the literature. We summarize the studies that report about nontoxic as well as toxic effects of CNT in-vitro and in-vivo. We describe how carbon nanotubes can readily be degraded under certain conditions. Another phenomenon is that despite the observed toxic effects which may occur to cells, organs and animals after uptake of CNT, intensive research investigations were undertaken in order to use these outstanding materials in medical applications. The second part of this review starts with a short description of the main principles in metrology. Observed conflicts were discussed in CNT toxicity assays into terms of measurement science or metrology issues. It was demonstrated that any specification of a measurand is only valid within the given framework. This means that many of the published results are within their measurement framework correct, but there are no means to compare them outside this framework.

  3. Spectroscopic study of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, Seamus; Weldon, Declan N.; Blau, Werner J.; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Kastner, J.; Kuzmany, Hans

    1994-11-01

    We present a comprehensive experimental study of the vibrational spectra of nanotubes. There are two main lines observed in the Raman spectrum, one positioned at 1350 cm-1, the D line, and the other at 1580 cm-1, the G line. Both these lines are very similar to those seen with disordered graphite. The disorder induced D line is very weak compared to the G line which is indicative of high crystalline materials. The position and intensity of the D line strongly depends on the energy of the exciting laser. This dispersion effect was also observed for graphitic particles and may be explained by a photoselective resonance process of nanotubes with different sizes. There are two optically active modes in the Infrared spectrum for highly orientated polycrystalline graphite which are the E1u and A2u modes. The E1u mode is positioned at 1587 cm-1 while the A2u mode is positioned at 868 cm-1. The Infrared spectrum of the nanotubes shows both modes although the E1u mode is downshifted to 1575 cm-1.

  4. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Insepov, Zeke; Hassanein, Ahmed

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  5. Multiscale Simulations of Carbon Nanotubes and Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2005-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics and hybrid continuum/atomistic simulations of carbon nanotubes in liquid environments with an emphasis on aqueous solutions. We emphasize computational issues such as interaction potentials and coupling techniques and their influence on the simulated physics. We present results from simulations of water flows inside and outside doped and pure carbon nanotubes and discuss their implications for experimental studies.

  6. Carbon nanotube electrodes in organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Valitova, Irina; Amato, Michele; Mahvash, Farzaneh; Cantele, Giovanni; Maffucci, Antonio; Santato, Clara; Martel, Richard; Cicoira, Fabio

    2013-06-07

    The scope of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the recent progress on carbon nanotube electrodes applied to organic thin film transistors. After an introduction on the general aspects of the charge injection processes at various electrode-semiconductor interfaces, we discuss the great potential of carbon nanotube electrodes for organic thin film transistors and the recent achievements in the field.

  7. Invisible Hyperbolic Metamaterial Nanotube at Visible Frequency.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; No, You-Shin; Chang, Sehwan; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2015-11-02

    Subwavelength-scale metal and dielectric nanostructures have served as important building blocks for electromagnetic metamaterials, providing unprecedented opportunities for manipulating the optical response of the matter. Recently, hyperbolic metamaterials have been drawing particular interest because of their unusual optical properties and functionalities, such as negative refraction and hyperlensing of light. Here, as a promising application of a hyperbolic metamaterial at visible frequency, we propose an invisible nanotube that consists of metal and dielectric alternating thin layers. The theoretical study of the light scattering of the layered nanotube reveals that almost-zero scattering can be achieved at a specific wavelength when the transverse-electric- or transverse-magnetic-polarized light is incident to the nanotube. In addition, the layered nanotube can be described as a radial-anisotropic hyperbolic metamaterial nanotube. The low scattering occurs when the effective permittivity of the hyperbolic nanotube in the angular direction is near zero, and thus the invisibility of the layered nanotube can be efficiently obtained by analyzing the equivalent hyperbolic nanotube. Our new method to design and tune an invisible nanostructure represents a significant step toward the practical implementation of unique nanophotonic devices such as invisible photodetectors and low-scattering near-field optical microscopes.

  8. Channeling of protons through BN nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borka Jovanović, V.; Borka, D.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper we study the angular and spatial distributions of protons channeled through boron-nitride (BN) nanotubes. The BN nanotubes have very similar structures like carbon nanotubes, but they are more thermally and chemically stable, and they also present good candidates for future channeling experiments. We present the angular and spatial distributions of MeV energy protons through the straight short (10, 10) single-wall BN nanotubes (SWBNNs). They were generated by a computer simulation method Borka et al. (2011, 2012a,b). Also, the effect of focusing of channeled protons is observed. A possible application of the obtained results for characterization of BN nanotubes is discussed. Analysis of angular and spatial distributions could be used to provide detailed information on the projectile-target interaction potentials inside BN nanotubes. We also varied the proton incident angle and energy and demonstrate that we can get a significant rearrangement of the propagating protons within the BN nanotube. This investigation may be used for proton beam guiding, to locate atomic impurities in nanotubes as well as for creating nanosized proton beams to be used in materials science, biology and medicine.

  9. Sacrificial template method of fabricating a nanotube

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yi-Ying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-05-01

    Methods of fabricating uniform nanotubes are described in which nanotubes were synthesized as sheaths over nanowire templates, such as using a chemical vapor deposition process. For example, single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are utilized as templates over which gallium nitride (GaN) is epitaxially grown. The ZnO templates are then removed, such as by thermal reduction and evaporation. The completed single-crystalline GaN nanotubes preferably have inner diameters ranging from 30 nm to 200 nm, and wall thicknesses between 5 and 50 nm. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the resultant nanotubes are single-crystalline with a wurtzite structure, and are oriented along the <001> direction. The present invention exemplifies single-crystalline nanotubes of materials with a non-layered crystal structure. Similar "epitaxial-casting" approaches could be used to produce arrays and single-crystalline nanotubes of other solid materials and semiconductors. Furthermore, the fabrication of multi-sheath nanotubes are described as well as nanotubes having multiple longitudinal segments.

  10. Invisible Hyperbolic Metamaterial Nanotube at Visible Frequency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Ho; No, You-Shin; Chang, Sehwan; Choi, Jae-Hyuck; Park, Hong-Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Subwavelength-scale metal and dielectric nanostructures have served as important building blocks for electromagnetic metamaterials, providing unprecedented opportunities for manipulating the optical response of the matter. Recently, hyperbolic metamaterials have been drawing particular interest because of their unusual optical properties and functionalities, such as negative refraction and hyperlensing of light. Here, as a promising application of a hyperbolic metamaterial at visible frequency, we propose an invisible nanotube that consists of metal and dielectric alternating thin layers. The theoretical study of the light scattering of the layered nanotube reveals that almost-zero scattering can be achieved at a specific wavelength when the transverse-electric- or transverse-magnetic-polarized light is incident to the nanotube. In addition, the layered nanotube can be described as a radial-anisotropic hyperbolic metamaterial nanotube. The low scattering occurs when the effective permittivity of the hyperbolic nanotube in the angular direction is near zero, and thus the invisibility of the layered nanotube can be efficiently obtained by analyzing the equivalent hyperbolic nanotube. Our new method to design and tune an invisible nanostructure represents a significant step toward the practical implementation of unique nanophotonic devices such as invisible photodetectors and low-scattering near-field optical microscopes. PMID:26522815

  11. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  12. Ophthalmologial Applications of Carbon Nanotube Nanotechology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David; Girten, Beverly (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The development of an implantable device consisting of an array of carbon nanotubes on a silicon chip for restoration of vision in patients with macular degeneration and other retinal disorders is presented. The use of carbon nanotube bucky paper for retinal cell transplantation is proposed. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  13. CARBON NANOTUBES: PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, John, E.

    2009-07-24

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered in 1991 as a minority byproduct of fullerene synthesis. Remarkable progress has been made in the ensuing years, including the discovery of two basic types of nanotubes (single-wall and multi-wall), great strides in synthesis and purification, elucidation of many fundamental physical properties, and important steps towards practical applications. Both the underlying science and technological potential of SWNT can profitably be studied at the scale of individual tubes and on macroscopic assemblies such as fibers. Experiments on single tubes directly reveal many of the predicted quantum confinement and mechanical properties. Semiconductor nanowires have many features in common with nanotubes, and many of the same fundamental and practical issues are in play – quantum confinement and its effect on properties; possible device structures and circuit architectures; thermal management; optimal synthesis, defect morphology and control, etc. In 2000 we began a small effort in this direction, conducted entirely by undergraduates with minimal consumables support from this grant. With DOE-BES approval, this grew into a project in parallel with the carbon nanotube work, in which we studied of inorganic semiconductor nanowire growth, characterization and novel strategies for electronic and electromechanical device fabrication. From the beginnings of research on carbon nanotubes, one of the major applications envisioned was hydrogen storage for fuel-cell powered cars and trucks. Subsequent theoretical models gave mixed results, the most pessimistic indicating that the fundamental H2-SWNT interaction was similar to flat graphite (physisorption) with only modest binding energies implying cryogenic operation at best. New material families with encouraging measured properties have emerged, and materials modeling has gained enormously in predictive power, sophistication, and the ability to treat a realistically representative number of atoms. One of

  14. Enzymatic degradation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yong; Allen, Brett L; Star, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    Because of their unique properties, carbon nanotubes and, in particular, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) have been used for the development of advanced composite and catalyst materials. Despite their growing commercial applications and increased production, the potential environmental and toxicological impacts of MWNTs are not fully understood; however, many reports suggest that they may be toxic. Therefore, a need exists to develop protocols for effective and safe degradation of MWNTs. In this article, we investigated the effect of chemical functionalization of MWNTs on their enzymatic degradation with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). We investigated HRP/H(2)O(2) degradation of purified, oxidized, and nitrogen-doped MWNTs and proposed a layer-by-layer degradation mechanism of nanotubes facilitated by side wall defects. These results provide a better understanding of the interaction between HRP and carbon nanotubes and suggest an eco-friendly way of mitigating the environmental impact of nanotubes.

  15. Lateral force microscopy of multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lievonen, J; Ahlskog, M

    2009-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes are usually imaged with the atomic force microscope (AFM) in non-contact mode. However, in many applications, such as mechanical manipulation or elasticity measurements, contact mode is used. The forces affecting the nanotube are then considerable and not fully understood. In this work lateral forces were measured during contact mode imaging with an AFM across a carbon nanotube. We found that, qualitatively, both magnitude and sign of the lateral forces to the AFM tip were independent of scan direction and can be concluded to arise from the tip slipping on the round edges of the nanotube. The dependence on the normal force applied to the tip and on the ratio between nanotube diameter and tip radius was studied. We show that for small values of this ratio, the lateral force signal can be explained with a simple geometrical model.

  16. A new class of boron nanotube.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Ying; Li, You-Cheng

    2009-12-07

    The configurations, stability and electronic structures of a new class of boron sheet and related boron nanotubes are predicted within the framework of density functional theory. This boron sheet is sparser than those of recent proposals. Our theoretic results show that the stable boron sheet remains flat and is metallic. There are bands similar to the pi-bands in graphite near the Fermi level. Stable nanotubes with various diameters and chiral vectors can be rolled from the sheet. Within our study, only the thin (8, 0) nanotube with a band gap of 0.44 eV is semiconducting, while all the other thicker boron nanotubes are metallic, independent of their chirality. It indicates the possibility, in the design of nanodevices, to control the electronic transport properties of the boron nanotube through the diameter.

  17. Substrate-supported lipid nanotube arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, A. I.; Poluektov, O. G.; Chemistry; North Carolina State

    2003-07-16

    This Communication describes the self-assembly of phospholipids into lipid nanotubes inside nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide substrate. Orientations of the lipid molecules in such lipid nanoscale structures were verified by high-resolution spin labeling EPR at 95 GHz. The static order parameter of lipids in such nanotube arrays was determined from low-temperature EPR spectra and was found to be exceptionally high, S{sub static} {approx} 0.9. We propose that substrate-supported lipid nanotube arrays have potential for building robust biochips and biosensors in which rigid nanoporous substrates protect the bilayer surface from contamination. The total bilayer surface in the lipid nanotube arrays is much greater than that in the planar substrate-supported membranes. The lipid nanotube arrays seem to be suitable for developing patterned lipid deposition and could be potentially used for patterning of membrane-associated molecules.

  18. On some trees having partition dimension four

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ida Bagus Kade Puja Arimbawa, K.; Baskoro, Edy Tri

    2016-02-01

    In 1998, G. Chartrand, E. Salehi and P. Zhang introduced the notion of partition dimension of a graph. Since then, the study of this graph parameter has received much attention. A number of results have been obtained to know the values of partition dimensions of various classes of graphs. However, for some particular classes of graphs, finding of their partition dimensions is still not completely solved, for instances a class of general tree. In this paper, we study the properties of trees having partition dimension 4. In particular, we show that, for olive trees O(n), its partition dimension is equal to 4 if and only if 8 ≤ n ≤ 17. We also characterize all centipede trees having partition dimension 4.

  19. Carbon Nanotube Based Microfluidic Elements for Filtration and Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Bakajin, O; Ben-Barak, N; Peng, J; Noy, A

    2003-06-25

    We have developed a method for integration of patterned arrays of carbon nanotubes or the ''nanotube mesh'' into microfabricated channels. The method includes standard lithographic methods for patterning and etching the substrate, followed by catalyst patterning, CVD deposition of nanotubes, and anodic bonding of coverslip top. We will describe a carbon nanotube filtering device fabricated using this method and discuss the use of carbon nanotube arrays as molecular concentration and separation media.

  20. Bulk Cutting of Carbon Nanotubes Using Electron Beam Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziegler, Kirk J. (Inventor); Rauwald, Urs (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Schmidt, Howard K. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Gu, Zhenning (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a method for attaining short carbon nanotubes utilizing electron beam irradiation, for example, of a carbon nanotube sample. The sample may be pretreated, for example by oxonation. The pretreatment may introduce defects to the sidewalls of the nanotubes. The method is shown to produces nanotubes with a distribution of lengths, with the majority of lengths shorter than 100 tun. Further, the median length of the nanotubes is between about 20 nm and about 100 nm.

  1. Psychological Dimensions of Cross-Cultural Differences

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0214 Psychological Dimensions of Cross- Cultural Differences Saucier, Gerard University of Oregon May...Psychological Dimensions of Cross- Cultural Differences Grant Research Final Performance Report – February 2013 prepared by Gerard Saucier, Principal...Psychological Dimensions of Cross- Cultural Differences Contract/Grant Number: FA9550-09-1-0398 Reporting period: June 1, 2009 to November 30, 2012

  2. Carbon nanotubes: Synthesis, integration and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jing

    Ever since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have captured the attention of researchers worldwide due to their remarkable structural, electrical and mechanical properties. They not only offer an ideal playground for fundamental research but also render great potential for all kinds of applications, including future electronic devices, sensors, exceptionally strong materials, flat-panel displays, hydrogen fuel cells, and so on. This thesis reports the study of nanotube properties and some of its applications. It is divided into three parts: (1) The chemical synthesis of individual single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) via chemical vapor deposition of methane; (2) the integration of individual SWNT into electronic circuits; (3) The studies on the electrical properties of these nanotubes, and the exploration of their potential applications. In order to facilitate the studies and applications of nanotubes, great efforts have been made towards their synthesis and production. Our approach is the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, through which we can produce individual SWNTs with high quality and high yield. However, the nanotubes produced directly using CVD (and other methods like laser ablation and arc discharge) are always tangled and bundled up together, and buried inside the graphitized bulk catalyst, which renders the manipulation and characterization a difficult task. We solved this problem by combining the chemical synthesis and conventional nanofabrication techniques together with selectively growing nanotubes at specific sites. Therefore, individual carbon nanotubes can be easily integrated into electrical circuits. Theoretical studies have shown nanotubes possess unique electronic properties; a SWNT be metallic, semiconducting or semi-metallic depending on its helicity. In our experimental studies we have observed all the 3 types of behaviors and confirmed the theoretical predictions. We also investigated the realization of various nanotube functional

  3. The international dimensions of neuroethics.

    PubMed

    Lombera, Sofia; Illes, Judy

    2009-08-01

    Neuroethics, in its modern form, investigates the impact of brain science in four basic dimensions: the self, social policy, practice and discourse. In this study, we analyzed a set of 461 peer-reviewed articles with neuroethics content, published by authors from 32 countries. We analyzed the data for: (1) trends in the development of international neuroethics over time, and (2) how challenges at the intersection of ethics and neuroscience are viewed in countries that are considered developed by International Monetary Fund (IMF) standards, and in those that are developing. Our results demonstrate a steady increase in global participation in neuroethics from 1989 to 2005, characterized by an increase in numbers of articles published specifically on neuroethics, journals publishing these articles, and countries contributing to the literature. The focus from all countries was on the practice of brain science and the amelioration of neurological disease. Indicators of technology creation and diffusion in developing countries were specifically correlated with increases in publications concerning policy implications of brain science. Neuroethics is an international endeavor and, as such, should be sensitive to the impact that context has on acceptance and use of technological innovation.

  4. THE INTERNATIONAL DIMENSIONS OF NEUROETHICS

    PubMed Central

    LOMBERA, SOFIA; ILLES, JUDY

    2008-01-01

    Neuroethics, in its modern form, investigates the impact of brain science in four basic dimensions: the self, social policy, practice and discourse. In this study, we analyzed a set of 461 peer-reviewed articles with neuroethics content, published by authors from 32 countries. We analyzed the data for: (1) trends in the development of international neuroethics over time, and (2) how challenges at the intersection of ethics and neuroscience are viewed in countries that are considered developed by International Monetary Fund (IMF) standards, and in those that are developing. Our results demonstrate a steady increase in global participation in neuroethics from 1989 to 2005, characterized by an increase in numbers of articles published specifically on neuroethics, journals publishing these articles, and countries contributing to the literature. The focus from all countries was on the practice of brain science and the amelioration of neurological disease. Indicators of technology creation and diffusion in developing countries were specifically correlated with increases in publications concerning policy implications of brain science. Neuroethics is an international endeavor and, as such, should be sensitive to the impact that context has on acceptance and use of technological innovation. PMID:18445073

  5. Deconstructing Signaling in Three Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cells in vivo exist within the context of a multicellular tissue, where their behavior is governed by homo- and heterotypic cell–cell interactions, the material properties of the extracellular matrix, and the distribution of various soluble and physical factors. Most methods currently used to study and manipulate cellular behavior in vitro, however, sacrifice physiological relevance for experimental expediency. The fallacy of such approaches has been highlighted by the recent development and application of three-dimensional culture models to cell biology, which has revealed striking phenotypic differences in cell survival, migration, and differentiation in genetically identical cells simply by varying culture conditions. These perplexing findings beg the question of what constitutes a three-dimensional culture and why cells behave so differently in two- and three-dimensional culture formats. In the following review, we dissect the fundamental differences between two- and three-dimensional culture conditions. We begin by establishing a basic definition of what “three dimensions” means at different biological scales and discuss how dimensionality influences cell signaling across different length scales. We identify which three-dimensional features most potently influence intracellular signaling and distinguish between conserved biological principles that are maintained across culture conditions and cellular behaviors that are sensitive to microenvironmental context. Finally, we highlight state-of-the-art molecular tools amenable to the study of signaling in three dimensions under conditions that facilitate deconstruction of signaling in a more physiologically relevant manner. PMID:24649923

  6. Contagion Shocks in One Dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertozzi, Andrea L.; Rosado, Jesus; Short, Martin B.; Wang, Li

    2015-02-01

    We consider an agent-based model of emotional contagion coupled with motion in one dimension that has recently been studied in the computer science community. The model involves movement with a speed proportional to a "fear" variable that undergoes a temporal consensus averaging based on distance to other agents. We study the effect of Riemann initial data for this problem, leading to shock dynamics that are studied both within the agent-based model as well as in a continuum limit. We examine the behavior of the model under distinguished limits as the characteristic contagion interaction distance and the interaction timescale both approach zero. The limiting behavior is related to a classical model for pressureless gas dynamics with "sticky" particles. In comparison, we observe a threshold for the interaction distance vs. interaction timescale that produce qualitatively different behavior for the system - in one case particle paths do not cross and there is a natural Eulerian limit involving nonlocal interactions and in the other case particle paths can cross and one may consider only a kinetic model in the continuum limit.

  7. Optoacoustic imaging in five dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deán-Ben, X. L.; Gottschalk, Sven; Fehm, Thomas F.; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    We report on an optoacoustic imaging system capable of acquiring volumetric multispectral optoacoustic data in real time. The system is based on simultaneous acquisition of optoacoustic signals from 256 different tomographic projections by means of a spherical matrix array. Thereby, volumetric reconstructions can be done at high frame rate, only limited by the pulse repetition rate of the laser. The developed tomographic approach presents important advantages over previously reported systems that use scanning for attaining volumetric optoacoustic data. First, dynamic processes, such as the biodistribution of optical biomarkers, can be monitored in the entire volume of interest. Second, out-of-plane and motion artifacts that could degrade the image quality when imaging living specimens can be avoided. Finally, real-time 3D performance can obviously save time required for experimental and clinical observations. The feasibility of optoacoustic imaging in five dimensions, i.e. real time acquisition of volumetric datasets at multiple wavelengths, is reported. In this way, volumetric images of spectrally resolved chromophores are rendered in real time, thus offering an unparallel imaging performance among the current bio-imaging modalities. This performance is subsequently showcased by video-rate visualization of in vivo hemodynamic changes in mouse brain and handheld visualization of blood oxygenation in deep human vessels. The newly discovered capacities open new prospects for translating the optoacoustic technology into highly performing imaging modality for biomedical research and clinical practice with multiple applications envisioned, from cardiovascular and cancer diagnostics to neuroimaging and ophthalmology.

  8. A Carbon Arc Apparatus For Production Of Nanotubes In Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, J. M.; Mason, G. R.; Feikema, D. A.

    2003-01-01

    Although many methods are available for production of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), the conventional carbon arc process remains the most popular due to its simplicity and large production rate. However, high temperatures inside the carbon arc generate strong buoyancy driven convection, and it is hypothesized that the non-uniform environment created by this flow will have large effects on the growth and morphology of SWNTs produced by the arc process. Indeed, using normal gravity experiments, Marin et al. have demonstrated that changes in the buoyant convection plume produced by altering the arc electrode orientation can be used to change the diameter distribution of the SWNTs produced; an effect they attribute to changes in the temperature of the local nanotube growth environment. While these experiments present convincing evidence that buoyant convection has a strong effect on nanotube growth, normal gravity experiments are severely limited in scope. The ideal way to study the effect of buoyancy on SWNT production is to remove it completely. Toward this goal, a microgravity carbon arc reactor has been designed for use in the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers. Although simple in principle, conventional carbon arc machines, which generally employ large reaction chambers and require heavy duty welding power supplies capable of supplying kilowatts of power, are not suitable for microgravity experiments. Here we describe a miniature carbon arc machine for SWNT production that fits into a conventional drop rig for use on the NASA Glenn 2.2 and 5 second drop towers, but that has a performance (production rate) that is better than most large ground-based machines.

  9. Ab initio study of H2O and water-chain-induced properties of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, B. K.; Singh, V.; Pathak, A.; Srivastava, R.

    2007-05-01

    We perform an ab initio study of the motion of the nano sized water dimer through a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), the stability of an encapsulated one-dimensional (1D) water chain inside SWCNT, and the H2O -induced structural, energetic, electronic, and optical properties of the SWCNTs. The adsorption of the water molecules is caused by the dispersion forces, i.e., the van der Waals (vdW) interactions. Thus, the role of the vdW interactions in the estimation of the BE for the weakly bound adsorbates cannot be ignored as has been done in several earlier publications. We find that a single H2O molecule or single water dimer or a 1D chain of water dimers is trapped inside the medium-sized (6,6) carbon nanotube placed in vacuum. However, the H2O molecule or water dimer may be transmitted in case the tube is surrounded by water or water vapor at high vapor pressure at high temperatures. On the other hand, a chain of single H2O molecules or more number of the encapsulated H2O molecules is very weakly coupled to the wide (10,10) carbon nanotube and can, thus, easily transmit through the carbon nanotube in agreement with the recent experiments. Further, appreciable adsorption both inside and on the surface of the (10,10) carbon nanotube is predicted in concurrence with the experiments. The small (medium-sized) diameter tubes will adsorb strongly (accommodate) the water molecules outside (inside) the nanotubes. The H2O adsorption converts the conducting small-diameter zigzag (5,0) tube into a semiconductor. Further, the adsorption reduces the band gap of the semiconducting achiral zigzag (10,0) nanotube but increases the band gap of a chiral semiconducting (4,2) tube. The adsorbed H2O molecules increase the electrical conductivity in agreement with the experiment. The overall peak structure in the optical absorption for the pristine tube is not altered significantly by the adsorption except for small alterations in the energy locations and the relative intensities

  10. Amazing Altered Books

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kieling, Linda W.

    2006-01-01

    Linda Kieling, an art teacher at Rosemont Ridge Middle school in West Linn, Oregon, describes an altered book art project she introduced to her students. Alteration of books is a form of recycling that started in the eleventh century when Italian monks recycled old manuscripts written on vellum by scraping off the ink and adding new text and…

  11. Spontaneous symmetry breaking in quasi one dimension

    SciTech Connect

    Satpathi, Urbashi Deo, P. Singha

    2015-06-24

    Electronic charge and spin separation leading to charge density wave and spin density wave is well established in one dimension in the presence and absence of Coulomb interaction. We start from quasi one dimension and show the possibility of such a transition in quasi one dimension as well as in two dimensions by going to a regime where it can be shown for electrons that just interact via Fermi statistics. Such density waves arise due to internal symmetry breaking in a many fermion quantum system. We can extend this result to very wide rings with infinitely many electrons including Coulomb interaction.

  12. Ising spin glasses in dimension five

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundow, P. H.; Campbell, I. A.

    2017-01-01

    Ising spin-glass models with bimodal, Gaussian, uniform, and Laplacian interaction distributions in dimension five are studied through detailed numerical simulations. The data are analyzed in both the finite-size scaling regime and the thermodynamic limit regime. It is shown that the values of critical exponents and of dimensionless observables at criticality are model dependent. Models in a single universality class have identical values for each of these critical parameters, so Ising spin-glass models in dimension five with different interaction distributions each lie in different universality classes. This result confirms conclusions drawn from measurements in dimension four and dimension two.

  13. Ising spin glasses in dimension five.

    PubMed

    Lundow, P H; Campbell, I A

    2017-01-01

    Ising spin-glass models with bimodal, Gaussian, uniform, and Laplacian interaction distributions in dimension five are studied through detailed numerical simulations. The data are analyzed in both the finite-size scaling regime and the thermodynamic limit regime. It is shown that the values of critical exponents and of dimensionless observables at criticality are model dependent. Models in a single universality class have identical values for each of these critical parameters, so Ising spin-glass models in dimension five with different interaction distributions each lie in different universality classes. This result confirms conclusions drawn from measurements in dimension four and dimension two.

  14. Origin of Everything and the 21 Dimensions of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loev, Mark

    2009-03-01

    The Dimensions of the Universe correspond with the Dimensions of the human body. The emotion that is a positive for every dimension is Love. The negative emotion that effects each dimension are listed. All seven negative emotions effect Peace, Love and Happiness. 21st Dimension: Happiness Groin & Heart 20th Dimension: Love Groin & Heart 19th Dimension: Peace Groin & heart 18th Dimension: Imagination Wave Eyes Anger 17th Dimension: Z Wave / Closed Birth 16th Dimension: Electromagnetic Wave Ears Anger 15th Dimension: Universal Wave Skin Worry 14th Dimension: Lover Wave Blood Hate 13th Dimension: Disposal Wave Buttocks Fear 12th Dimension: Builder Wave Hands Hate 11th Dimension: Energy Wave Arms Fear 10th Dimension: Time Wave Brain Pessimism 9th Dimension: Gravity Wave Legs Fear 8th Dimension: Sweet Wave Pancreas Fear 7th Dimension: File Wave Left Lung Fear 6th Dimension: Breathing Wave Right Lung Fear 5th Dimension: Digestive Wave Stomach Fear 4th Dimension: Swab Wave Liver Guilt 3rd Dimension: Space Wave Face Sadness 2nd Dimension: Line Wave Mouth Revenge 1st Dimension: Dot Wave Nose Sadness The seven deadly sins correspond: Anger Hate Sadness Fear Worry Pessimism Revenge Note: Guilt is fear

  15. Structure -- Magnetic Property Correlations in TiO 2 Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad Hosseinpour, Pegah

    TiO2 nanotube arrays are promising candidates for applications such as photocatalysis and for potential employment in spin-electronic (spintronic) devices. The functionality of TiO2-based nanotubes is highly dependent on their structure (microstructure and crystallographic symmetry) and magnetic properties. Unified understanding of the influence of these factors on the electronic structure of TiO2 is of paramount importance towards engineering these materials. This Dissertation aims at investigating the correlations of the morphology, crystallinity, crystal structure, electronic structure and magnetic properties of TiO2 nanotubes, with potential relevance to their functionality. Self-ordered arrays of amorphous TiO2 nanotubes (pure and Fe-doped with cationic concentration of ~2.1 at%) were synthesized by the electrochemical anodization technique, followed by subjecting them to thermal treatments up to 450 °C to crystallize these nanostructures. A variety of probes---morphological, structural, magnetic and spectroscopic---were used to characterize the properties of these nanostructures as functions of their processing conditions and the dopant content. Structure-functionality relationships in these nanostructures were verified by examining the photodegradation rate of methyl orange (a model water pollutant) in presence of TiO2 nanotubes under UV-Visible light irradiation. Results from this Dissertation research demonstrated that post-synthesis processing conditions---specifically, the nature of the annealing environment, as well as the presence of an external dopant, can alter the crystal structure and local electronic environment in TiO2 nanotubes, with subsequent effects on the magnetic properties of these nanostructures. The fundamental knowledge obtained in this research, on the interrelations of structural-magnetic properties and their potential influence on the functionality of TiO 2-based nanotubes, can be extended to the metal oxide semiconducting systems

  16. Physiological changes of the lichen Parmotrema tinctorum as result of carbon nanotubes exposition.

    PubMed

    Viana, Camila de O; Vaz, Raissa P; Cano, Abraham; Santos, Adelina P; Cançado, Luiz G; Ladeira, Luiz O; Junior, Ary Corrêa

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) is one of the more abundant nanomaterial produced in the world. Therefore, it is desirable to access its effects in all environment compartments, in order to mitigate environmental distress. This study aims to verify the potential use of lichens - classical atmospheric pollution indicators - as biomonitors of carbon nanotubes aerosols. To examine cause-effect relationships, preserving environmental microclimatic parameters, the lichen Parmotrema tinctorum (Nyl.) Hale was transplanted to open top chambers where aerosols of CNT were daily added. Physiological parameters such as cell viability, photosynthetic efficiency, cell permeability as well as nanoparticle internalization were assessed. Carbon nanotubes exposure led to reduction on the cell viability of P. tinctorum. The treatment with 100µg/mL of MWCNT-COOH resulted in intracellular ion leakage, probably due to changes in membrane permeability. No alterations on photosynthetic efficiency were detected. Carbon nanotubes entrapment and internalization into the lichen thallus were observed. Short term exposition of CNT produced measurable physiological changes in P. tinctorum lichen. This suggests the possibility of use of lichens as models to assess the environmental impact (air related) of engineered nanomaterials.

  17. Potential in vitro effects of carbon nanotubes on human aortic endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Valerie G.; Li Zheng; Hulderman, Tracy; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Kashon, Michael L.; Simeonova, Petia P.

    2009-05-01

    Respiratory exposure of mice to carbon nanotubes induces pulmonary toxicity and adverse cardiovascular effects associated with atherosclerosis. We hypothesize that the direct contact of carbon nanotubes with endothelial cells will result in dose-dependent effects related to altered cell function and cytotoxicity which may play a role in potential adverse pulmonary and cardiovascular outcomes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of purified single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT and MWCNT) on human aortic endothelial cells by evaluating actin filament integrity and VE-cadherin distribution by fluorescence microscopy, membrane permeability by measuring the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release, proliferation/viability by WST-1 assay, and overall functionality by tubule formation assay. Marked actin filament and VE-cadherin disruption, cytotoxicity, and reduced tubule formation occurred consistently at 24 h post-exposure to the highest concentrations [50-150 {mu}g/10{sup 6} cells (1.5-4.5 {mu}g/ml)] for both SWCNT and MWCNT tested in our studies. These effects were not observed with carbon black exposure and carbon nanotube exposure in lower concentrations [1-10 {mu}g/10{sup 6} cells (0.04-0.4 {mu}g/ml)] or in any tested concentrations at 3 h post-exposure. Overall, the results indicate that SWCNT and MWCNT exposure induce direct effects on endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner.

  18. Full mouth rehabilitation of a patient with reduced vertical dimension using multiple metal ce ramic restorations.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ashish R; Nallaswamy, Deepak; Ariga, Padma; Philip, Jacob Mathew

    2013-10-01

    Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration.

  19. Full mouth rehabilitation of a patient with reduced vertical dimension using multiple metal ce ramic restorations

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ashish R; Nallaswamy, Deepak; Ariga, Padma; Philip, Jacob Mathew

    2013-01-01

    Rehabilitation of a patient with severely worn dentition after restoring the vertical dimension is a complex procedure and assessment of the vertical dimension is an important aspect in these cases. This clinical report describes the full mouth rehabilitation of a patient who was clinically monitored to evaluate the adaptation to a removable occlusal splint to restore vertical dimension for a period 1 month and provisional restorations to determine esthetic and functional outcome for a period of 3 months. It is necessary to recognizing that form follows function and that anterior teeth play a vital role in the maintenance of oral health. Confirmation of tolerance to changes in the vertical dimension of occlusion (VDO) is of paramount importance. Articulated study casts and a diagnostic wax-up can provide important information for the evaluation of treatment options. Alteration of the VDO should be conservative and should not be changed without careful consideration. PMID:24403804

  20. New generation fiber reinforced polymer composites incorporating carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soliman, Eslam

    The last five decades observed an increasing use of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composites as alternative construction materials for aerospace and infrastructure. The high specific strength of FRP attracted its use as non-corrosive reinforcement. However, FRP materials were characterized with a relatively low ductility and low shear strength compared with steel reinforcement. On the other hand, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been introduced in the last decade as a material with minimal defect that is capable of increasing the mechanical properties of polymer matrices. This dissertation reports experimental investigations on the use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) to produce a new generation of FRP composites. The experiments showed significant improvements in the flexure properties of the nanocomposite when functionalized MWCNTs were used. In addition, MWCNTs were used to produce FRP composites in order to examine static, dynamic, and creep behavior. The MWCNTs improved the off-axis tension, off-axis flexure, FRP lap shear joint responses. In addition, they reduced the creep of FRP-concrete interface, enhanced the fracture toughness, and altered the impact resistance significantly. In general, the MWCNTs are found to affect the behaviour of the FRP composites when matrix failure dominates the behaviour. The improvement in the mechanical response with the addition of low contents of MWCNTs would benefit many industrial and military applications such as strengthening structures using FRP composites, composite pipelines, aircrafts, and armoured vehicles.

  1. Effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes on UASB microbial consortium.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Tushar; Mungray, Alka A; Mungray, Arvind K

    2016-03-01

    The continuous rise in production and applications of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has grown a concern about their fate and toxicity in the environment. After use, these nanomaterials pass through sewage and accumulate in wastewater treatment plants. Since, such plants rely on biological degradation of wastes; their activity may decrease due to the presence of CNTs. This study investigated the effect of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) microbial activity. The toxic effect on microbial viability, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), volatile fatty acids (VFA), and biogas generation was determined. The reduction in a colony-forming unit (CFU) was 29 and 58 % in 1 and 100 mg/L test samples, respectively, as compared to control. The volatile fatty acids and biogas production was also found reduced. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescent microscopy images confirmed that the MWCNT mediated microbial cell damage. This damage caused the increase in EPS carbohydrate, protein, and DNA concentration. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy results supported the alterations in sludge EPS due to MWCNT. Our observations offer a new insight to understand the nanotoxic effect of MWCNTs on UASB microflora in a complex environment system.

  2. Titania nanotube arrays as potential interfaces for neurological prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorkin, Jonathan Andrew

    Neural prostheses can make a dramatic improvement for those suffering from visual and auditory, cognitive, and motor control disabilities, allowing them regained functionality by the use of stimulating or recording electrical signaling. However, the longevity of these devices is limited due to the neural tissue response to the implanted device. In response to the implant penetrating the blood brain barrier and causing trauma to the tissue, the body forms a to scar to isolate the implant in order to protect the nearby tissue. The scar tissue is a result of reactive gliosis and produces an insulated sheath, encapsulating the implant. The glial sheath limits the stimulating or recording capabilities of the implant, reducing its effectiveness over the long term. A favorable interaction with this tissue would be the direct adhesion of neurons onto the contacts of the implant, and the prevention of glial encapsulation. With direct neuronal adhesion the effectiveness and longevity of the device would be significantly improved. Titania nanotube arrays, fabricated using electrochemical anodization, provide a conductive architecture capable of altering cellular response. This work focuses on the fabrication of different titania nanotube array architectures to determine how their structures and properties influence the response of neural tissue, modeled using the C17.2 murine neural stem cell subclone, and if glial encapsulation can be reduced while neuronal adhesion is promoted.

  3. Synthesizing boron nitride nanotubes filled with SiC nanowires by using carbon nanotubes as templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Weiqiang; Redlich, Philipp; Ernst, Frank; Rühle, Manfred

    1999-09-01

    A method is described to synthesize silicon carbide (SiC)-filled boron nitride (BN) nanotubes (NT) simultaneously in high yield by using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as templates. This method combines both carbon nanotube-substitution reaction and confined reaction. Through the CNT-substitution reaction, CNTs react with boron oxide vapor in the presence of nitrogen gas to form BN NTs, whose diameters and lengths are similar to those of the starting CNTs. The formation of the SiC filling is proceeded by the penetration of SiO vapor into the cavity of the nanotubes and subsequent reaction of SiO vapor with the inner carbon layers or volatile carbon mono-oxide in the interior to form SiC nanowires. The filled length can be up to the entire length of the nanotubes. SiC-filled (BN)xCy nanotubes also form in the product.

  4. Use of Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes for Covalent Attachment of Nanotubes to Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tour, James M.; Dyke, Christopher A.; Maya, Francisco; Stewart, Michael P.; Chen, Bo; Flatt, Austen K.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the invention is to covalently attach functionalized carbon nanotubes to silicon. This step allows for the introduction of carbon nanotubes onto all manner of silicon surfaces, and thereby introduction of carbon nano - tubes covalently into silicon-based devices, onto silicon particles, and onto silicon surfaces. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) dispersed as individuals in surfactant were functionalized. The nano - tube was first treated with 4-t-butylbenzenediazonium tetrafluoroborate to give increased solubility to the carbon nanotube; the second group attached to the sidewall of the nanotube has a silyl-protected terminal alkyne that is de-protected in situ. This gives a soluble carbon nanotube that has functional groups appended to the sidewall that can be attached covalently to silicon. This reaction was monitored by UV/vis/NJR to assure direct covalent functionalization.

  5. Helical polycarbodiimide cloaking of carbon nanotubes enables inter-nanotube exciton energy transfer modulation.

    PubMed

    Budhathoki-Uprety, Januka; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2014-11-05

    The use of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as near-infrared optical probes and sensors require the ability to simultaneously modulate nanotube fluorescence and functionally derivatize the nanotube surface using noncovalent methods. We synthesized a small library of polycarbodiimides to noncovalently encapsulate SWCNTs with a diverse set of functional coatings, enabling their suspension in aqueous solution. These polymers, known to adopt helical conformations, exhibited ordered surface coverage on the nanotubes and allowed systematic modulation of nanotube optical properties, producing up to 12-fold differences in photoluminescence efficiency. Polymer cloaking of the fluorescent nanotubes facilitated the first instance of controllable and reversible internanotube exciton energy transfer, allowing kinetic measurements of dynamic self-assembly and disassembly.

  6. Relationship between symptom dimensions and brain morphology in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Hirose, Motohisa; Hirano, Yoshiyuki; Nemoto, Kiyotaka; Sutoh, Chihiro; Asano, Kenichi; Miyata, Haruko; Matsumoto, Junko; Nakazato, Michiko; Matsumoto, Koji; Masuda, Yoshitada; Iyo, Masaomi; Shimizu, Eiji; Nakagawa, Akiko

    2016-10-11

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is known as a clinically heterogeneous disorder characterized by symptom dimensions. Although substantial numbers of neuroimaging studies have demonstrated the presence of brain abnormalities in OCD, their results are controversial. The clinical heterogeneity of OCD could be one of the reasons for this. It has been hypothesized that certain brain regions contributed to the respective obsessive-compulsive dimensions. In this study, we investigated the relationship between symptom dimensions of OCD and brain morphology using voxel-based morphometry to discover the specific regions showing alterations in the respective dimensions of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. The severities of symptom dimensions in thirty-three patients with OCD were assessed using Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory-Revised (OCI-R). Along with numerous MRI studies pointing out brain abnormalities in autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients, a previous study reported a positive correlation between ASD traits and regional gray matter volume in the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and amygdala in OCD patients. We investigated the correlation between gray and white matter volumes at the whole brain level and each symptom dimension score, treating all remaining dimension scores, age, gender, and ASD traits as confounding covariates. Our results revealed a significant negative correlation between washing symptom dimension score and gray matter volume in the right thalamus and a significant negative correlation between hoarding symptom dimension score and white matter volume in the left angular gyrus. Although our result was preliminary, our findings indicated that there were specific brain regions in gray and white matter that contributed to symptom dimensions in OCD patients.

  7. Collaborative Research and Development (CR&D). Delivery Order 0056: Novel Nanotube Synthesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    synthesis routes for nanotubes that are not pure carbon, e.g., boron nitride , boron -carbon nitride . Carbon nanotubes ...the fact that semiconducting nanotubes are mixed with metallic nanotubes in as-grown samples. Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are structural...AFRL-RX-WP-TM-2010-4091 COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (CR&D) Delivery Order 0056: Novel Nanotube Synthesis Myung Jong

  8. Electrochemical impedance measurement of a carbon nanotube probe electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Akira; Takei, Yusuke; Kan, Tetsuo; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shimoyama, Isao

    2012-12-01

    We measured and analyzed the electrochemical impedance of carbon nanotube (CNT) probe electrodes fabricated through the physical separation of insulated CNT bridges. The fabricated CNT electrodes were free-standing CNTs that were completely covered with an insulator, except for their tips. Typical dimensions of the nanoelectrodes were 1-10 nm in CNT diameter, 80-300 nm in insulator diameter, 0.5-4 μm in exposed CNT length and 1-10 μm in probe length. The electrochemical impedance at frequencies ranging from 40 Hz to 1 MHz was measured in physiological saline. The measured impedance of the CNT electrode was constant at 32 MΩ at frequencies below 1 kHz and was inversely proportional to frequency at frequencies above 10 kHz. By means of comparison with the parasitic capacitive impedance of the insulator membrane, we confirmed that the electrode was sufficiently insulated such that the measured constant impedance was given by the exposed CNT tip. Consequently, we can use the CNT electrode for highly localized electrochemical impedance measurements below 1 kHz. Considering an equivalent circuit and the nanoscopic dimensions of the CNT electrode, we demonstrated that the constant impedance was governed by diffusion impedance, whereas the solution resistance, charge-transfer resistance and double-layer capacitance were negligible.

  9. Four Essential Dimensions of Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: This conceptual paper aims to argue that times, spaces, bodies and things constitute four essential dimensions of workplace learning. It examines how practices relate or hang together, taking Gherardi's texture of practices or connectedness in action as the foundation for making visible essential but often overlooked dimensions of…

  10. Bilocal field theory in four dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, T. )

    1993-07-15

    A bilocal field theory having Moebius gauge invariance is proposed. In four dimensions there exists a zero momentum state of the first-quantized model which belongs to a nontrivial BRS cohomology class. A field theory Lagrangian having gauge invariance only in four dimensions is constructed.

  11. Unconscious Evaluation of Faces on Social Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Lorna H.; Ajina, Sara; Getov, Spas; Bahrami, Bahador; Todorov, Alexander; Rees, Geraint

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that two major axes, dominance and trustworthiness, characterize the social dimensions of face evaluation. Whether evaluation of faces on these social dimensions is restricted to conscious appraisal or happens at a preconscious level is unknown. Here we provide behavioral evidence that such preconscious evaluations exist and…

  12. Quantum Field Theory in (0 + 1) Dimensions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boozer, A. D.

    2007-01-01

    We show that many of the key ideas of quantum field theory can be illustrated simply and straightforwardly by using toy models in (0 + 1) dimensions. Because quantum field theory in (0 + 1) dimensions is equivalent to quantum mechanics, these models allow us to use techniques from quantum mechanics to gain insight into quantum field theory. In…

  13. Interlocked molecules: Moving into another dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournel-Marotte, Karine; Coutrot, Frédéric

    2016-12-01

    Molecular daisy-chain structures are typically made up of two interlocked components and can exhibit muscle-like contraction and extension in one dimension. Zinc-based multicomponent systems that can operate in two and three dimensions have now been designed and synthesized.

  14. Understanding Dimensions of Organizational Evaluation Capacity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bourgeois, Isabelle; Cousins, J. Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Organizational evaluation capacity building has been a topic of increasing interest in recent years. However, the actual dimensions of evaluation capacity have not been clearly articulated through empirical research. This study sought to address this gap by identifying the key dimensions of evaluation capacity in Canadian federal government…

  15. Quality Dimensions of Internet Search Engines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xie, M.; Wang, H.; Goh, T. N.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews commonly used search engines (AltaVista, Excite, infoseek, Lycos, HotBot, WebCrawler), focusing on existing comparative studies; considers quality dimensions from the customer's point of view based on a SERVQUAL framework; and groups these quality expectations in five dimensions: tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and…

  16. The effects of substrate phonon mode scattering on transport in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Perebeinos, Vasili; Rotkin, Slava V; Petrov, Alexey G; Avouris, Phaedon

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have large intrinsic carrier mobility due to weak acoustic phonon scattering. However, unlike two-dimensional metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), substrate surface polar phonon (SPP) scattering has a dramatic effect on the CNTFET mobility, due to the reduced vertical dimensions of the latter. We find that for the van der Waals distance between CNT and an SiO2 substrate, the low-field mobility at room temperature is reduced by almost an order of magnitude depending on the tube diameter. We predict additional experimental signatures of the SPP mechanism in dependence of the mobility on density, temperature, tube diameter, and CNT-substrate separation.

  17. Single-crystal gallium nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, Joshua; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Lee, Sangkwon; Yan, Haoquan; Choi, Heon-Jin; Yang, Peidong

    2003-04-10

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 (ref. 1), there have been significant research efforts to synthesize nanometre-scale tubular forms of various solids. The formation of tubular nanostructure generally requires a layered or anisotropic crystal structure. There are reports of nanotubes made from silica, alumina, silicon and metals that do not have a layered crystal structure; they are synthesized by using carbon nanotubes and porous membranes as templates, or by thin-film rolling. These nanotubes, however, are either amorphous, polycrystalline or exist only in ultrahigh vacuum. The growth of single-crystal semiconductor hollow nanotubes would be advantageous in potential nanoscale electronics, optoelectronics and biochemical-sensing applications. Here we report an 'epitaxial casting' approach for the synthesis of single-crystal GaN nanotubes with inner diameters of 30-200 nm and wall thicknesses of 5-50 nm. Hexagonal ZnO nanowires were used as templates for the epitaxial overgrowth of thin GaN layers in a chemical vapour deposition system. The ZnO nanowire templates were subsequently removed by thermal reduction and evaporation, resulting in ordered arrays of GaN nanotubes on the substrates. This templating process should be applicable to many other semiconductor systems.

  18. Structure, stability and elasticity of DNA nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Himanshu; Dwaraknath, Anjan; Maiti, Prabal K

    2015-01-14

    DNA nanotubes are tubular structures composed of DNA crossover molecules. We present a bottom up approach for the construction and characterization of these structures. Various possible topologies of nanotubes are constructed such as 6-helix, 8-helix and tri-tubes with different sequences and lengths. We have used fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure, stability and elasticity of these structures. Several nanosecond long MD simulations give the microscopic details about DNA nanotubes. Based on the structural analysis of simulation data, we show that 6-helix nanotubes are stable and maintain their tubular structure; while 8-helix nanotubes are flattened to stabilize themselves. We also comment on the sequence dependence and the effect of overhangs. These structures are approximately four times more rigid having a stretch modulus of ∼4000 pN compared to the stretch modulus of 1000 pN of a DNA double helix molecule of the same length and sequence. The stretch moduli of these nanotubes are also three times larger than those of PX/JX crossover DNA molecules which have stretch moduli in the range of 1500-2000 pN. The calculated persistence length is in the range of a few microns which is close to the reported experimental results on certain classes of DNA nanotubes.

  19. Lysozyme binds onto functionalized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bomboi, Francesca; Tardani, Franco; Gazzoli, Delia; Bonincontro, Adalberto; La Mesa, Camillo

    2013-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes have singular physicochemical properties making them attractive in a wide range of applications. Studies on carbon nanotubes and biological macromolecules exist in literature. However, ad hoc investigations are helpful to better understand the interaction mechanisms. We report on a system consisting of single walled carbon nanotubes and lysozyme. The phenomenology of nanotube-protein interactions and its effects on protein conformation were determined. We investigated the formation of oxidized nanotube-lysozyme conjugates, by studying the effect of both protein concentration and pH. Electrophoretic mobility, dielectric spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering were used to determine the interaction pathways, monitoring the surface charge density and the size of the complexes. The results allowed identifying the conditions of surface saturation at different pH values. The secondary structure of nanotube-adsorbed protein was controlled by circular dichroism; it was observed that it substantially retains its native conformation. Interestingly, we found that the interactions among oxidized nanotubes and lysozyme molecules are mainly of electrostatic nature and easily tunable by varying the pH of the solutions.

  20. Optical properties of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmoula, Mohamed; Sokoloff, Jeffrey; Lu, Wen-Tao; Close, Thomas; Menon, Latika; Richter, Christiaan

    2014-01-01

    We present experimental measurements and a theoretical analysis of the near UV to NIR optical properties of free standing titania nanotube arrays. An improved understanding of the optical physics of this type of nanostructure is important to several next generation solar energy conversion technologies. We measured the transmission, reflection, and absorption of the electromagnetic spectrum from 300 nm to 1000 nm (UV to NIR) of titania nanotube arrays. We measured the total, specular, and diffuse reflection and transmission using both single point detection and an integrating sphere spectrometer. We find that the transmission, but not the reflection, of light (UV to NIR) through the nanotube array is well-explained by classic geometric optics using an effective medium model taking into account the conical geometry of the nanotubes. For wavelengths shorter than ˜500 nm, we find the surprising result that the reflection coefficient for light incident on the open side of the nanotube array is greater than the reflection coefficient for light incident on the closed "floor" of the nanotube array. We consider theoretical models based on the eikonal approximation, photonic crystal band theory, and a statistical treatment of scattering to explain the observed data. We attribute the fact that light with wavelengths shorter than 500 nm is more highly reflected from the open than the closed tube side as being due to disorder scattering inside the nanotube array.